WorldWideScience

Sample records for human genome organization

  1. From hacking the human genome to editing organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In the recent decades, human genome engineering has been one of the major interesting research subjects, essentially because it raises new possibilities for personalized medicine and biotechnologies. With the development of engineered nucleases such as the Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), the Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and more recently the Clustered Regularly Interspaced short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), the field of human genome edition has evolved very rapidly. Every new genetic tool is broadening the scope of applications on human tissues, even before we can completely master each of these tools. In this review, we will present the recent advances regarding human genome edition tools, we will discuss the numerous implications they have in research and medicine, and we will mention the limits and concerns about such technologies.

  2. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Director Organization Reports & Publications Español The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds ... Landscape Social Media Videos Image Gallery Fact Sheets Human Genome Project Clinical Studies Genomic Careers DNA Day Calendar ...

  3. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and organ

  4. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and organ

  5. Approaching the three-dimensional organization and dynamics of the human genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and organ

  6. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P. falciparu

  7. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P.

  8. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-free human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. Left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected. PMID:25926546

  9. Towards a holistic understanding of the human genome by determination and integration of its sequential and three-dimensional organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and organ

  10. The cloning, genomic organization and tissue expression profile of the human DLG5 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbs Richard A

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial atrial fibrillation, an autosomal dominant disease, was previously mapped to chromosome 10q22. One of the genes mapped to the 10q22 region is DLG5, a member of the MAGUKs (Membrane Associated Gyanylate Kinase family which mediates intracellular signaling. Only a partial cDNA was available for DLG5. To exclude potential disease inducing mutations, it was necessary to obtain a complete cDNA and genomic sequence of the gene. Methods The Northern Blot analysis performed using 3' UTR of this gene indicated the transcript size to be about 7.2 KB. Using race technique and library screening the entire cDNA was cloned. This gene was evaluated by sequencing the coding region and splice functions in normal and affected family members with familial atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, haploid cell lines from affected patients were generated and analyzed for deletions that may have been missed by PCR. Results We identified two distinct alternately spliced transcripts of this gene. The genomic sequence of the DLG5 gene spanned 79 KB with 32 exons and was shown to have ubiquitous human tissue expression including placenta, heart, skeletal muscle, liver and pancreas. Conclusions The entire cDNA of DLG5 was identified, sequenced and its genomic organization determined.

  11. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as ist interplay with and embedding into the cell and o

  12. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and or

  13. Approaching the three-dimensional organization and dynamics of the human genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and o

  14. Genomic organization of the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, K; Hata, S; Devlin, P; Roncarolo, M G; De Vries, J E; Spits, H; Strominger, J L; Krangel, M S

    1988-11-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid clones comprising about 100 kilobases (kb) at the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus were isolated from a genomic library. The structure of the germ-line V delta 1 variable gene segment was determined. V delta 1 is located 8.5 kb downstream of the V alpha 13.1 gene segment, and both V segments are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. The V alpha 17.1 segment is located between V delta 1 and the D delta, J delta, C delta region (containing the diversity, joining, and constant gene segments). Thus, V delta and V alpha segments are interspersed along the chromosome. The germ-line organization of the D delta 2, J delta 1, and J delta 2 segments was determined. Linkage of C delta to the J alpha region was established by identification of J alpha segments within 20 kb downstream of C delta. The organization of the locus was also analyzed by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The unrearranged V delta 1 and D delta, J delta, C delta regions are quite distant from each other, apparently separated by a minimum of 175-180 kb.

  15. Hi-C-constrained physical models of human chromosomes recover functionally-related properties of genome organization

    CERN Document Server

    Di Stefano, Marco; Lien, Tonje G; Hovig, Eivind; Micheletti, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Combining genome-wide structural models with phenomenological data is at the forefront of efforts to understand the organizational principles regulating the human genome. Here, we use chromosome-chromosome contact data as knowledge-based constraints for large-scale three-dimensional models of the human diploid genome. The resulting models remain minimally entangled and acquire several functional features that are observed in vivo and that were never used as input for the model. We find, for instance, that gene-rich, active regions are drawn towards the nuclear center, while gene poor and lamina-associated domains are pushed to the periphery. These and other properties persist upon adding local contact constraints, suggesting their compatibility with non-local constraints for the genome organization. The results show that suitable combinations of data analysis and physical modelling can expose the unexpectedly rich functionally-related properties implicit in chromosome-chromosome contact data. Specific directi...

  16. Promoter characterization and genomic organization of the human X11β gene APBA2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hao, Yan

    2012-02-15

    Overexpression of neuronal adaptor protein X11β has been shown to decrease the production of amyloid-β, a toxic peptide deposited in Alzheimer\\'s disease brains. Therefore, manipulation of the X11β level may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer\\'s disease. As X11β expression can be regulated at the transcription level, we determined the genomic organization and the promoter of the human X11β gene, amyloid β A4 precursor protein-binding family A member 2 (APBA2). By RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends, a single APBA2 transcription start site and the complete sequence of exon 1 were identified. The APBA2 promoter was located upstream of exon 1 and was more active in neurons. The core promoter contains several CpG dinucleotides, and was strongly suppressed by DNA methylation. In addition, mutagenesis analysis revealed a putative Pax5-binding site within the promoter. Together, APBA2 contains a potent neuronal promoter whose activity may be regulated by DNA methylation and Pax5.

  17. Hi-C-constrained physical models of human chromosomes recover functionally-related properties of genome organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stefano, Marco; Paulsen, Jonas; Lien, Tonje G.; Hovig, Eivind; Micheletti, Cristian

    2016-10-01

    Combining genome-wide structural models with phenomenological data is at the forefront of efforts to understand the organizational principles regulating the human genome. Here, we use chromosome-chromosome contact data as knowledge-based constraints for large-scale three-dimensional models of the human diploid genome. The resulting models remain minimally entangled and acquire several functional features that are observed in vivo and that were never used as input for the model. We find, for instance, that gene-rich, active regions are drawn towards the nuclear center, while gene poor and lamina associated domains are pushed to the periphery. These and other properties persist upon adding local contact constraints, suggesting their compatibility with non-local constraints for the genome organization. The results show that suitable combinations of data analysis and physical modelling can expose the unexpectedly rich functionally-related properties implicit in chromosome-chromosome contact data. Specific directions are suggested for further developments based on combining experimental data analysis and genomic structural modelling.

  18. Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the still largely unknown sequential and three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated on the 30nm chromatin fiber level with Monte Carlo,

  20. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the still largely unknown sequential and three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated on the 30nm chromatin fiber level with Monte Carlo, Brownian Dyna

  1. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was folded according to the M

  2. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach by virtual microscopy the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was fold

  3. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  4. Human social genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural "social signal transduction" pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving.

  5. Human uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: genomic organization, alternative promoters, and erythroid-specific expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizencang, G; Solis, C; Bishop, D F; Warner, C; Desnick, R J

    2000-12-01

    Uroporphyrinogen-III (URO) synthase is the heme biosynthetic enzyme defective in congenital erythropoietic porphyria. The approximately 34-kb human URO-synthase gene (UROS) was isolated, and its organization and tissue-specific expression were determined. The gene had two promoters that generated housekeeping and erythroid-specific transcripts with unique 5'-untranslated sequences (exons 1 and 2A) followed by nine common coding exons (2B to 10). Expression arrays revealed that the housekeeping transcript was present in all tissues, while the erythroid transcript was only in erythropoietic tissues. The housekeeping promoter lacked TATA and SP1 sites, consistent with the observed low level expression in most cells, whereas the erythroid promoter contained GATA1 and NF-E2 sites for erythroid specificity. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the housekeeping promoter was active in both erythroid K562 and HeLa cells, while the erythroid promoter was active only in erythroid cells and its activity was increased during hemin-induced erythroid differentiation. Thus, human URO-synthase expression is regulated during erythropoiesis by an erythroid-specific alternative promoter.

  6. From the chromatin interaction network to the organization of the human genome into replication N/U-domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Rasha E.; Julienne, Hanna; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Petryk, Nataliya; Kahli, Malik; dʼAubenton-Carafa, Yves; Goldar, Arach; Jensen, Pablo; Hyrien, Olivier; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain; Audit, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the mammalian nucleus is now being unraveled thanks to the recent development of chromatin conformation capture (3C) technologies. Here we report the results of a combined multiscale analysis of genome-wide mean replication timing and chromatin conformation data that reveal some intimate relationships between chromatin folding and human DNA replication. We previously described megabase replication N/U-domains as mammalian multiorigin replication units, and showed that their borders are ‘master’ replication initiation zones that likely initiate cascades of origin firing responsible for the stereotypic replication of these domains. Here, we demonstrate that replication N/U-domains correspond to the structural domains of self-interacting chromatin, and that their borders act as insulating regions both in high-throughput 3C (Hi-C) data and high-resolution 3C (4C) experiments. Further analyses of Hi-C data using a graph-theoretical approach reveal that N/U-domain borders are long-distance, interconnected hubs of the chromatin interaction network. Overall, these results and the observation that a well-defined ordering of chromatin states exists from N/U-domain borders to centers suggest that ‘master’ replication initiation zones are at the heart of a high-order, epigenetically controlled 3D organization of the human genome.

  7. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  8. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  9. Towards a Holistic Understanding of the Human Genome by Determination and Integration of its Sequential and Three-Dimensional Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and o

  10. An overview on genome organization of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Maria

    2015-12-01

    In this review we will concentrate on some general genome features of marine organisms and their evolution, ranging from vertebrate to invertebrates until unicellular organisms. Before genome sequencing, the ultracentrifugation in CsCl led to high resolution of mammalian DNA (without seeing at the sequence). The analytical profile of human DNA showed that the vertebrate genome is a mosaic of isochores, typically megabase-size DNA segments that belong in a small number of families characterized by different GC levels. The recent availability of a number of fully sequenced genomes allowed mapping very precisely the isochores, based on DNA sequences. Since isochores are tightly linked to biological properties such as gene density, replication timing and recombination, the new level of detail provided by the isochore map helped the understanding of genome structure, function and evolution. This led the current level of knowledge and to further insights.

  11. Genomics of human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  12. Mapping the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Charles R.

    1989-06-01

    The following pages aim to lay a foundation for understanding the excitement surrounding the ''human genome project,'' as well as to convey a flavor of the ongoing efforts and plans at the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Our own work, of course, is only part of a broad international effort that will dramatically enhance our understanding of human molecular genetics before the end of this century. In this country, the bulk of the effort will be carried out under the auspices of the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, but significant contributions have already been made both by nonprofit private foundations and by private corporation. The respective roles of the DOE and the NIH are being coordinated by an inter-agency committee, the aims of which are to emphasize the strengths of each agency, to facilitate cooperation, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort. The NIH, for example, will continue its crucial work in medical genetics and in mapping the genomes of nonhuman species. The DOE, on the other hand, has unique experience in managing large projects, and its national laboratories are repositories of expertise in physics, engineering, and computer science, as well as the life sciences. The tools and techniques the project will ultimately rely on are thus likely to be developed in multidisciplinary efforts at laboratories like LBL. Accordingly, we at LBL take great pride in this enterprise -- an enterprise that will eventually transform our understanding of ourselves.

  13. Genomic organization and expression of the human fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (FALDH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, G.R.; Markova, N.G.; Compton, J.G. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    Mutations in the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) gene cause Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) - a disease characterized by mental retardation, spasticity, and congenital ichthyosis. To facilitate mutation analysis in SLS and to study the pathogenesis of FALDH deficiency, we have determined the structural organization and characterized expression of the FALDH (proposed designation ALDH10) gene. The gene consists of 10 exons spanning about 30.5 kb. A TATA-less promoter is associated with the major transcription initiation site found to be 258 hp upstream of the ATG codon. The G4C-rich sequences surrounding the transcription initiation site encompassed regulatory elements that interacted with proteins in HeLa nuclear extracts and were able to promote transcription in vitro. FALDH is widely expressed as three transcripts of 2, 3.8, and 4.0 kb, which originate from multiple polyadenylation signals in the 3{prime} UTR. An alternatively spliced mRNA was detected that contains an extra exon and encodes an enzyme that is likely to have altered membrane-binding properties. The FALDH gene lies only 50-85 kb from ALDH3, an aldehyde dehydrogenase gene that has homologous sequence and intron/exon structure. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Genomic organization and promoter cloning of the human X11α gene APBA1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chai, Ka-Ho

    2012-05-01

    X11α is a brain specific multi-modular protein that interacts with the Alzheimer\\'s disease amyloid precursor protein (APP). Aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), an APP cleavage product, is believed to be central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Recently, overexpression of X11α has been shown to reduce Aβ generation and to ameliorate memory deficit in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Therefore, manipulating the expression level of X11α may provide a novel route for the treatment of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Human X11α is encoded by the gene APBA1. As evidence suggests that X11α expression can be regulated at transcription level, we have determined the gene structure and cloned the promoter of APBA1. APBA1 spans over 244 kb on chromosome 9 and is composed of 13 exons and has multiple transcription start sites. A putative APBA1 promoter has been identified upstream of exon 1 and functional analysis revealed that this is highly active in neurons. By deletion analysis, the minimal promoter was found to be located between -224 and +14, a GC-rich region that contains a functional Sp3 binding site. In neurons, overexpression of Sp3 stimulates the APBA1 promoter while an Sp3 inhibitor suppresses the promoter activity. Moreover, inhibition of Sp3 reduces endogenous X11α expression and promotes the generation of Aβ. Our findings reveal that Sp3 play an essential role in APBA1 transcription.

  15. Human myoblast genome therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter K Law; Leo A Bockeria; Choong-Chin Liew; Danlin M Law; Ping Lu; Eugene KW Sim; Khawja H Haider; Lei Ye; Xun Li; Margarita N Vakhromeeva; Ilia I Berishvili

    2006-01-01

    Human Myoblast Genome Therapy (HMGT) is a platform technology of cell transplantation, nuclear transfer, and tissue engineering. Unlike stem cells, myoblasts are differentiated, immature cells destined to become muscles. Myoblasts cultured from satellite cells of adult muscle biopsies survive, develop, and function to revitalize degenerative muscles upon transplantation. Injection injury activates regeneration of host myofibers that fuse with the engrafted myoblasts, sharing their nuclei in a common gene pool of the syncytium. Thus, through nuclear transfer and complementation, the normal human genome can be transferred into muscles of patients with genetic disorders to achieve phenotype repair or disease prevention. Myoblasts are safe and efficient gene transfer vehicles endogenous to muscles that constitute 50% of body weight. Results of over 280 HMGT procedures on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) subjects in the past 15 years demonstrated absolute safety. Myoblast-injected DMD muscles showed improved histology.Strength increase at 18 months post-operatively averaged 123%. In another application of HMGT on ischemic cardiomyopathy, the first human myoblast transfer into porcine myocardium revealed that it was safe and effective. Clinical trials on approximately 220 severe cardiomyopathy patients in 15 countries showed a <10% mortality. Most subjects received autologous cells implanted on the epicardial surface during coronory artery bypass graft, or injected on the endomyocardial surface percutaneously through guiding catheters. Significant increases in left ventricular ejection fraction, wall thickness, and wall motion have been reported, with reduction in perfusion defective areas, angina, and shortness of breath. As a new modality of treatment for disease in the skeletal muscle or myocardium, HMGT emerged as safe and effective. Large randomized multi-center trials are under way to confirm these preliminary results. The future of HMGT is bright and exciting

  16. The Human Genome Diversity Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalli-Sforza, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Diversity Project (HGD Project) is an international anthropology project that seeks to study the genetic richness of the entire human species. This kind of genetic information can add a unique thread to the tapestry knowledge of humanity. Culture, environment, history, and other factors are often more important, but humanity`s genetic heritage, when analyzed with recent technology, brings another type of evidence for understanding species` past and present. The Project will deepen the understanding of this genetic richness and show both humanity`s diversity and its deep and underlying unity. The HGD Project is still largely in its planning stages, seeking the best ways to reach its goals. The continuing discussions of the Project, throughout the world, should improve the plans for the Project and their implementation. The Project is as global as humanity itself; its implementation will require the kinds of partnerships among different nations and cultures that make the involvement of UNESCO and other international organizations particularly appropriate. The author will briefly discuss the Project`s history, describe the Project, set out the core principles of the Project, and demonstrate how the Project will help combat the scourge of racism.

  17. Approaching the Sequential and Three-Dimensional Organization of Genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. To achieve a deeper unterstanding of the human genome the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic prope

  18. Initial genomics of the human nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Németh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report for the first time the genomics of a nuclear compartment of the eukaryotic cell. 454 sequencing and microarray analysis revealed the pattern of nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs in the linear human genome and identified different gene families and certain satellite repeats as the major building blocks of NADs, which constitute about 4% of the genome. Bioinformatic evaluation showed that NAD-localized genes take part in specific biological processes, like the response to other organisms, odor perception, and tissue development. 3D FISH and immunofluorescence experiments illustrated the spatial distribution of NAD-specific chromatin within interphase nuclei and its alteration upon transcriptional changes. Altogether, our findings describe the nature of DNA sequences associated with the human nucleolus and provide insights into the function of the nucleolus in genome organization and establishment of nuclear architecture.

  19. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  20. All about the Human Genome Project (HGP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genome Resources Access to the full human sequence All About The Human Genome Project (HGP) The Human ... an international research effort to sequence and map all of the genes - together known as the genome - ...

  1. Towards a Holistic Understanding of the Human Genome by Determination and Integration of its Sequential and Three-Dimensional Organization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was folded according to the M

  2. Genomic organization, complete sequence, and chromosomal location of the gene for human eotaxin (SCYA11), an eosinophil-specific CC chemokine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zepeda, E.A.; Sarafi, M.N.; Luster, A.D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States)]|[Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine that is a specific chemoattractant for eosinophils and is implicated in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. We describe the genomic organization, complete sequence, including 1354 bp 5{prime} of the RNA initiation site, and chromosomal localization of the human eotaxin gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis localized eotaxin to human chromosome 17, in the region q21.1-q21.2, and the human gene name SCYA11 was assigned. We also present the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the mouse eotaxin gene and have identified several regulatory elements that are conserved between the murine and the human promoters. In particular, the presence of elements such as NF-{Kappa}B, interferon-{gamma} response element, and glucocorticoid response element may explain the observed regulation of the eotaxin gene by cytokines and glucocorticoids. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Human genome. 1993 Program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

  4. Genomic organization of the human heparan sulfate-N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase gene: Exclusion from a causative role in the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S.K.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-03-05

    Heparan sulfate-N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (HSST) catalyzes both the N-deacetylation and the N-sulfation of heparan sulfate. Previous studies have resulted in the isolation of the human HSST gene from within the Treacher Collins syndrome locus (TCOF1) critical region on 5q. In the present study, the genomic organization of the HSST gene has been elucidated, and the 14 exons identified have been tested for TCOF1-specific mutations. As a result of these studies, mutations within the coding sequence and adjacent splice junctions of HSST can be excluded from a causative role in the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  6. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  7. Segmenting the Human Genome into Isochores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Paolo; Milanesi, Luciano; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is a mosaic of isochores, which are long (>200 kb) DNA sequences that are fairly homogeneous in base composition and can be assigned to five families comprising 33%-59% of GC composition. Although the compartmentalized organization of the mammalian genome has been investigated for more than 40 years, no satisfactory automatic procedure for segmenting the genome into isochores is available so far. We present a critical discussion of the currently available methods and a new approach called isoSegmenter which allows segmenting the genome into isochores in a fast and completely automatic manner. This approach relies on two types of experimentally defined parameters, the compositional boundaries of isochore families and an optimal window size of 100 kb. The approach represents an improvement over the existing methods, is ideally suited for investigating long-range features of sequenced and assembled genomes, and is publicly available at https://github.com/bunop/isoSegmenter.

  8. Genomic disorders: A window into human gene and genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplications alter the genetic constitution of organisms and can be a driving force of molecular evolution in humans and the great apes. In this context, the study of genomic disorders has uncovered the essential role played by the genomic architecture, especially low copy repeats (LCRs) or segmental duplications (SDs). In fact, regardless of the mechanism, LCRs can mediate or stimulate rearrangements, inciting genomic instability and generating dynamic and unstable regions prone to rapid molecular evolution. In humans, copy-number variation (CNV) has been implicated in common traits such as neuropathy, hypertension, color blindness, infertility, and behavioral traits including autism and schizophrenia, as well as disease susceptibility to HIV, lupus nephritis, and psoriasis among many other clinical phenotypes. The same mechanisms implicated in the origin of genomic disorders may also play a role in the emergence of segmental duplications and the evolution of new genes by means of genomic and gene duplication and triplication, exon shuffling, exon accretion, and fusion/fission events. PMID:20080665

  9. Genomic organization of the human osteopontin gene: Exclusion of the locus from a causative role in the pathogenesis of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, A.H.; Edwards, S.J.; Murray, J.C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is the principal phosphorylated glycoprotein of bone that is also expressed in a limited number of other tissues including dentine. In the current investigation the authors report the genomic organization of the SPP1 gene, which comprises seven exons, six of which contain coding sequence. The splice sites for exon donor and acceptor positions are in close agreement with previously published consensus sequences. Comparison of the human gene with its murine and bovine counterparts revealed a highly homologous organization. A highly informative short tandem repeat polymorphism isolated at the SPP1 locus showed no recombination with the autosomal dominant disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta type II. Nevertheless, sequencing of each exon in individuals affected by this disorder failed to reveal any disease-specific mutations. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Gender And The Human Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender issues arise in relation to the human genome across a number of dimensions: the level of attention given to the nuclear genome as opposed to the mitochondrial; the level of basic scientific research; decision-making in the clinic related to both reproductive decision-making on the one hand, and diagnostic and predictive testing on the other; and wider societal implications. Feminist bioethics offers a useful perspective for addressing these issues.

  11. Genome editing for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Torsten B; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Rossi, Derrick J; Cowan, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome-editing techniques holds much promise for the field of human gene therapy. From bacteria to model organisms and human cells, genome editing tools such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZNFs), TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 have been successfully used to manipulate the respective genomes with unprecedented precision. With regard to human gene therapy, it is of great interest to test the feasibility of genome editing in primary human hematopoietic cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of human genetic disorders such as hemoglobinopathies, primary immunodeficiencies, and cancer. In this chapter, we explore the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient ablation of genes in two clinically relevant primary human cell types, CD4+ T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. By using two guide RNAs directed at a single locus, we achieve highly efficient and predictable deletions that ablate gene function. The use of a Cas9-2A-GFP fusion protein allows FACS-based enrichment of the transfected cells. The ease of designing, constructing, and testing guide RNAs makes this dual guide strategy an attractive approach for the efficient deletion of clinically relevant genes in primary human hematopoietic stem and effector cells and enables the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy.

  12. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs, are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability.

  13. The Past, Present, and Future of Human Centromere Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Aldrup-MacDonald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is the chromosomal locus essential for chromosome inheritance and genome stability. Human centromeres are located at repetitive alpha satellite DNA arrays that compose approximately 5% of the genome. Contiguous alpha satellite DNA sequence is absent from the assembled reference genome, limiting current understanding of centromere organization and function. Here, we review the progress in centromere genomics spanning the discovery of the sequence to its molecular characterization and the work done during the Human Genome Project era to elucidate alpha satellite structure and sequence variation. We discuss exciting recent advances in alpha satellite sequence assembly that have provided important insight into the abundance and complex organization of this sequence on human chromosomes. In light of these new findings, we offer perspectives for future studies of human centromere assembly and function.

  14. Genome organization, instabilities, stem cells, and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar Pazhanisamy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely recognized that advances in exploring genome organization provide remarkable insights on the induction and progression of chromosome abnormalities. Much of what we know about how mutations evolve and consequently transform into genome instabilities has been characterized in the spatial organization context of chromatin. Nevertheless, many underlying concepts of impact of the chromatin organization on perpetuation of multiple mutations and on propagation of chromosomal aberrations remain to be investigated in detail. Genesis of genome instabilities from accumulation of multiple mutations that drive tumorigenesis is increasingly becoming a focal theme in cancer studies. This review focuses on structural alterations evolve to raise a variety of genome instabilities that are manifested at the nucleotide, gene or sub-chromosomal, and whole chromosome level of genome. Here we explore an underlying connection between genome instability and cancer in the light of genome architecture. This review is limited to studies directed towards spatial organizational aspects of origin and propagation of aberrations into genetically unstable tumors.

  15. Genomic organization and mapping of the gene (SLC25A19) encoding the human mitochondrial deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobazzi, V; Ventura, M; Fiermonte, G; Prezioso, G; Rocchi, M; Palmieri, F

    2001-01-01

    The deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC) transports deoxynucleotides into mitochondria and is therefore essential for mtDNA synthesis. The human DNC gene (SLC25A19) spans about 16.5 kb and consists of nine exons with the translation start site in exon 4. It is located on chromosome 17q25.3. Three transcripts, which differ in their 5' ends and are generated by alternative splicing, have been identified.

  16. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  17. Positive selection on the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallender, Eric J; Lahn, Bruce T

    2004-10-01

    Positive selection has undoubtedly played a critical role in the evolution of Homo sapiens. Of the many phenotypic traits that define our species--notably the enormous brain, advanced cognitive abilities, complex vocal organs, bipedalism and opposable thumbs--most (if not all) are likely the product of strong positive selection. Many other aspects of human biology not necessarily related to the 'branding' of our species, such as host-pathogen interactions, reproduction, dietary adaptation and physical appearance, have also been the substrate of varying levels of positive selection. Comparative genetics/genomics studies in recent years have uncovered a growing list of genes that might have experienced positive selection during the evolution of human and/or primates. These genes offer valuable inroads into understanding the biological processes specific to humans, and the evolutionary forces that gave rise to them. Here, we present a comprehensive review of these genes, and their implications for human evolution.

  18. Sequence-specific flexibility organization of splicing flanking sequence and prediction of splice sites in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yongchun; Zhang, Pengfei; Liu, Li; Li, Tao; Peng, Yong; Li, Guangpeng; Li, Qianzhong

    2014-09-01

    More and more reported results of nucleosome positioning and histone modifications showed that DNA structure play a well-established role in splicing. In this study, a set of DNA geometric flexibility parameters originated from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were introduced to discuss the structure organization around splice sites at the DNA level. The obtained profiles of specific flexibility/stiffness around splice sites indicated that the DNA physical-geometry deformation could be used as an alternative way to describe the splicing junction region. In combination with structural flexibility as discriminatory parameter, we developed a hybrid computational model for predicting potential splicing sites. And the better prediction performance was achieved when the benchmark dataset evaluated. Our results showed that the mechanical deformability character of a splice junction is closely correlated with both the splice site strength and structural information in its flanking sequences.

  19. Genome architecture: domain organization of interphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, Wendy A; van Steensel, Bas

    2013-03-14

    The architecture of interphase chromosomes is important for the regulation of gene expression and genome maintenance. Chromosomes are linearly segmented into hundreds of domains with different protein compositions. Furthermore, the spatial organization of chromosomes is nonrandom and is characterized by many local and long-range contacts among genes and other sequence elements. A variety of genome-wide mapping techniques have made it possible to chart these properties at high resolution. Combined with microscopy and computational modeling, the results begin to yield a more coherent picture that integrates linear and three-dimensional (3D) views of chromosome organization in relation to gene regulation and other nuclear functions.

  20. Comparative genomics of emerging human ehrlichiosis agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie C Dunning Hotopp

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma (formerly Ehrlichia phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Neorickettsia (formerly Ehrlichia sennetsu are intracellular vector-borne pathogens that cause human ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. We present the complete genome sequences of these organisms along with comparisons to other organisms in the Rickettsiales order. Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. display a unique large expansion of immunodominant outer membrane proteins facilitating antigenic variation. All Rickettsiales have a diminished ability to synthesize amino acids compared to their closest free-living relatives. Unlike members of the Rickettsiaceae family, these pathogenic Anaplasmataceae are capable of making all major vitamins, cofactors, and nucleotides, which could confer a beneficial role in the invertebrate vector or the vertebrate host. Further analysis identified proteins potentially involved in vacuole confinement of the Anaplasmataceae, a life cycle involving a hematophagous vector, vertebrate pathogenesis, human pathogenesis, and lack of transovarial transmission. These discoveries provide significant insights into the biology of these obligate intracellular pathogens.

  1. Genome organization of epidemic Acinetobacter baumannii strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triassi Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for hospital-acquired infections. A. baumannii epidemics described world-wide were caused by few genotypic clusters of strains. The occurrence of epidemics caused by multi-drug resistant strains assigned to novel genotypes have been reported over the last few years. Results In the present study, we compared whole genome sequences of three A. baumannii strains assigned to genotypes ST2, ST25 and ST78, representative of the most frequent genotypes responsible for epidemics in several Mediterranean hospitals, and four complete genome sequences of A. baumannii strains assigned to genotypes ST1, ST2 and ST77. Comparative genome analysis showed extensive synteny and identified 3068 coding regions which are conserved, at the same chromosomal position, in all A. baumannii genomes. Genome alignments also identified 63 DNA regions, ranging in size from 4 o 126 kb, all defined as genomic islands, which were present in some genomes, but were either missing or replaced by non-homologous DNA sequences in others. Some islands are involved in resistance to drugs and metals, others carry genes encoding surface proteins or enzymes involved in specific metabolic pathways, and others correspond to prophage-like elements. Accessory DNA regions encode 12 to 19% of the potential gene products of the analyzed strains. The analysis of a collection of epidemic A. baumannii strains showed that some islands were restricted to specific genotypes. Conclusion The definition of the genome components of A. baumannii provides a scaffold to rapidly evaluate the genomic organization of novel clinical A. baumannii isolates. Changes in island profiling will be useful in genomic epidemiology of A. baumannii population.

  2. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R.; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R.; Mullikin, James C.; Meader, Stephen J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E.; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E.; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E.; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours1–4, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other. PMID:22722832

  3. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R; Mullikin, James C; Meader, Stephen J; Ponting, Chris P; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H; Andrés, Aida M; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-06-28

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other.

  4. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  5. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the US and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  6. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert (Affiliation: Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences)

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the United States and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  7. The evolution of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonti, Corinne N; Capra, John A

    2015-12-01

    Human genomes hold a record of the evolutionary forces that have shaped our species. Advances in DNA sequencing, functional genomics, and population genetic modeling have deepened our understanding of human demographic history, natural selection, and many other long-studied topics. These advances have also revealed many previously underappreciated factors that influence the evolution of the human genome, including functional modifications to DNA and histones, conserved 3D topological chromatin domains, structural variation, and heterogeneous mutation patterns along the genome. Using evolutionary theory as a lens to study these phenomena will lead to significant breakthroughs in understanding what makes us human and why we get sick.

  8. Life in our hands? Some ethical perspectives on the human genome and human genome diversity projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius W. du Toit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dealt with implications of the human genome and the human genome diversity project. It examined some theological implications, such as: humans as the image of God, God as the creator of life, the changed role of miracles and healings in religion, the sacredness of nature, life and the genome. Ethical issues that were addressed include eugenics, germline intervention, determinism and the human genome diversity project. Economic and legal factors that play a role were also discussed. Whilst positive aspects of genome research were considered, a critical stance was adopted towards patenting the human genome and some concluding guidelines were proposed.

  9. Predicting distinct organization of transcription factor binding sites on the promoter regions: a new genome-based approach to expand human embryonic stem cell regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Batool; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Khosravi, Pegah; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2013-12-01

    Self-proliferation and differentiation into distinct cell types have been made stem cell as a promising target for regenerative medicine. Several key genes can regulate self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (hESCs). They work together and build a transcriptional hierarchy. Coexpression and coregulation of genes control by common regulatory elements on the promoter regions. Consequently, distinct organization and combination of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs modules) on promoter regions, in view of order and distance, lead to a common specific expression pattern within a set of genes. To gain insights into transcriptional regulation of hESCs, we selected promoter regions of eleven common expressed hESC genes including SOX2, LIN28, STAT3, NANOG, LEFTB, TDGF1, POU5F1, FOXD3, TERF1, REX1 and GDF3 to predict activating regulatory modules on promoters and discover key corresponding transcription factors. Then, promoter regions in human genome were explored for modules and 328 genes containing the same modules were detected. Using microarray data, we verified that 102 of 328 genes commonly upregulate in hESCs. Also, using output data of DNA-protein interaction assays, we found that 42 of all predicted genes are targets of SOX2, NANOG and POU5F1. Additionally, a protein interaction network of hESC genes was constructed based on biological processes, and interestingly, 126 downregulated genes along with upregulated ones identified by promoter analysis were predicted in the network. Based on the results, we suggest that the identified genes, coregulating with common hESC genes, represent a novel approach for gene discovery based on whole genome promoter analysis irrespective of gene expression. Altogether, promoter profiling can be used to expand hESC transcriptional regulatory circuitry by analysis of shared functional sequences between genes. This approach provides a clear image on underlying regulatory mechanism of gene expression profile and

  10. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  11. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara P Garcia

    Full Text Available Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH. Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species.

  12. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sara P; Pinho, Armando J

    2011-01-01

    Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef) than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH). Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species.

  13. A decade of human genome project conclusion: Scientific diffusion about our genome knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Fernanda; Góes, Andréa

    2016-05-06

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) was initiated in 1990 and completed in 2003. It aimed to sequence the whole human genome. Although it represented an advance in understanding the human genome and its complexity, many questions remained unanswered. Other projects were launched in order to unravel the mysteries of our genome, including the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This review aims to analyze the evolution of scientific knowledge related to both the HGP and ENCODE projects. Data were retrieved from scientific articles published in 1990-2014, a period comprising the development and the 10 years following the HGP completion. The fact that only 20,000 genes are protein and RNA-coding is one of the most striking HGP results. A new concept about the organization of genome arose. The ENCODE project was initiated in 2003 and targeted to map the functional elements of the human genome. This project revealed that the human genome is pervasively transcribed. Therefore, it was determined that a large part of the non-protein coding regions are functional. Finally, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure emerged. The mechanistic functioning of the genome has been redrafted, revealing a much more complex picture. Besides, a gene-centric conception of the organism has to be reviewed. A number of criticisms have emerged against the ENCODE project approaches, raising the question of whether non-conserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Thus, HGP and ENCODE projects accomplished a great map of the human genome, but the data generated still requires further in depth analysis. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:215-223, 2016.

  14. Evolutionary history and genome organization of DUF1220 protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bleness, Majesta S; Dickens, C Michael; Dumas, Laura J; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Sikela, James M

    2012-09-01

    DUF1220 protein domains exhibit the most extreme human lineage-specific (HLS) copy number increase of any protein coding region in the human genome and have recently been linked to evolutionary and pathological changes in brain size (e.g., 1q21-associated microcephaly). These findings lend support to the view that DUF1220 domain dosage is a key factor in the determination of primate (and human) brain size. Here we analyze 41 animal genomes and present the most complete account to date of the evolutionary history and genome organization of DUF1220 domains and the gene family that encodes them (NBPF). Included among the novel features identified by this analysis is a DUF1220 domain precursor in nonmammalian vertebrates, a unique predicted promoter common to all mammalian NBPF genes, six distinct clades into which DUF1220 sequences can be subdivided, and a previously unknown member of the NBPF gene family (NBPF25). Most importantly, we show that the exceptional HLS increase in DUF1220 copy number (from 102 in our last common ancestor with chimp to 272 in human; an average HLS increase of ~28 copies every million years since the Homo/Pan split) was driven by intragenic domain hyperamplification. This increase primarily involved a 4.7 kb, tandemly repeated three DUF1220 domain unit we have named the HLS DUF1220 triplet, a motif that is a likely candidate to underlie key properties unique to the Homo sapiens brain. Interestingly, all copies of the HLS DUF1220 triplet lie within a human-specific pericentric inversion that also includes the 1q12 C-band, a polymorphic heterochromatin expansion that is unique to the human genome. Both cytogenetic features likely played key roles in the rapid HLS DUF1220 triplet hyperamplification, which is among the most striking genomic changes specific to the human lineage.

  15. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  16. Relevance of the Human Genome Project to inherited metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, J

    1994-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is an international effort to identify the complete structure of the human genome. HUGO, the Human Genome Organization, facilitates international cooperation and exchange of information while the Genome Data Base will act as the on-line information retrieval and storage system for the huge amount of information being accumulated. The clinical register MIM (Mendelian Inheritance in Man) established by Victor McKusick is now an on-line resource that will allow biochemists working with inborn errors of metabolism to access the rapidly expanding body of knowledge. Biochemical and molecular genetics are complementary and should draw together to find solutions to the academic and clinical problems posed by inborn errors of metabolism.

  17. Big Data Analysis of Human Genome Variations

    KAUST Repository

    Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-01-25

    Since the human genome draft sequence was in public for the first time in 2000, genomic analyses have been intensively extended to the population level. The following three international projects are good examples for large-scale studies of human genome variations: 1) HapMap Data (1,417 individuals) (http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/downloads/genotypes/2010-08_phaseII+III/forward/), 2) HGDP (Human Genome Diversity Project) Data (940 individuals) (http://www.hagsc.org/hgdp/files.html), 3) 1000 genomes Data (2,504 individuals) http://ftp.1000genomes.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp/release/20130502/ If we can integrate all three data into a single volume of data, we should be able to conduct a more detailed analysis of human genome variations for a total number of 4,861 individuals (= 1,417+940+2,504 individuals). In fact, we successfully integrated these three data sets by use of information on the reference human genome sequence, and we conducted the big data analysis. In particular, we constructed a phylogenetic tree of about 5,000 human individuals at the genome level. As a result, we were able to identify clusters of ethnic groups, with detectable admixture, that were not possible by an analysis of each of the three data sets. Here, we report the outcome of this kind of big data analyses and discuss evolutionary significance of human genomic variations. Note that the present study was conducted in collaboration with Katsuhiko Mineta and Kosuke Goto at KAUST.

  18. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  19. The footprint of metabolism in the organization of mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berná Luisa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present five evolutionary hypotheses have been proposed to explain the great variability of the genomic GC content among and within genomes: the mutational bias, the biased gene conversion, the DNA breakpoints distribution, the thermal stability and the metabolic rate. Several studies carried out on bacteria and teleostean fish pointed towards the critical role played by the environment on the metabolic rate in shaping the base composition of genomes. In mammals the debate is still open, and evidences have been produced in favor of each evolutionary hypothesis. Human genes were assigned to three large functional categories (as well as to the corresponding functional classes according to the KOG database: (i information storage and processing, (ii cellular processes and signaling, and (iii metabolism. The classification was extended to the organisms so far analyzed performing a reciprocal Blastp and selecting the best reciprocal hit. The base composition was calculated for each sequence of the whole CDS dataset. Results The GC3 level of the above functional categories was increasing from (i to (iii. This specific compositional pattern was found, as footprint, in all mammalian genomes, but not in frog and lizard ones. Comparative analysis of human versus both frog and lizard functional categories showed that genes involved in the metabolic processes underwent the highest GC3 increment. Analyzing the KOG functional classes of genes, again a well defined intra-genomic pattern was found in all mammals. Not only genes of metabolic pathways, but also genes involved in chromatin structure and dynamics, transcription, signal transduction mechanisms and cytoskeleton, showed an average GC3 level higher than that of the whole genome. In the case of the human genome, the genes of the aforementioned functional categories showed a high probability to be associated with the chromosomal bands. Conclusions In the light of different

  20. The role of patient advocacy organizations in shaping genomic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Pei P; Sharp, Richard R

    2013-01-01

    Patient advocacy organizations (PAOs) are nonprofit groups that represent patients and families affected by a significant medical condition or disease. We review some of the different approaches that humanities and social researchers use to study PAOs. Drawing on this recent scholarship, we describe some contemporary patient groups and explore how PAOs can collaborate with biomedical researchers to advance genomic science. We highlight research that aims to describe how PAOs are contributing to multiple aspects of biomedical research, including study design, definition of research goals, data collection and analysis, dissemination of results, and research funding. We also describe several challenges that genomic researchers may encounter in collaborations with PAOs. Throughout our review, we focus on the manner in which new PAO roles challenge traditional boundaries between researchers and subjects, thereby redefining the relationship of patients to science. We consider how this shift may affect our view of scientific collaborations and impact genomic researchers in the future.

  1. The Human Genome Project: big science transforms biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Leroy; Rowen, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has transformed biology through its integrated big science approach to deciphering a reference human genome sequence along with the complete sequences of key model organisms. The project exemplifies the power, necessity and success of large, integrated, cross-disciplinary efforts - so-called 'big science' - directed towards complex major objectives. In this article, we discuss the ways in which this ambitious endeavor led to the development of novel technologies and analytical tools, and how it brought the expertise of engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians together with biologists. It established an open approach to data sharing and open-source software, thereby making the data resulting from the project accessible to all. The genome sequences of microbes, plants and animals have revolutionized many fields of science, including microbiology, virology, infectious disease and plant biology. Moreover, deeper knowledge of human sequence variation has begun to alter the practice of medicine. The Human Genome Project has inspired subsequent large-scale data acquisition initiatives such as the International HapMap Project, 1000 Genomes, and The Cancer Genome Atlas, as well as the recently announced Human Brain Project and the emerging Human Proteome Project.

  2. Mitochondrial genome organization and vertebrate phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Sérgio Luiz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of DNA sequencing techniques the organization of the vertebrate mitochondrial genome shows variation between higher taxonomic levels. The most conserved gene order is found in placental mammals, turtles, fishes, some lizards and Xenopus. Birds, other species of lizards, crocodilians, marsupial mammals, snakes, tuatara, lamprey, and some other amphibians and one species of fish have gene orders that are less conserved. The most probable mechanism for new gene rearrangements seems to be tandem duplication and multiple deletion events, always associated with tRNA sequences. Some new rearrangements seem to be typical of monophyletic groups and the use of data from these groups may be useful for answering phylogenetic questions involving vertebrate higher taxonomic levels. Other features such as the secondary structure of tRNA, and the start and stop codons of protein-coding genes may also be useful in comparisons of vertebrate mitochondrial genomes.

  3. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  4. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  5. Cajal body function in genome organization and transcriptome diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Iain A; Sturgill, David; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hager, Gordon L; Dundr, Miroslav

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear bodies contribute to non-random organization of the human genome and nuclear function. Using a major prototypical nuclear body, the Cajal body, as an example, we suggest that these structures assemble at specific gene loci located across the genome as a result of high transcriptional activity. Subsequently, target genes are physically clustered in close proximity in Cajal body-containing cells. However, Cajal bodies are observed in only a limited number of human cell types, including neuronal and cancer cells. Ultimately, Cajal body depletion perturbs splicing kinetics by reducing target small nuclear RNA (snRNA) transcription and limiting the levels of spliceosomal snRNPs, including their modification and turnover following each round of RNA splicing. As such, Cajal bodies are capable of shaping the chromatin interaction landscape and the transcriptome by influencing spliceosome kinetics. Future studies should concentrate on characterizing the direct influence of Cajal bodies upon snRNA gene transcriptional dynamics. Also see the video abstract here.

  6. Human and mouse genome analysis using array comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Antoine Maria

    2004-01-01

    Almost all human cancers as well as developmental abnormalities are characterized by the presence of genetic alterations, most of which target a gene or a particular genomic locus resulting in altered gene expression and ultimately an altered phenotype. Different types of genetic alterations include

  7. The characterization of twenty sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Pelak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of twenty human genomes to evaluate the prospects for identifying rare functional variants that contribute to a phenotype of interest. We sequenced at high coverage ten "case" genomes from individuals with severe hemophilia A and ten "control" genomes. We summarize the number of genetic variants emerging from a study of this magnitude, and provide a proof of concept for the identification of rare and highly-penetrant functional variants by confirming that the cause of hemophilia A is easily recognizable in this data set. We also show that the number of novel single nucleotide variants (SNVs discovered per genome seems to stabilize at about 144,000 new variants per genome, after the first 15 individuals have been sequenced. Finally, we find that, on average, each genome carries 165 homozygous protein-truncating or stop loss variants in genes representing a diverse set of pathways.

  8. Nucleolar organizer regions: genomic 'dark matter' requiring illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStay, Brian

    2016-07-15

    Nucleoli form around tandem arrays of a ribosomal gene repeat, termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). During metaphase, active NORs adopt a characteristic undercondensed morphology. Recent evidence indicates that the HMG-box-containing DNA-binding protein UBF (upstream binding factor) is directly responsible for this morphology and provides a mitotic bookmark to ensure rapid nucleolar formation beginning in telophase in human cells. This is likely to be a widely employed strategy, as UBF is present throughout metazoans. In higher eukaryotes, NORs are typically located within regions of chromosomes that form perinucleolar heterochromatin during interphase. Typically, the genomic architecture of NORs and the chromosomal regions within which they lie is very poorly described, yet recent evidence points to a role for context in their function. In Arabidopsis, NOR silencing appears to be controlled by sequences outside the rDNA (ribosomal DNA) array. Translocations reveal a role for context in the expression of the NOR on the X chromosome in Drosophila Recent work has begun on characterizing the genomic architecture of human NORs. A role for distal sequences located in perinucleolar heterochromatin has been inferred, as they exhibit a complex transcriptionally active chromatin structure. Links between rDNA genomic stability and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are now well established, and indications are emerging that this is important in aging and replicative senescence in higher eukaryotes. This, combined with the fact that rDNA arrays are recombinational hot spots in cancer cells, has focused attention on DNA damage responses in NORs. The introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into rDNA arrays leads to a dramatic reorganization of nucleolar structure. Damaged rDNA repeats move from the nucleolar interior to form caps at the nucleolar periphery, presumably to facilitate repair, suggesting that the chromosomal context of human NORs contributes to their genomic

  9. Human evolution: a tale from ancient genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2017-02-05

    The field of human ancient DNA (aDNA) has moved from mitochondrial sequencing that suffered from contamination and provided limited biological insights, to become a fully genomic discipline that is changing our conception of human history. Recent successes include the sequencing of extinct hominins, and true population genomic studies of Bronze Age populations. Among the emerging areas of aDNA research, the analysis of past epigenomes is set to provide more new insights into human adaptation and disease susceptibility through time. Starting as a mere curiosity, ancient human genetics has become a major player in the understanding of our evolutionary history.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity'.

  10. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  11. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  12. GO4genome: A Prokaryotic Phylogeny Based on Genome Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Merkl, Rainer; Wiezer, Arnim

    2009-01-01

    Determining the phylogeny of closely related prokaryotes may fail in an analysis of rRNA or a small set of sequences. Whole-genome phylogeny utilizes the maximally available sample space. For a precise determination of genome similarity, two aspects have to be considered when developing an algorithm of whole-genome phylogeny: (1) gene order conservation is a more precise signal than gene content; and (2) when using sequence similarity, failures in identifying orthologues or the in situ replac...

  13. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  14. A complex genome-microRNA interplay in human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Santosh; Bhadra, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding regulatory RNA exist in wide spectrum of organisms ranging from prokaryote bacteria to humans. In human, a systematic search for noncoding RNA is mainly limited to the nuclear and cytosolic compartments. To investigate whether endogenous small regulatory RNA are present in cell organelles, human mitochondrial genome was also explored for prediction of precursor microRNA (pre-miRNA) and mature miRNA (miRNA) sequences. Six novel miRNA were predicted from the organelle genome by bioinformatics analysis. The structures are conserved in other five mammals including chimp, orangutan, mouse, rat, and rhesus genome. Experimentally, six human miRNA are well accumulated or deposited in human mitochondria. Three of them are expressed less prominently in Northern analysis. To ascertain their presence in human skeletal muscles, total RNA was extracted from enriched mitochondria by an immunomagnetic method. The expression of six novel pre-miRNA and miRNA was confirmed by Northern blot analysis; however, low level of remaining miRNA was found by sensitive Northern analysis. Their presence is further confirmed by real time RT-PCR. The six miRNA find their multiple targets throughout the human genome in three different types of software. The luciferase assay was used to confirm that MT-RNR2 gene was the potential target of hsa-miR-mit3 and hsa-miR-mit4.

  15. Human Genome Editing and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Singh, Bahadur

    2016-04-01

    Editing human germline genes may act as boon in some genetic and other disorders. Recent editing of the genome of the human embryo with the CRISPR/Cas9 editing tool generated a debate amongst top scientists of the world for the ethical considerations regarding its effect on the future generations. It needs to be seen as to what transformation human gene editing brings to humankind in the times to come.

  16. Genomics of Streptococcus salivarius, a major human commensal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Christine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The salivarius group of streptococci is of particular importance for humans. This group consists of three genetically similar species, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus thermophilus. S. salivarius and S. vestibularis are commensal organisms that may occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans, whereas S. thermophilus is a food bacterium widely used in dairy production. We developed Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and comparative genomic analysis to confirm the clear separation of these three species. These analyses also identified a subgroup of four strains, with a core genome diverging by about 10%, in terms of its nucleotide sequence, from that of S. salivarius sensu stricto. S. thermophilus species displays a low level of nucleotide variability, due to its recent emergence with the development of agriculture. By contrast, nucleotide variability is high in the other two species of the salivarius group, reflecting their long-standing association with humans. The species of the salivarius group have genome sizes ranging from the smallest (∼ 1.7 Mb for S. thermophilus) to the largest (∼ 2.3 Mb for S. salivarius) among streptococci, reflecting genome reduction linked to a narrow, nutritionally rich environment for S. thermophilus, and natural, more competitive niches for the other two species. Analyses of genomic content have indicated that the core genes of S. salivarius account for about two thirds of the genome, indicating considerable variability of gene content and differences in potential adaptive features. Furthermore, we showed that the genome of this species is exceptionally rich in genes encoding surface factors, glycosyltransferases and response regulators. Evidence of widespread genetic exchanges was obtained, probably involving a natural competence system and the presence of diverse mobile elements. However, although the S. salivarius strains studied were isolated from several human body-related sites

  17. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Pär G; Suzuki, Harukazu; Ninomiya, Noriko; Akalin, Altuna; Sessa, Luca; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Brozzi, Alessandro; Luzi, Lucilla; Tan, Sin Lam; Yang, Liang; Kunarso, Galih; Ng, Edwin Lian-Chong; Batalov, Serge; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wells, Christine; Bajic, Vladimir B; Orlando, Valerio; Reid, James F; Lenhard, Boris; Lipovich, Leonard

    2006-04-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs), along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  18. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär G Engström

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs, along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  19. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. Copyright © 2017 Schwartz and Cavalli.

  20. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. PMID:28049701

  1. Mitochondrial genome organization and phylogeny of two vespid wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Stephen L; Dowton, Mark; Castro, Lyda R; Ruberu, Kalani; Whiting, Michael F; Austin, Andy D; Diement, Kieren; Stevens, Julia

    2008-10-01

    We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of Abispa ephippium (Hymenoptera: Vespoidea: Vespidae: Eumeninae) and most of the mitochondrial genome of Polistes humilis synoecus (Hymenoptera: Vespoidea: Vespidae: Polistinae). The arrangement of genes differed between the two genomes and also differed slightly from that inferred to be ancestral for the Hymenoptera. The genome organization for both vespids is different from that of all other mitochondrial genomes previously reported. A number of tRNA gene rearrangements were identified that represent potential synapomorphies for a subset of the Vespidae. Analysis of all available hymenopteran mitochondrial genome sequences recovered an uncontroversial phylogeny, one consistent with analyses of other types of data.

  2. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall, the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and is an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research.

  3. The Human Genome Project, and recent advances in personalized genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson BJ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brenda J Wilson, Stuart G Nicholls Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: The language of “personalized medicine” and “personal genomics” has now entered the common lexicon. The idea of personalized medicine is the integration of genomic risk assessment alongside other clinical investigations. Consistent with this approach, testing is delivered by health care professionals who are not medical geneticists, and where results represent risks, as opposed to clinical diagnosis of disease, to be interpreted alongside the entirety of a patient's health and medical data. In this review we consider the evidence concerning the application of such personalized genomics within the context of population screening, and potential implications that arise from this. We highlight two general approaches which illustrate potential uses of genomic information in screening. The first is a narrowly targeted approach in which genetic profiling is linked with standard population-based screening for diseases; the second is a broader targeting of variants associated with multiple single gene disorders, performed opportunistically on patients being investigated for unrelated conditions. In doing so we consider the organization and evaluation of tests and services, the challenge of interpretation with less targeted testing, professional confidence, barriers in practice, and education needs. We conclude by discussing several issues pertinent to health policy, namely: avoiding the conflation of genetics with biological determinism, resisting the “technological imperative”, due consideration of the organization of screening services, the need for professional education, as well as informed decision making and public understanding. Keywords: genomics, personalized medicine, ethics, population health, evidence, education

  4. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D; Torroja, Carlos F; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T; Guerra-Assunção, José A; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F; Laird, Gavin K; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Elliot, David; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Begum, Sharmin; Mortimore, Beverley; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Lloyd, Christine; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James D; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Lanz, Christa; Raddatz, Günter; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Schuster, Stephan C; Carter, Nigel P; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M J; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J; Zon, Leonard I; Postlethwait, John H; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J P; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L

    2013-04-25

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination.

  5. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D.; Torroja, Carlos F.; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E.; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T.; Guerra-Assunção, José A.; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F.; Laird, Gavin K.; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M.; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Carter, Nigel P.; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M. J.; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J.; Zon, Leonard I.; Postlethwait, John H.; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function1,2. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease3–5. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes6, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination. PMID:23594743

  6. Implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitcher, P.

    1998-11-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

  7. The Human Genome Project and Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Highlights the importance of the Human Genome Project in educating the public about genetics. Discusses four challenges that science educators must address: teaching for conceptual understanding, the nature of science, the personal and social impact of science and technology, and the principles of technology. Contains 45 references. (JRH)

  8. Genomics of the human carnitine acyltransferase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, FR; Huijkman, NCA; Boomsma, C; Kuipers, JRG; Bartelds, B

    2000-01-01

    Five genes in the human genome are known to encode different active forms of related carnitine acyltransferases: CPT1A for liver-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT1B for muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT2 for carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, CROT for carnitine octanoyltrans

  9. Combining two technologies for full genome sequencing of human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryabin, K G; Prokhortchouk, E B; Mazur, A M; Boulygina, E S; Tsygankova, S V; Nedoluzhko, A V; Rastorguev, S M; Matveev, V B; Chekanov, N N; D A, Goranskaya; Teslyuk, A B; Gruzdeva, N M; Velikhov, V E; Zaridze, D G; Kovalchuk, M V

    2009-10-01

    At present, the new technologies of DNA sequencing are rapidly developing allowing quick and efficient characterisation of organisms at the level of the genome structure. In this study, the whole genome sequencing of a human (Russian man) was performed using two technologies currently present on the market - Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection (SOLiD™) (Applied Biosystems) and sequencing technologies of molecular clusters using fluorescently labeled precursors (Illumina). The total number of generated data resulted in 108.3 billion base pairs (60.2 billion from Illumina technology and 48.1 billion from SOLiD technology). Statistics performed on reads generated by GAII and SOLiD showed that they covered 75% and 96% of the genome respectively. Short polymorphic regions were detected with comparable accuracy however, the absolute amount of them revealed by SOLiD was several times less than by GAII. Optimal algorithm for using the latest methods of sequencing was established for the analysis of individual human genomes. The study is the first Russian effort towards whole human genome sequencing.

  10. Patentering af det humane genom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Tine

    2004-01-01

    Direktiv 98/44/EF om retlig beskyttelse af bioteknologiske opfindelser blev gennemført i dansk ret med ikrafttrædelse den 30. juli 2000. Direktivet indeholder i artikel 5 en central bestemmelse som giver adgang til patent på humane gener. I artikel 5, stk. 3, er indføjet et skærpet krav til...

  11. Leadership in a Humane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the way leadership influences an organization to become humane through its features and behaviors; as well as the organizational circumstances in which humane leadership can be nurtured. The first empirical case study, in the fields of Human Resource Development (HRD) and hospitality management, to…

  12. Leadership in a Humane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the way leadership influences an organization to become humane through its features and behaviors; as well as the organizational circumstances in which humane leadership can be nurtured. The first empirical case study, in the fields of Human Resource Development (HRD) and hospitality management, to…

  13. [Novel bidirectional promoter from human genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, A S; Sverdlova, P S; Spirin, P V; Leonova, O G; Popenko, V I; Prasolov, V S; Rubtsov, P M

    2011-01-01

    In human and other mammalian genomes a number of closely linked gene pairs transcribed in opposite directions are found. According to bioinformatic analysis up to 10% of human genes are arranged in this way. In present work the fragment of human genome was cloned that separates genes localized at 2p13.1 and oriented "head-to-head", coding for hypothetical proteins with unknown functions--CCDC (Coiled Coil Domain Containing) 142 and TTC (TetraTricopeptide repeat Containing) 31. Intergenic CCDC142-TTC31 region overlaps with CpG-island and contains a number of potential binding sites for transcription factors. This fragment functions as bidirectional promoter in the system ofluciferase reporter gene expression upon transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. The vectors containing genes of two fluorescent proteins--green (EGFP) and red (DsRed2) in opposite orientations separated by the fragment of CCDC142-TTC31 intergenic region were constructed. In HEK293 cells transfected with these vectors simultaneous expression of two fluorescent proteins is observed. Truncated versions of intergenic region were obtained and their promoter activity measured. Minimal promoter fragment contains elements Inr, BRE, DPE characteristic for TATA-less promoters. Thus, from the human genome the novel bidirectional promoter was cloned that can be used for simultaneous constitutive expression of two genes in human cells.

  14. Viral symbiosis and the holobiontic nature of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Francis Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is a holobiontic union of the mammalian nuclear genome, the mitochondrial genome and large numbers of endogenized retroviral genomes. This article defines and explores this symbiogenetic pattern of evolution, looking at the implications for human genetics, epigenetics, embryogenesis, physiology and the pathogenesis of inborn errors of metabolism and many other diseases.

  15. Spatial Genome Organization and its emerging role as a Potential Diagnosis Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Meaburn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells the genome is highly spatially organized. Functional relevance of higher order genome organization is implied by the fact that specific genes, and even whole chromosomes, alter spatial position in concert with functional changes within the nucleus, for example with modifications to chromatin or transcription. The exact molecular pathways that regulate spatial genome organization and the full implication to the cell of such an organization remain to be determined. However, there is a growing realization that the spatial organization of the genome can be used as a marker of disease. While global genome organization patterns remain largely conserved in disease, some genes and chromosomes occupy distinct nuclear positions in diseased cells compared to their normal counterparts, with the patterns of reorganization differing between diseases. Importantly, mapping the spatial positioning patterns of specific genomic loci can distinguish cancerous tissue from benign with high accuracy. Genome positioning is an attractive novel biomarker since additional quantitative biomarkers are urgently required in many cancer types. Current diagnostic techniques are often subjective and generally lack the ability to identify aggressive cancer from indolent, which can lead to over- or under-treatment of patients. Proof-of-principle for the use of genome positioning as a diagnostic tool has been provided based on small scale retrospective studies. Future large-scale studies are required to assess the feasibility of bringing spatial genome organization-based diagnostics to the clinical setting and to determine if the positioning patterns of specific loci can be useful biomarkers for cancer prognosis. Since spatial reorganization of the genome has been identified in multiple human diseases, it is likely that spatial genome positioning patterns as a diagnostic biomarker may be applied to many diseases.

  16. Helminth genomics: The implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Brindley

    Full Text Available More than two billion people (one-third of humanity are infected with parasitic roundworms or flatworms, collectively known as helminth parasites. These infections cause diseases that are responsible for enormous levels of morbidity and mortality, delays in the physical development of children, loss of productivity among the workforce, and maintenance of poverty. Genomes of the major helminth species that affect humans, and many others of agricultural and veterinary significance, are now the subject of intensive genome sequencing and annotation. Draft genome sequences of the filarial worm Brugia malayi and two of the human schistosomes, Schistosoma japonicum and S. mansoni, are now available, among others. These genome data will provide the basis for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in helminth nutrition and metabolism, host-dependent development and maturation, immune evasion, and evolution. They are likely also to predict new potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. In this review, we present an overview of these efforts and emphasize the potential impact and importance of these new findings.

  17. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world.

  18. Report of the second Human Genome Diversity workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The Second Human Genome Diversity Workshop was successfully held at Penn State University from October 29--31, 1992. The Workshop was essentially organized around 7 groups, each comprising approximately 10 participants, representing the sampling issues in different regions of the world. These groups worked independently, using a common format provided by the organizers; this was adjusted as needed by the individual groups. The Workshop began with a presentation of the mandate to the participants, and of the procedures to be followed during the workshop. Dr. Feldman presented a summary of the results from the First Workshop. He and the other organizers also presented brief comments giving their perspective on the objectives of the Second Workshop. Dr. Julia Bodmer discussed the study of European genetic diversity, especially in the context of the HLA experience there, and of plans to extend such studies in the coming years. She also discussed surveys of world HLA laboratories in regard to resources related to Human Genome Diversity. Dr. Mark Weiss discussed the relevance of nonhuman primate studies for understanding how demographic processes, such as mate exchange between local groups, affected the local dispersion of genetic variation. Primate population geneticists have some relevant experience in interpreting variation at this local level, in particular, with various DNA fingerprinting methods. This experience may be relevant to the Human Genome Diversity Project, in terms of practical and statistical issues.

  19. RNA-guided human genome engineering via Cas9

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mali, Prashant; Yang, Luhan; Esvelt, Kevin M; Aach, John; Guell, Marc; DiCarlo, James E; Norville, Julie E; Church, George M

    2013-01-01

    .... We also compute a genome-wide resource of ~190 K unique gRNAs targeting ~40.5% of human exons. Our results establish an RNA-guided editing tool for facile, robust, and multiplexable human genome engineering.

  20. The human genome project and the future of medical practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The human genome project and the future of medical practice. ... the planning stages of the human genome project, the technology and sequence data ... the quality of healthcare available in the resource-rich and the resource-poor countries.

  1. An integrated 3-Dimensional Genome Modeling Engine for data-driven simulation of spatial genome organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szałaj, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Michalski, Paul; Pietal, Michal J; Luo, Oscar J; Sadowski, Michał; Li, Xingwang; Radew, Kamen; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-12-01

    ChIA-PET is a high-throughput mapping technology that reveals long-range chromatin interactions and provides insights into the basic principles of spatial genome organization and gene regulation mediated by specific protein factors. Recently, we showed that a single ChIA-PET experiment provides information at all genomic scales of interest, from the high-resolution locations of binding sites and enriched chromatin interactions mediated by specific protein factors, to the low resolution of nonenriched interactions that reflect topological neighborhoods of higher-order chromosome folding. This multilevel nature of ChIA-PET data offers an opportunity to use multiscale 3D models to study structural-functional relationships at multiple length scales, but doing so requires a structural modeling platform. Here, we report the development of 3D-GNOME (3-Dimensional Genome Modeling Engine), a complete computational pipeline for 3D simulation using ChIA-PET data. 3D-GNOME consists of three integrated components: a graph-distance-based heat map normalization tool, a 3D modeling platform, and an interactive 3D visualization tool. Using ChIA-PET and Hi-C data derived from human B-lymphocytes, we demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D-GNOME in building 3D genome models at multiple levels, including the entire genome, individual chromosomes, and specific segments at megabase (Mb) and kilobase (kb) resolutions of single average and ensemble structures. Further incorporation of CTCF-motif orientation and high-resolution looping patterns in 3D simulation provided additional reliability of potential biologically plausible topological structures.

  2. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept.

  3. Genomic organization and evolution of the ULBP genes in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Joshua H; Marron, Brandy M; Beever, Jonathan E; Roe, Bruce A; Lewin, Harris A

    2006-09-05

    The cattle UL16-binding protein 1 (ULBP1) and ULBP2 genes encode members of the MHC Class I superfamily that have homology to the human ULBP genes. Human ULBP1 and ULBP2 interact with the NKG2D receptor to activate effector cells in the immune system. The human cytomegalovirus UL16 protein is known to disrupt the ULBP-NKG2D interaction, thereby subverting natural killer cell-mediated responses. Previous Southern blotting experiments identified evidence of increased ULBP copy number within the genomes of ruminant artiodactyls. On the basis of these observations we hypothesized that the cattle ULBPs evolved by duplication and sequence divergence to produce a sufficient number and diversity of ULBP molecules to deliver an immune activation signal in the presence of immunogenic peptides. Given the importance of the ULBPs in antiviral immunity in other species, our goal was to determine the copy number and genomic organization of the ULBP genes in the cattle genome. Sequencing of cattle bacterial artificial chromosome genomic inserts resulted in the identification of 30 cattle ULBP loci existing in two gene clusters. Evidence of extensive segmental duplication and approximately 14 Kbp of novel repetitive sequences were identified within the major cluster. Ten ULBPs are predicted to be expressed at the cell surface. Substitution analysis revealed 11 outwardly directed residues in the predicted extracellular domains that show evidence of positive Darwinian selection. These positively selected residues have only one residue that overlaps with those proposed to interact with NKG2D, thus suggesting the interaction with molecules other than NKG2D. The ULBP loci in the cattle genome apparently arose by gene duplication and subsequent sequence divergence. Substitution analysis of the ULBP proteins provided convincing evidence for positive selection on extracellular residues that may interact with peptide ligands. These results support our hypothesis that the cattle ULBPs

  4. Genomic organization and evolution of the ULBP genes in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cattle UL16-binding protein 1 (ULBP1 and ULBP2 genes encode members of the MHC Class I superfamily that have homology to the human ULBP genes. Human ULBP1 and ULBP2 interact with the NKG2D receptor to activate effector cells in the immune system. The human cytomegalovirus UL16 protein is known to disrupt the ULBP-NKG2D interaction, thereby subverting natural killer cell-mediated responses. Previous Southern blotting experiments identified evidence of increased ULBP copy number within the genomes of ruminant artiodactyls. On the basis of these observations we hypothesized that the cattle ULBPs evolved by duplication and sequence divergence to produce a sufficient number and diversity of ULBP molecules to deliver an immune activation signal in the presence of immunogenic peptides. Given the importance of the ULBPs in antiviral immunity in other species, our goal was to determine the copy number and genomic organization of the ULBP genes in the cattle genome. Results Sequencing of cattle bacterial artificial chromosome genomic inserts resulted in the identification of 30 cattle ULBP loci existing in two gene clusters. Evidence of extensive segmental duplication and approximately 14 Kbp of novel repetitive sequences were identified within the major cluster. Ten ULBPs are predicted to be expressed at the cell surface. Substitution analysis revealed 11 outwardly directed residues in the predicted extracellular domains that show evidence of positive Darwinian selection. These positively selected residues have only one residue that overlaps with those proposed to interact with NKG2D, thus suggesting the interaction with molecules other than NKG2D. Conclusion The ULBP loci in the cattle genome apparently arose by gene duplication and subsequent sequence divergence. Substitution analysis of the ULBP proteins provided convincing evidence for positive selection on extracellular residues that may interact with peptide ligands. These

  5. MIR retrotransposon sequences provide insulators to the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianrong; Vicente-García, Cristina; Seruggia, Davide; Moltó, Eduardo; Fernandez-Miñán, Ana; Neto, Ana; Lee, Elbert; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Montoliu, Lluís; Lunyak, Victoria V; Jordan, I King

    2015-08-11

    Insulators are regulatory elements that help to organize eukaryotic chromatin via enhancer-blocking and chromatin barrier activity. Although there are several examples of transposable element (TE)-derived insulators, the contribution of TEs to human insulators has not been systematically explored. Mammalian-wide interspersed repeats (MIRs) are a conserved family of TEs that have substantial regulatory capacity and share sequence characteristics with tRNA-related insulators. We sought to evaluate whether MIRs can serve as insulators in the human genome. We applied a bioinformatic screen using genome sequence and functional genomic data from CD4(+) T cells to identify a set of 1,178 predicted MIR insulators genome-wide. These predicted MIR insulators were computationally tested to serve as chromatin barriers and regulators of gene expression in CD4(+) T cells. The activity of predicted MIR insulators was experimentally validated using in vitro and in vivo enhancer-blocking assays. MIR insulators are enriched around genes of the T-cell receptor pathway and reside at T-cell-specific boundaries of repressive and active chromatin. A total of 58% of the MIR insulators predicted here show evidence of T-cell-specific chromatin barrier and gene regulatory activity. MIR insulators appear to be CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) independent and show a distinct local chromatin environment with marked peaks for RNA Pol III and a number of histone modifications, suggesting that MIR insulators recruit transcriptional complexes and chromatin modifying enzymes in situ to help establish chromatin and regulatory domains in the human genome. The provisioning of insulators by MIRs across the human genome suggests a specific mechanism by which TE sequences can be used to modulate gene regulatory networks.

  6. About human genome Acerca del genoma humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojica Tobias

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The sequence ofthe human genome, an undertaking ofadvanced countries, is nearly complete. In fact The Human Genome Project has around 85% ofthe genome sequenced 4 times on the average, with an accuracy of roughly 1 in 1000 nucleotides. Celera Genomics, on the other hand, has 99% of the sequence of one person, with an accuracy of slightly less than 1 in 100. The Human Genome project trives to produce a physical map for public consumption following a step by step strategy, in which the researcher sequences short DNA fragments belonging to Iarger fragments of known relative
    position. Celera Genomics wants to have very rapidly a physical map which can be quickly used to develop genetic tests and drugs, which can be later sold. We feel that the sequence ofthe human genome is something, which will widen the gap between advanced and backward countries.En este artículo se revisan los eventos, alrededor del secuenciamiento del genoma humano, que han llevado a tanta excitación en los medios noticiosos y académicos en meses recientes. Se explican las estrategias que han llevado a que tengamos dos borradores diferentes pero complementarios, la estrategia llevada a cabo con el dinero
    de los contribuyentes que consiste en establecer el orden de fragmentos grandes de DNA antes de ser secuenciados y la estrategia llevada a cabo con dineros aportados por la industria privada, con la intención de explotar gananciosamente el conocimiento derivado del genoma humano. El genoma humano a mediados del año 2000 es
    un borrador incompleto que cubre aliededor del 85% de la secuencia con una precisión de un error en 1000 y el 99% de la secuencia con una precisión menor de 1 en 100 nucleótidos, También se discuten algunas de las posibles avenidas

  7. [Mapping and human genome sequence program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenbach, J

    1997-03-01

    Until recently, human genome programs focused primarily on establishing maps that would provide signposts to researchers seeking to identify genes responsible for inherited diseases, as well as a basis for genome sequencing studies. Preestablished gene mapping goals have been reached. The over 7,000 microsatellite markers identified to date provide a map of sufficient density to allow localization of the gene of a monogenic disease with a precision of 1 to 2 million base pairs. The physical map, based on systematically arranged overlapping sets of artificial yeast chromosomes (YACs), has also made considerable headway during the last few years. The most recently published map covers more than 90% of the genome. However, currently available physical maps cannot be used for sequencing studies because multiple rearrangements occur in YACs. The recently developed sets of radioinduced hybrids are extremely useful for incorporating genes into existing maps. A network of American and European laboratories has successfully used these radioinduced hybrids to map 15,000 gene tags from large-scale cDNA library sequencing programs. There are increasingly pressing reasons for initiating large scale human genome sequencing studies.

  8. Elucidation of the genome organization of tobacco mosaic virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitlin, M

    1999-01-01

    Proteins unique to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-infected plants were detected in the 1970s by electrophoretic analyses of extracts of virus-infected tissues, comparing their proteins to those generated in extracts of uninfected tissues. The genome organization of TMV was deduced principally from studies involving in vitro translation of proteins from the genomic and subgenomic messenger RNAs. The ultimate analysis of the TMV genome came in 1982 when P. Goelet and colleagues sequenced the entire...

  9. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational

  10. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states) are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational analysis of nucleosome

  11. The Genome Organization of Thermotoga maritima Reflects Its Lifestyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, Haythem; Lerman, Joshua A.; Portnoy, Vasiliy A.; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Nagarajan, Harish; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lee, Dae-Hee; Qiu, Yu; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-04-25

    Recent studies have revealed that microbial genomes have many more organizational features than previously thought. Here, an integrated approach utilizing multiple ‘omics’ datasets and bioinformatics tools is established that elucidates genomic features spanning various levels of cellular organization. This methodology produces gene annotation improvements and includes the definition of transcription units. These enhancements to the annotation enable identification of a set of genetic elements instrumental to gene expression and regulation including promoters, ribosome binding sites (RBSs) and untranslated regions (UTRs). This was applied to characterize the genome organization of Thermotoga maritima—a phylogenetically deep-branching, hyperthermophilic bacterium with a small 1.86 Mb genome. Analysis derived from this multiomics approach in combination with bioinformatics tools demonstrate that the genome organization of T. maritima reflects its lifestyle, both with respect to its extreme growth temperature and compact genome. Comparative analysis of genome features suggests that thermodynamic limitations on binding kinetics for RNA polymerase and the ribosome necessitate increased sequence conservation of promoters and RBSs. Thus, restricting the sequences capable of initiating transcription and translation. Furthermore, this organism has uncharacteristically short 5’UTRs (11-17 nucleotides), which reduce the potential for 5’UTR regulatory interactions. The short intergenic distances in the T. maritima genome (5 bp on average) leave little space for regulation through transcription factor binding. The net effect of these constraints, temperature and genomic space, is a reduced ability to tune gene expression. This effect is readily apparent in global gene expression patterns, which show a high fraction of genes expressed independent of growth state with a tight, linear mRNA/protein correlation (Pearson r = 0.62, p < 2.2 x 10-16 t-test). This methodology

  12. Human genomics and microarrays: implications for the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jana; Isik, Frank

    2002-09-01

    The Human Genome Project was launched in 1989 in an effort to sequence the entire span of human DNA. Although coding sequences are important in identifying mutations, the static order of DNA does not explain how a cell or organism may respond to normal and abnormal biological processes. By examining the mRNA content of a cell, researchers can determine which genes are being activated in response to a stimulus. Traditional methods in molecular biology generally work on a "one gene: one experiment" basis, which means that the throughput is very limited and the "whole picture" of gene function is hard to obtain. To study each of the 60,000 to 80,000 genes in the human genome under each biological circumstance is not practical. Recently, microarrays (also known as gene or DNA chips) have emerged; these allow for the simultaneous determination of expression for thousands of genes and analysis of genome-wide mRNA expression. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to provide the clinical plastic surgeon with a working knowledge and understanding of the fields of genomics, microarrays, and bioinformatics and second, to present a case to illustrate how these technologies can be applied in the study of wound healing.

  13. An overview of the human genome project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The human genome project is one of the most ambitious scientific projects to date, with the ultimate goal being a nucleotide sequence for all four billion bases of human DNA. In the process of determining the nucleotide sequence for each base, the location, function, and regulatory regions from the estimated 100,000 human genes will be identified. The genome project itself relies upon maps of the human genetic code derived from several different levels of resolution. Genetic linkage analysis provides a low resolution genome map. The information for genetic linkage maps is derived from the analysis of chromosome specific markers such as Sequence Tagged Sites (STSs), Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTRs) or other polymorphic (highly informative) loci in a number of different-families. Using this information the location of an unknown disease gene can be limited to a region comprised of one million base pairs of DNA or less. After this point, one must construct or have access to a physical map of the region of interest. Physical mapping involves the construction of an ordered overlapping (contiguous) set of recombinant DNA clones. These clones may be derived from a number of different vectors including cosmids, Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs), P1 derived Artificial Chromosomes (PACs), somatic cell hybrids, or Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs). The ultimate goal for physical mapping is to establish a completely overlapping (contiguous) set of clones for the entire genome. After a gene or region of interest has been localized using physical mapping the nucleotide sequence is determined. The overlap between genetic mapping, physical mapping and DNA sequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for the isolation of disease genes through positional cloning.

  14. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, van den Myrthe; Murk, Tinka; Steegenga, Wilma; Gils-Kok, van Dieuwertje

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling was performed in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiated into adipocytes (day 10) while being continuously exposed to either one of three different persistent organic pollutants (POPs), namely TCDD, PFOS, and TBT. The Illumina Infinium 450K Human DNA

  15. 76 FR 58023 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  16. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,...

  17. 77 FR 61770 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Medicine RFAs..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: October 4, 2012. David...

  18. 77 FR 28888 - National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, ] Rockville,...

  19. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine.

  20. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome...... of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should...... shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb...

  1. Genome Editing in Human Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. This unit describes protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases.

  2. GENOME EDITING IN HUMAN CELLS USING CRISPR/CAS NUCLEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. Here we describe protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 Endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases. PMID:26423589

  3. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paydar Ima

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are small (~22 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate cell movement, specification, and development. Expression of miRNAs is highly regulated, both spatially and temporally. Based on direct cloning, sequence conservation, and predicted secondary structures, a large number of miRNAs have been identified in higher eukaryotic genomes but whether these RNAs are simply a subset of a much larger number of noncoding RNA families is unknown. This is especially true in zebrafish where genome sequencing and annotation is not yet complete. Results We analyzed the zebrafish genome to identify the number and location of proven and predicted miRNAs resulting in the identification of 35 new miRNAs. We then grouped all 415 zebrafish miRNAs into families based on seed sequence identity as a means to identify possible functional redundancy. Based on genomic location and expression analysis, we also identified those miRNAs that are likely to be encoded as part of polycistronic transcripts. Lastly, as a resource, we compiled existing zebrafish miRNA expression data and, where possible, listed all experimentally proven mRNA targets. Conclusion Current analysis indicates the zebrafish genome encodes 415 miRNAs which can be grouped into 44 families. The largest of these families (the miR-430 family contains 72 members largely clustered in two main locations along chromosome 4. Thus far, most zebrafish miRNAs exhibit tissue specific patterns of expression.

  4. Sequence space coverage, entropy of genomes and the potential to detect non-human DNA in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maley Carlo C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes store information for building and maintaining organisms. Complete sequencing of many genomes provides the opportunity to study and compare global information properties of those genomes. Results We have analyzed aspects of the information content of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli (K-12 genomes. Virtually all possible (> 98% 12 bp oligomers appear in vertebrate genomes while 98% to D. melanogaster (12–17 bp, C. elegans (11–17 bp, A. thaliana (11–17 bp, S. cerevisiae (10–16 bp and E. coli (9–15 bp. Frequencies of unique oligomers in the genomes follow similar patterns. We identified a set of 2.6 M 15-mers that are more than 1 nucleotide different from all 15-mers in the human genome and so could be used as probes to detect microbes in human samples. In a human sample, these probes would detect 100% of the 433 currently fully sequenced prokaryotes and 75% of the 3065 fully sequenced viruses. The human genome is significantly more compact in sequence space than a random genome. We identified the most frequent 5- to 20-mers in the human genome, which may prove useful as PCR primers. We also identified a bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, which has an exceptionally low diversity of oligomers given the size of its genome and its GC content. The entropy of coding regions in the human genome is significantly higher than non-coding regions and chromosomes. However chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 12 and 14 have a relatively high proportion of coding DNA without high entropy, and chromosome 20 is the opposite with a low frequency of coding regions but relatively high entropy. Conclusion Measures of the frequency of oligomers are useful for designing PCR assays and for identifying chromosomes and organisms with hidden structure that had not been previously recognized. This information may be used to detect

  5. Report on the Human Genome Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

    1987-04-01

    The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large. multi-year. multidisciplinary. technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA. major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing. theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted. broadly based. scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time. single laboratory effort into a coordinated. worldwide. comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude. but so will be the benefit to biological understanding. new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

  6. Human genome: proto-oncogenes and proretroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisselev, L L; Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Berditchevsky, F B; Tret'yakov, L D

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the studies undertaken at the Laboratory for Molecular Bases of Oncogenesis (Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow) till middle of 1984 is presented. The human genome contains multiple dispersed nucleotide sequences related to the proto-oncogene mos and to proretroviral sequences in tight juxtaposition to each other. From sequencing appropriate cloned fragments of human DNA in phage and plasmid vectors it follows that one of these regions, NV-1, is a pseudogene of proto-mos with partial duplications and two Alu elements intervening its coding sequence, and the other, CL-1, seems to be also a mos-related gene with a deletion of the internal part of the structural gene. CL-1 is flanked by a proretroviral-like sequence including tRNAiMet binding site and U5 (part of the long terminal repeat). The proretroviral-like sequences are transcribed in 21-35S poly(A)+RNA abundant in normal and malignant human cells. Two hypotheses are proposed: endogenous retroviruses take part in amplification of at least some proto-oncogenes; proto-oncogenes are inactivated via insertion of movable genetic elements and conversion into pseudogenes. Potential oncogenicity of a normal human genome undergoes two controversial influences: it increases due to proto-oncogene amplification and decreases due to inactivation of some of them.

  7. Standardized metadata for human pathogen/vector genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien G Dugan

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing has accelerated the determination of genome sequences for thousands of human infectious disease pathogens and dozens of their vectors. The scale and scope of these data are enabling genotype-phenotype association studies to identify genetic determinants of pathogen virulence and drug/insecticide resistance, and phylogenetic studies to track the origin and spread of disease outbreaks. To maximize the utility of genomic sequences for these purposes, it is essential that metadata about the pathogen/vector isolate characteristics be collected and made available in organized, clear, and consistent formats. Here we report the development of the GSCID/BRC Project and Sample Application Standard, developed by representatives of the Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCIDs, the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs for Infectious Diseases, and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH, informed by interactions with numerous collaborating scientists. It includes mapping to terms from other data standards initiatives, including the Genomic Standards Consortium's minimal information (MIxS and NCBI's BioSample/BioProjects checklists and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI. The standard includes data fields about characteristics of the organism or environmental source of the specimen, spatial-temporal information about the specimen isolation event, phenotypic characteristics of the pathogen/vector isolated, and project leadership and support. By modeling metadata fields into an ontology-based semantic framework and reusing existing ontologies and minimum information checklists, the application standard can be extended to support additional project-specific data fields and integrated with other data represented with comparable standards. The use of this metadata standard by all ongoing and future GSCID sequencing projects will

  8. Bioinformatics Assisted Gene Discovery and Annotation of Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    As the sequencing stage of human genome project is near the end, the work has begun for discovering novel genes from genome sequences and annotating their biological functions. Here are reviewed current major bioinformatics tools and technologies available for large scale gene discovery and annotation from human genome sequences. Some ideas about possible future development are also provided.

  9. [Human genomic project and human genomic haplotype map project: opportunitiy, challenge and strategy in stomatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-qing; Zeng, Xin; Wang, Zhi

    2010-08-01

    The human genomic project and the international HapMap project were designed to create a genome-wide database of patterns of human genetic variation, with the expectation that these patterns would be useful for genetic association studies of common diseases, thus lead to molecular diagnosis and personnel therapy. The article briefly reviewed the creation, target and achievement of those two projects. Furthermore, the authors have given four suggestions in facing to the opportunities and challenges brought by the two projects, including cultivation improvement of elites, cross binding of multi-subjects, strengthening construction of research base and initiation of natural key scientific project.

  10. Understanding the Human Genome Project -- A Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contribute to human disease. In 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick described the double helix structure ... of sequencing whole exomes or genomes, groundbreaking comparative genomic studies are now identifiying the causes of rare ...

  11. The Isochores as a Fundamental Level of Genome Structure and Organization: A General Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Maria; Musto, Héctor

    2017-03-01

    The recent availability of a number of fully sequenced genomes (including marine organisms) allowed to map very precisely the isochores, based on DNA sequences, confirming the results obtained before genome sequencing by the ultracentrifugation in CsCl. In fact, the analytical profile of human DNA showed that the vertebrate genome is a mosaic of isochores, typically megabase-size DNA segments that belong to a small number of families characterized by different GC levels. In this review, we will concentrate on some general genome features regarding the compositional organization from different organisms and their evolution, ranging from vertebrates to invertebrates until unicellular organisms. Since isochores are tightly linked to biological properties such as gene density, replication timing, and recombination, the new level of detail provided by the isochore map helped the understanding of genome structure, function, and evolution. All the findings reported here confirm the idea that the isochores can be considered as a "fundamental level of genome structure and organization." We stress that we do not discuss in this review the origin of isochores, which is still a matter of controversy, but we focus on well established structural and physiological aspects.

  12. Vomeronasal organ and human pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotier, D

    2011-09-01

    For many organisms, pheromonal communication is of particular importance in managing various aspects of reproduction. In tetrapods, the vomeronasal (Jacobson's) organ specializes in detecting pheromones in biological substrates of congeners. This information triggers behavioral changes associated, in the case of certain pheromones, with neuroendocrine correlates. In human embryos, the organ develops and the nerve fibers constitute a substrate for the migration of GnRH-secreting cells from the olfactory placode toward the hypothalamus. After this essential step for subsequent secretion of sex hormones by the anterior hypophysis, the organ regresses and the neural connections disappear. The vomeronasal cavities can still be observed by endoscopy in some adults, but they lack sensory neurons and nerve fibers. The genes which code for vomeronasal receptor proteins and the specific ionic channels involved in the transduction process are mutated and nonfunctional in humans. In addition, no accessory olfactory bulbs, which receive information from the vomeronasal receptor cells, are found. The vomeronasal sensory function is thus nonoperational in humans. Nevertheless, several steroids are considered to be putative human pheromones; some activate the anterior hypothalamus, but the effects observed are not comparable to those in other mammals. The signaling process (by neuronal detection and transmission to the brain or by systemic effect) remains to be clearly elucidated.

  13. Azolla - A Model Organism for Plant Genomic Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Long Qiu; Jun Yu

    2003-01-01

    The aquatic ferns of the genus Azolla are nitrogen-fixing plants that have great potentials in agricultural production and environmental conservation. Azolla in many aspects is qualified to serve as a model organism for genomic studies because of its importance in agriculture, its unique position in plant evolution, its symbiotic relationship with the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena azollae, and its moderate-sized genome. The goals of this genome project are not only to understand the biology of the Azolla genome to promote its applications in biological research and agriculture practice but also to gain critical insights about evolution of plant genomes. Together with the strategic and technical improvement as well as cost reduction of DNA sequencing, the deciphering of their genetic code is imminent.

  14. Azolla—A Model Organism for Plant Genomic Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-LongQiu; JunYu

    2003-01-01

    The aquatic ferns of the genus Azolla are nitrogen-fixing plants that have great potentials in agricultural production and environmental conservation.Azolla in many aspects is qualified to serve as a model organism for genomic studies because of its importance in agriculture,its unique position in plant evolution,its symbiotic relationship with the N2-fixing cyanobacterium,Anabaena azollae,and its moderate-sized genome.The goals of this genome project are not only to understand the biology of the Azolla genome to promote its applications in biological research and agriculture practice but also to gain critical insights about evolution of plant genomes.Together with the strategic and technical improvement as well as cost reduction of DNA sequencing,the deciphering of their genetic code is imminent.

  15. Genome organization of herpesvirus aotus type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Herpesvirus aotus type 2, a virus commonly found in owl monkeys without overt disease, has a similar genome structure to the oncogenic herpesviruses of nonhuman primates (herpesvirus saimiri, herpesvirus ateles). Virion DNA of herpesvirus aotus type 2 (M-DNA) has an unique 110-kilobase-pair region of low G + C content (40.2%, L-DNA), inserted between stretches of repetitive H-DNA (68.7% G + C, about 41 kilobase pairs per molecule) that are variable in length. A minority of virions contain def...

  16. Exuberant innovation: The Human Genome Project

    CERN Document Server

    Gisler, Monika; Woodard, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed synthesis of the development of the Human Genome Project (HGP) from 1986 to 2003 in order to test the "social bubble" hypothesis that strong social interactions between enthusiastic supporters of the HGP weaved a network of reinforcing feedbacks that led to a widespread endorsement and extraordinary commitment by those involved in the project, beyond what would be rationalized by a standard cost-benefit analysis in the presence of extraordinary uncertainties and risks. The vigorous competition and race between the initially public project and several private initiatives is argued to support the social bubble hypothesis. We also present quantitative analyses of the concomitant financial bubble concentrated on the biotech sector. Confirmation of this hypothesis is offered by the present consensus that it will take decades to exploit the fruits of the HGP, via a slow and arduous process aiming at disentangling the extraordinary complexity of the human complex body. The HGP has ushered other...

  17. The PCNA pseudogenes in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoimenov Ivaylo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a key protein in the eukaryotic DNA replication and cell proliferation. Following the cloning and characterisation of the human PCNA gene, the question of the existence of pseudogenes in the human genome was raised. Findings In this short communication we summarise the existing information about the PCNA pseudogenes and critically assess their status. Conclusions We propose the existence of at least four valid PCNA pseudogenes, PCNAP1, PCNAP2, LOC392454 and LOC390102. We would like to recommend assignment of a name for LOC392454 as "proliferating cell nuclear antigen pseudogene 3" (alias PCNAP3 and a name for LOC390102 as "proliferating cell nuclear antigen pseudogene 4" (alias PCNAP4. We prompt for more critical evaluation of the existence of a PCNA pseudogene, designated as PCNAP.

  18. Genomic basis for the convergent evolution of electric organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Jason R.; Traeger, Lindsay L.; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Moffett, Howell; Chen, Po-Hao; Novina, Carl D.; Phillips, George N.; Anand, Rene; Wells, Gregg B.; Pinch, Matthew; Güth, Robert; Unguez, Graciela A.; Albert, James S.; Zakon, Harold H.; Samanta, Manoj P.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic basis of convergent traits that originate repeatedly over broad taxonomic scales. The myogenic electric organ has evolved six times in fishes to produce electric fields used in communication, navigation, predation, or defense. We have examined the genomic basis of the convergent anatomical and physiological origins of these organs by assembling the genome of the electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) and sequencing electric organ and skeletal muscle transcriptomes from three lineages that have independently evolved electric organs. Our results indicate that, despite millions of years of evolution and large differences in the morphology of electric organ cells, independent lineages have leveraged similar transcription factors and developmental and cellular pathways in the evolution of electric organs. PMID:24970089

  19. Building the sequence map of the human pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng

    2010-01-01

    Here we integrate the de novo assembly of an Asian and an African genome with the NCBI reference human genome, as a step toward constructing the human pan-genome. We identified approximately 5 Mb of novel sequences not present in the reference genome in each of these assemblies. Most novel...... analysis of predicted genes indicated that the novel sequences contain potentially functional coding regions. We estimate that a complete human pan-genome would contain approximately 19-40 Mb of novel sequence not present in the extant reference genome. The extensive amount of novel sequence contributing...... to the genetic variation of the pan-genome indicates the importance of using complete genome sequencing and de novo assembly....

  20. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

  1. Unusual assortment of segments in 2 rare human rotavirus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Simona; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Potgieter, Christiaan A; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Banyai, Krisztian; Platia, Maria A; Colomba, Claudia; Martella, Vito

    2010-05-01

    Using full-length genome sequence analysis, we investigated 2 rare G3P[9] human rotavirus strains isolated from children with diarrhea. The genomes were recognized as assortments of genes closely related to rotaviruses originating from cats, ruminants, and humans. Results suggest multiple transmissions of genes from animal to human strains of rotaviruses.

  2. Sequencing of the smallest Apicomplexan genome from the human pathogen Babesia microti†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornillot, Emmanuel; Hadj-Kaddour, Kamel; Dassouli, Amina; Noel, Benjamin; Ranwez, Vincent; Vacherie, Benoît; Augagneur, Yoann; Brès, Virginie; Duclos, Aurelie; Randazzo, Sylvie; Carcy, Bernard; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Delbecq, Stéphane; Moubri-Ménage, Karina; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Usmani-Brown, Sahar; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Vivarès, Christian P.; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Schetters, Theo P.; Krause, Peter J.; Gorenflot, André; Berry, Vincent; Barbe, Valérie; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2012-01-01

    We have sequenced the genome of the emerging human pathogen Babesia microti and compared it with that of other protozoa. B. microti has the smallest nuclear genome among all Apicomplexan parasites sequenced to date with three chromosomes encoding ∼3500 polypeptides, several of which are species specific. Genome-wide phylogenetic analyses indicate that B. microti is significantly distant from all species of Babesidae and Theileridae and defines a new clade in the phylum Apicomplexa. Furthermore, unlike all other Apicomplexa, its mitochondrial genome is circular. Genome-scale reconstruction of functional networks revealed that B. microti has the minimal metabolic requirement for intraerythrocytic protozoan parasitism. B. microti multigene families differ from those of other protozoa in both the copy number and organization. Two lateral transfer events with significant metabolic implications occurred during the evolution of this parasite. The genomic sequencing of B. microti identified several targets suitable for the development of diagnostic assays and novel therapies for human babesiosis. PMID:22833609

  3. Genomic organization and evolution of the Atlantic salmon hemoglobin repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Ruth B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of salmonids are considered pseudo-tetraploid undergoing reversion to a stable diploid state. Given the genome duplication and extensive biological data available for salmonids, they are excellent model organisms for studying comparative genomics, evolutionary processes, fates of duplicated genes and the genetic and physiological processes associated with complex behavioral phenotypes. The evolution of the tetrapod hemoglobin genes is well studied; however, little is known about the genomic organization and evolution of teleost hemoglobin genes, particularly those of salmonids. The Atlantic salmon serves as a representative salmonid species for genomics studies. Given the well documented role of hemoglobin in adaptation to varied environmental conditions as well as its use as a model protein for evolutionary analyses, an understanding of the genomic structure and organization of the Atlantic salmon α and β hemoglobin genes is of great interest. Results We identified four bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs comprising two hemoglobin gene clusters spanning the entire α and β hemoglobin gene repertoire of the Atlantic salmon genome. Their chromosomal locations were established using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis and linkage mapping, demonstrating that the two clusters are located on separate chromosomes. The BACs were sequenced and assembled into scaffolds, which were annotated for putatively functional and pseudogenized hemoglobin-like genes. This revealed that the tail-to-tail organization and alternating pattern of the α and β hemoglobin genes are well conserved in both clusters, as well as that the Atlantic salmon genome houses substantially more hemoglobin genes, including non-Bohr β globin genes, than the genomes of other teleosts that have been sequenced. Conclusions We suggest that the most parsimonious evolutionary path leading to the present organization of the Atlantic salmon

  4. HCMI Organization | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consortium HCMI was created and funded by the National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK, foundation Hubrecht Organoid Technology, and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Together, these organizations develop policy and make programmatic decisions to contribute to the function of the HCMI. National Cancer Institute

  5. Genomics into Healthcare: the 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortina, Paolo; Al Khaja, Najib; Al Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak; Nair, Pratibha; Innocenti, Federico; Patrinos, George P; Kricka, Larry J

    2014-05-01

    The joint 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium, "Genomics into Healthcare" was coorganized by the Center for Arab Genomic Studies (http://www.cags.org.ae) in collaboration with the Golden Helix Foundation (http://www.goldenhelix.org) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 17 to 19 November, 2013. The meeting was attended by over 900 participants, doctors and biomedical students from over 50 countries and was organized into a series of nine themed sessions that covered cancer genomics and epigenetics, genomic and epigenetic studies, genomics of blood and metabolic disorders, cytogenetic diagnosis and molecular profiling, next-generation sequencing, consanguinity and hereditary diseases, clinical genomics, clinical applications of pharmacogenomics, and genomics in public health.

  6. Data mining and the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarbanel, Henry [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Callan, Curtis [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, William [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, Freeman [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Hwa, Terence [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Koonin, Steven [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Levine, Herbert [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Rothaus, Oscar [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, Roy [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Stubbs, Christopher [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, Peter [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    2000-01-07

    As genomics research moves from an era of data acquisition to one of both acquisition and interpretation, new methods are required for organizing and prioritizing the data. These methods would allow an initial level of data analysis to be carried out before committing resources to a particular genetic locus. This JASON study sought to delineate the main problems that must be faced in bioinformatics and to identify information technologies that can help to overcome those problems. While the current influx of data greatly exceeds what biologists have experienced in the past, other scientific disciplines and the commercial sector have been handling much larger datasets for many years. Powerful datamining techniques have been developed in other fields that, with appropriate modification, could be applied to the biological sciences.

  7. 75 FR 10488 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHGRI MAP Review... Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; LRP 2010 Teleconference. Date: April 7,...

  8. 78 FR 20933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Loan Repayment Program... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Room 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville,...

  9. 76 FR 35223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Sequencing Centers...D, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...

  10. 77 FR 60706 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Special Emphasis... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of...

  11. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Resource...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  12. 75 FR 52538 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Date: November 19-20..., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  13. 75 FR 8374 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Revolutionary..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076,...

  14. 78 FR 68856 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  15. 78 FR 14806 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel: Clinically Relevant... grant applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 4th Floor Conference Room,...

  16. Composition and organization of active centromere sequences in complex genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Karen E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres are sites of chromosomal spindle attachment during mitosis and meiosis. While the sequence basis for centromere identity remains a subject of considerable debate, one approach is to examine the genomic organization at these active sites that are correlated with epigenetic marks of centromere function. Results We have developed an approach to characterize both satellite and non-satellite centromeric sequences that are missing from current assemblies in complex genomes, using the dog genome as an example. Combining this genomic reference with an epigenetic dataset corresponding to sequences associated with the histone H3 variant centromere protein A (CENP-A, we identify active satellite sequence domains that appear to be both functionally and spatially distinct within the overall definition of satellite families. Conclusions These findings establish a genomic and epigenetic foundation for exploring the functional role of centromeric sequences in the previously sequenced dog genome and provide a model for similar studies within the context of less-characterized genomes.

  17. Online genetic databases informing human genome epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Julian PT

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of high throughput genotyping technology and the information available via projects such as the human genome sequencing and the HapMap project, more and more data relevant to the study of genetics and disease risk will be produced. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of human genome epidemiology studies rely on the ability to identify relevant studies and to obtain suitable data from these studies. A first port of call for most such reviews is a search of MEDLINE. We examined whether this could be usefully supplemented by identifying databases on the World Wide Web that contain genetic epidemiological information. Methods We conducted a systematic search for online databases containing genetic epidemiological information on gene prevalence or gene-disease association. In those containing information on genetic association studies, we examined what additional information could be obtained to supplement a MEDLINE literature search. Results We identified 111 databases containing prevalence data, 67 databases specific to a single gene and only 13 that contained information on gene-disease associations. Most of the latter 13 databases were linked to MEDLINE, although five contained information that may not be available from other sources. Conclusion There is no single resource of structured data from genetic association studies covering multiple diseases, and in relation to the number of studies being conducted there is very little information specific to gene-disease association studies currently available on the World Wide Web. Until comprehensive data repositories are created and utilized regularly, new data will remain largely inaccessible to many systematic review authors and meta-analysts.

  18. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Katherine S; Salama, Sofie R; King, Bryan;

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 gen...... contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.......Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202...... genomic elements that are highly conserved in vertebrates but show evidence of significantly accelerated substitution rates in human. These are mostly in non-coding DNA, often near genes associated with transcription and DNA binding. Resequencing confirmed that the five most accelerated elements...

  19. Cephalopod genomics: A plan of strategies and organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J.; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Di Cristo, Carlo; Dilkes, Brian P.; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Freeman, Robert M.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Koenig, Kristen M.; Lindgren, Annie R.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Minx, Patrick; Moroz, Leonid L.; Nödl, Marie-Therese; Nyholm, Spencer V.; Ogura, Atsushi; Pungor, Judit R.; Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.; Schwarz, Erich M.; Shigeno, Shuichi; Strugnell, Jan M.; Wollesen, Tim; Zhang, Guojie; Ragsdale, Clifton W.

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, “Paths to Cephalopod Genomics- Strategies, Choices, Organization,” held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austria, Australia, China, Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Spain and the USA) met to address the pressing need for genome sequencing of cephalopod mollusks. This group, drawn from cephalopod biologists, neuroscientists, developmental and evolutionary biologists, materials scientists, bioinformaticians and researchers active in sequencing, assembling and annotating genomes, agreed on a set of cephalopod species of particular importance for initial sequencing and developed strategies and an organization (CephSeq Consortium) to promote this sequencing. The conclusions and recommendations of this meeting are described in this white paper. PMID:23451296

  20. Biology, genome organization and evolution of parvoviruses in marine shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of parvoviruses are now know to infect marine shrimp, and these viruses alone or in combination with other viruses have the potential to cause major losses in shrimp aquaculture globally. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the biology, genome organization, gene expression, and...

  1. The draft genome of a termite illuminates alternative social organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termites have substantial economic and ecological impact worldwide. They are also the oldest organisms living in complex societies, having evolved a caste system independent of that of eusocial Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). Here we provide the first genome sequence for a termite, Zootermopsis ...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Anthony J.; Kelly, Denise; Flint, Harry J;

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183(T) (= DSM 16839(T) = NCIMB 14029(T)), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-...

  3. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  4. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  5. Human Genomics in China——Ten Years Endeavor: From Planning to Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhu; ZHAO Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    @@ Ten years ago, the Chinese National Human Genome Center at Shanghai (South Center, hereafter) was es-tablished in the Zhangjiang HiTech Park of Pudong District in Shanghai. To commemorate this important event, which marks the beginning of the Genomics Era in China, we specially organize a series of mini-reviews for this special issue. We hope that this effort may draw the attention of the Chinese life science research workers to collectively recall the short but fruitful history of human genome project and coordinately explore the trend and goal of the future development of this academic discipline in China.

  6. Evolution and genomics of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reynoso, M A; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Barros-Núñez, P

    2015-08-21

    Most living beings are able to perform actions that can be considered intelligent or, at the very least, the result of an appropriate reaction to changing circumstances in their environment. However, the intelligence or intellectual processes of humans are vastly superior to those achieved by all other species. The adult human brain is a highly complex organ weighing approximately 1500g, which accounts for only 2% of the total body weight but consumes an amount of energy equal to that required by all skeletal muscle at rest. Although the human brain displays a typical primate structure, it can be identified by its specific distinguishing features. The process of evolution and humanisation of the Homo sapiens brain resulted in a unique and distinct organ with the largest relative volume of any animal species. It also permitted structural reorganization of tissues and circuits in specific segments and regions. These steps explain the remarkable cognitive abilities of modern humans compared not only with other species in our genus, but also with older members of our own species. Brain evolution required the coexistence of two adaptation mechanisms. The first involves genetic changes that occur at the species level, and the second occurs at the individual level and involves changes in chromatin organisation or epigenetic changes. The genetic mechanisms include: a) genetic changes in coding regions that lead to changes in the sequence and activity of existing proteins; b) duplication and deletion of previously existing genes; c) changes in gene expression through changes in the regulatory sequences of different genes; and d) synthesis of non-coding RNAs. Lastly, this review describes some of the main documented chromosomal differences between humans and great apes. These differences have also contributed to the evolution and humanisation process of the H. sapiens brain. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights

  7. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  8. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  9. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong-Hae; Kim, Rosalind; Adams, Paul; Chandonia, John-Marc

    2007-09-14

    The initial objective of the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center was to obtain a near complete three-dimensional (3D) structural information of all soluble proteins of two minimal organisms, closely related pathogens Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae. The former has fewer than 500 genes and the latter has fewer than 700 genes. A semiautomated structural genomics pipeline was set up from target selection, cloning, expression, purification, and ultimately structural determination. At the time of this writing, structural information of more than 93percent of all soluble proteins of M. genitalium is avail able. This chapter summarizes the approaches taken by the authors' center.

  10. Modeling chromosomes in mouse to explore the function of genes, genomic disorders, and chromosomal organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Brault

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges of genomic research after the completion of the human genome project is to assign a function to all the genes and to understand their interactions and organizations. Among the various techniques, the emergence of chromosome engineering tools with the aim to manipulate large genomic regions in the mouse model offers a powerful way to accelerate the discovery of gene functions and provides more mouse models to study normal and pathological developmental processes associated with aneuploidy. The combination of gene targeting in ES cells, recombinase technology, and other techniques makes it possible to generate new chromosomes carrying specific and defined deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations that are accelerating functional analysis. This review presents the current status of chromosome engineering techniques and discusses the different applications as well as the implication of these new techniques in future research to better understand the function of chromosomal organization and structures.

  11. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M.; Lindskog, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome......Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide...

  12. Genomics and identity: the bioinformatisation of human life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub

    2009-06-01

    The genomics "revolution" is spreading. Originating in the molecular life sciences, it initially affected a number of biomedical research fields such as cancer genomics and clinical genetics. Now, however, a new "wave" of genomic bioinformation is transforming a widening array of disciplines, including those that address the social, historical and cultural dimensions of human life. Increasingly, bioinformation is affecting "human sciences" such as psychiatry, psychology, brain research, behavioural research ("behavioural genomics"), but also anthropology and archaeology ("bioarchaeology"). Thus, bioinformatics is having an impact on how we define and understand ourselves, how identities are formed and constituted, and, finally, on how we (on the basis of these redefined identities) assess and address some of the more concrete societal issues involved in genomics governance in various settings. This article explores how genomics and bioinformation, by influencing research agendas in the human sciences and the humanities, are affecting our self-image, our identity, the way we see ourselves. The impact of bioinformation on self-understanding will be assessed on three levels: (1) the collective level (the impact of comparative genomics on our understanding of human beings as a species), (2) the individual level (the impact of behavioural genomics on our understanding of ourselves as individuals), and (3) the genealogical level (the impact of population genomics on our understanding of human history, notably early human history). This threefold impact will be assessed from two seemingly incompatible philosophical perspectives, namely a "humanistic" perspective (represented in this article by Francis Fukuyama) and a "post-humanistic" one (represented by Peter Sloterdijk). On the basis of this analysis it will be concluded that, rather than focussing on human "enhancement" by adding or deleting genes, genome-oriented practices of the Self will focus on using genomics

  13. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Shimoyama

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases.

  14. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; De Pons, Jeff; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R.; Tutaj, Marek; Petri, Victoria; Hayman, G. Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Ghiasvand, Omid; Thota, Jyothi; Dwinell, Melinda R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu) has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases. PMID:27736745

  15. Understanding Spatial Genome Organization:Methods and Insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vijay Ramani; Jay Shendure; Zhijun Duan

    2016-01-01

    The manner by which eukaryotic genomes are packaged into nuclei while maintaining crucial nuclear functions remains one of the fundamental mysteries in biology. Over the last ten years, we have witnessed rapid advances in both microscopic and nucleic acid-based approaches to map genome architecture, and the application of these approaches to the dissection of higher-order chromosomal structures has yielded much new information. It is becoming increasingly clear, for example, that interphase chromosomes form stable, multilevel hierarchical structures. Among them, self-associating domains like so-called topologically associating domains (TADs) appear to be building blocks for large-scale genomic organization. This review describes features of these broadly-defined hierarchical structures, insights into the mechanisms underlying their formation, our current understanding of how interactions in the nuclear space are linked to gene regulation, and important future directions for the field.

  16. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M Vargas

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence ...

  17. Genetic variation and the de novo assembly of human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of genetic variation and the assembly of genome sequences are both inextricably linked to advances in DNA-sequencing technology. Short-read massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our ability to discover genetic variation but is insufficient to generate high-quality genome assemblies or resolve most structural variation. Full resolution of variation is only guaranteed by complete de novo assembly of a genome. Here, we review approaches to genome assembly, the nature of gaps or missing sequences, and biases in the assembly process. We describe the challenges of generating a complete de novo genome assembly using current technologies and the impact that being able to perfectly sequence the genome would have on understanding human disease and evolution. Finally, we summarize recent technological advances that improve both contiguity and accuracy and emphasize the importance of complete de novo assembly as opposed to read mapping as the primary means to understanding the full range of human genetic variation.

  18. Heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial genomes of human lice and ticks revealed by high throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyu Xiong

    Full Text Available The typical mitochondrial (mt genomes of bilateral animals consist of 37 genes on a single circular chromosome. The mt genomes of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, and the human head louse, Pediculus capitis, however, are extensively fragmented and contain 20 minichromosomes, with one to three genes on each minichromosome. Heteroplasmy, i.e. nucleotide polymorphisms in the mt genome within individuals, has been shown to be significantly higher in the mt cox1 gene of human lice than in humans and other animals that have the typical mt genomes. To understand whether the extent of heteroplasmy in human lice is associated with mt genome fragmentation, we sequenced the entire coding regions of all of the mt minichromosomes of six human body lice and six human head lice from Ethiopia, China and France with an Illumina HiSeq platform. For comparison, we also sequenced the entire coding regions of the mt genomes of seven species of ticks, which have the typical mitochondrial genome organization of bilateral animals. We found that the level of heteroplasmy varies significantly both among the human lice and among the ticks. The human lice from Ethiopia have significantly higher level of heteroplasmy than those from China and France (Pt<0.05. The tick, Amblyomma cajennense, has significantly higher level of heteroplasmy than other ticks (Pt<0.05. Our results indicate that heteroplasmy level can be substantially variable within a species and among closely related species, and does not appear to be determined by single factors such as genome fragmentation.

  19. Ancient Human Genome Sequence of an Extinct Palaeo-Eskimo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Li, Yingrui; Lindgreen, Stinus;

    2010-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from approximately 4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20x, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an...... for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit....

  20. Recent and ongoing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Hellmann, Ines; Hubisz, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    The recent availability of genome-scale genotyping data has led to the identification of regions of the human genome that seem to have been targeted by selection. These findings have increased our understanding of the evolutionary forces that affect the human genome, have augmented our knowledge...... of gene function and promise to increase our understanding of the genetic basis of disease. However, inferences of selection are challenged by several confounding factors, especially the complex demographic history of human populations, and concordance between studies is variable. Although such studies...

  1. Population genetic inference from personal genome data: impact of ancestry and admixture on human genomic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Jeffrey M; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Peckham, Heather E; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G; Reese, Martin G; Lincoln, Stephen E; Butte, Atul J; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2012-10-05

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas-70% of the European ancestry in today's African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7-8 generations ago.

  2. Translation of the human genome into clinical allergy, part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Saito

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available After completion of sequencing of the human genome, you will no longer be able to discover a new gene and may not be able to find a new molecule in the human body. Instead, you may find many new molecule networks. It will be possible to select information obtained from animal models just where orthologous genes are functioning similarly. Mouse disease models will not be used any longer where key orthologous genes are working differently than in humans. Analysis of cell type-selective transcripts from database searches is now available to minimize the efforts required for drug discovery. As such, it will soon be possible to use computational modeling to analyze integrative biological function and to test hypotheses without performing any in vivo or in vitro experimentation. However, before establishing a system simulating the human body, which consists of a variety of organs, which further consist of various types of cells, which then consist of various types of proteins, which consist of 20 types of amino acids, there are many steps that need to be understood.

  3. Genomic organization and sequence analysis of the vomeronasal receptor V2R genes in mouse genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hui; Zhang YaPing

    2007-01-01

    Two multigene superfamilies, named V1R and V2R, encoding seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified as pheromone receptors in mammals. Three V2R gene families have been described in mouse and rat. Here we screened the updated mouse genome sequence database and finally retrieved 63 putative functional V2R genes including three newly identified genes which formed a new additional family. We described the genomic organization of these genes and also characterized the conservation of mouse V2R protein sequences. These genomic and sequence information we described are useful as part of the evidence to speculate the functional domain of V2Rs and should give aid to the functionality study in the future.

  4. Dissecting the human microbiome with single-cell genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2017-06-14

    Recent advances in genome sequencing of single microbial cells enable the assignment of functional roles to members of the human microbiome that cannot currently be cultured. This approach can reveal the genomic basis of phenotypic variation between closely related strains and can be applied to the targeted study of immunogenic bacteria in disease.

  5. Genome Editing: A New Approach to Human Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteus, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the genome with precise spatial and nucleotide resolution (genome editing) has been a powerful research tool. In the past decade, the tools and expertise for using genome editing in human somatic cells and pluripotent cells have increased to such an extent that the approach is now being developed widely as a strategy to treat human disease. The fundamental process depends on creating a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the genome and then allowing the cell's endogenous DSB repair machinery to fix the break such that precise nucleotide changes are made to the DNA sequence. With the development and discovery of several different nuclease platforms and increasing knowledge of the parameters affecting different genome editing outcomes, genome editing frequencies now reach therapeutic relevance for a wide variety of diseases. Moreover, there is a series of complementary approaches to assessing the safety and toxicity of any genome editing process, irrespective of the underlying nuclease used. Finally, the development of genome editing has raised the issue of whether it should be used to engineer the human germline. Although such an approach could clearly prevent the birth of people with devastating and destructive genetic diseases, questions remain about whether human society is morally responsible enough to use this tool.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of human parasitic roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yung Chul; Kim, Won; Park, Joong-Ki

    2011-08-01

    The genome length of the Ascaris lumbricoides, human parasitic roundworm, is 14,281 bp with a nucleotide composition of 22.1% A, 49.8% T, 7.8% C, and 20.3% G. The genome consists of 12 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 1 control region.

  7. Proteome organization in a genome-reduced bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, Sebastian; van Noort, Vera; Betts, Matthew J; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Batisse, Claire; Rode, Michaela; Yamada, Takuji; Maier, Tobias; Bader, Samuel; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro; Castaño-Diez, Daniel; Chen, Wei-Hua; Devos, Damien; Güell, Marc; Norambuena, Tomas; Racke, Ines; Rybin, Vladimir; Schmidt, Alexander; Yus, Eva; Aebersold, Ruedi; Herrmann, Richard; Böttcher, Bettina; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Russell, Robert B; Serrano, Luis; Bork, Peer; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2009-11-27

    The genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae is among the smallest found in self-replicating organisms. To study the basic principles of bacterial proteome organization, we used tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) in a proteome-wide screen. The analysis revealed 62 homomultimeric and 116 heteromultimeric soluble protein complexes, of which the majority are novel. About a third of the heteromultimeric complexes show higher levels of proteome organization, including assembly into larger, multiprotein complex entities, suggesting sequential steps in biological processes, and extensive sharing of components, implying protein multifunctionality. Incorporation of structural models for 484 proteins, single-particle electron microscopy, and cellular electron tomograms provided supporting structural details for this proteome organization. The data set provides a blueprint of the minimal cellular machinery required for life.

  8. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  9. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular

  10. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular char

  11. Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Nastaran; Phanstiel, Douglas H; He, Chao; Grubert, Fabian; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Kasowski, Maya; Zhang, Michael Q; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that interactions between regulatory genomic elements play an important role in regulating gene expression. We generated a genome-wide interaction map of regulatory elements in human cells (ENCODE tier 1 cells, K562, GM12878) using Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) experiments targeting six broadly distributed factors. Bound regions covered 80% of DNase I hypersensitive sites including 99.7% of TSS and 98% of enhancers. Correlating this map with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets revealed cohesin, CTCF, and ZNF143 as key components of three-dimensional chromatin structure and revealed how the distal chromatin state affects gene transcription. Comparison of interactions between cell types revealed that enhancer-promoter interactions were highly cell-type-specific. Construction and comparison of distal and proximal regulatory networks revealed stark differences in structure and biological function. Proximal binding events are enriched at genes with housekeeping functions, while distal binding events interact with genes involved in dynamic biological processes including response to stimulus. This study reveals new mechanistic and functional insights into regulatory region organization in the nucleus. © 2014 Heidari et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  13. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Interphase Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte Carl

  14. Three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories in the human interphase cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1999-01-01

    markdownabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte Carl

  15. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models, which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte Car

  16. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Otto, Thomas D.

    2014-09-09

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host–parasite interface may have mediated host switching.

  17. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas D; Rayner, Julian C; Böhme, Ulrike; Pain, Arnab; Spottiswoode, Natasha; Sanders, Mandy; Quail, Michael; Ollomo, Benjamin; Renaud, François; Thomas, Alan W; Prugnolle, Franck; Conway, David J; Newbold, Chris; Berriman, Matthew

    2014-09-09

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host-parasite interface may have mediated host switching.

  18. Genome Editing and Its Applications in Model Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyuan Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances are important for innovative biological research. Development of molecular tools for DNA manipulation, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas, has revolutionized genome editing. These approaches can be used to develop potential therapeutic strategies to effectively treat heritable diseases. In the last few years, substantial progress has been made in CRISPR/Cas technology, including technical improvements and wide application in many model systems. This review describes recent advancements in genome editing with a particular focus on CRISPR/Cas, covering the underlying principles, technological optimization, and its application in zebrafish and other model organisms, disease modeling, and gene therapy used for personalized medicine.

  19. Genomic Organization and Expression in E. coli of Zebrafish Terra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵知行; 华正春; 孟安明

    2001-01-01

    Zebrafish terra encodes a transcription factor that is specifically expressed in developing somites.Previous studies suggested that this gene is involved in vertebrate somitogenesis. In this study, the genomic DNA of terra locus was isolated and its organization was investigated. The analysis showed that terra locus consists of 3 introns and occupies 3154 bp in the genome of zebrafish. The exon-intron junctions of the second and third introns conform to the GT-AG rule, while the first intron has the unusual junction sequences of GT-AC. An IPTG-inducible expression system was established to produce terra protein in bacterial cells. Overexpression of terra protein leads to the formation of inclusion bodies in the bacterial ceils. The protein will be used to study its structure and function.

  20. Genome Editing and Its Applications in Model Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongyuan; Liu, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Technological advances are important for innovative biological research. Development of molecular tools for DNA manipulation, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas), has revolutionized genome editing. These approaches can be used to develop potential therapeutic strategies to effectively treat heritable diseases. In the last few years, substantial progress has been made in CRISPR/Cas technology, including technical improvements and wide application in many model systems. This review describes recent advancements in genome editing with a particular focus on CRISPR/Cas, covering the underlying principles, technological optimization, and its application in zebrafish and other model organisms, disease modeling, and gene therapy used for personalized medicine.

  1. Genome editing: a robust technology for human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Pandian; Song, Minjung; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells comprise induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells, which have tremendous potential for biological and therapeutic applications. The development of efficient technologies for the targeted genome alteration of stem cells in disease models is a prerequisite for utilizing stem cells to their full potential. Genome editing of stem cells is possible with the help of synthetic nucleases that facilitate site-specific modification of a gene of interest. Recent advances in genome editing techniques have improved the efficiency and speed of the development of stem cells for human disease models. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated system are powerful tools for editing DNA at specific loci. Here, we discuss recent technological advances in genome editing with site-specific nucleases in human stem cells.

  2. Localizing recent adaptive evolution in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, Scott H; Hubisz, Melissa J; Clark, Andrew G;

    2007-01-01

    Identifying genomic locations that have experienced selective sweeps is an important first step toward understanding the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. Using statistical methods that account for the confounding effects of population demography, recombination rate variation, and single......-nucleotide polymorphism ascertainment, while also providing fine-scale estimates of the position of the selected site, we analyzed a genomic dataset of 1.2 million human single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in African-American, European-American, and Chinese samples. We identify 101 regions of the human genome......, clusters of olfactory receptors, genes involved in nervous system development and function, immune system genes, and heat shock genes. We also observe consistent evidence of selective sweeps in centromeric regions. In general, we find that recent adaptation is strikingly pervasive in the human genome...

  3. [The Human Genome Project and the right to intellectual property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambrón, A

    2000-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was designed to achieve two objectives. The scientific goal was the mapping and sequencing of the human genome and the social objective was to benefit the health and well-being of humanity. Although the first objective is nearing successful conclusion, the same cannot be said for the second, mainly because the benefits will take some time to be applicable and effective, but also due to the very nature of the project. The HGP also had a clear economic dimension, which has had a major bearing on its social side. Operating in the midst of these three dimensions is the right to intellectual property (although not just this right), which has facilitated the granting of patents on human genes. Put another way, the carrying out of the HGP has required the privatisation of knowledge of the human genome, and this can be considered an attack on the genetic heritage of mankind.

  4. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories in the Human Interphase Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDespite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its three-dimensional structure is widely unknown. The regulation of genes has been shown to be connected closely to the three-dimensional organization of the genome in the cell nucleus. The nucleus of the cell has for a long t

  5. Expression, tandem repeat copy number variation and stability of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick Brian P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrosatellites are some of the largest variable number tandem repeats in the human genome, but what role these unusual sequences perform is unknown. Their importance to human health is clearly demonstrated by the 4q35 macrosatellite D4Z4 that is associated with the onset of the muscle degenerative disease facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Nevertheless, many other macrosatellite arrays in the human genome remain poorly characterized. Results Here we describe the organization, tandem repeat copy number variation, transmission stability and expression of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome: the TAF11-Like array located on chromosomes 5p15.1, the SST1 arrays on 4q28.3 and 19q13.12, the PRR20 array located on chromosome 13q21.1, and the ZAV array at 9q32. All are polymorphic macrosatellite arrays that at least for TAF11-Like and SST1 show evidence of meiotic instability. With the exception of the SST1 array that is ubiquitously expressed, all are expressed at high levels in the testis and to a lesser extent in the brain. Conclusions Our results extend the number of characterized macrosatellite arrays in the human genome and provide the foundation for formulation of hypotheses to begin assessing their functional role in the human genome.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells: Harnessing human genetics in a dish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Federico

    2016-07-01

    Because of their extraordinary differentiation potential, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can differentiate into virtually any cell type of the human body, providing a powerful platform not only for generating relevant cell types useful for cell replacement therapies, but also for modeling human development and disease. Expanding this potential, structures resembling human organs, termed organoids, have been recently obtained from hPSCs through tissue engineering. Organoids exhibit multiple cell types self-organizing into structures recapitulating in part the physiology and the cellular interactions observed in the organ in vivo, offering unprecedented opportunities for human disease modeling. To fulfill this promise, tissue engineering in hPSCs needs to be supported by robust and scalable genome editing technologies. With the advent of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, manipulating the genome of hPSCs has now become an easy task, allowing modifying their genome with superior precision, speed, and throughput. Here we review current and potential applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in hPSCs and how they contribute to establish hPSCs as a model of choice for studying human genetics. Developmental Dynamics 245:788-806, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 75 FR 52537 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  8. 75 FR 2148 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  9. 78 FR 24223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd floor Conf. Room 3146, 5635 Fishers...

  10. 76 FR 3643 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January...

  11. The mouse genome database: genotypes, phenotypes, and models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD's catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations.

  12. Sequence and annotation of the apicoplast genome of the human pathogen Babesia microti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprajita Garg

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan intraerythrocytic parasite Babesia microti is an emerging human pathogen and the primary cause of human babesiosis, a malaria-like illness endemic in the United States. The pathogen is transmitted to humans by the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, and by transfusion of blood from asymptomatic B. microti-infected donors. Whereas the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of this parasite have been sequenced, assembled and annotated, its apicoplast genome remained incomplete, mainly due to its low representation and high A+T content. Here we report the complete sequence and annotation of the apicoplast genome of the B. microti R1 isolate. The genome consists of a 28.7 kb circular molecule encoding primarily functions important for maintenance of the apicoplast DNA, transcription, translation and maturation of organellar proteins. Genome analysis and annotation revealed a unique gene structure and organization of the B. microti apicoplast genome and suggest that all metabolic and non-housekeeping functions in this organelle are nuclear-encoded. B. microti apicoplast functions are significantly different from those of the host, suggesting that they might be useful as targets for development of potent and safe therapies for the treatment of human babesiosis.

  13. Integrated genomics and proteomics of the Torpedo californica electric organ: concordance with the mammalian neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mate Suzanne E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During development, the branchial mesoderm of Torpedo californica transdifferentiates into an electric organ capable of generating high voltage discharges to stun fish. The organ contains a high density of cholinergic synapses and has served as a biochemical model for the membrane specialization of myofibers, the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We studied the genome and proteome of the electric organ to gain insight into its composition, to determine if there is concordance with skeletal muscle and the NMJ, and to identify novel synaptic proteins. Results Of 435 proteins identified, 300 mapped to Torpedo cDNA sequences with ≥2 peptides. We identified 14 uncharacterized proteins in the electric organ that are known to play a role in acetylcholine receptor clustering or signal transduction. In addition, two human open reading frames, C1orf123 and C6orf130, showed high sequence similarity to electric organ proteins. Our profile lists several proteins that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle or are muscle specific. Synaptic proteins such as acetylcholinesterase, acetylcholine receptor subunits, and rapsyn were present in the electric organ proteome but absent in the skeletal muscle proteome. Conclusions Our integrated genomic and proteomic analysis supports research describing a muscle-like profile of the organ. We show that it is a repository of NMJ proteins but we present limitations on its use as a comprehensive model of the NMJ. Finally, we identified several proteins that may become candidates for signaling proteins not previously characterized as components of the NMJ.

  14. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P; Bernstein, Bradley E; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K; Ward, Lucas D; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L; Farnham, Peggy J; Feingold, Elise A; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C; Gilbert, David M; Gingeras, Thomas R; Green, Eric D; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D; Myers, Richard M; Pazin, Michael J; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P; Hardison, Ross C

    2014-04-29

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease.

  15. CRISPR-mediated genome editing and human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liquan Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats technology has emerged as a powerful technology for genome editing and is now widely used in basic biomedical research to explore gene function. More recently, this technology has been increasingly applied to the study or treatment of human diseases, including Barth syndrome effects on the heart, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hemophilia, β-Thalassemia, and cystic fibrosis. CRISPR/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9 genome editing has been used to correct disease-causing DNA mutations ranging from a single base pair to large deletions in model systems ranging from cells in vitro to animals in vivo. In addition to genetic diseases, CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing has also been applied in immunology-focused applications such as the targeting of C-C chemokine receptor type 5, the programmed death 1 gene, or the creation of chimeric antigen receptors in T cells for purposes such as the treatment of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS or promoting anti-tumor immunotherapy. Furthermore, this technology has been applied to the genetic manipulation of domesticated animals with the goal of producing biologic medical materials, including molecules, cells or organs, on a large scale. Finally, CRISPR/Cas9 has been teamed with induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells to perform multiple tissue engineering tasks including the creation of disease models or the preparation of donor-specific tissues for transplantation. This review will explore the ways in which the use of CRISPR/Cas9 is opening new doors to the treatment of human diseases.

  16. Advances in environmental genomics: towards an integrated view of micro-organisms and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Philippe N; Médigue, Claudine; Normand, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    Microbial genome sequencing has, for the first time, made accessible all the components needed for both the elaboration and the functioning of a cell. Associated with other global methods such as protein and mRNA profiling, genomics has considerably extended our knowledge of physiological processes and their diversity not only in human, animal and plant pathogens but also in environmental isolates. At a higher level of complexity, the so-called meta approaches have recently shown great promise in investigating microbial communities, including uncultured micro-organisms. Combined with classical methods of physico-chemistry and microbiology, these endeavours should provide us with an integrated view of how micro-organisms adapt to particular ecological niches and participate in the dynamics of ecosystems.

  17. Genome organization and characteristics of soybean microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Marie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and play important roles in many aspects of plant biology. The role(s of miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants such as soybean is not well understood. We examined a library of small RNAs from Bradyrhizobium japonicum-inoculated soybean roots and identified novel miRNAs. In order to enhance our understanding of miRNA evolution, diversification and function, we classified all known soybean miRNAs based on their phylogenetic conservation (conserved, legume- and soybean-specific miRNAs and examined their genome organization, family characteristics and target diversity. We predicted targets of these miRNAs and experimentally validated several of them. We also examined organ-specific expression of selected miRNAs and their targets. Results We identified 120 previously unknown miRNA genes from soybean including 5 novel miRNA families. In the soybean genome, genes encoding miRNAs are primarily intergenic and a small percentage were intragenic or less than 1000 bp from a protein-coding gene, suggesting potential co-regulation between the miRNA and its parent gene. Difference in number and orientation of tandemly duplicated miRNA genes between orthologous genomic loci indicated continuous evolution and diversification. Conserved miRNA families are often larger in size and produce less diverse mature miRNAs than legume- and soybean-specific families. In addition, the majority of conserved and legume-specific miRNA families produce 21 nt long mature miRNAs with distinct nucleotide distribution and regulate a more conserved set of target mRNAs compared to soybean-specific families. A set of nodule-specific target mRNAs and their cognate regulatory miRNAs had inverse expression between root and nodule tissues suggesting that spatial restriction of target gene transcripts by miRNAs might govern nodule-specific gene expression in soybean. Conclusions Genome

  18. Sheep (Ovis aries) T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piccinni, Barbara; Massari, Serafina; Caputi Jambrenghi, Anna; Giannico, Francesco; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Ciccarese, Salvatrice; Antonacci, Rachele

    2015-01-01

    ..."). While the T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and the genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus has been determined in human and mouse, this information is still poorly known in artiodactyl species, such as sheep...

  19. Human genome and open source: balancing ethics and business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has been completed thanks to a massive use of computer techniques, as well as the adoption of the open-source business and research model by the scientists involved. This model won over the proprietary model and allowed a quick propagation and feedback of research results among peers. In this paper, the author will analyse some ethical and legal issues emerging by the use of such computer model in the Human Genome property rights. The author will argue that the Open Source is the best business model, as it is able to balance business and human rights perspectives.

  20. Sequencing and analysis of an Irish human genome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tong, Pin

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies generating complete human sequences from Asian, African and European subgroups have revealed population-specific variation and disease susceptibility loci. Here, choosing a DNA sample from a population of interest due to its relative geographical isolation and genetic impact on further populations, we extend the above studies through the generation of 11-fold coverage of the first Irish human genome sequence.

  1. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  2. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  3. Genomic divergences among cattle, dog and human estimated from large-scale alignments of genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shade Larry L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 11 Mb of finished high quality genomic sequences were sampled from cattle, dog and human to estimate genomic divergences and their regional variation among these lineages. Results Optimal three-way multi-species global sequence alignments for 84 cattle clones or loci (each >50 kb of genomic sequence were constructed using the human and dog genome assemblies as references. Genomic divergences and substitution rates were examined for each clone and for various sequence classes under different functional constraints. Analysis of these alignments revealed that the overall genomic divergences are relatively constant (0.32–0.37 change/site for pairwise comparisons among cattle, dog and human; however substitution rates vary across genomic regions and among different sequence classes. A neutral mutation rate (2.0–2.2 × 10(-9 change/site/year was derived from ancestral repetitive sequences, whereas the substitution rate in coding sequences (1.1 × 10(-9 change/site/year was approximately half of the overall rate (1.9–2.0 × 10(-9 change/site/year. Relative rate tests also indicated that cattle have a significantly faster rate of substitution as compared to dog and that this difference is about 6%. Conclusion This analysis provides a large-scale and unbiased assessment of genomic divergences and regional variation of substitution rates among cattle, dog and human. It is expected that these data will serve as a baseline for future mammalian molecular evolution studies.

  4. New complete genome sequences of human rhinoviruses shed light on their phylogeny and genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdobnov Evgeny M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (HRV, the most frequent cause of respiratory infections, include 99 different serotypes segregating into two species, A and B. Rhinoviruses share extensive genomic sequence similarity with enteroviruses and both are part of the picornavirus family. Nevertheless they differ significantly at the phenotypic level. The lack of HRV full-length genome sequences and the absence of analysis comparing picornaviruses at the whole genome level limit our knowledge of the genomic features supporting these differences. Results Here we report complete genome sequences of 12 HRV-A and HRV-B serotypes, more than doubling the current number of available HRV sequences. The whole-genome maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis suggests that HRV-B and human enteroviruses (HEV diverged from the last common ancestor after their separation from HRV-A. On the other hand, compared to HEV, HRV-B are more related to HRV-A in the capsid and 3B-C regions. We also identified the presence of a 2C cis-acting replication element (cre in HRV-B that is not present in HRV-A, and that had been previously characterized only in HEV. In contrast to HEV viruses, HRV-A and HRV-B share also markedly lower GC content along the whole genome length. Conclusion Our findings provide basis to speculate about both the biological similarities and the differences (e.g. tissue tropism, temperature adaptation or acid lability of these three groups of viruses.

  5. Genomic organization of Bruton`s tyrosine kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, J.; Conley, M.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk), is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that has been identified as the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). XLA patients have profound hypogammaglobulinemia and markedly reduced numbers of B cells while their T cell and phagocyte numbers remain normal. To determine the genomic organization of Btk, intron/exon borders were identified by sequencing cosmid DNA using cDNA primers. Nineteen exons spanning 37 kb of genomic DNA were identified. All the intron/exon splice junctions followed the GT/AG rule. The translational ATG start codon was in exon 2 which was 6 kb downstream of exon 1. Exon 19, 519 bp in length and 3.8 kb distal to exon 18, was the largest exon and included the 450 bp of the 3{prime} untranslated region. Exons 6 through 18 formed the largest cluster of exons with no intron being longer than 1550 bp. There was no apparent correlation between the exon boundaries of Btk and the functional domains of the protein or the exon boundaries of src, the nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase prototype. The region 500 bp upstream of the presumed transcriptional start site was sequenced and found to have a G+C content of 52%. No TATA-type promoter elements in the -20 bp to -30 bp region were identified. However, at position -48 bp, a TGTGAA motif was found that bears some similarity to the TATA box. This sequence was preceded by a perfect inverted CCAAT box at position -90 bp. Three retinoic acid binding sites were also identified at positions -50 bp, -83 bp and -197 bp. Defining the genomic structure of Btk will permit us to identify regulatory elements in this gene and to identify mutations in genomic DNA of patients with XLA.

  6. The accessible chromatin landscape of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Robert E; Rynes, Eric; Humbert, Richard; Vierstra, Jeff; Maurano, Matthew T; Haugen, Eric; Sheffield, Nathan C; Stergachis, Andrew B; Wang, Hao; Vernot, Benjamin; Garg, Kavita; John, Sam; Sandstrom, Richard; Bates, Daniel; Boatman, Lisa; Canfield, Theresa K; Diegel, Morgan; Dunn, Douglas; Ebersol, Abigail K; Frum, Tristan; Giste, Erika; Johnson, Audra K; Johnson, Ericka M; Kutyavin, Tanya; Lajoie, Bryan; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Lee, Kristen; London, Darin; Lotakis, Dimitra; Neph, Shane; Neri, Fidencio; Nguyen, Eric D; Qu, Hongzhu; Reynolds, Alex P; Roach, Vaughn; Safi, Alexias; Sanchez, Minerva E; Sanyal, Amartya; Shafer, Anthony; Simon, Jeremy M; Song, Lingyun; Vong, Shinny; Weaver, Molly; Yan, Yongqi; Zhang, Zhancheng; Zhang, Zhuzhu; Lenhard, Boris; Tewari, Muneesh; Dorschner, Michael O; Hansen, R Scott; Navas, Patrick A; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Lieb, Jason D; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Akey, Joshua M; Sabo, Peter J; Kaul, Rajinder; Furey, Terrence S; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-06

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) are markers of regulatory DNA and have underpinned the discovery of all classes of cis-regulatory elements including enhancers, promoters, insulators, silencers and locus control regions. Here we present the first extensive map of human DHSs identified through genome-wide profiling in 125 diverse cell and tissue types. We identify ∼2.9 million DHSs that encompass virtually all known experimentally validated cis-regulatory sequences and expose a vast trove of novel elements, most with highly cell-selective regulation. Annotating these elements using ENCODE data reveals novel relationships between chromatin accessibility, transcription, DNA methylation and regulatory factor occupancy patterns. We connect ∼580,000 distal DHSs with their target promoters, revealing systematic pairing of different classes of distal DHSs and specific promoter types. Patterning of chromatin accessibility at many regulatory regions is organized with dozens to hundreds of co-activated elements, and the transcellular DNase I sensitivity pattern at a given region can predict cell-type-specific functional behaviours. The DHS landscape shows signatures of recent functional evolutionary constraint. However, the DHS compartment in pluripotent and immortalized cells exhibits higher mutation rates than that in highly differentiated cells, exposing an unexpected link between chromatin accessibility, proliferative potential and patterns of human variation.

  7. Transcription factories and nuclear organization of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskiw, C H; Cope, N F; Clay, I; Schoenfelder, S; Nagano, T; Fraser, P

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic compartmental organization of the transcriptional machinery in mammalian nuclei places particular constraints on the spatial organization of the genome. The clustering of active RNA polymerase I transcription units from several chromosomes at nucleoli is probably the best-characterized and universally accepted example. RNA polymerase II localization in mammalian nuclei occurs in distinct concentrated foci that are several-fold fewer in number compared to the number of active genes and transcription units. Individual transcribed genes cluster at these shared transcription factories in a nonrandom manner, preferentially associating with heterologous, coregulated genes. We suggest that the three-dimensional (3D) conformation and relative arrangement of chromosomes in the nucleus has a major role in delivering tissue-specific gene-expression programs.

  8. Organization and evolution of primate centromeric DNA from whole-genome shotgun sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Alkan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The major DNA constituent of primate centromeres is alpha satellite DNA. As much as 2%-5% of sequence generated as part of primate genome sequencing projects consists of this material, which is fragmented or not assembled as part of published genome sequences due to its highly repetitive nature. Here, we develop computational methods to rapidly recover and categorize alpha-satellite sequences from previously uncharacterized whole-genome shotgun sequence data. We present an algorithm to computationally predict potential higher-order array structure based on paired-end sequence data and then experimentally validate its organization and distribution by experimental analyses. Using whole-genome shotgun data from the human, chimpanzee, and macaque genomes, we examine the phylogenetic relationship of these sequences and provide further support for a model for their evolution and mutation over the last 25 million years. Our results confirm fundamental differences in the dispersal and evolution of centromeric satellites in the Old World monkey and ape lineages of evolution.

  9. Learning about human population history from ancient and modern genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Mark; Krause, Johannes

    2011-08-18

    Genome-wide data, both from SNP arrays and from complete genome sequencing, are becoming increasingly abundant and are now even available from extinct hominins. These data are providing new insights into population history; in particular, when combined with model-based analytical approaches, genome-wide data allow direct testing of hypotheses about population history. For example, genome-wide data from both contemporary populations and extinct hominins strongly support a single dispersal of modern humans from Africa, followed by two archaic admixture events: one with Neanderthals somewhere outside Africa and a second with Denisovans that (so far) has only been detected in New Guinea. These new developments promise to reveal new stories about human population history, without having to resort to storytelling.

  10. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome...... on chromosomes 3, 15, and 19, were analyzed. The relative proportion of wild-type to rearranged structures was determined in DNA samples from blood obtained from different, unrelated individuals. The results obtained indicate that recurrent genomic rearrangements occur at relatively high frequency in somatic...... cells. Interestingly, the rearrangements studied were significantly more abundant in adults than in newborn individuals, suggesting that such DNA rearrangements might start to appear during embryogenesis or fetal life and continue to accumulate after birth. The relevance of our results in regard...

  11. The diploid genome sequence of an individual human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Levy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is a genome sequence of an individual human. It was produced from approximately 32 million random DNA fragments, sequenced by Sanger dideoxy technology and assembled into 4,528 scaffolds, comprising 2,810 million bases (Mb of contiguous sequence with approximately 7.5-fold coverage for any given region. We developed a modified version of the Celera assembler to facilitate the identification and comparison of alternate alleles within this individual diploid genome. Comparison of this genome and the National Center for Biotechnology Information human reference assembly revealed more than 4.1 million DNA variants, encompassing 12.3 Mb. These variants (of which 1,288,319 were novel included 3,213,401 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, 53,823 block substitutions (2-206 bp, 292,102 heterozygous insertion/deletion events (indels(1-571 bp, 559,473 homozygous indels (1-82,711 bp, 90 inversions, as well as numerous segmental duplications and copy number variation regions. Non-SNP DNA variation accounts for 22% of all events identified in the donor, however they involve 74% of all variant bases. This suggests an important role for non-SNP genetic alterations in defining the diploid genome structure. Moreover, 44% of genes were heterozygous for one or more variants. Using a novel haplotype assembly strategy, we were able to span 1.5 Gb of genome sequence in segments >200 kb, providing further precision to the diploid nature of the genome. These data depict a definitive molecular portrait of a diploid human genome that provides a starting point for future genome comparisons and enables an era of individualized genomic information.

  12. The "most wanted" taxa from the human microbiome for whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A Fodor

    Full Text Available The goal of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP is to generate a comprehensive catalog of human-associated microorganisms including reference genomes representing the most common species. Toward this goal, the HMP has characterized the microbial communities at 18 body habitats in a cohort of over 200 healthy volunteers using 16S rRNA gene (16S sequencing and has generated nearly 1,000 reference genomes from human-associated microorganisms. To determine how well current reference genome collections capture the diversity observed among the healthy microbiome and to guide isolation and future sequencing of microbiome members, we compared the HMP's 16S data sets to several reference 16S collections to create a 'most wanted' list of taxa for sequencing. Our analysis revealed that the diversity of commonly occurring taxa within the HMP cohort microbiome is relatively modest, few novel taxa are represented by these OTUs and many common taxa among HMP volunteers recur across different populations of healthy humans. Taken together, these results suggest that it should be possible to perform whole-genome sequencing on a large fraction of the human microbiome, including the 'most wanted', and that these sequences should serve to support microbiome studies across multiple cohorts. Also, in stark contrast to other taxa, the 'most wanted' organisms are poorly represented among culture collections suggesting that novel culture- and single-cell-based methods will be required to isolate these organisms for sequencing.

  13. Rat Genome Database: a unique resource for rat, human, and mouse quantitative trait locus data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Rajni; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G Thomas; Smith, Jennifer R; Wang, Shur-Jen; Lowry, Timothy F; Petri, Victoria; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Liu, Weisong; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J

    2013-09-16

    The rat has been widely used as a disease model in a laboratory setting, resulting in an abundance of genetic and phenotype data from a wide variety of studies. These data can be found at the Rat Genome Database (RGD, http://rgd.mcw.edu/), which provides a platform for researchers interested in linking genomic variations to phenotypes. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) form one of the earliest and core datasets, allowing researchers to identify loci harboring genes associated with disease. These QTLs are not only important for those using the rat to identify genes and regions associated with disease, but also for cross-organism analyses of syntenic regions on the mouse and the human genomes to identify potential regions for study in these organisms. Currently, RGD has data on >1,900 rat QTLs that include details about the methods and animals used to determine the respective QTL along with the genomic positions and markers that define the region. RGD also curates human QTLs (>1,900) and houses>4,000 mouse QTLs (imported from Mouse Genome Informatics). Multiple ontologies are used to standardize traits, phenotypes, diseases, and experimental methods to facilitate queries, analyses, and cross-organism comparisons. QTLs are visualized in tools such as GBrowse and GViewer, with additional tools for analysis of gene sets within QTL regions. The QTL data at RGD provide valuable information for the study of mapped phenotypes and identification of candidate genes for disease associations.

  14. Primer on Molecular Genetics; DOE Human Genome Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  15. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi, J Ramon; de la Cruz, Xavier; Orozco, Modesto

    2004-01-01

    The existence of sequences in the human genome which can be a target for triplex formation, and accordingly are candidates for anti-gene therapies, has been studied by using bioinformatics tools. It was found that the population of triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences (TTS) is much more abundant than that expected from simple random models. The population of TTS is large in all the genome, without major differences between chromosomes. A wide analysis along annotated regions of th...

  16. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  17. Does organ selling violate human dignity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpinar-Şencan, Zümrüt; Baumann, Holger; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2017-07-11

    Shortages in the number of donated organs after death and the growing number of end-stage organ failure patients on waiting lists call for looking at alternatives to increase the number of organs that could be used for transplantation purposes. One option that has led to a legal and ethical debate is to have regulated markets in human organs. Opponents of a market in human organs offer different arguments that are mostly founded on contingent factors that can be adjusted. However, some authors have asked the question whether we still have a reason to believe that there is something wrong with offering human organs for sale for transplantation purposes, even if the circumstances under which the practice takes place are improved. One prominent argument regarding this appeals to the notion of human dignity. It is argued that organ selling violates human dignity. This paper presents a systematic discussion of dignity-based arguments in the organ selling debate, and then develops a social account of dignity. It is argued that allowing the practice of organ selling inherently runs the risk of promoting the notion that some persons have less worth than others and that persons have a price, which is incompatible with dignity. The approach is defended against possible objections and it is shown that it can capture the notion that autonomy is linked to human dignity in important ways, while dignity at the same time can constrain the autonomous choices of persons with regards to certain practices.

  18. Human genome and the african personality: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickel, Elijah; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    The integration of the human genome with the African personality should be viewed as an interdependent whole. The African personality, for purposes of this article, comprises Black experiences, Negritude, and an Africa-centered axiology and epistemology. The outcome results in a spiritual focused collective consciousness. Anthropologically, historically (and with the Human Genome Project), genetically Africa has proven to be the source of all human life. Human kind wherever they exist on the planet using the African personality must be viewed as interconnected. Although racism and its progeny discrimination preexist the human genome project (HGP), the human genome provides an evidence-based rationale for the end to all policy and subsequent practice based on race and racism. Policy must be based on evidence to be competent practice. It would be remiss if not irresponsible of social work and the other behavioral scientist concerned with intervention and prevention behaviors to not infuse the findings of the HCPs. The African personality is a concept that provides a wholistic way to evaluate human behavior from an African worldview.

  19. Conceptualizing Human Microbiota: From Multicelled Organ to Ecological Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Foxman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota of a typical, healthy human contains 10 times as many cells as the human body and incorporates bacteria, viruses, archea, protozoans, and fungi. This diverse microbiome (the collective genomes of the microbial symbionts that inhabit a human host is essential for human functioning. We discuss the unstated assumptions and implications of current conceptualizations of human microbiota: (1 a single unit that interacts with the host and the external environment; a multicelled organ; (2 an assemblage of multiple taxa, but considered as a single unit in its interactions with the host; (3 an assemblage of multiple taxa, which each interacts with the host and the environment independently; and (4 a dynamic ecological community consisting of multiple taxa each potentially interacting with each other, the host, and the environment. Each conceptualization leads to different predictions, methodologies, and research strategies.

  20. Effects of aneuploidy on genome structure, expression, and interphase organization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Huettel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy refers to losses and/or gains of individual chromosomes from the normal chromosome set. The resulting gene dosage imbalance has a noticeable affect on the phenotype, as illustrated by aneuploid syndromes, including Down syndrome in humans, and by human solid tumor cells, which are highly aneuploid. Although the phenotypic manifestations of aneuploidy are usually apparent, information about the underlying alterations in structure, expression, and interphase organization of unbalanced chromosome sets is still sparse. Plants generally tolerate aneuploidy better than animals, and, through colchicine treatment and breeding strategies, it is possible to obtain inbred sibling plants with different numbers of chromosomes. This possibility, combined with the genetic and genomics tools available for Arabidopsis thaliana, provides a powerful means to assess systematically the molecular and cytological consequences of aberrant numbers of specific chromosomes. Here, we report on the generation of Arabidopsis plants in which chromosome 5 is present in triplicate. We compare the global transcript profiles of normal diploids and chromosome 5 trisomics, and assess genome integrity using array comparative genome hybridization. We use live cell imaging to determine the interphase 3D arrangement of transgene-encoded fluorescent tags on chromosome 5 in trisomic and triploid plants. The results indicate that trisomy 5 disrupts gene expression throughout the genome and supports the production and/or retention of truncated copies of chromosome 5. Although trisomy 5 does not grossly distort the interphase arrangement of fluorescent-tagged sites on chromosome 5, it may somewhat enhance associations between transgene alleles. Our analysis reveals the complex genomic changes that can occur in aneuploids and underscores the importance of using multiple experimental approaches to investigate how chromosome numerical changes condition abnormal phenotypes and

  1. Genomic signatures of diet-related shifts during human origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Warner, Lisa R; Fedrigo, Olivier; Wall, Christine E; Wray, Gregory A

    2011-04-07

    There are numerous anthropological analyses concerning the importance of diet during human evolution. Diet is thought to have had a profound influence on the human phenotype, and dietary differences have been hypothesized to contribute to the dramatic morphological changes seen in modern humans as compared with non-human primates. Here, we attempt to integrate the results of new genomic studies within this well-developed anthropological context. We then review the current evidence for adaptation related to diet, both at the level of sequence changes and gene expression. Finally, we propose some ways in which new technologies can help identify specific genomic adaptations that have resulted in metabolic and morphological differences between humans and non-human primates.

  2. Prospects for the Chinese Human Genome Project (HGP)at the beginning of next century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chinese Human Genome Project (CHGP) as part of the international human genome research has achieved significant progress and created a solid foundation for further development. While participating in the human genome sequencing and gene discovery, the emphasis of CHGP in the next century will be laid on functional genomics. The strategy, resources and some policy issues will be addressed.

  3. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-04

    Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome-wide transcriptome analyses of different tissues. Gene expression measurements from these independent datasets, generated using samples from fresh frozen surgical specimens and postmortem tissues, are consistent. Overall, the different genome-wide analyses support a distribution in which many proteins are found in all tissues and relatively few in a tissue-restricted manner. Moreover, we discuss the applications of publicly available omics data for building genome-scale metabolic models, used for analyzing cell and tissue functions both in physiological and in disease contexts. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  4. A human rights approach to human trafficking for organ removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiani-Saberi, Debra; Columb, Seán

    2013-11-01

    Human trafficking for organ removal (HTOR) should not be reduced to a problem of supply and demand of organs for transplantation, a problem of organized crime and criminal justice, or a problem of voiceless, abandoned victims. Rather, HTOR is at once an egregious human rights abuse and a form of human trafficking. As such, it demands a human-rights based approach in analysis and response to this problem, placing the victim at the center of initiatives to combat this phenomenon. Such an approach requires us to consider how various measures impact or disregard victims/potential victims of HTOR and gives us tools to better advocate their interests, rights and freedoms.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus hominis strain Hudgins isolated from human skin implicates metabolic versatility and several virulence determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelby Calkins

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus hominis is a predominant member of the human skin microbiome. We here report on the genomic analysis of Staphylococcus hominis strain Hudgins that was isolated from the wrist area of human skin. The partial genome assembly of S. hominis Hudgins consists of 2,211,863 bp of DNA with 2174 protein-coding genes and 90 RNA genes. Based on the genomic analysis of KEGG pathways, the organism is expected to be a versatile heterotroph potentially capable of hydrolyzing the sugars glucose, fructose, mannose, and the amino acids alanine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine, threonine, cysteine, methionine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, arginine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan for energy production through aerobic respiration, with occasional lactate and acetate fermentation. Evidence for poly-gamma glutamate capsule and type IV Com system pili were identified in the genome. Based on COG analysis, the genome of S. hominis Hudgins clusters away from the previously published S. hominis genome ZBW5.

  6. [From human genome to individualized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Barrio, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the knowledge of our genome, and a deeper understanding of the molecular basis of disease are laying the foundations of Individualised Medicine. This new approach to Medicine seeks to establish a consistent relation between the genetic profile of each individual and the clinical profile of every disease, thereby helping healthcare professionals to individualise treatment for each patient, in order to administrate the right drug at the right dose, while optimising its efficacy and safety. Translational research, Pharmacogenetics, Pharmacogenomics, biomarkers and diagnostic tests are bringing profound change already under way to our healthcare systems, and pose new ethical and social challenges that our legal framework will have to address.

  7. A new approach for using genome scans to detect recent positive selection in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Tang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scanning for signals of recent positive selection is essential for a comprehensive and systematic understanding of human adaptation. Here, we present a genomic survey of recent local selective sweeps, especially aimed at those nearly or recently completed. A novel approach was developed for such signals, based on contrasting the extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH profiles between populations. We applied this method to the genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data of both the International HapMap Project and Perlegen Sciences, and detected widespread signals of recent local selection across the genome, consisting of both complete and partial sweeps. A challenging problem of genomic scans of recent positive selection is to clearly distinguish selection from neutral effects, given the high sensitivity of the test statistics to departures from neutral demographic assumptions and the lack of a single, accurate neutral model of human history. We therefore developed a new procedure that is robust across a wide range of demographic and ascertainment models, one that indicates that certain portions of the genome clearly depart from neutrality. Simulations of positive selection showed that our tests have high power towards strong selection sweeps that have undergone fixation. Gene ontology analysis of the candidate regions revealed several new functional groups that might help explain some important interpopulation differences in phenotypic traits.

  8. From Environment to Man: Genome Evolution and Adaptation of Human Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujoulat, Fabien; Roger, Frédéric; Bourdier, Alice; Lotthé, Anne; Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    Environment is recognized as a huge reservoir for bacterial species and a source of human pathogens. Some environmental bacteria have an extraordinary range of activities that include promotion of plant growth or disease, breakdown of pollutants, production of original biomolecules, but also multidrug resistance and human pathogenicity. The versatility of bacterial life-style involves adaptation to various niches. Adaptation to both open environment and human specific niches is a major challenge that involves intermediate organisms allowing pre-adaptation to humans. The aim of this review is to analyze genomic features of environmental bacteria in order to explain their adaptation to human beings. The genera Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Ochrobactrum provide valuable examples of opportunistic behavior associated to particular genomic structure and evolution. Particularly, we performed original genomic comparisons among aeromonads and between the strictly intracellular pathogens Brucella spp. and the mild opportunistic pathogens Ochrobactrum spp. We conclude that the adaptation to human could coincide with a speciation in action revealed by modifications in both genomic and population structures. This adaptation-driven speciation could be a major mechanism for the emergence of true pathogens besides the acquisition of specialized virulence factors. PMID:24704914

  9. Genome-wide approaches to understanding human ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaeberlein Matt

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of genomic technologies in biogerontology has the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of human ageing. High-throughput screens for alleles correlated with survival in long-lived people have uncovered novel genes involved in age-associated disease. Genome-wide longevity studies in simple eukaryotes are identifying evolutionarily conserved pathways that determine longevity. It is hoped that validation of these 'public' aspects of ageing in mice, along with analyses of variation in candidate human ageing genes, will provide targets for future interventions to slow the ageing process and retard the onset of age-associated pathologies.

  10. Microfabrication of human organs-on-chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Dongeun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Fraser, Jacob P; Shea, Daniel E; Khan, Mohammed; Bahinski, Anthony; Hamilton, Geraldine A; Ingber, Donald E

    2013-11-01

    'Organs-on-chips' are microengineered biomimetic systems containing microfluidic channels lined by living human cells, which replicate key functional units of living organs to reconstitute integrated human organ-level pathophysiology in vitro. These microdevices can be used to test efficacy and toxicity of drugs and chemicals, and to create in vitro models of human disease. Thus, they potentially represent low-cost alternatives to conventional animal models for pharmaceutical, chemical and environmental applications. Here we describe a protocol for the fabrication, microengineering and operation of these microfluidic organ-on-chip systems. First, microengineering is used to fabricate a multilayered microfluidic device that contains two parallel elastomeric microchannels separated by a thin porous flexible membrane, along with two full-height, hollow vacuum chambers on either side; this requires ∼3.5 d to complete. To create a 'breathing' lung-on-a-chip that mimics the mechanically active alveolar-capillary interface of the living human lung, human alveolar epithelial cells and microvascular endothelial cells are cultured in the microdevice with physiological flow and cyclic suction applied to the side chambers to reproduce rhythmic breathing movements. We describe how this protocol can be easily adapted to develop other human organ chips, such as a gut-on-a-chip lined by human intestinal epithelial cells that experiences peristalsis-like motions and trickling fluid flow. Also, we discuss experimental techniques that can be used to analyze the cells in these organ-on-chip devices.

  11. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Pollard

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 genomic elements that are highly conserved in vertebrates but show evidence of significantly accelerated substitution rates in human. These are mostly in non-coding DNA, often near genes associated with transcription and DNA binding. Resequencing confirmed that the five most accelerated elements are dramatically changed in human but not in other primates, with seven times more substitutions in human than in chimp. The accelerated elements, and in particular the top five, show a strong bias for adenine and thymine to guanine and cytosine nucleotide changes and are disproportionately located in high recombination and high guanine and cytosine content environments near telomeres, suggesting either biased gene conversion or isochore selection. In addition, there is some evidence of directional selection in the regions containing the two most accelerated regions. A combination of evolutionary forces has contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.

  12. Genomics and the Ark: an ecocentric perspective on human history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub; Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Views of ourselves in relationship to the rest of the biosphere are changing. Theocentric and anthropocentric perspectives are giving way to more ecocentric views on the history, present, and future of humankind. Novel sciences, such as genomics, have deepened and broadened our understanding of the process of anthropogenesis, the coming into being of humans. Genomics suggests that early human history must be regarded as a complex narrative of evolving ecosystems, in which human evolution both influenced and was influenced by the evolution of companion species. During the agricultural revolution, human beings designed small-scale artificial ecosystems or evolutionary "Arks," in which networks of plants, animals, and microorganisms coevolved. Currently, our attitude towards this process seems subject to a paradoxical reversal. The boundaries of the Ark have dramatically broadened, and genomics is not only being used to increase our understanding of our ecological past, but may also help us to conserve, reconstruct, or even revivify species and ecosystems to whose degradation or (near) extinction we have contributed. This article explores the role of genomics in the elaboration of a more ecocentric view of ourselves with the help of two examples, namely the renaissance of Paleolithic diets and of Pleistocene parks. It argues that an understanding of the world in ecocentric terms requires new partnerships and mutually beneficial forms of collaboration and convergence between life sciences, social sciences, and the humanities.

  13. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost......BACKGROUND: Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than point...... mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome....

  14. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs, population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs, as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart

  15. The genomic structure of the human UFO receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Faust, M; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1993-02-01

    Using a DNA transfection-tumorigenicity assay we have recently identified the UFO oncogene. It encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by the juxtaposition of two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats in its extracellular domain. Here we describe the genomic organization of the human UFO locus. The UFO receptor is encoded by 20 exons that are distributed over a region of 44 kb. Different isoforms of UFO mRNA are generated by alternative splicing of exon 10 and differential usage of two imperfect polyadenylation sites resulting in the presence or absence of 1.5-kb 3' untranslated sequences. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses revealed multiple transcriptional initiation sites including a major site 169 bp upstream of the translation start site. The promoter region is GC rich, lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains potential recognition sites for a variety of trans-acting factors, including Sp1, AP-2 and the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Proto-UFO and its oncogenic counterpart exhibit identical cDNA and promoter regions sequences. Possible modes of UFO activation are discussed.

  16. Targeted genome editing in human cells using CRISPR/Cas nucleases and truncated guide RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanfang; Reyon, Deepak; Joung, J Keith

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases have recently emerged as a robust genome-editing platform that functions in a wide range of organisms. To reduce off-target effects of these nucleases, we developed and validated a modified system that uses truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs). The use of tru-gRNAs leads to decreases in off-target effects and does not generally compromise the on-target efficiencies of these genome-editing nucleases. In this chapter, we describe guidelines for identifying potential tru-gRNA target sites and protocols for measuring the on-target efficiencies of CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases in human cells.

  17. Targets of balancing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrés, Aida M; Hubisz, Melissa J; Indap, Amit

    2009-01-01

    to maintaining phenotypic variation in natural populations. Nevertheless, its prevalence and specific targets in the human genome remain largely unknown. We have analyzed the patterns of diversity and divergence of 13,400 genes in two human populations using an unbiased single-nucleotide polymorphism data set......, a genome-wide approach, and a method that incorporates demography in neutrality tests. We identified an unbiased catalog of genes with signatures of long-term balancing selection, which includes immunity genes as well as genes encoding keratins and membrane channels; the catalog also shows enrichment...... in functional categories involved in cellular structure. Patterns are mostly concordant in the two populations, with a small fraction of genes showing population-specific signatures of selection. Power considerations indicate that our findings represent a subset of all targets in the genome, suggesting...

  18. Evolutionary forces shaping genomic islands of population differentiation in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofer Tamara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Levels of differentiation among populations depend both on demographic and selective factors: genetic drift and local adaptation increase population differentiation, which is eroded by gene flow and balancing selection. We describe here the genomic distribution and the properties of genomic regions with unusually high and low levels of population differentiation in humans to assess the influence of selective and neutral processes on human genetic structure. Methods Individual SNPs of the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP showing significantly high or low levels of population differentiation were detected under a hierarchical-island model (HIM. A Hidden Markov Model allowed us to detect genomic regions or islands of high or low population differentiation. Results Under the HIM, only 1.5% of all SNPs are significant at the 1% level, but their genomic spatial distribution is significantly non-random. We find evidence that local adaptation shaped high-differentiation islands, as they are enriched for non-synonymous SNPs and overlap with previously identified candidate regions for positive selection. Moreover there is a negative relationship between the size of islands and recombination rate, which is stronger for islands overlapping with genes. Gene ontology analysis supports the role of diet as a major selective pressure in those highly differentiated islands. Low-differentiation islands are also enriched for non-synonymous SNPs, and contain an overly high proportion of genes belonging to the 'Oncogenesis' biological process. Conclusions Even though selection seems to be acting in shaping islands of high population differentiation, neutral demographic processes might have promoted the appearance of some genomic islands since i as much as 20% of islands are in non-genic regions ii these non-genic islands are on average two times shorter than genic islands, suggesting a more rapid erosion by recombination, and iii most loci are

  19. Nanotechnological Strategies for Biofabrication of Human Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Rezende

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging technology dealing with so-called nanomaterials which at least in one dimension have size smaller than 100 nm. One of the most potentially promising applications of nanotechnology is in the area of tissue engineering, including biofabrication of 3D human tissues and organs. This paper focused on demonstrating how nanomaterials with nanolevel size can contribute to development of 3D human tissues and organs which have macrolevel organization. Specific nanomaterials such as nanofibers and nanoparticles are discussed in the context of their application for biofabricating 3D human tissues and organs. Several examples of novel tissue and organ biofabrication technologies based on using novel nanomaterials are presented and their recent limitations are analyzed. A robotic device for fabrication of compliant composite electrospun vascular graft is described. The concept of self-assembling magnetic tissue spheroids as an intermediate structure between nano- and macrolevel organization and building blocks for biofabrication of complex 3D human tissues and organs is introduced. The design of in vivo robotic bioprinter based on this concept and magnetic levitation of tissue spheroids labeled with magnetic nanoparticles is presented. The challenges and future prospects of applying nanomaterials and nanotechnological strategies in organ biofabrication are outlined.

  20. Enhancing Biology Instruction with the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxeda, Rosa J.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2003-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a recent scientific milestone that has received notable attention. This article shows how a biology course is using the HGP to enhance students' experiences by providing awareness of cutting edge research, with information on new emerging career options, and with opportunities to consider ethical questions raised…

  1. The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; Gottesman, Kay S.; Goulding, Philip G.; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Micikas, Lynda B.; Mural, Richard J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zola, John

    This module, for high school teachers, is the second of two modules about the Human Genome Project (HGP) produced by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The first section of this module provides background information for teachers about the structure and objectives of the HGP, aspects of the science and technology that underlie the…

  2. Human Genome Project and cystic fibrosis--a symbiotic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoi, L G; Smith, C L

    1999-11-01

    When Watson and Crick determined the structure of DNA in 1953, a biological revolution began. One result of this revolution is the Human Genome Project. The primary goal of this international project is to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. Although molecular biologists and geneticists are most enthusiastic about the Human Genome Project, all areas of clinical medicine and fields of biology will be affected. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, inherited, lethal disease of white persons. In 1989, researchers located the cystic fibrosis gene on the long arm of chromosome 7 by a technique known as positional cloning. The most common mutation (a 3-base pair deletion) of the cystic fibrosis gene occurs in 70% of patients with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge gained from genetic research on cystic fibrosis will help researchers develop new therapies (e.g., gene) and improve standard therapies (e.g., pharmacologic) so that a patient's life span is increased and quality of life is improved. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, the article provides an overview of the Human Genome Project and its clinical significance in advancing interdisciplinary care for patients with cystic fibrosis. Second, the article includes a discussion of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, and management of cystic fibrosis.

  3. DOE Human Genome Program contractor-grantee workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings for the DOE Human Genome Program`s Contractor-Grantee Workshop V held in Sante Fe, New Mexico January 28, February 1, 1996. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled Sequencing; Mapping; Informatics; Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues; and Infrastructure. Reports of individual projects described herein are separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  4. Human genome program report. Part 2, 1996 research abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  5. Templated sequence insertion polymorphisms in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Aplan, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Templated Sequence Insertion Polymorphism (TSIP) is a recently described form of polymorphism recognized in the human genome, in which a sequence that is templated from a distant genomic region is inserted into the genome, seemingly at random. TSIPs can be grouped into two classes based on nucleotide sequence features at the insertion junctions; Class 1 TSIPs show features of insertions that are mediated via the LINE-1 ORF2 protein, including 1) target-site duplication (TSD), 2) polyadenylation 10-30 nucleotides downstream of a “cryptic” polyadenylation signal, and 3) preference for insertion at a 5’-TTTT/A-3’ sequence. In contrast, class 2 TSIPs show features consistent with repair of a DNA double-strand break via insertion of a DNA “patch” that is derived from a distant genomic region. Survey of a large number of normal human volunteers demonstrates that most individuals have 25-30 TSIPs, and that these TSIPs track with specific geographic regions. Similar to other forms of human polymorphism, we suspect that these TSIPs may be important for the generation of human diversity and genetic diseases.

  6. The human genome; you gain some, you lose some

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriek, Marjolein

    2007-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) in the human genome are inherent in both evolutionary progression as well as the etiology of disease. The introduction of this thesis will review CNVs that appear to be neutral as well as CNVs that appear to be related to a phenotypic trait. This will be followed by a

  7. Reconsidering democracy - History of the human genome project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijer, M

    What options are open for people-citizens, politicians, and other nonscientists-to become actively involved in and anticipate new directions in the life sciences? In addressing this question, this article focuses on the start of the Human Genome Project (1985-1990). By contrasting various models of

  8. Reconsidering democracy - History of the human genome project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijer, M

    2003-01-01

    What options are open for people-citizens, politicians, and other nonscientists-to become actively involved in and anticipate new directions in the life sciences? In addressing this question, this article focuses on the start of the Human Genome Project (1985-1990). By contrasting various models of

  9. Human Genome Program Report. Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  10. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  11. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  12. The humankind genome: from genetic diversity to the origin of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belizário, Jose E

    2013-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have failed to establish common variant risk for the majority of common human diseases. The underlying reasons for this failure are explained by recent studies of resequencing and comparison of over 1200 human genomes and 10 000 exomes, together with the delineation of DNA methylation patterns (epigenome) and full characterization of coding and noncoding RNAs (transcriptome) being transcribed. These studies have provided the most comprehensive catalogues of functional elements and genetic variants that are now available for global integrative analysis and experimental validation in prospective cohort studies. With these datasets, researchers will have unparalleled opportunities for the alignment, mining, and testing of hypotheses for the roles of specific genetic variants, including copy number variations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and indels as the cause of specific phenotypes and diseases. Through the use of next-generation sequencing technologies for genotyping and standardized ontological annotation to systematically analyze the effects of genomic variation on humans and model organism phenotypes, we will be able to find candidate genes and new clues for disease's etiology and treatment. This article describes essential concepts in genetics and genomic technologies as well as the emerging computational framework to comprehensively search websites and platforms available for the analysis and interpretation of genomic data.

  13. 78 FR 55752 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Sites for..., Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC...

  14. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research...

  15. 76 FR 35224 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  16. 76 FR 5390 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHGRI Sample Repository..., National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville, MD...

  17. 77 FR 58402 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; R25 DAP Sept. 2012...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Rockville, MD...

  18. 75 FR 62548 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... . Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  19. 76 FR 22112 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-04-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Special Emphasis Panel... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April...

  20. 76 FR 19780 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane... Assistance Program No. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April...

  1. 75 FR 80509 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: December 16, 2010. Jennifer S....

  2. 77 FR 8268 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome...). Contact Person: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome...

  3. 77 FR 20646 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment Program...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Rockville, MD...

  4. 77 FR 59933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; ELSI CEERS RFA (SEP... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  5. 76 FR 66731 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, DAP for CEGS-SEP. Date...@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  6. 76 FR 66076 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 19, 2011. Jennifer S....

  7. 77 FR 64816 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  8. 78 FR 56905 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; H3AFRICA ELSI Research.... Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Suite 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD...

  9. 78 FR 77477 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  10. 76 FR 9031 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  11. 75 FR 13558 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research...

  12. 75 FR 8977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  13. 75 FR 2147 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: February 8-9, 2010....

  14. 77 FR 35991 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  15. 78 FR 31953 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SEP-UDN Coordinating... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd Floor Conference Room, 3146, 5635...

  16. 75 FR 67380 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Ken D. Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome... Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 26,...

  17. 75 FR 19984 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers...

  18. 78 FR 11898 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  19. 78 FR 70063 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH...

  20. 76 FR 36930 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, DAP R-25. Date: July...@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  1. 75 FR 8373 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, GWAS Comparing Design... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  2. 75 FR 60467 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  3. 78 FR 47715 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  4. 76 FR 50486 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  5. 76 FR 10909 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  6. 77 FR 50140 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  7. 76 FR 17930 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genetic... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  8. 77 FR 2304 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... given that the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) will host a series of meetings to enable... for Human Genome Research. Background materials on the proposed reorganization and...

  9. 77 FR 2735 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: February 13-14, 2012....

  10. 78 FR 9707 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; H3Africa (RM-006, RM... Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville, MD 20852, (301)...

  11. 77 FR 22332 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, H3Africa Biorepository... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 4076, Rockville, MD...

  12. 77 FR 74676 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Person: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute...@nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  13. 77 FR 12604 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... >Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, CIDR Contract. Date...: National Human Genome Reseach Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Room 4076, Rockville, MD 20852,...

  14. 78 FR 21382 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome... Person: Camilla E. Day, PhD., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research...

  15. 75 FR 56115 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; CEGS DAP. Date... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September...

  16. 75 FR 48977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  17. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  18. 77 FR 31863 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel DAP R25 Eppig.... (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  19. 77 FR 71604 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Date: January 11, 2013..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076,...

  20. 75 FR 46951 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The meeting will be...: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: September 13-14, 2010. Open: September 13,...

  1. 78 FR 107 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd Floor Conference Room, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20851... Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers...

  2. 75 FR 32957 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Protein Resource RFA... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  3. 75 FR 44800 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... Call). Contact Person: Mark S. Guyer, Director for Extramural Research, National Human Genome...

  4. 77 FR 64816 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  5. 76 FR 22407 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment Program....172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 12, 2011. Jennifer...

  6. 76 FR 79199 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  7. 77 FR 6810 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; CIDR Contract Renewal... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  8. 75 FR 35821 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  9. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer research.

  10. How China's Procuratorial Organs Protect Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING DALI

    2011-01-01

    @@ Question: The Twelfth Five-Year Program, which was approved by the 2011 session of the National People's Congress, calls for better protection of human rights and more work to promote China's human rights cause.Would you tell us about the role played by procuratorial organs in this endeavor?

  11. Partial genomic organization of ribosomal protein S7 gene from malaria vector Anopheles stephensi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJNIKANT DIXIT; SARITA DIXIT; UPAL ROY; YOGESH S.SHOUCHE; SURENDRA GAKHAR

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we describe the partial genomic organization of ribosomal protein S7 gene isolated from the mosquito Anopheles stephensi. Initially a 558 bp partial cDNA sequence was amplified as precursor mRNA sequence containing 223 bp long intron. 5' and 3' end sequences were recovered using end specific rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) polymerase chain reaction. The full-length cDNA sequence was 914 nucleotide long with an open reading frame capable of encoding 192 amino acid long protein with calculated molecular mass of 22174 Da and a pI point of 9.94. Protein homology search revealed >75% identity to other insect's S7 ribosomal proteins. Analysis of sequence alignment revealed several highly conserved domains, one of which is related to nuclear localization signal (NLS) region of human rpS7. Interestingly, intron nucleotide sequence comparison with A. gambiae showed a lesser degree of conservation as compared to coding and untranslated regions. Like this, early studies on the genomic organization and cDNA/Expressed sequence tag analysis (EST) could help in genome annotation ofA. stephensi, and would be likely to be sequenced in the future.

  12. Multiple Whole Genome Alignments Without a Reference Organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexander; Kislyuk, Andrey; Brudno, Michael

    2009-01-16

    Multiple sequence alignments have become one of the most commonly used resources in genomics research. Most algorithms for multiple alignment of whole genomes rely either on a reference genome, against which all of the other sequences are laid out, or require a one-to-one mapping between the nucleotides of the genomes, preventing the alignment of recently duplicated regions. Both approaches have drawbacks for whole-genome comparisons. In this paper we present a novel symmetric alignment algorithm. The resulting alignments not only represent all of the genomes equally well, but also include all relevant duplications that occurred since the divergence from the last common ancestor. Our algorithm, implemented as a part of the VISTA Genome Pipeline (VGP), was used to align seven vertebrate and sixDrosophila genomes. The resulting whole-genome alignments demonstrate a higher sensitivity and specificity than the pairwise alignments previously available through the VGP and have higher exon alignment accuracy than comparable public whole-genome alignments. Of the multiple alignment methods tested, ours performed the best at aligning genes from multigene families?perhaps the most challenging test for whole-genome alignments. Our whole-genome multiple alignments are available through the VISTA Browser at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/index.shtml.

  13. Genomic organization, sequence divergence, and recombination of feline immunodeficiency virus from lions in the wild

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondgeroth Kerry

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV naturally infects multiple species of cat and is related to human immunodeficiency virus in humans. FIV infection causes AIDS-like disease and mortality in the domestic cat (Felis catus and serves as a natural model for HIV infection in humans. In African lions (Panthera leo and other exotic felid species, disease etiology introduced by FIV infection are less clear, but recent studies indicate that FIV causes moderate to severe CD4 depletion. Results In this study, comparative genomic methods are used to evaluate the full proviral genome of two geographically distinct FIV subtypes isolated from free-ranging lions. Genome organization of FIVPle subtype B (9891 bp from lions in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania and FIVPle subtype E (9899 bp isolated from lions in the Okavango Delta in Botswana, both resemble FIV genome sequence from puma, Pallas cat and domestic cat across 5' LTR, gag, pol, vif, orfA, env, rev and 3'LTR regions. Comparative analyses of available full-length FIV consisting of subtypes A, B and C from FIVFca, Pallas cat FIVOma and two puma FIVPco subtypes A and B recapitulate the species-specific monophyly of FIV marked by high levels of genetic diversity both within and between species. Across all FIVPle gene regions except env, lion subtypes B and E are monophyletic, and marginally more similar to Pallas cat FIVOma than to other FIV. Sequence analyses indicate the SU and TM regions of env vary substantially between subtypes, with FIVPle subtype E more related to domestic cat FIVFca than to FIVPle subtype B and FIVOma likely reflecting recombination between strains in the wild. Conclusion This study demonstrates the necessity of whole-genome analysis to complement population/gene-based studies, which are of limited utility in uncovering complex events such as recombination that may lead to functional differences in virulence and pathogenicity. These full-length lion

  14. The genome in three dimensions: a new frontier in human brain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amanda C; Bharadwaj, Rahul; Whittle, Catheryne; Krueger, Winfried; Mirnics, Karoly; Hurd, Yasmin; Rasmussen, Theodore; Akbarian, Schahram

    2014-06-15

    Less than 1.5% of the human genome encodes protein. However, vast portions of the human genome are subject to transcriptional and epigenetic regulation, and many noncoding regulatory DNA elements are thought to regulate the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes. For example, chromosomal "loopings" are pivotal for the orderly process of gene expression, by enabling distal regulatory enhancer or silencer elements to directly interact with proximal promoter and transcription start sites, potentially bypassing hundreds of kilobases of interspersed sequence on the linear genome. To date, however, epigenetic studies in the human brain are mostly limited to the exploration of DNA methylation and posttranslational modifications of the nucleosome core histones. In contrast, very little is known about the regulation of supranucleosomal structures. Here, we show that chromosome conformation capture, a widely used approach to study higher-order chromatin, is applicable to tissue collected postmortem, thereby informing about genome organization in the human brain. We introduce chromosome conformation capture protocols for brain and compare higher-order chromatin structures at the chromosome 6p22.2-22.1 schizophrenia and bipolar disorder susceptibility locus, and additional neurodevelopmental risk genes, (DPP10, MCPH1) in adult prefrontal cortex and various cell culture systems, including neurons derived from reprogrammed skin cells. We predict that the exploration of three-dimensional genome architectures and function will open up new frontiers in human brain research and psychiatric genetics and provide novel insights into the epigenetic risk architectures of regulatory noncoding DNA. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome sequence of the stramenopile Blastocystis, a human anaerobic parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Blastocystis is a highly prevalent anaerobic eukaryotic parasite of humans and animals that is associated with various gastrointestinal and extraintestinal disorders. Epidemiological studies have identified different subtypes but no one subtype has been definitively correlated with disease. Results Here we report the 18.8 Mb genome sequence of a Blastocystis subtype 7 isolate, which is the smallest stramenopile genome sequenced to date. The genome is highly compact and contains intriguing rearrangements. Comparisons with other available stramenopile genomes (plant pathogenic oomycete and diatom genomes) revealed effector proteins potentially involved in the adaptation to the intestinal environment, which were likely acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Moreover, Blastocystis living in anaerobic conditions harbors mitochondria-like organelles. An incomplete oxidative phosphorylation chain, a partial Krebs cycle, amino acid and fatty acid metabolisms and an iron-sulfur cluster assembly are all predicted to occur in these organelles. Predicted secretory proteins possess putative activities that may alter host physiology, such as proteases, protease-inhibitors, immunophilins and glycosyltransferases. This parasite also possesses the enzymatic machinery to tolerate oxidative bursts resulting from its own metabolism or induced by the host immune system. Conclusions This study provides insights into the genome architecture of this unusual stramenopile. It also proposes candidate genes with which to study the physiopathology of this parasite and thus may lead to further investigations into Blastocystis-host interactions. PMID:21439036

  16. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  17. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  18. Inference of distant genetic relations in humans using "1000 genomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khudhair, Ahmed; Qiu, Shuhao; Wyse, Meghan; Chowdhury, Shilpi; Cheng, Xi; Bekbolsynov, Dulat; Saha-Mandal, Arnab; Dutta, Rajib; Fedorova, Larisa; Fedorov, Alexei

    2015-01-07

    Nucleotide sequence differences on the whole-genome scale have been computed for 1,092 people from 14 populations publicly available by the 1000 Genomes Project. Total number of differences in genetic variants between 96,464 human pairs has been calculated. The distributions of these differences for individuals within European, Asian, or African origin were characterized by narrow unimodal peaks with mean values of 3.8, 3.5, and 5.1 million, respectively, and standard deviations of 0.1-0.03 million. The total numbers of genomic differences between pairs of all known relatives were found to be significantly lower than their respective population means and in reverse proportion to the distance of their consanguinity. By counting the total number of genomic differences it is possible to infer familial relations for people that share down to 6% of common loci identical-by-descent. Detection of familial relations can be radically improved when only very rare genetic variants are taken into account. Counting of total number of shared very rare single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from whole-genome sequences allows establishing distant familial relations for persons with eighth and ninth degrees of relationship. Using this analysis we predicted 271 distant familial pairwise relations among 1,092 individuals that have not been declared by 1000 Genomes Project. Particularly, among 89 British and 97 Chinese individuals we found three British-Chinese pairs with distant genetic relationships. Individuals from these pairs share identical-by-descent DNA fragments that represent 0.001%, 0.004%, and 0.01% of their genomes. With affordable whole-genome sequencing techniques, very rare SNPs should become important genetic markers for familial relationships and population stratification. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Human skin: an independent peripheral endocrine organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The historical picture of the endocrine system as a set of discrete hormone-producing organs has been substituted by organs regarded as organized communities in which the cells emit, receive and coordinate molecular signals from established endocrine organs, other distant sources, their neighbors, and themselves. In this wide sense, the human skin and its tissues are targets as well as producers of hormones. Although the role of hormones in the development of human skin and its capacity to produce and release hormones are well established, little attention has been drawn to the ability of human skin to fulfil the requirements of a classic endocrine organ. Indeed, human skin cells produce insulin-like growth factors and -binding proteins, propiomelanocortin derivatives, catecholamines, steroid hormones and vitamin D from cholesterol, retinoids from diet carotenoids, and eicosanoids from fatty acids. Hormones exert their biological effects on the skin through interaction with high-affinity receptors, such as receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones and thyroid hormones. In addition, the human skin is able to metabolize hormones and to activate and inactivate them. These steps are overtaken in most cases by different skin cell populations in a coordinated way indicating the endocrine autonomy of the skin. Characteristic examples are the metabolic pathways of the corticotropin-releasing hormone/propiomelanocortin axis, steroidogenesis, vitamin D, and retinoids. Hormones exhibit a wide range of biological activities on the skin, with major effects caused by growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, neuropeptides, sex steroids, glucocorticoids, retinoids, vitamin D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands, and eicosanoids. At last, human skin produces hormones which are released in the circulation and are important for functions of the entire organism, such as sex hormones, especially in aged individuals, and insulin-like growth

  20. Genomic Organization of the Drosophila Telomere RetrotransposableElements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.A.; DeBaryshe, P.G.; Traverse, K.L.; Celniker, S. E.; Pardue, M-L.

    2006-10-16

    The emerging sequence of the heterochromatic portion of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, with the most recent update of euchromatic sequence, gives the first genome-wide view of the chromosomal distribution of the telomeric retrotransposons, HeT-A, TART, and Tahre. As expected, these elements are entirely excluded from euchromatin, although sequence fragments of HeT-A and TART 3 untranslated regions are found in nontelomeric heterochromatin on the Y chromosome. The proximal ends of HeT-A/TART arrays appear to be a transition zone because only here do other transposable elements mix in the array. The sharp distinction between the distribution of telomeric elements and that of other transposable elements suggests that chromatin structure is important in telomere element localization. Measurements reported here show (1) D. melanogaster telomeres are very long, in the size range reported for inbred mouse strains (averaging 46 kb per chromosome end in Drosophila stock 2057). As in organisms with telomerase, their length varies depending on genotype. There is also slight under-replication in polytene nuclei. (2) Surprisingly, the relationship between the number of HeT-A and TART elements is not stochastic but is strongly correlated across stocks, supporting the idea that the two elements are interdependent. Although currently assembled portions of the HeT-A/TART arrays are from the most-proximal part of long arrays, {approx}61% of the total HeT-A sequence in these regions consists of intact, potentially active elements with little evidence of sequence decay, making it likely that the content of the telomere arrays turns over more extensively than has been thought.

  1. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.O. [Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lapham, E.V. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Child Development Center

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genomes of three cestode species of Taenia infecting animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Lin, Rui-Qing; Li, Ming-Wei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhang, Kou-Xing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2011-04-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences provide useful markers for investigating population genetic structures, systematics and phylogenetics of organisms. Although Taenia multiceps, T. hydatigena, and T. taeniaeformis are common taeniid tapeworms of ruminants, pigs, dogs, or cats, causing significant economic losses, no published study on their mt genomes is available. The complete mt genomes of T. multiceps, T. hydatigena, and T. taeniaeformis were amplified in two overlapping fragments and then sequenced. The sizes of the entire mt genome were 13700 bp for T. multiceps, 13489 bp for T. hydatigena, and 13647 bp for T. taeniaeformis. Each of the three genomes contains 36 genes, consisting of 12 genes for proteins, 2 genes for rRNA, and 22 genes for tRNA, which are the same as the mt genomes of all other cestode species studied to date. All genes are transcribed in the same direction and have a nucleotide composition high in A and T. The contents of A+T of the complete genomes are 71.3% for T. multiceps, 70.8% for T. hydatigena, and 73.0% for T. taeniaeformis. The AT bias had a significant effect on both the codon usage pattern and amino acid composition of proteins. T. multiceps and T. hydatigena had two noncoding regions, but T. taeniaeformis had only one. Phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes revealed that T. multiceps, T. hydatigena, and T. taeniaeformis were more closely related to the other members of the Taenia genus, consistent with results of previous morphological and molecular studies. The present study determined the complete mt genome sequences for three Taenia species of animal and human health significance, providing useful markers for studying the systematics, population genetics, and molecular epidemiology of these cestode parasites of animals and humans.

  3. A periodic pattern of SNPs in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo Eskerod; Villesen, Palle; Wiuf, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    or alignment errors, for example, transposable elements (SINE, LINE, and LTR), tandem repeats, and large duplicated regions. However, we found that the pattern is almost entirely confined to what we define as "periodic DNA." Periodic DNA is a genomic region with a high degree of periodicity in nucleotide usage...... periodic DNA. Our results suggest that not all SNPs in the human genome are created by independent single nucleotide mutations, and that care should be taken in analysis of SNPs from periodic DNA. The latter may have important consequences for SNP and association studies....

  4. Global genome nucleotide excision repair is organized into domains that promote efficient DNA repair in chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirong; Evans, Katie; Bennett, Mark; Webster, Richard M.; Leadbitter, Matthew; Teng, Yumin; Waters, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The rates at which lesions are removed by DNA repair can vary widely throughout the genome, with important implications for genomic stability. To study this, we measured the distribution of nucleotide excision repair (NER) rates for UV-induced lesions throughout the budding yeast genome. By plotting these repair rates in relation to genes and their associated flanking sequences, we reveal that, in normal cells, genomic repair rates display a distinctive pattern, suggesting that DNA repair is highly organized within the genome. Furthermore, by comparing genome-wide DNA repair rates in wild-type cells and cells defective in the global genome–NER (GG-NER) subpathway, we establish how this alters the distribution of NER rates throughout the genome. We also examined the genomic locations of GG-NER factor binding to chromatin before and after UV irradiation, revealing that GG-NER is organized and initiated from specific genomic locations. At these sites, chromatin occupancy of the histone acetyl-transferase Gcn5 is controlled by the GG-NER complex, which regulates histone H3 acetylation and chromatin structure, thereby promoting efficient DNA repair of UV-induced lesions. Chromatin remodeling during the GG-NER process is therefore organized into these genomic domains. Importantly, loss of Gcn5 significantly alters the genomic distribution of NER rates; this has implications for the effects of chromatin modifiers on the distribution of mutations that arise throughout the genome. PMID:27470111

  5. Meta-basic estimates the size of druggable human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2009-06-01

    We present here the estimation of the upper limit of the number of molecular targets in the human genome that represent an opportunity for further therapeutic treatment. We select around approximately 6300 human proteins that are similar to sequences of known protein targets collected from DrugBank database. Our bioinformatics study estimates the size of 'druggable' human genome to be around 20% of human proteome, i.e. the number of the possible protein targets for small-molecule drug design in medicinal chemistry. We do not take into account any toxicity prediction, the three-dimensional characteristics of the active site in the predicted 'druggable' protein families, or detailed chemical analysis of known inhibitors/drugs. Instead we rely on remote homology detection method Meta-BASIC, which is based on sequence and structural similarity. The prepared dataset of all predicted protein targets from human genome presents the unique opportunity for developing and benchmarking various in silico chemo/bio-informatics methods in the context of the virtual high throughput screening.

  6. The pathological consequences of impaired genome integrity in humans; disorders of the DNA replication machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and efficient replication of the human genome occurs in the context of an array of constitutional barriers, including regional topological constraints imposed by chromatin architecture and processes such as transcription, catenation of the helical polymer and spontaneously generated DNA lesions, including base modifications and strand breaks. DNA replication is fundamentally important for tissue development and homeostasis; differentiation programmes are intimately linked with stem cell division. Unsurprisingly, impairments of the DNA replication machinery can have catastrophic consequences for genome stability and cell division. Functional impacts on DNA replication and genome stability have long been known to play roles in malignant transformation through a variety of complex mechanisms, and significant further insights have been gained from studying model organisms in this context. Congenital hypomorphic defects in components of the DNA replication machinery have been and continue to be identified in humans. These disorders present with a wide range of clinical features. Indeed, in some instances, different mutations in the same gene underlie different clinical presentations. Understanding the origin and molecular basis of these features opens a window onto the range of developmental impacts of suboptimal DNA replication and genome instability in humans. Here, I will briefly overview the basic steps involved in DNA replication and the key concepts that have emerged from this area of research, before switching emphasis to the pathological consequences of defects within the DNA replication network; the human disorders. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Genome-Wide Associations of Gene Expression Variation in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  8. Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  9. Human Genome Diversity Project. Summary of planning workshop 3(B): Ethical and human-rights implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The third planning workshop of the Human Genome Diversity Project was held on the campus of the US National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, from February 16 through February 18, 1993. The second day of the workshop was devoted to an exploration of the ethical and human-rights implications of the Project. This open meeting centered on three roundtables, involving 12 invited participants, and the resulting discussions among all those present. Attendees and their affiliations are listed in the attached Appendix A. The discussion was guided by a schedule and list of possible issues, distributed to all present and attached as Appendix B. This is a relatively complete, and thus lengthy, summary of the comments at the meeting. The beginning of the summary sets out as conclusions some issues on which there appeared to be widespread agreement, but those conclusions are not intended to serve as a set of detailed recommendations. The meeting organizer is distributing his recommendations in a separate memorandum; recommendations from others who attended the meeting are welcome and will be distributed by the meeting organizer to the participants and to the Project committee.

  10. CAGO: a software tool for dynamic visual comparison and correlation measurement of genome organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Feng; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    CAGO (Comparative Analysis of Genome Organization) is developed to address two critical shortcomings of conventional genome atlas plotters: lack of dynamic exploratory functions and absence of signal analysis for genomic properties. With dynamic exploratory functions, users can directly manipulate chromosome tracks of a genome atlas and intuitively identify distinct genomic signals by visual comparison. Signal analysis of genomic properties can further detect inconspicuous patterns from noisy genomic properties and calculate correlations between genomic properties across various genomes. To implement dynamic exploratory functions, CAGO presents each genome atlas in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format and allows users to interact with it using a SVG viewer through JavaScript. Signal analysis functions are implemented using R statistical software and a discrete wavelet transformation package waveslim. CAGO is not only a plotter for generating complex genome atlases, but also a platform for exploring genome atlases with dynamic exploratory functions for visual comparison and with signal analysis for comparing genomic properties across multiple organisms. The web-based application of CAGO, its source code, user guides, video demos, and live examples are publicly available and can be accessed at http://cbs.ym.edu.tw/cago.

  11. CAGO: a software tool for dynamic visual comparison and correlation measurement of genome organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Feng Chang

    Full Text Available CAGO (Comparative Analysis of Genome Organization is developed to address two critical shortcomings of conventional genome atlas plotters: lack of dynamic exploratory functions and absence of signal analysis for genomic properties. With dynamic exploratory functions, users can directly manipulate chromosome tracks of a genome atlas and intuitively identify distinct genomic signals by visual comparison. Signal analysis of genomic properties can further detect inconspicuous patterns from noisy genomic properties and calculate correlations between genomic properties across various genomes. To implement dynamic exploratory functions, CAGO presents each genome atlas in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG format and allows users to interact with it using a SVG viewer through JavaScript. Signal analysis functions are implemented using R statistical software and a discrete wavelet transformation package waveslim. CAGO is not only a plotter for generating complex genome atlases, but also a platform for exploring genome atlases with dynamic exploratory functions for visual comparison and with signal analysis for comparing genomic properties across multiple organisms. The web-based application of CAGO, its source code, user guides, video demos, and live examples are publicly available and can be accessed at http://cbs.ym.edu.tw/cago.

  12. A genome-to-genome analysis of associations between human genetic variation, HIV-1 sequence diversity, and viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; Carlson, Jonathan M; Brumme, Chanson J; McLaren, Paul J; Brumme, Zabrina L; John, Mina; Haas, David W; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Dalmau, Judith; López-Galíndez, Cecilio; Casado, Concepción; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Bernasconi, Enos; Vernazza, Pietro; Klimkait, Thomas; Yerly, Sabine; O'Brien, Stephen J; Listgarten, Jennifer; Pfeifer, Nico; Lippert, Christoph; Fusi, Nicolo; Kutalik, Zoltán; Allen, Todd M; Müller, Viktor; Harrigan, P Richard; Heckerman, David; Telenti, Amalio; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-10-29

    HIV-1 sequence diversity is affected by selection pressures arising from host genomic factors. Using paired human and viral data from 1071 individuals, we ran >3000 genome-wide scans, testing for associations between host DNA polymorphisms, HIV-1 sequence variation and plasma viral load (VL), while considering human and viral population structure. We observed significant human SNP associations to a total of 48 HIV-1 amino acid variants (pgenome-to-genome approach highlights sites of genomic conflict and is a strategy generally applicable to studies of host-pathogen interaction. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01123.001.

  13. MORPHIN: a web tool for human disease research by projecting model organism biology onto a human integrated gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Yang, Sunmo; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2014-07-01

    Despite recent advances in human genetics, model organisms are indispensable for human disease research. Most human disease pathways are evolutionally conserved among other species, where they may phenocopy the human condition or be associated with seemingly unrelated phenotypes. Much of the known gene-to-phenotype association information is distributed across diverse databases, growing rapidly due to new experimental techniques. Accessible bioinformatics tools will therefore facilitate translation of discoveries from model organisms into human disease biology. Here, we present a web-based discovery tool for human disease studies, MORPHIN (model organisms projected on a human integrated gene network), which prioritizes the most relevant human diseases for a given set of model organism genes, potentially highlighting new model systems for human diseases and providing context to model organism studies. Conceptually, MORPHIN investigates human diseases by an orthology-based projection of a set of model organism genes onto a genome-scale human gene network. MORPHIN then prioritizes human diseases by relevance to the projected model organism genes using two distinct methods: a conventional overlap-based gene set enrichment analysis and a network-based measure of closeness between the query and disease gene sets capable of detecting associations undetectable by the conventional overlap-based methods. MORPHIN is freely accessible at http://www.inetbio.org/morphin.

  14. The proposed market for human organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, S J

    1993-01-01

    During the last decade there have been enormous advances in the transplantation of vital human organs--in particular, the kidney, lung, heart, liver, pancreas, and small intestine. Unfortunately, efforts to provide the benefits of these operations to patients have been severely hindered by limitations in the supply of organs--limitations that are a consequence of regulation prohibiting the use of market incentives to increase the supply. Markets for organs could take various forms: sales by living donors; sales of future interests in organs, to be removed on the death of the donor; and sales of organs of a recently deceased person by the family of the deceased. Two additional issues relate to the design of a market: the geographic scope of the market and rules of liability for the sale of diseased or defective organs.

  15. Genomic characterization of large heterochromatic gaps in the human genome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Altemose

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest gaps in the human genome assembly correspond to multi-megabase heterochromatic regions composed primarily of two related families of tandem repeats, Human Satellites 2 and 3 (HSat2,3. The abundance of repetitive DNA in these regions challenges standard mapping and assembly algorithms, and as a result, the sequence composition and potential biological functions of these regions remain largely unexplored. Furthermore, existing genomic tools designed to predict consensus-based descriptions of repeat families cannot be readily applied to complex satellite repeats such as HSat2,3, which lack a consistent repeat unit reference sequence. Here we present an alignment-free method to characterize complex satellites using whole-genome shotgun read datasets. Utilizing this approach, we classify HSat2,3 sequences into fourteen subfamilies and predict their chromosomal distributions, resulting in a comprehensive satellite reference database to further enable genomic studies of heterochromatic regions. We also identify 1.3 Mb of non-repetitive sequence interspersed with HSat2,3 across 17 unmapped assembly scaffolds, including eight annotated gene predictions. Finally, we apply our satellite reference database to high-throughput sequence data from 396 males to estimate array size variation of the predominant HSat3 array on the Y chromosome, confirming that satellite array sizes can vary between individuals over an order of magnitude (7 to 98 Mb and further demonstrating that array sizes are distributed differently within distinct Y haplogroups. In summary, we present a novel framework for generating initial reference databases for unassembled genomic regions enriched with complex satellite DNA, and we further demonstrate the utility of these reference databases for studying patterns of sequence variation within human populations.

  16. Coping with genetic diversity: the contribution of pathogen and human genomics to modern vaccinology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, D. [Universidade Federal da Bahia and Universidade Estadual da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Barbosa, T. [Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Rihet, P. [TAGC-INSERM U928, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France)

    2011-10-28

    Vaccine development faces major difficulties partly because of genetic variation in both infectious organisms and humans. This causes antigenic variation in infectious agents and a high interindividual variability in the human response to the vaccine. The exponential growth of genome sequence information has induced a shift from conventional culture-based to genome-based vaccinology, and allows the tackling of challenges in vaccine development due to pathogen genetic variability. Additionally, recent advances in immunogenetics and genomics should help in the understanding of the influence of genetic factors on the interindividual and interpopulation variations in immune responses to vaccines, and could be useful for developing new vaccine strategies. Accumulating results provide evidence for the existence of a number of genes involved in protective immune responses that are induced either by natural infections or vaccines. Variation in immune responses could be viewed as the result of a perturbation of gene networks; this should help in understanding how a particular polymorphism or a combination thereof could affect protective immune responses. Here we will present: i) the first genome-based vaccines that served as proof of concept, and that provided new critical insights into vaccine development strategies; ii) an overview of genetic predisposition in infectious diseases and genetic control in responses to vaccines; iii) population genetic differences that are a rationale behind group-targeted vaccines; iv) an outlook for genetic control in infectious diseases, with special emphasis on the concept of molecular networks that will provide a structure to the huge amount of genomic data.

  17. Fruits of human genome project and private venture, and their impact on life science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikekawa, A; Ikekawa, S

    2001-12-01

    A small knowledge base was created by organizing the Human Genome Project (HGP) and its related issues in "Science" magazines between 1996 and 2000. This base revealed the stunning achievement of HGP and a private venture and its impact on today's biology and life science. In the mid-1990, they encouraged the development of advanced high throughput automated DNA sequencers and the technologies that can analyse all genes at once in a systematic fashion. Using these technologies, they completed the genome sequence of human and various other organisms. These fruits opened the door to comparative genomics, functional genomics, the interdisprinary field between computer and biology, and proteomics. They have caused a shift in biological investigation from studying single genes or proteins to studying all genes or proteins at once, and causing revolutional changes in traditional biology, drug discovery and therapy. They have expanded the range of potential drug targets and have facilitated a shift in drug discovery programs toward rational target-based strategies. They have spawned pharmacogenomics that could give rise to a new generation of highly effective drugs that treat causes, not just symptoms. They should also cause a migration from the traditional medications that are safe and effective for every members of the population to personalized medicine and personalized therapy.

  18. Clusters of adaptive evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B. Scheinfeldt

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable work has been devoted to identifying regions of the human genome that have been subjected to recent positive selection. Although detailed follow-up studies of putatively selected regions are critical for a deeper understanding of human evolutionary history, such studies have received comparably less attention. Recently, we have shown that ALMS1 has been the target of recent positive selection acting on standing variation in Eurasian populations. Here, we describe a careful follow-up analysis of genetic variation across the ALMS1 region, which unexpectedly revealed a cluster of substrates of positive selection. Specifically, through the analysis of SNP data from the HapMap and HGDP-CEPH samples as well sequence data from the region, we find compelling evidence for three independent and distinct signals of recent positive selection across this 3 Mb region surrounding ALMS1. Moreover, we analyzed the HapMap data to identify other putative clusters of independent selective events and conservatively discovered 19 additional clusters of adaptive evolution. This work has important implications for the interpretation of genome-scans for positive selection in humans and more broadly contributes to a better understanding of how recent positive selection has shaped genetic variation across the human genome.

  19. Controlling our destinies: Historical, philosophical, social and ethical perspectives on the Human Genome Project: Final report, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, P.R.

    1996-09-25

    This report briefly describes the efforts by the organizing committee in preparation for the conference entitled Controlling Our Destinies: Historical, Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Perspectives on the Human Genome Project. The conference was held October 5-8, 1995.

  20. Genome-wide landscapes of human local adaptation in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    Full Text Available Genetic studies of human local adaptation have been facilitated greatly by recent advances in high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies. However, few studies have investigated local adaptation in Asian populations on a genome-wide scale and with a high geographic resolution. In this study, taking advantage of the dense population coverage in Southeast Asia, which is the part of the world least studied in term of natural selection, we depicted genome-wide landscapes of local adaptations in 63 Asian populations representing the majority of linguistic and ethnic groups in Asia. Using genome-wide data analysis, we discovered many genes showing signs of local adaptation or natural selection. Notable examples, such as FOXQ1, MAST2, and CDH4, were found to play a role in hair follicle development and human cancer, signal transduction, and tumor repression, respectively. These showed strong indications of natural selection in Philippine Negritos, a group of aboriginal hunter-gatherers living in the Philippines. MTTP, which has associations with metabolic syndrome, body mass index, and insulin regulation, showed a strong signature of selection in Southeast Asians, including Indonesians. Functional annotation analysis revealed that genes and genetic variants underlying natural selections were generally enriched in the functional category of alternative splicing. Specifically, many genes showing significant difference with respect to allele frequency between northern and southern Asian populations were found to be associated with human height and growth and various immune pathways. In summary, this study contributes to the overall understanding of human local adaptation in Asia and has identified both known and novel signatures of natural selection in the human genome.

  1. Statistical analysis of simple repeats in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, F.; Liò, P.

    2005-03-01

    The human genome contains repetitive DNA at different level of sequence length, number and dispersion. Highly repetitive DNA is particularly rich in homo- and di-nucleotide repeats, while middle repetitive DNA is rich of families of interspersed, mobile elements hundreds of base pairs (bp) long, among which belong the Alu families. A link between homo- and di-polymeric tracts and mobile elements has been recently highlighted. In particular, the mobility of Alu repeats, which form 10% of the human genome, has been correlated with the length of poly(A) tracts located at one end of the Alu. These tracts have a rigid and non-bendable structure and have an inhibitory effect on nucleosomes, which normally compact the DNA. We performed a statistical analysis of the genome-wide distribution of lengths and inter-tract separations of poly(X) and poly(XY) tracts in the human genome. Our study shows that in humans the length distributions of these sequences reflect the dynamics of their expansion and DNA replication. By means of general tools from linguistics, we show that the latter play the role of highly-significant content-bearing terms in the DNA text. Furthermore, we find that such tracts are positioned in a non-random fashion, with an apparent periodicity of 150 bases. This allows us to extend the link between repetitive, highly mobile elements such as Alus and low-complexity words in human DNA. More precisely, we show that Alus are sources of poly(X) tracts, which in turn affect in a subtle way the combination and diversification of gene expression and the fixation of multigene families.

  2. CRISPR-Cas9 System as a Versatile Tool for Genome Engineering in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted nucleases are influential instruments for intervening in genome revision with great accuracy. RNA-guided Cas9 nucleases produced from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas systems have noticeably altered the means to modify the genomes of distinct organisms. They can be notably used to facilitate effective genome manipulation in eukaryotic cells by clearly detailing a 20-nt targeting sequence inside its directed RNA. We discuss the most recent advancements in the molecular basis of the type II CRISPR/Cas system and encapsulate applications and elements affecting its use in human cells. We also propose possible applications covering its uses ranging from basic science to implementation in the clinic.

  3. 78 FR 61851 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    ... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research... Human Genome Research Institute, 4076 Conference Room, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  4. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 2: Resources for Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haury, David L.

    This ERIC Digest identifies how the human genome project fits into the "National Science Education Standards" and lists Human Genome Project Web sites found on the World Wide Web. It is a resource companion to "Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators" (Haury 2001). The Web resources and…

  5. 75 FR 51828 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... for Human Genome Research. The meetings will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance..., PhD, Director for Extramural Research, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane...: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: May 16-17, 2011. Open: May 16, 2011, 8:30...

  6. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, D; Kim, J-H; Yeo, W-H; Oh, K; Lee, K-H; Kim, M-H; Ryew, S-M; Ahn, S-G; Gao, D; Cangelosi, G A; Chung, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottleneck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab and saliva samples. DNA is attracted onto a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle four microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for 1 month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery, and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol.

  7. Opening plenary speaker: Human genomics, precision medicine, and advancing human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Eric D

    2016-08-01

    Starting with the launch of the Human Genome Project in 1990, the past quarter-century has brought spectacular achievements in genomics that dramatically empower the study of human biology and disease. The human genomics enterprise is now in the midst of an important transition, as the growing foundation of genomic knowledge is being used by researchers and clinicians to tackle increasingly complex problems in biomedicine. Of particular prominence is the use of revolutionary new DNA sequencing technologies for generating prodigious amounts of DNA sequence data to elucidate the complexities of genome structure, function, and evolution, as well as to unravel the genomic bases of rare and common diseases. Together, these developments are ushering in the era of genomic medicine. Augmenting the advances in human genomics have been innovations in technologies for measuring environmental and lifestyle information, electronic health records, and data science; together, these provide opportunities of unprecedented scale and scope for investigating the underpinnings of health and disease. To capitalize on these opportunities, U.S. President Barack Obama recently announced a major new research endeavor - the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative. This bold effort will be framed around several key aims, which include accelerating the use of genomically informed approaches to cancer care, making important policy and regulatory changes, and establishing a large research cohort of >1 million volunteers to facilitate precision medicine research. The latter will include making the partnership with all participants a centerpiece feature in the cohort's design and development. The Precision Medicine Initiative represents a broad-based research program that will allow new approaches for individualized medical care to be rigorously tested, so as to establish a new evidence base for advancing clinical practice and, eventually, human health.

  8. Organic Fertilisation, Soil Quality and Human Health

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Chapters: 1) Convergence or divide in the movement for sustainable and just agriculture. 2) No-till agriculture in the USA. 3) Organic fertilizers in sub-Saharan farming systems. 4) Biofuel Production Byproducts as Soil Amendments. 5) Pseudomonas and microbes for disease-suppressive soils. 6) Conservation Tillage Impact on Soil Aggregation, Organic Matter Turnover and Biodiversity. 7) Sustainable agricultural NP turnover in the 27 European countries. 8) Tomato production for human health, not...

  9. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics© system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs.

  10. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lawrence

    2009-01-23

    Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B) translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs.

  11. Marketing human organs: the autonomy paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, P A; Thomasma, D C; Daar, A S

    1996-03-01

    The severe shortage of organs for transplantation and the continual reluctance of the public to voluntarily donate has prompted consideration of alternative strategies for organ procurement. This paper explores the development of market approaches for procuring human organs for transplantation and considers the social and moral implications of organ donation as both a "gift of life" and a "commodity exchange." The problematic and paradoxical articulation of individual autonomy in relation to property rights and marketing human body parts is addressed. We argue that beliefs about proprietorship over human body parts and the capacity to provide consent for organ donation are culturally constructed. We contend that the political and economic framework of biomedicine, in western and non-western nations, influences access to transplantation technology and shapes the form and development of specific market approaches. Finally, we suggest that marketing approaches for organ procurement are and will be negotiated within cultural parameters constrained by several factors: beliefs about the physical body and personhood, religious traditions, economic conditions, and the availability of technological resources.

  12. Genomic discovery of potent chromatin insulators for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingdong; Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Hao; Qi, Heyuan; Song, Chao-Zhong; Navas, Patrick A; Emery, David W; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2015-02-01

    Insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity, which usually manifest as hematopoietic malignancy, represent major barriers to realizing the promise of gene therapy. Although insulator sequences that block transcriptional enhancers could mitigate or eliminate these risks, so far no human insulators with high functional potency have been identified. Here we describe a genomic approach for the identification of compact sequence elements that function as insulators. These elements are highly occupied by the insulator protein CTCF, are DNase I hypersensitive and represent only a small minority of the CTCF recognition sequences in the human genome. We show that the elements identified acted as potent enhancer blockers and substantially decreased the risk of tumor formation in a cancer-prone animal model. The elements are small, can be efficiently accommodated by viral vectors and have no detrimental effects on viral titers. The insulators we describe here are expected to increase the safety of gene therapy for genetic diseases.

  13. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzmiller, D.; Bradbury, M.; Cram, S. (comps.)

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratories Life Sciences Division and biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1991. Selected research highlights include: yeast artificial chromosome libraries from flow sorted human chromosomes 16 and 21; distances between the antigen binding sites of three murine antibody subclasses measured using neutron and x-ray scattering; NFCR 10th anniversary highlights; kinase-mediated differences found in the cell cycle regulation of normal and transformed cells; and detecting mutations that cause Gaucher's disease by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Project descriptions include: genomic structure and regulation, molecular structure, cytometry, cell growth and differentiation, radiation biology and carcinogenesis, and pulmonary biology.

  14. Concise review: Human cell engineering: cellular reprogramming and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Prashant; Cheng, Linzhao

    2012-01-01

    Cell engineering is defined here as the collective ability to both reset and edit the genome of a mammalian cell. Until recently, this had been extremely challenging to achieve as nontransformed human cells are significantly refractory to both these processes. The recent success in reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells that are self-renewable in culture, coupled with our increasing ability to effect precise and predesigned genomic editing, now readily permits cellular changes at both the genetic and epigenetic levels. These dual capabilities also make possible the generation of genetically matched, disease-free stem cells from patients for regenerative medicine. The objective of this review is to summarize the key enabling developments on these two rapidly evolving research fronts in human cell engineering, highlight unresolved issues, and outline potential future research directions.

  15. Current theoretical models fail to predict the topological complexity of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsuaga, Javier; Jayasinghe, Reyka G; Scharein, Robert G; Segal, Mark R; Stolz, Robert H; Vazquez, Mariel

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the folding of the human genome is a key challenge of modern structural biology. The emergence of chromatin conformation capture assays (e.g., Hi-C) has revolutionized chromosome biology and provided new insights into the three dimensional structure of the genome. The experimental data are highly complex and need to be analyzed with quantitative tools. It has been argued that the data obtained from Hi-C assays are consistent with a fractal organization of the genome. A key characteristic of the fractal globule is the lack of topological complexity (knotting or inter-linking). However, the absence of topological complexity contradicts results from polymer physics showing that the entanglement of long linear polymers in a confined volume increases rapidly with the length and with decreasing volume. In vivo and in vitro assays support this claim in some biological systems. We simulate knotted lattice polygons confined inside a sphere and demonstrate that their contact frequencies agree with the human Hi-C data. We conclude that the topological complexity of the human genome cannot be inferred from current Hi-C data.

  16. The nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Plasmopara halstedii virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göpfert Jens C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only very few viruses of Oomycetes have been studied in detail. Isometric virions were found in different isolates of the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, the downy mildew pathogen of sunflower. However, complete nucleotide sequences and data on the genome organization were lacking. Methods Viral RNA of different P. halstedii isolates was subjected to nucleotide sequencing and analysis of the viral genome. The N-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein was determined using Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The complete nucleotide sequences of both single-stranded RNA segments (RNA1 and RNA2 were established. RNA1 consisted of 2793 nucleotides (nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a single open-reading frame (ORF1 of 2745 nt. ORF1 was framed by a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR of 18 nt and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of 30 nt. ORF1 contained motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp and showed similarities to RdRp of Scleropthora macrospora virus A (SmV A and viruses within the Nodaviridae family. RNA2 consisted of 1526 nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a second ORF (ORF2 of 1128 nt. ORF2 coded for the single viral coat protein (CP and was framed by a 5' UTR of 164 nt and a 3' UTR of 234 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 was verified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments. Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the N-terminal sequence of the CP. The N-terminal sequence represented a region within ORF2 suggesting a proteolytic processing of the CP in vivo. The CP showed similarities to CP of SmV A and viruses within the Tombusviridae family. Fragments of RNA1 (ca. 1.9 kb and RNA2 (ca. 1.4 kb were used to analyze the nucleotide sequence variation of virions in different P. halstedii isolates. Viral sequence variation was 0.3% or less regardless of their host's pathotypes, the geographical origin and the sensitivity towards the fungicide metalaxyl. Conclusions The results showed the presence of a single and new

  17. The nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Plasmopara halstedii virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Only very few viruses of Oomycetes have been studied in detail. Isometric virions were found in different isolates of the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, the downy mildew pathogen of sunflower. However, complete nucleotide sequences and data on the genome organization were lacking. Methods Viral RNA of different P. halstedii isolates was subjected to nucleotide sequencing and analysis of the viral genome. The N-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein was determined using Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The complete nucleotide sequences of both single-stranded RNA segments (RNA1 and RNA2) were established. RNA1 consisted of 2793 nucleotides (nt) exclusive its 3' poly(A) tract and a single open-reading frame (ORF1) of 2745 nt. ORF1 was framed by a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of 18 nt and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of 30 nt. ORF1 contained motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) and showed similarities to RdRp of Scleropthora macrospora virus A (SmV A) and viruses within the Nodaviridae family. RNA2 consisted of 1526 nt exclusive its 3' poly(A) tract and a second ORF (ORF2) of 1128 nt. ORF2 coded for the single viral coat protein (CP) and was framed by a 5' UTR of 164 nt and a 3' UTR of 234 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 was verified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments. Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the N-terminal sequence of the CP. The N-terminal sequence represented a region within ORF2 suggesting a proteolytic processing of the CP in vivo. The CP showed similarities to CP of SmV A and viruses within the Tombusviridae family. Fragments of RNA1 (ca. 1.9 kb) and RNA2 (ca. 1.4 kb) were used to analyze the nucleotide sequence variation of virions in different P. halstedii isolates. Viral sequence variation was 0.3% or less regardless of their host's pathotypes, the geographical origin and the sensitivity towards the fungicide metalaxyl. Conclusions The results showed the presence of a single and new virus type in

  18. A Competitive Market in Human Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Frederick

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available I offer consequentialist and deontological arguments for a competitive market in human organs, from live as well as dead donors. I consider the objections that a market in organs will frustrate altruism, coerce the desperate, expose under-informed agents to unacceptable risks, exacerbate inequality, degrade those who participate in it, involve a kind of slavery, impose invidious costs, and impair third-party choice sets. I show that each of these objections is without merit and that, in consequence, the opposition to markets in organs is an untenable endorsement of death, suffering and the suppression of freedom.

  19. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailao, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo; Silva Ferreira, Marcia Eliana da; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Leon-Narvaez, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasi...

  20. Detection of extracellular genomic DNA scaffold in human thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanisms underlying transition of a thrombus susceptible to tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) fibrinolysis to one that is resistant is unclear. Demonstration of a new possible thrombus scaffold may open new avenues of research in thrombolysis and may provide mechanistic insight...... thrombi. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive detection of genomic DNA associated with histones in the extracellular matrix of human and mouse thrombi suggest the presence of a new thrombus-associated scaffold....

  1. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  2. Human genome-guided identification of memory-modulating drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Gerhards, Christiane; Heck, Angela; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Schicktanz, Nathalie; Auschra, Bianca; Demougin, Philippe; Mumme, Eva; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hanser, Edveena; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Jessen, Frank; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Milnik, Annette; Paganetti, Paolo; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-11-12

    In the last decade there has been an exponential increase in knowledge about the genetic basis of complex human traits, including neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not clear, however, to what extent this knowledge can be used as a starting point for drug identification, one of the central hopes of the human genome project. The aim of the present study was to identify memory-modulating compounds through the use of human genetic information. We performed a multinational collaborative study, which included assessment of aversive memory--a trait central to posttraumatic stress disorder--and a gene-set analysis in healthy individuals. We identified 20 potential drug target genes in two genomewide-corrected gene sets: the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction and the long-term depression gene set. In a subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers, we aimed at providing a proof of concept for the genome-guided identification of memory modulating compounds. Pharmacological intervention at the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction gene set led to significant reduction of aversive memory. The findings demonstrate that genome information, along with appropriate data mining methodology, can be used as a starting point for the identification of memory-modulating compounds.

  3. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  4. The human genome: Some assembly required. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Project promises to be one of the most rewarding endeavors in modern biology. The cost and the ethical and social implications, however, have made this project the source of considerable debate both in the scientific community and in the public at large. The 1994 Graduate Student Symposium addresses the scientific merits of the project, the technical issues involved in accomplishing the task, as well as the medical and social issues which stem from the wealth of knowledge which the Human Genome Project will help create. To this end, speakers were brought together who represent the diverse areas of expertise characteristic of this multidisciplinary project. The keynote speaker addresses the project`s motivations and goals in the larger context of biological and medical sciences. The first two sessions address relevant technical issues, data collection with a focus on high-throughput sequencing methods and data analysis with an emphasis on identification of coding sequences. The third session explores recent advances in the understanding of genetic diseases and possible routes to treatment. Finally, the last session addresses some of the ethical, social and legal issues which will undoubtedly arise from having a detailed knowledge of the human genome.

  5. A Compendium of Chromatin Contact Maps Reveals Spatially Active Regions in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anthony D; Hu, Ming; Jung, Inkyung; Xu, Zheng; Qiu, Yunjiang; Tan, Catherine L; Li, Yun; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Barr, Cathy L; Ren, Bing

    2016-11-15

    The three-dimensional configuration of DNA is integral to all nuclear processes in eukaryotes, yet our knowledge of the chromosome architecture is still limited. Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture studies have uncovered features of chromatin organization in cultured cells, but genome architecture in human tissues has yet to be explored. Here, we report the most comprehensive survey to date of chromatin organization in human tissues. Through integrative analysis of chromatin contact maps in 21 primary human tissues and cell types, we find topologically associating domains highly conserved in different tissues. We also discover genomic regions that exhibit unusually high levels of local chromatin interactions. These frequently interacting regions (FIREs) are enriched for super-enhancers and are near tissue-specifically expressed genes. They display strong tissue-specificity in local chromatin interactions. Additionally, FIRE formation is partially dependent on CTCF and the Cohesin complex. We further show that FIREs can help annotate the function of non-coding sequence variants. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome organization of the SARS-CoV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Jianfei; Wang, Jing;

    2003-01-01

    Annotation of the genome sequence of the SARS-CoV (severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus) is indispensable to understand its evolution and pathogenesis. We have performed a full annotation of the SARS-CoV genome sequences by using annotation programs publicly available or devel...

  7. Sequencing and annotated analysis of an Estonian human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleoja, Rutt; Sarapik, Aili; Reimann, Ene; Reemann, Paula; Jaakma, Ülle; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2012-02-01

    In present study we describe the sequencing and annotated analysis of the individual genome of Estonian. Using SOLID technology we generated 2,449,441,916 of 50-bp reads. The Bioscope version 1.3 was used for mapping and pairing of reads to the NCBI human genome reference (build 36, hg18). Bioscope enables also the annotation of the results of variant (tertiary) analysis. The average mapping of reads was 75.5% with total coverage of 107.72 Gb. resulting in mean fold coverage of 34.6. We found 3,482,975 SNPs out of which 352,492 were novel. 21,222 SNPs were in coding region: 10,649 were synonymous SNPs, 10,360 were nonsynonymous missense SNPs, 155 were nonsynonymous nonsense SNPs and 58 were nonsynonymous frameshifts. We identified 219 CNVs with total base pair coverage of 37,326,300 bp and 87,451 large insertion/deletion polymorphisms covering 10,152,256 bp of the genome. In addition, we found 285,864 small size insertion/deletion polymorphisms out of which 133,969 were novel. Finally, we identified 53 inversions, 19 overlapped genes and 2 overlapped exons. Interestingly, we found the region in chromosome 6 to be enriched with the coding SNPs and CNVs. This study confirms previous findings, that our genomes are more complex and variable as thought before. Therefore, sequencing of the personal genomes followed by annotation would improve the analysis of heritability of phenotypes and our understandings on the functions of genome.

  8. Predicting human genetic interactions from cancer genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lu

    Full Text Available Synthetic Lethal (SL genetic interactions play a key role in various types of biological research, ranging from understanding genotype-phenotype relationships to identifying drug-targets against cancer. Despite recent advances in empirical measuring SL interactions in human cells, the human genetic interaction map is far from complete. Here, we present a novel approach to predict this map by exploiting patterns in cancer genome evolution. First, we show that empirically determined SL interactions are reflected in various gene presence, absence, and duplication patterns in hundreds of cancer genomes. The most evident pattern that we discovered is that when one member of an SL interaction gene pair is lost, the other gene tends not to be lost, i.e. the absence of co-loss. This observation is in line with expectation, because the loss of an SL interacting pair will be lethal to the cancer cell. SL interactions are also reflected in gene expression profiles, such as an under representation of cases where the genes in an SL pair are both under expressed, and an over representation of cases where one gene of an SL pair is under expressed, while the other one is over expressed. We integrated the various previously unknown cancer genome patterns and the gene expression patterns into a computational model to identify SL pairs. This simple, genome-wide model achieves a high prediction power (AUC = 0.75 for known genetic interactions. It allows us to present for the first time a comprehensive genome-wide list of SL interactions with a high estimated prediction precision, covering up to 591,000 gene pairs. This unique list can potentially be used in various application areas ranging from biotechnology to medical genetics.

  9. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Neng-zhi; Liu, Zi-xian; Qiu, Wen-yuan

    2009-02-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and correlation of 16 nearest neighboring nucleotides (AA, AC, AG, ..., TT) in 12 human chromosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (i) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ii) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coefficients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  10. Normalization of Complete Genome Characteristics: Application to Evolution from Primitive Organisms to Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorimachi, Kenji; Okayasu, Teiji; Ohhira, Shuji

    2015-04-01

    Normalized nucleotide and amino acid contents of complete genome sequences can be visualized as radar charts. The shapes of these charts depict the characteristics of an organism's genome. The normalized values calculated from the genome sequence theoretically exclude experimental errors. Further, because normalization is independent of both target size and kind, this procedure is applicable not only to single genes but also to whole genomes, which consist of a huge number of different genes. In this review, we discuss the applications of the normalization of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid contents of complete genomes to the investigation of genome structure and to evolutionary research from primitive organisms to Homo sapiens. Some of the results could never have been obtained from the analysis of individual nucleotide or amino acid sequences but were revealed only after the normalization of nucleotide and amino acid contents was applied to genome research. The discovery that genome structure was homogeneous was obtained only after normalization methods were applied to the nucleotide or predicted amino acid contents of genome sequences. Normalization procedures are also applicable to evolutionary research. Thus, normalization of the contents of whole genomes is a useful procedure that can help to characterize organisms.

  11. Insular organization of gene space in grass genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Andrea; Müller, Hans-Georg; Massa, Alicia N; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Deal, Karin R; You, Frank M; Xu, Xiangyang; Gu, Yong Q; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Anderson, Olin D; Chan, Agnes P; Rabinowicz, Pablo; Devos, Katrien M; Dvorak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Wheat and maize genes were hypothesized to be clustered into islands but the hypothesis was not statistically tested. The hypothesis is statistically tested here in four grass species differing in genome size, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor, and Aegilops tauschii. Density functions obtained under a model where gene locations follow a homogeneous Poisson process and thus are not clustered are compared with a model-free situation quantified through a non-parametric density estimate. A simple homogeneous Poisson model for gene locations is not rejected for the small O. sativa and B. distachyon genomes, indicating that genes are distributed largely uniformly in those species, but is rejected for the larger S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii genomes, providing evidence for clustering of genes into islands. It is proposed to call the gene islands "gene insulae" to distinguish them from other types of gene clustering that have been proposed. An average S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii insula is estimated to contain 3.7 and 3.9 genes with an average intergenic distance within an insula of 2.1 and 16.5 kb, respectively. Inter-insular distances are greater than 8 and 81 kb and average 15.1 and 205 kb, in S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A greater gene density observed in the distal regions of the Ae. tauschii chromosomes is shown to be primarily caused by shortening of inter-insular distances. The comparison of the four grass genomes suggests that gene locations are largely a function of a homogeneous Poisson process in small genomes. Nonrandom insertions of LTR retroelements during genome expansion creates gene insulae, which become less dense and further apart with the increase in genome size. High concordance in relative lengths of orthologous intergenic distances among the investigated genomes including the maize genome suggests functional constraints on gene distribution in the grass genomes.

  12. Insular organization of gene space in grass genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gottlieb

    Full Text Available Wheat and maize genes were hypothesized to be clustered into islands but the hypothesis was not statistically tested. The hypothesis is statistically tested here in four grass species differing in genome size, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor, and Aegilops tauschii. Density functions obtained under a model where gene locations follow a homogeneous Poisson process and thus are not clustered are compared with a model-free situation quantified through a non-parametric density estimate. A simple homogeneous Poisson model for gene locations is not rejected for the small O. sativa and B. distachyon genomes, indicating that genes are distributed largely uniformly in those species, but is rejected for the larger S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii genomes, providing evidence for clustering of genes into islands. It is proposed to call the gene islands "gene insulae" to distinguish them from other types of gene clustering that have been proposed. An average S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii insula is estimated to contain 3.7 and 3.9 genes with an average intergenic distance within an insula of 2.1 and 16.5 kb, respectively. Inter-insular distances are greater than 8 and 81 kb and average 15.1 and 205 kb, in S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A greater gene density observed in the distal regions of the Ae. tauschii chromosomes is shown to be primarily caused by shortening of inter-insular distances. The comparison of the four grass genomes suggests that gene locations are largely a function of a homogeneous Poisson process in small genomes. Nonrandom insertions of LTR retroelements during genome expansion creates gene insulae, which become less dense and further apart with the increase in genome size. High concordance in relative lengths of orthologous intergenic distances among the investigated genomes including the maize genome suggests functional constraints on gene distribution in the grass genomes.

  13. Bonus Organisms in High-Throughput Eukaryotic Whole-Genome Shorgun Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Platt, Darren

    2006-02-06

    The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced over 50 eukaryotic genomes, ranging in size from 15 MB to 1.6 GB, over a wide range of organism types. In the course of doing so, it has become clear that a substantial fraction of these data sets contains bonus organisms, usually prokaryotes, in addition to the desired genome. While some of these additional organisms are extraneous contamination, they are sometimes symbionts, and so can be of biological interest. Therefore, it is desirable to assemble the bonus organisms along with the main genome. This transforms the problem into one of metagenomic assembly, which is considerably more challenging than traditional whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The different organisms will usually be present at different sequence depths, which is difficult to handle in most WGS assemblers. In addition, with multiple distinct genomes present, chimerism can produce cross-organism combinations. Finally, there is no guarantee that only a single bonus organism will be present. For example, one JGI project contained at least two different prokaryotic contaminants, plus a 145 KB plasmid of unknown origin. We have developed techniques to routinely identify and handle such bonus organisms in a high-throughput sequencing environment. Approaches include screening and partitioning the unassembled data, and iterative subassemblies. These methods are applicable not only to bonus organisms, but also to desired components such as organelles. These procedures have the additional benefit of identifying, and allowing for the removal of, cloning artifacts such as E.coli and spurious vector inclusions.

  14. Global genomic diversity of human papillomavirus 6 based on 724 isolates and 190 complete genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelen, Mateja M; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Burt, Felicity J; Chan, Paul K S; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L; Garland, Suzanne M; Giri, Adriana A; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N M; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Zidovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D; Poljak, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV6 variant lineages

  15. Biology, genome organization, and evolution of parvoviruses in marine shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Arun K; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Saksmerprome, Vanvimon; Lakshman, Dilip K

    2014-01-01

    As shrimp aquaculture has evolved from a subsistent farming activity to an economically important global industry, viral diseases have also become a serious threat to the sustainable growth and productivity of this industry. Parvoviruses represent an economically important group of viruses that has greatly affected shrimp aquaculture. In the early 1980s, an outbreak of a shrimp parvovirus, infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), led to the collapse of penaeid shrimp farming in the Americas. Since then, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the parvoviruses of shrimp and developing diagnostic methods aimed to preventing the spread of diseases caused by these viruses. To date, four parvoviruses are known that infect shrimp; these include IHHNV, hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV), spawner-isolated mortality virus (SMV), and lymphoid organ parvo-like virus. Due to the economic repercussions that IHHNV and HPV outbreaks have caused to shrimp farming over the years, studies have been focused mostly on these two pathogens, while information on SMV and LPV remains limited. IHHNV was the first shrimp virus to be sequenced and the first for which highly sensitive diagnostic methods were developed. IHHNV-resistant lines of shrimp were also developed to mitigate the losses caused by this virus. While the losses due to IHHNV have been largely contained in recent years, reports of HPV-induced mortalities in larval stages in hatchery and losses due to reduced growth have increased. This review presents a comprehensive account of the history and current knowledge on the biology, diagnostics methods, genomic features, mechanisms of evolution, and management strategies of shrimp parvoviruses. We also highlighted areas where research efforts should be focused in order to gain further insight on the mechanisms of parvoviral pathogenicity in shrimp that will help to prevent future losses caused by these viruses.

  16. [Genetic individuality and the universal declaration on the human genome and human rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueiros, Jesús M; Saruwatari, Garbiñe; Oliva-Sánchez, Pablo Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the epistemic and ontological relationship between science and law through the concept of individual in the Universal Declaration of the Human Genome and Human Rights. We argue for a better understanding of this relationship in order to foresee ethical and social consequences derived from Law adopting concepts with a strong scientific meaning.

  17. Human and non-human primate genomes share hotspots of positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Enard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Among primates, genome-wide analysis of recent positive selection is currently limited to the human species because it requires extensive sampling of genotypic data from many individuals. The extent to which genes positively selected in human also present adaptive changes in other primates therefore remains unknown. This question is important because a gene that has been positively selected independently in the human and in other primate lineages may be less likely to be involved in human specific phenotypic changes such as dietary habits or cognitive abilities. To answer this question, we analysed heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomes of single human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque individuals using a new method aiming to identify selective sweeps genome-wide. We found an unexpectedly high number of orthologous genes exhibiting signatures of a selective sweep simultaneously in several primate species, suggesting the presence of hotspots of positive selection. A similar significant excess is evident when comparing genes positively selected during recent human evolution with genes subjected to positive selection in their coding sequence in other primate lineages and identified using a different test. These findings are further supported by comparing several published human genome scans for positive selection with our findings in non-human primate genomes. We thus provide extensive evidence that the co-occurrence of positive selection in humans and in other primates at the same genetic loci can be measured with only four species, an indication that it may be a widespread phenomenon. The identification of positive selection in humans alongside other primates is a powerful tool to outline those genes that were selected uniquely during recent human evolution.

  18. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  19. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  20. Experimental annotation of the human genome using microarray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, D D; Schadt, E E; Armour, C D; He, Y D; Garrett-Engele, P; McDonagh, P D; Loerch, P M; Leonardson, A; Lum, P Y; Cavet, G; Wu, L F; Altschuler, S J; Edwards, S; King, J; Tsang, J S; Schimmack, G; Schelter, J M; Koch, J; Ziman, M; Marton, M J; Li, B; Cundiff, P; Ward, T; Castle, J; Krolewski, M; Meyer, M R; Mao, M; Burchard, J; Kidd, M J; Dai, H; Phillips, J W; Linsley, P S; Stoughton, R; Scherer, S; Boguski, M S

    2001-02-15

    The most important product of the sequencing of a genome is a complete, accurate catalogue of genes and their products, primarily messenger RNA transcripts and their cognate proteins. Such a catalogue cannot be constructed by computational annotation alone; it requires experimental validation on a genome scale. Using 'exon' and 'tiling' arrays fabricated by ink-jet oligonucleotide synthesis, we devised an experimental approach to validate and refine computational gene predictions and define full-length transcripts on the basis of co-regulated expression of their exons. These methods can provide more accurate gene numbers and allow the detection of mRNA splice variants and identification of the tissue- and disease-specific conditions under which genes are expressed. We apply our technique to chromosome 22q under 69 experimental condition pairs, and to the entire human genome under two experimental conditions. We discuss implications for more comprehensive, consistent and reliable genome annotation, more efficient, full-length complementary DNA cloning strategies and application to complex diseases.

  1. Complete genome sequence of human astrovirus genotype 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernet Guy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human astroviruses (HAstVs are one of the important causes of acute gastroenteritis in children. Currently, eight HAstV genotypes have been identified and all but two (HAstV-6 and HAstV-7 have been fully sequenced. We here sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of a HAstV-6 strain (192-BJ07, which was identified in Beijing, China. Results The genome of 192-BJ07 consists of 6745 nucleotides. The 192-BJ07 strain displays a 77.2-78.0% nucleotide sequence identity with other HAstV genotypes and exhibits amino acid sequence identities of 86.5-87.4%, 94.2-95.1%, and 65.5-74.8% in the ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 regions, respectively. Homological analysis of ORF2 shows that 192-BJ07 is 96.3% identical to the documented HAstV-6 strain. Further, phylogenetic analysis indicates that different genomic regions are likely undergoing different evolutionary and selective pressures. No recombination event was observed in HAstV-6 in this study. Conclusion The completely sequenced and characterized genome of HAstV-6 (192-BJ07 provides further insight into the genetics of astroviruses and aids in the surveillance and control of HAstV gastroenteritis.

  2. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  3. The complete mitochondrial genomes for three Toxocara species of human and animal health significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiang-Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying mitochondrial (mt genomics has important implications for various fundamental areas, including mt biochemistry, physiology and molecular biology. In addition, mt genome sequences have provided useful markers for investigating population genetic structures, systematics and phylogenetics of organisms. Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxocara malaysiensis cause significant health problems in animals and humans. Although they are of importance in human and animal health, no information on the mt genomes for any of Toxocara species is available. Results The sizes of the entire mt genome are 14,322 bp for T. canis, 14029 bp for T. cati and 14266 bp for T. malaysiensis, respectively. These circular genomes are amongst the largest reported to date for all secernentean nematodes. Their relatively large sizes relate mainly to an increased length in the AT-rich region. The mt genomes of the three Toxocara species all encode 12 proteins, two ribosomal RNAs and 22 transfer RNA genes, but lack the ATP synthetase subunit 8 gene, which is consistent with all other species of Nematode studied to date, with the exception of Trichinella spiralis. All genes are transcribed in the same direction and have a nucleotide composition high in A and T, but low in G and C. The contents of A+T of the complete genomes are 68.57% for T. canis, 69.95% for T. cati and 68.86% for T. malaysiensis, among which the A+T for T. canis is the lowest among all nematodes studied to date. The AT bias had a significant effect on both the codon usage pattern and amino acid composition of proteins. The mt genome structures for three Toxocara species, including genes and non-coding regions, are in the same order as for Ascaris suum and Anisakis simplex, but differ from Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus and Caenorhabditis elegans only in the location of the AT-rich region, whereas there are substantial differences when compared with Onchocerca volvulus

  4. Global organization of a positive-strand RNA virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Wu

    Full Text Available The genomes of plus-strand RNA viruses contain many regulatory sequences and structures that direct different viral processes. The traditional view of these RNA elements are as local structures present in non-coding regions. However, this view is changing due to the discovery of regulatory elements in coding regions and functional long-range intra-genomic base pairing interactions. The ∼4.8 kb long RNA genome of the tombusvirus tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV contains these types of structural features, including six different functional long-distance interactions. We hypothesized that to achieve these multiple interactions this viral genome must utilize a large-scale organizational strategy and, accordingly, we sought to assess the global conformation of the entire TBSV genome. Atomic force micrographs of the genome indicated a mostly condensed structure composed of interconnected protrusions extending from a central hub. This configuration was consistent with the genomic secondary structure model generated using high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (i.e. SHAPE, which predicted different sized RNA domains originating from a central region. Known RNA elements were identified in both domain and inter-domain regions, and novel structural features were predicted and functionally confirmed. Interestingly, only two of the six long-range interactions known to form were present in the structural model. However, for those interactions that did not form, complementary partner sequences were positioned relatively close to each other in the structure, suggesting that the secondary structure level of viral genome structure could provide a basic scaffold for the formation of different long-range interactions. The higher-order structural model for the TBSV RNA genome provides a snapshot of the complex framework that allows multiple functional components to operate in concert within a confined context.

  5. Personal and population genomics of human regulatory variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernot, Benjamin; Stergachis, Andrew B; Maurano, Matthew T; Vierstra, Jeff; Neph, Shane; Thurman, Robert E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Akey, Joshua M

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics and evolutionary forces acting on regulatory variation in humans remains elusive because of the difficulty in defining functionally important noncoding DNA. Here, we combine genome-scale maps of regulatory DNA marked by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) from 138 cell and tissue types with whole-genome sequences of 53 geographically diverse individuals in order to better delimit the patterns of regulatory variation in humans. We estimate that individuals likely harbor many more functionally important variants in regulatory DNA compared with protein-coding regions, although they are likely to have, on average, smaller effect sizes. Moreover, we demonstrate that there is significant heterogeneity in the level of functional constraint in regulatory DNA among different cell types. We also find marked variability in functional constraint among transcription factor motifs in regulatory DNA, with sequence motifs for major developmental regulators, such as HOX proteins, exhibiting levels of constraint comparable to protein-coding regions. Finally, we perform a genome-wide scan of recent positive selection and identify hundreds of novel substrates of adaptive regulatory evolution that are enriched for biologically interesting pathways such as melanogenesis and adipocytokine signaling. These data and results provide new insights into patterns of regulatory variation in individuals and populations and demonstrate that a large proportion of functionally important variation lies beyond the exome.

  6. The three-dimensional genome organization of Drosophila melanogaster through data integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingjiao; Tjong, Harianto; Li, Xiao; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Chiolo, Irene; Alber, Frank

    2017-07-31

    Genome structures are dynamic and non-randomly organized in the nucleus of higher eukaryotes. To maximize the accuracy and coverage of three-dimensional genome structural models, it is important to integrate all available sources of experimental information about a genome's organization. It remains a major challenge to integrate such data from various complementary experimental methods. Here, we present an approach for data integration to determine a population of complete three-dimensional genome structures that are statistically consistent with data from both genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) and lamina-DamID experiments. Our structures resolve the genome at the resolution of topological domains, and reproduce simultaneously both sets of experimental data. Importantly, this data deconvolution framework allows for structural heterogeneity between cells, and hence accounts for the expected plasticity of genome structures. As a case study we choose Drosophila melanogaster embryonic cells, for which both data types are available. Our three-dimensional genome structures have strong predictive power for structural features not directly visible in the initial data sets, and reproduce experimental hallmarks of the D. melanogaster genome organization from independent and our own imaging experiments. Also they reveal a number of new insights about genome organization and its functional relevance, including the preferred locations of heterochromatic satellites of different chromosomes, and observations about homologous pairing that cannot be directly observed in the original Hi-C or lamina-DamID data. Our approach allows systematic integration of Hi-C and lamina-DamID data for complete three-dimensional genome structure calculation, while also explicitly considering genome structural variability.

  7. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus from Lanzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chuanfeng; Fu, Shengfang; Zhou, Xv; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complete genome of human respiratory syncytial virus was sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the full-length human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) genome sequence belongs to gene type NA1. We sequenced the genome in order to create the full-length cDNA infectious clone and develop vaccines against HRSV.

  9. 78 FR 64222 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Committee, CEGS-- Initiative to Maximize Research Education in Genomics. Date: November 7-8, 2013. Time: 8..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National...

  10. Generation of human organs in pigs via interspecies blastocyst complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Platero Luengo, A; Gil, M A; Suzuki, K; Cuello, C; Morales Valencia, M; Parrilla, I; Martinez, C A; Nohalez, A; Roca, J; Martinez, E A; Izpisua Belmonte, J C

    2016-10-01

    More than eighteen years have passed since the first derivation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but their clinical use is still met with several challenges, such as ethical concerns regarding the need of human embryos, tissue rejection after transplantation and tumour formation. The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enables the access to patient-derived pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and opens the door for personalized medicine as tissues/organs can potentially be generated from the same genetic background as the patient recipients, thus avoiding immune rejections or complication of immunosuppression strategies. In this regard, successful replacement, or augmentation, of the function of damaged tissue by patient-derived differentiated stem cells provides a promising cell replacement therapy for many devastating human diseases. Although human iPSCs can proliferate unlimitedly in culture and harbour the potential to generate all cell types in the adult body, currently, the functionality of differentiated cells is limited. An alternative strategy to realize the full potential of human iPSC for regenerative medicine is the in vivo tissue generation in large animal species via interspecies blastocyst complementation. As this technology is still in its infancy and there remains more questions than answers, thus in this review, we mainly focus the discussion on the conceptual framework, the emerging technologies and recent advances involved with interspecies blastocyst complementation, and will refer the readers to other more in-depth reviews on dynamic pluripotent stem cell states, genome editing and interspecies chimeras. Likewise, other emerging alternatives to combat the growing shortage of human organs, such as xenotransplantation or tissue engineering, topics that has been extensively reviewed, will not be covered here.

  11. Functional genomics for food microbiology: Molecular mechanisms of weak organic acid preservative adaptation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Brul; W. Kallemeijn; G. Smits

    2008-01-01

    The recent era of genomics has offered tremendous possibilities to biology. This concise review describes the possibilities of applying (functional) genomics studies to the field of microbial food stability. In doing so, the studies on weak-organic-acid stress response in yeast are discussed by way

  12. Chloroplast Genome Sequence of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L. Millspaugh and Cajanus scarabaeoides: Genome organization and Comparison with other legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi Kaila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L. Millspaugh, a diploid (2n = 22 legume crop with a genome size of 852 Mbp, serves as an important source of human dietary protein especially in South East Asian and African regions. In this study, the draft chloroplast genomes of Cajanus cajan and Cajanus scarabaeoides were sequenced. Cajanus scarabaeoides is an important species of the Cajanus gene pool and has also been used for developing promising CMS system by different groups. A male sterile genotype harbouring the Cajanus scarabaeoides cytoplasm was used for sequencing the plastid genome. The cp genome of Cajanus cajan is 152,242bp long, having a quadripartite structure with LSC of 83,455 bp and SSC of 17,871 bp separated by IRs of 25,398 bp. Similarly, the cp genome of Cajanus scarabaeoides is 152,201bp long, having a quadripartite structure in which IRs of 25,402 bp length separates 83,423 bp of LSC and 17,854 bp of SSC. The pigeonpea cp genome contains 116 unique genes, including 30 tRNA, 4 rRNA, 78 predicted protein coding genes and 5 pseudogenes. A 50kb inversion was observed in the LSC region of pigeonpea cp genome, consistent with other legumes. Comparison of cp genome with other legumes revealed the contraction of IR boundaries due to the absence of rps19 gene in the IR region. Chloroplast SSRs were mined and a total of 280 and 292 cpSSRs were identified in Cajanus scarabaeoides and Cajanus cajan respectively. RNA editing was observed at 37 sites in both Cajanus scarabaeoides and Cajanus cajan, with maximum occurrence in the ndh genes. The pigeonpea cp genome sequence would be beneficial in providing informative molecular markers which can be utilized for genetic diversity analysis and aid in understanding the plant systematics studies among major grain legumes.

  13. 76 FR 3917 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, TRND--RFP... Person: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  14. 77 FR 5035 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Sequencing Technology..., Rockville, MD 20852, (301) 402-0838, nakamurk@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Human...

  15. 78 FR 47715 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The meeting will be... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human...

  16. 76 FR 29772 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; ELSI-SEP. Date: June...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human...

  17. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  18. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Pace

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods has not been recognized, as genome sequences from each major arthropod clade have not been reported until recently. Initial genomic analysis of the chelicerate Tetranychus urticae suggested that loss of Hox genes and Hox gene clustering might be more common than previously assumed. To further characterize the genomic evolution of arthropod Hox genes, we compared the genomic arrangement and general characteristics of Hox genes from representative taxa from each arthropod subphylum. Results In agreement with others, we find arthropods generally contain ten Hox genes arranged in a common orientation in the genome, with an increasing number of sampled species missing either Hox3 or abdominal-A orthologs. The genomic clustering of Hox genes in species we surveyed varies significantly, ranging from 0.3 to 13.6 Mb. In all species sampled, arthropod Hox genes are dispersed in the genome relative to the vertebrate Mus musculus. Differences in Hox cluster size arise from variation in the number of intervening genes, intergenic spacing, and the size of introns and UTRs. In the arthropods surveyed, Hox gene duplications are rare and four microRNAs are, in general, conserved in similar genomic positions relative to the Hox genes. Conclusions The tightly clustered Hox complexes found in the vertebrates are not evident within arthropods, and differential patterns of Hox gene dispersion are found throughout the arthropods. The comparative genomic data continue to

  19. CTCF-Mediated Human 3D Genome Architecture Reveals Chromatin Topology for Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhonghui; Luo, Oscar Junhong; Li, Xingwang; Zheng, Meizhen; Zhu, Jacqueline Jufen; Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Trzaskoma, Pawel; Magalska, Adriana; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Ruszczycki, Blazej; Michalski, Paul; Piecuch, Emaly; Wang, Ping; Wang, Danjuan; Tian, Simon Zhongyuan; Penrad-Mobayed, May; Sachs, Laurent M.; Ruan, Xiaoan; Wei, Chia-Lin; Liu, Edison T.; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Plewczynski, Dariusz; Li, Guoliang; Ruan, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Spatial genome organization and its effect on transcription remains a fundamental question. We applied an advanced ChIA-PET strategy to comprehensively map higher-order chromosome folding and specific chromatin interactions mediated by CTCF and RNAPII with haplotype specificity and nucleotide resolution in different human cell lineages. We find that CTCF/cohesin-mediated interaction anchors serve as structural foci for spatial organization of constitutive genes concordant with CTCF-motif orientation, whereas RNAPII interacts within these structures by selectively drawing cell-type-specific genes towards CTCF-foci for coordinated transcription. Furthermore, we show that haplotype-variants and allelic-interactions have differential effects on chromosome configuration influencing gene expression and may provide mechanistic insights into functions associated with disease susceptibility. 3D-genome simulation suggests a model of chromatin folding around chromosomal axes, where CTCF is involved in defining the interface between condensed and open compartments for structural regulation. Our 3D-genome strategy thus provides unique insights in the topological mechanism of human variations and diseases. PMID:26686651

  20. CTCF-Mediated Human 3D Genome Architecture Reveals Chromatin Topology for Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhonghui; Luo, Oscar Junhong; Li, Xingwang; Zheng, Meizhen; Zhu, Jacqueline Jufen; Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Trzaskoma, Pawel; Magalska, Adriana; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Ruszczycki, Blazej; Michalski, Paul; Piecuch, Emaly; Wang, Ping; Wang, Danjuan; Tian, Simon Zhongyuan; Penrad-Mobayed, May; Sachs, Laurent M; Ruan, Xiaoan; Wei, Chia-Lin; Liu, Edison T; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Plewczynski, Dariusz; Li, Guoliang; Ruan, Yijun

    2015-12-17

    Spatial genome organization and its effect on transcription remains a fundamental question. We applied an advanced chromatin interaction analysis by paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) strategy to comprehensively map higher-order chromosome folding and specific chromatin interactions mediated by CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with haplotype specificity and nucleotide resolution in different human cell lineages. We find that CTCF/cohesin-mediated interaction anchors serve as structural foci for spatial organization of constitutive genes concordant with CTCF-motif orientation, whereas RNAPII interacts within these structures by selectively drawing cell-type-specific genes toward CTCF foci for coordinated transcription. Furthermore, we show that haplotype variants and allelic interactions have differential effects on chromosome configuration, influencing gene expression, and may provide mechanistic insights into functions associated with disease susceptibility. 3D genome simulation suggests a model of chromatin folding around chromosomal axes, where CTCF is involved in defining the interface between condensed and open compartments for structural regulation. Our 3D genome strategy thus provides unique insights in the topological mechanism of human variations and diseases.

  1. Genomic variation landscape of the human gut microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schloissnig, Siegfried; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    Whereas large-scale efforts have rapidly advanced the understanding and practical impact of human genomic variation, the practical impact of variation is largely unexplored in the human microbiome. We therefore developed a framework for metagenomic variation analysis and applied it to 252 faecal...... metagenomes of 207 individuals from Europe and North America. Using 7.4 billion reads aligned to 101 reference species, we detected 10.3 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 107,991 short insertions/deletions, and 1,051 structural variants. The average ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous...... polymorphism rates of 0.11 was more variable between gut microbial species than across human hosts. Subjects sampled at varying time intervals exhibited individuality and temporal stability of SNP variation patterns, despite considerable composition changes of their gut microbiota. This indicates...

  2. Genome-Wide Identification of Regulatory Sequences Undergoing Accelerated Evolution in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinran; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Feng; Tian, Weidong

    2016-10-01

    Accelerated evolution of regulatory sequence can alter the expression pattern of target genes, and cause phenotypic changes. In this study, we used DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) to annotate putative regulatory sequences in the human genome, and conducted a genome-wide analysis of the effects of accelerated evolution on regulatory sequences. Working under the assumption that local ancient repeat elements of DHSs are under neutral evolution, we discovered that ∼0.44% of DHSs are under accelerated evolution (ace-DHSs). We found that ace-DHSs tend to be more active than background DHSs, and are strongly associated with epigenetic marks of active transcription. The target genes of ace-DHSs are significantly enriched in neuron-related functions, and their expression levels are positively selected in the human brain. Thus, these lines of evidences strongly suggest that accelerated evolution on regulatory sequences plays important role in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. De novo assembly and phasing of a Korean human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Rhie, Arang; Kim, Junsoo; Lee, Sangjin; Sohn, Min-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Uk; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kuk, Junho; Park, Gun Hwa; Kim, Juhyeok; Ryu, Hanna; Kim, Jongbum; Roh, Mira; Baek, Jeonghun; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Changhoon

    2016-10-13

    Advances in genome assembly and phasing provide an opportunity to investigate the diploid architecture of the human genome and reveal the full range of structural variation across population groups. Here we report the de novo assembly and haplotype phasing of the Korean individual AK1 (ref. 1) using single-molecule real-time sequencing, next-generation mapping, microfluidics-based linked reads, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequencing approaches. Single-molecule sequencing coupled with next-generation mapping generated a highly contiguous assembly, with a contig N50 size of 17.9 Mb and a scaffold N50 size of 44.8 Mb, resolving 8 chromosomal arms into single scaffolds. The de novo assembly, along with local assemblies and spanning long reads, closes 105 and extends into 72 out of 190 euchromatic gaps in the reference genome, adding 1.03 Mb of previously intractable sequence. High concordance between the assembly and paired-end sequences from 62,758 BAC clones provides strong support for the robustness of the assembly. We identify 18,210 structural variants by direct comparison of the assembly with the human reference, identifying thousands of breakpoints that, to our knowledge, have not been reported before. Many of the insertions are reflected in the transcriptome and are shared across the Asian population. We performed haplotype phasing of the assembly with short reads, long reads and linked reads from whole-genome sequencing and with short reads from 31,719 BAC clones, thereby achieving phased blocks with an N50 size of 11.6 Mb. Haplotigs assembled from single-molecule real-time reads assigned to haplotypes on phased blocks covered 89% of genes. The haplotigs accurately characterized the hypervariable major histocompatability complex region as well as demonstrating allele configuration in clinically relevant genes such as CYP2D6. This work presents the most contiguous diploid human genome assembly so far, with extensive investigation of

  4. Human brain evolution: harnessing the genomics (r)evolution to link genes, cognition, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Genevieve; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2010-10-21

    The evolution of the human brain has resulted in numerous specialized features including higher cognitive processes such as language. Knowledge of whole-genome sequence and structural variation via high-throughput sequencing technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to view human evolution at high resolution. However, phenotype discovery is a critical component of these endeavors and the use of nontraditional model organisms will also be critical for piecing together a complete picture. Ultimately, the union of developmental studies of the brain with studies of unique phenotypes in a myriad of species will result in a more thorough model of the groundwork the human brain was built upon. Furthermore, these integrative approaches should provide important insights into human diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding our genetic inheritance: The US Human Genome Project, The first five years FY 1991--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-04-01

    The Human Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort with the goal of analyzing the structure of human DNA and determining the location of the estimated 100,000 human genes. In parallel with this effort, the DNA of a set of model organisms will be studied to provide the comparative information necessary for understanding the functioning of the human genome. The information generated by the human genome project is expected to be the source book for biomedical science in the 21st century and will by of immense benefit to the field of medicine. It will help us to understand and eventually treat many of the more than 4000 genetic diseases that affect mankind, as well as the many multifactorial diseases in which genetic predisposition plays an important role. A centrally coordinated project focused on specific objectives is believed to be the most efficient and least expensive way of obtaining this information. The basic data produced will be collected in electronic databases that will make the information readily accessible on convenient form to all who need it. This report describes the plans for the U.S. human genome project and updates those originally prepared by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the National Research Council (NRC) in 1988. In the intervening two years, improvements in technology for almost every aspect of genomics research have taken place. As a result, more specific goals can now be set for the project.

  6. Understanding our Genetic Inheritance: The U.S. Human Genome Project, The First Five Years FY 1991--1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    The Human Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort with the goal of analyzing the structure of human DNA and determining the location of the estimated 100,000 human genes. In parallel with this effort, the DNA of a set of model organisms will be studied to provide the comparative information necessary for understanding the functioning of the human genome. The information generated by the human genome project is expected to be the source book for biomedical science in the 21st century and will by of immense benefit to the field of medicine. It will help us to understand and eventually treat many of the more than 4000 genetic diseases that affect mankind, as well as the many multifactorial diseases in which genetic predisposition plays an important role. A centrally coordinated project focused on specific objectives is believed to be the most efficient and least expensive way of obtaining this information. The basic data produced will be collected in electronic databases that will make the information readily accessible on convenient form to all who need it. This report describes the plans for the U.S. human genome project and updates those originally prepared by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the National Research Council (NRC) in 1988. In the intervening two years, improvements in technology for almost every aspect of genomics research have taken place. As a result, more specific goals can now be set for the project.

  7. The Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project. Summary document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    In 1991 a group of human geneticists and molecular biologists proposed to the scientific community that a world wide survey be undertaken of variation in the human genome. To aid their considerations, the committee therefore decided to hold a small series of international workshops to explore the major scientific issues involved. The intention was to define a framework for the project which could provide a basis for much wider and more detailed discussion and planning--it was recognized that the successful implementation of the proposed project, which has come to be known as the Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project, would not only involve scientists but also various national and international non-scientific groups all of which should contribute to the project`s development. The international HGD workshop held in Sardinia in September 1993 was the last in the initial series of planning workshops. As such it not only explored new ground but also pulled together into a more coherent form much of the formal and informal discussion that had taken place in the preceding two years. This report presents the deliberations of the Sardinia workshop within a consideration of the overall development of the HGD Project to date.

  8. Comparative genomics of the neglected human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Jane M.; Adams, John H.; Silva, Joana C.; Bidwell, Shelby L.; Lorenzi, Hernan; Caler, Elisabet; Crabtree, Jonathan; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Merino, Emilio F.; Amedeo, Paolo; Cheng, Qin; Coulson, Richard M. R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Essien, Kobby; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Gilson, Paul R.; Gueye, Amy H.; Guo, Xiang; Kang’a, Simon; Kooij, Taco W. A.; Korsinczky, Michael; Meyer, Esmeralda V.-S.; Nene, Vish; Paulsen, Ian; White, Owen; Ralph, Stuart A.; Ren, Qinghu; Sargeant, Tobias J.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Sullivan, Steven A.; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Galinski, Mary R.; Barnwell, John W.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.

    2008-01-01

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is responsible for 25-40% of the ~515 million annual cases of malaria worldwide. Although seldom fatal, the parasite elicits severe and incapacitating clinical symptoms and often relapses months after a primary infection has cleared. Despite its importance as a major human pathogen, P. vivax is little studied because it cannot be propagated in the laboratory except in non-human primates. We determined the genome sequence of P. vivax in order to shed light on its distinctive biologic features, and as a means to drive development of new drugs and vaccines. Here we describe the synteny and isochore structure of P. vivax chromosomes, and show that the parasite resembles other malaria parasites in gene content and metabolic potential, but possesses novel gene families and potential alternate invasion pathways not recognized previously. Completion of the P. vivax genome provides the scientific community with a valuable resource that can be used to advance scientific investigation into this neglected species. PMID:18843361

  9. Dynamic association of NUP98 with the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liang

    Full Text Available Faithful execution of developmental gene expression programs occurs at multiple levels and involves many different components such as transcription factors, histone-modification enzymes, and mRNA processing proteins. Recent evidence suggests that nucleoporins, well known components that control nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking, have wide-ranging functions in developmental gene regulation that potentially extend beyond their role in nuclear transport. Whether the unexpected role of nuclear pore proteins in transcription regulation, which initially has been described in fungi and flies, also applies to human cells is unknown. Here we show at a genome-wide level that the nuclear pore protein NUP98 associates with developmentally regulated genes active during human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Overexpression of a dominant negative fragment of NUP98 levels decreases expression levels of NUP98-bound genes. In addition, we identify two modes of developmental gene regulation by NUP98 that are differentiated by the spatial localization of NUP98 target genes. Genes in the initial stage of developmental induction can associate with NUP98 that is embedded in the nuclear pores at the nuclear periphery. Alternatively, genes that are highly induced can interact with NUP98 in the nuclear interior, away from the nuclear pores. This work demonstrates for the first time that NUP98 dynamically associates with the human genome during differentiation, revealing a role of a nuclear pore protein in regulating developmental gene expression programs.

  10. Insertion and deletion mutagenesis of the human cytomegalovirus genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaete, R.R.; Mocarski, E.S.

    1987-10-01

    Studies on human cytomegalovirus (CMV) have been limited by a paucity of molecular genetic techniques available for manipulating the viral genome. The authors have developed methods for site-specific insertion and deletion mutagenesis of CMV utilizing a modified Escherichia coli lacZ gene as a genetic marker. The lacZ gene was placed under the control of the major ..beta.. gene regulatory signals and inserted into the viral genome by homologous recombination, disrupting one of two copies of this ..beta.. gene within the L-component repeats of CMV DNA. They observed high-level expression of ..beta..-galactosidase by the recombinant in a temporally authentic manner, with levels of this enzyme approaching 1% of total protein in infected cells. Thus, CMV is an efficient vector for high-level expression of foreign gene products in human cells. Using back selection of lacZ-deficient virus in the presence of the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl ..beta..-D-galactoside, they generated random endpoint deletion mutants. Analysis of these mutant revealed that CMV DNA sequences flanking the insert had been removed, thereby establishing this approach as a means of determining whether sequences flanking a lacZ insertion are dispensable for viral growth. In an initial test of the methods, they have shown that 7800 base pairs of one copy of L-component repeat sequences can be deleted without affecting viral growth in human fibroblasts.

  11. Controls of nucleosome positioning in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Gaffney

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes are important for gene regulation because their arrangement on the genome can control which proteins bind to DNA. Currently, few human nucleosomes are thought to be consistently positioned across cells; however, this has been difficult to assess due to the limited resolution of existing data. We performed paired-end sequencing of micrococcal nuclease-digested chromatin (MNase-seq from seven lymphoblastoid cell lines and mapped over 3.6 billion MNase-seq fragments to the human genome to create the highest-resolution map of nucleosome occupancy to date in a human cell type. In contrast to previous results, we find that most nucleosomes have more consistent positioning than expected by chance and a substantial fraction (8.7% of nucleosomes have moderate to strong positioning. In aggregate, nucleosome sequences have 10 bp periodic patterns in dinucleotide frequency and DNase I sensitivity; and, across cells, nucleosomes frequently have translational offsets that are multiples of 10 bp. We estimate that almost half of the genome contains regularly spaced arrays of nucleosomes, which are enriched in active chromatin domains. Single nucleotide polymorphisms that reduce DNase I sensitivity can disrupt the phasing of nucleosome arrays, which indicates that they often result from positioning against a barrier formed by other proteins. However, nucleosome arrays can also be created by DNA sequence alone. The most striking example is an array of over 400 nucleosomes on chromosome 12 that is created by tandem repetition of sequences with strong positioning properties. In summary, a large fraction of nucleosomes are consistently positioned--in some regions because they adopt favored sequence positions, and in other regions because they are forced into specific arrangements by chromatin remodeling or DNA binding proteins.

  12. HUMAN CANCER IS A PARASITE SPREAD VIA INTRUSION IN GENOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Rumyantsev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article is devoted to further development of new paradigm about the biology of human cancer: the hypothesis of parasitic nature, origin and evolution of the phenomenon. The study included integrative reconsidering, and reinterpretation of the make-ups, traits and processes existing both in human and animal cancers. It was demonstrated that human cancer possesses nearly analogous set of traits characteristic of transmissible animal cancer. Undoubted analogies are seen in the prevalence, clinical exposure, progression of disease, origin of causative agents, immune response against invasion and especially in the intrinsic deviations of the leading traits of cancerous cells. Both human and animal cancers are highly exceptional pathogens. But in contrast to contagious animal cancers the cells of of human cancer can not pass between individuals as usual infectious agents. Exhaustive evidence of the parasitic nature and evolutionary origin of human cancer was revealed and interpreted. In contrast to animal cancer formed of solitary cell lineage, human cancer consists of a couple of lineages constructed under different genetic regulations and performed different structural and physiological functions. The complex make-up of cancer composition remains stable over sequential propagation. The subsistence of human cancer regularly includes obligatory interchange of its successive forms. Human cancer possesses its own biological watch and the ability to gobble its victim, transmit via the intrusion of the genome, perform intercommunications within the tumor components and between the dispersed subunits of cancer. Such intrinsic traits characterize human cancer as a primitively structured parasite that can be classified in Class Mammalians, Species Genomeintruder malevolent (G.malevolent.

  13. Computational Comparison of Human Genomic Sequence Assemblies for a Region of Chromosome 4

    OpenAIRE

    Semple, Colin; Stewart W. Morris; Porteous, David J.; Evans, Kathryn L.

    2002-01-01

    Much of the available human genomic sequence data exist in a fragmentary draft state following the completion of the initial high-volume sequencing performed by the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and Celera Genomics (CG). We compared six draft genome assemblies over a region of chromosome 4p (D4S394–D4S403), two consecutive releases by the IHGSC at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), two consecutive releases from the National Centre for Biotechnology Informa...

  14. A co-evolutionary arms race: trypanosomes shaping the human genome, humans shaping the trypanosome genome

    OpenAIRE

    Capewell, Paul; Cooper, Anneli; Clucas, Caroline; Weir, William; MacLeod, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness in humans and one of several pathogens that cause the related veterinary disease Nagana. A complex co-evolution has occurred between these parasites and primates that led to the emergence of trypanosome-specific defences and counter-measures. The first line of defence in humans and several other catarrhine primates is the trypanolytic protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1) found within two serum protein complexes, trypanosome l...

  15. [Organ transplantation and human dignity. Editorial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardenheuer, H J; Kupatt, C; Anselm, R

    1994-08-01

    Modern medicine has succeeded in achieving enormous technical developments. One recent highlight has been the introduction of postmortem organ transplantation. At the same time, serious objections have been raised concerning the radical changes in the cultural conception of the inviolable body. One major objection arises from the conflict of considering a brain-dead person as dead. The presence of brain death is a prerequisite for post-mortem organ donation, because only during this phase of dying does the individual quality as dead while the organs, other than the brain, remain viable. The objection implies scepticism as to the physician's ability to distinguish a dead from a living person. On the other hand, even the critics must rely on the physician's ability to discriminate, e.g., when to discontinue resuscitation. The medical community has not found reasons to restrict the definition of irreversible coma 25 years after its first formulation. It must be clearly recognised that reasons other than medical ones can be decisive for refusing organ donation. One ethical problem is the therapeutic benefit of organ transplantation. The beneficiary of the treatment is not the donor, but another person, the recipient. The concept of human dignity does not allow the use of a person for purposes other than the ones he/she consents to, as Immanual Kant stated. Although the human corpse is not a person in the full sense, even if it is protected by the thought of respect for the former person, the life-interest of the organ recipient had to be considered legitimate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Evolving aphids: one genome-one organism insects or holobionts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mandrioli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aphids have obligate mutualistic relationships with microorganisms that provide them with essential substances lacking in their diet, together with symbionts conferring them conditional adaptive advantages related, for instance, to the thermal tolerance and to the resistance to parasitoid wasps. The presence/absence of a secondary symbiont may have a relevant phenotypic effect so that aphid microbial symbionts constitute a sort of second genome with its own genetic inheritance. On the whole, genes important for aphid survival and reproduction are not uniquely present in the aphid nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but also in the chromosomes of each symbiont. As a consequence, aphids should be viewed as holobionts with an extended genome (the hologenome including the host and its symbiotic microbiome. In this connection, the true unit of selection in evolution must be considered the aphid holobiont, in place of the single host as individual separated from its symbionts.

  17. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and mosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (ⅰ) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ⅱ) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coeffi-cients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  18. Genome mining unveils widespread natural product biosynthetic capacity in human oral microbe Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwei; Hao, Tingting; Xie, Zhoujie; Horsman, Geoff P.; Chen, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen causing human dental caries. As a Gram-positive bacterium with a small genome (about 2 Mb) it is considered a poor source of natural products. Due to a recent explosion in genomic data available for S. mutans strains, we were motivated to explore the natural product production potential of this organism. Bioinformatic characterization of 169 publically available genomes of S. mutans from human dental caries revealed a surprisingly rich source of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. Anti-SMASH analysis identified one nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster, seven polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters and 136 hybrid PKS/NRPS gene clusters. In addition, 211 ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) clusters and 615 bacteriocin precursors were identified by a combined analysis using BAGEL and anti-SMASH. S. mutans harbors a rich and diverse natural product genetic capacity, which underscores the importance of probing the human microbiome and revisiting species that have traditionally been overlooked as “poor” sources of natural products. PMID:27869143

  19. Genomic imprinting and human psychology: cognition, behavior and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Lisa M; Ragsdale, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Imprinted genes expressed in the brain are numerous and it has become clear that they play an important role in nervous system development and function. The significant influence of genomic imprinting during development sets the stage for structural and physiological variations affecting psychological function and behaviour, as well as other physiological systems mediating health and well-being. However, our understanding of the role of imprinted genes in behaviour lags far behind our understanding of their roles in perinatal growth and development. Knowledge of genomic imprinting remains limited among behavioral scientists and clinicians and research regarding the influence of imprinted genes on normal cognitive processes and the most common forms of neuropathology has been limited to date. In this chapter, we will explore how knowledge of genomic imprinting can be used to inform our study of normal human cognitive and behavioral processes as well as their disruption. Behavioural analyses of rare imprinted disorders, such as Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, provide insight regarding the phenotypic impact of imprinted genes in the brain, and can be used to guide the study of normal behaviour as well as more common but etiologically complex disorders such as ADHD and autism. Furthermore, hypotheses regarding the evolutionary development of imprinted genes can be used to derive predictions about their role in normal behavioural variation, such as that observed in food-related and social interactions.

  20. A library of TAL effector nucleases spanning the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsub; Kweon, Jiyeon; Kim, Annie; Chon, Jae Kyung; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hye Joo; Kim, Sojung; Lee, Choongil; Jeong, Euihwan; Chung, Eugene; Kim, Doyoung; Lee, Mi Seon; Go, Eun Mi; Song, Hye Jung; Kim, Hwangbeom; Cho, Namjin; Bang, Duhee; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) can be readily engineered to bind specific genomic loci, enabling the introduction of precise genetic modifications such as gene knockouts and additions. Here we present a genome-scale collection of TALENs for efficient and scalable gene targeting in human cells. We chose target sites that did not have highly similar sequences elsewhere in the genome to avoid off-target mutations and assembled TALEN plasmids for 18,740 protein-coding genes using a high-throughput Golden-Gate cloning system. A pilot test involving 124 genes showed that all TALENs were active and disrupted their target genes at high frequencies, although two of these TALENs became active only after their target sites were partially demethylated using an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase. We used our TALEN library to generate single- and double-gene-knockout cells in which NF-κB signaling pathways were disrupted. Compared with cells treated with short interfering RNAs, these cells showed unambiguous suppression of signal transduction.

  1. A hybrid approach for de novo human genome sequence assembly and phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Lam, Jessica; Lam, Ernest T; Hastie, Alex R; Marks, Patrick; Lee, Joyce; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Giorda, Kristina; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Wall, Jeffrey D; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Despite tremendous progress in genome sequencing, the basic goal of producing a phased (haplotype-resolved) genome sequence with end-to-end contiguity for each chromosome at reasonable cost and effort is still unrealized. In this study, we describe an approach to performing de novo genome assembly and experimental phasing by integrating the data from Illumina short-read sequencing, 10X Genomics linked-read sequencing, and BioNano Genomics genome mapping to yield a high-quality, phased, de novo assembled human genome.

  2. Organization and comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes of bioluminescent Elateroidea (Coleoptera: Polyphaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Danilo T; Mitani, Yasuo; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Viviani, Vadim R

    2016-07-25

    Mitochondrial genome organization in the Elateroidea superfamily (Coleoptera), which include the main families of bioluminescent beetles, has been poorly studied and lacking information about Phengodidae family. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of Neotropical Lampyridae (Bicellonycha lividipennis), Phengodidae (Brasilocerus sp.2 and Phrixothrix hirtus) and Elateridae (Pyrearinus termitilluminans, Hapsodrilus ignifer and Teslasena femoralis). All species had a typical insect mitochondrial genome except for the following: in the elaterid T. femoralis genome there is a non-coding region between NADH2 and tRNA-Trp; in the phengodids Brasilocerus sp.2 and P. hirtus genomes we did not find the tRNA-Ile and tRNA-Gln. The P. hirtus genome showed a ~1.6kb non-coding region, the rearrangement of tRNA-Tyr, a new tRNA-Leu copy, and several regions with higher AT contents. Phylogenetics analysis using Bayesian and ML models indicated that the Phengodidae+Rhagophthalmidae are closely related to Lampyridae family, and included Drilus flavescens (Drilidae) as an internal clade within Elateridae. This is the first report that compares the mitochondrial genomes organization of the three main families of bioluminescent Elateroidea, including the first Neotropical Lampyridae and Phengodidae. The losses of tRNAs, and translocation and duplication events found in Phengodidae mt genomes, mainly in P. hirtus, may indicate different evolutionary rates in these mitochondrial genomes. The mitophylogenomics analysis indicates the monophyly of the three bioluminescent families and a closer relationship between Lampyridae and Phengodidae/Rhagophthalmidae, in contrast with previous molecular analysis.

  3. Microsatellite interruptions stabilize primate genomes and exist as population-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms within individual human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D; Eckert, Kristin A

    2014-07-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000-40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The

  4. The influence of genomic context on mutation patterns in the human genome inferred from rare variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaibley, Valerie M; Zawistowski, Matthew; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G; Nelson, Matthew R; St Jean, Pamela L; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Novembre, John; Zöllner, Sebastian; Li, Jun Z

    2013-12-01

    Understanding patterns of spontaneous mutations is of fundamental interest in studies of human genome evolution and genetic disease. Here, we used extremely rare variants in humans to model the molecular spectrum of single-nucleotide mutations. Compared to common variants in humans and human-chimpanzee fixed differences (substitutions), rare variants, on average, arose more recently in the human lineage and are less affected by the potentially confounding effects of natural selection, population demographic history, and biased gene conversion. We analyzed variants obtained from a population-based sequencing study of 202 genes in >14,000 individuals. We observed considerable variability in the per-gene mutation rate, which was correlated with local GC content, but not recombination rate. Using >20,000 variants with a derived allele frequency ≤ 10(-4), we examined the effect of local GC content and recombination rate on individual variant subtypes and performed comparisons with common variants and substitutions. The influence of local GC content on rare variants differed from that on common variants or substitutions, and the differences varied by variant subtype. Furthermore, recombination rate and recombination hotspots have little effect on rare variants of any subtype, yet both have a relatively strong impact on multiple variant subtypes in common variants and substitutions. This observation is consistent with the effect of biased gene conversion or selection-dependent processes. Our results highlight the distinct biases inherent in the initial mutation patterns and subsequent evolutionary processes that affect segregating variants.

  5. Documenting genomics: Applying archival theory to preserving the records of the Human Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The Human Genome Archive Project (HGAP) aimed to preserve the documentary heritage of the UK's contribution to the Human Genome Project (HGP) by using archival theory to develop a suitable methodology for capturing the results of modern, collaborative science. After assessing past projects and different archival theories, the HGAP used an approach based on the theory of documentation strategy to try to capture the records of a scientific project that had an influence beyond the purely scientific sphere. The HGAP was an archival survey that ran for two years. It led to ninety scientists being contacted and has, so far, led to six collections being deposited in the Wellcome Library, with additional collections being deposited in other UK repositories. In applying documentation strategy the HGAP was attempting to move away from traditional archival approaches to science, which have generally focused on retired Nobel Prize winners. It has been partially successful in this aim, having managed to secure collections from people who are not 'big names', but who made an important contribution to the HGP. However, the attempt to redress the gender imbalance in scientific collections and to improve record-keeping in scientific organisations has continued to be difficult to achieve.

  6. CAG-encoded polyglutamine length polymorphism in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeats has been identified as the pathogenic mutation in nine different genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. The majority of individuals clinically diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia do not have mutations within known disease genes, and it is likely that additional ataxias or Huntington disease-like disorders will be found to be caused by this common mutational mechanism. We set out to determine the length distributions of CAG-polyglutamine tracts for the entire human genome in a set of healthy individuals in order to characterize the nature of polyglutamine repeat length variation across the human genome, to establish the background against which pathogenic repeat expansions can be detected, and to prioritize candidate genes for repeat expansion disorders. Results We found that repeats, including those in known disease genes, have unique distributions of glutamine tract lengths, as measured by fragment analysis of PCR-amplified repeat regions. This emphasizes the need to characterize each distribution and avoid making generalizations between loci. The best predictors of known disease genes were occurrence of a long CAG-tract uninterrupted by CAA codons in their reference genome sequence, and high glutamine tract length variance in the normal population. We used these parameters to identify eight priority candidate genes for polyglutamine expansion disorders. Twelve CAG-polyglutamine repeats were invariant and these can likely be excluded as candidates. We outline some confusion in the literature about this type of data, difficulties in comparing such data between publications, and its application to studies of disease prevalence in different populations. Analysis of Gene Ontology-based functions of CAG-polyglutamine-containing genes provided a visual framework for interpretation of these genes' functions. All nine known disease genes were involved in DNA

  7. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Murk, Albertinka J; Kok, Dieuwertje E; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2017-04-01

    Ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can accumulate in humans where they might influence differentiation of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation is one of the underlying mechanisms by which POPs affect adipocyte differentiation, and to what extent DNA methylation can be related to gene transcription. Adipocyte differentiation was induced in two human cell models with continuous exposure to different POPs throughout differentiation. From the seven tested POPs, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) decreased lipid accumulation, while tributyltin (TBT) increased lipid accumulation. In human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), TCDD and TBT induced opposite gene expression profiles, whereas after PFOS exposure gene expression remained relatively stable. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis showed that all three POPs affected DNA methylation patterns in adipogenic and other genes, possibly related to the phenotypic outcome, but without concomitant gene expression changes. Differential methylation was predominantly detected in intergenic regions, where the biological relevance of alterations in DNA methylation is unclear. This study demonstrates that POPs, at environmentally relevant levels, are able to induce differential DNA methylation in human differentiating adipocytes. Copyright © 2017 Wageningen University. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Five Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences from Diospyros: Genome Organization and Comparative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Fu

    Full Text Available Diospyros is the largest genus in Ebenaceae, comprising more than 500 species with remarkable economic value, especially Diospyros kaki Thunb., which has traditionally been an important food resource in China, Korea, and Japan. Complete chloroplast (cp genomes from D. kaki, D. lotus L., D. oleifera Cheng., D. glaucifolia Metc., and Diospyros 'Jinzaoshi' were sequenced using Illumina sequencing technology. This is the first cp genome reported in Ebenaceae. The cp genome sequences of Diospyros ranged from 157,300 to 157,784 bp in length, presenting a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats each separated by one large and one small single-copy region. For each cp genome, 134 genes were annotated, including 80 protein-coding, 31 tRNA, and 4 rRNA unique genes. In all, 179 repeats and 283 single sequence repeats were identified. Four hypervariable regions, namely, intergenic region of trnQ_rps16, trnV_ndhC, and psbD_trnT, and intron of ndhA, were identified in the Diospyros genomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole cp genome, protein-coding, and intergenic and intron sequences indicated that D. oleifera is closely related to D. kaki and could be used as a model plant for future research on D. kaki; to our knowledge, this is proposed for the first time. Further, these analyses together with two large deletions (301 and 140 bp in the cp genome of D. 'Jinzaoshi', support its placement as a new species in Diospyros. Both maximum parsimony and likelihood analyses for 19 taxa indicated the basal position of Ericales in asterids and suggested that Ebenaceae is monophyletic in Ericales.

  9. An Aboriginal Australian genome reveals separate human dispersals into Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Guo, Xiaosen; Wang, Yong; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Rasmussen, Simon; Albrechtsen, Anders; Skotte, Line; Lindgreen, Stinus; Metspalu, Mait; Jombart, Thibaut; Kivisild, Toomas; Zhai, Weiwei; Eriksson, Anders; Manica, Andrea; Orlando, Ludovic; De La Vega, Francisco M; Tridico, Silvana; Metspalu, Ene; Nielsen, Kasper; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Muller, Craig; Dortch, Joe; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Lund, Ole; Wesolowska, Agata; Karmin, Monika; Weinert, Lucy A; Wang, Bo; Li, Jun; Tai, Shuaishuai; Xiao, Fei; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; van Driem, George; Jha, Aashish R; Ricaut, François-Xavier; de Knijff, Peter; Migliano, Andrea B; Gallego Romero, Irene; Kristiansen, Karsten; Lambert, David M; Brunak, Søren; Forster, Peter; Brinkmann, Bernd; Nehlich, Olaf; Bunce, Michael; Richards, Michael; Gupta, Ramneek; Bustamante, Carlos D; Krogh, Anders; Foley, Robert A; Lahr, Marta M; Balloux, Francois; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wang, Jun; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-10-07

    We present an Aboriginal Australian genomic sequence obtained from a 100-year-old lock of hair donated by an Aboriginal man from southern Western Australia in the early 20th century. We detect no evidence of European admixture and estimate contamination levels to be below 0.5%. We show that Aboriginal Australians are descendants of an early human dispersal into eastern Asia, possibly 62,000 to 75,000 years ago. This dispersal is separate from the one that gave rise to modern Asians 25,000 to 38,000 years ago. We also find evidence of gene flow between populations of the two dispersal waves prior to the divergence of Native Americans from modern Asian ancestors. Our findings support the hypothesis that present-day Aboriginal Australians descend from the earliest humans to occupy Australia, likely representing one of the oldest continuous populations outside Africa.

  10. The UK Human Genome Mapping Project online computing service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysavy, F R; Bishop, M J; Gibbs, G P; Williams, G W

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of computing and networking facilities developed by the Medical Research Council to provide online computing support to the Human Genome Mapping Project (HGMP) in the UK. The facility is connected to a number of other computing facilities in various centres of genetics and molecular biology research excellence, either directly via high-speed links or through national and international wide-area networks. The paper describes the design and implementation of the current system, a 'client/server' network of Sun, IBM, DEC and Apple servers, gateways and workstations. A short outline of online computing services currently delivered by this system to the UK human genetics research community is also provided. More information about the services and their availability could be obtained by a direct approach to the UK HGMP-RC.

  11. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  12. A streamlined protocol for extracting RNA and genomic DNA from archived human blood and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Gipsy; Vera, Santiago; Elam, Marshall B; Raghow, Rajendra

    2015-04-01

    We combined the TRIzol method of nucleic acid extraction with QIAamp columns to achieve coextraction of RNA and genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and biopsied skeletal muscle, both stored at -80 °C for many months. Total RNA was recovered from the upper aqueous phase of TRIzol. The interphase and organic phases were precipitated with ethanol, digested with proteinase K, and filtered through QIAamp MinElute columns to recover DNA. The combined protocol yielded excellent quality and quantity of nucleic acids from archived human PBMCs and muscle and may be easily adapted for other tissues.

  13. Linkage disequilibrium of evolutionarily conserved regions in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Todd A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strong linkage disequilibrium (LD recently found in genic or exonic regions of the human genome demonstrated that LD can be increased by evolutionary mechanisms that select for functionally important loci. This suggests that LD might be stronger in regions conserved among species than in non-conserved regions, since regions exposed to natural selection tend to be conserved. To assess this hypothesis, we used genome-wide polymorphism data from the HapMap project and investigated LD within DNA sequences conserved between the human and mouse genomes. Results Unexpectedly, we observed that LD was significantly weaker in conserved regions than in non-conserved regions. To investigate why, we examined sequence features that may distort the relationship between LD and conserved regions. We found that interspersed repeats, and not other sequence features, were associated with the weak LD tendency in conserved regions. To appropriately understand the relationship between LD and conserved regions, we removed the effect of repetitive elements and found that the high degree of sequence conservation was strongly associated with strong LD in coding regions but not with that in non-coding regions. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that the degree of sequence conservation does not simply increase LD as predicted by the hypothesis. Rather, it implies that purifying selection changes the polymorphic patterns of coding sequences but has little influence on the patterns of functional units such as regulatory elements present in non-coding regions, since the former are generally restricted by the constraint of maintaining a functional protein product across multiple exons while the latter may exist more as individually isolated units.

  14. Probing Genome Maintenance Functions of human RECQ1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furqan Sami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of DNA-unwinding enzymes that play key roles in protecting the genome stability in all kingdoms of life. Human RecQ homologs include RECQ1, BLM, WRN, RECQ4, and RECQ5β. Although the individual RecQ-related diseases are characterized by a variety of clinical features encompassing growth defects (Bloom Syndrome and Rothmund Thomson Syndrome to premature aging (Werner Syndrome, all these patients have a high risk of cancer predisposition. Here, we present an overview of recent progress towards elucidating functions of RECQ1 helicase, the most abundant but poorly characterized RecQ homolog in humans. Consistent with a conserved role in genome stability maintenance, deficiency of RECQ1 results in elevated frequency of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal instability, increased DNA damage and greater sensitivity to certain genotoxic stress. Delineating what aspects of RECQ1 catalytic functions contribute to the observed cellular phenotypes, and how this is regulated is critical to establish its biological functions in DNA metabolism. Recent studies have identified functional specialization of RECQ1 in DNA repair; however, identification of fundamental similarities will be just as critical in developing a unifying theme for RecQ actions, allowing the functions revealed from studying one homolog to be extrapolated and generalized to other RecQ homologs.

  15. PROBING GENOME MAINTENANCE FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN RECQ1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furqan Sami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of DNA-unwinding enzymes that play key roles in protecting the genome stability in all kingdoms of life.'Human RecQ homologs include RECQ1, BLM, WRN, RECQ4, and RECQ5β.'Although the individual RecQ-related diseases are characterized by a variety of clinical features encompassing growth defects (Bloom Syndrome and Rothmund Thomson Syndrome to premature aging (Werner Syndrome, all these patients have a high risk of cancer predisposition.'Here, we present an overview of recent progress towards elucidating functions of RECQ1 helicase, the most abundant but poorly characterized RecQ homolog in humans.'Consistent with a conserved role in genome stability maintenance, deficiency of RECQ1 results in elevated frequency of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal instability, increased DNA damage and greater sensitivity to certain genotoxic stress.'Delineating what aspects of RECQ1 catalytic functions contribute to the observed cellular phenotypes, and how this is regulated is critical to establish its biological functions in DNA metabolism.'Recent studies have identified functional specialization of RECQ1 in DNA repair; however, identification of fundamental similarities will be just as critical in developing a unifying theme for RecQ actions, allowing the functions revealed from studying one homolog to be extrapolated and generalized to other RecQ homologs.

  16. Retrocopy contributions to the evolution of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haussler David

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution via point mutations is a relatively slow process and is unlikely to completely explain the differences between primates and other mammals. By contrast, 45% of the human genome is composed of retroposed elements, many of which were inserted in the primate lineage. A subset of retroposed mRNAs (retrocopies shows strong evidence of expression in primates, often yielding functional retrogenes. Results To identify and analyze the relatively recently evolved retrogenes, we carried out BLASTZ alignments of all human mRNAs against the human genome and scored a set of features indicative of retroposition. Of over 12,000 putative retrocopy-derived genes that arose mainly in the primate lineage, 726 with strong evidence of transcript expression were examined in detail. These mRNA retroposition events fall into three categories: I 34 retrocopies and antisense retrocopies that added potential protein coding space and UTRs to existing genes; II 682 complete retrocopy duplications inserted into new loci; and III an unexpected set of 13 retrocopies that contributed out-of-frame, or antisense sequences in combination with other types of transposed elements (SINEs, LINEs, LTRs, even unannotated sequence to form potentially novel genes with no homologs outside primates. In addition to their presence in human, several of the gene candidates also had potentially viable ORFs in chimpanzee, orangutan, and rhesus macaque, underscoring their potential of function. Conclusion mRNA-derived retrocopies provide raw material for the evolution of genes in a wide variety of ways, duplicating and amending the protein coding region of existing genes as well as generating the potential for new protein coding space, or non-protein coding RNAs, by unexpected contributions out of frame, in reverse orientation, or from previously non-protein coding sequence.

  17. Comparative genomics of human stem cell factor (SCF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Dehbashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a critical protein with key roles in the cell such as hematopoiesis, gametogenesis and melanogenesis. In the present study a comparative analysis on nucleotide sequences of SCF was performed in Humanoids using bioinformatics tools including NCBI-BLAST, MEGA6, and JBrowse. Our analysis of nucleotide sequences to find closely evolved organisms with high similarity by NCBI-BLAST tools and MEGA6 showed that human and Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes were placed into the same cluster. By using JBrowse, we found that SCF in Neanderthal had a single copy number similar to modern human and partly conserved nucleotide sequences. Together, the results approved the gene flow and genetics similarity of SCF among human and P. troglodytes. This may suggest that during evolution, SCF gene transferred partly intact either on the basis of sequence or function from the same ancestors to P. troglodytes, the ancient human like Neanderthal, and then to the modern human.

  18. Analysis of copy number variation in the rhesus macaque genome identifies candidate loci for evolutionary and human disease studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Arthur S; Gutiérrez-Arcelus, María; Perry, George H; Vallender, Eric J; Johnson, Welkin E; Miller, Gregory M; Korbel, Jan O; Lee, Charles

    2008-04-15

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are heritable gains and losses of genomic DNA in normal individuals. While copy number variation is widely studied in humans, our knowledge of CNVs in other mammalian species is more limited. We have designed a custom array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) platform with 385 000 oligonucleotide probes based on the reference genome sequence of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), the most widely studied non-human primate in biomedical research. We used this platform to identify 123 CNVs among 10 unrelated macaque individuals, with 24% of the CNVs observed in multiple individuals. We found that segmental duplications were significantly enriched at macaque CNV loci. We also observed significant overlap between rhesus macaque and human CNVs, suggesting that certain genomic regions are prone to recurrent CNV formation and instability, even across a total of approximately 50 million years of primate evolution ( approximately 25 million years in each lineage). Furthermore, for eight of the CNVs that were observed in both humans and macaques, previous human studies have reported a relationship between copy number and gene expression or disease susceptibility. Therefore, the rhesus macaque offers an intriguing, non-human primate outbred model organism with which hypotheses concerning the specific functions of phenotypically relevant human CNVs can be tested.

  19. Coping with genetic diversity: the contribution of pathogen and human genomics to modern vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lemaire

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine development faces major difficulties partly because of genetic variation in both infectious organisms and humans. This causes antigenic variation in infectious agents and a high interindividual variability in the human response to the vaccine. The exponential growth of genome sequence information has induced a shift from conventional culture-based to genome-based vaccinology, and allows the tackling of challenges in vaccine development due to pathogen genetic variability. Additionally, recent advances in immunogenetics and genomics should help in the understanding of the influence of genetic factors on the interindividual and interpopulation variations in immune responses to vaccines, and could be useful for developing new vaccine strategies. Accumulating results provide evidence for the existence of a number of genes involved in protective immune responses that are induced either by natural infections or vaccines. Variation in immune responses could be viewed as the result of a perturbation of gene networks; this should help in understanding how a particular polymorphism or a combination thereof could affect protective immune responses. Here we will present: i the first genome-based vaccines that served as proof of concept, and that provided new critical insights into vaccine development strategies; ii an overview of genetic predisposition in infectious diseases and genetic control in responses to vaccines; iii population genetic differences that are a rationale behind group-targeted vaccines; iv an outlook for genetic control in infectious diseases, with special emphasis on the concept of molecular networks that will provide a structure to the huge amount of genomic data.

  20. 77 FR 67385 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  1. 78 FR 66752 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, October 15, 2013, 01:00 p.m. to October 15, 2013, 02:30 p.m., National...

  2. 76 FR 65738 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  3. 77 FR 55853 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

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    2012-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research, September 10, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to September 11, 2012, 5 p.m., National Institutes...

  4. 76 FR 63932 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, ENCODE Technology RFA...- 4280, mckenneyk@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172,...

  5. 75 FR 53703 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-09-01

    ... National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... review and funding cycle. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human...

  6. 77 FR 27471 - National Human Genome Research Institute Amended Notice of Meeting

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    2012-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research, May 21, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to May 22, 2012, 5:00 p.m., National Institutes of Health,...

  7. 75 FR 26762 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-05-12

    ... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research....nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research... No: 2010-11051] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National...

  8. 76 FR 71581 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  9. 78 FR 65342 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  10. From the peas of Gregor Mendel to the human genome and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Paces, V

    2008-01-01

    In the middle of the 19th century, Gregor Mendel conducted his experiments with peas. This took place in the Augustinian monastery in Brno (now the Czech Republic), where he was the abbot. These experiments laid the foundations of modern genetics. At around the same time Charles Darwin formulated his theory of evolution. Through their work, these two men inaugurated the age of modern biology. The next most important step came in 1953 when James Watson and Francis Crick solved the elusive DNA structure. Since then methods for ‘reading’ genetic information have developed quickly, and genomes of many organisms have been analysed, including our own. The human genome consists of 3 billion letters (nucleotides) and it comprises approximately 25,000 genes. The smallest natural genome is the genome of Mycoplasma genitalium. It consists of a mere 500,000 nucleotides and is composed of 500 genes. Yet, mycoplasma is capable of a completely independent life. It would appear from this fact that basic life itself is no...

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome organization of Tor tor (Hamilton, 1822).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Goel, Chirag; Kumari Sahoo, Prabhati; Singh, Atul K; Barat, Ashoktaru

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Tor tor, a threatened "Mahseer" was sequenced for the first time. The mitochondrial genome size determined to be 16,554 bp in length and consisted of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNA genes and a control region or displacement loop (D-Loop) region, resembling the typical organizational pattern of most of the teleost. The overall base composition found was A: 31.8%, T: 25%, G: 15.7% and C: 27.4%; A + T: 56.9% and G + C: 43.1%. The phylogenetic tree constructed using 11 other cyprinids' total mtDNA datasets confirmed the location of present species among mahseers. The total sequence data could support further study in molecular systematics, species identification, evolutionary and conservation genetics.

  12. Selenium in human male reproductive organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldereid, N B; Thomassen, Y; Purvis, K

    1998-08-01

    The objective of the study was to obtain information on the concentration and distribution of selenium throughout the human male reproductive tract. Material was removed at autopsy from 41 men who had died suddenly and unexpectedly. Semen samples were also provided from 184 men attending an andrology clinic for fertility investigation and from 32 healthy volunteers. Significant positive correlations in the selenium concentration were demonstrated between the different reproductive organs, the testis having the highest concentrations. No correlation was found between the concentration of selenium in the genital organs and liver, kidney or blood, suggesting that its uptake and/or biochemical activity in the reproductive organs may be controlled by similar mechanisms not shared by the other organs. No significant age-dependent changes could be detected in tissue selenium concentrations. In a group of men under fertility investigation, a significant positive correlation was obtained between seminal plasma concentrations of selenium and concentrations of spermatozoa in the same ejaculate. A significant positive correlation between concentrations of zinc and selenium in the same ejaculates indicated that selenium may arise largely from the prostate gland.

  13. Genome Editing and Its Applications in Model Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Dongyuan Ma; Feng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances are important for innovative biological research. Development of molecular tools for DNA manipulation, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas), has revolutionized genome editing. These approaches can be used to develop potential therapeutic strategies to effectively treat heritable diseases. In the last few years, subs...

  14. Genome Organization of the SARS-CoV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Xu; Zizhang Zhang; Wei Wei; Songgang Li; Jun Wang; Jian Wang; Jun Yu; Huanming Yang; Jianfei Hu; Jing Wang; Yujun Han; Yongwu Hu; Jie Wen; Yan Li; Jia Ji; Jia Ye

    2003-01-01

    Annotation of the genome sequence of the SARS-CoV (severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus) is indispensable to understand its evolution and pathogenesis. We have performed a full annotation of the SARS-CoV genome sequences by using annotation programs publicly available or developed by ourselves.Totally, 21 open reading frames (ORFs) of genes or putative uncharacterized proteins (PUPs) were predicted. Seven PUPs had not been reported previously, and two of them were predicted to contain transmembrane regions. Eight ORFs partially overlapped with or embedded into those of known genes, revealing that the SARS-CoV genome is a small and compact one with overlapped coding regions.The most striking discovery is that an ORF locates on the minus strand. We have also annotated non-coding regions and identified the transcription regulating sequences (TRS) in the intergenic regions. The analysis of TRS supports the minus strand extending transcription mechanism of coronavirus. The SNP analysis of different isolates reveals that mutations of the sequences do not affect the prediction results of ORFs.

  15. RNA structures, genomic organization and selection of recombinant HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is an evolutionary mechanism intrinsic to the evolution of many RNA viruses. In retroviruses and notably in the case of HIV, recombination is so frequent that it can be considered as part of its mode of replication. This process not only plays a central role in shaping HIV genetic diversity worldwide, but has also been involved in immune escape and development of resistance to antiviral treatments. Recombination does not create new mutations in the existing genetic repertoire of the virus, but creates new combinations of pre-existing polymorphisms. The simultaneous insertion of multiple substitutions in a single replication cycle leaves little room for the progressive coevolution of regions of proteins, RNA or, more in general, genomes, to accommodate these drastic sequence changes. Therefore, recombination, while allowing the virus to rapidly explore larger sequence space than the slow accumulation of point mutations, also runs the risk of generating non functional viruses. Recombination is the consequence of a switch in the template used during reverse transcription and is promoted by the presence of structured regions in the genomic RNA template. In this review, we discuss new observations suggesting that the distribution of RNA structures along the HIV genome may enhance recombination rates in regions where the resultant progeny is less likely to be impaired, and could therefore maximize the evolutionary value of this source of genetic diversity.

  16. Interspecies chimeric complementation for the generation of functional human tissues and organs in large animal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The past decade's rapid progress in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) research has generated hope for meeting the rising demand of organ donation, which remains the only effective cure for end-stage organ failure, a major cause of death worldwide. Despite the potential, generation of transplantable organs from hPSCs using in vitro differentiation is far-fetched. An in vivo interspecies chimeric complementation strategy relying on chimeric-competent hPSCs and zygote genome editing provides an auspicious alternative for providing unlimited organ source for transplantation.

  17. Identification of six Loci associated with pelvic organ prolapse using genome-wide association analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen-Brady, K.; Cannon-Albright, L.; Farnham, J.M.; Teerlink, C.; Vierhout, M.E.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Kluivers, K.B.; Norton, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : There is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to pelvic organ prolapse. We conducted a genome-wide association study to investigate whether common genetic variants modify the risk of pelvic organ prolapse. METHODS: : We recruited women who had been evaluated

  18. Diversity and genomic insights into the uncultured Chloroflexi from the human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alisha G; Schwientek, Patrick; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Woyke, Tanja; Levy, Shawn; Beall, Clifford J; Griffen, Ann; Leys, Eugene; Podar, Mircea

    2014-09-01

    Many microbial phyla that are widely distributed in open environments have few or no representatives within animal-associated microbiota. Among them, the Chloroflexi comprises taxonomically and physiologically diverse lineages adapted to a wide range of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. A distinct group of uncultured chloroflexi related to free-living anaerobic Anaerolineae inhabits the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and includes low-abundance human oral bacteria that appear to proliferate in periodontitis. Using a single-cell genomics approach, we obtained the first draft genomic reconstruction for these organisms and compared their inferred metabolic potential with free-living chloroflexi. Genomic data suggest that oral chloroflexi are anaerobic heterotrophs, encoding abundant carbohydrate transport and metabolism functionalities, similar to those seen in environmental Anaerolineae isolates. The presence of genes for a unique phosphotransferase system and N-acetylglucosamine metabolism suggests an important ecological niche for oral chloroflexi in scavenging material from lysed bacterial cells and the human tissue. The inferred ability to produce sialic acid for cell membrane decoration may enable them to evade the host defence system and colonize the subgingival space. As with other low abundance but persistent members of the microbiota, discerning community and host factors that influence the proliferation of oral chloroflexi may help understand the emergence of oral pathogens and the microbiota dynamics in health and disease states.

  19. Genome organization and pathogenicity of Corynebacterium diphtheriae C7(-) and PW8 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Masaaki; Komiya, Takako; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Ishiwa, Akiko; Nagata, Noriyo; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Takahashi, Motohide

    2010-09-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is the causative agent of diphtheria. In 2003, the complete genomic nucleotide sequence of an isolate (NCTC13129) from a large outbreak in the former Soviet Union was published, in which the presence of 13 putative pathogenicity islands (PAIs) was demonstrated. In contrast, earlier work on diphtheria mainly employed the C7(-) strain for genetic analysis; therefore, current knowledge of the molecular genetics of the bacterium is limited to that strain. However, genomic information on the NCTC13129 strain has scarcely been compared to strain C7(-). Another important C. diphtheriae strain is Park-Williams no. 8 (PW8), which has been the only major strain used in toxoid vaccine production and for which genomic information also is not available. Here, we show by comparative genomic hybridization that at least 37 regions from the reference genome, including 11 of the 13 PAIs, are considered to be absent in the C7(-) genome. Despite this, the C7(-) strain still retained signs of pathogenicity, showing a degree of adhesion to Detroit 562 cells, as well as the formation of and persistence in abscesses in animal skin comparable to that of the NCTC13129 strain. In contrast, the PW8 strain, suggested to lack 14 genomic regions, including 3 PAIs, exhibited more reduced signs of pathogenicity. These results, together with great diversity in the presence of the 37 genomic regions among various C. diphtheriae strains shown by PCR analyses, suggest great heterogeneity of this pathogen, not only in genome organization, but also in pathogenicity.

  20. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Pang, Kevin; Powers, Meghan L; Reitzel, Adam M; Ryan, Joseph F; Simmons, David; Tada, Takashi; Park, Morgan; Gupta, Jyoti; Brooks, Shelise Y; Blakesley, Robert W; Yokoyama, Shozo; Haddock, Steven Hd; Martindale, Mark Q; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2012-01-01

    ...). The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism...