WorldWideScience

Sample records for human geography series

  1. The Geography of the Beatles Approaching Concepts of Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robert J., II

    2004-01-01

    Human geography can be taught by focusing on popular culture contexts with which undergraduate students may already be familiar such as rock music. The Geography of the Beatles introduced undergraduate students to concepts of "new" cultural geography such as space, place, representation, geopolitics, social space, and tourism-pilgrimage…

  2. Perspectives on Population in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Max; Keller, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    A study of human geography begins with the human population. In fact, demographic topics frequently relate to other units in the AP Human Geography course. The three main concepts elaborated upon in this article are (1) the demographic transition model, (2) Malthusian theory and its critics, and (3) pronatalist and antinatalist policies that might…

  3. Humanizing the Writing in Cultural Geography Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Ann E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses how cultural geography textbooks can be written to improve the portrayal of people and cultures. Author's criticism is based on a study of cultural and human geography textbooks current in 1976 which revealed a predominance of male images and an abstract style of presentation. (Author/AV)

  4. Human Geography Trains Diverse Perspectives on Global Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Education for equity in global development and cultural diversity calls for professional capacity building to perceive diverse perspectives on complex procedures of globalisation. The discipline of human geography is such a "provider of perspectives". The purpose of this paper is to propose a historic series of how theories of geography…

  5. Human Geography Trains Diverse Perspectives on Global Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Education for equity in global development and cultural diversity calls for professional capacity building to perceive diverse perspectives on complex procedures of globalisation. The discipline of human geography is such a "provider of perspectives". The purpose of this paper is to propose a historic series of how theories of geography…

  6. Politics: critical essays in human geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnew, J.; Mamadouh, V.

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the breadth or narrowness of the understanding of politics and the political, 'politics' in human geography is defined as either the operation of power in all social relations or the workings of power directed to or by the state. This volume avoids the two extremes by acknowledging the

  7. Perspectives on Political Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Jonathan; Smothers-Marcello, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Two trends have remade the field of political geography over the past quarter-century. First, a revision of taken-for-granted concepts that amounted to "spatial determinism." Second, pioneering many new and emerging concepts such as political ecology. Both trends are important contributions to the evolving section of the AP Human…

  8. Perspectives on Cultural Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher; Johnston-Anumonwo, Ibipo

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of selected current concerns in cultural geography and the way it is taught. It includes coverage of cultural convergence and divergence, race and gender as culturally defined topics, and best teaching practices, including those related to analyzing controversial issues. Two important geographical models are laid…

  9. Perspectives on Urban Geography in Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton-Short, Lisa; Monk, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    "Perspectives on Urban Geography" constitutes a major part of the AP Human Geography course outline. In this article, urban core revitalization and rising suburban poverty are considered as two challenges facing cities in developed countries; and industrialization and the growth of megacities as two challenges facing cities in developing…

  10. The Nature of Geography and Its Perspectives in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alexander B.; Hare, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    AP Human Geography students need to develop an understanding of what it means to examine the world around them from a geographic perspective. Focusing attention on geography's concern with spatial relationships, place characteristics, and geographic context helps student appreciate the nature of the discipline and the insights it offers. These…

  11. Placing Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Its Role in U.S. Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Advanced Placement Human Geography (AP HG) in the context of its place in efforts to reform geography education. It presents a critical analysis of the AP program and its curriculum, asserting that it represents "powerful knowledge" as conceptualized by Young. It concludes with a call for research in AP HG aligned…

  12. Using Cocoa and Chocolate to Teach Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Heike C.

    2010-01-01

    Food topics are uniquely suited to increase students' interest in human geography. A highly processed food like chocolate can be studied in a variety of different ways, making it possible to include chocolate examples and activities at various points in a human geography class. The goals of this article are to provide sufficient background…

  13. Using Cocoa and Chocolate to Teach Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Heike C.

    2010-01-01

    Food topics are uniquely suited to increase students' interest in human geography. A highly processed food like chocolate can be studied in a variety of different ways, making it possible to include chocolate examples and activities at various points in a human geography class. The goals of this article are to provide sufficient background…

  14. Mobile Learning in a Human Geography Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Claire; Tate, Nicholas; Dickie, Jennifer; Brown, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on reusable mobile digital learning resources designed to assist human geography undergraduate students in exploring the geographies of life in Dublin. Developing active learning that goes beyond data collection to encourage observation and thinking in the field is important. Achieving this in the context of large class sizes…

  15. Teaching across the Divide: Physical and Human Geographies of Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveson, Kurt; Neave, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This article critically reflects on our effort to "teach across the divide", by integrating physical and human geography in a new first-year course. We achieved this integration by structuring our course around a series of key events, in order to draw out the interaction of "natural" and "social" forces. After setting…

  16. The human footprint in Mexico: physical geography and historical legacies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte González-Abraham

    Full Text Available Using publicly available data on land use and transportation corridors we calculated the human footprint index for the whole of Mexico to identify large-scale spatial patterns in the anthropogenic transformation of the land surface. We developed a map of the human footprint for the whole country and identified the ecological regions that have most transformed by human action. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which (a physical geography, expressed spatially in the form of biomes and ecoregions, compared to (b historical geography, expressed as the spatial distribution of past human settlements, have driven the patterns of human modification of the land. Overall Mexico still has 56% of its land surface with low impact from human activities, but these areas are not evenly distributed. The lowest values are on the arid north and northwest, and the tropical southeast, while the highest values run along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and from there inland along an east-to-west corridor that follows the Mexican transversal volcanic ranges and the associated upland plateau. The distribution of low- and high footprint areas within ecoregions forms a complex mosaic: the generally well-conserved Mexican deserts have some highly transformed agro-industrial areas, while many well-conserved, low footprint areas still persist in the highly-transformed ecoregions of central Mexico. We conclude that the spatial spread of the human footprint in Mexico is both the result of the limitations imposed by physical geography to human development at the biome level, and, within different biomes, of a complex history of past civilizations and technologies, including the 20th Century demographic explosion but also the spatial pattern of ancient settlements that were occupied by the Spanish Colony.

  17. The human footprint in Mexico: physical geography and historical legacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Abraham, Charlotte; Ezcurra, Exequiel; Garcillán, Pedro P; Ortega-Rubio, Alfredo; Kolb, Melanie; Bezaury Creel, Juan E

    2015-01-01

    Using publicly available data on land use and transportation corridors we calculated the human footprint index for the whole of Mexico to identify large-scale spatial patterns in the anthropogenic transformation of the land surface. We developed a map of the human footprint for the whole country and identified the ecological regions that have most transformed by human action. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which (a) physical geography, expressed spatially in the form of biomes and ecoregions, compared to (b) historical geography, expressed as the spatial distribution of past human settlements, have driven the patterns of human modification of the land. Overall Mexico still has 56% of its land surface with low impact from human activities, but these areas are not evenly distributed. The lowest values are on the arid north and northwest, and the tropical southeast, while the highest values run along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and from there inland along an east-to-west corridor that follows the Mexican transversal volcanic ranges and the associated upland plateau. The distribution of low- and high footprint areas within ecoregions forms a complex mosaic: the generally well-conserved Mexican deserts have some highly transformed agro-industrial areas, while many well-conserved, low footprint areas still persist in the highly-transformed ecoregions of central Mexico. We conclude that the spatial spread of the human footprint in Mexico is both the result of the limitations imposed by physical geography to human development at the biome level, and, within different biomes, of a complex history of past civilizations and technologies, including the 20th Century demographic explosion but also the spatial pattern of ancient settlements that were occupied by the Spanish Colony.

  18. What Can Human Geography Offer Climate Change Modelling?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of Geography may be one of the most prominent and oldest disciplines in the conceptualization of human–environment interactions that integrates elements from both natural and social sciences. Yet, much research on society–environment interactions on climate change reduces human...... conceptual modelling of climate change adaption and mitigation. In other words, geographical representations do matter. In the following we will first reflect upon what I shall call spatio-temporal tides and waves of the human environment theme to examine the methodological grounds on which climate change...

  19. The role of geography in human adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Coop

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Various observations argue for a role of adaptation in recent human evolution, including results from genome-wide studies and analyses of selection signals at candidate genes. Here, we use genome-wide SNP data from the HapMap and CEPH-Human Genome Diversity Panel samples to study the geographic distributions of putatively selected alleles at a range of geographic scales. We find that the average allele frequency divergence is highly predictive of the most extreme F(ST values across the whole genome. On a broad scale, the geographic distribution of putatively selected alleles almost invariably conforms to population clusters identified using randomly chosen genetic markers. Given this structure, there are surprisingly few fixed or nearly fixed differences between human populations. Among the nearly fixed differences that do exist, nearly all are due to fixation events that occurred outside of Africa, and most appear in East Asia. These patterns suggest that selection is often weak enough that neutral processes -- especially population history, migration, and drift -- exert powerful influences over the fate and geographic distribution of selected alleles.

  20. The role of geography in human adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Graham; Pickrell, Joseph K; Novembre, John; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Li, Jun; Absher, Devin; Myers, Richard M; Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi Luca; Feldman, Marcus W; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2009-06-01

    Various observations argue for a role of adaptation in recent human evolution, including results from genome-wide studies and analyses of selection signals at candidate genes. Here, we use genome-wide SNP data from the HapMap and CEPH-Human Genome Diversity Panel samples to study the geographic distributions of putatively selected alleles at a range of geographic scales. We find that the average allele frequency divergence is highly predictive of the most extreme F(ST) values across the whole genome. On a broad scale, the geographic distribution of putatively selected alleles almost invariably conforms to population clusters identified using randomly chosen genetic markers. Given this structure, there are surprisingly few fixed or nearly fixed differences between human populations. Among the nearly fixed differences that do exist, nearly all are due to fixation events that occurred outside of Africa, and most appear in East Asia. These patterns suggest that selection is often weak enough that neutral processes -- especially population history, migration, and drift -- exert powerful influences over the fate and geographic distribution of selected alleles.

  1. A quantitative comparison of the similarity between genes and geography in worldwide human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaolong; Zöllner, Sebastian; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2012-08-01

    Multivariate statistical techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) have been widely used to summarize the structure of human genetic variation, often in easily visualized two-dimensional maps. Many recent studies have reported similarity between geographic maps of population locations and MDS or PCA maps of genetic variation inferred from single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, this similarity has been evident primarily in a qualitative sense; and, because different multivariate techniques and marker sets have been used in different studies, it has not been possible to formally compare genetic variation datasets in terms of their levels of similarity with geography. In this study, using genome-wide SNP data from 128 populations worldwide, we perform a systematic analysis to quantitatively evaluate the similarity of genes and geography in different geographic regions. For each of a series of regions, we apply a Procrustes analysis approach to find an optimal transformation that maximizes the similarity between PCA maps of genetic variation and geographic maps of population locations. We consider examples in Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, East Asia, and Central/South Asia, as well as in a worldwide sample, finding that significant similarity between genes and geography exists in general at different geographic levels. The similarity is highest in our examples for Asia and, once highly distinctive populations have been removed, Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results provide a quantitative assessment of the geographic structure of human genetic variation worldwide, supporting the view that geography plays a strong role in giving rise to human population structure.

  2. Progress in the human geography of the Maghreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, K; Lawless, R I

    1987-03-01

    Sutton and Lawless review a selection of the prolific literature on the Maghreb's human geography published from the late 1970s onward. The pedigree of the discipline in Maghreb was established by several notable geographers who lived, researched, and wrote there. Augustin Bernard's writings on rural settlement, his atlas, and study of Algeria are still cited. Jean Despois's regional study with Raynal and his work on Tunisia, together with the detailed rural research of Jean Poncet, provides a particularly rich coverage for that country. Jean Dresch's early work on Morocco exemplified an early critique of the contemporaneous uncritical colonial human geography. The Sahara's fascination also inspired pioneering studies by Robert Capot-Rey. The work of these notables and others provided a solid background of geographical literature on the Maghreb to be supplemented, criticized, and challenged by more recent researchers, sometimes pupils of the above individuals, and increasingly North African by birth. The tradition of general texts on the Maghreb has continued, though increasingly with systematic approaches replacing regional appraisals. The geography of the decolonization of the Maghreb by Isnard has been replaced by a study summarizing recent collaborative work by a team of French geographers. The Saharan extensions of the Maghreb states have often been linked in general works, sometimes being juxtaposed against the Maghreb as in the essays offered to Jean Despois. Lawless and Findlay's collaborative study juxtaposes geographical studies of each country's economic development with political scientists' evaluations of their sociopolitical development. This review limits itself largely to geographers and geographical journals, only occasionally including significant works from other subject areas, and to 1977-1978 publications, with a few notable exceptions. The spatial juxtaposition of contrasting approaches to economic development, liberal market economy

  3. A Critical Approach to Discipline of Human Geography as an Apparatus for State Hegemony in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen, Nurettin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the hegemony of political power on the discipline of human geography in Turkey. Throughout the history of the country, human geography curricula have been aligned with the nationalist and hegemonic power politics of state authorities instead of being guided by universal norms, thus ignoring Turkey's sociopolitical and cultural…

  4. A Critical Approach to Discipline of Human Geography as an Apparatus for State Hegemony in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen, Nurettin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the hegemony of political power on the discipline of human geography in Turkey. Throughout the history of the country, human geography curricula have been aligned with the nationalist and hegemonic power politics of state authorities instead of being guided by universal norms, thus ignoring Turkey's sociopolitical and cultural…

  5. Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Looking Back and Looking Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanegran, David A.; Zeigler, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, AP Human Geography has grown in numbers and spread to almost every state. This article synopsizes the early history of the subject, summarizes the course and the exam, highlights positive impacts on the discipline of geography, and focuses on the following three issues: teachers who come to the course having majored in…

  6. Perspectives on the Development and Future of Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrant, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography faced a number of hurdles that nearly derailed the course before it launched in 2000-2001. A dedicated cadre of geography professionals and high school teachers rose to the challenge and the course remains one of the fastest growing AP courses currently offered by College Board. Seventeen readers and leaders…

  7. Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use in Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, William G.; Watson, Nancy H.

    2016-01-01

    ''Agriculture, Food, and Rural Land Use" constitutes a major part of the AP Human Geography course outline. This article explores challenging topics to teach, emerging research trends in agricultural geography, and sample teaching approaches for concretizing abstract topics. It addresses content identified as "essential knowledge"…

  8. Human geography in the French Institute: new discipline or missed opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staum, M S

    1987-10-01

    The geography section of the Class of Moral and Political Sciences of the French National Institute, which was in existence from December 1795 to January 1803, responded inadequately to the theoretical challenges of Montesquieu, the hygienists, Volney, and Degérando to study thoroughly native peoples to determine the effects of physical geographic conditions on the body and mind. Most geographers had no interest in human geography, and even statistical geography received only superficial discussion. Despite the emergence of the scientific journal, only a few authors partly transcended the stereotypes of the noble-ignoble savage. The only expedition partly planned by the Institute in this period had an ambitious exploration program that precluded a linguistically sophisticated study of native peoples. Bonaparte's dissolution of the Class hindered further opportunities for studying human geography during the Empire.

  9. Using Web-Based GIS in Introductory Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songer, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Advocates for using a geographic information system (GIS) in education assert that GIS improves student learning. However, studies to clarify the relationship between learning and using GIS are still needed. This study examines the effects of using Web-based GIS maps in place of paper maps on students' geography content knowledge and motivation…

  10. GeoHumanities, GIScience and Smart City Lifeworld approaches to geography and the new human condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Charles

    2017-09-01

    The New Human Condition (NHC) is perhaps the largest cognitive challenge in history to human intelligence and agency and concerns our species' ability to cope with the consequences and responsibilities of being the major driver of planetary change in the twenty-first century (Pálsson et al., 2013; Holm et al., 2015). But despite long held assumptions about intra-disciplinary engagements between its "human" and "physical" branches, geography's weakness as a discipline is that it has yet to gather sufficient momentum to collectively shape and implement practical and sustainable climate change policies and actions (Castree, 2014a). However, by considering together the heuristic values of the concepts of the Anthropocene and Planetary Boundaries, the Anglo-American sphere of geography recognizes in either ironic, or unconscious manners that a new strand of environmental determinism (discredited by geographical thought and practice in the early twentieth century) has re-emerged to elide the role of human agency and broadly dominate the discussion of climate change. Mike Hulme (2011, 247) states that "climate determinism" is "a form of analysis and prediction in which climate is first extracted from the matrix of interdependencies that shape human life within the physical world". Within this discourse it is often the biophysical sphere that is employed to explain the course of human behavior; consequently, this dominating perspective threatens to skew our predictions and understandings of future societies, cultures, climates and destinies. Climate change will certainly constrain human agency, but it also creates the potential for geography to play to its intra and inter disciplinary strengths and begin discussing and addressing human-environmental dilemmas in practical and realistic ways; and secondly, seize the climate change crisis as an opportunity to study where, why and for whom global environmental change matters. Firstly, this paper considers a theoretical

  11. LANDSCAPE, PLACE AND REGION: THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES FOR ONE HUMAN GEOGRAPHY OF LIVED SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Serpa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It intends to discuss the different theoretical and methodological perspectives for human Geography starting from the work with landscape, place and region concepts pointing to the constitution/consolidation of one human Geography of lived spaces. There will be presented, so preliminary, the different approaches for the concepts of landscape, place and region in human Geography with the priority of the discussion about the possibility of the work with these concepts on also dialectic and phenomenological bases. Landscape, place and region will be presented as epistemological and methodological ways for a geographical approach focused on spatial practices, on spaces of representation and on the representations of space (LEFEBVRE, 2000, what points for the importance of space representations as intrinsic element of space production processes in contemporarily times. It will also search to present the bases of a human Geography of lived spaces presenting it as a cognitive Geography of social and spatial representations that contemplates the complex structures of society representation connecting this discussion with the work with the presented concepts (landscape, place and region.

  12. Revisiting the Americas: Teaching and Learning the Geography of the Western Hemisphere. Pathways in Geography Series, Title No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Tom, Ed.; Brooker-Gross, Susan, Ed.

    This book, issued in observance of the Columbus Quincentennial and on the occasion of the 27th International Geographical Congress, addresses a broad range of contemporary topics including environmental change, dynamics of the world economy, human needs, wants and rights, political order and change, and contemporary cultures. The format is one of…

  13. Advanced Placement Human Geography and the Annual Meetings of the National Council for Geographic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublett, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the National Council for Geographic Education have been instrumental in the creation, launch, and early success of Advanced Placement Human Geography. Annual meetings of the Council have served as a forum for spreading the word about the course and its follow-up national examination and in helping teachers develop content confidence and…

  14. Reframing Photographic Research Methods in Human Geography: A Long-Term Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a long-term reflection on the introduction of a photographic research project into a third-year undergraduate Human Geography module. The findings indicate that, whilst the students valued the project, it did impact on their overall performance, their evaluation of the module and the ways in which they spoke about it. The paper…

  15. Advanced Placement Human Geography and the Annual Meetings of the National Council for Geographic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublett, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the National Council for Geographic Education have been instrumental in the creation, launch, and early success of Advanced Placement Human Geography. Annual meetings of the Council have served as a forum for spreading the word about the course and its follow-up national examination and in helping teachers develop content confidence and…

  16. Reframing Photographic Research Methods in Human Geography: A Long-Term Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a long-term reflection on the introduction of a photographic research project into a third-year undergraduate Human Geography module. The findings indicate that, whilst the students valued the project, it did impact on their overall performance, their evaluation of the module and the ways in which they spoke about it. The paper…

  17. From The Human-Environment Theme Towards Sustainability – Danish Geography and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2013-01-01

    Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions. In this ar......Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions...... and climate change and how geographers articulate their role and function as knowledge on human-environment interactions changes. The analysis of the geographical education reveal that geographers’ find their discipline contribute considerably to ESD, and thus the human environment theme seems...

  18. Remapping Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan M.; Norwine, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Little that occurs in contemporary academic geography will surprise members of the National Association of Scholars, for a large part of the field has joined the other humanities and social sciences in the bawdy saloon of progressive politics, cultural nihilism, and subjective epistemology. That geographers are in there roistering with the…

  19. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  20. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  1. Human gut microbiome viewed across age and geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut microbial communities represent one source of human genetic and metabolic diversity. To examine how gut microbiomes differ among human populations, we characterized bacterial species in fecal samples from 531 individuals, plus the gene content of 110 of them. The cohort encompassed healthy child...

  2. Cultural Geography and Videogames

    OpenAIRE

    Ash, James; Gallacher, Lesley Anne

    2011-01-01

    While videogames have been a popular form of entertainment practice for a number of decades, it is only recently that they have been paid much attention by academics. Although there is a burgeoning body of scholarship that deals with videogames in new media and games studies, human geography is only just beginning to offer its own take on the medium and the practices associated with it. This essay outlines ways in which scholars (both within geography and beyond) have traced out the geographi...

  3. Geographies of Production II: Political Economic Geographies: A pluralist direction?

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A

    2016-01-01

    Within economic geography, it has been argued that political economy approaches have diminished in both prevalence and influence to the detriment of both the sub-discipline and to human geography as a whole. This report challenges such a perspective, arguing that political economic geographies remains very much vibrant and engaging in contemporary economic geography and in the way in which economic geographers engages with the nature of the contemporary global economy. It argues that the perc...

  4. Teaching Feminist Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Linda; Bowlby, Sophia

    1983-01-01

    Adopting a feminist perspective on geography should lead to changes in the content and organization of undergraduate courses and teaching methods, particularly in assessing the role of gender relations in human geography and in challenging the male-dominated world of academic research and teaching where women have remained largely invisible.…

  5. A Lesson Plan for Advanced Placement Human Geography®: A Site Location Exercise for New Businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleski, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The lesson described in this article meets several needs for Advanced Placement Human Geography (APHG®) teachers. In the interest of preserving time in the classroom, this lesson is intended to be a capstone assignment, allowing students to synthesize several concepts of the APHG® curriculum, such as demography, economic development, and cultural…

  6. Physical geography and the study of human vulnerability due to natural and other hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Natek

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical geography in Slovenia has achieved a significant level of knowledge on natural and other hazards, after studying these phenomena since 1950s. These extremely complex features are clearly showing the interconnections between the nature and man and the increasing vulnerability of modern societies. The article is based on geographical approach to hazards, which does not consider them as casual events, but as constituent parts of the environment, including very different ways of human adaptation. The rapid development of science and technology have even increased our vulnerability and direct exposure to hazards, what is considered as new challenge to physical geographers in looking for new approaches to increase the possibilities of sustainable 'co-existence' with natural and other hazards.

  7. Crop domestication, global human-mediated migration, and the unresolved role of geography in pest control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda H. Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ecological pest management seeks to improve pest control through the manipulation of ecological processes that promote natural enemies and suppress pests. These approaches can involve cultural practices such as reduced tillage, increased use of non-crop plants that provide food and shelter for natural enemies, and intercropping to enhance the abundance and diversity of natural enemies. A major assumption of ecological pest management is that these activities can be equally effective for all insect herbivores. Here, I propose that these strategies may only be effective for a subset of pests and geographic regions because most insect pests have complex evolutionary histories that make them difficult to manage. I discuss how crop domestication and human-mediated migration are major evolutionary events that shape the geography of interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. Insect herbivores can evolve to be pests through three major modes: 1 herbivores associated with the crop wild ancestor may shift onto the domesticated crop, 2 herbivores may host-shift from native host plants onto an introduced crop, or 3 human-mediated migration can introduce insect pests into new cropping regions. The resulting geographic structure can influence the success of pest management by altering ecological factors such as: species distributions, patterns of biodiversity, community structure, and natural enemy attack rates. I discuss how the different modes of insect pest evolution structure a set of relevant questions and approaches for ecological pest management. By acknowledging how agricultural history and geography shape the ecology and evolution of insect pests, we may collectively develop a better capacity to identify where and how ecological pest management approaches can be most broadly effective.

  8. Geography, Ethnicity or Subsistence-Specific Variations in Human Microbiome Composition and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod K; Paul, Sandip; Dutta, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    One of the fundamental issues in the microbiome research is characterization of the healthy human microbiota. Recent studies have elucidated substantial divergences in the microbiome structure between healthy individuals from different race and ethnicity. This review provides a comprehensive account of such geography, ethnicity or life-style-specific variations in healthy microbiome at five major body habitats-Gut, Oral-cavity, Respiratory Tract, Skin, and Urogenital Tract (UGT). The review focuses on the general trend in the human microbiome evolution-a gradual transition in the gross compositional structure along with a continual decrease in diversity of the microbiome, especially of the gut microbiome, as the human populations passed through three stages of subsistence like foraging, rural farming and industrialized urban western life. In general, gut microbiome of the hunter-gatherer populations is highly abundant with Prevotella, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Clostridiales, Ruminobacter etc., while those of the urban communities are often enriched in Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, and Firmicutes. The oral and skin microbiome are the next most diverse among different populations, while respiratory tract and UGT microbiome show lesser variations. Higher microbiome diversity is observed for oral-cavity in hunter-gatherer group with higher prevalence of Haemophilus than agricultural group. In case of skin microbiome, rural and urban Chinese populations show variation in abundance of Trabulsiella and Propionibacterium. On the basis of published data, we have characterized the core microbiota-the set of genera commonly found in all populations, irrespective of their geographic locations, ethnicity or mode of subsistence. We have also identified the major factors responsible for geography-based alterations in microbiota; though it is not yet clear which factor plays a dominant role in shaping the microbiome-nature or nurture, host genetics or his environment. Some of

  9. Geography, Ethnicity or Subsistence-Specific Variations in Human Microbiome Composition and Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental issues in the microbiome research is characterization of the healthy human microbiota. Recent studies have elucidated substantial divergences in the microbiome structure between healthy individuals from different race and ethnicity. This review provides a comprehensive account of such geography, ethnicity or life-style-specific variations in healthy microbiome at five major body habitats—Gut, Oral-cavity, Respiratory Tract, Skin, and Urogenital Tract (UGT. The review focuses on the general trend in the human microbiome evolution—a gradual transition in the gross compositional structure along with a continual decrease in diversity of the microbiome, especially of the gut microbiome, as the human populations passed through three stages of subsistence like foraging, rural farming and industrialized urban western life. In general, gut microbiome of the hunter-gatherer populations is highly abundant with Prevotella, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Clostridiales, Ruminobacter etc., while those of the urban communities are often enriched in Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, and Firmicutes. The oral and skin microbiome are the next most diverse among different populations, while respiratory tract and UGT microbiome show lesser variations. Higher microbiome diversity is observed for oral-cavity in hunter-gatherer group with higher prevalence of Haemophilus than agricultural group. In case of skin microbiome, rural and urban Chinese populations show variation in abundance of Trabulsiella and Propionibacterium. On the basis of published data, we have characterized the core microbiota—the set of genera commonly found in all populations, irrespective of their geographic locations, ethnicity or mode of subsistence. We have also identified the major factors responsible for geography-based alterations in microbiota; though it is not yet clear which factor plays a dominant role in shaping the microbiome—nature or nurture, host genetics

  10. Geography, Ethnicity or Subsistence-Specific Variations in Human Microbiome Composition and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod K.; Paul, Sandip; Dutta, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    One of the fundamental issues in the microbiome research is characterization of the healthy human microbiota. Recent studies have elucidated substantial divergences in the microbiome structure between healthy individuals from different race and ethnicity. This review provides a comprehensive account of such geography, ethnicity or life-style-specific variations in healthy microbiome at five major body habitats—Gut, Oral-cavity, Respiratory Tract, Skin, and Urogenital Tract (UGT). The review focuses on the general trend in the human microbiome evolution—a gradual transition in the gross compositional structure along with a continual decrease in diversity of the microbiome, especially of the gut microbiome, as the human populations passed through three stages of subsistence like foraging, rural farming and industrialized urban western life. In general, gut microbiome of the hunter-gatherer populations is highly abundant with Prevotella, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Clostridiales, Ruminobacter etc., while those of the urban communities are often enriched in Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, and Firmicutes. The oral and skin microbiome are the next most diverse among different populations, while respiratory tract and UGT microbiome show lesser variations. Higher microbiome diversity is observed for oral-cavity in hunter-gatherer group with higher prevalence of Haemophilus than agricultural group. In case of skin microbiome, rural and urban Chinese populations show variation in abundance of Trabulsiella and Propionibacterium. On the basis of published data, we have characterized the core microbiota—the set of genera commonly found in all populations, irrespective of their geographic locations, ethnicity or mode of subsistence. We have also identified the major factors responsible for geography-based alterations in microbiota; though it is not yet clear which factor plays a dominant role in shaping the microbiome—nature or nurture, host genetics or his environment

  11. Effects of an Introductory Geography Course on Student Perceptions of Geography at the University of Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlick, Forrest J.; Kolden, Crystal A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study surveyed students in geography courses at the University of Idaho, investigating perceptions of geography's role in their daily lives, relevance to careers or academics, and parts of their geographic skill. Primarily, white, younger than 20, gender-balanced students in Introduction to Physical Geography and Human Geography courses…

  12. Lived spaces in history: a study in human geography in the context of Sangam texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K N

    2010-01-01

    There has been considerable research work on early South India, particularly early Tamilakam, using archaeological, epigraphical and literary sources. Earlier, studies on early Tamilakam was almost exclusively based on the early Tamil texts, called as heroic or bardic poetry. However, a wealth of material has been generated by archaeological exploration, that have unearthed a mass of material from paleolithic, mesolithic, neolithic and the iron age megalithic, bordering on the early historic ages. A number of Tamil Brahmi label inscriptions have also been discovered. However, the largest number of archaeological finds have been megalithic burial sites and habitation sites are only in the process of being discovered. There are also difficulties in corroborating archaeological and epigraphic material with the enormous corpus of early Tamil texts. As a result, there is a tendency to dismiss the early Tamil texts as not conducive to historical analysis. The present article argues that we will still be able to use the material of the early Tamil texts using the tools provided by human geography, and suggests a methodology for making use of the literary material for further explorations in the early history of Tamilakam.

  13. The Cultural Geography of Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesler, Wilbert M.

    1987-01-01

    This article shows how health care delivery is related to cultural or human geography. This is accomplished by describing health care delivery in terms of 12 popular themes of cultural geography. (JDH)

  14. Geography in High School in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohe; Bradbury, Ian K.

    1993-01-01

    Maintains that geography occupies a prominent position in the Chinese secondary curriculum. Describes the current course content, which includes both physical and human geography. Concludes by discussing barriers to further development, including lack of qualified staff and poor textbooks. (CFR)

  15. Geography in Higher Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Fen; Tang, Jianzhong

    1982-01-01

    Chinese geography expanded rapidly after liberation in 1949. Since 1976 there has been a vigorous effort to improve geographical teaching and research. The major problems being tackled include the separation of physical and human geography, the neglect of human geography, a lack of breadth in geographical training, and the low status of geography…

  16. Double-Play: Using Minor League Baseball to Apply Themes and Standards in Human Geography Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    Growing student interest in sports provides geography teachers with a special opportunity to make connections between it and fundamental concepts in the discipline. This article examines the structure, arrangement, relationships, and distinctions among minor league baseball franchise locations, stadia, and team names, and presents examples of…

  17. Geography Markup Language

    OpenAIRE

    Burggraf, David S

    2006-01-01

    Geography Markup Language (GML) is an XML application that provides a standard way to represent geographic information. GML is developed and maintained by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), which is an international consortium consisting of more than 250 members from industry, government, and university departments. Many of the conceptual models described in the ISO 19100 series of geomatics standards have been implemented in GML, and it is itself en route to becoming an ISO Standard (TC/2...

  18. Effects of an Introductory Geography Course on Student Perceptions of Geography at the University of Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlick, Forrest J.; Kolden, Crystal A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study surveyed students in geography courses at the University of Idaho, investigating perceptions of geography's role in their daily lives, relevance to careers or academics, and parts of their geographic skill. Primarily, white, younger than 20, gender-balanced students in Introduction to Physical Geography and Human Geography…

  19. Application of Psychology in the History of Human Geography Teaching%心理学在历史人文地理教学中的应用探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚红

    2012-01-01

    历史人文地理学主要研究历史时期人文地理现象分布、演变及其发展规律,具有较强的学科交叉性,其成熟发展必须注重吸收和借鉴相关学科的研究方法和研究手段。本文通过心理学在历史人文地理教学中的民族地理、社会地理两大领域的应用,尝试探析心理学研究方法在研究和教授历史人文地理学中是一种有效手段。%The historical anthropogeography mainly studies on historical period of human geography phenomenon distribution,evolution and the law of development has a strong interdisciplinary the mature development must pay attention to absorb and learn from related disciplines of research methods and research tools.In this paper,the application of psychology in the history of human geography teaching in the two major areas of the national geography,social geography,try the exploration psychology research method is an effective tool in the study and professor of history anthropogeography.

  20. 地图制图学在人文地理学中的应用及不足%Cartography inHuman Geography and Deficiencies in the Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜斌; 张谦舵; 郭映泽

    2014-01-01

    National Natural Science Foundation and the National Social Science Fund project , thematic maps , I get some experiences , combined with the analysis of the development of human geography in recent years , combined with the development of modern cartog-raphy, as well as modern cartography in the humanities geography in the application , said:cartography in geography application defi-ciencies.Cartography and Geography for the better development of science provide a theoretical basis .%参与国家自然科学基金项目和国家社会科学基金项目,在绘制专题图时,得到了些心得体会,结合分析近些年人文地理学的发展,并结合现代制图学的发展,以及现代制图学在人文地理学中的应用,指出地图制图学在人文地理应用中的不足。为地图制图学和人文地理学更好的发展提供理论依据。

  1. The diversification of research approaches in human geography in Chinese Mainland%我国人文地理学研究方法多样化问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤茂林

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with the problems facing the Chinese geographical academia from a re-view paper on the issues of the progress and retrospect in geography in Chinese mainland,the paper reviews the related research results, and guides the readers to the methodologi-cal issues of human geography research. Through the retrospect of the development of hu-man geography approaches and philosophies in the Anglophone world, the author comes to a conclusion that the research paradigm and methodology has been diversified since the 1970s. Through the period from the 1970s to the present, geography was in a state of tur-moil. Although Chinese human geographers need not dance to the pipe of the Anglophone counterparts, the diversification of approaches in the Anglophone world can be used as a reference point. Just because of the realization of the limitations of positivist paradigm and reaction,structurism (including Marxism), humanism, feminism, and post-modernism (including poststructurism) appeared and exerted much effect on the research methodologies and par-adigms of human geography in Anglophone world. During this course of methodological diversification, geography lost its traditional core but now has a strong periphery.China, as a giant transitional developing country, has a complex geographical pattern of human activities. This complexity is attributed not only to its long history and giant in-ternal inequality, physically and economically, but also to the market-based social and eco-nomic reforms. The result is that the postmodern issue parallels the modern problem.This situation gives Chinese human geographers an unprecedented opportunity. The relat-ed researches by Chinese human geographers are dominated by empiricism, particularly positivism, and the attention that the researchers paid to the human aspects is not enough.So it is badly needed to diversify the research methodology and approach in order to deepen the researches. The paper discusses the necessity, and gives

  2. Everyday Geography: 365 Reflections on Why Geography Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Last year, beginning on New Year's Day, as president of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE), the author wrote one tweet every day beginning with "What is Geography? 1 of 365" and posted them to his Twitter page. His goals in the series were several. He sought to point out as organization president how the NCGE serves the geography…

  3. Philosophy and science in geography, XVI-XXI centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Capel

    2016-03-01

    Without losing the critical contributions that the discipline had in the last half century, and the ones that they have been made in various branches of human geography, from the historical to cultural geography.

  4. Geography Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Burggraf

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Geography Markup Language (GML is an XML application that provides a standard way to represent geographic information. GML is developed and maintained by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC, which is an international consortium consisting of more than 250 members from industry, government, and university departments. Many of the conceptual models described in the ISO 19100 series of geomatics standards have been implemented in GML, and it is itself en route to becoming an ISO Standard (TC/211 CD 19136. An overview of GML together with its implications for the geospatial web is given in this paper.

  5. Cultural Analysis in Geography: A Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, W.

    1981-01-01

    The article offers a description of a one semester college-level course in cultural geography. The outline is based on six themes--cultural analysis in geography, cultural universals, perception of the cultural environment, cultural diffusion, folk culture and popular culture, and humans and the land. (DB)

  6. 中国人文地理学研究进展与展望%Updated Progress and Perspectives of the Discipline of Human Geography in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方创琳; 周尚意; 柴彦威; 陆玉麒; 朱竑; 冯健; 刘云刚

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the status quo, progress and future development prospects of human geogra- phy, particularly on its crucial and newly emerged subgroups including the theory of human-environment in- teractions, cultural geography, behavioral geography, social geography, and political geography. After compar- ing intensive literature review of both China and English-world scholars, we strongly believe that human geog- raphy in China has achieved fruitful results on its theoretical innovation, research methodology, technological innovation and practical application. Some conclusions can be drawn as follows. (1) By virtue of geographical thinking, the position and content of the theory of human-environment interactions has been greatly enhanced. (2) The scope of cultural geography has broadened, whose study direction is turning to New Cultural Geogra- phy. (3) Behavioral geography has aroused attention and generated many crucial results. (4) To meet the needs of geopolitical strategy, political geography resurges in the research and policy analysis circles. (5) Along with the construction of harmonious society, social geography is emerging as an important field. The general trendsof Chinese human geography in future has to keep pace with Chinese social and economic development, be ori- ented to the national strategic needs, aimed at establishing a scientific development viewpoint with harmonious human-environment interactions, and solving new problems in national development with full strength. Mean- while, it should deepen studies on the theory and research methods of human-environment interactions, strength- en the research on the regulation mechanism, process, pattern, rhythm, and the demonstration and application of the man-land system, and strengthen the research on systematical management and monitoring, dynamic simula- tion, and technique support system, and enhance the research on global problems, global change and its regional

  7. Perspectives in geography of culture and civilizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grčić Мirko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of relevant methodological essence of "traditional" and "new" cultural geography. In the introduction is given an explanation of philosophic concepts of space, environment, place and the region in cultural geography. In second section is analyzed the meaning of civilization and the genesis of geography of civilization (géographie de civilisation. Special attention is on features of geographical posibilism as methodological paradigm, and the concept of cultural landscape as the essence of classical geography of culture and civilization. After this part are researched specific characteristics of certain academic schools and methodological perspectives in cultural geography. Postmodern paradigm and essence of "new" cultural geography are in the main focus. Postmodernism is changing the meaning of the basic concepts in cultural geography, which are analyzed in the introduction, such as space, culture, cultural region, cultural landscape and others. "New" cultural geography reassessed social and moral issues associated with the characteristics of the postmodern era. In this regard, methodological paradigm must be changed. This ascertainment is based on the interpretation of humanistic geography, where the emphasis is on the interpretation of cultural symbols, causal link and the "spirit of place" (Spiritus Loci. In accordance with modern conceptions of human in psychological notion, there are at least three theoretical directions, which find resonance in the appropriate cultural geography: behaviorism, psychoanalytic concept and cognitive concept - gestaltism and geography of perception. In conclusion is emphasized the need of finding a dialectical unity in "classical" and "new" cultural geography. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176017

  8. Replacing positivism in medical geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David

    2005-06-01

    Revisiting debates about philosophical approaches in medical geography suggests that logical positivism may have been prematurely discarded. An analysis of authoritative texts in medical geography and their sources in human geography shows that logical positivism has been conflated with Comtean positivism, science, empiricism, quantification, science politics, scientism and so on, to produce the "standard version" of the all-purpose pejorative "positivism", which it is easy to dismiss as an evil. It is argued that the standard version fails to do justice to logical positivism, being constructed on sources which are at some distance from the logical positivist movement itself. An alternative approach is then developed, an historically and geographically situated interpretation of logical positivism as a deliberately and knowingly constructed oppositional epistemology within an oppressive and anti-scientific culture predicated on idealist intuitionism. Contrasting the standard version with this alternative reading of logical positivism suggests that much may have been lost in human, and thus, medical geography, by throwing out the logical positivist baby with the "positivism" bath water. It is concluded that continuing to unpack the standard version of logical positivism may identify benefits from a more nuanced appreciation of logical positivism, but it is premature to take these to the level of detailed impacts on the kinds of medical geographies that could be done or the ways of doing them.

  9. The Geography of Need: Identifying Human Service Needs in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Colleen; Miller, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Given the recent economic crisis and the accompanying funding cuts across social service programs, it is helpful to observe the geographic distribution of demographic characteristics and economic conditions that together create a human service needs profile. The authors provide a conceptual framework for a systematic analysis of county…

  10. The Geography of Need: Identifying Human Service Needs in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Colleen; Miller, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Given the recent economic crisis and the accompanying funding cuts across social service programs, it is helpful to observe the geographic distribution of demographic characteristics and economic conditions that together create a human service needs profile. The authors provide a conceptual framework for a systematic analysis of county…

  11. I Persevered with my Geography

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this personal reflection, I trace some of the interconnections between Stuart Hall’s work and the ‘new’ cultural geography. In the context of my own intellectual biography, and indebted to Hall and those geographers whose work has been influenced by him, I am interested in ‘routes’ rather than ‘roots’, and in the traffic between cultural studies and ‘critical’ human geography. Drawing on a selection of Hall’s work and a number of published interviews, I reflect on several moments of traffi...

  12. Differences between physical and human process simulation in geography:Empirical analysis of two cases%自然过程与人文过程模拟之差异比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhipeng; ZHANG Jin; LIU Weidong; WU Hong

    2012-01-01

    @@%Physical geography and human geography are the principal branches of the geographical sciences.Physical process simulation and human process simulation in geography are both quantitative methods used to recover past events and even to forecast events based on precisely determined parameters.There are four differences between physical process simulation and human process simulation in geography,which we summarize with two specific cases,one of which is about a typhoon's development and its precipitation,and the other of which is regarding the evolution of three industrial structures in China.The differences focus on four aspects:the main factors of the research framework; the knowledge background of the systematic analysis framework; the simulation data sources and quantitative method; and the core of the study object and the method of forecast application.As the human-land relationship is the key ideology of the man-land system,the relationship between the physical and human factors is becoming increasingly close at present.Physical process simulation and human process simulation in geography will exhibit crossing and blending in the future to reflect the various geographical phenomena better.

  13. Toward a new history and geography of human genes informed by ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Joseph K; Reich, David

    2014-09-01

    Genetic information contains a record of the history of our species, and technological advances have transformed our ability to access this record. Many studies have used genome-wide data from populations today to learn about the peopling of the globe and subsequent adaptation to local conditions. Implicit in this research is the assumption that the geographic locations of people today are informative about the geographic locations of their ancestors in the distant past. However, it is now clear that long-range migration, admixture, and population replacement subsequent to the initial out-of-Africa expansion have altered the genetic structure of most of the world's human populations. In light of this we argue that it is time to critically reevaluate current models of the peopling of the globe, as well as the importance of natural selection in determining the geographic distribution of phenotypes. We specifically highlight the transformative potential of ancient DNA. By accessing the genetic make-up of populations living at archaeologically known times and places, ancient DNA makes it possible to directly track migrations and responses to natural selection.

  14. Gender, race + geography = jeopardy: marginalized women, human rights and HIV in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Susana T; Kelly, Brook

    2011-11-01

    Across the United States, laws, policies, and practices put women living with HIV in jeopardy. In particular, the dignity, health, and well-being of women living with and at risk for HIV as well as the health and well-being of their families and communities is hampered by punitive laws and policies. Laws and policies that do not meet, or worse, criminalize women's sexual and reproductive rights result in the economic, social and political deprivation of marginalized women and girls-and especially those living with and at risk of HIV. These laws and policies exacerbate an already outsized HIV epidemic in underserved communities, and communities of color in the United States. This article draws from and builds on a human rights workshop that took place as part of the forum "Bringing Gender Home: Implementing Gender Responsive HIV/AIDS Programming for US Women and Girls," sponsored by the Office of Women's Health. It focuses on the damaging impact of laws, policies, and practices that criminalize women's sexuality. These laws significantly impact the well-being of women living with and at risk for HIV, and have an impact on the capacity of poor women of color in the United States to fully exercise their rights. When laws that purport to protect public health have the result of limiting women's reproductive choices, or have a disproportionate impact on marginalized groups such as sex workers, fundamental breaches of women's rights occur.

  15. Analysis of Human Geography Articles Published on the Three Chinese Authoritative Geography Journals in Recent 30 Years%30年来中国地理学综合学术期刊中人文地理学论文载文分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓斌; 曹雪; 周寅康; 黄贤金; 高怡

    2012-01-01

    20世纪80年代以来,中国人文地理学实现了全面复兴。采用文献计量学分析方法,对1980~2010年《地理学报》、《地理科学》和《地理研究》3个中国地理学综合学术期刊所刊载的文献进行统计,以人文地理学论文为对象,分别从载文的时空特点、研究领域、研究方法、研究机构等方面进行综合分析,梳理了中国人文地理学的发展脉络和研究热点,并对后期人文地理学的发展趋势进行了展望。%As is well-known,ever since the 1980s,Human Geography in China has achieved comprehensive rehabilitation and it maintains an extraordinary growth speed.Bibliometrics methods is used in this paper to collect statistics of literature which have been published on the three Chinese authoritative geographical journals "Acta Geographica Sinica","Scientia Geographica Sinica " and"Geographical Research"from 1980 to 2010.With the object of the articles in Human geography,features of the articles and authors which include the space-time characteristics,research field,methods,and institutes are all analyzed comprehensively.This paper combines the development process and the research hotspot of Human Geography in China and prospects the trend of human geography development in the later period.Results show that Chinese Human Geography emphasizes on the practical applicability and has intensive exchanges as well as intersects with other subjects.What’s more,a mature system of Human Geography authors of the three journals is taking shape.However,there are several shortcomings during the fast improvement,such as the disequilibrium in the development of sub-subjects and distribution of researchers,and lack of guidance theories and innovative methods and models.Only by solving these problems can China’s Human Geography keep a rapid and sound development.

  16. Housing / Human Settlements Atlas series: continued support towards more sustainable human settlements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goss, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of current policy as it relates to the establishment of sustainable human settlements and specifically settlement locality. The objective of the Housing / Human Settlements Atlas series is to guide housing / settlement investment decisions by various...

  17. Human Resource Management in Virtual Organizations. Research in Human Resource Management Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneman, Robert L., Ed.; Greenberger, David B., Ed.

    This document contains 14 papers on human resources (HR) and human resource management (HRM) in virtual organizations. The following papers are included: "Series Preface" (Rodger Griffeth); "Volume Preface" (Robert L. Heneman, David B. Greenberger); "The Virtual Organization: Definition, Description, and…

  18. 人文地理国情综合统计分析指标体系初探%Human Geography Conditions Comprehensive Statistical Analysis of Index System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国; 张晶

    2015-01-01

    The geographical situation of statistical analysis is an important part of geographic condition monitoring, at present only in the basic statistical analysis stage, comprehensive statistical analysis and the corresponding index system and there is no corresponding standard.Therefore, this paper related human geography conditions comprehensive statistical analysis index system for construction, the establishment of index system of evaluation of comprehensive statistical analysis of the classification of human geography condition factor has the practicability and applicability, to lay a solid foundation for later statistical analysis.%地理国情统计分析是地理国情监测的重要组成部分,目前的研究仅限于基本统计分析阶段,综合统计分析及其相应的指标体系尚无相应的标准。因此,本文对相关人文地理国情综合统计分析指标体系进行构建,建立具有实用性与适用性的人文地理国情要素综合统计分析评价的分类指标体系,为后期的统计分析奠定基础。

  19. Czech Student Attitudes towards Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Janko, Tomas; Mrazkova, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates 540 Czech lower secondary students' attitudes towards geography. It examined the general influence of gender and grade level on attitudes towards geography with an emphasis on four specific areas in particular: geography as a school subject; geography and the environment; the importance of geography; and the relevance of…

  20. Educating the Human Brain. Human Brain Development Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.

    2006-01-01

    "Educating the Human Brain" is the product of a quarter century of research. This book provides an empirical account of the early development of attention and self regulation in infants and young children. It examines the brain areas involved in regulatory networks, their connectivity, and how their development is influenced by genes and…

  1. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  2. Educating the Human Brain. Human Brain Development Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.

    2006-01-01

    "Educating the Human Brain" is the product of a quarter century of research. This book provides an empirical account of the early development of attention and self regulation in infants and young children. It examines the brain areas involved in regulatory networks, their connectivity, and how their development is influenced by genes and…

  3. Are the classical historical geography of the Byzantine world and Gis technology a contradiction? On the usage of contemporary technologies in the humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović St. Mihailo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the latest developments in the field of Digital Humanities. It indicates in which ways these technologies are already used in the historical and geographical science throughout the world and how they could be integrated systematically into Byzantine Studies. In the first part of the article international projects, which are based on GIS (Geographic Information Systems, and their links in the World Wide Web are presented. In the second part the author shows on the basis of his scholarly results on the historical geography of Byzantine Macedonia, how medieval written sources can be transferred into digital format in order to achieve a higher level of spatial data analysis. The neglect of this important and recent scholarly approach in the 21st century could lead to the marginalisation of Byzantine Studies in general, and of the historical geography of the Byzantine Empire in particular. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177015: Hrišćanska kultura na Balkanu u srednjem veku: Vizantijsko carstvo, Srbi i Bugari od 9. do 15. veka

  4. 洛杉矶学派及其对人文地理学的影响%Los Angeles School and Its Impacts on Disciplines of Human Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙斌栋; 魏旭红; 王婷

    2015-01-01

    Emerging at the end of 1980s, urban theorists, cultural critics and social commentators have devoted a tremendous amount of attention to the study of Los Angeles. This attention derives from the complex theoreti-cal and practical urban issues in Los Angeles, and also from the continuous competition among the power of globalization, which obviously influenced the general economic order all over the world. Los Angeles School (LA School) is constructed by a group of geography scholars, such as Edward W. Soja, Allen J. Scott, Michael J. Dear, Mike Davis et al., to generalize their systematic academic points of view. This article aims to make a de-tailed and systematic introduction to the LA school, and tries to sort out its impacts on many disciplines in the field of human geography. According to the summarization, this article supports that the LA school is based on Soja’s social-spatial dialectics theory. This theory strongly suggests that spatiality also plays a big role in the formation of social relations when the basic production mode in the era and keeps unchanged. Under this theo-retical framework, we can see that crisis and reconstruction are just the dialectic’s projection in reality, which means that crisis tends to cause urban reconstruction, and the reconstruction may lead to some new urban crisis at the same time. Los Angeles metropolitan area has provided a vivid interpretation and reasonably exemplified LA school’s basic academic points of view, as well gives us an accurate demonstration of the circulation be-tween urban crisis and reconstruction. Many views of LA School have already made an important influence on the branches of human geography, such as economic geography, urban geography and social geography, provid-ing a lot of important academic hypothesis and ideas for follow-up researches. The main contribution that the LA school has made includes the significant enrichment on the core and traditional idea of the relationship be

  5. Changing Horizons in Geography Education

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Changing Horizons in Geography Education considers and develops aspects of the Bologna Process through the three pillars of operation. These were Europeanisation, Professional Development and Exciting Geography.

  6. Geography Makes a Comeback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPike, Elizabeth; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents two lesson plans exemplifying analytical geography. The first lesson shows how medical geography can be used to track the silent route of cholera. The second lesson about the Bermuda Triangle is an exercise in fundamental mapping skills and teaches children a valuable lesson in double-checking facts. (RLC)

  7. The Practices of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    Sarah Bednarz begins by thanking Rebecca Theobald for the invitation to contrubute to this issue of "The Geography Teacher"("TGT"). As a member of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) Publications Committee and coeditor of the "Journal of Geography," Bednarz confesses that she was not favorably…

  8. Let's Sell Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, R. E.; Gritzner, C. F., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This 1963 article, reprinted from the "Journal of Geography" lamented the lack of geographic education. Urged geographers to promote the subject and ensure its place in the curriculum. Claimed school administrators failed to understand geography's vital role. Discussed current status of the field and mentioned poor student test scores. (NL)

  9. Lafayette Geography Institute, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ., Indianapolis. Geography Educators' Network of Indiana.

    This document contains 7 geography lesson plans: (1) "Can You Give Me Directions to the Game?" by Tim Robison (uses Geographic Information Systems to establish directions to a place; grades 6-8); (2) "Crossing China by Sampan" by Marcie Ritchie (examines the role of geography in communication throughout China; grade 6); (3) "Indiana Tornado…

  10. Numerical analysis of the human nostril by the Fourier series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, M; Katsuki, T

    1990-02-01

    Fourier series has been applied in a numerical analysis of the human nostril morphology. The relationship between the nostril form and the Fourier coefficients was examined: the constant affected the size, the first term determined the roundness, and the second term determined the flatness of the morphology. The inclination of the apse line was calculated from the phase of the second term. Ninety-five standardized nostril photographs were analyzed by Fourier series: 48 of adult Japanese females and 47 of German females. The German nostril was larger in size, flatter in shape, and the apse line closer to the sagittal plane than the Japanese counterpart. As a clinical application of nostril digitization, pre- and post-operative cleft lip noses were analyzed. Fourier analysis has proved to be useful in a numerical evaluation of morphological differences of, and post-operative changes made to, the nostril.

  11. Development of population geography from antropogeography to spatial-analitical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Spasovski Milena; Šantić Danica

    2013-01-01

    Population geography is a subdiscipline of Human geography and studies the distribution, concentration and density of population over the terestrial surface, as well as differences in population size, changes and characteristics, like structures, migrations, activity etc, among some places present compared to others. Population geography has had a perscientific stage as long as human history. First modern scientific treatis of population in geography was th...

  12. Population Education in Geography: Some Sample Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This booklet contains sample lessons and learning materials from the countries of Asia and Oceania for teaching population education in geography courses. The booklet is one of a series of six, each of which brings out population education concepts as part of a particular subject area. The subject areas treated in the other booklets are home…

  13. Geography: Key to World Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Delineates the nature of applied geography, asserting that geography links the natural and social sciences. Underscores geography's role in data analysis and problem solving on a global scale. Traces the discipline's history. Maps geography's status in higher education institutions. Discusses new technologies used by geographers. Summarizes career…

  14. Human Resource Management in Virtual Organizations. Research in Human Resource Management Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneman, Robert L., Ed.; Greenberger, David B., Ed.

    This document contains 14 papers on human resources (HR) and human resource management (HRM) in virtual organizations. The following papers are included: "Series Preface" (Rodger Griffeth); "Volume Preface" (Robert L. Heneman, David B. Greenberger); "The Virtual Organization: Definition, Description, and Identification" (David B. Greenberger,…

  15. Responsible geographies and geographies of response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    This dissertation engages with Danish University geographers at work and their explication of the role of geography in shaping socio-environmental debates in an era of the anthropocene. Situating sustainability concepts in a historygeographical context the dissertation examines responses and resp......This dissertation engages with Danish University geographers at work and their explication of the role of geography in shaping socio-environmental debates in an era of the anthropocene. Situating sustainability concepts in a historygeographical context the dissertation examines responses...... in higher education literature. The methodological framework is based on the social nature approach that tangles these quite distinct epistemological communities by consulting the socio-natures produced. It is concluded that though geographers find sustainability themes important to geography......, sustainability is more often implicit than it is explicit. This produces a number of dilemmas and contradictions since geographers both seek to distance themselves from produced politics while at the same time elucidating them. Geographies of response and responsibilities address the battleground over...

  16. MODERN MILITARY GEOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Bezuidenhout

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern Military Geography is a new text that explores the relationship between geography and military conflict. As such, it covers many different scenarios and operational theatres and brings perspective to the link between local topography, hydrographical settings, climate, coastal conditions and military operations. The text goes further by examining the influence of secondary factors, which include, biological, health and environmental issues on military operations. The unique interaction between physical conditions and the geopolitical realities of different geographical settings are well illustrated. This book is therefore an excellent addition to the fields of military geography and military history, as well as other related military disciplines.

  17. Geography and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Corna Pellegrini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests that Tourism and Geography are closely intertwined, because tourists are in search of experience and geographer has as its main purpose the pursuit of knowledge. Models and hypotheses need always to be verified in theterritorial context of daily fieldwork, geographical interpretation and travel experience, were Geography and Tourism entwined in reciprocal relationship of personal attitude, nature, and field research. Environmental responsibility is another and common field were Geography can change and develop Tourism in the same mutual support in a continuous and mutual way. The case studies support it fully.

  18. Multiple Cultures of Doing Geography Facilitate Global Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to explain why geography is a prime discipline for analysing globalisation and a multicultural view of Global Studies. The generic approach of human geography to first select an appropriate methodology is taken as a key approach. Design/methodology/approach: Concepts from aggregate disciplines such as history, economics,…

  19. "Publish or Perish" as citation metrics used to analyze scientific output in the humanities: International case studies in economics, geography, social sciences, philosophy, and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneyx, Audrey

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, the most commonly used source of bibliometric data is the Thomson ISI Web of Knowledge, in particular the (Social) Science Citation Index and the Journal Citation Reports, which provide the yearly Journal Impact Factors. This database used for the evaluation of researchers is not advantageous in the humanities, mainly because books, conference papers, and non-English journals, which are an important part of scientific activity, are not (well) covered. This paper presents the use of an alternative source of data, Google Scholar, and its benefits in calculating citation metrics in the humanities. Because of its broader range of data sources, the use of Google Scholar generally results in more comprehensive citation coverage in the humanities. This presentation compares and analyzes some international case studies with ISI Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar. The fields of economics, geography, social sciences, philosophy, and history are focused on to illustrate the differences of results between these two databases. To search for relevant publications in the Google Scholar database, the use of "Publish or Perish" and of CleanPoP, which the author developed to clean the results, are compared.

  20. Saussure and Linguistic Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roy

    1993-01-01

    Discusses Saussures's "Cours de linguistique generale," which was published in 1916, and devotes specific attention to the significance of Part VI, which is devoted to linguistic geography. (16 references) (Author/VWL)

  1. "Lesbian Migrants in the Gentrified Valley" and "Other" Geographies of Rural Gentrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darren P.; Holt, Louise

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the migration and cultural consumption practices of lesbian households within processes of rural change. Taking forward Phillips' (2004. Progress in Human Geography 28, 5-30) discussion of neglected geographies of rural gentrification, and building upon Halfacree's (2001. International Journal of Population Geography 7,…

  2. Human activities and microbial geographies. An anthropological approach to the risk of infections in West African hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alessandro, Eugénie

    2015-07-01

    In hospital care, management of the risk of infection represents a crucial issue. Nevertheless, this question remains a neglected area in anthropological research, especially in African countries. To shed new light on this question, we conducted an anthropological investigation in the infectious disease department of a hospital in Niger. Daily observation of the work of the hospital staff for a total period of 6 months was spread out over 2008 and 2009. During our prolonged stay, we also collected 64 in-depth interviews of health care workers and attendants in the department. This study method made it possible to describe many of the practices and discourses related to the issues of medical and personal care and hospital hygiene and to compare the practices observed to standard principles for preventing hospital-acquired infections. Our ethnographic attention to the behavior of the actors showed the absence of formal spatial segmentations between different activities. The care provided by the untrained relatives serving as personal attendants introduced territorial enclaves governed by home hygiene standards into the interior of technical spaces. At the same time, privatizing equipment and space for their diverse activities, the medical staff disrupted technical chains and generated the recurrent crossing of microbial geographies. These results allow us to offer two principal guidelines for improving the quality of care and the management of risks of infection in hospitals in West Africa: (1) the essential role of the attendants in the care provided to hospital inpatients must be officially taken into account, especially by including them in the organization of medical hygiene procedures; (2) the different overlapping technical activities and social activities in the work space must be limited by their geographic and architectural segmentation.

  3. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were…

  4. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were sought in…

  5. A Theoretical Analysis of the Geography of Schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso Highlights the Roles of Human Mobility and Water Resources Development in Disease Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Saez, Javier; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Casagrandi, Renato; Sokolow, Susanne H; De Leo, Giulio A; Mande, Theophile; Ceperley, Natalie; Froehlich, Jean-Marc; Sou, Mariam; Karambiri, Harouna; Yacouba, Hamma; Maiga, Amadou; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We study the geography of schistosomiasis across Burkina Faso by means of a spatially explicit model of water-based disease dynamics. The model quantitatively addresses the geographic stratification of disease burden in a novel framework by explicitly accounting for drivers and controls of the disease, including spatial information on the distributions of population and infrastructure, jointly with a general description of human mobility and climatic/ecological drivers. Spatial patterns of disease are analysed by the extraction and the mapping of suitable eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix subsuming the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The relevance of the work lies in the novel mapping of disease burden, a byproduct of the parametrization induced by regional upscaling, by model-guided field validations and in the predictive scenarios allowed by exploiting the range of possible parameters and processes. Human mobility is found to be a primary control at regional scales both for pathogen invasion success and the overall distribution of disease burden. The effects of water resources development highlighted by systematic reviews are accounted for by the average distances of human settlements from water bodies that are habitats for the parasite's intermediate host. Our results confirm the empirical findings about the role of water resources development on disease spread into regions previously nearly disease-free also by inspection of empirical prevalence patterns. We conclude that while the model still needs refinements based on field and epidemiological evidence, the proposed framework provides a powerful tool for large-scale public health planning and schistosomiasis management.

  6. A Theoretical Analysis of the Geography of Schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso Highlights the Roles of Human Mobility and Water Resources Development in Disease Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Perez-Saez

    Full Text Available We study the geography of schistosomiasis across Burkina Faso by means of a spatially explicit model of water-based disease dynamics. The model quantitatively addresses the geographic stratification of disease burden in a novel framework by explicitly accounting for drivers and controls of the disease, including spatial information on the distributions of population and infrastructure, jointly with a general description of human mobility and climatic/ecological drivers. Spatial patterns of disease are analysed by the extraction and the mapping of suitable eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix subsuming the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The relevance of the work lies in the novel mapping of disease burden, a byproduct of the parametrization induced by regional upscaling, by model-guided field validations and in the predictive scenarios allowed by exploiting the range of possible parameters and processes. Human mobility is found to be a primary control at regional scales both for pathogen invasion success and the overall distribution of disease burden. The effects of water resources development highlighted by systematic reviews are accounted for by the average distances of human settlements from water bodies that are habitats for the parasite's intermediate host. Our results confirm the empirical findings about the role of water resources development on disease spread into regions previously nearly disease-free also by inspection of empirical prevalence patterns. We conclude that while the model still needs refinements based on field and epidemiological evidence, the proposed framework provides a powerful tool for large-scale public health planning and schistosomiasis management.

  7. Volunteered Geographic Information and Computational Geography: New Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI), one of the most important types of user-generated web content, has been emerging as a new phenomenon. VGI is contributed by numerous volunteers and supported by web 2.0 technologies. This chapter discusses how VGI provides new perspectives for computational geography, a transformed geography based on the use of data-intensive computing and simulations to uncover the underlying mechanisms behind geographic forms and processes. We provide several exemplars of computational geography using OpenStreetMap data and GPS traces to investigate the scaling of geographic space and its implications for human mobility patterns. We illustrate that the field of geography is experiencing a dramatic change and that geoinformatics and computational geography deserve to be clearly distinguished, with the former being a study of engineering and the latter being a science. Keywords geoinformatics, openstreetmap, scaling of geographic space, spatial heterogeneity

  8. The Information Revolution in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikunov, Vladimir S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a number of topics in geography that are effected by the multimedia information revolution. These include research in political geography, finance, and the geography of tourism and medicine. Considers new technologies assisting spatial modeling and visualization of data and their effects on these fields. (MJP)

  9. Human subjects protection issues in QUERI implementation research: QUERI Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie Mona

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Subjects protections approaches, specifically those relating to research review board oversight, vary throughout the world. While all are designed to protect participants involved in research, the structure and specifics of these institutional review boards (IRBs can and do differ. This variation affects all types of research, particularly implementation research. Methods In 2001, we began a series of inter-related studies on implementing evidence-based collaborative care for depression in Veterans Health Administration primary care. We have submitted more than 100 IRB applications, amendments, and renewals, and in doing so, we have interacted with 13 VA and University IRBs across the United States (U.S.. We present four overarching IRB-related themes encountered throughout the implementation of our projects, and within each theme, identify key challenges and suggest approaches that have proved useful. Where applicable, we showcase process aids developed to assist in resolving a particular IRB challenge. Results There are issues unique to implementation research, as this type of research may not fit within the traditional Human Subjects paradigm used to assess clinical trials. Risks in implementation research are generally related to breaches of confidentiality, rather than health risks associated with traditional clinical trials. The implementation-specific challenges discussed are: external validity considerations, Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, risk-benefit issues, the multiple roles of researchers and subjects, and system-level unit of analysis. Discussion Specific aspects of implementation research interact with variations in knowledge, procedures, and regulatory interpretations across IRBs to affect the implementation and study of best methods to increase evidence-based practice. Through lack of unambiguous guidelines and local liability concerns, IRBs are often at risk of applying both variable and inappropriate or

  10. Danish geography teachers' perceptions of their own teaching professionalism according to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel

    2015-01-01

    and natural science are more familiar to teach the sub-subject of weather formation in connection to climatic change, than Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Human Geography and social science. The teachers orientated against Human Geography put emphasis on the more problem......This paper reports from research examining eight Geography teachers’ own perceptions of their teaching professionalism, understood as Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), in relation to the topic of climate change. Apparently, Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Physical Geography......-oriented/discursive aspects of teaching climate change, some of them neglecting parts of the curriculum focused on weather formation. Most of the interviewed Geography teachers emphasize the collegial cooperation with science colleagues e.g. during professional development activities, when reflecting on their own teaching...

  11. Geography teachers PCK according to climate change - match between beliefs and reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    with a strong academic profile in Physical Geography and natural science are more familiar to teach about weather formation in connection to teaching climate change, than Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Human Geography and social science. The teachers orientated against Human Geography put......The aim of this study is to uncover differences or similarities between Geography teachers’ own perception of their Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) in relation to teaching weather formation and climate change and how they actually perform “in-action” in the lower secondary school. The concept...... of Pedagogical Content Knowledge is understood as an amalgam of Subject Matter Knowledge (SMK), Pedagogical Knowledge (PK) and Knowledge of Context (KofC). There will be presented results from interviews and observations from eight lower secondary Geography teachers and from a questionnaire send to Geography...

  12. Geography and Orienteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, W. P.

    1972-01-01

    Orienteering is a rapidly growing sport, developed in Sweden, which has great possibilities for education in geography. It can be conceived as an organizing device for outdoor work and as a basis for developing map skills and for map construction. (Author)

  13. The Revenge of Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ia. Belokrenitsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This author discussed the prominent book of American journalist and expert Robert D. Kaplan in the light of the recent publication of its Russian translation: [Kaplan R. Mest’ geografi i (The revenge of geography / Transl. by M. Kotov. Moscow: Ko-Libri, 2015. P.277].

  14. Geographies of health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwan, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    This fourth annual special issue of the Annals of the Association of American Geographers focuses on the geographies of health, disease, and well-being. The call for abstracts was issued in early 2010, and review of full papers and revised submissions lasted from December 2010 to March 2012.

  15. Human Rights and Education. Comparative & International Education Series, Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrow, Norma Bernstein, Ed.

    This book discusses the relationship between human rights and education. Education is discussed both within the context of human rights, and as the ultimate sanction and guarantee of all human rights. Part 1, "Education as a Human Right," is comprised of the following chapters: (1) "Human Rights and Education: An Overview" (D.…

  16. Genetics: A New Landscape for Medical Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Margaret; Emch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of human pathogens resistant to medical treatment will present a challenge to the international public health community in the coming decades. Geography is uniquely positioned to examine the progressive evolution of pathogens across space and through time, and to link molecular change to interactions between population and environmental drivers. Landscape as an organizing principle for the integration of natural and cultural forces has a long history in geography, and, more specifically, in medical geography. Here, we explore the role of landscape in medical geography, the emergent field of landscape genetics, and the great potential that exists in the combination of these two disciplines. We argue that landscape genetics can enhance medical geographic studies of local-level disease environments with quantitative tests of how human-environment interactions influence pathogenic characteristics. In turn, such analyses can expand theories of disease diffusion to the molecular scale and distinguish the important factors in ecologies of disease that drive genetic change of pathogens.

  17. Transformation of Geography as an Interdisciplinary Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Afrakhteh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Geography as a science of the spatial analysis of phenomena is based on three main objectives: studying spatial structures, examining the locational-spatial order of socio-economic activities, and searching spatial relationships and functions through hierarchical leveling of rural and urban settlements. The applied form of geography or “spatial planning” addresses the modification of spatial structures, the locational-spatial order of activities, and the organization of spatial relationships and functions. There are mutual interactions between structure and function in this spatial order. Science has developed a complex structure through the electronic revolution, which is called “third wave science”; also specialized studies have developed. Specialized studies result in a very deep understanding of subjects, but this deep understanding always remains just in a “spot” and its applications could be traumatic, which is because it is not regulated in combination with other dimensions of human life. This kind of science cannot be beneficial in human life or solve some important problems. The main aim of this article, which is based on qualitative content analysis, is to analyze geography as an interdisciplinary science. The findings of the study show that geographical research has interdisciplinary characteristics; otherwise it cannot explain today’s complex problems. Geography can both use the findings of other sciences, including statistics, mathematics, economics, sociology, history and psychology, and provide them with services and help.

  18. Practice and Economic Geography

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A; Murphy, J. T.

    2010-01-01

    Economic geography has over the last decade become increasingly interested in the role of practice, conceptualised as the regularised or stabilised social actions through which economic agents organize or coordinate production, marketing, service provision, exchange and/or innovation activities. Interest in practice is most clearly manifest in a growing body of research concerned to conceptualise how the regularized social relations and interactions linking economic actors (e.g. entrepreneurs...

  19. Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Graves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ambition of this issue of Portal is to reach across the methodological boundaries of history, politics, literature and geography to apply their complementary perspectives to the study of identity and its relation to space and place, an aim that involves attempting to identify the many different ways the notoriously slippery concepts of identity and geography may intersect. For this issue we have selected articles that cast a fresh perspective on two areas where identity and geography intersect: the construction of identity through the imaginative recreation of place in literature: Mapping Literary Spaces; and the study of the shifting relationships of centre and periphery, exclusion and inclusion in urban settings and geopolitical confrontations: Social and Political Peripheries. Gerard Toal has written that geography is not a noun but a verb: it does not describe what space is but studies what we do with space, imaginatively and politically. The articles in this issue illustrate the exercise of the literary and political imagination and the role of materiality and memory in the creation of geographic representation. They show too a new awareness of the centrality of space in the constitution of identities, and the need for a new geocritical reading of its discourse, as the interrelations of place and community are played out on the many scales of social and political life, from the local to the global.   The special issue is organised thus: Introduction Matthew Graves (Aix-Marseille University & Liz Rechniewski (Sydney University: “Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities.” I. Mapping Literary Spaces - Isabelle Avila (University of Paris XIII, "Les Cartes de l'Afrique au XIXe siècle et Joseph Conrad : Perceptions d'une Révolution Cartographique." - Daniela Rogobete (University of Craiova, "Global vs Glocal: Dimensions of the post-1981 Indian English Novel." II. Social and Political Peripheries - Elizabeth Rechniewski (Sydney

  20. A review on the application of actor network theory to human geography%行动者网络理论在人文地理领域应用研究述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宣; 王小依

    2013-01-01

    行动者网络理论以一种结构化的方式来构建行为主体之间的关系,并将要素流动和网络化互动形态纳入分析范畴,为各学科研究提供了全新的视角,在人文地理领域的应用也日渐增多.本文在总结行动者网络理论主要内容的基础上,分类归纳评述了行动者网络理论在不同分支研究领域的应用主题和方式,并就研究的深度、广度、影响力进行国内外对比.研究表明,行动者网络理论对人与非人行动者的一致看待及其通过转译过程解析网络关系的研究模式,除强化了经济地理等领域的理论建构之外,也为乡村地理、城市地理、经济地理、旅游地理等领域的地方发展、政策实践研究提供了一种有效的分析方法.引入该理论的人文地理研究引用频次高,有较大的学术影响.目前国内研究多停留在行动者网络理论分析框架的直接套用,极少涉及分析框架改进和理论思考,在广度和深度上与国际研究仍有差距.%Recently,the actor-network theory (ANT) was widely applied to the field of human geography.ANT approach provides a new perspective by allowing researchers to take into consideration the flow of factors and network interaction.After a brief introduction of ANT,this paper summarizes the progress of ANT applications to human geography by summing up the application topics and methods in different branches,and compares the gap between international and domestic researches.This paper reveals that ANT promotes the progress of human geography in both theory and application.Most theoretic explorations happened in the field of economic geography:the relational economic geography based on ANT provides new angle for the reconstruction of "postmodernism" economic geography theory system.In application,analytical framework of ANT applied to the field of human geography emphasizes actors,translation process,and the result,with special attention to the spatial

  1. The Matter of Geography in Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2015-01-01

    of investigating human environment interactions. In this paper we aim to contribute to this particular field of knowledge by providing an empirical analysis of ESD in Danish University Geography. In this paper it is examined how programs in Geography in higher education have taken different approaches......Geographical imaginations are absolutely vital to make sense of sustainability challenges. Yet, a number of studies reveal that geography education has been slow in integrating issues of sustainability into curricula. Geography is particularly interesting in the context of ESD, due to its tradition...... approaches to be able to understand the dynamics, complexity and interactions in various scales. Third, geographers find their discipline provides an integrative knowledge platform between the natural and social sciences....

  2. Italian information geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paradiso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A range of papers focusing on Italian cases of ICTs use and changes in society are presented here in this NETCOM issue. A national research group on Geography of Information Society was founded in 2007 and hosted by the Italian Geographical Society later evolved in a specialty group within AgeI, the Association of Italian Geographers. This issue brings together papers from members of the Italian specialty group along the general theme of Internet mediation in everyday life. A pre...

  3. AP Geography, Environmental Science Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    Geography may not be particularly known as a hot topic among today's students--even some advocates suggest it suffers from an image problem--but by at least one measure, the subject is starting to come into its own. Across more than 30 topics covered in the Advanced Placement (AP) program, participation in geography is rising faster than any…

  4. Integrating Geography into American History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Geography faces stiff curricular competition from the continuing emphasis of policy makers on the three R's and science. In many places, this competition seems to have squeezed out any systematic attention to geography or the other social studies, particularly in elementary school. What's more, it doesn't look like things are going to turn around…

  5. Omani Students' Definitions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on students' definitions of geography. The purpose of the present study was to add to the existing literature by exploring Omani students' definitions of geography. Participants were 477 students of grade 6 (ages 11-12) and grade 10 (ages 15-16) in one school district in Oman. They had been taught geography…

  6. Learning through Literature: Geography, Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Mary Ellen

    This resource book provides specific strategies and activities for integrating the intermediate geography curriculum with related children's literature selections. The book includes the following sections: (1) "World Geography Overview"; (2) "Oceans"; (3) "Polar Regions"; (4) "Islands"; (5) "Rain Forests"; (6) "Mountains"; (7) "Forests"; (8)…

  7. AP Geography, Environmental Science Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    Geography may not be particularly known as a hot topic among today's students--even some advocates suggest it suffers from an image problem--but by at least one measure, the subject is starting to come into its own. Across more than 30 topics covered in the Advanced Placement (AP) program, participation in geography is rising faster than any…

  8. Geography Resources for Elementary Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, David M., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Highlights geography resources available from the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC). Provides a brief description of five resources. Articles deal with teaching geography through the use of unique images of China, the integration of tactile and visual learning, the Gall-Peters map projection, a map game, and geographic literacy. (KO)

  9. Mapping the Journey toward Self-Authorship in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Niamh; Fournier, Eric J.; Hardwick, Susan W.; Healey, Mick; MacLachlan, John; Seemann, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    Learning is a developmental journey, and geography curriculum plays a key role in supporting student progression. In this article, we argue that the concept of "self-authorship" is a useful guiding principle in supporting curriculum revision and reform. A series of international case studies illustrate how self-authorship can be enacted…

  10. A New Pathway: Video-Based Professional Development in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Richard G.; Brysch, Carmen P.; Mohan, Audrey; Backler, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The Gilbert M. Grosvenor Center for Geographic Education, in partnership with the Agency for Instructional Technology, and the National Geographic Education Foundation have embarked on the production of a twenty-two-program, Web-based professional development series for teachers of geography, social studies, and environmental science, titled…

  11. A Road Map for Improving Geography Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Jill A.; Edelson, Daniel C.; Hildebrant, Barbara; Hinde, Elizabeth; Kenney, Marianne; Kolvoord, Robert; Lanegran, David; Marcello, Jody Smothers; Morrill, Robert; Ruiz-Primo, Maria; Seixas, Peter; Shavelson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In late 2012, both the second edition of the "Geography for Life: National Geography Standards" and the National Science Foundation-funded "Road Map for Geography Education Project" reports were released; the former document describes the conceptual goals for K-12 geography education, and the latter, a route to coordinating reform efforts to…

  12. Human Activity Recognition as Time-Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyesuk Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a system that can recognize daily human activities with a Kinect-style depth camera. Our system utilizes a set of view-invariant features and the hidden state conditional random field (HCRF model to recognize human activities from the 3D body pose stream provided by MS Kinect API or OpenNI. Many high-level daily activities can be regarded as having a hierarchical structure where multiple subactivities are performed sequentially or iteratively. In order to model effectively these high-level daily activities, we utilized a multiclass HCRF model, which is a kind of probabilistic graphical models. In addition, in order to get view-invariant, but more informative features, we extract joint angles from the subject’s skeleton model and then perform the feature transformation to obtain three different types of features regarding motion, structure, and hand positions. Through various experiments using two different datasets, KAD-30 and CAD-60, the high performance of our system is verified.

  13. 自然地理学研究前沿%The Research Forefront of Physical Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡运龙; 李双成; 方修琦

    2009-01-01

    The forefront of physical geography research is driven by social needs. The global concern on resources and environment issues and major issues facing sustainable development of China has a series of demands for physical geography. International Geosphere-Biosphere Program, International Human Dimensions Program of Global Environmental Change, World Climate Research Program, Biological Diversity Program and Earth System Science Partnership contain the forefront of physical geography research. China's State Key Basic Research Program, the priority area of development of Earth Sciences Department of National Natural Science Foundation of China, State Science and Technology Support Program etc. have conducted a series of cutting-edge physical geography research. A number of new methods and techniques for physical geography research have emerged in data collection, model simulation, laboratory analysis, studies on physical geographical processes and environmental change and global physical geographical research.%自然地理学的研究前沿是在学科发展和社会需求的共同驱动下形成的.对资源环境问题的全球性关注和我国可持续发展面临的重大问题对自然地理学提出了一系列需求.国际地圈生物圈计划、全球环境变化人文因素计划、世界气候研究计划、生物多样性计划以及地球系统科学联盟中的许多领域包含着自然地理学的研究前沿,我国国家重点基础研究发展计划、国家自然科学基金委员会地球科学部优先发展领域、科技支撑计划等也提出了一系列自然地理学的研究前沿.若干自然地理学的新方法和技术已被应用于数据采集、模型模拟、实验室分析、自然地理过程研究、环境变化研究、全球自然地理学研究.本文概括了所有这些前沿领域和论题.

  14. Geography Standards for China: New Dimensions for Geography Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya-nam, Zhang

    1996-01-01

    Briefly explains the 10 standard objective statements that characterize geography curriculum reform in China. The standards reflect a rigorous and scientific orientation incorporating mathematics, physics, geology, and demographics. No social education component is present. (MJP)

  15. Geography From Another Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The GEODESY software program is intended to promote geographical awareness among students with its remote sensing capabilities to observe the Earth's surface from distant vantage points. Students and teachers using GEODESY learn to interpret and analyze geographical data pertaining to the physical attributes of their community. For example, the program provides a digital environment of physical features, such as mountains and bodies of water, as well as man-made features, such as roads and parks, using aerial photography, satellite imagery, and geographic information systems data in accordance with National Geography Standards. The main goal is to have the students and teachers gain a better understanding of the unique forces that drive their coexistence. GEODESY was developed with technical assistance and financial support from Stennis Space Center's Commercial Remote Sensing Program Office, now known as the Earth Science Applications Directorate.

  16. Geography of European Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitin Dmitry V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the role of international migration has increased dramatically in most European countries. The growth in migration has made some authors proclaim the beginning of a second Migration Period that could transform the social and cultural identity of Europe. The article presents an analysis of international migration geography in Europe in the last twenty-five years. The authors identify the main trends in migration, provide migration profiles of European countries, and propose a classification based on the recent changes in the migrant stock. Changes in the migrant stock (total emigration and immigration reflect the level of involvement in international and global processes. They can serve as an indicator of a country’s attractiveness for both foreigners and the country’s citizens. The study shows that European countries are increasingly split into ‘immigrant’ and ‘emigrant’ states. The authors describe spatial patterns of migration. The volume and localisation of migration flows in Europe are affected not only by cultural and historical circumstance, such as a colonial past or a common language. The scale of immigrant influx often does not depend on a donor country’s demographic potential or the level of its socio-economic development. The links between the place of origin and destination are often more complex than it might initially seem. The authors stress the importance of a differentiated immigration policy taking into account ethnic and cultural features of host societies.

  17. Series elasticity of the human triceps surae muscle : Measurement by controlled-release vs. resonance methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    With a newly developed Controlled-Release Ergometer the complete characteristic of the series elastic component can be measured in human muscles. Previous estimates were based on the resonance method: muscle elasticity was assessed from the resonance frequency of the muscle elasticity connected to a

  18. In vivo measurement of the series elasticity release curve of human triceps surae muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    1998-01-01

    The force-extension characteristic of the series-elastic component of the human triceps surae muscle has been measured in vivo by means of a hydraulic controlled-release ergometer in 12 subjects. The SEC characteristic can be described by a linear relation between muscle moment and extension, with a

  19. Why Talk? A Conversation about Language with Walter J. Ong. The National Humanities Faculty Why Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Walter J.; Altree, Wayne

    This document, one of a series on questions regarding humanistic education, contains a transcribed conversation about language between Walter J. Ong, Professor of English and Professor of Humanities in Psychiatry at Saint Louis University, and Wayne Altree of Newton South High School, Newton Center, Massachusetts. This conversation on language…

  20. Adding geography to the new economic geography : bridging the gap between theory and empirics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Brakman, S.; Garretsen, J.H.; Schramm, M.

    2010-01-01

    For reasons of analytical tractability, new economic geography (NEG) models treat geography in a very simple way, focusing on stylized 'unidimensional' geography structures (e.g. an equidistant or line economy). All the well-known NEG results are based on these simple geography structures. When doin

  1. Geography and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, L

    1989-05-01

    Most people in Britain today work in jobs dominated very markedly by either women or men. Sex-typing occurs in many other activities. For example, child care and domestic work, whether paid or unpaid, are generally considered to be tasks for women. However, with the exception of domestic work and child care, the allocation of activities to women or men varies between societies. For example, in much of sub-Saharan Africa, women work in fields, growing basic subsistence crops for their families, whereas in much of Latin America, women's agricultural work is confined to tending animals and food processing. Inequality arises because the role of women is generally associated with inferior status, socially, politically and/or economically. When mapping the geography of gender, an example shows that female life expectancy at birth is highest in the developed countries and lowest in the poorest countries of the Third World. Regarding the relationship between gender divisions and various aspects of spatial organization within societies most attention has focused on differences in ethnic group, social class, and stage in the life cycle. In mid-19th century Britain large-scale factory production precipitated a spatial separation between home and work and created the possibility of separate spheres of life for women and men. A particular social form, namely a nuclear family with a dependent wife, can operate as a factor contributing to changes in the spatial organization of urban areas in the form of suburban growth. After decades of outward movement by affluent social groups, a return to small pockets within inner-urban areas is now evident. This process is known as gentrification. An additional factor of significance in connection with gentrification is the increasing success of middle-class women in obtaining well-paid career jobs.

  2. Assessing Sustainability Teaching and Learning in Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widener, Jeffrey M.; Gliedt, Travis; Tziganuk, Ashlee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to understand if geographers, who teach in a new sustainability program, are conveying new knowledge, understanding, skills and competence about the integrated and holistic concept of "sustainability", rather than individual human-environmental issues to the students. In other words, are geography professors…

  3. Nazi biopolitics and the dark geographies of the selva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giaccaria, P.; Minca, C.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the spatialities of Nazi genocidial practices. It does so by engaging with the concepts of selva and città, as inspired by Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben and drawing upon a broader tradition in human geography. Although the historical events that we recall have been extens

  4. The Romance of China: The Geography of Fascination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Christopher L.

    1987-01-01

    Shows how geography instructors can capitalize on student interest in China and its unique images in teaching basic geographic themes. Demonstrates how China can illustrate these five themes (which are absolute and relative location; physical and cultural place; human-environment interaction; movement; and region) in a way that will capture…

  5. Turkish Primary Students' Perceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyurt, Secil

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth investigation of Turkish primary school students' perceptions of geography. Gender differences in students' perceptions of geography were investigated, including definitions of geography and its field of study. The findings showed that "landforms," "our geographical regions/Turkey,"…

  6. Fieldwork Lesson based on" the International Geography Olympiad" (iGeo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Seiichi

    2017-04-01

    Japanese social studies consist of three fields. That's geography, history and civics. About geographical studies in Japan, it has a lot of contents of human geography and has little contents of natural geography. I think that Japanese social studies teachers should teach more natural geography contents for ESD.   There is a fieldwork lesson in geographical studies in Japan. This is the educational activity by which body and head were used. But in fact, fieldwork lessons are not performed in many Japanese junior high schools. I was a leader of iGeo2012 (in Germany). iGeo is held by three tests; Multimedia tests, Writing tests and Fieldwork tests. The test is included of a lot of contents of natural geography. And there are two skills that students acquire through the fieldwork test in iGeo. One is a map making skill, the other is decision making skill. Japanese students need more knowledge of natural geography. And those are not enough skills for Japanese students. So I did a fieldwork lesson based on iGeo's fieldwork test. The fieldwork lesson was performed around the school. It was also performed under the point of natural geography. After the lessons, students could improve map making skill. Because a lot of maps made by students in this lesson got prize of map contest in Japan. Some maps were included the view of natural geography.

  7. Building Geography's New Frontier: Implementing the Australian Curriculum Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Geography as a compulsory learning area from Foundation year, such as Kindergarten, to Year 8 in Australia provides new opportunities for learning and teaching. Opportunities, in part, will be driven by challenges associated with the introduction of this learning area. Key challenges are about variability: in take-up of the…

  8. The Geology of Haiti: An Annotated Bibliography of Haiti’s Geology, Geography and Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    sciences, ecology, geomechanics , human geography, and oceanography. The database provides current coverage of almost 2,000 international journals...Geological Abstracts, Ecological Abstracts, International Development Abstracts and Oceanographic Literature Review, Geomechanics Abstracts. See

  9. U-series and radiocarbon analyses of human and faunal remains from Wajak, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Paul; Wood, Rachel; Stringer, Chris; Bartsiokas, Antonis; de Vos, John; Aubert, Maxime; Kinsley, Les; Grün, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    Laser ablation U-series dating results on human and faunal bone fragments from Wajak, Indonesia, indicate a minimum age of between 37.4 and 28.5 ka (thousands of years ago) for the whole assemblage. These are significantly older than previously published radiocarbon estimates on bone carbonate, which suggested a Holocene age for a human bone fragment and a late Pleistocene age for a faunal bone. The analysis of the organic components in the faunal material show severe degradation and a positive δ(13)C ratio indicate a high degree of secondary carbonatisation. This may explain why the thermal release method used for the original age assessments yielded such young ages. While the older U-series ages are not in contradiction with the morphology of the Wajak human fossils or Javanese biostratigraphy, they will require a reassessment of the evolutionary relationships of modern human remains in Southeast Asia and Oceania. It can be expected that systematic direct dating of human fossils from this area will lead to further revisions of our understanding of modern human evolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The potential of remote sensing for monitoring land cover changes and effects on physical geography in the area of Kayisdagi Mountain and its surroundings (Istanbul).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geymen, Abdurrahman; Baz, Ibrahim

    2008-05-01

    The effect of land cover change, from natural to anthropogenic, on physical geography conditions has been studied in Kayisdagi Mountain. Land degradation is the most important environmental issue involved in this study. Most forms of land degradation are natural processes accelerated by human activity. Land degradation is a human induced or natural process that negatively affects the ability of land to function effectively within an ecosystem. Environmental degradation from human pressure and land use has become a major problem in the study area because of high population growth, urbanization rate, and the associated rapid depletion of natural resources. When studying the cost of land degradation, it is not possible to ignore the role of urbanization. In particular, a major cause of deforestation is conversion to urban land. The paper reviews the principles of current remote sensing techniques considered particularly suitable for monitoring Kayisdagi Mountain and its surrounding land cover changes and their effects on physical geography conditions. In addition, this paper addresses the problem of how spatially explicit information about degradation processes in the study area rangelands can be derived from different time series of satellite data. The monitoring approach comprises the time period between 1990 and 2005. Satellite remote sensing techniques have proven to be cost effective in widespread land cover changes. Physical geography and particularly natural geomorphologic processes like erosion, mass movement, physical weathering, and chemical weathering features etc. have faced significant unnatural variation.

  11. Structural analysis of a series of antiviral agents complexed with human rhinovirus 14.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The binding to human rhinovirus 14 of a series of eight antiviral agents that inhibit picornaviral uncoating after entry into host cells has been characterized crystallographically. All of these bind into the same hydrophobic pocket within the viral protein VP1 beta-barrel structure, although the orientation and position of each compound within the pocket was found to differ. The compounds cause the protein shell to be less flexible, thereby inhibiting disassembly. Although the antiviral pote...

  12. Japan: Geography, Cuisine, and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Karen

    These materials are designed as four modules: geography, foods, the kitchen, and culture and are to be used singly or jointly as a unit on Japanese food and culture. Common ingredients of Japanese food, nutritional information, methods of preparation, and illustrations of utensils and eating implements are given in conjunction with cultural…

  13. Towards a Geography of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of the discipline of geography to the field of education is complex since they have both been dependent upon the contributions of other social science disciplines, particularly those in the mainstream of social sciences (economics, sociology and political science). Indeed, the number of researchers who would consider themselves as…

  14. Teaching Energy Geographies via Videography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    In our digital age of information acquisition, multimedia information streams are constant, constantly changing and often contain multiple messages about topics important to everyday life, such as energy geographies. Recognizing that college students are prime consumers of digital information, it seems that crafting of academic engagement for and…

  15. Geography in the International Baccalaureate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Stuart; Dawson, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) is doing much to promote the teaching of geography in schools. Since its establishment in 1968 to provide a common curriculum and university entrance credential for children of a geographically mobile international community, it has evolved and now includes schools in national systems all over the…

  16. The geography of Chinese science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, David Emanual; Gunessee, Saileshsingh; Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann;

    2014-01-01

    . The geography of Chinese science is thus not only monocentric as regards overall scientific output, but also exhibits unusually hierarchical collaboration patterns. Unlike in Europe and North America, national and regional capitals are becoming ever more important as scientific coordination centers....

  17. Arena Symposium: Dearing and Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Brian; Quigley, George; Toyne, Peter; Johnston, Ron; Butlin, Robin A.; Beer, Andrew; Cutler, Cecile

    1998-01-01

    Presents eight papers delivered at a symposium on the impact of the Dearing Report on geography instruction in the United Kingdom. The Dearing Report reviews higher education and charts the course of curriculum and instruction for the next 20 years. The papers address standards, regional applications, and criticisms. (MJP)

  18. Geography of the asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, B. H.

    1978-01-01

    The CSM classification serves as the starting point on the geography of the asteroid belt. Raw data on asteroid types are corrected for observational biases (against dark objects, for instance) to derive the distribution of types throughout the belt. Recent work on family members indicates that dynamical families have a true physical relationship, presumably indicating common origin in the breakup of a parent asteroid.

  19. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  20. Deconstruction Geography: A STEM Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlhar, Adam M.; Duffield, Stacy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article will define the engineering design process used to create an integrated curriculum at STEM Center Middle School, and it features the planning, implementation, and revision of the Deconstruction Geography unit. The Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Center opened in the fall of 2009 as a way to relieve overcrowding at the…

  1. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  2. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  3. Geography, demography, and economic growth in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, D E; Sachs, J D

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of climate, topography, and natural ecology on public health, nutrition, demographics, technological diffusion, international trade and other determinants of economic development in Africa. The goal of this paper is to emphasize the need for intensified research on the issues at the intersection of ecology and human society. Geography was given emphasis because of three reasons: the minimal gain from another recitation of the damage caused by statism, protectionism and corruption to African economic performance; negligence of the role of natural forces in shaping economic performance; and tailoring of policies to geographical realities. The paper also discusses the general problems of tropical development and the focus of Africa's problems in worldwide tropical perspectives; demographic trends in Africa; use of standard cross-country growth equations with demographic and geographic variables, to account for the relative roles of geography; and the future growth strategies and the need for urban-based export growth in manufacturing and services. Lastly, the authors provide a summary of conclusions and discuss the agenda for future research.

  4. [Josué de Castro and The Geography of Hunger in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this article is to reinterpret the classic work Geografia da Fome [The Geography of Hunger], first published in 1946. The article provides a summary of the five food area maps and the main nutritional deficiencies in Brazil, based on Josué de Castro's original conception. Currently, the nutritional epidemiological profile identified by Josué de Castro, characterized by nutritional deficiencies (malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, endemic goiter, iron deficiency anemia, etc.), overlap with chronic non-communicable diseases (obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemias, etc.). However, the complex and paradoxical issue of hunger is a persistently recurrent theme in Brazil. Given a series of current dilemmas, including the planet's ecological sustainability and the need to guarantee the human right to adequate, healthy nutrition, it is urgent to reawaken the struggle led by Josué de Castro for the adoption of a sustainable economic development model and a society free of poverty and hunger.

  5. Improving Student Writing Abilities in Geography: Examining the Benefits of Criterion-Based Assessment and Detailed Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydon, Joseph; Wilson, Kathi; Boyd, Cleo

    2014-01-01

    Poor quality writing skills among undergraduate geography students is a significant concern among university instructors. This article reports on a multipronged strategy aimed at improving student writing in a large, first-year human geography course. The strategy emphasized ways to provide effective feedback through teaching assistant training,…

  6. Population structure and cultural geography of a folktale in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert M; Greenhill, Simon J; Atkinson, Quentin D

    2013-04-07

    Despite a burgeoning science of cultural evolution, relatively little work has focused on the population structure of human cultural variation. By contrast, studies in human population genetics use a suite of tools to quantify and analyse spatial and temporal patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Human genetic diversity can be explained largely as a result of migration and drift giving rise to gradual genetic clines, together with some discontinuities arising from geographical and cultural barriers to gene flow. Here, we adapt theory and methods from population genetics to quantify the influence of geography and ethnolinguistic boundaries on the distribution of 700 variants of a folktale in 31 European ethnolinguistic populations. We find that geographical distance and ethnolinguistic affiliation exert significant independent effects on folktale diversity and that variation between populations supports a clustering concordant with European geography. This pattern of geographical clines and clusters parallels the pattern of human genetic diversity in Europe, although the effects of geographical distance and ethnolinguistic boundaries are stronger for folktales than genes. Our findings highlight the importance of geography and population boundaries in models of human cultural variation and point to key similarities and differences between evolutionary processes operating on human genes and culture.

  7. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights: A Human Rights Perspective. Human Rights Education Series, Topic Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, David M.

    This curriculum is intended to further thoughtful examination and responsible action among high school students about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues. Unlike other curricula this discussion is not in the context of civil or political rights but in the broader context of human rights. These rights, as defined in the Universal…

  8. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Geography lessons and the results of these activities. The activities are from fifth to twelfth grade, passing through a first example of water pollution resulting from a Hercules labour, through the lyricism of the aurora borealis description, through the dramatic life of a refugee from Darfur, through the Dobrudgea winter landscape, through the grey urban landscape of Bucharest in the 90s and so on. Students were put into learning situations that stimulated their creativity, developed communication competencies and enriched their general knowledge.

  9. Geographies of High Frequency Trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the geographies of high frequency trading. Today shares shift hands within micro seconds, giving rise to a form of financial geographies termed algorithmic capitalism. This notion refers to the different spatio-temporalities produced by high frequency trading, under...... the valuation of time. As high frequency trading accelerates financial markets, the paper examines the spatio-temporalities of automated trading by the ways in which the speed of knowledge exploitation in financial markets is not only of interest, but also the expansion between different temporalities....... The paper demonstrates how the intensification of time-space compression produces radical new dynamics in the financial market and develops information rent in HFT as convertible to a time rent and a spatio-temporal rent. The final section discusses whether high frequency trading only responds to crises...

  10. Didáctica Geográfica nº 17-2016. ISSN: 0210-492-X 277 SCOFFHAM, S. (EDITOR (2013 Teaching Geography Creatively. Learning to teach in the Primary School series. 198 pp. ISBN: 978-0-415-50819-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADELA TORRES MARTÍNEZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available  El libro Teaching Geography Creatively, editado por Stephen Scoffham, supone una fuente de recursos y orientaciones didácticas fundamentadas en investigaciones recientes de gran interés para aquellos docentes de Infantil y Primaria que hayan decidido apostar por la creatividad en sus aulas. Estas orientaciones no solo buscan la motivación del alumnado sino que, en la línea del constructivismo, defienden la necesidad de fomentar un pensamiento crítico en ellos para construir aprendizajes con sentido y conectados realmente con su mundo. Se pretende así acabar con la idea que asocia la enseñanza de la geografía con el aprendizaje memorístico y pasivo, dentro de cuatro paredes. Tal y como hacen otros títulos de la serie en la que se integra, Learning to Teach in the Primary School, esta monografía defiende también una comunicación bidireccional en la transmisión del conocimiento (alumno-profesor, alumno-alumno y un currículo flexible que permita un aprendizaje creativo, donde el centro de atención sea el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje y no los resultados. 

  11. Helping Your Child Learn Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1996-01-01

    By the year 2000, all students will leave grades 4, 8, and 12 having demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter including English, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography, and every school in America will ensure that all students learn to use their minds well, so they may be prepared for responsible citizenship, further learning, and productive employment in our Nation's modern economy.

  12. Geography Education: Applying Spatial Aspects to Everyday Life: American Association of Geographers Geography Education Specialty Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessell, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout his career teaching geography, Johnathan Wessell has always stressed to his students that they already knew a lot about geography before they entered his classroom. He writes in this article that once he convinces his students of this, they begin to realize that geography is all around them, and that they, in turn, begin to shift their…

  13. Does the High School Geography Experience Influence Enrollment in University Geography Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydon, Joseph; McLaughlin, Christina; Wilson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The literature suggests that owing to profound difficulties with high school geography curricula, teachers play a vital role in stimulating student interest and in providing a platform for continuation in the study of geography at university. Yet, with little empirical evidence offered in support, it is unclear why students select geography at…

  14. Reconciling Discourse about Geography and Teaching Geography: The Case of Singapore Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    This study draws upon a Foucauldian notion of discourse to explore how four pre-service geography teachers in Singapore made decisions about what geography is and how to enact their understandings of geography in their classrooms. This analysis of discursive power is particularly relevant to Singapore because of the high level of state control…

  15. How Are Non-Geography Majors Motivated in a Large Introductory World Geography Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Won; Huynh, Niem Tu

    2015-01-01

    University students who do not declare geography as their major are at risk of poor motivation to learn in an introductory geography class. However, research exploring the role of non-majors' motivation is lacking. This study examines motivational factors impacting non-geography students' engagement and performance. The findings suggest that…

  16. Planetary Landscape Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, H.

    the landscape. Unique or common landscape forms: Depending on the given planet, one feature can have special value (or can be of different scientific importance): on Io, a impact crater would be more important, than on the Moon, etc. Current processes: Naturally, "living" landscapes (with active volcanoes, geysers, dust devils or active weather processes) are more valuable than "dead" ones. Cultural landscape values. Human presence on a extraterrestrial body is of high impor- tance. Human landing sites with footprints or landing sites with spacecraft "debris" or scientific devices makes any - otherwise unimportant - landscape valuable for us. Even the proper names of surface features will change their physical value: for a Hungarian, for example, a crater named after a Hungarian scientist will have a special value and will attract more interest than other craters. These factors are comparable with our tourist value categories. Economical landscape values. As on Earth, it makes an area more valuable if it has economically usable and profitable raw materials: minerals, rocks (impactites and other materials formed in special conditions or a long time ago). Aesthetic landscape values. We, humans, consider this as an other important factor since the German painter A. Altdorfer in the 16th century has first chosen certain land- 2 scapes that he considered to be of artistic value even without human figures present in the landscape. Parts of aesthetic landscape values are not part of the surface or local environment but of the planet or planetary system: the color of lack of the atmosphere, clouds, the characteristics of the visible moons. The abiogenic surface elements of this category are for example sand dunes, relief forms with order in their shape or distri- bution, or extreme landforms: extensive smooth plains or deep canyons. "Human presence (or life) - friendliness" values. Conditions for longer human pres- ence will be one of the most important factors when we start

  17. Enhancing the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, J.; Chong, E.

    2011-12-01

    Singapore has a long tradition of geography education at the secondary and Junior College levels (ages 12-18). Although most geography teachers teach both human and physical geography, many of them have received more extensive university training in human geography. The Earth Obervatory of Singapore (EOS), a newly established research institute at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), is building an education and outreach program to integrate its research across formal and informal education. We are collaborating with the Singapore Ministry of Education to enhance the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore classrooms. EOS is providing input to national curriculum, textbook materials, and teaching resources, as well as providing inquiry-based field seminars and workshops for inservice teachers. An upcoming 5-year "Our Dynamic Earth" exhibit at the Science Centre Singapore will be a centerpoint of outreach to younger students, their teachers and parents, and to the community at large. On a longer time scale, the upcoming undergraduate program in earth science at NTU, the first of its kind in Singapore, will provide a stream of earth scientists into the geography teaching workforce. Developing ties between EOS and the National Institute of Education will further enhance teacher training. With a highly centralized curriculum, small land area, high-performing student population, and key stakeholders eager to collaborate with EOS, Singapore presents an unusual opportunity to impact classrooms on a national scale.

  18. THEORETICAL CONCEPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHY TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Montes Galbán

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to determine the current theoretical concepts handled by third stage basic education geography teachers. A non experimental descriptive study was made. Data was collected through a semi structured questionnaire. The population was conformed by the teachers who work at the National schools placed in the parishes Raul Leoni and Cacique Mara of Maracaibo city, Zulia State. There is not clarity in regard to the correct handling of the different geographic currents, and the slight notion teachers have leans towards a traditional, descriptive, retrospective memory based conception.

  19. Migrations in Slovenian geography textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Senegačnik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, the migrations are treated in almost all geographical textbooks for different levels of education. In the textbooks for the elementary school from the sixth to ninth grade, students acquire knowledge of the migrations by the inductive approach. Difficulty level of treatment and quantity of information are increasing by the age level. In the grammar school program a trail of gaining knowledge on migration is deductive. Most attention is dedicated to migrations in general geography textbooks. The textbooks for vocational and technical school programs deal with migrations to a lesser extent and with different approaches.

  20. Economic development and the geography of institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Garretsen, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    To explain cross-country income differences, research has recently focused on the so-called deep determinants of economic development, notably institutions and geography. This article shows that it is not only absolute geography, in terms of for instance climate or being landlocked, but also relativ

  1. Teaching Development Geography: Observations from the Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellings, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Approaches to teaching the dynamics of development at South Africa's National University of Lesotho are criticized. Teaching development geography, which focuses on articulation and class formation and which rejects the spatial approach, is detrimental to the geography department. The objective should be to provide technical skills unavailable…

  2. Teaching geography yesterday, today and tommorow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Kunaver

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of the professional education in teaching geography in Slovene language has an age of about one hundred ycars, without intermission. The author expresses the opinion that the nowadays theoretical and praetical didactics of geography should be better linked with the research vvork and should also faster follow the results from abroad.

  3. Omani Students' Definitions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on students' definitions of geography. The purpose of the present study was to add to the existing literature by exploring Omani students' definitions of geography. Participants were 477 students of grade 6 (ages 11-12) and grade 10 (ages 15-16) in one school district in Oman. They had been taught…

  4. Geography and Technology in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George A.

    1994-01-01

    Multimedia instruction, which combines visual images, video clips, music, voice, and text, is a compelling way to engage students' interest in geography. The computer, telecommunications, and multimedia are tools that today's students will use in their adult working lives. The National Geographic Society can enhance geography instruction with two…

  5. Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christopherson, Robert, W.; Birkeland, Ginger

    Among the most highly regarded in physical geography, Robert Christopherson’s best-selling texts are known for their meticulous attention to detail, currency, accuracy, and rich integration of climate change science. Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography,Ninth Edition is uniquely orga...

  6. Trade costs in empirical New Economic Geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Garretsen, J.H.

    Trade costs are a crucial element of New Economic Geography (NEG) models. Without trade costs there is no role for geography. In empirical NEG studies the unavailability of direct trade cost data calls for the need to approximate these trade costs by introducing a trade cost function. In doing so,

  7. Beyond Science and Math: Integrating Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Michael E.; Grubbs, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the status of World Geography Education and the importance of these concepts in developing 21st century students. Moreover, the authors also showcase how World Geography concepts can be intentionally taught through a technological/engineering, design-based learning challenge that requires students to solve a global housing…

  8. Teaching Geography through an Animated Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Waters, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Geography is a fun and exciting discipline involving the interrogation of place and space. Film is a powerful and meaningful tool, which also transmits perceptions of place and space. Therefore, this article builds a rationale for utilizing film in the teaching of geography, particularly animated film. Next, it discusses two classroom-tested…

  9. Geography at QUT: Evolution of a Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Iraphne R. W.; Hastings, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper focuses on the constraints encountered in developing and introducing a geography discipline programme, with a distinctive regional focus, within a university of technology. Through a case study approach, the analysis relates the development of geography at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) to changes in geographical education in…

  10. Experiencing the New Geography in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Uli; Burpee, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Considers the difficulties experienced by the East German School system adjusting to a more progressive educational philosophy. Specifically, contrasts the traditional East German geography instruction (focused solely on physical geography) with the West German emphasis on social issues and problem solving. Many East German instructors distrust…

  11. [Seed geography: its concept and basic scientific issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shun-Li; Wang, Zong-Shuai; Zeren, Wangmu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new concept 'seed geography' was provided, and its definition, research contents, and scientific issues were put forward. Seed geography is a newly developed interdisciplinary science from plant geography, seed ecology, and phytosociology, which studies the geographic variation patterns of seed biological traits as well as their relationships with environmental factors from macroscopic to microscopic, and the seed formation, development, and change trends. The main research contents would include geography of seed mass, geography of seed chemical components, geography of seed morphology, geography of seed cell biological characteristics, geography of seed physiological characteristics, geography of seed genetic characteristics, and geography of flower and fruit. To explore the scientific issues in seed geography would help us to better understand the long-term adaptation and evolution of seed characteristics to natural environments.

  12. Classifying human voices by using hybrid SFX time-series preprocessing and ensemble feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Simon; Lan, Kun; Wong, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Voice biometrics is one kind of physiological characteristics whose voice is different for each individual person. Due to this uniqueness, voice classification has found useful applications in classifying speakers' gender, mother tongue or ethnicity (accent), emotion states, identity verification, verbal command control, and so forth. In this paper, we adopt a new preprocessing method named Statistical Feature Extraction (SFX) for extracting important features in training a classification model, based on piecewise transformation treating an audio waveform as a time-series. Using SFX we can faithfully remodel statistical characteristics of the time-series; together with spectral analysis, a substantial amount of features are extracted in combination. An ensemble is utilized in selecting only the influential features to be used in classification model induction. We focus on the comparison of effects of various popular data mining algorithms on multiple datasets. Our experiment consists of classification tests over four typical categories of human voice data, namely, Female and Male, Emotional Speech, Speaker Identification, and Language Recognition. The experiments yield encouraging results supporting the fact that heuristically choosing significant features from both time and frequency domains indeed produces better performance in voice classification than traditional signal processing techniques alone, like wavelets and LPC-to-CC.

  13. Development of Time-Series Human Settlement Mapping System Using Historical Landsat Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, H.; Nagai, M.; Shibasaki, R.

    2016-06-01

    Methodology of automated human settlement mapping is highly needed for utilization of historical satellite data archives for urgent issues of urban growth in global scale, such as disaster risk management, public health, food security, and urban management. As development of global data with spatial resolution of 10-100 m was achieved by some initiatives using ASTER, Landsat, and TerraSAR-X, next goal has targeted to development of time-series data which can contribute to studies urban development with background context of socioeconomy, disaster risk management, public health, transport and other development issues. We developed an automated algorithm to detect human settlement by classification of built-up and non-built-up in time-series Landsat images. A machine learning algorithm, Local and Global Consistency (LLGC), was applied with improvements for remote sensing data. The algorithm enables to use MCD12Q1, a MODIS-based global land cover map with 500-m resolution, as training data so that any manual process is not required for preparation of training data. In addition, we designed the method to composite multiple results of LLGC into a single output to reduce uncertainty. The LLGC results has a confidence value ranging 0.0 to 1.0 representing probability of built-up and non-built-up. The median value of the confidence for a certain period around a target time was expected to be a robust output of confidence to identify built-up or non-built-up areas against uncertainties in satellite data quality, such as cloud and haze contamination. Four scenes of Landsat data for each target years, 1990, 2000, 2005, and 2010, were chosen among the Landsat archive data with cloud contamination less than 20%.We developed a system with the algorithms on the Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS) in the University of Tokyo and processed 5200 scenes of Landsat data for cities with more than one million people worldwide.

  14. Time-Elastic Generative Model for Acceleration Time Series in Human Activity Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Organero, Mario; Ruiz-Blazquez, Ramona

    2017-02-08

    Body-worn sensors in general and accelerometers in particular have been widely used in order to detect human movements and activities. The execution of each type of movement by each particular individual generates sequences of time series of sensed data from which specific movement related patterns can be assessed. Several machine learning algorithms have been used over windowed segments of sensed data in order to detect such patterns in activity recognition based on intermediate features (either hand-crafted or automatically learned from data). The underlying assumption is that the computed features will capture statistical differences that can properly classify different movements and activities after a training phase based on sensed data. In order to achieve high accuracy and recall rates (and guarantee the generalization of the system to new users), the training data have to contain enough information to characterize all possible ways of executing the activity or movement to be detected. This could imply large amounts of data and a complex and time-consuming training phase, which has been shown to be even more relevant when automatically learning the optimal features to be used. In this paper, we present a novel generative model that is able to generate sequences of time series for characterizing a particular movement based on the time elasticity properties of the sensed data. The model is used to train a stack of auto-encoders in order to learn the particular features able to detect human movements. The results of movement detection using a newly generated database with information on five users performing six different movements are presented. The generalization of results using an existing database is also presented in the paper. The results show that the proposed mechanism is able to obtain acceptable recognition rates (F = 0.77) even in the case of using different people executing a different sequence of movements and using different hardware.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF TIME-SERIES HUMAN SETTLEMENT MAPPING SYSTEM USING HISTORICAL LANDSAT ARCHIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Miyazaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methodology of automated human settlement mapping is highly needed for utilization of historical satellite data archives for urgent issues of urban growth in global scale, such as disaster risk management, public health, food security, and urban management. As development of global data with spatial resolution of 10-100 m was achieved by some initiatives using ASTER, Landsat, and TerraSAR-X, next goal has targeted to development of time-series data which can contribute to studies urban development with background context of socioeconomy, disaster risk management, public health, transport and other development issues. We developed an automated algorithm to detect human settlement by classification of built-up and non-built-up in time-series Landsat images. A machine learning algorithm, Local and Global Consistency (LLGC, was applied with improvements for remote sensing data. The algorithm enables to use MCD12Q1, a MODIS-based global land cover map with 500-m resolution, as training data so that any manual process is not required for preparation of training data. In addition, we designed the method to composite multiple results of LLGC into a single output to reduce uncertainty. The LLGC results has a confidence value ranging 0.0 to 1.0 representing probability of built-up and non-built-up. The median value of the confidence for a certain period around a target time was expected to be a robust output of confidence to identify built-up or non-built-up areas against uncertainties in satellite data quality, such as cloud and haze contamination. Four scenes of Landsat data for each target years, 1990, 2000, 2005, and 2010, were chosen among the Landsat archive data with cloud contamination less than 20%.We developed a system with the algorithms on the Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS in the University of Tokyo and processed 5200 scenes of Landsat data for cities with more than one million people worldwide.

  16. Time-Elastic Generative Model for Acceleration Time Series in Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Munoz-Organero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Body-worn sensors in general and accelerometers in particular have been widely used in order to detect human movements and activities. The execution of each type of movement by each particular individual generates sequences of time series of sensed data from which specific movement related patterns can be assessed. Several machine learning algorithms have been used over windowed segments of sensed data in order to detect such patterns in activity recognition based on intermediate features (either hand-crafted or automatically learned from data. The underlying assumption is that the computed features will capture statistical differences that can properly classify different movements and activities after a training phase based on sensed data. In order to achieve high accuracy and recall rates (and guarantee the generalization of the system to new users, the training data have to contain enough information to characterize all possible ways of executing the activity or movement to be detected. This could imply large amounts of data and a complex and time-consuming training phase, which has been shown to be even more relevant when automatically learning the optimal features to be used. In this paper, we present a novel generative model that is able to generate sequences of time series for characterizing a particular movement based on the time elasticity properties of the sensed data. The model is used to train a stack of auto-encoders in order to learn the particular features able to detect human movements. The results of movement detection using a newly generated database with information on five users performing six different movements are presented. The generalization of results using an existing database is also presented in the paper. The results show that the proposed mechanism is able to obtain acceptable recognition rates (F = 0.77 even in the case of using different people executing a different sequence of movements and using different

  17. African Geography for Schools: A Handbook for Teachers. A Unesco Source Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, B., Ed.; And Others

    This book is the first in a series of UNESCO guide books for teaching geography on a continental scale, dealing with either land masses or vast regional groups which have common characteristics. Written by African geographers, it is intended for primary and secondary school teachers, teacher-training institutions in Africa, and also for geography…

  18. Revisiting Emotional Geographies: Implications for Family Engagement and Education Policy in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    From 2000 to 2001, Andy Hargreaves produced a series of publications introducing the concept of distinctive emotional geographies of teaching. The concept addressed how teacher emotions are situated within the context of their work and influence interactions with students, colleagues, administrators, and families. Hargreaves contended that…

  19. Strengthening the ties between university and school - Bilingual geography is the future for our multifarious subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnikel, F.

    2003-04-01

    An incessantly growing interaction between numerous fields of human activity asks for an open-minded approach and interdisciplinarity. No subject matches geography when it comes to bridging the gaps between different aspects of human life. Geography does not only describe, analyse and explain the "natural" state of the world we live in, it does also connect the disciplines within the physical branch of the subject with disciplines in the human or anthropogenic part, which describes the state of the world "as is". Geography is, therefore, in itself multi-disciplinary. Considering the immense importance of geography as the subject dealing with our environment and facing the fact that it is this environment which is already endangered by the multiple forms of human interference, geography and its multi-disciplinary character deserve even increased attention. The growth of the world's population, future climatic change and shortages of natural resources add to the importance of geography as the one subject in school dealing with these problems. In our societies, which are constantly growing together in political and economic issues, the structures of communication additionally mainly rely on an easily accessible and widely spread language like English to serve the needs of modern international contact. In Bavaria, the signs of the times have been recognized quite early. Nearly 8000 pupils at more than 80 high-level secondary schools ("Gymnasien") attend bilingual teaching, a large part of which is performed in geography. The Adolf-Weber-Gymnasium serves as an example, since it has the largest group of pupils instructed in bilingual geography in Munich. Next term, more than 150 boys and girls from five grades will be taught geography in English. Our goal is, in contrast to concepts of bilingual teaching in some other German states, not only to improve the language capability of our pupils. It is more an investment in scientific propaedeutics. It strenghtens the ties

  20. Geografia e cartografia escolar: o que sabem e como ensinam professoras das séries iniciais do Ensino Fundamental? Geography and school cartography: what do teachers from the initial series know and how do they teach?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Rodrigo Oliveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este texto resulta de parte de uma investigação sobre saberes e práticas de professoras das séries iniciais com o uso de atlas municipal escolar. Buscamos com esta investigação nos aproximar de uma análise das práticas docentes de duas professoras de 4ª série do Ensino Fundamental da rede estadual no município de Limeira no interior paulista. Neste artigo, procuramos identificar processos que estruturam e caracterizam as atuações dessas professoras com o uso das páginas temáticas e mapas escolares do atlas municipal, enfocando principalmente não mais as formas de construção de conhecimentos com o atlas, mas sim qual a base de conhecimentos, e quais são os saberes que estruturaram as situações de ensino promovidas por elas com o uso desse material didático em sala de aula. Utilizando fundamentos metodológicos de uma abordagem qualitativa da pesquisa educacional, podemos concluir que os saberes das professoras acerca de conhecimentos cartográficos têm sua origem na experiência cotidiana do trabalho docente; envolvem saberes advindos principalmente do contato e da experiência com outras professoras; das imagens e memórias de quando eram alunas; e do uso de livros didáticos. Verificamos com os sujeitos desta investigação que o atlas gera no contexto escolar processos de ensino e aprendizagem motivadores no sentido de tratar de problemáticas locais vivenciadas tanto pelas professoras como pelos alunos.This text results from an investigation on knowledges and practices of teachers of the initial series of Fundamental Education and their use of the school municipal atlas. We have sought in this study to inspect closely the teaching practices of two teachers of the fourth grade of Fundamental Education in a state school of the city of Limeira, State of São Paulo. The article seeks to identify processes that structure and characterize the actions of these teachers with the use of theme pages and school maps of the

  1. Looking for an international strategy for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop

    2014-01-01

    Geography education is under pressure in many countries in the world. Many publications in the field of geography education and a lot of papers presented at geography conferences focus on the problematic position of geography in primary and secondary education. However, describing the problem is eas

  2. Looking for an international strategy for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop

    Geography education is under pressure in many countries in the world. Many publications in the field of geography education and a lot of papers presented at geography conferences focus on the problematic position of geography in primary and secondary education. However, describing the problem is

  3. Geography Teachers' Stories of Sustainability: An Introduction to Narrative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Geography teacher recruitment and retention is an important issue for the future of geography education. This Special Issue of "International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education" ("IRGEE") tackles this issue head on by focusing on geography teachers' narratives about their experiences of teaching geography, and…

  4. Information Geography: A Bridge between Engineering and the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the metaphor of engineering and the social sciences located on either side of a chasm and connected by the bridge of information geography. Information geography is not an integral part of engineering and is a new field within geography, a social science discipline. The specialty of information geography is one of the newest in…

  5. Barriers to Teaching Introductory Physical Geography Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. RITTER

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning geography online is becoming an option for more students but not without controversy. Issues of faculty resources, logistics, professional recognition, and pedagogical concerns are cited as barriers to teaching online. Offering introductory physical geography online presents special challenges. As a general education course, an introductory physical geography course has a diverse population of students with disparate educational needs and goals that impacts its ability to be delivered online. Online learning is further complicated when lab courses require specialized laboratory equipment and fieldwork. A survey of geography departments in the United States was conducted to determine barriers to the deployment of introductory physical geography lab courses. Lack of faculty interest, faculty resources, and pedagogical concerns were found to be the most important barriers to deploying online physical geography lab courses. Knowing the challenges faced by geography departments offering online courses provides insight into where valuable support services and resources can best be used to address them. Recent advances in blogging, podcasting, lecture capture, web conferencing, and augmented reality are offered as solutions to the concerns expressed by survey respondents.

  6. Big Data in Transport Geography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner; Agerholm, Niels; Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk

    The emergence of new tracking technologies and Big Data has caused a transformation of the transport geography field in recent years. One new datatype, which is starting to play a significant role in public transport, is smart card data. Despite the growing focus on smart card data, there is a need...... for studies that explicitly compare the quality of this new type of data to traditional data sources. With the current focus on Big Data in the transport field, public transport planners are increasingly looking towards smart card data to analyze and optimize flows of passengers. However, in many cases...... it is not all public transport passengers in a city, region or country with a smart card system that uses the system, and in such cases, it is important to know what biases smart card data has in relation to giving a complete view upon passenger flows. This paper therefore analyses the quality and biases...

  7. Imagined Transcultural Histories and Geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Winter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a globalised world, an assumption prevails that the nation has somehow lost its power to regulate our lives, being undermined by other forces, either top-down through the impact of global capitalism or bottom-up through migrations, transnational religious, ethnic or social movement communities or other transversal politics. A related idea is that ‘culture’ is now irrevocably hybridised and border-zoned, that we no longer live in a world of discrete, located, identifiable and historically grounded cultures but in some unstable and for-the-moment insterstitiality, a sort of cultural interlanguage that sits outside well-mapped structures of power. Yet, just as the nation and the boundaries it sets around culture are being conceptually chased from our maps of the world, they come galloping back to reassert themselves. They do so politically, economically, legally, symbolically. Amidst all the noise of our transnationalisms, hybridities and interstitialities, the idea of what it is to be ‘Australian’ or ‘French’ or ‘Filipino’ or ‘Asian’ reaffirms itself, in mental geographies and constructed histories, as our ‘imagined community’ (to use Benedict Anderson’s famous term [Anderson 1983], or indeed, ‘imagined Other’, even if it is an imagined ‘Other’ that we would somehow wish to incorporate into our newly hybridised Self. Using the notion of transcultural mappings, the articles in this special issue investigate this apparent paradox. They look at how the Self and Other have been mapped through imagined links between geography, history and cultural location. They interrogate the tension between the persistence of mappings of the world based on discrete national or cultural identities on one hand, and, on the other hand, the push to move beyond these carefully guarded borders and problematise precise notions of identity and belonging.

  8. Assessing Tsunami Vulnerabilities of Geographies with Shallow Water Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2012-01-01

    Tsunami preparedness is crucial for saving human lives in case of disasters that involve massive water movement. In this work, we develop a framework for visual assessment of tsunami preparedness of geographies. Shallow water equations (also called Saint Venant equations) are a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations that are derived by depth-integrating the Navier-Stokes equations and provide a great abstraction of water masses that have lower depths compared to their free surface area. Our specific contribution in this study is to use Microsoft's XNA Game Studio to import underwater and shore line geographies, create different tsunami scenarios, and visualize the propagation of the waves and their impact on the shore line geography. Most importantly, we utilized the computational power of graphical processing units (GPUs) as HLSL based shader files and delegated all of the heavy computations to the GPU. Finally, we also conducted a validation study, in which we have tested our model against a controlled shallow water experiment. We believe that such a framework with an easy to use interface that is based on readily available software libraries, which are widely available and easily distributable, would encourage not only researchers, but also educators to showcase ideas.

  9. Spatial dependence of genetic data related to human health and livestock disease resistance: a role for geography to support the One Health approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Joost

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial dependence of located health and/or genetic data can be used to detect clusters likely to reveal disease prevalence or signatures of adaptation possibly associated with characteristics of the local environment (high temperatures, air or water pollution, be it in humans or animals (Murtaugh et al. 2017. Most often, geographic maps are produced to represent health data. Medical information is transmitted through thematic choropleth maps. For instance administrative units are colored according to the variable of interest. But it is key to analyse health and/or genetic data by explicitly including geographic characteristics (distances, co-location and also the potential and power of spatial statistics to detect specific patterns in the geographic distribution of disease occurrences (“make visible the invisible”. A classic example using clusters is the map produced by John Snow (Snow 1855 showing the number of deaths caused by a cholera outbreak in London. Looking at a detail of Snow's original map, it is possible to realize how he graphically represented the number of deaths, with short bold lines representing death occurrences (frequencies forming a kind of histogram placed on the street at the addresses where it happened - what we currently name georeferencing. A cluster of death people is an effect observed on the territory, and the existence of such a cluster depends on an infected water pump located at the same place (the cause. How can this spatial dependence be detected and measured? It is possible to identify spatial patterns in the geographic space by means of spatial statistics. We need to determine whether the variable of interest is randomly distributed or spatially dependent, and to check if the patterns observed are robust to random permutations. We also need to explore the data, to find out what is the range of influence of this spatial dependence. Here we focus on the functioning of one among several measures of

  10. Development of population geography from antropogeography to spatial-analitical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasovski Milena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Population geography is a subdiscipline of Human geography and studies the distribution, concentration and density of population over the terestrial surface, as well as differences in population size, changes and characteristics, like structures, migrations, activity etc, among some places present compared to others. Population geography has had a perscientific stage as long as human history. First modern scientific treatis of population in geography was the F. Ratzels book Antropogeography in 1882. During the first half of the XX century, French geographer Vidal de la Blanche gave a capital importance of population studies in his work Principes de Geographie Humaine. In interwar years, various aspects of population were studied. After The Second World War started the renovating movement of geography and new tendencies appear in human geography and, consequently in population geography. Attempts were made to define population geography as a separate sub-discipline. The world wide trend of treating population geography as separate discipline was expressed by publishing monographs, bibliographies and textbooks. The most significant authors who worked on defining population geography were French geographers P. George (1951, 1959, Beaujen-Garnier (1965, 1966; North-american geographers: G. Trewarta (1953, 1969, W. Bunge (1962, J. Clance (1965, 1971, W. Zelinski (1966; in Great Britain: J.I. Clarke (1965; in USSR: Ju.G. Sauškin i D.N. Anučin (1950, V.V. Pokšiševskij (1966, D.I. Valentej (1973; in Poland V. Ormotski (1931, L. Kosinski (1967 A. Jagelski (1980. Those authors and their works had the significant influence on the development of population science in the world and also in Serbia. Although the development of population geography was different in different countries and scientific research centers, we can clearly defined four stages. First stage lasted untill 1960s and was characterised by works of G.Trewarta, H. Doerres Ju.G. Sauškin, D

  11. Parameterization using Fourier series expansion of the diffuse reflectance of human skin to vary the concentration of the melanocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narea, J. Freddy; Muñoz, Aarón A.; Castro, Jorge; Muñoz, Rafael A.; Villalba, Caroleny E.; Martinez, María. F.; Bravo, Kelly D.

    2013-11-01

    Human skin has been studied in numerous investigations, given the interest in knowing information about physiology, morphology and chemical composition. These parameters can be determined using non invasively optical techniques in vivo, such as the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The human skin color is determined by many factors, but primarily by the amount and distribution of the pigment melanin. The melanin is produced by the melanocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis. This research characterize the spectral response of the human skin using the coefficients of Fourier series expansion. Simulating the radiative transfer equation for the Monte Carlo method to vary the concentration of the melanocytes (fme) in a simplified model of human skin. It fits relating the Fourier series coefficient a0 with fme. Therefore it is possible to recover the skin biophysical parameter.

  12. Department of Geography and Environmental Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-02

    Sep 2, 2016 ... Department of Geography and Planning, University of Jos, Nigeria. Abstract. This study assessed ... climates (global, regional, and local) have never been static. ..... Synthesis of its Nature, causes,. Effects and Management ...

  13. Geography and glocal scale - generational conversion/Geografia i skala glokalna - przemiana generacyjna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirveli, Marika; Lewczuk, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    The proposed text presents a conceptual change in the scope of some of the key concepts in the light of the two dictionaries (Britannica and Human Geography Dictionary) and Anglo-Saxon publications about the future of geography. Then, it combines the concept of references to the ongoing interdisciplinary studies included in the structure of the University of the Second and Third Generation. Applications built this way are of two types: (1) referring to a fundamental change in the process within the human perception of the environment for generations X and Y, and (2) referring to the process of glocalization, glocal scale and premises of the University of the Third Generation (3GU)

  14. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Evaluation of a Series of 2-Amino-Naphthoquinones against Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago A. P. de Moraes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of a series of aminonaphthoquinones resulting from the reaction of suitable aminoacids with 1,4-naphthoquinone was assayed against SF-295 (glioblastoma, MDAMB-435 (breast, HCT-8 (colon, HCT-116 (colon, HL-60 (leukemia, OVCAR-8 (ovarian, NCI-H358M (bronchoalveolar lung carcinoma and PC3-M (prostate cancer cells and also against PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results demonstrated that all the synthetic aminonaphthoquinones had relevant cytotoxic activity against all human cancer lines used in this experiment. Five of the compounds showed high cytotoxicity and selectivity against all cancer cell lines tested (IC50 = 0.49 to 3.89 µg·mL−1. The title compounds were less toxic to PBMC, since IC50 was 1.5 to eighteen times higher (IC50 = 5.51 to 17.61 µg·mL−1 than values shown by tumour cell lines. The mechanism of cell growth inhibition and structure–activity relationships remains as a target for future investigations.

  15. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Case Series Seen in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Deirdre Therese; Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill to treat menstrual cycle abnormalities prior to investigation and diagnosis. Vaccine research does not present an ovary histology report of tested rats but does present a testicular histology report. Enduring ovarian capacity and duration of function following vaccination is unresearched in preclinical studies, clinical and postlicensure studies. Postmarketing surveillance does not accurately represent diagnoses in adverse event notifications and can neither represent unnotified cases nor compare incident statistics with vaccine course administration rates. The potential significance of a case series of adolescents with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency following HPV vaccination presenting to a general practice warrants further research. Preservation of reproductive health is a primary concern in the recipient target group. Since this group includes all prepubertal and pubertal young women, demonstration of ongoing, uncompromised safety for the ovary is urgently required. This matter needs to be resolved for the purposes of population health and public vaccine confidence.

  16. Chart Series

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) offers several different Chart Series with data on beneficiary health status, spending, operations, and quality...

  17. The creation and circulation of public geographies

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob; Linehan, Denis; O'Callaghan, Cian; Lawton, Philip

    2013-01-01

    In response to the commentaries, we discuss further how social media disrupts and remakes the creation and circulation of geographical knowledges and potentially reconfigures the moral economy of the social sciences. In particular, we examine questions of what is meant by public geography, the publics which such geographies serve, alternative and complementary approaches to social media, the politics of authorship within collective blogs, the politics and mechanisms of knowledge c...

  18. The impacts of Walter Isard on geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Randall W.

    In the course of preparing this paper, which initially focused solely on identifying the impacts of input-output analysis on geography, a much broader perspective on the impacts of Walter Isard on geography ultimately emerged. In the tradition of input-output analysis, these impacts are grouped into direct, indirect, and induced effects, and summarized under the heading of influence. Walter Isard touched the lives of many through personal relationships, books and articles, and an energetic devotion to and enthusiasm for the creation of a regional science association. The Regional Science Association and its publications supported something of a greenhouse environment in which the seedlings of GIS and scientific geography could take root, until they were well enough established to enter mainstream geography. While clearly not limited to geography, the fruits of Walter Isard's labors continue to populate the discipline through his contemporaries, their students, students' students, and so on. The formative years of both regional science and scientific geography left an indelible mark on the nature of geographic inquiry.

  19. A non linear analysis of human gait time series based on multifractal analysis and cross correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Diosdado, A [Department of Mathematics, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnologia, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Acueducto s/n, 07340, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed databases with gait time series of adults and persons with Parkinson, Huntington and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseases. We obtained the staircase graphs of accumulated events that can be bounded by a straight line whose slope can be used to distinguish between gait time series from healthy and ill persons. The global Hurst exponent of these series do not show tendencies, we intend that this is because some gait time series have monofractal behavior and others have multifractal behavior so they cannot be characterized with a single Hurst exponent. We calculated the multifractal spectra, obtained the spectra width and found that the spectra of the healthy young persons are almost monofractal. The spectra of ill persons are wider than the spectra of healthy persons. In opposition to the interbeat time series where the pathology implies loss of multifractality, in the gait time series the multifractal behavior emerges with the pathology. Data were collected from healthy and ill subjects as they walked in a roughly circular path and they have sensors in both feet, so we have one time series for the left foot and other for the right foot. First, we analyzed these time series separately, and then we compared both results, with direct comparison and with a cross correlation analysis. We tried to find differences in both time series that can be used as indicators of equilibrium problems.

  20. Fieldwork in Geography Education: Defining or Declining? The State of Fieldwork in Canadian Undergraduate Geography Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; Leydon, Joseph; Wincentak, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the prevalence of fieldwork in undergraduate Geography programs in Canada. It examines the presence of fieldwork, provided through both field courses and courses that include fieldwork components, by reviewing program requirements and course offerings in undergraduate geography programs. The research explores the extent to…

  1. Progress in Human Geography in a century:A bibliometric review of 73 SSCI journals%百年SSCI看国际人文地理学的发展特点与规律--基于73种人文地理类期刊的文献计量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟赛香; 袁甜; 苏香燕; 胡鹏; 薛熙明

    2015-01-01

    从文献总量、文献类型、成长趋势、关键词、作者、国家与机构等方面,对1900-2012年SSCI收录的73种人文地理期刊的144719条文献记录,进行了较为全面的文献计量分析,包括:构建作者评价指标体系以分析作者对人文地理研究的学术贡献,利用网络图分析各阶段作者、国家与机构之间合作的网络关系等。研究表明:①百年来,人文地理发文量总体呈快速上升趋势,但占SSCI发文总量的比重却呈下降趋势;②英美一直引领全球人文地理研究及其发展;③人文地理学有明显研究热点主题,包括地方性、迁移、性别、旅游、规划等,研究注重地理与政治的结合,以及对GIS和RS为代表的地理信息技术的采借;研究热点区域集中在英、美两国,尤以其特大城市为重点,中国的部分城市近十年来也受到较多关注;④人文地理学作者分布有明显阶段性特征,并形成了以Johnston R J、Thrift N、Sayer A、Jackson P、Harvey D等为中心的学术高产核心作者群。本研究对揭示人文地理学发展的特征和趋势有较好的参考借鉴。%On the basis of 144719 document records from 73 Human Geography journals from SSCI database during 1900-2012, the paper conducted an integrated bibliometric analysis in respect to characteristics of document types, document outputs, keywords, authors, countries and institutions. Meanwhile, an indicator system was established to examine the features and trends of Human Geography development through comprehensive assessment towards authors worldwide. Our analysis focused on the scientific outputs, subject categories, international collaboration and geographic distribution. A multi- criteria assessment system was built to measure the contributions of 387 authors in four periods within 1900-2012. Then network phase analysis supported by Matlab and Netdraw was used to reveal the network relationships

  2. U-series constraints on the Holocene human presence in the Cuatro Cienegas basin, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. R.; Felstead, N.; Gonzalez, S.; Leng, M. J.; Metcalfe, S. E.; Patchett, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    U-series tufa ages dating a human trackway have been obtained, part of a larger Late Pleistocene - Recent palaeoclimate and human occupation study of the Cuatro Cienegas basin, NE Mexico. Our analytical approach, including tracer calibration, couples aspects of what we consider best practice in the U-series community with our U-Pb experiences which includes the EarthTime U-Pb tracer calibration exercise. The recently discovered trackway is near a small hydrothermal pool within the basin [1], an ecologically highly significant oasis in the Chihuahuan desert. The oasis comprises >200 freshwater hydrothermal pools and a river system, and the related ecosystem hosts >70 endemic species[2]. Pools are fed by waters that circulate a deep karstic system and that originate in the surrounding upper Jurassic-lower Cretaceous Sierra Madre Oriental mountains (>3000m) [3]. The area hosted nomadic hunter-gatherers during the Holocene, and possibly as early as Late Pleistocene (~12 ka BP). Despite the basin's ecological significance, only three palaeoenvironmental studies have been published to date, and limited geochronological constraints are available. A pollen study of drill core through peats and tufas proximal to the pools suggested a long period of climatic stability and biogeographic isolation[4], a notion supported by the large number of endemic species, but other palynological and plant macrofossil data suggest that large climatic changes occurred post Late Pleistocene [5]. The 10 m long in situ trackway is preserved in tufa and five samples from the uppermost surfaces were analysed to date the footprints. The tufas comprise clean carbonate with no petrographic evidence of replacement and little contaminant detrital material (on some exposed upper surfaces). Powdered tufa was processed following [6-8], and analysed by TIMS (Triton, U) and MC-ICP-MS (Th, Nu HR), although our future analyses will primarily be obtained on a Neptune. Samples were spiked with a 229Th/236U

  3. The analysis of statistics, geography and dynamics of xenophobic agression in Russia [2005-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М М Yusupov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Xenophobia is one of significant challenges to social and national security of Russia. In some regions of the country the crimes pertaining to xenophobia show a persistent upward trend. However, the lack of official information on statistics, geography and dynamics of xenophobic crimes blocks the elaboration of regional measures designed to cope with the challenge of xenophobia. The results of the investigations of the survey papers of the Moscow Office for Human Rights over the period of 2005-2007 conducted to analyze the statistics, geography and dynamics of xenophobic aggression in federal districts of Russia are presented in the article.

  4. Introduction of Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    1.1 General information Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography (XIEG), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), was established on 7 July, 1998, by merging of two previously exist- ing institutes of CAS, namely Institute of Geography

  5. Between East and West: Geography in Higher Education in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Frank

    1980-01-01

    Traces the evolution of the geography curriculum in higher education in Yugoslavia. From the 19th century geography instruction has survived the trauma of foreign domination, a royalist kingdom, and the advent of a socialist state. (Author/KC)

  6. Demographic Trends (1970-2010) for Coastal Geographies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Demographic Trends (1970-2010) were derived from Census Block Group Data for 13 different coastal geographies. For a full listing of the geographies available,...

  7. Teaching Young Children Basic Concepts of Geography: A Literature-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Mary Anne Zeitler; Vasiliev, Ren; Lin, Qiuyun

    2002-01-01

    This article advocates a literature-based instructional approach as a way of promoting geographic awareness in early childhood classrooms. Instruction focuses on basic geography concepts of location, place, human- environment interaction, movement, and region. Examples of children's picture books are included to show what early childhood teachers…

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of a Cognitive Architecture for the Cultural Geography Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) proposed by Ajzen (1991). TPB postulates three key factors that determine an individual’s intention, leading to a...BLANK 123 LIST OF REFERENCES Ajzen , I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior . Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), 179–211...GEOGRAPHY MODEL ........................................................13 1. Theory of Planned Behavior

  9. Teaching the Six Essential Elements of Geography with Quality Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this article the author describes how she teaches third and sixth grade classes about the six essential elements of geography at the beginning of each school year. The six elements organize the eighteen national standards and include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and…

  10. BRICS: an explanation in critical geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendra Meena

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BRICS, an abbreviation for Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, a group of five influential and emerging economies successfully completed its fifth annual summit in Durban during March 26-27, 2013. A significantly unique feature of the group is its geographical spread as evident from the location of these five constituent states which are situated in four continents. The paper seeks to explain the phenomenon of the disparate group BRICS through literature in Critical Geography as it is understood that the recent phase of globalization has created spatial patterns which were hitherto not experienced and therefore not clearly recognized in the literature on International Relations and traditional geography. Such spatially variegated groupings like the BRICS could be analyzed and interpreted in Critical Geography and Critical Geopolitics literature through three important concepts: a Space b Geographical and Geopolitical Imaginations and c Region. The paper seeks to explain BRICS through these conceptual tools.

  11. Teachers envisioning future geography education at their schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their curriculum-makin

  12. Teachers envisioning future geography education at their schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their

  13. Turkish Primary Students' Perceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyurt, Secil

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth investigation of Turkish primary school students' perceptions of geography. Gender differences in students' perceptions of geography were investigated, including definitions of geography and its field of study. The findings showed that "landforms," "our geographical regions/Turkey,"…

  14. Rethinking Postgraduate Geography Education in the USA: Issues and Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kenneth; Bednarz, Sarah; Monk, Janice; Solem, Michael; Stoltman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Postgraduate geography education in the USA is growing and changing. In recent years, the number of postgraduate programs has increased at both the doctoral and master's levels. Interest in improving and reforming doctoral education has increased dramatically both inside and outside geography, and geography has been involved in these reforms.…

  15. Teachers Envisioning Future Geography Education at Their Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their curriculum-making competences. In a master course at Fontys…

  16. A Comparative Analysis of Geography Education: International Samples and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, Suleyman

    2010-01-01

    In today's world, the developments being experienced in geography education are focusing on issues like the following: integrating technology into geography courses, placing a comprehensive and integrative perspective regarding geography into the curriculum, stressing independent learning and team-learning simultaneously, educating students to…

  17. Development of Geography in Higher Education in China since 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojian; Kong, Yunfeng; Peng, Baoyu

    2007-01-01

    China is one of the largest countries in terms of geography student enrolment in higher education. This study draws on an extensive collection of data as well as the authors' own surveys of 20 geography schools/departments, to elaborate on the development features of China's geography in higher education (GHE) against its unique background since…

  18. The China National Geography Competition for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wang; Dongying, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Four Chinese middle school students represented China during the third International Geography Olympiad (IGEO) held in 2000 in Korea and that was the first time for China to participate in the IGEO. In 2005 the China Society of Geography and the Beijing Normal University decided to co-organise the China National Geography Competition (CNGC) for…

  19. Conceptualizing violence for health and medical geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVerteuil, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Despite the fact that violence is a major threat to public health, the term itself is rarely considered as a phenomenon unto itself, and rarely figures explicitly in work by health and medical geographers. In response, I propose a definitionally and conceptually more robust approach to violence using a tripartite frame (interpersonal violence, structural violence, mass intentional violence) and suggest critical interventions through which to apply this more explicit and conceptually more robust approach: violence and embodiment via substance abuse in health geography, and structural violence via mental illness in medical geography.

  20. Makiguchi Tsunesaburo and Language, Value-Creative Composition Instruction, and the Geography of Identity in Community Studies: A Response to Politicized Imagining and Ineffective Critical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulah, Jason

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author examines Makiguchi Tsunesaburo's philosophy and practice of human geography ("jinsei chirigaku"), community studies ("kyodoka"), and composition instruction based on "value-creating pedagogy" ("soka kyoikugaku") for thinking through and responding to two competing trends…

  1. Geography Teachers' Concepts of Working with Thinking through Geography Strategies--Results of an Empirical Reconstructive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applis, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The educational standards in geography in the German-speaking world separately refer to the areas of competence of judgment and evaluation and thus attach outstanding importance to reflective value orientation in geography classes. The tasks and challenges that arise from that for geography teachers will be investigated in a…

  2. Effects of Series Elasticity on the Human Knee Extension Torque-Angle Relationship in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ohgo, Kazuya; Takeishi, Ryuichi; Yoshinaga, Kazunari; Tsunoda, Naoya; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of series elasticity on the torque-angle relationship of the knee extensors in vivo. Forty-two men volunteered to take part in the present study. The participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions at eight knee-joint angles (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110[degree]). The…

  3. Middle Eastern Geographies of World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    retain.131 Soon after the fall of Basra, Sir Percy Cox, Chief Political Officer to the campaign, and Lord Hardinge, the Viceroy of India, both made...34Why Geography Matters ... But So Little is Learned." Orbis 47, no. 2 (Spring 2003): 217- 233. McFate, Montgomery, and Andrea Jackson . "An

  4. Internationalizing Geography Education: A Focus on India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Michael; Balachandran, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    The Association of American Geographers (AAG), through its Center for Global Geography Education (CGGE) project, recently published a collection of online educational resources examining important geographic issues affecting people, places, and environments in India. The resources were created by a delegation of high school teachers and academic…

  5. Capstone Portfolios and Geography Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Joann

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing demands regarding student learning outcomes and accreditation, a capstone portfolio was added to assess critical thinking and communication skills of geography majors at a large public university in the USA. The portfolio guidelines were designed to be adaptable to a flexible curriculum where about half of the requirements within…

  6. Teaching Gender and Geography in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ramon, Maria-Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of gender themes into university teaching in geography in Spain in 1989, significant gains have been made but challenges remain in relation to placing gender into undergraduate curricula and developing teaching resources in local languages. Geographers in Spain have to meet those challenges in the near future in order to…

  7. Geography Education for "An Attainable Global Perspective"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Phil; Pawson, Eric; Solem, Michael; Ray, Waverly

    2014-01-01

    This article considers approaches to promoting global perspectives as both cognitive and affective learning outcomes within geography education. Particular attention is paid to the work of Robert Hanvey, who proposed "An Attainable Global Perspective" in the 1970s, which explicitly ties to the content and perspectives embedded in…

  8. Applying Disciplinary Literacy in Elementary Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Judy; Ming, Kavin

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a social studies teacher and a literacy teacher describe a vision for social studies that highlights reading practices that foster disciplinary literacy in elementary geography. Their purpose is to share a practical approach for enriching elementary social studies lessons and activities with a geographic lens. During the…

  9. The National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that the National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project is an inservice teacher education success story. Describes the origins, objectives, and development of the project. Summarizes the impact of the project and contends that its success is the result of the workshop format and guided practice in instructional strategies. (CFR)

  10. Financial Geographies and Emerging Markets in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Karreman (Bas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the contemporary financial geographies in Central and Eastern Europe and argues how these may affect the established European finacial centre network in the future. As the development of the financial sector in Europe’s emerging markets is largely dependent on foreign

  11. Toward Securing a Future for Geography Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Geography graduates face an uncertain future. To help students think and practice as a geographer, we must teach disciplinary knowledge--particularly threshold concepts--as well as skills and attributes. We must role model and articulate our geographical reasoning using signature pedagogies and promote high-impact and signature learning…

  12. Sustainability in the Australian Curriculum: Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric

    2014-01-01

    "Sustainability" is one of the seven major concepts in the geography curriculum. It is also one of the three cross-curriculum priorities in the Australian curriculum, together with Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. This paper describes how the concept is explained…

  13. The National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that the National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project is an inservice teacher education success story. Describes the origins, objectives, and development of the project. Summarizes the impact of the project and contends that its success is the result of the workshop format and guided practice in instructional strategies. (CFR)

  14. Geography and Geographical Information Science: Interdisciplinary Integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellul, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To understand how Geography and Geographical Information Science (GIS) can contribute to Interdisciplinary Research (IDR), it is relevant to articulate the differences between the different types of such research. "Multidisciplinary" researchers work in a "parallel play" mode, completing work in their disciplinary work streams…

  15. A futures perspective in Dutch geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, Iris; Béneker, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Geography education offers many possibilities for futures education. In The Netherlands, a future perspective is obvious in the vision behind the curriculum for secondary education, but this perspective becomes thinner and less open when elaborated in the syllabus, textbooks and examinations. From

  16. Lightning Talk: Biopython (bio) Geography Module

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas J. Matzke

    2010-01-01

    For Google Summer of Code 2009/NESCENT Phyloinformatics Summer of Code 2009, I built a Geography module for Biopython. The purpose of the module is to search, download, and process biogeographical data from GBIF, much as Biopython currently accesses Genbank. Application of the tool to a historical biogeography study on bivalves will be illustrated.

  17. Marine Geography of the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-01-01

    Reconnaissance Geography of Japan," University of Wisconsin Studies in the Social Sciences and History, No. 22, 283 pp., 1934. , "Japan, A Physical...Vol. 2. pp 2 Inlleiol dMoine Obsetvotory0 Kobe, (&r, Japone ’). RESTRICTED 3 Ref erences: Korea, Fishery Experimental Station, "Report on the Drift

  18. Community Engagement for Student Learning in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Chalkley, Brian; Fletcher, Stephen; Hay, Iain; Le Heron, Erena; Mohan, Audrey; Trafford, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the role and purpose of community engagement as a learning and teaching strategy within higher education geography. It explores different interpretations of the concept of community engagement and illustrates different examples of this kind of learning through six case studies drawn from Australia, New Zealand, the UK, and…

  19. Nationalism in Geography Classrooms: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Kolson; White, George; Leib, Jonathan; Dalby, Simon; Algeo, Katie; Jansson, David; Zimmerman, Jackson

    2011-01-01

    This set of essays is based on a panel session convened at the 2009 meeting of the Association of American Geographers, which sought to explore the many challenges and pitfalls involved with teaching nationalism as a topic in geography classrooms. The authors offer different but complementary insights into the practical difficulties and potential…

  20. A futures perspective in Dutch geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, Iris; Béneker, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Geography education offers many possibilities for futures education. In The Netherlands, a future perspective is obvious in the vision behind the curriculum for secondary education, but this perspective becomes thinner and less open when elaborated in the syllabus, textbooks and examinations. From a

  1. Teaching Historical Geographies of American Film Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The geographies of Hollywood are multiple, contradictory, ephemeral and tangible. Our preconceived conceptions of space and place play a dynamic role in what elements we tend to focus on when discussing the cultural industry of American cinema. This essay uses Hollywood as a metaphor for the American film production industry and a historical…

  2. A Geography of Uruguay for Elementary Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzhugh, William P.

    This paper is part of a larger study, conducted as part of a Christa McAuliffe Fellowship research project, "A Comparative Geography of Three Ecologically Similar Regions." The study compared the Chesapeake Bay region of Maryland with the Murray River region of South Australia and the Rio de la Plata region of Uruguay. The project was…

  3. Global Health, Geographical Contingency, and Contingent Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Health geography has emerged from under the “shadow of the medical” to become one of the most vibrant of all the subdisciplines. Yet, this success has also meant that health research has become increasingly siloed within this subdisciplinary domain. As this article explores, this represents a potential lost opportunity with regard to the study of global health, which has instead come to be dominated by anthropology and political science. Chief among the former's concerns are exploring the gap between the programmatic intentions of global health and the unintended or unanticipated consequences of their deployment. This article asserts that recent work on contingency within geography offers significant conceptual potential for examining this gap. It therefore uses the example of alcohol taxation in Botswana, an emergent global health target and tool, to explore how geographical contingency and the emergent, contingent geographies that result might help counter the prevailing tendency for geography to be side-stepped within critical studies of global health. At the very least, then, this intervention aims to encourage reflection by geographers on how to make explicit the all-too-often implicit links between their research and global health debates located outside the discipline. PMID:27611662

  4. Economic development, growth, institutions and geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhupatiraju, S.; Verspagen, B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we test the Rodrik et al (2004) framework to explain differences in development levels across countries by using a broader set of definitions for institutions, geography and economic variables. We use a multi-faceted database to measure institutions in an attempt to go beyond the sing

  5. Environmental Concerns in the Geography Curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for implementing EE and ESD through the geography curriculum in the South ... three concepts; environmental education, sustainable development and ... education has changed with time depending on how people conceived of the ... Di Chiro makes it clear that conceptually we view the environment as interactions taking.

  6. Implementation Challenges of the New Geography Diploma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation Challenges of the New Geography Diploma Syllabus in Tanzania: A Case Study of Korogwe and ... Huria: Journal of the Open University of Tanzania. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives ... The study used Korogwe and Dakawa Teachers' Training Colleges as a case.

  7. Possibilities for an International Assessment in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Rod; Bourke, Terri

    2017-01-01

    A recent editorial in International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education (IRGEE) highlighted an opportunity for the inclusion of geography as a subject in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) tests. At present, TIMSS tests only encompass mathematics and physical sciences. The IRGEE editors encouraged…

  8. Geography, GIS and Employability in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seremet, Mehmet; Chalkley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although higher education in Turkey does not have especially well-advanced systems and resources for addressing graduate employability, two developments are making it particularly important for Turkish geography departments to give increased priority to this agenda. One is the country's new Higher Education Qualifications Framework and the other…

  9. Commission on College Geography. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounsbury, John F.

    This 1974 report describes the history of the Commission on College Geography, which was supported by the National Science Foundation. There are four major parts to the paper. Part I deals with the objectives of the commission. It was established in 1963 as an outgrowth of the work of the Liberal Education Committee appointed by the Council of the…

  10. Food's cultural geographies: texture, creativity, and publics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Cook; P. Jackson; A. Hayes-Conroy; S. Abrahamsson; R. Sandover; M. Sheller; H. Henderson; L. Hallett; S. Imai; D. Maye; A. Hill

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about emerging cultural geographies of food. It is the result of a collaborative blog-to-paper process that led to an experimental, fragmented, dialogic text. Food is often researched precisely because it can help to vividly animate tensions between the small and intimate realms of e

  11. Multimedia Technology and Students' Achievement in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, Edmar Bernardes; Kvasnak, Robb Neil

    2012-01-01

    In this study done at a community college in South Florida, the achievements of students who spoke English as their second language who had attended their K-12 education outside the United States in their home countries, in a U.S. college course on world geography are compared with the achievements of students in the same classes who spoke English…

  12. Teaching Cultural Geography with "The Amazing Race"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Sarah L.

    2017-01-01

    The reality show "The Amazing Race" serves as a useful text for the cultural geography classroom. As competitors travel the world, they complete challenging tasks designed to be both educational and entertaining. Audiences see actual images from destinations around the world and learn about the unique cultures of these places. They also…

  13. The geography teacher's set of appliances - `GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT' - Self improved school equipment used in teaching geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajtok-Tari, I.

    2009-04-01

    The multimedia application and the use of Internet are becoming more and more common at schools and at homes due to the widespread of computers. The multimedia programs offer a great help for geography teachers because with their use all the visual aids are not needed in the classroom. They mix the advantages of blacboards, slides, displays, overhead projectors and VCR-s. At the same time offering other opportunities which could not be provided by the aids mentioned above because of their limits. Using a projector connected to a computer students can see the visual aids prepared by the teacher projected. Their use is justified because student's books cannot contain all the increasing amount of knowledge. Success is guaranteed because students are sensitive to new approaches. Digitalizing the material and finding it on the internet that way preparing a colourful, varied geography lesson is a time-consuming process. Being the methodologist and didactic information technologist at the Geography Department of Eszterházy Károly College I have been working for years on facilitating the work of my students, colleagues and my own activity using varied visual aids and types of equipment as preparation for the geography lesson. I have created an electronic set of appliances using the Dreamweaver MX program (‘GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT', from the 1st September 2006 on the Internet), it can be a real help for the teacher in each teaching situation. The ‘GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT' is a multimedia, Internet service which can be loaded free, the teacher gets into a virtual office clicking to the different pieces (drawer, shelf, wall map, globe, laptop, Tv set etc.) the teacher can continue with the necessary school equipment. Such equipment like: lesson plans for the lessons using digital technology, photos, video clips, animation, illustrations, pieces of music, maps, collection of minerals, database, diagrams, charts, bibliography, student's books, geography lexicons, magazines

  14. Geography - Changing Faces of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanacek-Schubert, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Geography - Changing Faces of the Earth In Austria there are currently some major reforms concerning high school education underway. At our school, the Bundesgymnasium and Bundesrealgymnasium Draschestrasse, a school belonging to the Vienna Bilingual Schooling branch, we have developed a course system in which pupils can select courses and determine individually which areas of study they want to focus on. Specially devised courses have been developed which fit within the framework of natural and applied sciences but go beyond the basic curriculum in geography. At the same time the structure of the basic courses, compulsory for all pupils, was altered in order to allow for topics that are currently in the news to be dealt with sufficiently. In the basic courses of geography exogenic and endogenic forces are dealt with extensively. The main idea is to make children aware of the powers that make landscapes look the way the do now - and what their appearance may have been thousands or millions of years ago. A piece of rubble, a depression in the landscape or the way a tree may bend may serve as the key to what lies underneath earth's surface. These tell-tale signs are worth investigating, they can open up our eyes and change our perception of the world. A great focus, in particular in the 7th grade, is placed on glaciers and karst, most notably in the Alps and the Mediterranean region, whereas the 6th grade emphasizes weathering, erosion and endogenic forces in the geography curriculum. The newly installed whiteboards at our school allow for excellent visualization of subject-related aspects concerning the aforementioned topics and issues. In addition to the geography basic-course we have devised a special course entitled „Dante's Peak" which deals specifically with the endogenic forces that help shape the appearance of the earth, in particular plate tectonics, vulcanism, earthquakes.

  15. Elevated human chorionic gonadotropin levels in patients with chronic kidney disease: Case series and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Soni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Women are often subjected to serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG testing prior to diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. A positive result leads to further testing to rule out pregnancy and avoid possible fetal teratogenicity. The impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD on HCG testing has not been studied. We report a series of 5 women out of 62 with CKD, who had a positive HCG test on routine pre-transplant screening at a single transplant center. We analyzed their case records retrospectively. Despite aggressive investigation, their elevated HCG levels remained unexplained. The positive test contributed to delays in transplantation and increased overall cost of treatment.

  16. Towards human exploration of space: the THESEUS review series on cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal research priorities

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, André E.; André E. Larina, Irina; Momken, Iman; Blanc, Stéphane; White, Olivier; Prisk, Kim; Linnarsson, Dag

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The THESEUS project (Towards Human Exploration of Space: aEUropean Strategy) was initiated within the seventh FrameworkProgramme by the European Commission. This project aimed toprovide a cross-cutting, life science-based roadmap for Europe’sstrategy towards human exploration of space, especially for deepspace missions and its relevance to applications on Earth. Toaddress these challenges, relevance of space research on thecardiovascular system, the lungs and kidneys, ...

  17. Prevalence of genotoxic chemicals among animal and human carcinogens evaluated in the IARC Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C

    1989-06-01

    To determine whether genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens contribute similarly to the cancer burden in humans, an analysis was performed on agents that were evaluated in Supplements 6 and 7 to the IARC Monographs for their carcinogenic effects in humans and animals and for the activity in short-term genotoxicity tests. The prevalence of genotoxic carcinogens on four groups of agents, consisting of established human carcinogens (group 1, n = 30), probable human carcinogens (group 2A, n = 37), possible human carcinogens (group 2B, n = 113) and on agents with limited evidence of carcinogenicity in animals (a subset of group 3, n = 149) was determined. A high prevalence in the order of 80 to 90% of genotoxic carcinogens was found in each of the groups 1, 2A and 2B, which were also shown to be multi-species/multi-tissues carcinogens. The distribution of carcinogenic potency in rodents did not reveal any specific characteristic of the human carcinogens in group 1 that would differentiate them from agents in groups 2A, 2B and 3. The results of this analysis indicate that (a) an agent with unknown carcinogenic potential showing sufficient evidence of activity in in vitro/in vivo genotoxicity assays (involving as endpoints DNA damage and chromosomal/mutational damage) may represent a hazard to humans; and b) an agent showing lack of activity in this spectrum of genotoxicity assays should undergo evaluation for carcinogenicity by rodent bioassay, in view of the present lack of validated short-term tests for non-genotoxic carcinogens. Overall, this analysis implies that genotoxic carcinogens add more to the cancer burden in man than non-genotoxic carcinogens. Thus, identification of such genotoxic carcinogens and subsequent lowering of exposure will remain the main goal for primary cancer prevention in man.

  18. Promoter Hypermethylation of the EMP3 Gene in a Series of 229 Human Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Mellai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial membrane protein 3 (EMP3 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in the critical region 19q13.3 for several solid tumors, including tumors of the nervous systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the EMP3 promoter hypermethylation status in a series of 229 astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors and in 16 GBM cell lines. The analysis was performed by methylation-specific PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore, the EMP3 expression at protein level was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis. Associations of EMP3 hypermethylation with total 1p/19q codeletion, MGMT promoter hypermethylation, IDH1/IDH2 and TP53 mutations, and EGFR amplification were studied, as well as its prognostic significance. The EMP3 promoter hypermethylation has been found in 39.5% of gliomas. It prevailed in low-grade tumors, especially in gliomas with an oligodendroglial component, and in sGBMs upon pGBMs. In oligodendroglial tumors, it was strongly associated with both IDH1/IDH2 mutations and total 1p/19q codeletion and inversely with EGFR gene amplification. No association was found with MGMT hypermethylation and TP53 mutations. In the whole series, the EMP3 hypermethylation status correlated with 19q13.3 loss and lack of EMP3 expression at protein level. A favorable prognostic significance on overall survival of the EMP3 promoter hypermethylation was found in patients with oligodendroglial tumors.

  19. Integrating Hydrology and Historical Geography in an Interdisciplinary Environmental Masters Program in Northern Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Kirsten; James, April

    2016-04-01

    Research in hydrology and other sciences are increasingly calling for new collaborations that "…simultaneously explore the biogeophysical, social and economic forces that shape an increasingly human-dominated global hydrologic system…" (Vorosmarty et al. 2015, p.104). With many environmental programs designed to help students tackle environmental problems, these initiatives are not without fundamental challenges (for example, they are often developed around a single epistemology of positivism). Many environmental graduate programs provide narrow interdisciplinary training (within the sciences, or bridging to the social sciences) but do not necessarily engage with the humanities. Geography however, has a long tradition and history of bridging the geophysical, social sciences, and humanities. In this paper, we reflect on new programming in an Interdisciplinary Master's program in Northern Ontario, Canada, inspired by the rich tradition of geography. As Canada Research Chairs trained in different geographical traditions (historical geography and hydrology), we aim to bring together approaches in the humanities and geophysical sciences to understand hydrological and environmental change over time. We are teaching in a small, predominantly undergraduate University located in Northern Ontario, Canada, a region shaped significantly by colonial histories and resource development. The Masters of Environmental Studies/Masters of Environmental Sciences (MES/MESc) program was conceived from a decade of interdisciplinary dialogue across three undergraduate departments (Geography, Biology and Chemistry, History) to promote an understanding of both humanistic and scientific approaches to environmental issues. In the fall of 2015, as part of our 2015-2020 Canada Research Chair mandates, we introduced new initiatives to further address the integration of humanities and sciences to our graduate program. We believe the new generation of environmental scientists and practioners

  20. Strong Memory in Time Series of Human Magnetoencephalograms Can Identify Photosensitive Epilepsy

    CERN Document Server

    Yulmetyev, R M; Hänggi, P; Khusaenova, E V; Shimojo, S; Yulmetyeva, D G

    2006-01-01

    o discuss the salient role of the statistical memory effects in the human brain functioning we have analyzed a set of stochastic memory quantifiers that reflects the dynamical characteristics of neuromagnetic brain responses to a flickering stimulus of different color combinations from a group of control subjects which is contrasted with those from a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (PSE). We have discovered the emergence of strong memory and the accompanying transition to a regular and robust regime of chaotic behavior of the signals in the separate areas for a patient with PSE. This finding most likely identifies the regions of the location the protective mechanism in a human organism against occurrence of PSE.

  1. GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT to study geography: the homepage and reflections from the users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajtok-Tari, I.

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of the GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT is to convey structured information to teachers and pupils, as well as, professors and students of geography. This learning aid is a homepage, first published in Hungarian still in 2006 (http://netszkozkeszlet.ektf.hu), to help in orientation among the rapidly growing information on the Internet, to provide extra digitalized professional materials that are not yet available digitally and to share experiences of the teachers and professors working in the same area of interest and language environment. At present, its English version is already prepared and partly available at the same address. The GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT can be used free after registration, at present the homepage counts 2807 registered users. The interested user first enters a virtual office where the entries of the Menu can be opened by clicking at the drawer, shelf, wall map, globe, laptop, TV-set, etc. These entries are professional lesson plans using digital technology, photos, video clips, animations on physical and social geography. The homepage also mirrors pieces of music, maps, collection of minerals, database links, diagrams, bibliography, lecture notes, dictionaries, scientific and popular journals, geography games, web pages, etc. The whole set of appliances is based on Dreamweaver MX program. During the past 2.5 years some experience has been gained about the GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT in use, mainly from teachers of geography, who downloaded and responded to the questionnaire. Another source of information is the group of students in the College, where future teachers of geography are trained in a one-semester course on application of the Info-Communication Technology. From the first group, i.e. 59 active teachers of geography, 54 % use the Internet "always" or "frequently" in the classroom, whereas 75 % of them rely on it for preparation to the lessons. Before trying the homepage, these numbers were 25 % and 54 %, only. From among the listed

  2. Using Landsat time series for characterizing forest disturbance dynamics in the coupled human and natural systems of Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Cornelius; Pflugmacher, Dirk; Hostert, Patrick; Seidl, Rupert

    2017-08-01

    Remote sensing is a key information source for improving the spatiotemporal understanding of forest ecosystem dynamics. Yet, the mapping and attribution of forest change remains challenging, particularly in areas where a number of interacting disturbance agents simultaneously affect forest development. The forest ecosystems of Central Europe are coupled human and natural systems, with natural and human disturbances affecting forests both individually and in combination. To better understand the complex forest disturbance dynamics in such systems, we utilize 32-year Landsat time series to map forest disturbances in five sites across Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, and Slovakia. All sites consisted of a National Park and the surrounding forests, reflecting three management zones of different levels of human influence (managed, protected, strictly protected). This allowed for a comparison of spectral, temporal, and spatial disturbance patterns across a gradient from natural to coupled human and natural disturbances. Disturbance maps achieved overall accuracies ranging from 81% to 93%. Disturbance patches were generally small, with 95% of the disturbances being smaller than 10 ha. Disturbance rates ranged from 0.29% yr-1 to 0.95% yr-1, and differed substantially among management zones and study sites. Natural disturbances in strictly protected areas were longer in duration (median of 8 years) and slightly less variable in magnitude compared to human-dominated disturbances in managed forests (median duration of 1 year). However, temporal dynamics between natural and human-dominated disturbances showed strong synchrony, suggesting that disturbance peaks are driven by natural events affecting managed and unmanaged areas simultaneously. Our study demonstrates the potential of remote sensing for mapping forest disturbances in coupled human and natural systems, such as the forests of Central Europe. Yet, we also highlight the complexity of such systems in terms

  3. Arts and Humanities Programs in Rural America. Rural Information Center Publication Series, No. 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton-Otway, Gemma, Comp.

    This directory contains resource materials and listings of organizations, funding resources, and databases pertaining to cultural programs in rural American communities. A 67-item bibliography includes books, journals, and newspaper articles covering arts and crafts, humanities, music, festivals, theater, historic preservation, economic…

  4. Recent Trends in Human Resource Development. Japanese Industrial Relations Series 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Tadashi

    This paper discusses human resources development (HRD) in Japanese industry. Chapter I addresses changing industrial and occupational structures as a foundation for planning and constructing management strategy, especially for business restructuring. The actual situation regarding business diversification is considered, and an attempt is made to…

  5. The Cultural Geography on the III Millennium: epistemic-methodological and educational perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Correia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article puts in evidence the Cultural and Humanistic Geography and its new shapes of working with the knowledge. For such thing, it reflects about the geographic knowledge on the third millennium and the new humanistic perspectives of this lore. So that it points out the feeling and the emotion starting from the subjectivism and from the relation people have with their own living and realized space. These reflections are treated as a general and a geographical knowledge, but more particularly in a geographical sight, pointing out in this last, the categories which envolve the daily life of the local citizens, the more evident and substantials to the grasp in the positioned geographical science, as well, for the teaching of this subject. Reflects also about the position of the contemporary knowledge, as well as pointing out the possible contribution Geography may bring to the efectiveness of those. For that reason, it points some metodologic and pedagogical questions of the actual geography, reaching fenomenological grounds of the social representations, for the elaboration of one more human lore, particularly inside the geographical science, which could contribute to the project of the society at all. For this, the fenomenological vision of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty it is put in evidence, like the Moscovici’s theory of social plays. These theories go towards one humanistic geography to be built and reflected in an academic, educational and pedagogical environment.

  6. The spaces of urban economic geographies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsø Hansen, Høgni; Winther, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The paper focuses on the transformation of the industrial structure and the location dynamics on the edge of the metropolitan region of Copenhagen with the aim of explaining the rise of new spaces in the urban economic geography. The main concern of the paper is the role the transformation...... of Copenhagen. The recent changes in the economic geographies of the outer city of Copenhagen are used as a launch pad for discussing the theoretical and analytical challenges in understanding the industrial change in new urban forms....... of the outer city plays in the urban economy of Copenhagen. The centre of attention is on the changing industrial structure, the progressively higher complexity of firm location, and the division of labour that have emerged in the past decade of growth as a result of the resurgence of the metropolitan region...

  7. The Geography of Film Viewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barratt, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    While many cognitive scientists assume that the fundamental nature of human cognitive faculties is universal, recent research suggests that cognitive differences exist between Westerners and East Asians. The goal of the proposed paper is to assess the potential implications of this research for t...

  8. The emerging geographies of climate justice

    OpenAIRE

    Susannah Fisher

    2012-01-01

    Climate justice is a well-used concept within the international climate debate yet it has often remained little more than a static ideal. This paper brings together literatures on environmental justice, development processes, and the politics of scale to argue that we need to be more attentive to the emerging geographies of climate justice, particularly in the global South where climate change provokes questions of uneven development processes as well as environmental concerns. Through an ana...

  9. Geography, institutions, and compared development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Luis Vaz

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a significant improvement in the economic performance of some African countries. The resulting increased dispersion in income levels across Africa, combined with the pertinence of detecting regional role models renders an intra-African analysis more attractive. In this paper I estimate the respective contribution of institutions, geography, and policies in determining income levels in sub-Saharan Africa. I find that income per capita in this region can be explained to a...

  10. Algorithms for reengineering 1991 census geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, S; Rao, L

    1995-03-01

    "The availability of GIS [geographic information systems] technology and digital boundaries of census output areas now makes it possible for users to design their own census geography. Three algorithms are described that can be used for this purpose. An Arc/Info implementation is briefly outlined and case studies presented to demonstrate some of the results of explicitly designing zoning systems for use with 1991 [U.K.] census data."

  11. For a social geography of emerging countries

    OpenAIRE

    Fleury, Antoine; Houssay-Holzschuch, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    New economic world order, new geographies of development, new powers… A whole range of expressions has appeared in the past three decades to coin the major and multi-dimensional changes that have affected global political economics. More specifically, those expressions refer to a transition towards a multi-polar world: the domination of the West and later the Triade is now counterbalanced by the economic and perhaps political power of countries that were once called under-developed - China be...

  12. Fourier series analysis of the electrophysiological pattern of fatigue in healthy human beings, after curare administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatine, J J; Shochina, M; Mahler, Y; Gonen, B; Magora, A

    1991-08-01

    Real time computer analysis of the electrophysiological development of muscular fatigue after small doses of d-tubocurarine (TC), has been examined in anesthetized human beings. As compared to a decrease of frequency in the control measurements, previous studies have shown an increase of the frequency of spikes after TC administration. The present experiments were carried out on the biceps brachii of 8 healthy human volunteers maintained in isometric contraction against a constant counter load until complete fatigue occurred. The Fourier spectrum analysis showed a statistically significant shift to lower frequencies before, and a milder statistically non significant shift after TC. These results may indicate that under mild curarization the early phase of muscular contraction requires a higher number of large motor units and thus, at a later stage of the contraction the pool of available large motor units becomes smaller. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that mild curarization causes a state of initial muscular fatigue.

  13. REVIEW OF GEOGRAPHY DISTANCE LEARNING STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS THE THEMATIC COURSES IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur Yazıcı

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine Department of Geography Distance Learning students’ approaches towards the thematic courses in Physical Geography field in academic year 2014-2015 Spring semester. 4 Open-ended questions were asked to the students to designate the difficulties and the problems encountered when implementing the online courses. The study which was participated in 66 distance learning students was performed through qualitative analysis technique. The data were analyzed by using descriptive analysis method. At the end of the research, deficiency of map skill development and field work practices were directly related to the Physical Geography field among the problems that the students’ come face to face. Alongside of overcoming these issues, students stated that they demanded to improve communication with each other and especially the lecturers.

  14. Models in geography ? A sense to research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Brunet

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Ideas on models and modelling made a conspicuous entry into geography in the 1960s. They have since evolved, through practice and under the influence of—partly justified—criticism. No serious research can dispense with modelling as a means to reach the essential and to evaluate the divergence between singular geographical objects and the models that assist their interpretation. On two conditions, which merit further definition and exploration : models must have meaning in and through the practices, objectives and intentions of human action ; and we must know how to use models—whether tried and tested or new—to understand the structure and dynamics of singular geographical objects, and not just to infer general mechanisms from them, even though they will certainly enhance our understanding of the nature and scope of general mechanisms.

  15. Economic Geography and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Bosker, E. Maarten; Garretsen, Harry

    2008-01-01

    The physical or absolute geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is often blamed for its poor economic performance. A country's location however not only determines its absolute geography, it also pins down its relative position on the globe vis-à-vis other countries. This paper assesses the importance of relative geography, and access to foreign markets in particular, in explaining the substantial income differences between SSA countries. We base our empirical analysis on a new economic geogra...

  16. Genes mirror geography within Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novembre, John; Johnson, Toby; Bryc, Katarzyna; Kutalik, Zoltán; Boyko, Adam R; Auton, Adam; Indap, Amit; King, Karen S; Bergmann, Sven; Nelson, Matthew R; Stephens, Matthew; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2008-11-06

    Understanding the genetic structure of human populations is of fundamental interest to medical, forensic and anthropological sciences. Advances in high-throughput genotyping technology have markedly improved our understanding of global patterns of human genetic variation and suggest the potential to use large samples to uncover variation among closely spaced populations. Here we characterize genetic variation in a sample of 3,000 European individuals genotyped at over half a million variable DNA sites in the human genome. Despite low average levels of genetic differentiation among Europeans, we find a close correspondence between genetic and geographic distances; indeed, a geographical map of Europe arises naturally as an efficient two-dimensional summary of genetic variation in Europeans. The results emphasize that when mapping the genetic basis of a disease phenotype, spurious associations can arise if genetic structure is not properly accounted for. In addition, the results are relevant to the prospects of genetic ancestry testing; an individual's DNA can be used to infer their geographic origin with surprising accuracy-often to within a few hundred kilometres.

  17. The development of physical geography at the University of Ljubljana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Lovrenčak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an attempt to present the development of physical geography at the Department of Geography at the Ljubljanaćs Faculty of Arts. The last two decades, from 1989 to 2009, are discussed, trying to include all its branches,forming the Chair of physical geography during this period. The presentation of physical geographers, who worked as researchers and teachers in particular branches of physical geography, should demonstrate the way and degree of studying physical-geographical characteristics of, mainly, Slovenian landscapes.

  18. Transportation geography: The influence of Walter Isard and regional science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Stephanie E.

    . This paper explores the influence of Walter Isard, his work, and the field of regional science generally on transportation geography. It argues that Isard's impact was both subtle and significant. Regional science greatly influenced the emergence of modern transportation geography in the 1950s. Transportation themes and methods from Isard's own work provided early building blocks for transportation geography. Moreover, Isard and regional science contributed importantly to the development of the intellectual network of persons, places, and institutions that early on defined the subfield. Regional science and transportation geography have diverged in recent decades, but opportunities exist for renewed interaction.

  19. [Monoclonal antibodies of the ICO series against differentiation antigens of human lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, A Iu

    1990-08-01

    The principal characteristics of monoclonal antibodies (MCA) ICO have been presented. The MCA ICO panel includes MCA against differentiating antigens of T- and B-lymphocytes, myelomonocytes, human leukemia-associated antigens. The following MCA have been described: MCA ICO-87 against common T-cell antigen CD7, ICO-33 and ICO-80 against common T-cell antigen CD5, MCA ICO-10 against Thy-1 antigen of early thymocytes, ICO-44 against CD1c antigen of cortical thymocytes, MCA ICO-90 against CD3 antigen of mature T-lymphocytes, MCA ICO-86 against CD4 antigen of T-helper/inductor cells, MCA ICO-31 against CD8 antigen of T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells, MCA ICO-1 against nonpolymorphic antigens of HLA II class, MCA ICO-12 against CD22 antigen of B-lymphocytes, MCA ICO-30 against mu-chain of human IgGM, MCA ICO-66 against CD37 antigen of B-lymphocytes, MCA ICO-88 against antigen of activated T- and B-cells, MCA ICO-35 against lymphoblasts, MCA ICO-88 against CD38 antigen of thymocytes and activated cells.

  20. From time series analysis to a biomechanical multibody model of the human eye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascolo, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Universita di Udine, Udine (Italy); Dipartimento di Bioingegneria, CISM, Udine (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.pascolo@uniud.it; Carniel, R. [Dipartimento di Georisorse e Territorio, Universita di Udine, Udine (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.carniel@uniud.it

    2009-04-30

    A mechanical model of the human eye is presented aimed at estimating the level of muscular activation. The applicability of the model in the biomedical field is discussed. Human eye movements studied in the laboratory are compared with the ones produced by a virtual eye described in kinematical terms and subject to the dynamics of six actuators, as many as the muscular systems devoted to the eye motion control. The definition of an error function between the experimental and the numerical response and the application of a suitable law that links activation and muscular force are at the base of the proposed methodology. The aim is the definition of a simple conceptual tool that could help the specialist in the diagnosis of potential physiological disturbances of saccadic and nystagmic movements but can also be extended in a second phase when more sophisticated data become available. The work is part of a collaboration between the Functional Mechanics Laboratory of the University and the Neurophysiopatology Laboratory of the 'S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital in Udine, Italy.

  1. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Introduction to thematic minireview series: Development of human therapeutics based on induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Mahendra; Gottesfeld, Joel M

    2014-02-21

    With the advent of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology, it is now possible to derive patient-specific cell lines that are of great potential in both basic research and the development of new therapeutics for human diseases. Not only do hiPSCs offer unprecedented opportunities to study cellular differentiation and model human diseases, but the differentiated cell types obtained from iPSCs may become therapeutics themselves. These cells can also be used in the screening of therapeutics and in toxicology assays for potential liabilities of therapeutic agents. The remarkable achievement of transcription factor reprogramming to generate iPSCs was recognized by the award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine to Shinya Yamanaka in 2012, just 6 years after the first publication of reprogramming methods to generate hiPSCs (Takahashi, K., Tanabe, K., Ohnuki, M., Narita, M., Ichisaka, T., Tomoda, K., and Yamanaka, S. (2007) Cell 131, 861-872). This minireview series highlights both the promises and challenges of using iPSC technology for disease modeling, drug screening, and the development of stem cell therapeutics.

  3. Towards human exploration of space: The THESEUS review series on immunology research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jean-Pol, Frippiat; Crucian, Brian E; de Quervain, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    to maintain immune homeostasis under such challenges. In the framework of the THESEUS project whose aim was to develop an integrated life sciences research roadmap regarding human space exploration, experts working in the field of space immunology, and related disciplines, established a questionnaire sent......Dysregulation of the immune system occurs during spaceflight and may represent a crew health risk during exploration missions because astronauts are challenged by many stressors. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the biology of immune modulation under spaceflight conditions in order to be able...... to scientists around the world. From the review of collected answers, they deduced a list of key issues and provided several recommendations such as a maximal exploitation of currently available resources on Earth and in space, and to increase increments duration for some ISS crew members to 12 months or longer...

  4. A method for extracting human gait series from accelerometer signals based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mao-Jing; Zhuang, Jian-Jun; Hou, Feng-Zhen; Zhan, Qing-Bo; Shao, Yi; Ning, Xin-Bao

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied to analyse accelerometer signals collected during normal human walking. First, the self-adaptive feature of EEMD is utilised to decompose the accelerometer signals, thus sifting out several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) at disparate scales. Then, gait series can be extracted through peak detection from the eigen IMF that best represents gait rhythmicity. Compared with the method based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), the EEMD-based method has the following advantages: it remarkably improves the detection rate of peak values hidden in the original accelerometer signal, even when the signal is severely contaminated by the intermittent noises; this method effectively prevents the phenomenon of mode mixing found in the process of EMD. And a reasonable selection of parameters for the stop-filtering criteria can improve the calculation speed of the EEMD-based method. Meanwhile, the endpoint effect can be suppressed by using the auto regressive and moving average model to extend a short-time series in dual directions. The results suggest that EEMD is a powerful tool for extraction of gait rhythmicity and it also provides valuable clues for extracting eigen rhythm of other physiological signals.

  5. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY: CONSTRUCTS AND QUESTIONS RELATING TO CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Hawley

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:A series of questions are raised to prompt examination of the role and place of physical geography in the school curriculum and its relationship with science; consequently challenging teachers to consider the implications for their pedagogy. An examination of physical geography knowledge illustrates how it is constructed with a plurality of meanings, and a framework for interpreting different meanings and approaches is offered followed by critical discussion of the dominant discourses and teaching approaches adopted in schools. Contexts have played an important role in influencing how physical geography has been taught in schools and the paper discusses the merits of recent trends towards teaching physical geography via issues- based or social contexts, where physical topics are explored for social relevance rather than understanding of the physical processes and drivers. Evidence for and against this approach is outlined and questions raised about whether integrated and applied approaches to teaching physical geography dilute the quality and emphasis of learning and understanding. It is suggested that physical geography, as taught in schools, may need to catch up by adopting a less ‘fixist’ view of the physical world, by which teachers develop a curriculum and pedagogies more appropriately matched to contemporary understandings of physical geography, so enabling students to develop as more informed, critical thinkers when considering the physical world. KEY WORDS:Physical geography, schools, curriculum, pedagogy, knowledge, questions, debate. RÉSUMÉ:Une série de questions sont soulevées pour inciter examen du rôle et la place de la géographie physique dans les programmes scolaires et de sa relation avec la science ; offrant donc un défi pour les enseignants d’examiner les implications de leur enseignement. Un examen de connaissance de la géographie physique illustre comment il est construit avec une pluralité de

  6. Several Theoretical Issues on Innovation Geography%创新地理学研究的几个理论问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕拉昌; 黄茹; 廖倩

    2016-01-01

    In the 1920s, Schumpeter proposed the theory of Innovation, but this theory did not arouse the atten-tion by mainstream economists until 1950s-1960s. Though the space research of innovation had also aroused the concern of the geographers during that period, it failed to be the main areas of geography study. Since the 1980s, with "spatial turn" of human geography and emerging of knowledge economy, innovation geography has emerged as an important research area of geography, however, the research on the basic theory of innova-tion geography is still very limited, and that whether innovation geography as an independent subject is still un-der debating, therefore, those important issues concerned the discipline of innovation geography, such as the re-search object, discipline nature and tasks need to be examined further. This article argues that:Innovation Ge-ography is an independent subject studying relationship between human's innovation activities and geographi-cal environment. The innovation activities of human beings as the most important aspect of human activities have great significances to establishing the intelligent human-earth relationship system. As a branch subject of human geography, innovation geography has cross-discipline nature, because it has close relationship with the branch subject of human geography and other subjects such as political science, management science, econom-ics, policy science, urban planning and so on. We conclude the main tasks of innovation geography as follows:1) The basic theory of innovation geography;2) the regional distribution and combination of innovation ele-ments such as talents, capital, technology, etc.;3) the examination and evaluation of Innovation Milieu and in-novation ecology and evaluation;4) the survey of innovation geography and the study of the space pattern and regional effect of innovation;5) the study of innovation links, innovation networks and innovation cluster;6) the study of multi-scale innovation

  7. Presence of human papilloma virus in a series of breast carcinoma from Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Pereira Suarez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology and the molecular mechanisms related to breast carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Some recent reports have examined the role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in breast cancer. METHODS: Sixty one fresh frozen breast cancers samples were analyzed. Samples were tested for HPV by PCR, and products were automatically sequenced. Findings were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics. RESULTS: The HPV DNA prevalence in the breast cancer samples was 26% (16/61. Clinical parameters were not statistically associated with HPV presence (p>0.05 χ(2 test. Sequence analysis in a subgroup of cases indicates the prevalence of low risk HPV11, followed by high risk HPV16. We found no HPV transcriptional activity. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated for the first time in Argentina the presence of HPV in a proportion of the malignant breast tissues. This finding suggests that HPV may have a biological significance in breast carcinogenesis.

  8. Geo-Bibliometric Mapping of French Geography: An Examination of Geography Dissertations Produced in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herubel, Jean-Pierre V. M.

    2005-01-01

    French geography dissertations for the years 1985-2002 were examined for their salient characteristics in terms of degree production, dissertation type, institutional affiliation, and geographical reach. These dissertations offer a rich base of research conducted in a country known for its innovative geographical research and tradition. Particular…

  9. Regeneration of human bones in hip osteonecrosis and human cartilage in knee osteoarthritis with autologous adipose-tissue-derived stem cells: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Jaewoo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This is a series of clinical case reports demonstrating that a combination of percutaneously injected autologous adipose-tissue-derived stem cells, hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma and calcium chloride may be able to regenerate bones in human osteonecrosis, and with addition of a very low dose of dexamethasone, cartilage in human knee osteoarthritis. Case reports Stem cells were obtained from adipose tissue of abdominal origin by digesting lipoaspirate tissue with collagenase. These stem cells, along with hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma and calcium chloride, were injected into the right hip of a 29-year-old Korean woman and a 47-year-old Korean man. They both had a history of right hip osteonecrosis of the femoral head. For cartilage regeneration, a 70-year-old Korean woman and a 79-year-old Korean woman, both with a long history of knee pain due to osteoarthritis, were injected with stem cells along with hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma, calcium chloride and a nanogram dose of dexamethasone. Pre-treatment and post-treatment MRI scans, physical therapy, and pain score data were then analyzed. Conclusions The MRI data for all the patients in this series showed significant positive changes. Probable bone formation was clear in the patients with osteonecrosis, and cartilage regeneration in the patients with osteoarthritis. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes, subjective pain, and functional status all improved. Autologous mesenchymal stem cell injection, in conjunction with hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma and calcium chloride, is a promising minimally invasive therapy for osteonecrosis of femoral head and, with low-dose dexamethasone, for osteoarthritis of human knees.

  10. Toxic megacolon and human Cytomegalovirus in a series of severe ulcerative colitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuoli, Valeria; Rizzuto, Maria Rosa; Gallo, Elena; Orlando, Ambrogio; Cottone, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection has been reported to be a cause of refractory ulcerative colitis (UC). Toxic megacolon (TM) is a rare but severe complication of an acute attack of UC. Aim of this study is to evaluate in a case-control study the association between HCMV and TM. All patients who were admitted at Medicine Department of V. Cervello Hospital in Palermo (tertiary referral center) for a severe UC flare-up complicated by the onset of TM (diameter of the transverse colon>6 cm) between January 1990 and November 2011 were identified through the electronic database. A total of 24 consecutive patients (16 male/8 female) with TM were identified. Each case of TM were individually matched by sex, age, extent of the underlying disease to 24 severe UC controls who did not develop TM. A further non matched control population of 48 severe UC was included. Haematoxilin and eosin stain, immunohistochemical procedure and nested polymerase chain reaction were performed to detect HCMV genes and proteins on rectal biopsies or surgical specimens. Pp65 antigenemia was performed in order to diagnose any possible systemic infection. HCMV frequency was compared between patients with and without TM during follow-up, using Fisher's Exact test. HCMV was detected in histological specimens of 11 patients (46%) with TM compared to 2 (9%) severe UC matched controls (P = 0.0078) and 7 (14%) unmatched controls (p = 0,003). In severe colitis the presence of HCMV is more frequently associated with TM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Human Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Adults: A Multicenter Case Series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingyu Tan

    Full Text Available Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP caused by human adenovirus (HAdV, especially HAdV type 55 (HAdV-55 in immunocompetent adults has raised increasing concerns. Clinical knowledge of severe CAP and acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by HAdV-55 is still limited, though the pathogen has been fully characterized by whole-genome sequencing.We conducted a multicentre retrospective review of all consecutive patients with severe CAP caused by HAdV in immunocompetent adults admitted to the Emergency Department Intensive Care Unit of two hospitals in Northern China between February 2012 and April 2014. Clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, treatments and outcomes of these patients were collected and analyzed.A total of 15 consecutive severe CAP patients with laboratory-confirmed adenovirus infections were included. The median age was 30 years and all cases were identified during the winter and spring seasons. HAdV-55 was the most frequently (11/15 detected HAdV type. Persistent high fever, cough and rapid progression of dyspnea were typically reported in these patients. Significantly increased pneumonia severity index (PSI, respiratory rate, and lower PaO2/FiO2, hypersensitive CRP were reported in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.013, 0.022, 0.019 and 0.026, respectively. The rapid development of bilateral consolidations within 10 days after illness onset were the most common radiographic finding, usually accompanied by adjacent ground glass opacities and pleural effusions. Total mortality was 26.7% in this study. Corticosteroids were prescribed to 14 patients in this report, but the utilization rate between survivors and non-survivors was not significant.HAdV and the HAdV-55 sub-type play an important role among viral pneumonia pathogens in hospitalized immunocompetent adults in Northern China. HAdV should be tested in severe CAP patients with negative bacterial cultures and a lack of response to antibiotic

  12. Geography program, design, structure and operational strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    The geography program is designed to move systematically toward a capability to increase remote sensing data into operational systems for monitoring land use and related environmental change. The problems of environmental imbalance arising from rapid urbanization and other dramatic changes in land use are considered. These overall problems translate into working level problems of establishing the validity of various sensor-data combinations that will best obtain the regional land use and environmental information. The goal, to better understand, predict, and assist policy makers to regulate urban and regional land use changes resulting from population growth and technological advancement, is put forth.

  13. Geography influences microsatellite polymorphism diversity in Amerindians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlrausch, Fabiana B; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Petzl-Erler, M Luiza; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Salzano, Francisco M; Hutz, Mara H

    2005-04-01

    Data related to 15 short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are reported for four South American Indian populations, and integrated with previous Brazilian Indian results. Overall heterozygosities varied significantly among groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.002). The lowest levels of heterozygosity were observed in the Ache, Ayoreo, and Surui, an expected finding considering their isolation and ethnohistory. Genetic distance and gene diversity analyses suggested that geography was a good predictor of genetic affinity among these Native Americans. New evidence from this study supports the hypothesis that the Ache population descends from a Ge group that preceded the Guarani colonization of Paraguay.

  14. Towards a geography of emotional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2016-09-01

    This article is a forum response to a research article on self-reporting methods when studying discrete emotions in science education environments. Studying emotions in natural settings is a difficult task because of the complexity of deciphering verbal and non-verbal communication. In my response I present three main points that build on insights mainly from philosophy and anthropology. The three points are: first, the significance of connecting the visible and measurable with the invisible and intangible; second, what it means to think about the practices of knowing; and third, an argument to map out a geography of analysis that takes also into account who or what emotions are directed at.

  15. Polish electoral geography and its methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Rykiel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the understanding of electoral geography between social sciences are discussed in the article. Main fields and spatial scales of Polish electoral geography are identified. Main methods of multidimensional statistics are discussed. A necessity of a proper choice, based on theories of voting behaviour, of explaning variables to statistical models are emphasised. Regression analysis indicates only a formal usefulness in electoral geography, for quantitative relationships between variables in the model can be evidenced, which may be meaningless not only essentially, but even statistically. The application of canonical analysis in electoral geography brought a methodological turning-point to the statistical approach. This method allowed to combine: (1 the foundation of the selection of input variables on theories of voting behaviour; (2 the analysis of dependence of the electoral results on socio-economic characteristics of areas; (3 an identification of electoral options; (4 a quantification of the role of the historical heritage in the contemporary voting behaviour; and (5 the analysis of the stability of the electoral space. A well grounded opinion was weakened about the general competitiveness of right- and left-wing parties in Poland’s political space. Parties with similar rather than different programmes compete in given areas. It was indicated that elections have only formal influence on the structure of Parliament while the electoral system is decisive. Electoral, including territorial, manipulations also play their part. The empirical analysis indicated that Poland’s political space is polarised between the right-wing-oriented areas of the south-eastern half of the country and the left-wing-oriented areas of the north-western half. The political competition between the left and the right operates merely on the national scale, while it is not reflected territorially.The quantification of the influence of the nineteenth

  16. Geographical Values, the Values of Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The debates of the twenty-first century render extremely topical the questions that the discipline of geography was asking at the time of its emergence as a scientific curiosity—but by reversing them:  from the theory of the effects of climate on the psychology of peoples at the time of Montesquieu, we have moved to the anthropogenic construction of the greenhouse effect and of global warming, from development according to the proximity of  differences in region, landscape and culture, we sli...

  17. Music Regions and Mental Maps: Teaching Cultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobe, Hunter; Banis, David

    2010-01-01

    Music informs understandings of place and is an excellent vehicle for teaching cultural geography. A study was developed of geography students' perception of where music genres predominate in the United States. Its approach, involving mental map exercises, reveals the usefulness and importance of maps as an iterative process in teaching cultural…

  18. GIS Adoption among Senior High School Geography Teachers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chi, Yu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the adoption of geographic information system (GIS) knowledge and skills through in-service training for high school geography teachers in Taiwan. Through statistical analysis of primary data collected from a census of Taiwan's high school geography teachers, it explores what motivates these teachers to undertake GIS…

  19. Teaching Critical Thinking in World Regional Geography through Stakeholder Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziarto, Kristin M.; McCarthy, Linda; Padilla, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a stakeholder debate based on a real-world case of regional construction--that of Turkey's application to join the European Union--improved students' critical thinking in an introductory world regional geography course. Such courses are a staple offering among US geography departments, and often the only exposure of non-majors to geographic…

  20. Population and Pedagogy: The Geography Classroom after Malthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Argues that introductory texts in population geography overlook many important issues and current debates. Suggests that teaching population geography would benefit from reading and discussing Malthus' actual words; examining fertility dynamics and influences on reproductive choice; and considering gender issues. Presents a classroom activity to…

  1. A Possibilist Analysis of the Geography National Curriculum in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David; Hopkin, John

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the national curriculum for geography as it has evolved in England since its inception in 1991 following the Education Reform Act of 1988. Whilst the main contents of our original analysis are provided by way of a table, enabling the reader ready access to the broad trends we identify in how geography has been…

  2. GIS Adoption among Senior High School Geography Teachers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chi, Yu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the adoption of geographic information system (GIS) knowledge and skills through in-service training for high school geography teachers in Taiwan. Through statistical analysis of primary data collected from a census of Taiwan's high school geography teachers, it explores what motivates these teachers to undertake GIS…

  3. Teaching Physical Geography with Toys, Household Items, and Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Laura; Pankratz, Mary Jo; Alberts, Heike

    2014-01-01

    While many college physical geography instructors already use a wide variety of creative teaching approaches in their classes, others have not yet been exposed to teaching with toys, household items, or food. The goal in this article is to present some ideas for teaching college-level physical geography (weather/climate and geomorphology) for…

  4. The Pedagogical Implications of a Futures Program in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Robert

    The intent of this paper is to provide geography educators and researchers with insights into creating a "geography of the future." Among the insights of major interest to geographers (including students, teachers, researchers, and other professional geographers) are that altered states of consciousness (such as often brought on by hallucinogens)…

  5. Bridging Geography and Education for Sustainable Development: A Korean Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Douglas R.; Tschapka, Johannes M.

    2017-01-01

    There is an apparent disconnect between geography and education for sustainable development (ESD), with geography underrepresented in publications and curricula related to sustainability though the discipline embraces the need to foment positive change. To bridge this schism, this article introduces advances in education for sustainable…

  6. Factors Strengthening School Geography's Curricular Position in the Nineteenth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zachary A.; Boehm, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the evolution of geography in the United States' K-12 education system throughout the Nineteenth Century to understand the causes of variations, shifts in focus, and relative importance placed on geography. A broad theoretical framework, based on the work of sociologists of education and education…

  7. Australia in German Geography Textbooks for Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Berta

    2007-01-01

    German Geography textbooks are structured using the principle of "Systematic Geography based on a regional example" that is predominant in Germany. Compared to other macroregions such as Europe, North America, Africa, or Asia, however, Australia is presented less frequently in school textbooks. Those textbooks which deal with Australia…

  8. Australia in German Geography Textbooks for Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Berta

    2007-01-01

    German Geography textbooks are structured using the principle of "Systematic Geography based on a regional example" that is predominant in Germany. Compared to other macroregions such as Europe, North America, Africa, or Asia, however, Australia is presented less frequently in school textbooks. Those textbooks which deal with Australia…

  9. Geography Teachers and Curriculum Making in "Changing Times"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the controls and influences over geography teachers' curriculum making. A tension is identified between the teacher's agency to "make" a geography curriculum and a controlling social-economic climate of accountability, performance pressure and technological change which limits the teacher's agency. The paper argues…

  10. Some Thoughts about a New International Geography Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schee, Joop; Notte, Henk; Zwartjes, Luc

    2010-01-01

    An important question for geography teachers all over the world is how to define, stimulate and test geographic literacy. Although modern technology is no guarantee of quality, it offers new possibilities for teaching and testing, as can be seen in contemporary geography learning/teaching units using digital maps and interactive tests. Tests such…

  11. Some Perceptions of English Geography Textbook Authors on Writing Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Catling, Simon

    2016-01-01

    There has been much research into the nature and uses of school geography textbooks as teaching resources, yet the perceptions of their authors have been neglected. This study investigated the perspectives of a sample of authors of English primary and secondary school geography textbooks on their experiences as textbook authors. It enquired into…

  12. Experiencing Cultural Geography in the Birthplace of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, John

    2014-01-01

    Over time, fewer and fewer geography scholars have the opportunity to actually engage in fieldwork. This article summarizes a field experience shared by a group of geography faculty and students who traveled through the Mississippi Delta endeavoring to study the dynamic nature of the region's blues music and culture. This endeavor entailed…

  13. The New Era of Geography Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shuichi

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes the recent changes in the highly centralized national geography curriculum in Japan. Prominent reforms include the implementation of environmental studies in the elementary schools and a broader emphasis, across the curriculum, on world geography. In teacher education, emphasis is now placed on teaching skills rather than subject…

  14. Introduction of Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1.1 General information Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography(XIEG),Chinese Academy of Sciences(CAS),was established on 7 July,1998,by merging of two previously existing institutes of CAS,namely Institute of Geography (IOG,established in 1961)and Institute of Biology,Pedology and Desert Research(IBPDR,established in 1965).

  15. The Matter of Geography in Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2015-01-01

    Geographical imaginations are absolutely vital to make sense of sustainability challenges. Yet, a number of studies reveal that geography education has been slow in integrating issues of sustainability into curricula. Geography is particularly interesting in the context of ESD, due to its traditi...

  16. Australian Primary In-Service Teachers' Conceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Lou

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the second part of a two pronged qualitative investigation that examines the ways in which Australian primary teachers conceptualise geography and geography teaching. In the first part of the project, 47 pre-service primary teachers were surveyed. In this paper, I draw on interviews with six in-service primary teachers to…

  17. European Geography Higher Education Fieldwork and the Skills Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Glenda P.; Speake, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration focuses on skill acquisition as a means of improving student employability and fieldwork is considered to be a pivotal teaching method for geography students to obtain such skills. This paper presents results from a major substantive survey of European geography academics and students which investigated their perspectives…

  18. Influence of the geographical curriculum on competences of geography teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Resnik Planinc

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the influence of geographical curriculum on competences of geography teacher. It is focused on complex and symbiotic relation between curriculum and achieved and recommended competences of geography teacher and their importance for geographical education. The competences should therefore be derived from the theories, concerning values, knowledge, curriculum and whole educational process, which underpin good pedagogical practice.

  19. The Geography Teacher. Volume 6, Number 2, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geography Teacher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "The Geography Teacher" provides hands-on reference and educative material for K-12 Geography teachers. The journal also pioneers innovative ideas for contemporary teaching methods, including lesson plans. This issue contains the following: (1) Census in Schools Program (census.gov); (2) Ask Dr. de Blij (Dr. Harm de Blij); (3) Eritrea:…

  20. The Geography Teacher. Volume 5, Number 1, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geography Teacher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "The Geography Teacher" provides hands-on reference and educative material for K-12 Geography teachers. The journal also pioneers innovative ideas for contemporary teaching methods, including lesson plans. This issue contains the following: (1) Ask Dr. de Blij (Dr. Harm de Blij); (2) Around the World in Eighty Days (Donald P. Albert);…

  1. Geography and Creativity: Developing Joyful and Imaginative Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffham, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is a complex and contested notion but is now widely recognised as a feature of learning across the curriculum. This article explores how primary geography teaching can be enriched by creative practice. It goes beyond simply suggesting imaginative ways to devise geography lessons, to outline a pedagogy which places children at the heart…

  2. Geography Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmenli, Yurdal; Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    This study scrutinizes geography teachers' attitude and belief levels regarding classroom management. As a matter of fact, classroom management is one of the prominent areas emphasized by all educators. Descriptive correlational survey model was used in the study. Study group includes 58 geography teachers working in Sivas province during the…

  3. European Geography Higher Education Fieldwork and the Skills Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Glenda P.; Speake, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration focuses on skill acquisition as a means of improving student employability and fieldwork is considered to be a pivotal teaching method for geography students to obtain such skills. This paper presents results from a major substantive survey of European geography academics and students which investigated their perspectives…

  4. Experiencing Cultural Geography in the Birthplace of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, John

    2014-01-01

    Over time, fewer and fewer geography scholars have the opportunity to actually engage in fieldwork. This article summarizes a field experience shared by a group of geography faculty and students who traveled through the Mississippi Delta endeavoring to study the dynamic nature of the region's blues music and culture. This endeavor entailed the…

  5. Music Regions and Mental Maps: Teaching Cultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobe, Hunter; Banis, David

    2010-01-01

    Music informs understandings of place and is an excellent vehicle for teaching cultural geography. A study was developed of geography students' perception of where music genres predominate in the United States. Its approach, involving mental map exercises, reveals the usefulness and importance of maps as an iterative process in teaching cultural…

  6. Bridging Geography and Education for Sustainable Development: A Korean Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Douglas R.; Tschapka, Johannes M.

    2017-01-01

    There is an apparent disconnect between geography and education for sustainable development (ESD), with geography underrepresented in publications and curricula related to sustainability though the discipline embraces the need to foment positive change. To bridge this schism, this article introduces advances in education for sustainable…

  7. Relaxing Hukou : Increased labor mobility and China's economic geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Maarten; Brakman, Steven; Garretsen, Harry; Schramm, Marc

    2012-01-01

    China's Hukou system poses severe restrictions on labor mobility. This paper assesses the possible consequences of relaxing these restrictions for China's internal economic geography. We base our analysis on a new economic geography (NEG) model. First, we estimate the important model parameters usin

  8. The Turkish Geography Teaching Program (2005) and Technology Use in Geography Courses: An Overview of High School Teachers' Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, Suleyman

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the importance and use of technology in geography courses, what the 2005 geography teaching program changed in terms of technology and some of the factors preventing the effective use of technology from teachers' perspectives. The research outcomes suggested that, despite the fact that there is a common consensus among…

  9. Visualizing Multiple Variables Across Scale and Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay

    2016-01-01

    Comparing multiple variables to select those that effectively characterize complex entities is important in a wide variety of domains - geodemographics for example. Identifying variables that correlate is a common practice to remove redundancy, but correlation varies across space, with scale and over time, and the frequently used global statistics hide potentially important differentiating local variation. For more comprehensive and robust insights into multivariate relations, these local correlations need to be assessed through various means of defining locality. We explore the geography of this issue, and use novel interactive visualization to identify interdependencies in multivariate data sets to support geographically informed multivariate analysis. We offer terminology for considering scale and locality, visual techniques for establishing the effects of scale on correlation and a theoretical framework through which variation in geographic correlation with scale and locality are addressed explicitly. Prototype software demonstrates how these contributions act together. These techniques enable multiple variables and their geographic characteristics to be considered concurrently as we extend visual parameter space analysis (vPSA) to the spatial domain. We find variable correlations to be sensitive to scale and geography to varying degrees in the context of energy-based geodemographics. This sensitivity depends upon the calculation of locality as well as the geographical and statistical structure of the variable.

  10. Understanding News Geography and Major Determinants of Global News Coverage of Disasters

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Haewoon

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we reveal the structure of global news coverage of disasters and its determinants by using a large-scale news coverage dataset collected by the GDELT (Global Data on Events, Location, and Tone) project that monitors news media in over 100 languages from the whole world. Significant variables in our hierarchical (mixed-effect) regression model, such as the number of population, the political stability, the damage, and more, are well aligned with a series of previous research. Yet, strong regionalism we found in news geography highlights the necessity of the comprehensive dataset for the study of global news coverage.

  11. Meeting the Challenge of Systemic Change in Geography Education: Lucy Sprague Mitchell's Young Geographers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    The history of K-12 geography education has been characterized by recurrent high hopes and dashed expectations. There have, however, been moments when the trajectory of geography education might have changed to offer students the opportunity to develop a thorough working knowledge of geography. Lucy Sprague Mitchell's geography program developed…

  12. Glycolipid core structure switching from globo- to lacto- and ganglio-series during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of TERA-2-derived human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenderson, B A; Andrews, P W; Nudelman, E; Clausen, H; Hakomori, S

    1987-07-01

    We have analyzed the glycolipid markers of a recently cloned human embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line, NTERA-2, which differentiates extensively into a variety of somatic cell types when exposed to retinoic acid. These tumor cells provide a model system that can be used to study the ontogeny of glycolipid diversity during human embryonic development. Glycolipid antigens were identified by cell surface immunofluorescence and thin-layer chromatography immunostaining using a comprehensive set of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies. Undifferentiated NTERA-2 cells were found to express predominantly globo-series glycolipids, including Gb3, Gb5 (IV3GalGb4), globo-ganglioside (IV3NeuAc alpha 2----3GalGb4), globo-H (IV3Fuc alpha 1----2GalGb4), and globo-A (IV3GalNAc alpha 1----3[Fuc alpha 1----2]GalGb4). When NTERA-2 cells were induced to differentiate by culturing in the presence of 10(-5) M retinoic acid, a remarkable shift of cellular glycolipids from globo-series to lacto- and ganglio-series was observed: Globo-series structures declined, particularly during the period 7-20 days after first exposure to retinoic acid, while lacto-series structures, including fucosyl alpha 1----3 type 2 chain (Lex) and sialosyl type 2 chain, and ganglio-series structures, including GM3, GD3, 9-O-acetyl-GD3, GM2, GD2, and GT3, increased. The presence of globo-A and globo-H as the major ABH blood group antigens in undifferentiated NTERA-2 cells suggests that globo-series blood group antigens are embryonic antigens, synthesis of which switches to lacto-series during human development. Two-color immunofluorescence analysis indicated preferential expression of several ganglio- and lacto-series antigens on different subsets of differentiated cells and permitted the relationship of these subsets to the development of neurons in NTERA-2 cultures to be determined. The results suggest that glycosyltransferase, particularly those involved in controlling glycoconjugate core structure assembly

  13. Understanding Human Development Potentials and Demands for Greenhouse Gas Emissions:with Empirical Analysis using time series and cross-sectional data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jiahua

    2004-01-01

    Based on an investigation of the meaning of development, the neo-dassical economic approach to development, and the post-welfarist theory of development, this paper proposes a conceptual framework for understanding human development potentials, while undertaking empirical analysis using cross-sectional and time series data on human development. Human development is associated with basic necessities for subsistence, the quality of life,and political and civil rights, in addition to income indicators. Our analysis suggests that the concept of human development potentials has two dimensions:the rights of development and limits to human development. Both are largely ignored in the neoclassical theory of development. However, human development is not unbounded, which approaches to a relatively fixed constant at given economic,technological and institutional conditions. This conceptual understanding is supported by results from the empirical examination of the relationships between demands for carbon emissions and other elements of human development.

  14. A phenomenographic analysis of elementary teacher candidates' conceptions of geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Brian D.

    A phenomenographic analysis of elementary teacher candidates attending a large university in north Texas was conducted during the Spring and Fall of 2007. The research study was conducted in two phases with a total of 150 participants. Analysis of the data sought to describe the diversity of conceptions of geography as well as the diversity of conceptions of learning geography held by this participant group. Three conceptions of geography emerged from the data analysis. Two of the three conceptions represent a surface (or shallow) conception of geography and one conception was interpreted to be relational in nature. Four conceptions of learning of geography were found. One of these conceptions of learning geography represents the highest level of phenomenographic categorization: "growing or changing as a person or teacher." Overall the data suggests that the participants of the study have a more advanced understanding of pedagogy than of the content of geography. This apparent disconnect between the conceptions of the content of a subject and the conceptions of learning that subject has not been previously reported in the academic literature.

  15. Adaptive Fourier series modeling of time-varying evoked potentials: study of human somatosensory evoked response to etomidate anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, N V; Vaz, C A; McPherson, R W; Hanley, D F

    1991-01-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) have traditionally been analyzed in time domain, with amplitude and latency of various signal components used in clinical interpretation. A new approach, called adaptive Fourier series modeling (FSM), is presented here. Dynamic changes in magnitudes of Fourier coefficients are analyzed for diagnostic purposes. In order to estimate the time-varying changes in the Fourier coefficients of noisy signals, a least mean-square filtering algorithm is applied. Results of computer simulations as well as experimental data are presented. Time-varying trends are presented in a new compressed evoked spectrum format. These techniques are applied to the study of alterations in human somatosensory EPs caused by the intravenous administration of etomidate during neurosurgical procedures. Amplitude increases of the order of 200-500% occurring within a time span of about 100 sec were captured. Due to its superior convergence properties, the adaptive FSM technique estimates more rapid changes in amplitude and latency than exponentially weighted averaging or moving window averaging schemes.

  16. Natural vs human-induced changes at the Tauranga Harbour area (New Zealand): a time -series acoustic seabed classification comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capperucci, Ruggero Maria; Bartholomä, Alexander; Renken, Sabrina; De Lange, Willem

    2013-04-01

    The Tauranga Harbour Bay (New Zealand) is a mesotidal estuary system, enclosed by the Matakana barrier island. It hosts the leading export port in New Zealand and the second largest import port by value. Coastal changes are well documented over the last decades, mainly at the southern entrance of the area, between Matakana Island and Mt. Maunganui. It is an extremely dynamic environment, where natural processes are strongly influenced by human activities. In particular, the understanding of the recent evolution of the system is crucial for policymakers. In fact, the cumulative impact due to the maintenance of the port (mainly dredging activities, shipping, facilities construction, but also increasing tourism) and its already approved expansion clashes with the claim of the local Maori communities, which recently leaded to a court action. A hydroacoustic multiple-device survey (Side-scan Sonar SSS, Multibeam Echo-sounder MBES and Single Beam Echo-sounder) coupled with sediment sampling was carried out in March 2011 over an area of 0.8 km2, southern Matakana Island, along the Western Channel. The area is not directly impacted by dredging activities, resulting in an optimal testing site for assessing indirect effects of human disturbance on coastal dynamics. The main goals were: 1. To test the response of different acoustic systems in such a highly dynamic environment; 2. To study the influence of dredging activities on sediment dynamics and habitat changes, by means of comparing the current data with existing ones, in order to distinguish between natural and human induced changes Results demonstrate a good agreement between acoustic classifications from different systems. They seem to be mainly driven by the sediment distribution, with a distinctive fingerprint given by shells and shell fragments. Nevertheless, the presence of relevant topographic features (i.e. large bedform fields) influences swath-looking systems (SSS and MBES). SSS and MBES classifications tend

  17. Essential maths skills for AS/A-level geography

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Don't let your students miss out on easy marks; help them improve their skills and feel confident about the maths they need for AS/A-level Geography with this essential guide. If your students struggle with student t-test or Spearman rank correlation, this is the book for them. This textbook companion will improve students' essential maths skills for geography, whichever awarding body specification you're following. You can use it throughout the course, whenever you feel your students need some extra help. - Develop understanding of both maths and geography using worked examples and

  18. (Hardly anyone listening? Writing silent geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Boyd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1984, J. Douglas Porteous challenged the geography world to silence. True geographical appreciation cannot be expressed in prose; the logical conclusion is for geographers to be silent. Given that they cannot be silent, Porteous advocated nontraditional writing, such as poetry. In 1994, Paul Cloke illustrated the power of reflective narrative for a geographer grappling to understand the world. In 1998, I started writing geographic poetry. In 2012, I draw these strands together in this reflective essay, drawing on a poetic journey over a decade old now. Can I reflect a sense of place or place-making that transcends traditional geographical expression? Did Porteous truly open a geographic window otherwise closed to me? I conclude the poetry does create geographical sense and sensibility, but more as constructed possibilities than as objective realities. The poetry provides glimpses into the experiences of geographical displacement encountered by many New Australians, and thus may best be considered as metageographical expressions.

  19. STUDY ON GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS’ INTERNET USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA ELIZA DULAMĂ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze the behavior of a sample of 30 third-year students of various majors of the Faculty of Geography, “Babeş-Bolyai” University of ClujNapoca, Romania, regarding the Internet use. We applied a questionnaire containing 15 items related to: Internet activities performed; length of time students spend on the Internet; devices used to access the Internet; types of materials that students downloaded, read, viewed, forwarded or posted on the Internet; types of applications used. Taking into account the time students spent daily on the Internet and correlated with other responses we concluded that their concerns were closely related to the Internet, whether it was about communication, career, or personal life.

  20. Shakespearian Biography and the Geography of Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Scheil

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The essay looks at the possibilities for reconciling two vibrant strands of Shakespeare studies. Many scholars have persuasively argued that Shakespeare’s plays were created within the collaborative environment of the London playhouses, involving a variety of influences within the performance network of early modern London. Conversely, recent archaeological work at New Place, Shakespeare’s home in Stratford, convincingly maintains that Shakespeare would have spent the majority of his time here, and not in London. Could Shakespeare have collaborated if he was not based in London? And if his primary residence was in Stratford, how could he have contributed as a collaborator with other playwrights? Resolving the contradictions between these two divergent models is particularly urgent for biographers, who have to chart a geography of Shakespeare’s writing career amid his two locales.

  1. Behind the Wall of China. Young Discovery Library Series: 42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuttil, Joelle

    This book is part of an international series developed as a collaboration among the author, the illustrator, an advisory group of elementary school teachers and an aademic specialist on the subject. This volume provides in brief and simple terms some facts about the geography, history, and daily life of China. Some of the questions this book seeks…

  2. A Fractal Perspective on Scale in Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scale is a fundamental concept that has attracted persistent attention in geography literature over the past several decades. However, it creates enormous confusion and frustration, particularly in the context of geographic information science, because of scale-related issues such as image resolution and the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP. This paper argues that the confusion and frustration arise from traditional Euclidean geometric thinking, in which locations, directions, and sizes are considered absolute, and it is now time to revise this conventional thinking. Hence, we review fractal geometry, together with its underlying way of thinking, and compare it to Euclidean geometry. Under the paradigm of Euclidean geometry, everything is measurable, no matter how big or small. However, most geographic features, due to their fractal nature, are essentially unmeasurable or their sizes depend on scale. For example, the length of a coastline, the area of a lake, and the slope of a topographic surface are all scale-dependent. Seen from the perspective of fractal geometry, many scale issues, such as the MAUP, are inevitable. They appear unsolvable, but can be dealt with. To effectively deal with scale-related issues, we present topological and scaling analyses illustrated by street-related concepts such as natural streets, street blocks, and natural cities. We further contend that one of the two spatial properties, spatial heterogeneity, is de facto the fractal nature of geographic features, and it should be considered the first effect among the two, because it is global and universal across all scales, which should receive more attention from practitioners of geography.

  3. Framework for the Analysis of Geography of Transnational Corporations Investments Abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Alexey V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a methodology for studying the geography of companies — an area of human geography that remains understudied in Russia. The authors refer to foreign direct investment (FDI studies to stress the importance of analysing individual transnational corporations. Special attention is paid to FDI statistics, including international statistics provided by IMF, OECD, and UNCTAD, the official data of central banks on FDI destinations, and information on companies’ assets by geographical segments. The article emphasises limitations of classical localisation concepts (e. g. A. Lösch’s theory and key concepts of transnationalisation (e. g. J. H. Dunning’s ‘eclectic paradigm’, R. Vernon’s ‘product life cycle’, and the ‘flying geese paradigm’ developed by Japanese authors. Dynamic localisation concepts (e. g. the Uppsala model and hierarchical/wave diffusion models are considered an important contribution to the existing theoretical framework for studying FDI geography. Various patterns of spatial d istribution of FDI are examined taking Russian transboundary investments, including those distorted by the ‘neighbourhood effect’ as an example.

  4. The use of new technology in teaching geography in the EHEA. The subjects of Social and Economic Geography, Cartography and Photointerpretation, and GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Pallarès

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last five years, the Autonomous University of Barcelona's Geography Department studies have undergone a series of structural changes. Adaptation to an online system has led to a structural change in the way in which knowledge is disseminated and materials produced, and the application of the so-called Bologna Process (adaptation to the European Higher Education Area, EHEA has brought with it the need to change certain habits in the way knowledge is disseminated, a new credit transfer system (ECTS and skills-based training. The Department has taken part in a pilot test project initiated by the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB. In this period of change, we are simultaneously offering three teaching systems: the traditional system, in line with the study plan from 2002; the Bologna Process system, started in 2005-2006, and the online system, which was started in the academic year 2001-2002 and which does not form part of the Bologna Process. Two or three years from now, there will be two systems, face-to-face and online, both of which are to be adapted to the Bologna Process. This article looks to show what these changes have meant, in terms of the experience in subjects we teach (Cartography and Photointerpretation, Social and Economic Geography and Geographic Information Systems, which provides the basis for a discussion of the pros and cons of adaptation of Geogr@phy Online and to the Bologna Process.

  5. A new tool for measuring the suckling stimulus during breastfeeding in humans: the orokinetogram and the Fourier series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloschin, L M; Althabe, O; Olivé, H; Diena, V; Repezza, B

    1998-11-01

    The Fourier series was used to analyse the oral movements recorded by the orokinetogram during breastfeeding in human babies. This is a new method that allows recording of oral movements without introducing any extrinsic element between the nipple and the mouth of the baby. The advantage of displaying suckling activity after fast Fourier transform (FFT) is that this algorithm allows storage, quantification and frequency analysis of the oral movements throughout a suckling bout, which enables the total oral activity to be measured. Two types of oral movements are found: slow high amplitude (SHA) and fast low amplitude (FLA). FLA movements may be derived from peristaltic movements of the tongue that result in tickling stimuli to the mechanoreceptors of the nipple and milk expression. The frequency bandwidth of oral movements is wider (0-8 Hz) than has been described previously (0-3 Hz) and this is due to the presence of the FLA oral movements. An indirect measurement of the energy of oral movements during suckling is obtained by the pattern of energy distribution used in each individual frequency band by oral movements. This pattern changes in relation to the periods of continuous and intermittent suckling activity. SHA and FLA oral movements are more intense during continuous suckling. Statistical analysis showed a correlation between the energy of SHA and FLA waves throughout the suckling bout, and also that the highest level of energy during suckling activity is displayed during the first 2 min. The novel tools described in this paper allow investigation of the role of suckling stimulus in reflex hormone release and other mother-infant interactions.

  6. The Use of Project Work in Undergraduate Geography Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, John; Bowlby, Sophia

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of optional group projects for third-year college-level geography students. The authors conclude that this format, besides being intellectually rewarding, teaches students valuable research, problem solving, and social skills. (AM)

  7. Rethinking postgraduate education in geography: The case of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Droogleever Fortuijn

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses reforms in postgraduate education in geography in the Netherlands in the context of Europeanization and globalization. Europeanization and globalization have resulted in challenges as well as opportunities for students and universities. In terms of internationalization, European

  8. Bifurcation theory for hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    This book contributes to an understanding of how bifurcation theory adapts to the analysis of economic geography. It is easily accessible not only to mathematicians and economists, but also to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in nonlinear mathematics. The self-organization of hexagonal agglomeration patterns of industrial regions was first predicted by the central place theory in economic geography based on investigations of southern Germany. The emergence of hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography models was envisaged by Krugman. In this book, after a brief introduction of central place theory and new economic geography, the missing link between them is discovered by elucidating the mechanism of the evolution of bifurcating hexagonal patterns. Pattern formation by such bifurcation is a well-studied topic in nonlinear mathematics, and group-theoretic bifurcation analysis is a well-developed theoretical tool. A finite hexagonal lattice is used to express uniformly distri...

  9. The Use of Project Work in Undergraduate Geography Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, John; Bowlby, Sophia

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of optional group projects for third-year college-level geography students. The authors conclude that this format, besides being intellectually rewarding, teaches students valuable research, problem solving, and social skills. (AM)

  10. Geography students learn more about risk and vulnerability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Murambadoro, M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of the outreach programme the South African Risk and Vulnerability Atlas (SARVA) was introduced to geography students of the Society of South African Geographers Students. The students were attending their annual conference hosted...

  11. Russian Socio-Economic Geography: Status, Challenges, Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynov Vasilii

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The socio-economic geography studies the processes, characteristics and patterns of spatial development. In the recent decades, however, this area of scientific investigation has failed its promise, which happened for a number of external and internal reasons. The main external reason is the development of "consumer society", which does not require the search of new space and therefore ignores the "spatial" science, geography. Internal reason is the blurring of socio-economic geography along the variety of new lines of research. The discipline was, in many ways, redundant, and unselective in the application of theoretical and methodological tools liberally borrowed from other branches of both geography and economics. The only way this discipline can return to its former glory is by going all the way back to doing proper spatial research.

  12. An Elaboration of the Fundamental Themes in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Richard G.; Petersen, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the 1984 publication of the Joint Committee on Geographic Education's "Guidelines for Geographic Education: Elementary and Secondary Schools" was a landmark in the national reform movement in geography education. (CFR)

  13. Family Migration History: A Project in Introductory Cultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrich, Barbara E.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an activity intended to heighten teaching effectiveness and student interest in college-level introductory cultural geography. By tracing their family's migration history, students experience a sense of time, place, and cultural heritage. (Author)

  14. Fourier series

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstov, Georgi P

    1962-01-01

    Richard A. Silverman's series of translations of outstanding Russian textbooks and monographs is well-known to people in the fields of mathematics, physics, and engineering. The present book is another excellent text from this series, a valuable addition to the English-language literature on Fourier series.This edition is organized into nine well-defined chapters: Trigonometric Fourier Series, Orthogonal Systems, Convergence of Trigonometric Fourier Series, Trigonometric Series with Decreasing Coefficients, Operations on Fourier Series, Summation of Trigonometric Fourier Series, Double Fourie

  15. A Comparison of Content in Syllabus-Based Senior Geography Textbooks and Standards-Based Senior Geography Textbooks in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daihu

    2011-01-01

    As a result of China's geography education reform, the Geography Standards for Senior Secondary Schools was released in 2003. Being the first kind over the past seven decades, the Standards put forward some changes for senior geography education. For the textbooks' crucial role in Chinese educational system, the changes in geographical education…

  16. The Geography Curriculum and Its Contents: Preparing for the Twenty-First Century in Argentina Geography Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Gloria Z. de

    1996-01-01

    Considers the various educational philosophies governing geography instruction in Argentina and places them in historical perspective. Contrasts the positivist and historicist approaches and discusses the current curriculum. Includes summaries of proposed changes in the curriculum emphasizing social education. (MJP)

  17. 中国地理学期刊编辑出版研究的综述%Review on Editing and Publishing Research of Geography Journals in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵歆

    2015-01-01

    通过全面收集和系统整理中国地理学类期刊编辑发表的编辑出版研究成果,总结分析中国地理期刊在期刊发展方面的特点,包括地理期刊的总体发展、主要期刊的发展历程、英文期刊的发展、中外期刊发展对比等。概括分析了中国主要地理期刊载文、人文地理学科刊文、主要期刊引文分析等方面的统计结果。最后,对中国地理期刊编辑在期刊与学科发展关系、期刊选题和办刊思路、提高期刊编辑质量、防止稿件重复发表、电脑与网络使用方法等5方面的研究做出了全面总结。%Based on the literature of editing and publishing research of geography journals, this article firstly presents the characteristics of China’s journal development, including development of geography journal groups, core journals and English journals, as well as comparisons of geography journals at home and abroad. Then we make a statistical analysis of the papers published in major geography journals, papers related to hu-man geography, and papers cited in core journals. Finally, we summarize what the Chinese geography editors have done in some aspects such as journal and geographical development, manuscript topic and idea creation, editing quality enhancement, plagiarism and duplication prevention, and computer and network application to editing and publishing. Some conclusions can be drawn in this study:Chinese geographers, especially editors, have done much research on the development and comparison of geography journals of China and other coun-tries. In recent years, the number of papers focusing on the development of geography journals has been in-creasing. The geography journal editors not only are engaged in word editing, but also record the achievements obtained in Chinese geographical research. Meanwhile, they have been tracking the international trend of disci-plinary development. Hence, in the past decades, the Chinese geography

  18. Anmerkungen zum Konzept einer Sprachengeographie = Annotations to a concept of language geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jordan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Language is without any doubt a societal phenomenon, which is in many more ways related to space. While francophone, anglophone and Spanish geography have developed a kind of language geography or geolinguistics as a subdiscipline of geography, geographers in German-speaking countries pay some attention to this fact only within ethnic geography. The paper highlights some more important spatial aspects of language and proposes to regard language geography as a subdiscipline of cultural geography which has to co-operate closely with linguistics and history.

  19. Geography of conservation spending, biodiversity, and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T R; Rankin, P S

    2016-10-01

    We used linear and multivariate models to examine the associations between geography, biodiversity, per capita economic output, national spending on conservation, governance, and cultural traits in 55 countries. Cultural traits and social metrics of modernization correlated positively with national spending on conservation. The global distribution of this spending culture was poorly aligned with the distribution of biodiversity. Specifically, biodiversity was greater in the tropics where cultures tended to spend relatively less on conservation and tended to have higher collectivism, formalized and hierarchical leadership, and weaker governance. Consequently, nations lacking social traits frequently associated with modernization, environmentalism, and conservation spending have the largest component of Earth's biodiversity. This has significant implications for setting policies and priorities for resource management given that biological diversity is rapidly disappearing and cultural traits change slowly. Therefore, we suggest natural resource management adapt to and use characteristics of existing social organization rather than wait for or promote social values associated with conservation spending. Supporting biocultural traditions, engaging leaders to increase conservation commitments, cross-national efforts that complement attributes of cultures, and avoiding interference with nature may work best to conserve nature in collective and hierarchical societies. Spending in modernized nations may be a symbolic response to a symptom of economic development and environmental degradation, and here conservation actions need to ensure that biodiversity is not being lost. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  20. China: Background Notes Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  1. Scientific values and research innovations of Human-economic Geography in construction of ecological civilization%人文—经济地理学在生态文明建设中的学科价值与学术创新

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊杰; 周侃; 孙威; 陈东

    2013-01-01

    The achievements in the forward-looking human-economic geographic studies on the interactions between natural sphere and human sphere as well as the distribution and evolution mechanism of human living and production activities on the earth' s surface have been playing a prominent role in guiding the scientific decision-making and promoting the orderly territorial development. The Eighteenth National Congress of the Communist Party of China has put the optimization of spatial development pattern as the primary task of ecological civilization; this provides an unprecedented opportunity of development and huge demand for human-economic geography. Based on the analyses of the microscopic differentiation and humanizing tendency caused by the emphasis on mechanism and process studies, and the requirements of multidisciplinary supporting system for the construction of ecological civilization, this paper discusses the comprehensive values of human-economic geography as a research field, and re-recognizes the basic categories of the subject from the aspects of factors and mechanisms, interface and process, functions and structure, scale and its conversion. Specifically, this paper discusses the topics such as: (1) the Equilibrium Model for the balance between comprehensive benefits of economy, ecology and society and the stereo system of production, distribution and consumption; (2) carrying capacity evaluation method, oriented toward the interaction between human system and natural system; (3) the theory for the emergence of territorial functions and the identification method; (4) the research innovation by which the planar space of territorial functions is incorporated into the theoretical framework of spatial structures. Finally, in response to the challenges from the replacements among different subjects, four aspects of disciplinary development path are put forward for the future, including: paying equal attention to academic and ideological contents, making

  2. The Geology of Burma (Myanmar): An Annotated Bibliography of Burma’s Geology, Geography and Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    ecology, geomechanics , human geography, and oceanography. The database provides current coverage of almost 2,000 international journals, including...Oceanographic Literature Review, Geomechanics Abstracts. See: www.elsevier.com GeoRef: see: American Geological Institute, Alexandria, VA, listed above...International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Science & Geomechanics Abstracts. 2. Volume 23, Issue 1, Pages A27-A27. ISSN: 0020-7624. OCLC

  3. RESEARCH ON GEOGRAPHY TEACHING AND TEACHER EDUCATION IN PORTUGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELSA PACHECO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the debate on the significance of geographical education as part of the development of a society in which discussion on how Geography is taught at international scale, and then addresses the intersection between research produced in the reports on t he introduction to professional practice and related study plans, c concerning the 2nd cycle of the teaching of History and Geography, in force since 2010 in Portugal. Based on the outcomes of the discussion, we will consider the research trends and whether or not they are suited to the latest recommendations on geographical education, in particular the training of Geography teachers, according to the assessed proposals which were submitted following the new law regulating the training of Geography teachers in Portugal. Among the main outcomes, we highlighted the diversity of topics addressed in the internship reports and the growing attention to new technologies in the cycle of studies under analysis, which suggests the adequacy of the future Masters in the Teaching of Geography at the University of Porto (starting in 2015/16 to the European recommendations on these matters

  4. New Geographies of Work: A Case Study from Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brita Hermelin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and analyses the geography of work, i.e., the spatial patterns in where paid work is done. The geography of work may diverge from the geography of employment when paid work is done at the premises of client organizations, during commuting, on business trips, on external meetings, at home or at other places. The particular patterns in the geography of work depend on a number of factors, possibilities and constraints. The paper takes its point of departure from the debate about how structural economic changes resulting from evolving service industries and the development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT entail new forms for the organization of paid work. Flexibility, reflexivity, flows and places are key concepts. The paper presents a case study from Stockholm that takes a workplace perspective and looks at knowledge-intensive work in a public sector organization. The empirical study analyses data from interviews, time diaries and a questionnaire. We analyse how the geography of work is the result of negotiations between different parties and in different arenas, and how this spatial pattern is the result of the character of work tasks and accessibility of ICT support. The discussion illustrates a complex picture of the coexistence of spatial fix and spatial flexibility, and how this may cause tensions but also convenient solutions for organizing and conducting paid work.

  5. RESEARCH ON GEOGRAPHY TEACHING AND TEACHER EDUCATION IN PORTUGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELSA PACHECO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the debate on the significance of geographical education as part of the development of a society in which discussion on how Geography is taught at international scale, and then addresses the intersection between research produced in the reports on t he introduction to professional practice and related study plans, c concerning the 2nd cycle of the teaching of History and Geography, in force since 2010 in Portugal. Based on the outcomes of the discussion, we will consider the research trends and whether or not they are suited to the latest recommendations on geographical education, in particular the training of Geography teachers, according to the assessed proposals which were submitted following the new law regulating the training of Geography teachers in Portugal. Among the main outcomes, we highlighted the diversity of topics addressed in the internship reports and the growing attention to new technologies in the cycle of studies under analysis, which suggests the adequacy of the future Masters in the Teaching of Geography at the University of Porto (starting in 2015/16 to the European recommendations on these matters

  6. RESEARCH ON GEOGRAPHY TEACHING AND TEACHER EDUCATION IN PORTUGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELSA PACHECO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the debate on the significance of geographical education as part of the development of a society in which discussion on how Geography is taught at international scale, and then addresses the intersection between research produced in the reports on t he introduction to professional practice and related study plans, c concerning the 2nd cycle of the teaching of History and Geography, in force since 2010 in Portugal. Based on the outcomes of the discussion, we will consider the research trends and whether or not they are suited to the latest recommendations on geographical education, in particular the training of Geography teachers, according to the assessed proposals which were submitted following the new law regulating the training of Geography teachers in Portugal. Among the main outcomes, we highlighted the diversity of topics addressed in the internship reports and the growing attention to new technologies in the cycle of studies under analysis, which suggests the adequacy of the future Masters in the Teaching of Geography at the University of Porto (starting in 2015/16 to the European recommendations on these matters

  7. M-learning in a geography lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirski, Katri

    2014-05-01

    We live in rapidly advancing world. Our homes and offices are invaded by new technological achievements. School is a part of the society and many students nowadays use smartphones and table pc's daily. Therefore it's important that schoolteachers advise them on how to manage in such a complex world of engineering miracles and show how to use this kind of equipment in their studies and everyday life. Geography is a natural substance and the best way to study nature is to see, touch and feel it directly. It's important to link the theoretical knowledge that students acquire in a classroom with a practical work in the nature. M-learning gives a great opportunity for that. M-learning, shortened from mobile learning is defined as learning across multiple contexts, through social and content interactions, using personal electronic devices. The main goal of M-learning is to bring new technological equipment to the studies for the purpose of diversifying the learning process. You can use M-learning whether students are doing individual or teamwork. By doing the practical work and thinking all the steps through the students are more actively involved in the learning process and can acquire and fix the knowledge more effectively. Personal electronic devices give the freedom to study anytime and anywhere. This means M-learning is really good for trails and other outdoor activities. In spring 2012 I did my Master's thesis about M-learning. For it I compiled a geographical trail in Tallinn city centre. There were many different geographical tasks that students had to solve. The trail included whether observation, practical work on a slope (measuring the height and the inclination of a slope), drawing a plan, questions about rocks, trees and many other tasks. The students had worksheets, where there were only geographical coordinates. They used GPS devices to get to the designated points. In every point they had a task to take a photo. After the exercises the students formed

  8. Geografilärares och niondeklassares syn på undervisningen om klimatförändringenClimate change education: Geography teachers’ and ninth-graders’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela Hermans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been increasingly recognised that education plays a key role in addressing human-induced climate change. The ultimate goal of climate change education (CCE is positive impacts on the climate through both individual and collective actions. The aim of this study is to investigate geography teachers’ and their ninth-graders’ views about CCE. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews with geography teachers (N = 13 and questionnaires for ninth-graders (N = 549 at eleven secondary schools from all parts of Swedish-speaking Finland. The results show that although the students’ attitudes to CCE is positive, it does not supply them with action competence. The geography teachers in this study largely miss the ultimate goal of CCE, pointing at the need for more effort to be made in the process of developing CCE at secondary school.

  9. Towards a theory of regional diversification : Combining insights from Evolutionary Economic Geography and Transition Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, R.A.; Coenen, Lars; Frenken, K.; Truffer, B.

    2017-01-01

    Towards a theory of regional diversification: combining insights from Evolutionary Economic Geography and Transition Studies. Regional Studies. This paper develops a theoretical framework of regional diversification by combining insights from Evolutionary Economic Geography and Transition Studies.

  10. Improving Geography Learning in the Schools: Efforts by the National Geographic Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulli, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the National Geographic Society's Geography Education Program continues to work on improving geography instruction and learning. Outlines future activities of the National Geographic Society including urban outreach and technology training. (CFR)

  11. Effect of Day-Studentship on Study of Geography among Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-04-19

    Apr 19, 2011 ... exploration to study geography, the institution of prizes on a yearly basis to .... geography enhances understanding of the world around man. ... Senior School Certificate Examination for two years, 2005 and 2006 were.

  12. Improving Geography Learning in the Schools: Efforts by the National Geographic Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulli, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the National Geographic Society's Geography Education Program continues to work on improving geography instruction and learning. Outlines future activities of the National Geographic Society including urban outreach and technology training. (CFR)

  13. A brief introduction to Physical Geography of Arid Land in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A book, Physical Geography of Arid Land in China, mainly edited by Prof. Xi CHEN from Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences has been published by Science Press in July of 2010.

  14. Foucault's geo-epistemology: Geography, spaces, places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Marinković

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses Foucault’s “spatial turn” which represented a very firm criticism of the western historical thought. By introducing “new” spatial metaphors or dispositives in the restoring Foucauldian discourse, through the concept of geo-epistemology, we identify the significance of this turn. Geo-epistemology simultaneously represents the analysis of knowledge and discourses which are formed through spaces and the analysis of space formed through knowledge/power/discourses. Of many spatial metaphors that Foucault used in almost his entire opus we single out the metaphor of the scenography of space/dramaturgy of scenes, which reflects well Foucault’s usual starting points of the analysis which he used to indicate points of break and transformation: of discourses, established practices, their effects, ritual regularities and implementations, their relationships – towards bodies, population, the diseased, prisoners, people on the margins, abnormal people. The paper names examples of discourses and practices that Foucault researched in order to demonstrate that the subjects of his analysis always had their spatialized forms, their geography, their archaeology, history, and a Nietzschean type of genealogy, i.e. spaces where they were placed and in which their speeches or technologies were distributed. The paper also discusses Foucault’s “heterotopic geography” which was only seemingly reactionary and conservative in its relinquishing of dialectal sources of a totalizing history. In the conclusion the paper stresses that, unlike Neo-Marxist responses to the hegemony of a temporal narrative, Foucault’s research of space had much more far-reaching consequences: an epistemological transformation of space and other basic geographic concepts.

  15. Creating Regional Futures: A Scenario-Based Inter- and Transdisciplinary Case Study as a Model for Applied Student-Centred Learning in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhold-Eisebith, Martina; Freyer, Bernhard; Mose, Ingo; Muhar, Andreas; Vilsmaier, Ulli

    2009-01-01

    Human geography students face changing qualification requirements due to a shift towards new topics, educational tasks and professional options regarding issues of spatial development. This "practical turn" raises the importance of inter- and transdisciplinary work, management and capability building skills, with case study projects and…

  16. [Health as an interdisciplinary construction. Example of the dialogue between geography, health and territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat-Roze, Jeanne-Marie

    2011-09-01

    It is common to confuse health and medicine, but this comparison is far too limited to promote health. Health is related to the living conditions of the individual, from all points of view: food, education, housing, work, travels, health care. Obviously the latter is part of it but is just one link in a long chain. A health condition is the result of a system of multiple interactive components at a given time and in a given place: endogenous factors (physical, biological, genetic) and exogenous ones (political, economic, social and cultural environments, features of the living conditions). The discrepancies are the results of the differentiated combinations of these factors. Some contexts associate a series of health protecting factors whereas others associate factors of vulnerability. There has always been a dialogue between, on the one hand, medicine and, on the other hand, sociology, anthropology and economy. It dates back to antiquity for geography (cf: Hippocrates treatise: on air, water and places) but it disappeared at the time of Pasteur revolution. The 20th century marks the return of geography and in 2009 a French law takes hold of one of its key words "territory". Why? What are the contributions of this discipline? Maps are a strong image of this discipline, which cannot be limited to this production. Geography also contributes to the laws of distance, polarity and flows and to the notions of scale, accessibility, network, basin, space for living, territorial dynamics.... We have here a very good opportunity to establish a dialogue between health and geography. Indeed, the perception of the territorial dimension of health issues is being reinforced both through the reading of epidemics such as SARS and flues and through the discrepancies in the health conditions. This reinforcement is related to the territorialization procedures. In the field of health care planning this discipline provides us, thanks to its tools, with decision-making diagnoses

  17. Is Singapore’s School Geography Relevant to Our Changing World?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chew-Hung CHANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available How school geography should be taught has been a longstanding issue for geography educators. In some countries, state or national level curriculum predicates how the subject should be taught in schools. This paper examines these questions in relation to existing frameworks of conceptualizing school geography, such as the International Charter on Geographical Education. School geography in Singapore has evolved from regional geography to thematic geography to systematic geography. A review of the curriculum in 2007 resulted in a distinct form of school geography unprecedented in Singapore’s education history. Today, school geography in Singapore is learnt conceptually with national level assessment designed to that end. To what extent is this evolution in curriculum design in step with changes in our world? In response to the changes in school geography, pre-service and in-service teacher training has also responded by focusing on conceptual learning and inquiry. This paper will explore the state of school geography curricula in Singapore today, and the curriculum of teacher training, with the intent to critically discuss the state of geography education in Singapore. Although geography has remained a disciplinary subject whose place has yet been disputed, the big question of why study geography in the first place needs to be answered to ensure its continued survival. In particular, school geography will be examined for its relevance to a fast changing world. This critique ends by offering a reason to how geography plays an important role in education for sustainable development, and its relevance to Singaporeans or even any citizen of the world.

  18. CONTRIBUTIONS OF GENDER FOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN SCHOOL GEOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA VICTORIA FERNÁNDEZ CASO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available  In recent years, the teaching of school geography lived a renewal both in terms of curricular requirements and in the knowledge and practices that go round educational institutions. However, beyond these changes, from academic research in teaching we are obtaining evidence about the difficulties or limits on its scope, regarding the adoption of new disciplinary perspectives, like gendered geography. Analyzing the features of a gender perspective in the teaching of school geography involves considering the fact that Argentina will expand and reformulate the regulatory framework of the educational system and move forward on legislation that relates to children and adolescents who are now considered subjects of law by establishing compulsory secondary level (Law 26.206 and the sanction of the Law of Integral Sexual Education (Law 26.150. 

  19. Education remix: New media, literacies, and the emerging digital geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha Vasudevan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores instances of youth educating themselves beyond the boundaries of school through engagement with and production of “digital geographies,” or the emerging landscapes that are being produced through the confluence of new communicative practices and available media and technologies. A framework of digital geographies, which is grounded in theories of spatiality, literacies, and multimodality, is used to analyze the social media practices and multimedia artifacts produced by two court-involved youth, who are part of an ongoing, multi-year ethnography of an alternative to incarceration program. Attention to digital geographies, and attendant communicative practices, can yield important insights about education beyond the school walls. The conclusion addresses the implications of this research for meaningful educational contexts for adolescents’ literacies and how learning might be conceptualized and designed within school.

  20. Pharmaceutical prospects: biopharming and the geography of technological expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Richard

    2012-04-01

    The paper explores the role of imagined geographies in the shaping of new technologies. I argue that the role of place in future-oriented visions of technoscience is a neglected topic in studies of the social shaping of technology. The paper proposes an approach that combines the sociology of expectations with the geography of science. It focuses on the interplay between envisaged and current geographies to highlight the recursive dynamics of place and imagination. To illustrate this approach, the paper discusses the example of biopharming, the production of biopharmaceuticals using genetically modified crops. I argue that expectations for biopharming bear the imprint of place, or rather of the places in which they are imagined, as well as those they imagine, and ultimately those they produce. I use this example to suggest how social studies of science and technology can usefully investigate the spaces, places and scales of technological development.

  1. TYPES OF SCIENTIFIC DESCRIPTIONS IN ROMANIAN GEOGRAPHY TEXTBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIORICA BLÎNDA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study will provide a brief look into the numerous aspects of description as a unit of discourse and into the/as well as into those/distinctive discourse methods. The perspectives of the proposed analysis emphasize that description as a unit of discourse is no longer denigrated and that it has regained its well-defined place within the discourse (especially within the discourse of geography as a primary unit of discourse. The analysis is based on a corpus of studies represented by texts of geography available in geography textbooks. Through this study there will be outlined a number of methods and strategies of the discursive process through description.

  2. Development and Validation of the Test of Geography-Related Attitudes (ToGRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Scott L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced the development and validation of the Test of Geography-Related Attitudes (ToGRA). The ToGRA measures student attitude on four discrete measures student attitude on four discrete scales: 1) leisure interest in geography; 2) enjoyment of geographic education; 3) career interest in geography; and 4) interest in place. The ToGRA…

  3. Gender Representation in Academic Geography in Catalonia (Spain): Towards a Masculinization of the Discipline? Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolors Garcia-Ramon, Maria; Pujol, Herminia

    2004-01-01

    In the mid-1980s Spanish geography seemed to be a success story in relation to gender and geography (Garcia-Ramon et al. , 1988 ). But in recent years this positive aspect has been less marked, at least in Catalan geography. The total percentage of women staff has remained quite steady but the male:female ratio has significantly increased among…

  4. What Is the Place of Radical/Critical Research in Geography Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Roger; Morgan, John

    2010-01-01

    In this article the value of critical research to research in geography education is considered. It raises the question as to whether the geography education community requires a wider range of orientations to research, concerned as we are with its impact on classroom practice, policy-making and future directions for geography education. (Contains…

  5. Geography Standards in the United States: Past Influences and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Heffron, Susan Gallagher; Solem, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how geography is represented and positioned in primary and secondary (referred to here as K-12) education in the United States through a critical analysis of the content and implementation of the National Geography Standards, "Geography for Life." We begin by providing context on the organization…

  6. The Australian Geography Competition: An Overview of Participation and Results 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Iraphne R. W.; Berg, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Geography Competition (AGC) was established in 1995 by the Royal Geographical Society of Queensland (RGSQ) and the Australian Geography Teachers' Association to promote the study of geography in Australian secondary schools and to reward student excellence in geographical studies. Initially focusing on students at the lower…

  7. Employing SWOT Analysis in Coursework on the Geographies of Regional Economic Development and Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafsky, Ronald V.; Sonnichsen, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    The use of SWOT analysis is a means through which geography students can investigate key concepts in economic geography and essential topics in regional economic development. This article discusses the results of a course project where economic geography students employed SWOT analysis to explore medium-sized metropolitan areas across the southern…

  8. Interactive Problem-Solving Geography: An Introduction in Chinese Classrooms to Locational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Nu Nu; Giles, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Reform in geography education, as reflected in "Geography for Life: National Geography Standards" (1994) for the U.S.A., favors a constructivist approach to learning. This study examines the acceptance of this approach among students in two upper secondary schools in China. A lesson was developed to illustrate interactive problem solving methods.…

  9. Employing SWOT Analysis in Coursework on the Geographies of Regional Economic Development and Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafsky, Ronald V.; Sonnichsen, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    The use of SWOT analysis is a means through which geography students can investigate key concepts in economic geography and essential topics in regional economic development. This article discusses the results of a course project where economic geography students employed SWOT analysis to explore medium-sized metropolitan areas across the southern…

  10. Social implications of the Human Genome Project: Policy roundtable series and journals. Final progress report, March 15, 2001 - March 15, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiguer, Erica

    2002-12-30

    This report reflects the activities of the Harvard Health Caucus at Harvard Medical School that were supported, in part, by the Department of Energy. The following policy roundtables and panels were held: Spring 2001 Policy Roundtable Series: The social implications of the Human Genome Project; Spring 2002 Policy Roundtable Series: Managing globalization to improve health; 13 February 2002 Keynote Address: The globalization of health; 25 February 2002 Healthier or Wealthier: Which comes first in the new global era?; 28 February 2002 The crisis of neglected diseases: Creating R&D incentives for diseases of developing countries; 7 March 2002 Health care education in the developing world: Bridging global and local health care practices; 20 March 2002 Building a legal framework for global health: How can the US and UN work to reduce global disparities?; 25 April 2002 The role of mass media and tobacco control efforts. Caucus organizational information is also included.

  11. The geography of recent genetic ancestry across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Peter; Coop, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The recent genealogical history of human populations is a complex mosaic formed by individual migration, large-scale population movements, and other demographic events. Population genomics datasets can provide a window into this recent history, as rare traces of recent shared genetic ancestry are detectable due to long segments of shared genomic material. We make use of genomic data for 2,257 Europeans (in the Population Reference Sample [POPRES] dataset) to conduct one of the first surveys of recent genealogical ancestry over the past 3,000 years at a continental scale. We detected 1.9 million shared long genomic segments, and used the lengths of these to infer the distribution of shared ancestors across time and geography. We find that a pair of modern Europeans living in neighboring populations share around 2-12 genetic common ancestors from the last 1,500 years, and upwards of 100 genetic ancestors from the previous 1,000 years. These numbers drop off exponentially with geographic distance, but since these genetic ancestors are a tiny fraction of common genealogical ancestors, individuals from opposite ends of Europe are still expected to share millions of common genealogical ancestors over the last 1,000 years. There is also substantial regional variation in the number of shared genetic ancestors. For example, there are especially high numbers of common ancestors shared between many eastern populations that date roughly to the migration period (which includes the Slavic and Hunnic expansions into that region). Some of the lowest levels of common ancestry are seen in the Italian and Iberian peninsulas, which may indicate different effects of historical population expansions in these areas and/or more stably structured populations. Population genomic datasets have considerable power to uncover recent demographic history, and will allow a much fuller picture of the close genealogical kinship of individuals across the world.

  12. The new economic geography: Past, present and the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahisa Fujita

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a summary of our conversation on the past, present and future of the new economic geography, which took place with the help of an interlocutor in San Juan, Puerto Rico in November 2002. Following the intro-duction, we explain what the new economic geography is, and we describe some basic models. The discussion of its various critical aspects is presented subse-quently, and the article concludes with the discussion of future issues and challenges facing the field.

  13. The Patterns of Unemployment and the Geography of Social Housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    During the last few decades in the academic field, the debate has increased on the effects of social geography on the opportunities of socioeconomic integration. On one hand, it has been discussed how the contents of the urban structure and social geography affect not only the way people interact...... system, labor markets, education and training, the research has shown the role played by place of residence in shaping individual outcomes such as unemployment. In the context of this debate the importance of territory of residence with respect to the problem of unemployment has been highlighted...

  14. THE ANALYSIS OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE FOURTH CLASS GEOGRAPHY TEXTBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANA CHIRCEV

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the analysis of the illustrations found in five different Geography textbooks in Romania. The analysis is based on several criteria: number, size, clarity, pedagogical usefulness. The following conclusions have been drawn: the illustrations are numerous; most of the illustrations are too small and unclear to be efficiently used in the teaching activity; the purpose of some materials is purely illustrative; some illustrations are overcharged with details, which prevent children from understanding them. Authors and publishing houses are advised to choose the illustrations in the fourth class Geography textbooks more carefully.

  15. The student’s new companion on economic geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Dörry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To come straight to the point, the new textbook Wirtschaftsgeographie [Economic Geography] by Boris Braun and Christian Schulz is a highly recommendable read. In pursuit of its goal to outline “a very dynamic and multifarious sub-domain of geography” [author’s translation] (p. 249, this book is mainly directed at current and prospective students of the field of economic geography (p. 6. It keeps both these promises in quite an appealing manner. Alongside an insightful introduction to the my...

  16. Values of space in the process of geography education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Resnik Planinc

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Across Europe the need for finding new methodologies for the teaching of space-related topics in primary and secondary schools is perceived. Accordingly, the author suggests possibilities for the development of geography teaching; particularly with regard to subject areas concerning sustainable development, values of space, and increasing the public awareness of both. The paper discusses the options, tendencies and potential obstacles towards the implementation of those topics into geography as well as into other curricula and looks at the differences between expectation, and the actual delivery.

  17. CONTRIBUTIONS OF HISTORICAL CRITICAL PEDAGOGY TO GEOGRAPHY TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas André Teixeira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show some contributions of historical critical pedagogy to Geography teaching. Such thoughts aim to discuss how this teaching enters school education in the context of neoliberalism. Assuming that the emptiness in Geography teaching in school education is a result of Brazilian educational policies in neoliberalism, we intend to characterize the impairment of the critical perspective on this area of knowledge and present some contributions of historical critical pedagogy to face and overcome the current order. Besides, we seek to highlight the required knowledge to achieve an education that contributes to build a different society.

  18. Free E-books Essays on Geography and GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ESRI publication ArcNews is the greatest edition among GIS publications. It is published four times a year in 750 000 copies, and there is also ArcNews Online. Its content relates to ESRI's activities and products. However, ArcNews has in recent years contained articles on trends in geography, geospatial themes and GIS written by university professors and scientists. Some of the articles were published as an e-book titled Essays on Geography and GIS in 2008.

  19. Field work in geography. Region with experience in socio-environmental conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Ensabella

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article emphasizes the importance of the geographical field work in a region with socio-environmental conflict, such us the problem with water in Sierras Chicas, Cordoba. The main focus is a pedagogical experience, the Socio-Communal Practice (SCP, performed by professors, students and assistants of the subject Rural Geography, of the Bachelor’s in Geography course of studies of the Philosophy and Humanity School (PHS, in the city of La Granja, in Colón, Córdoba. The SCP is an experience that makes the students approach the social field of the territory conflicts. It is an activity that goes beyond the extension project, since it involves all the students doing the subject. And it is also a way to combine -in our case, from the geographic work- the teaching, investigation and extension functions typical of the university students. Through the SCP, we aim to make the Rural Geography students approach the field work, with local social organizations that deeply know the problems of their cities and that work together with our investigation group. In addition, this contact together with the individual thoughts, the group discussion and the debates between the university students, will broaden, in the whole society, the knowledge about the reality in which they live and with which they struggle. This article starts by defining what it is understood by SCP. Then, taking into account our practice, we develop what we consider to be the two logics that support the field work. One refers to the building of knowledge and to the different ways of learning and knowing. The other is related to the understanding of the socio-territory conflict in the area where the practice will be done: the Mesa del Agua and La Granja environment. We include a section about the description of the experience and its results, and we conclude with some reflections made taking into account the continuity of the practice

  20. Examining the Place of Geography in the American Social Studies Curriculum and the Efforts toward an Effective Teacher Education in K-12 Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin AYAS

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper primarily focuses on locating geography education in the American secondary social studies curriculum, and then examines the American teacher education in geography. Therefore, the paper first defines the common ground between social studies and geography, followed by a discussion regarding how geography as a school subject fits in to the social studies curriculum. It next analyzes the American experience in preparing pre- and in-service geography and/or social studies teachers as there have been quite efforts to that end due to the widespread “geographic illiteracy” in the American schools. As a result, the current paper attempts to provide the interested audience with a general perspective concerning the place of geography education in the American schools, and suggests a comprehensive teacher education model based on the related literature investigated

  1. Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-Alana, L.A.; Moreno, A; Pérez-de-Gracia, F. (Fernando)

    2011-01-01

    The last 20 years have witnessed a considerable increase in the use of time series techniques in econometrics. The articles in this important set have been chosen to illustrate the main themes in time series work as it relates to econometrics. The editor has written a new concise introduction to accompany the articles. Sections covered include: Ad Hoc Forecasting Procedures, ARIMA Modelling, Structural Time Series Models, Unit Roots, Detrending and Non-stationarity, Seasonality, Seasonal Adju...

  2. A Magic Carpet Trip to Learning Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Billie M.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a series of hands-on activities for teaching about continents and oceans. Includes projects on (1) why earth is the blue planet; (2) continent names, shapes, and locations; and (3) continental drift. Discusses use of poetry, music games, mathematics, and science to interest students. Suggests ending with using maps in following directions…

  3. Railway stations and a geography of networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Oosten

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPaper presented at the 6th Annual Congress of the Netherlands Research School for Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics. The Congress took place at The Hague, December 12th 2000. This paper was published in the TRAIL Proceedings series (Delft: TRAIL Research School, October 30th 2000).

  4. The Yellowstone hotspot, Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, and human geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Despain, D.G.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Good, John M.; Morgan Morzel, Lisa Ann.

    2007-01-01

    Active geologic processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are fundamental in shaping the landscapes of the greater Yellowstone ecosystem (GYE), a high volcanic plateau flanked by a crescent of still higher mountainous terrain. The processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are volcanism, faulting, and uplift and are observed in the geology at the surface. We attribute the driving forces responsible for the northeastward progression of these processes to a thermal plume rising through the Earth’s mantle into the base of the southwest-moving North American plate. This progression began 16 million years ago (Ma) near the Nevada-Oregon border and arrived at Yellowstone about 2 Ma. Before arrival of the hotspot, an older landscape existed, particularly mountains created during the Laramide orogeny about 70–50 Ma and volcanic terrain formed by Absaroka andesitic volcanism mostly between 50–45 Ma. These landscapes were more muted than the present, hotspot-modified landscape because the Laramide-age mountains had worn down and an erosion surface of low relief had developed on the Absaroka volcanic terrain.

  5. Human induced dryland degradation in Ordos Plateau, China, revealed by multilevel statistical modeling of normalized difference vegetation index and rainfall time-series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing ZHANG; JianMing NIU; Tongliga BAO; Alexander BUYANTUYEV; Qing ZHANG; JianJun DONG; XueFeng ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Land degradation causes serious environmental problems in many regions of the world, and although it can be effectively assessed and monitored using a time series of rainfall and a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from remotely-sensed imagery, dividing human-induced land degradation from vegetation dynamics due to climate change is not a trivial task. This paper presented a multilevel statistical modeling of the NDVI-rainfall relationship to detect human-induced land degradation at local and landscape scales in the Ordos Plateau of Inner Mongolia, China, and recognized that anthropogenic activities result in either positive (land restoration and re-vegetation) or negative (degradation) trends. Linear regressions were used to assess the accuracy of the multi-level statistical model. The results show that:(1) land restoration was the dominant process in the Ordos Plateau between 1998 and 2012;(2) the effect of the statistical removal of precipitation revealed areas of human-induced land degradation and improvement, the latter reflecting successful restoration projects and changes in land man-agement in many parts of the Ordos; (3) compared to a simple linear regression, multilevel statistical modeling could be used to analyze the relationship between the NDVI and rainfall and improve the accuracy of detecting the effect of human activities. Additional factors should be included when analyzing the NDVI-rainfall relationship and detecting human-induced loss of vegetation cover in drylands to improve the accuracy of the approach and elimi-nate some observed non-significant residual trends.

  6. Constitutive modeling of the human Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) under uniaxial loading using viscoelastic prony series and hyperelastic five parameter Mooney-Rivlin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Souvik; Mondal, Debabrata; Motalab, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In this present study, the stress-strain behavior of the Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is studied under uniaxial loads applied with various strain rates. Tensile testing of the human ACL samples requires state of the art test facilities. Furthermore, difficulty in finding human ligament for testing purpose results in very limited archival data. Nominal Stress vs. deformation gradient plots for different strain rates, as found in literature, is used to model the material behavior either as a hyperelastic or as a viscoelastic material. The well-known five parameter Mooney-Rivlin constitutivemodel for hyperelastic material and the Prony Series model for viscoelastic material are used and the objective of the analyses comprises of determining the model constants and their variation-trend with strain rates for the Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) material using the non-linear curve fitting tool. The relationship between the model constants and strain rate, using the Hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin model, has been obtained. The variation of the values of each coefficient with strain rates, obtained using Hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin model are then plotted and variation of the values with strain rates are obtained for all the model constants. These plots are again fitted using the software package MATLAB and a power law relationship between the model constants and strain rates is obtained for each constant. The obtained material model for Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) material can be implemented in any commercial finite element software package for stress analysis.

  7. A Teacher's Perspective of Geography: A School Subject for Today, Tomorrow, and for All Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a retired long-time geography teacher offers his perspective on what a geography teacher needs to keep in mind when teaching geography. The author notes that geography is a useful school subject because it helps young people make their way in the world by giving them some tools to become lifelong learners. The author encourages…

  8. Geography via the Overhead Projector: Do It This Way, 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Thomas D.

    This booklet is designed to assist teachers in their use of overhead projectors when teaching geography. With the overhead technique, relationships among patterns can be suggested bit by bit on inexpensive, easily prepared overlays that are projected to sizes appropriate for a particular instructional situation. A general discussion of the…

  9. Opening the Mind? Geographies of Knowledge and Curricular Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, Hanne; Millar, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by Bourdieu's ("Homo Academicus, Polity," Cambridge, 1988; "The Logic of Practice, Polity," Cambridge, 1990) ideas of knowledge reproduction, the article presents an empirical mapping of knowledge geographies, as manifest in the curricular practices found within a single international MA programme in Denmark. Following…

  10. Substance Abuse Prevention and Geography. Teacher's Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Geographic Alliance, Storrs.

    This guide integrates themes of geography with health issues of the 1990s to encourage healthy lifestyles and promote geographic literacy. Designed for use by social studies educators and educators responsible for teaching about substance abuse and related health issues, this guide includes lessons for kindergarten through 12th grade. After an…

  11. Geography Happens: So Make It Happen through Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannangelo, Duane M.; Mealor, W. T., Jr.; Lebo, Julie; France, Nancy

    This set of lesson plans incorporates teaching the five themes of geography in using the novel, "The Pearl," by John Steinbeck. Questions about the novel are related to the themes of location, place, regions, relationships within place, and movement of peoples. One section has an annotated bibliography with other literature selections…

  12. Economic Geography and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Maarten; Garretsen, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africas (SSA) physical geography is often blamed for its poor economic performance. A countrys geographical location does, however, not only determine its agricultural conditions or disease environment. It also pins down a countrys relative position vis--vis other countries, affecting it

  13. Models of economic geography : dynamics, estimation and policy evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaap, Thijs

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we look at economic geography models from a number of angles. We started by placing the theory in a context of preceding theories, both earlier work on spatial economics and other children of the monopolistic competition ‘revolution.’ Next, we looked at the theoretical properties of t

  14. Geography Education in Asia: Samples from Different Countries and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, Suleyman

    2010-01-01

    With the maximum use of the technology such as geographic information science (GIS), remote sensing (RS), and global positioning systems (GPSs) in geography courses, along with its integrative perspective on the social and life sciences and an emphasis on student-centered education, problem solving, and sustainable and environmental education,…

  15. The Study of Geography in an Interdependent World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saueressig-Schreuder, Yda

    The importance of restructuring the discipline of geography and enhancing its role in the precollege curriculum as part of a global approach to education is emphasized in this paper. International education is seen as an essential part of high school and college education in an increasingly interdependent world. The oil crisis, the world economic…

  16. Field Trips as Valuable Learning Experiences in Geography Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowka, Amy Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Field trips have been acknowledged as valuable learning experiences in geography. This article uses Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model to discuss how students learn and how field trips can help enhance learning. Using Kolb's experiential learning theory as a guide in the design of field trips helps ensure that field trips contribute to…

  17. Themes for Teaching the Geography of the Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausladen, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Provides a framework for introducing students to the geography of the Soviet Union. Identifies basic themes for a geographical approach, including (1) advantages and disadvantages of size and location; (2) spatial impact of political economy; (3) paradox of economic development; (4) challenges of governing a multinational state; (5) integration…

  18. Place, networks, space: theorising the geographies of social movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicholls, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines how geography affects the different types of networks underlying social movements. The principal argument of the paper is that networks forged in particular places and at great distances play distinctive yet complementary functions in broad-based social movements. Not only does

  19. Technology geography: studying the relationships between technology, location and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik J.

    2006-01-01

    Operations management, international management, public policy and economic geography are scientific areas which come together in the study of international technology transfer. This study shows how each of these areas has its own central issues but also has specific parts that are relevant for rese

  20. Module Cluster: UG - 001.00 (GSC) Urban Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Wade R.

    This is one of several module clusters developed for the Camden Teacher Corps project. This module cluster is designed to introduce students to urban studies through the application of a geographic approach. Although geography shares with other social sciences many concepts and methods, it has contributed a distinctive set of viewpoints and a…

  1. Geography and Map Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on geography and map libraries and a paper on European access to biomedical databases, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "History and Current Status of the Globe Museum of the Austrian National Library" by Franz Wawrik (Austria); (2) "Earth…

  2. Determining the Cognitive Structures of Geography Teacher Candidates on "Earthquake"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Bastürk; Aladag, Caner

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the cognitive structures of the students of geography teaching department by identifying their conceptual frameworks about the concept of earthquake. A case study design from qualitative research approaches was used in this research. Sample group of the study constitutes 155 students from the Department…

  3. International business and economic geography : knowledge, time and transactions costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Philip

    This paper sketches out how the ways in which a combination of economic geography and international business approaches can shed light on the spatial behaviour of multinational companies. The emphasis of the argument here is on the nature of the knowledge content embedded in the transactions of the

  4. GEOGRAPHY AND MOOC. ANALYSING THE STATE OF THE ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Rodrigo Comino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different tools are applied to transmit Geography by universities, schools, and professionals... Nowadays, the university teaching is in a process of reflexion and evaluation about concrete pedagogical guidelines, which help to innovate and understand the actual exigencies of the information society. The use of TICs and the new methods in E-Learning are essentials, and for the Geography cannot be indifferent. This discipline was reconverted with the application of Moodle platforms or Webs 2.0. during the last decade, for example, to teach Geographical Information Systems (GIS or dense topics like Political Geography. Despite the relative novelty of MOOC (Massively Open Online Courses in the virtual academic world, today this tool represents a great achievement for the virtual and real time learning. COURSERA, EDX, FUTURE LEARN, IVERSITY, LYNDA, MOOC-Advisor Beta, OPEN2Study, SAYLOR.ORG and UDACITY are examples of international platforms, which work to design and prepare only specific courses. On the other hand, some Spanish MOOC platforms are AbiertaUGR, MiriadaX, REDUNX, UNED COMA and Unimooc. Furthermore, there are available courses about Geography (associated direct or indirectly. The creation of different topics with audio-visual materials and interesting elaborated texts, along three or four weeks (depend of course, free access and without economic costs are some characteristics of the MOOC. 

  5. International business and economic geography : knowledge, time and transactions costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This paper sketches out how the ways in which a combination of economic geography and international business approaches can shed light on the spatial behaviour of multinational companies. The emphasis of the argument here is on the nature of the knowledge content embedded in the transactions of the

  6. Contesting Europe: Representations of Space in English School Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John

    2008-01-01

    The development of national education systems was premised on the assumption that they would offer particular representations of the "national space", and school subjects such as geography and history offered pupils specific accounts of space and time. The project of European integration suggests the need for school curricula to offer…

  7. Rethinking Postgraduate Education in Geography: International Perspectives on Improving Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Janice; Foote, Kenneth; Solem, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This symposium brings together multi-national assessments of the current state of and challenges facing postgraduate education in geography. Contributors from Europe, Australia, South Africa and the USA identify ways in which restructuring of educational systems and wider political contexts affect programmes within the field. While highlighting…

  8. Thinking in a "Worldly" Way: Mobility, Knowledge, Power and Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Johannah; Kenway, Jane

    2010-01-01

    In order to enhance understandings of the international mobility of researchers and the implications of their mobility for knowledge production and circulation, we need to develop more sophisticated conceptual resources. Here we draw on and seek to develop ideas generated from literary theory and geography in order to highlight the links between…

  9. Using Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart" in Introductory Geography Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, James

    1993-01-01

    Describes use of Nigerian author, Chinua Achebe's novel, "Things Fall Apart," in an introductory geography course at the secondary school or college level. Provides a summary of the book's story, which deals with the impact of colonialism and Christianity on the culture of eastern Nigeria. Includes recommended instructional strategies…

  10. Geography Students' Assessment of Internship Experience at a Kenyan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simiyu, Robert Romborah; Okaka, Fredrick Okoth; Omondi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings of Moi University's geography students' assessment of their internship, which underscore the importance of internship in bridging the gap between theoretical knowledge and its application in the real world of work. Not only were the majority of the students able to apply geographical knowledge and skills in their work…

  11. Racetrack Mapping: Engaging Students in Mathematics and Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Calvin; Davis, Rob

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a classroom investigation of a sequence of cross-disciplinary mapping lessons undertaken by Grade Five students at Black Hill Primary, a Victorian State Primary School in Ballarat. While this activity was broadly framed around Mathematics, there were also important elements from Geography, (a new emphasis in the Victorian…

  12. Teaching gender and geography: the case of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Droogleever Fortuijn

    2011-01-01

    Feminist geography teaching in universities in the Netherlands originated 30 years ago in an academic context that counteracted this new development for ideological reasons. Nowadays, the neoliberal conditions of the market have replaced the conservative ideology that prevailed 30 years ago. Feminis

  13. Bisexuals in space and geography: more-than-queer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Geographies of sexualities mainly focusses on the lived experiences and sexual identity negotiations of gay men and lesbian women in a society based upon binary divisions of sex, gender, and sexualities. This review article wants to consider a more theoretically informed relational approach to under

  14. Where in the World of Sustainability Education Is US Geography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lee

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates latest developments in sustainability studies, sustainability education and geography's place in sustainability education, with a focus on the USA. The investigation draws on latest information on sustainability education, from a survey of the 29 sustainability degree programs in the USA and interviews with the program…

  15. Shipwreck: Using Literature and Student Imagination To Teach Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Donna Kay

    1999-01-01

    Provides a geography lesson that integrates literature by focusing on the book "Robinson Crusoe." Explains that the lesson consists of three parts that students perform in groups and individually in which they follow the adventures of Crusoe using the ship's log and excerpts from his journal. (CMK)

  16. Where in the World of Sustainability Education Is US Geography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lee

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates latest developments in sustainability studies, sustainability education and geography's place in sustainability education, with a focus on the USA. The investigation draws on latest information on sustainability education, from a survey of the 29 sustainability degree programs in the USA and interviews with the program…

  17. Ideas on How to Enliven the Teaching of Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demko, George J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides concrete ideas for increasing the interest level of elementary and secondary students in geography. States that instruction must begin with the personal interests of students, and recommends such activities as using maps to trace the "geogeneology" of students, the origins of rock groups, athletic competitions, and natural disasters. (JDH)

  18. A Road Map for Learning Progressions Research in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Niem Tu; Solem, Michael; Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of learning progressions (LP) and assesses the potential of this line of research to improve geography education. It presents the merits and limitations of three of the most common approaches used to conduct LP research and draws on one approach to propose a first draft of a LP on map reading and interpretation.…

  19. Australian Primary Pre-Service Teachers' Conceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Lou

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a survey of Australian primary pre-service teachers' experiences, conceptions and perceptions of geography. Research was conducted with two cohorts of undergraduate primary pre-service teachers; one group in second year and another in the final year of a four-year teacher education course. The findings show…

  20. Mindful Learning in Geography: Cultivating Balanced Attitudes toward Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-min; Ryu, Jaemyong

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the potential of mindful learning in geography education. A hypothesis was developed to form the research topic, and three experiments were performed to analyze it. The experiments supported the hypothesis. In other words, mindful learning was found to be helpful for cultivating balanced attitudes toward regions. In conclusion,…

  1. State Geography Using NOAA Polar-Orbiting Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Stephen J.

    1985-01-01

    NOAA polar-orbiting satellites have the capability of providing views of entire states. This article describes the characteristics of data from these satellites, indicates their advantages and disadvantages, and shows how the satellite data can be used in a statewide representation of physical geography for students at the introductory level. (RM)

  2. E-Learning for Geography's Teaching and Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kenneth; Bednarz, Bob; Boxall, James; Chalmers, Lex; France, Derek; Kesby, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The authors embed their advocacy of educational technology in a consideration of contemporary pedagogy in geography. They provide examples of e-learning from a wide range of teaching and learning contexts. They promote the idea that considering best practice with reference to educational technology will increase the versatility of teaching…

  3. Opinions of the Geography Teacher Candidates toward Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyihoglu, Aysegul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the opinions of the teacher candidates about mind mapping technique used in Geography education of undergraduate program. In this study, the qualitative research techniques were used. The study group consists of 55 teacher candidates. The teacher candidates have been asked for their opinions about the process…

  4. Fieldwork in Geography and Long Term Memory Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Andrew A.; White, Richard T.

    This paper discusses a study of learning retention among junior high school students involved in a field trip in a geography course. The study was based on a model of memory proposed by Robert Gagne and R.T. White. This model of cognitive processes, postulated on the belief that recall of any element is a function of its degree of interlinking in…

  5. Early School Leaving and the Cultural Geography of High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, John; Hattam, Robert

    2002-01-01

    States early school leaving is a protracted educational problem throughout the world. Examines early school leaving from the position of young Australians (n=209) who left school or were considering leaving. Provides tentative theorizing traversing aspects of the cultural geography of high school as partial explanation of what is occurring. (BT)

  6. Teaching Cultural Geography with "Bend It like Beckham"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeo, Katie

    2007-01-01

    The British film "Bend It Like Beckham" (2002) is pedagogically useful in the cultural geography classroom for engaging students with core concepts, such as ethnicity, migration, acculturation, and assimilation, and with more advanced modes of analysis, such as the social construction of identity. Although the film depicts a particular…

  7. From Geography Action to Civic Engagement: The Mesa Grande Ruins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Carol C.

    2012-01-01

    Geography Action Week 2000 was fast approaching and the author was trying to decide on a way for her fourth grade class to actively participate in the theme for the year. The theme "Here Today--Here Tomorrow: A Geographic Focus on Conservation" centered on sustainable use, preservation, and restoration of our natural and cultural…

  8. Shipwreck: Using Literature and Student Imagination To Teach Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Donna Kay

    1999-01-01

    Provides a geography lesson that integrates literature by focusing on the book "Robinson Crusoe." Explains that the lesson consists of three parts that students perform in groups and individually in which they follow the adventures of Crusoe using the ship's log and excerpts from his journal. (CMK)

  9. A Toolkit to Implement Graduate Attributes in Geography Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel; McLean, Angela; Smith, Nell; Bond, Carol; Jenkins, Martin; Marshall, Stephen; Frielick, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    This article uses findings from a project on engagement with graduate outcomes across higher education institutions in New Zealand to produce a toolkit for implementing graduate attributes in geography curricula. Key facets include strong leadership; academic developers to facilitate conversations about graduate attributes and teaching towards…

  10. Cartography and Population Geography as Current Events: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comenetz, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    The Sanders housing lawsuit in Pennsylvania provides a case study of how to incorporate current events into the teaching of cartography or population geography at the high school or college level. Settlement of the Sanders case resulted in the release of information about the segregation of public housing by race in the Pittsburgh area. The issues…

  11. Geography Resources for Middle School and High School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiddie, Laura

    1989-01-01

    Provides educational resources for teaching geography from the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC). Includes units on the Model United Nations, China, Middle America, and the United States. Resources stress themes of economic, political, and social interactions and interdependence. Provides simulations, maps, sample tests, and lesson…

  12. Comparing Assessments within Junior Geography Textbooks Used in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daihu

    2013-01-01

    The 2001 Geography Standards for Junior Secondary Schools are the first national standards for geographic education since the founding of Communist China. The standards heralded several new ideas for geographic education, and textbook assessments are one important way for understanding their impact. This study examines the changes in assessments…

  13. China: A Case Study in Using Geography to Understand Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Katherine

    1992-01-01

    Presents a geography lesson on China to be used to help students understand contemporary and historical China. Suggests that China's population may be the most important factor shaping Chinese culture today. Includes teaching strategies and a student handout to provide an understanding of culture through the geographical concepts of place and…

  14. Geography and Math: A Technique for Finding Population Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enedy, Joseph D.

    1993-01-01

    Argues that methods and procedures for teaching geography are becoming increasingly important as nongeography teachers present geographic concepts in other subjects. Describes an interdisciplinary instructional unit in which students use mathematical calculations to identify population centers in the United States and China. Provides maps, tables,…

  15. Geography as a Behavioral Study in the Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Randall C.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that geography can be made more relevant in today's social studies if it is presented as the study of the environmental impact of culture. This theme is illustrated by contrasting cultural influences which shaped the physically similar east and southeastern regions of China and the U.S. (JDH)

  16. A Note on the Identification of Common Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slez, Adam; O'Connell, Heather A.; Curtis, Katherine J.

    2017-01-01

    Areal data have been used to good effect in a wide range of sociological research. One of the most persistent problems associated with this type of data, however, is the need to combine data sets with incongruous boundaries. To help address this problem, we introduce a new method for identifying common geographies. We show that identifying common…

  17. Geography Students' Assessment of Internship Experience at a Kenyan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simiyu, Robert Romborah; Okaka, Fredrick Okoth; Omondi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings of Moi University's geography students' assessment of their internship, which underscore the importance of internship in bridging the gap between theoretical knowledge and its application in the real world of work. Not only were the majority of the students able to apply geographical knowledge and skills in their work…

  18. Education, Parenting and Family: The Social Geographies of Family Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Emma; Marandet, Elodie

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between education, parenting and family through the prism and particularities of family learning. Family learning is an example of an educational initiative, primarily aimed at parents and linked to wider policy concerns, which can be explored through a mapping of its social geographies; family learning is…

  19. Models of economic geography : dynamics, estimation and policy evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaap, Thijs

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we look at economic geography models from a number of angles. We started by placing the theory in a context of preceding theories, both earlier work on spatial economics and other children of the monopolistic competition ‘revolution.’ Next, we looked at the theoretical properties of

  20. Rethinking Postgraduate Education in Geography: The Case of the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuijn, Joos Droogleever

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses reforms in postgraduate education in geography in the Netherlands in the context of Europeanization and globalization. Europeanization and globalization have resulted in challenges as well as opportunities for students and universities. In terms of internationalization, Europeanization and the global economic crisis have…

  1. Geography Education Research in Serbia: A Teacher's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajovic, Goran; Bulatovic, Jelisavka

    2017-01-01

    In all European Union countries have harmonized attitudes on the need and improving the quality geographic of education and his innovating. Modernization of geographic education is unthinkable without quality professional and personal development of teacher's geography. Renewal, modernization and supplement professional knowledge and skills…

  2. Use of the Fourier series window protocol with a zig-zag surface coil in 31P NMR human skin spectroscopy. A theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, M E; Cowie, A G; Manners, D N; Hands, L J; Styles, P

    1996-08-01

    The use of a zig-zag surface coil with a three-pulse Fourier Series Window (FSW) has been suggested as a means by which in vivo NMR spectroscopic studies of human skin can be performed. Using direct numerical simulations of the magnetic field profile of a 10 limb zig-zag surface coil, the role of the FSW in reducing NMR signals originating from the deeper skeletal muscle layers is examined theoretically. The extent of muscle signal contamination is determined for different coil inter-limb spacings and pulse width settings. The optimum inter-limb spacing for studying living human skin, that which minimizes signal contamination and maximizes skin signal collected, is shown to be between 4 and 6 mm. These calculations demonstrate that the FSW and zig-zag surface coil offer a protocol for investigating the metabolism of large areas of surface tissue while keeping signal contamination from the deeper skeletal muscle layers down to an acceptable level.

  3. Mass spectrometric detection of multiple extended series of neutral highly fucosylated N-acetyllactosamine oligosaccharides in human milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenninger, Anja; Chan, Shiu-Yung; Karas, Michael; Finke, Berndt; Stahl, Bernd; Costello, Catherine E.

    2008-12-01

    Complex mixtures of high-molecular weight fractions of pooled neutral human milk oligosaccharides (obtained via gel permeation chromatography) have been investigated. The subfractions were each permethylated and analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry, in order to investigate their oligosaccharide compositions. The obtained spectra reveal that human milk contains more complex neutral oligosaccharides than have been described previously; the data show that these oligosaccharides can be highly fucosylated, and that their poly-N-acetyllactosamine cores are substituted with up to 10 fucose residues on an oligosaccharide that has 7-N-acetyllactosamine units. This is the first report of the existence in human milk of this large range of highly fucosylated oligosaccharides which possess novel, potentially immunologically active structures.

  4. MILITARY GEOGRAPHY: FROM PEACE TO WAR/E.J. PALKA & F.A. GALGANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A.P. Smit

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available There has always been a long-standing relationship between Geography and themilitary. In the book Military Geography: from Peace to War, Military Geographyis defined as the “application of geographic information, tools and techniques tomilitary problems”. In the international arena, Military Geography enjoysrecognition as a formal sub-discipline with its own speciality group within theAssociation of American Geographers. Military Geography: from Peace to War is awelcome addition to a rather sparse literature collection of this applied subdisciplineof Geography.The book starts with an explanation of the scope of Military Geography that isextremely useful for researchers and students of Military Geography. Thisexplanation enables one to identify the context of the operation under discussion(peacetime, stability and support operations (SASO, or war, the scale of theoperation (strategic, operational or tactical, the approach used to study it(systematic, topical or regional and the perspective of the study (applied and/orhistorical.

  5. Sustainable development in the curriculum of geography course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağrı Öztürk Demirbaş

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available     It is most commonly referred that ‘sustainability is to meet possibility of future generations needs without depriving them to meet their needs’. Sustainability is based on three principles such as economical, social and environmental sustainability. It has been declared as the Education Decade of United Nations for Sustainable Development between the years 2005-2014. The main aim is to create learning opportunities enabling to form new lifestyles, values and attitudes for an economical, social as well as environmental sustainable future. Thus, individuals’ awareness are raised and created to have more sensitive perspective. In this context, one of the training programs is Curriculum of Geography Course which has been reflected by sustainable development. In this research, objectives were given place related to sustainable development in Curriculum of Geography Course; the objectives associated with learning areas, activities, skills, values and measurement and evaluation techniques and the percentage of distributions are investigated. Document analysis, one of qualitative research methods, is used in the research. In the study, it is based on current Curriculum of Geography Course. The mentioned items in the purpose are examined by the researcher and are illustrated in detail in terms of reliability. As a result of the study, the objectives of curriculum of Geography course related to sustainable development are stated in each grade level. Especially in 11 and 12 grades intensity of the objectives are shown. The learning area, ‘Environment and Society”, is mentioned as having forefront position when looking distribution of the objectives. As a result, it has been reached an idea that Curriculum of Geography Course aims to create awareness towards to sustainable development. There has been made some suggestions based on the results of research to create awareness and raise conscious citizens of the world.

  6. NOTES ON IMAGES TO TEACH GEOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaine Maria Tonini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at providing notes on images of identities regarded as others in our society. My own academic research starting on with my Geography textbook and cut through by media was the guiding thread I have chosen. We aim at having a critical gaze upon what guides the subject, divides, separates, ranks, normalises, territorialises, and makes meanings of subjects. Based on this assumption, reflections show pros and cons of the textbook in contemporary times, a period of deep changes in the way of being and learning. as meanings inscribed in textbooks are close to lifeworld, students’ everyday life, as they have the same meanings in other places: TV, newspapers, magazines, ads, internet, these images do not belong only to the classroom during reading. Outside of school they are drives for these students’ cultural practices. What one learns with image-inscribed meanings they bring to their everyday life, there is no border between what these students learn in school and their ways of being in society. Finally, I have found out that other meanings are not in these images in these times, discourse sameness barring other meanings, even with so many affirmatives education policies have introduced. This strongly visualised discursive permanence must be urgently investigated. RESUMO: Este texto tem a intenção de estabelecer algumas notas sobre as imagens de identidades posicionadas como ‘Outras’ na nossa sociedade. O fio condutor escolhido foi minha trajetória de pesquisa acadêmica, iniciada pelo livro didático de Geografia e permeada pela mídia. Objetiva-se produzir uma analítica do olhar, que conduza pelos seus enunciados uma reflexão sobre aquilo que nomeia o sujeito. Isto permite a constatar o que divide, separa, categoriza, normaliza, territorializa as identidades e, consequentemente, produz significados sobre os sujeitos. Com este pressuposto as reflexões travadas mostram encaixes e desencaixes do livro didáticos na

  7. The vaccination of human beings with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi: a new series of volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Menezes

    1973-04-01

    Full Text Available Five human volunteers were vaccinated with a live avirulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and followed-up for one year. Except for a few cases of questionable results presented by only one Laboratory, ali the other clinicai, parasitological and serological tests remained negative during that period.

  8. Geography and International Knowledge. A Report of the Committee on Geography and International Studies of the Association of American Geographers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Geographers, Washington, DC.

    This report illustrates how geography can play an important role in improving America's performance in international matters. The degree of interdependence among nations intensifies daily. Today world interaction affects everyone. For example, a frost in Brazil raises coffee prices in the United States and a strike in Africa's Copperbelt affects…

  9. Teaching Economic Geography in Two Contrasting Asian Contexts: Decentering Anglo-American Economic Geography in China and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Henry Wai-Chung; Liu, Weidong

    2006-01-01

    Teaching economic geography outside Anglo-American countries presents a particular pedagogical challenge, as theories and concepts developed in these countries might not be directly applicable outside their intellectual and national contexts. In this paper, the authors show how the peculiar institutional and development environments in China and…

  10. Geography Geo-Wiki in the Classroom: Using Crowdsourcing to Enhance Geographical Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Perger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Geo-Wiki is a crowdsourcing tool used to derive information, based on satellite imagery, to validate and enhance global land cover. Around 5000 users are registered, who contribute to different campaigns to collect data across various domains (e.g., agriculture, biomass, human impact, etc.. However, seeing the Earth’s surface from above does not provide all of the necessary information for understanding what is happening on the ground. Instead, we need to enhance this experience with local knowledge or with additional information, such as geo-located photographs of surface features with annotation. The latest development in enhancing Geo-Wiki in this context has been achieved through collaboration with the University of Waterloo to set up a separate branch called Geography Geo-Wiki for use in undergraduate teaching. We provide the pedagogical objectives for this branch and describe two modules that we have introduced in first and third year Physical Geography classes. The majority of the feedback was positive and in, many cases, was part of what the student liked best about the course. Future plans include the development of additional assignments for the study of environmental processes using Geo-Wiki that would engage students in a manner that is very different from that of conventional teaching.

  11. Characterization of population structure from the mitochondrial DNA vis-à-vis language and geography in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther J; Koki, George; Merriwether, D Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Situated along a corridor linking the Asian continent with the outer islands of the Pacific, Papua New Guinea has long played a key role in understanding the initial peopling of Oceania. The vast diversity in languages and unique geographical environments in the region have been central to the debates on human migration and the degree of interaction between the Pleistocene settlers and newer migrants. To better understand the role of Papua New Guinea in shaping the region's prehistory, we sequenced the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of three populations, a total of 94 individuals, located in the East Sepik Province of Papua New Guinea. We analyzed these samples with a large data set of Oceania populations to examine the role of geography and language in shaping population structure within New Guinea and between the region and Island Melanesia. Our results from median-joining networks, star-cluster age estimates, and population genetic analyses show that while highland New Guinea populations seem to be the oldest settlers, there has been significant gene flow within New Guinea with little influence from geography or language. The highest genetic division is between Papuan speakers of New Guinea versus East Papuan speakers located outside of mainland New Guinea. Our study supports the weak language barriers to genetic structuring among populations in close contact and highlights the complexity of understanding the genetic histories of Papua New Guinea in association with language and geography.

  12. Mass spectrometric U-series dating of Huanglong Cave in Hubei Province, Central China: evidence for early presence of modern humans in Eastern Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guanjun; Wu, Xianzhu; Wang, Qian; Tu, Hua; Feng, Yue-xing; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2013-08-01

    Most researchers believe that anatomically modern humans (AMH) first appeared in Africa 160-190 ka ago, and would not have reached eastern Asia until ∼50 ka ago. However, the credibility of these scenarios might have been compromised by a largely inaccurate and compressed chronological framework previously established for hominin fossils found in China. Recently there has been a growing body of evidence indicating the possible presence of AMH in eastern Asia ca. 100 ka ago or even earlier. Here we report high-precision mass spectrometric U-series dating of intercalated flowstone samples from Huanglong Cave, a recently discovered Late Pleistocene hominin site in northern Hubei Province, central China. Systematic excavations there have led to the in situ discovery of seven hominin teeth and dozens of stone and bone artifacts. The U-series dates on localized thin flowstone formations bracket the hominin specimens between 81 and 101 ka, currently the most narrow time span for all AMH beyond 45 ka in China, if the assignment of the hominin teeth to modern Homo sapiens holds. Alternatively this study provides further evidence for the early presence of an AMH morphology in China, through either independent evolution of local archaic populations or their assimilation with incoming AMH. Along with recent dating results for hominin samples from Homo erectus to AMH, a new extended and continuous timeline for Chinese hominin fossils is taking shape, which warrants a reconstruction of human evolution, especially the origins of modern humans in eastern Asia.

  13. Comparison of data transformation procedures to enhance topographical accuracy in time-series analysis of the human EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, O; Keil, A; Elbert, T; Müller, M M

    2002-01-30

    We describe a methodology to apply current source density (CSD) and minimum norm (MN) estimation as pre-processing tools for time-series analysis of single trial EEG data. The performance of these methods is compared for the case of wavelet time-frequency analysis of simulated gamma-band activity. A reasonable comparison of CSD and MN on the single trial level requires regularization such that the corresponding transformed data sets have similar signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). For region-of-interest approaches, it should be possible to optimize the SNR for single estimates rather than for the whole distributed solution. An effective implementation of the MN method is described. Simulated data sets were created by modulating the strengths of a radial and a tangential test dipole with wavelets in the frequency range of the gamma band, superimposed with simulated spatially uncorrelated noise. The MN and CSD transformed data sets as well as the average reference (AR) representation were subjected to wavelet frequency-domain analysis, and power spectra were mapped for relevant frequency bands. For both CSD and MN, the influence of noise can be sufficiently suppressed by regularization to yield meaningful information, but only MN represents both radial and tangential dipole sources appropriately as single peaks. Therefore, when relating wavelet power spectrum topographies to their neuronal generators, MN should be preferred.

  14. Case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-06-20

    Jun 20, 2013 ... Upper cervical spine injuries: a management of a series of 70 cases. El Fatemi ... women, with traffic accidents being the major traumatic cause. .... osteosynthesis is preferred to respect the biomechanics of the cervical spine ...

  15. Interdisciplinarity at the Human-Environment Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld; Arler, Finn

    2010-01-01

    discussed, including Geography, Human Ecology, Environmental Studies, Environmental Management, Ecological Economics, Sustainability Science and Earth System Science. Key problems of carrying out interdisciplinary research are identified, including differences of both ontological, epistemological...

  16. Japan: Land of Samurai and Robots. Young Discovery Library Series: 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheimer, Laurence

    Part of an international series of amply illustrated, colorful, small size books designed for children ages 5 to 10, this volume talks about Japanese culture, modern life style, geography, music, arts, sports, and traditions. There is a brief description of how Japanese children learn to read and write. Japanese hot baths, school books, the…

  17. Economic Development: The Quest for Material Well-Being. Instructional Activities Series IA/S-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Willis D.

    This activity is one of a series of 17 teacher-developed instructional activities for geography at the secondary-grade level described in SO 009 140. The activity investigates economic change in developing nations. It employs the dialogue approach. Given data about the Aswan High Dam in Egypt and about the environment of northeast Africa, students…

  18. Nautical Charts: Another Dimension in Developing Map Skills. Instructional Activities Series IA/S-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, W. F.; Botly, D. H.

    These activities are part of a series of 17 teacher-developed instructional activities for geography at the secondary-grade level described in SO 009 140. In the activities students develop map skills by learning about and using nautical charts. The first activity involves students in using parallel rulers and a compass rose to find their…

  19. What Is All This Dam Foolishness? Instructional Activities Series IA/S-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Erwin

    This activity is one of a series of 17 teacher-developed instructional activities for geography at the secondary grade level described in SO 009 140. This activity investigates the proposed construction of a dam. It employs a simulation technique in which students debate the conflicts that may evolve between groups with differing goals. To provide…

  20. Perspective on the Development Process of Human-Economic Geography and Regional Development Studies%人文-经济地理学和区域发展研究基本脉络的透视——对该领域在中国科学院地理科学与资源研究所发展历程的讨论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊杰

    2011-01-01

    Reviewing the evolution of the field of human-economic geography and regional development studies in the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research of CAS, this paper clarifies the history of the discipline construction. In the second half of the 20th century, first of all, the nature of the discipline was determined as interdisciplinary, and its development orientation as serving national economy and social development demands. The research methods of techno-economic analysis were also explored. Secondly, great achievements have been made in the study of territorial differentiation pattern of human-economic geography,especially in the study of territorial differentiation system, represented by agricultural regional planning and land use research, and in the study of spatial structure organization, such as the location theory and pole-axis theory. In the first decade of this century, on the one hand, following the history line of territorial differentiation and spatial structure research, influential achievements were also made in the area of spatial organization, such as in the formation and evolution of territorial functional zones, interactions between spaces, and coordinated development of urban and rural areas. On the other hand, due to the humanity tendency arisen from the study of new territorial spaces and new factors and the emerging of new fields, including the research on responses to informationization and globalization, tourism geography, and financial geography, etc., more vitality and diversity were brought into human-economic geography. Thanks to the establishment of earth system science and the lead of solving important realistic problems in regional sustainable development, great importance has been attached to resource and environment carrying capacity and resource-environment effect research. The research direction characterized by socio-economic development and resource environment interaction research centered on regional