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Sample records for human genome encodes

  1. CAG-encoded polyglutamine length polymorphism in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeats has been identified as the pathogenic mutation in nine different genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. The majority of individuals clinically diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia do not have mutations within known disease genes, and it is likely that additional ataxias or Huntington disease-like disorders will be found to be caused by this common mutational mechanism. We set out to determine the length distributions of CAG-polyglutamine tracts for the entire human genome in a set of healthy individuals in order to characterize the nature of polyglutamine repeat length variation across the human genome, to establish the background against which pathogenic repeat expansions can be detected, and to prioritize candidate genes for repeat expansion disorders. Results We found that repeats, including those in known disease genes, have unique distributions of glutamine tract lengths, as measured by fragment analysis of PCR-amplified repeat regions. This emphasizes the need to characterize each distribution and avoid making generalizations between loci. The best predictors of known disease genes were occurrence of a long CAG-tract uninterrupted by CAA codons in their reference genome sequence, and high glutamine tract length variance in the normal population. We used these parameters to identify eight priority candidate genes for polyglutamine expansion disorders. Twelve CAG-polyglutamine repeats were invariant and these can likely be excluded as candidates. We outline some confusion in the literature about this type of data, difficulties in comparing such data between publications, and its application to studies of disease prevalence in different populations. Analysis of Gene Ontology-based functions of CAG-polyglutamine-containing genes provided a visual framework for interpretation of these genes' functions. All nine known disease genes were involved in DNA

  2. Detection of regulatory SNPs in human genome using ChIP-seq ENCODE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryzgalov, Leonid O; Antontseva, Elena V; Matveeva, Marina Yu; Shilov, Alexander G; Kashina, Elena V; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A; Merkulova, Tatyana I

    2013-01-01

    A vast amount of SNPs derived from genome-wide association studies are represented by non-coding ones, therefore exacerbating the need for effective identification of regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) among them. However, this task remains challenging since the regulatory part of the human genome is annotated much poorly as opposed to coding regions. Here we describe an approach aggregating the whole set of ENCODE ChIP-seq data in order to search for rSNPs, and provide the experimental evidence of its efficiency. Its algorithm is based on the assumption that the enrichment of a genomic region with transcription factor binding loci (ChIP-seq peaks) indicates its regulatory function, and thereby SNPs located in this region are more likely to influence transcription regulation. To ensure that the approach preferably selects functionally meaningful SNPs, we performed enrichment analysis of several human SNP datasets associated with phenotypic manifestations. It was shown that all samples are significantly enriched with SNPs falling into the regions of multiple ChIP-seq peaks as compared with the randomly selected SNPs. For experimental verification, 40 SNPs falling into overlapping regions of at least 7 TF binding loci were selected from OMIM. The effect of SNPs on the binding of the DNA fragments containing them to the nuclear proteins from four human cell lines (HepG2, HeLaS3, HCT-116, and K562) has been tested by EMSA. A radical change in the binding pattern has been observed for 29 SNPs, besides, 6 more SNPs also demonstrated less pronounced changes. Taken together, the results demonstrate the effective way to search for potential rSNPs with the aid of ChIP-seq data provided by ENCODE project.

  3. Structured RNAs in the ENCODE selected regions of the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Washietl, Stefan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Korbel, Jan O

    2007-01-01

    characteristic signals in primary sequence, comparative approaches evaluating evolutionary conservation of structures are most promising. We have used three recently introduced programs based on either phylogenetic-stochastic context-free grammar (EvoFold) or energy directed folding (RNAz and AlifoldZ), yielding......Functional RNA structures play an important role both in the context of noncoding RNA transcripts as well as regulatory elements in mRNAs. Here we present a computational study to detect functional RNA structures within the ENCODE regions of the human genome. Since structural RNAs in general lack...... and EvoFold, and an additional 239 RNAz or EvoFold predictions are supported by the (more stringent) AlifoldZ algorithm. Five hundred seventy RNAz structure predictions fall into regions that show signs of selection pressure also on the sequence level (i.e., conserved elements). More than 700 predictions...

  4. Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birney, Ewan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Dutta, Anindya

    2007-01-01

    We report the generation and analysis of functional data from multiple, diverse experiments performed on a targeted 1% of the human genome as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE Project. These data have been further integrated and augmented by a number of evolutionary and computational analyses...

  5. On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Price, Nicholas; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Zufall, Rebecca A; Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    A recent slew of ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium publications, specifically the article signed by all Consortium members, put forward the idea that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current estimates according to which the fraction of the genome that is evolutionarily conserved through purifying selection is less than 10%. Thus, according to the ENCODE Consortium, a biological function can be maintained indefinitely without selection, which implies that at least 80 - 10 = 70% of the genome is perfectly invulnerable to deleterious mutations, either because no mutation can ever occur in these "functional" regions or because no mutation in these regions can ever be deleterious. This absurd conclusion was reached through various means, chiefly by employing the seldom used "causal role" definition of biological function and then applying it inconsistently to different biochemical properties, by committing a logical fallacy known as "affirming the consequent," by failing to appreciate the crucial difference between "junk DNA" and "garbage DNA," by using analytical methods that yield biased errors and inflate estimates of functionality, by favoring statistical sensitivity over specificity, and by emphasizing statistical significance rather than the magnitude of the effect. Here, we detail the many logical and methodological transgressions involved in assigning functionality to almost every nucleotide in the human genome. The ENCODE results were predicted by one of its authors to necessitate the rewriting of textbooks. We agree, many textbooks dealing with marketing, mass-media hype, and public relations may well have to be rewritten.

  6. Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birney, Ewan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Dutta, Anindya; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R; Margulies, Elliott H; Weng, Zhiping; Snyder, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Thurman, Robert E; Kuehn, Michael S; Taylor, Christopher M; Neph, Shane; Koch, Christoph M; Asthana, Saurabh; Malhotra, Ankit; Adzhubei, Ivan; Greenbaum, Jason A; Andrews, Robert M; Flicek, Paul; Boyle, Patrick J; Cao, Hua; Carter, Nigel P; Clelland, Gayle K; Davis, Sean; Day, Nathan; Dhami, Pawandeep; Dillon, Shane C; Dorschner, Michael O; Fiegler, Heike; Giresi, Paul G; Goldy, Jeff; Hawrylycz, Michael; Haydock, Andrew; Humbert, Richard; James, Keith D; Johnson, Brett E; Johnson, Ericka M; Frum, Tristan T; Rosenzweig, Elizabeth R; Karnani, Neerja; Lee, Kirsten; Lefebvre, Gregory C; Navas, Patrick A; Neri, Fidencio; Parker, Stephen C J; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Shafer, Anthony; Vetrie, David; Weaver, Molly; Wilcox, Sarah; Yu, Man; Collins, Francis S; Dekker, Job; Lieb, Jason D; Tullius, Thomas D; Crawford, Gregory E; Sunyaev, Shamil; Noble, William S; Dunham, Ian; Denoeud, France; Reymond, Alexandre; Kapranov, Philipp; Rozowsky, Joel; Zheng, Deyou; Castelo, Robert; Frankish, Adam; Harrow, Jennifer; Ghosh, Srinka; Sandelin, Albin; Hofacker, Ivo L; Baertsch, Robert; Keefe, Damian; Dike, Sujit; Cheng, Jill; Hirsch, Heather A; Sekinger, Edward A; Lagarde, Julien; Abril, Josep F; Shahab, Atif; Flamm, Christoph; Fried, Claudia; Hackermüller, Jörg; Hertel, Jana; Lindemeyer, Manja; Missal, Kristin; Tanzer, Andrea; Washietl, Stefan; Korbel, Jan; Emanuelsson, Olof; Pedersen, Jakob S; Holroyd, Nancy; Taylor, Ruth; Swarbreck, David; Matthews, Nicholas; Dickson, Mark C; Thomas, Daryl J; Weirauch, Matthew T; Gilbert, James; Drenkow, Jorg; Bell, Ian; Zhao, XiaoDong; Srinivasan, K G; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ooi, Hong Sain; Chiu, Kuo Ping; Foissac, Sylvain; Alioto, Tyler; Brent, Michael; Pachter, Lior; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso; Choo, Siew Woh; Choo, Chiou Yu; Ucla, Catherine; Manzano, Caroline; Wyss, Carine; Cheung, Evelyn; Clark, Taane G; Brown, James B; Ganesh, Madhavan; Patel, Sandeep; Tammana, Hari; Chrast, Jacqueline; Henrichsen, Charlotte N; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Nagalakshmi, Ugrappa; Wu, Jiaqian; Lian, Zheng; Lian, Jin; Newburger, Peter; Zhang, Xueqing; Bickel, Peter; Mattick, John S; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Weissman, Sherman; Hubbard, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Rogers, Jane; Stadler, Peter F; Lowe, Todd M; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Struhl, Kevin; Gerstein, Mark; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Fu, Yutao; Green, Eric D; Karaöz, Ulaş; Siepel, Adam; Taylor, James; Liefer, Laura A; Wetterstrand, Kris A; Good, Peter J; Feingold, Elise A; Guyer, Mark S; Cooper, Gregory M; Asimenos, George; Dewey, Colin N; Hou, Minmei; Nikolaev, Sergey; Montoya-Burgos, Juan I; Löytynoja, Ari; Whelan, Simon; Pardi, Fabio; Massingham, Tim; Huang, Haiyan; Zhang, Nancy R; Holmes, Ian; Mullikin, James C; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Paten, Benedict; Seringhaus, Michael; Church, Deanna; Rosenbloom, Kate; Kent, W James; Stone, Eric A; Batzoglou, Serafim; Goldman, Nick; Hardison, Ross C; Haussler, David; Miller, Webb; Sidow, Arend; Trinklein, Nathan D; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Barrera, Leah; Stuart, Rhona; King, David C; Ameur, Adam; Enroth, Stefan; Bieda, Mark C; Kim, Jonghwan; Bhinge, Akshay A; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jun; Yao, Fei; Vega, Vinsensius B; Lee, Charlie W H; Ng, Patrick; Shahab, Atif; Yang, Annie; Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Zhu, Zhou; Xu, Xiaoqin; Squazzo, Sharon; Oberley, Matthew J; Inman, David; Singer, Michael A; Richmond, Todd A; Munn, Kyle J; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Wallerman, Ola; Komorowski, Jan; Fowler, Joanna C; Couttet, Phillippe; Bruce, Alexander W; Dovey, Oliver M; Ellis, Peter D; Langford, Cordelia F; Nix, David A; Euskirchen, Ghia; Hartman, Stephen; Urban, Alexander E; Kraus, Peter; Van Calcar, Sara; Heintzman, Nate; Kim, Tae Hoon; Wang, Kun; Qu, Chunxu; Hon, Gary; Luna, Rosa; Glass, Christopher K; Rosenfeld, M Geoff; Aldred, Shelley Force; Cooper, Sara J; Halees, Anason; Lin, Jane M; Shulha, Hennady P; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Mousheng; Haidar, Jaafar N S; Yu, Yong; Ruan, Yijun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Green, Roland D; Wadelius, Claes; Farnham, Peggy J; Ren, Bing; Harte, Rachel A; Hinrichs, Angie S; Trumbower, Heather; Clawson, Hiram; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer; Zweig, Ann S; Smith, Kayla; Thakkapallayil, Archana; Barber, Galt; Kuhn, Robert M; Karolchik, Donna; Armengol, Lluis; Bird, Christine P; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kern, Andrew D; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Martin, Joel D; Stranger, Barbara E; Woodroffe, Abigail; Davydov, Eugene; Dimas, Antigone; Eyras, Eduardo; Hallgrímsdóttir, Ingileif B; Huppert, Julian; Zody, Michael C; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Estivill, Xavier; Bouffard, Gerard G; Guan, Xiaobin; Hansen, Nancy F; Idol, Jacquelyn R; Maduro, Valerie V B; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jennifer C; Park, Morgan; Thomas, Pamela J; Young, Alice C; Blakesley, Robert W; Muzny, Donna M; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Jiang, Huaiyang; Weinstock, George M; Gibbs, Richard A; Graves, Tina; Fulton, Robert; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Clamp, Michele; Cuff, James; Gnerre, Sante; Jaffe, David B; Chang, Jean L; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S; Koriabine, Maxim; Nefedov, Mikhail; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Zhu, Baoli; de Jong, Pieter J

    2007-06-14

    We report the generation and analysis of functional data from multiple, diverse experiments performed on a targeted 1% of the human genome as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE Project. These data have been further integrated and augmented by a number of evolutionary and computational analyses. Together, our results advance the collective knowledge about human genome function in several major areas. First, our studies provide convincing evidence that the genome is pervasively transcribed, such that the majority of its bases can be found in primary transcripts, including non-protein-coding transcripts, and those that extensively overlap one another. Second, systematic examination of transcriptional regulation has yielded new understanding about transcription start sites, including their relationship to specific regulatory sequences and features of chromatin accessibility and histone modification. Third, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure has emerged, including its inter-relationship with DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. Finally, integration of these new sources of information, in particular with respect to mammalian evolution based on inter- and intra-species sequence comparisons, has yielded new mechanistic and evolutionary insights concerning the functional landscape of the human genome. Together, these studies are defining a path for pursuit of a more comprehensive characterization of human genome function.

  7. Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Genome-wide analysis reveals loci encoding anti-macrophage factors in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Dowling

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important human pathogen whose infection biology is still poorly understood. The bacterium is endemic to tropical regions, including South East Asia and Northern Australia, where it causes melioidosis, a serious disease associated with both high mortality and antibiotic resistance. B. pseudomallei is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to replicate in macrophages. However despite the critical nature of its interaction with macrophages, few anti-macrophage factors have been characterized to date. Here we perform a genome-wide gain of function screen of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 to identify loci encoding factors with anti-macrophage activity. We identify a total of 113 such loci scattered across both chromosomes, with positive gene clusters encoding transporters and secretion systems, enzymes/toxins, secondary metabolite, biofilm, adhesion and signal response related factors. Further phenotypic analysis of four of these regions shows that the encoded factors cause striking cellular phenotypes relevant to infection biology, including apoptosis, formation of actin 'tails' and multi-nucleation within treated macrophages. The detailed analysis of the remaining host of loci will facilitate genetic dissection of the interaction of this important pathogen with host macrophages and thus further elucidate this critical part of its infection cycle.

  9. The mitochondrial genome encodes abundant small noncoding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seungil Ro; Hsiu-Yen Ma; Chanjae Park; Nicole Ortogero; Rui Song; Grant W Hennig; Huili Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs identified thus far are all encoded by the nuclear genome.Here,we report that the murine and human mitochondriai genomes encode thousands of small noncoding RNAs,which are predominantly derived from the sense transcripts of the mitochondrial genes (host genes),and we termed these small RNAs mitochondrial genome-encoded small RNAs (mitosRNAs).DICER inactivation affected,but did not completely abolish mitosRNA production.MitosRNAs appear to be products of currently unidentified mitochondrial ribonucleases.Overexpression of mitosRNAs enhanced expression levels of their host genes in vitro,and dysregulated mitosRNA expression was generally associated with aberrant mitochondrial gene expression in vivo.Our data demonstrate that in addition to 37 known mitochondrial genes,the mammalian mitochondrial genome also encodes abundant mitosRNAs,which may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial gene expression in the cell.

  10. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  11. Cell encoding recombinant human erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A.K.; Withy, R.M.; Zabrecky, J.R.; Masiello, N.C.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes a C127 cell transformed with a recombinant DNA vector. It comprises: a DNA sequence encoding human erythropoietin, the transformed cell being capable of producing N-linked and O-linked glycosylated human erythropoietin.

  12. Characterization of promoter region and genomic structure of the murine and human genes encoding Src like adapter protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratchmarova, I; Sosinowski, T; Weiss, A; Witter, K; Vincenz, C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-10

    Src-like adapter protein (SLAP) was identified as a signaling molecule in a yeast two-hybrid system using the cytoplasmic domain of EphA2, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase (Pandey et al., 1995. Characterization of a novel Src-like adapter protein that associates with the Eck receptor tyrosine kinase. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19201-19204). It is very similar to members of the Src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in that it contains very homologous SH3 and SH2 domains (Abram and Courtneidge, 2000. Src family tyrosine kinases and growth factor signaling. Exp. Cell. Res. 254, 1-13.). However, instead of a kinase domain at the C-terminus, it contains a unique C-terminal region. In order to exclude the possibility that an alternative form exists, we have isolated genomic clones containing the murine Slap gene as well as the human SLA gene. The coding regions of murine Slap and human SLA genes contain seven exons and six introns. Absence of any kinase domain in the genomic region confirm its designation as an adapter protein. Additionally, we have cloned and sequenced approximately 2.6 kb of the region 5' to the initiator methionine of the murine Slap gene. When subcloned upstream of a luciferase gene, this fragment increased the transcriptional activity about 6-fold in a human Jurkat T cell line and approximately 52-fold in a murine T cell line indicating that this region contains promoter elements that dictate SLAP expression. We have also cloned the promoter region of the human SLA gene. Since SLAP is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid and by activation of B cells, the cloning of its promoter region will permit a detailed analysis of the elements required for its transcriptional regulation.

  13. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-11-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus.

  14. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  15. Genomic organization and mapping of the gene (SLC25A19) encoding the human mitochondrial deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobazzi, V; Ventura, M; Fiermonte, G; Prezioso, G; Rocchi, M; Palmieri, F

    2001-01-01

    The deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC) transports deoxynucleotides into mitochondria and is therefore essential for mtDNA synthesis. The human DNC gene (SLC25A19) spans about 16.5 kb and consists of nine exons with the translation start site in exon 4. It is located on chromosome 17q25.3. Three transcripts, which differ in their 5' ends and are generated by alternative splicing, have been identified.

  16. Cloning of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding human type XVIII collagen and localization of the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen gene to mouse chromosome 10 and human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S.P.; Warman, M.L.; Timmons, S.; Olsen, B.R.; Knoll, J.H.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Seldin, M.F. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Cheng, Sou-De (Children' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Types XV and XVIII collagen belong to a unique and novel subclass of the collagen superfamily for which the authors have proposed the name the MULTIPLEXIN family. Members of this class contain polypeptides with multiple triple-helical domains separated and flanked by non-triple-helical regions. In this paper, they report the isolation of human cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen chain. Utilizing a genomic clone as probe, they have mapped the COL18A1 gene to chromosome 21q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have shown that the murine Col18a1 locus is on chromosome 10, close to the loci for Col6a1 and Col6a2. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  17. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Director Organization Reports & Publications Español The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds ... Landscape Social Media Videos Image Gallery Fact Sheets Human Genome Project Clinical Studies Genomic Careers DNA Day Calendar ...

  18. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  19. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  20. Human social genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural "social signal transduction" pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving.

  1. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  2. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  3. Genomics of the human carnitine acyltransferase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, FR; Huijkman, NCA; Boomsma, C; Kuipers, JRG; Bartelds, B

    2000-01-01

    Five genes in the human genome are known to encode different active forms of related carnitine acyltransferases: CPT1A for liver-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT1B for muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT2 for carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, CROT for carnitine octanoyltrans

  4. High nucleosome occupancy is encoded at human regulatory sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiree Tillo

    Full Text Available Active eukaryotic regulatory sites are characterized by open chromatin, and yeast promoters and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs typically have low intrinsic nucleosome occupancy. Here, we show that in contrast to yeast, DNA at human promoters, enhancers, and TFBSs generally encodes high intrinsic nucleosome occupancy. In most cases we examined, these elements also have high experimentally measured nucleosome occupancy in vivo. These regions typically have high G+C content, which correlates positively with intrinsic nucleosome occupancy, and are depleted for nucleosome-excluding poly-A sequences. We propose that high nucleosome preference is directly encoded at regulatory sequences in the human genome to restrict access to regulatory information that will ultimately be utilized in only a subset of differentiated cells.

  5. An expansive human regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neph, Shane; Vierstra, Jeff; Stergachis, Andrew B; Reynolds, Alex P; Haugen, Eric; Vernot, Benjamin; Thurman, Robert E; John, Sam; Sandstrom, Richard; Johnson, Audra K; Maurano, Matthew T; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Wang, Hao; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Diegel, Morgan; Roach, Vaughn; Dunn, Douglas; Neri, Jun; Schafer, Anthony; Hansen, R Scott; Kutyavin, Tanya; Giste, Erika; Weaver, Molly; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter; Zhang, Miaohua; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; MacCoss, Michael J; Akey, Joshua M; Bender, M A; Groudine, Mark; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-06

    Regulatory factor binding to genomic DNA protects the underlying sequence from cleavage by DNase I, leaving nucleotide-resolution footprints. Using genomic DNase I footprinting across 41 diverse cell and tissue types, we detected 45 million transcription factor occupancy events within regulatory regions, representing differential binding to 8.4 million distinct short sequence elements. Here we show that this small genomic sequence compartment, roughly twice the size of the exome, encodes an expansive repertoire of conserved recognition sequences for DNA-binding proteins that nearly doubles the size of the human cis-regulatory lexicon. We find that genetic variants affecting allelic chromatin states are concentrated in footprints, and that these elements are preferentially sheltered from DNA methylation. High-resolution DNase I cleavage patterns mirror nucleotide-level evolutionary conservation and track the crystallographic topography of protein-DNA interfaces, indicating that transcription factor structure has been evolutionarily imprinted on the human genome sequence. We identify a stereotyped 50-base-pair footprint that precisely defines the site of transcript origination within thousands of human promoters. Finally, we describe a large collection of novel regulatory factor recognition motifs that are highly conserved in both sequence and function, and exhibit cell-selective occupancy patterns that closely parallel major regulators of development, differentiation and pluripotency.

  6. Current View on Phytoplasma Genomes and Encoded Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kube

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas are specialised bacteria that are obligate parasites of plant phloem tissue and insects. These bacteria have resisted all attempts of cell-free cultivation. Genome research is of particular importance to analyse the genetic endowment of such bacteria. Here we review the gene content of the four completely sequenced ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ genomes that include those of ‘Ca. P. asteris’ strains OY-M and AY-WB, ‘Ca. P. australiense,’ and ‘Ca. P. mali’. These genomes are characterized by chromosome condensation resulting in sizes below 900 kb and a G + C content of less than 28%. Evolutionary adaption of the phytoplasmas to nutrient-rich environments resulted in losses of genetic modules and increased host dependency highlighted by the transport systems and limited metabolic repertoire. On the other hand, duplication and integration events enlarged the chromosomes and contribute to genome instability. Present differences in the content of membrane and secreted proteins reflect the host adaptation in the phytoplasma strains. General differences are obvious between different phylogenetic subgroups. ‘Ca. P. mali’ is separated from the other strains by its deviating chromosome organization, the genetic repertoire for recombination and excision repair of nucleotides or the loss of the complete energy-yielding part of the glycolysis. Apart from these differences, comparative analysis exemplified that all four phytoplasmas are likely to encode an alternative pathway to generate pyruvate and ATP.

  7. Genomics of human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  8. Mapping the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Charles R.

    1989-06-01

    The following pages aim to lay a foundation for understanding the excitement surrounding the ''human genome project,'' as well as to convey a flavor of the ongoing efforts and plans at the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Our own work, of course, is only part of a broad international effort that will dramatically enhance our understanding of human molecular genetics before the end of this century. In this country, the bulk of the effort will be carried out under the auspices of the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, but significant contributions have already been made both by nonprofit private foundations and by private corporation. The respective roles of the DOE and the NIH are being coordinated by an inter-agency committee, the aims of which are to emphasize the strengths of each agency, to facilitate cooperation, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort. The NIH, for example, will continue its crucial work in medical genetics and in mapping the genomes of nonhuman species. The DOE, on the other hand, has unique experience in managing large projects, and its national laboratories are repositories of expertise in physics, engineering, and computer science, as well as the life sciences. The tools and techniques the project will ultimately rely on are thus likely to be developed in multidisciplinary efforts at laboratories like LBL. Accordingly, we at LBL take great pride in this enterprise -- an enterprise that will eventually transform our understanding of ourselves.

  9. Natural biased coin encoded in the genome determines cell strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri, Faezeh; Mahini, Hamid; Sharifi-Zarchi, Ali; Totonchi, Mehdi; Tusserkani, Ruzbeh; Pezeshk, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Decision making at a cellular level determines different fates for isogenic cells. However, it is not yet clear how rational decisions are encoded in the genome, how they are transmitted to their offspring, and whether they evolve and become optimized throughout generations. In this paper, we use a game theoretic approach to explain how rational decisions are made in the presence of cooperators and competitors. Our results suggest the existence of an internal switch that operates as a biased coin. The biased coin is, in fact, a biochemical bistable network of interacting genes that can flip to one of its stable states in response to different environmental stimuli. We present a framework to describe how the positions of attractors in such a gene regulatory network correspond to the behavior of a rational player in a competing environment. We evaluate our model by considering lysis/lysogeny decision making of bacteriophage lambda in E. coli.

  10. Natural biased coin encoded in the genome determines cell strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Dorri

    Full Text Available Decision making at a cellular level determines different fates for isogenic cells. However, it is not yet clear how rational decisions are encoded in the genome, how they are transmitted to their offspring, and whether they evolve and become optimized throughout generations. In this paper, we use a game theoretic approach to explain how rational decisions are made in the presence of cooperators and competitors. Our results suggest the existence of an internal switch that operates as a biased coin. The biased coin is, in fact, a biochemical bistable network of interacting genes that can flip to one of its stable states in response to different environmental stimuli. We present a framework to describe how the positions of attractors in such a gene regulatory network correspond to the behavior of a rational player in a competing environment. We evaluate our model by considering lysis/lysogeny decision making of bacteriophage lambda in E. coli.

  11. Human myoblast genome therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter K Law; Leo A Bockeria; Choong-Chin Liew; Danlin M Law; Ping Lu; Eugene KW Sim; Khawja H Haider; Lei Ye; Xun Li; Margarita N Vakhromeeva; Ilia I Berishvili

    2006-01-01

    Human Myoblast Genome Therapy (HMGT) is a platform technology of cell transplantation, nuclear transfer, and tissue engineering. Unlike stem cells, myoblasts are differentiated, immature cells destined to become muscles. Myoblasts cultured from satellite cells of adult muscle biopsies survive, develop, and function to revitalize degenerative muscles upon transplantation. Injection injury activates regeneration of host myofibers that fuse with the engrafted myoblasts, sharing their nuclei in a common gene pool of the syncytium. Thus, through nuclear transfer and complementation, the normal human genome can be transferred into muscles of patients with genetic disorders to achieve phenotype repair or disease prevention. Myoblasts are safe and efficient gene transfer vehicles endogenous to muscles that constitute 50% of body weight. Results of over 280 HMGT procedures on Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) subjects in the past 15 years demonstrated absolute safety. Myoblast-injected DMD muscles showed improved histology.Strength increase at 18 months post-operatively averaged 123%. In another application of HMGT on ischemic cardiomyopathy, the first human myoblast transfer into porcine myocardium revealed that it was safe and effective. Clinical trials on approximately 220 severe cardiomyopathy patients in 15 countries showed a <10% mortality. Most subjects received autologous cells implanted on the epicardial surface during coronory artery bypass graft, or injected on the endomyocardial surface percutaneously through guiding catheters. Significant increases in left ventricular ejection fraction, wall thickness, and wall motion have been reported, with reduction in perfusion defective areas, angina, and shortness of breath. As a new modality of treatment for disease in the skeletal muscle or myocardium, HMGT emerged as safe and effective. Large randomized multi-center trials are under way to confirm these preliminary results. The future of HMGT is bright and exciting

  12. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  13. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  14. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  15. A decade of human genome project conclusion: Scientific diffusion about our genome knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Fernanda; Góes, Andréa

    2016-05-06

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) was initiated in 1990 and completed in 2003. It aimed to sequence the whole human genome. Although it represented an advance in understanding the human genome and its complexity, many questions remained unanswered. Other projects were launched in order to unravel the mysteries of our genome, including the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This review aims to analyze the evolution of scientific knowledge related to both the HGP and ENCODE projects. Data were retrieved from scientific articles published in 1990-2014, a period comprising the development and the 10 years following the HGP completion. The fact that only 20,000 genes are protein and RNA-coding is one of the most striking HGP results. A new concept about the organization of genome arose. The ENCODE project was initiated in 2003 and targeted to map the functional elements of the human genome. This project revealed that the human genome is pervasively transcribed. Therefore, it was determined that a large part of the non-protein coding regions are functional. Finally, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure emerged. The mechanistic functioning of the genome has been redrafted, revealing a much more complex picture. Besides, a gene-centric conception of the organism has to be reviewed. A number of criticisms have emerged against the ENCODE project approaches, raising the question of whether non-conserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Thus, HGP and ENCODE projects accomplished a great map of the human genome, but the data generated still requires further in depth analysis. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:215-223, 2016.

  16. All about the Human Genome Project (HGP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genome Resources Access to the full human sequence All About The Human Genome Project (HGP) The Human ... an international research effort to sequence and map all of the genes - together known as the genome - ...

  17. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  18. Human genome. 1993 Program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

  19. A ROBUST ADAPTIVE VIDEO ENCODER BASED ON HUMAN VISUAL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Hao; Zhang Jiangshan; Zhu Yaoting; Zhu Guangxi

    2003-01-01

    A Robust Adaptive Video Encoder (RAVE) based on human visual model is proposed. The encoder combines the best features of Fine Granularity Scalable (FGS) coding, framedropping coding, video redundancy coding, and human visual model. According to packet loss and available bandwidth of the network, the encoder adjust the output bit rate by jointly adapting quantization step-size instructed by human visual model, rate shaping, and periodically inserting key frame. The proposed encoder is implemented based on MPEG-4 encoder and is compared with the case of a conventional FGS algorithm. It is shown that RAVE is a very efficient robust video encoder that provides improved visual quality for the receiver and consumes equal or less network resource. Results are confirmed by subjective tests and simulation tests.

  20. A ROBUST ADAPTIVE VIDEO ENCODER BASED ON HUMAN VISUAL MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YinHao; ZhangJiangshan

    2003-01-01

    A Robust Adaptive Video Encoder (RAVE) based on human visual model is proposed.The encoder combines the best features of Fine Granularity Scalabla (FGS) coding,frame-dropping coding,video redundancy coding,and human visual model.According to packet loss and available bandwidth of the network,the encoder adjust the output bit rate by jointly adapting quantization step-size instructed by human visual model,rate shaping,and periodically inserting key frame.The proposed encoder is implemented based on MPEG-4 encoder and is compared with the case of a conventional FGS algorithm.It is shown that RAVE is a very efficient robust videl encoder that provides improved visual quality for the receiver and consumes equal or less network resource.Results are confirmed by subjective tests and simulation tests.

  1. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  2. Gender And The Human Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender issues arise in relation to the human genome across a number of dimensions: the level of attention given to the nuclear genome as opposed to the mitochondrial; the level of basic scientific research; decision-making in the clinic related to both reproductive decision-making on the one hand, and diagnostic and predictive testing on the other; and wider societal implications. Feminist bioethics offers a useful perspective for addressing these issues.

  3. Comparative genomics of the family Vibrionaceae reveals the wide distribution of genes encoding virulence-associated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the family Vibrionaceae are ubiquitous in marine environments. Several of these species are important pathogens of humans and marine species. Evidence indicates that genetic exchange plays an important role in the emergence of new pathogenic strains within this family. Data from the sequenced genomes of strains in this family could show how the genes encoded by all these strains, known as the pangenome, are distributed. Information about the core, accessory and panproteome of this family can show how, for example, genes encoding virulence-associated proteins are distributed and help us understand how virulence emerges. Results We deduced the complete set of orthologs for eleven strains from this family. The core proteome consists of 1,882 orthologous groups, which is 28% of the 6,629 orthologous groups in this family. There were 4,411 accessory orthologous groups (i.e., proteins that occurred in from 2 to 10 proteomes and 5,584 unique proteins (encoded once on only one of the eleven genomes. Proteins that have been associated with virulence in V. cholerae were widely distributed across the eleven genomes, but the majority was found only on the genomes of the two V. cholerae strains examined. Conclusions The proteomes are reflective of the differing evolutionary trajectories followed by different strains to similar phenotypes. The composition of the proteomes supports the notion that genetic exchange among species of the Vibrionaceae is widespread and that this exchange aids these species in adapting to their environments.

  4. 76 FR 63932 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, ENCODE Technology RFA...- 4280, mckenneyk@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172,...

  5. A brief review on the Human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international research consortium that aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The second phase of the project comprised 1640 datasets from 147 different cell types, yielding a set of 30 publications across several journals. These data revealed that 80.4% of the human genome displays some functionality in at least one cell type. Many of these regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and further form a network or three-dimensional conformation to affect gene expression. These elements are also related to sequence variants associated with diseases or traits. All these findings provide us new insights into the organization and regulation of genes and genome, and serve as an expansive resource for understanding human health and disease.

  6. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  7. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall, the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and is an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research.

  8. Human Transcriptome and Chromatin Modifications: An ENCODE Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A decade-long project, led by several international research groups, called the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE, recently released an unprecedented amount of data. The ambitious project covers transcriptome, cistrome, epigenome, and interactome data from more than 1,600 sets of experiments in human. To make use of this valuable resource, it is important to understand the information it represents and the techniques that were used to generate these data. In this review, we introduce the data that ENCODE generated, summarize the observations from the data analysis, and revisit a computational approach that ENCODE used to predict gene expression, with a focus on the human transcriptome and its association with chromatin modifications.

  9. Phonetic Feature Encoding in Human Superior Temporal Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesgarani, Nima; Cheung, Connie; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    During speech perception, linguistic elements such as consonants and vowels are extracted from a complex acoustic speech signal. The superior temporal gyrus (STG) participates in high-order auditory processing of speech, but how it encodes phonetic information is poorly understood. We used high-density direct cortical surface recordings in humans while they listened to natural, continuous speech to reveal the STG representation of the entire English phonetic inventory. At single electrodes, we found response selectivity to distinct phonetic features. Encoding of acoustic properties was mediated by a distributed population response. Phonetic features could be directly related to tuning for spectrotemporal acoustic cues, some of which were encoded in a nonlinear fashion or by integration of multiple cues. These findings demonstrate the acoustic-phonetic representation of speech in human STG. PMID:24482117

  10. Phonetic feature encoding in human superior temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesgarani, Nima; Cheung, Connie; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2014-02-28

    During speech perception, linguistic elements such as consonants and vowels are extracted from a complex acoustic speech signal. The superior temporal gyrus (STG) participates in high-order auditory processing of speech, but how it encodes phonetic information is poorly understood. We used high-density direct cortical surface recordings in humans while they listened to natural, continuous speech to reveal the STG representation of the entire English phonetic inventory. At single electrodes, we found response selectivity to distinct phonetic features. Encoding of acoustic properties was mediated by a distributed population response. Phonetic features could be directly related to tuning for spectrotemporal acoustic cues, some of which were encoded in a nonlinear fashion or by integration of multiple cues. These findings demonstrate the acoustic-phonetic representation of speech in human STG.

  11. The Human Genome Diversity Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalli-Sforza, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Diversity Project (HGD Project) is an international anthropology project that seeks to study the genetic richness of the entire human species. This kind of genetic information can add a unique thread to the tapestry knowledge of humanity. Culture, environment, history, and other factors are often more important, but humanity`s genetic heritage, when analyzed with recent technology, brings another type of evidence for understanding species` past and present. The Project will deepen the understanding of this genetic richness and show both humanity`s diversity and its deep and underlying unity. The HGD Project is still largely in its planning stages, seeking the best ways to reach its goals. The continuing discussions of the Project, throughout the world, should improve the plans for the Project and their implementation. The Project is as global as humanity itself; its implementation will require the kinds of partnerships among different nations and cultures that make the involvement of UNESCO and other international organizations particularly appropriate. The author will briefly discuss the Project`s history, describe the Project, set out the core principles of the Project, and demonstrate how the Project will help combat the scourge of racism.

  12. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes in four Gossypium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucleotide binding site (NBS) genes encode a large family of disease resistance (R) proteins in plants. The availability of genomic data of the two diploid cotton species, Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, and the two allotetraploid cotton species, Gossypium hirsutum (TM-1) and Gossypium ...

  13. Human subtelomeric WASH genes encode a new subclass of the WASP family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Linardopoulou

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Subtelomeres are duplication-rich, structurally variable regions of the human genome situated just proximal of telomeres. We report here that the most terminally located human subtelomeric genes encode a previously unrecognized third subclass of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein family, whose known members reorganize the actin cytoskeleton in response to extracellular stimuli. This new subclass, which we call WASH, is evolutionarily conserved in species as diverged as Entamoeba. We demonstrate that WASH is essential in Drosophila. WASH is widely expressed in human tissues, and human WASH protein colocalizes with actin in filopodia and lamellipodia. The VCA domain of human WASH promotes actin polymerization by the Arp2/3 complex in vitro. WASH duplicated to multiple chromosomal ends during primate evolution, with highest copy number reached in humans, whose WASH repertoires vary. Thus, human subtelomeres are not genetic junkyards, and WASH's location in these dynamic regions could have advantageous as well as pathologic consequences.

  14. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Qian

    Full Text Available We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  15. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R.; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R.; Mullikin, James C.; Meader, Stephen J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E.; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E.; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E.; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours1–4, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other. PMID:22722832

  16. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R; Mullikin, James C; Meader, Stephen J; Ponting, Chris P; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H; Andrés, Aida M; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-06-28

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other.

  17. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the ADH7 gene encoding human class IV ({sigma}) ADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hirokazu; Baraona, E.; Lieber, C.S. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    1996-01-15

    The ADH7 gene encoding human Class IV ({sigma}) alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was cloned from a Caucasian genomic DNA library and characterized. It has nine exons and eight introns that span about 22 kb, and its intron insertion is identical to that of the other ADH genes (ADH1 to ADH5). The nucleotide sequences of the exons encoding 374 amino acids are identical to the previously reported cDNA sequence of {sigma} ADH. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that ADH7 is located on human chromosome 4q23-q24, close to the ADH cluster locus (4q21-q25). These data are consistent with the view that Class IV ADH is a member of the ADH family and is phylogenetically close to the other ADHs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The evolution of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonti, Corinne N; Capra, John A

    2015-12-01

    Human genomes hold a record of the evolutionary forces that have shaped our species. Advances in DNA sequencing, functional genomics, and population genetic modeling have deepened our understanding of human demographic history, natural selection, and many other long-studied topics. These advances have also revealed many previously underappreciated factors that influence the evolution of the human genome, including functional modifications to DNA and histones, conserved 3D topological chromatin domains, structural variation, and heterogeneous mutation patterns along the genome. Using evolutionary theory as a lens to study these phenomena will lead to significant breakthroughs in understanding what makes us human and why we get sick.

  19. Life in our hands? Some ethical perspectives on the human genome and human genome diversity projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius W. du Toit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article dealt with implications of the human genome and the human genome diversity project. It examined some theological implications, such as: humans as the image of God, God as the creator of life, the changed role of miracles and healings in religion, the sacredness of nature, life and the genome. Ethical issues that were addressed include eugenics, germline intervention, determinism and the human genome diversity project. Economic and legal factors that play a role were also discussed. Whilst positive aspects of genome research were considered, a critical stance was adopted towards patenting the human genome and some concluding guidelines were proposed.

  20. Genomics and physiology of a marine flavobacterium encoding a proteorhodopsin and a xanthorhodopsin-like protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Riedel

    Full Text Available Proteorhodopsin (PR photoheterotrophy in the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95 has previously been investigated, showing no growth stimulation in the light at intermediate carbon concentrations. Here we report the genome sequence of strain PRO95 and compare it to two other PR encoding Dokdonia genomes: that of strain 4H-3-7-5 which shows the most similar genome, and that of strain MED134 which grows better in the light under oligotrophic conditions. Our genome analysis revealed that the PRO95 genome as well as the 4H-3-7-5 genome encode a protein related to xanthorhodopsins. The genomic environment and phylogenetic distribution of this gene suggest that it may have frequently been recruited by lateral gene transfer. Expression analyses by RT-PCR and direct mRNA-sequencing showed that both rhodopsins and the complete β-carotene pathway necessary for retinal production are transcribed in PRO95. Proton translocation measurements showed enhanced proton pump activity in response to light, supporting that one or both rhodopsins are functional. Genomic information and carbon source respiration data were used to develop a defined cultivation medium for PRO95, but reproducible growth always required small amounts of yeast extract. Although PRO95 contains and expresses two rhodopsin genes, light did not stimulate its growth as determined by cell numbers in a nutrient poor seawater medium that mimics its natural environment, confirming previous experiments at intermediate carbon concentrations. Starvation or stress conditions might be needed to observe the physiological effect of light induced energy acquisition.

  1. Marek’s disease virus-encoded microRNAs: genomics, expression and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the recently discovered small non-coding RNA molecules that have post-transcriptional regulatory functions in many important biological processes. A large number of miRNAs have been found to be encoded by viral genomes, especially in herpesviruses. Previous research regarding miRNAs encoded by herpesviruses, including Marek’s disease virus (MDV), has demonstrated their involvement in lytic replication, latent infection, T-lymphocyte transformation and tumorigenesis. MDV is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, with the ability to induce tumors in natural hosts; however, formation of these tumors can be prevented by immunization with attenuated or nonpathogenic forms of the virus. Marek’s disease is considered to be a good biomedical model for investigating the biology, genetics, and immunology of tumorigenesis. In this paper, we review the discovery and identification of MDV-encoded miRNAs, along with their genomics, expression profiles, and currently known functions. We also discuss the prospects and techniques possibly applicable to the further investigation of the biological roles of MDV-encoded miRNAs.

  2. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  3. Targets of balancing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrés, Aida M; Hubisz, Melissa J; Indap, Amit

    2009-01-01

    to maintaining phenotypic variation in natural populations. Nevertheless, its prevalence and specific targets in the human genome remain largely unknown. We have analyzed the patterns of diversity and divergence of 13,400 genes in two human populations using an unbiased single-nucleotide polymorphism data set......, a genome-wide approach, and a method that incorporates demography in neutrality tests. We identified an unbiased catalog of genes with signatures of long-term balancing selection, which includes immunity genes as well as genes encoding keratins and membrane channels; the catalog also shows enrichment...... in functional categories involved in cellular structure. Patterns are mostly concordant in the two populations, with a small fraction of genes showing population-specific signatures of selection. Power considerations indicate that our findings represent a subset of all targets in the genome, suggesting...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Veillonella parvula HSIVP1, Isolated from the Human Small Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Boekhorst, J.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Veillonella species are frequently encountered commensals in the human small intestine. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the first cultured representative from this ecosystem, Veillonella parvula strain HSIVP1. The genome is predicted to encode all the necessary enzymes required for the

  5. Genome analysis and identification of gelatinase encoded gene in Enterobacter aerogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahimi, Safiyyah; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Khalid, Rozida Abdul; Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Lamri, Mohd Fadly; Bakar, Mohd Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, bioinformatic analysis towards genome sequence of E. aerogenes was done to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hot spring water and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and fish gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species gelatine, respectively. Enterobacter aerogenes was partially genome sequenced resulting in 5.0 mega basepair (Mbp) total size of sequence. From pre-process pipeline, 87.6 Mbp of total reads, 68.8 Mbp of total high quality reads and 78.58 percent of high quality percentage was determined. Genome assembly produced 120 contigs with 67.5% of contigs over 1 kilo base pair (kbp), 124856 bp of N50 contig length and 55.17 % of GC base content percentage. About 4705 protein gene was identified from protein prediction analysis. Two candidate genes selected have highest similarity identity percentage against gelatinase enzyme available in Swiss-Prot and NCBI online database. They were NODE_9_length_26866_cov_148.013245_12 containing 1029 base pair (bp) sequence with 342 amino acid sequence and NODE_24_length_155103_cov_177.082458_62 which containing 717 bp sequence with 238 amino acid sequence, respectively. Thus, two paired of primers (forward and reverse) were designed, based on the open reading frame (ORF) of selected genes. Genome analysis of E. aerogenes resulting genes encoded gelatinase were identified.

  6. Genomics of Streptococcus salivarius, a major human commensal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Christine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The salivarius group of streptococci is of particular importance for humans. This group consists of three genetically similar species, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus thermophilus. S. salivarius and S. vestibularis are commensal organisms that may occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans, whereas S. thermophilus is a food bacterium widely used in dairy production. We developed Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and comparative genomic analysis to confirm the clear separation of these three species. These analyses also identified a subgroup of four strains, with a core genome diverging by about 10%, in terms of its nucleotide sequence, from that of S. salivarius sensu stricto. S. thermophilus species displays a low level of nucleotide variability, due to its recent emergence with the development of agriculture. By contrast, nucleotide variability is high in the other two species of the salivarius group, reflecting their long-standing association with humans. The species of the salivarius group have genome sizes ranging from the smallest (∼ 1.7 Mb for S. thermophilus) to the largest (∼ 2.3 Mb for S. salivarius) among streptococci, reflecting genome reduction linked to a narrow, nutritionally rich environment for S. thermophilus, and natural, more competitive niches for the other two species. Analyses of genomic content have indicated that the core genes of S. salivarius account for about two thirds of the genome, indicating considerable variability of gene content and differences in potential adaptive features. Furthermore, we showed that the genome of this species is exceptionally rich in genes encoding surface factors, glycosyltransferases and response regulators. Evidence of widespread genetic exchanges was obtained, probably involving a natural competence system and the presence of diverse mobile elements. However, although the S. salivarius strains studied were isolated from several human body-related sites

  7. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. This technique can now be extended to the study of other HERV genomes within the human chromosomes that may have contributed to

  8. Circular RNAs with hammerhead ribozymes encoded in eukaryotic genomes: The enemy at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Marcos; Cervera, Amelia

    2017-04-27

    A new family of non-autonomous retrotransposons with self-cleaving hammerhead ribozymes, the so called retrozymes, has recently been found encoded in diverse plant genomes. These retroelements can be actively transcribed, and their RNAs accumulate in the cells as abundant non-coding circular RNAs (circRNAs) of small size (600-1000 nt). Related circRNAs with self-cleaving ribozymes had already been described in plants, and belong to a group of infectious RNA agents with an uncertain origin: the viroids and viroid-like satellites of plant RNA viruses. These pathogenic circRNAs show many structural similarities with retrozyme circRNAs, and both have been found to occur in flowering plants as heterogeneous RNA molecules of positive and negative polarities. Taking all these data together, we hypothesize that circRNAs encoded by genomic retrozymes could have given origin to infectious circRNAs with self-cleaving ribozymes. Moreover, we propose that retrozymes in time could have evolved from the ancient family of Penelope-like retroelements, which also harbour hammerhead ribozymes. Putative retrozyme sequences with hammerhead ribozymes have been detected as well in metazoan genomes, opening the door to a common occurrence of circRNAs with self-cleaving motifs among eukaryotes.

  9. Abundant 5S rRNA-like transcripts encoded by the mitochondrial genome in amoebozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullerwell, Charles E; Burger, Gertraud; Gott, Jonatha M; Kourennaia, Olga; Schnare, Murray N; Gray, Michael W

    2010-05-01

    5S rRNAs are ubiquitous components of prokaryotic, chloroplast, and eukaryotic cytosolic ribosomes but are apparently absent from mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) of many eukaryotic groups including animals and fungi. Nevertheless, a clearly identifiable, mitochondrion-encoded 5S rRNA is present in Acanthamoeba castellanii, a member of Amoebozoa. During a search for additional mitochondrial 5S rRNAs, we detected small abundant RNAs in other members of Amoebozoa, namely, in the lobose amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis and in the myxomycete slime mold Physarum polycephalum. These RNAs are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), cosediment with mitoribosomes in glycerol gradients, and can be folded into a secondary structure similar to that of bona fide 5S rRNAs. Further, in the mtDNA of another slime mold, Didymium nigripes, we identified a region that in sequence, potential secondary structure, and genomic location is similar to the corresponding region encoding the Physarum small RNA. A mtDNA-encoded small RNA previously identified in Dictyostelium discoideum is here shown to share several characteristics with known 5S rRNAs. Again, we detected genes encoding potential homologs of this RNA in the mtDNA of three other species of the genus Dictyostelium as well as in a related genus, Polysphondylium. Taken together, our results indicate a widespread occurrence of small, abundant, mtDNA-encoded RNAs with 5S rRNA-like structures that are associated with the mitoribosome in various amoebozoan taxa. Our working hypothesis is that these novel small abundant RNAs represent radically divergent mitochondrial 5S rRNA homologs. We posit that currently unrecognized 5S-like RNAs may exist in other mitochondrial systems in which a conventional 5S rRNA cannot be identified.

  10. Exons I and VII of the gene (Ker10) encoding human keratin 10 undergo structural rearrangements within repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A V; Buchman, V L; Bliskovsky, V V; Shvets YuP; Kisselev, L L

    1992-07-15

    A genomic fragment containing the K51 gene previously isolated from a rat genomic library by hybridization with the v-mos probe in nonstringent conditions [Chumakov et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290 (1986) 1252-1254], resembles a human keratin type-I-encoding gene [Shvets et al., Mol. Biol. 24 (1990) 663-677]. This genomic clone, K51, has been used as a probe to search for related human genes. A recombinant clone, HK51, with a 1.5-kb insert, was isolated from a human embryonic skin cDNA library, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence was determined. Analysis has shown that the cloned cDNA encodes human keratin 10 (Ker10). All presently known nt sequences of the human Ker10-encoding gene (Ker10) are not identical. Differences are concentrated in the 5'-end of the first exon and in the middle of the seventh exon within repeats. In spite of structural rearrangements in two of eight exons, the reading frame and position of the stop codon are preserved. The genetic rearrangements cause changes in hydrophobicity profiles of the N and C termini of Ker10. It was also noticed that insertion of one nt leads to the formation of an unusual 3'-end of the transcript.

  11. Big Data Analysis of Human Genome Variations

    KAUST Repository

    Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-01-25

    Since the human genome draft sequence was in public for the first time in 2000, genomic analyses have been intensively extended to the population level. The following three international projects are good examples for large-scale studies of human genome variations: 1) HapMap Data (1,417 individuals) (http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/downloads/genotypes/2010-08_phaseII+III/forward/), 2) HGDP (Human Genome Diversity Project) Data (940 individuals) (http://www.hagsc.org/hgdp/files.html), 3) 1000 genomes Data (2,504 individuals) http://ftp.1000genomes.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp/release/20130502/ If we can integrate all three data into a single volume of data, we should be able to conduct a more detailed analysis of human genome variations for a total number of 4,861 individuals (= 1,417+940+2,504 individuals). In fact, we successfully integrated these three data sets by use of information on the reference human genome sequence, and we conducted the big data analysis. In particular, we constructed a phylogenetic tree of about 5,000 human individuals at the genome level. As a result, we were able to identify clusters of ethnic groups, with detectable admixture, that were not possible by an analysis of each of the three data sets. Here, we report the outcome of this kind of big data analyses and discuss evolutionary significance of human genomic variations. Note that the present study was conducted in collaboration with Katsuhiko Mineta and Kosuke Goto at KAUST.

  12. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  13. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  14. Genome Sequence of Avian Escherichia coli Strain IHIT25637, an Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli Strain of ST131 Encoding Colistin Resistance Determinant MCR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Christa; Göttig, Stephan; Bülte, Maria; Fiedler, Sophie; Tietgen, Manuela; Leidner, Ursula; Heydel, Carsten; Bauerfeind, Rolf; Semmler, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    Sequence type 131 (ST131) is one of the predominant Escherichia coli lineages among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) that causes a variety of diseases in humans and animals and frequently shows multidrug resistance. Here, we report the first genome sequence of an ST131-ExPEC strain from poultry carrying the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance gene mcr-1. Copyright © 2016 Ewers et al.

  15. Human and mouse genome analysis using array comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Antoine Maria

    2004-01-01

    Almost all human cancers as well as developmental abnormalities are characterized by the presence of genetic alterations, most of which target a gene or a particular genomic locus resulting in altered gene expression and ultimately an altered phenotype. Different types of genetic alterations include

  16. The characterization of twenty sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Pelak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of twenty human genomes to evaluate the prospects for identifying rare functional variants that contribute to a phenotype of interest. We sequenced at high coverage ten "case" genomes from individuals with severe hemophilia A and ten "control" genomes. We summarize the number of genetic variants emerging from a study of this magnitude, and provide a proof of concept for the identification of rare and highly-penetrant functional variants by confirming that the cause of hemophilia A is easily recognizable in this data set. We also show that the number of novel single nucleotide variants (SNVs discovered per genome seems to stabilize at about 144,000 new variants per genome, after the first 15 individuals have been sequenced. Finally, we find that, on average, each genome carries 165 homozygous protein-truncating or stop loss variants in genes representing a diverse set of pathways.

  17. Ipsilateral directional encoding of joystick movements in human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohit; Gaona, Charles; Roland, Jarod; Anderson, Nick; Freudenberg, Zachary; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2009-01-01

    The majority of Brain Computer Interfaces have relied on signals related to primary motor cortex and the operation of the contralateral limb. Recently, the physiology associated with same-sided (ipsilateral) motor movements has been found to have a unique cortical physiology. This study sets out to assess whether more complex motor movements can be discerned utilizing ipsilateral cortical signals. In this study, three invasively monitored human subjects were recorded while performing a center out joystick task with the hand ipsilateral to the hemispheric subdural grid array. It was found that directional tuning was present in ipsilateral cortex. This information was encoded in both distinct anatomic populations and spectral distributions. These findings support the notion that ipsilateral signals may provide added information for BCI operation in the future.

  18. Genomic disorders: A window into human gene and genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplications alter the genetic constitution of organisms and can be a driving force of molecular evolution in humans and the great apes. In this context, the study of genomic disorders has uncovered the essential role played by the genomic architecture, especially low copy repeats (LCRs) or segmental duplications (SDs). In fact, regardless of the mechanism, LCRs can mediate or stimulate rearrangements, inciting genomic instability and generating dynamic and unstable regions prone to rapid molecular evolution. In humans, copy-number variation (CNV) has been implicated in common traits such as neuropathy, hypertension, color blindness, infertility, and behavioral traits including autism and schizophrenia, as well as disease susceptibility to HIV, lupus nephritis, and psoriasis among many other clinical phenotypes. The same mechanisms implicated in the origin of genomic disorders may also play a role in the emergence of segmental duplications and the evolution of new genes by means of genomic and gene duplication and triplication, exon shuffling, exon accretion, and fusion/fission events. PMID:20080665

  19. Genomic and Functional Characterization of qnr-Encoding Plasmids from Municipal Wastewater Biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ella; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be "hotspots" for antibiotic resistance, since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp), multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to five different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9 Kbp) and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other pKPN3-like

  20. Genomic and functional characterization of qnr-encoding plasmids from municipal wastewater biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella eKaplan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be hotspots for antibiotic resistance since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp, multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to 5 different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9Kbp and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other p

  1. A human RNA polymerase II subunit is encoded by a recently generated multigene family

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    Mattei Marie-Geneviève

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequences encoding the yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB subunits are single copy genes. Results While those characterized so far for the human (h RPB are also unique, we show that hRPB subunit 11 (hRPB11 is encoded by a multigene family, mapping on chromosome 7 at loci p12, q11.23 and q22. We focused on two members of this family, hRPB11a and hRPB11b: the first encodes subunit hRPB11a, which represents the major RPB11 component of the mammalian RPB complex ; the second generates polypeptides hRPB11bα and hRPB11bβ through differential splicing of its transcript and shares homologies with components of the hPMS2L multigene family related to genes involved in mismatch-repair functions (MMR. Both hRPB11a and b genes are transcribed in all human tissues tested. Using an inter-species complementation assay, we show that only hRPB11bα is functional in yeast. In marked contrast, we found that the unique murine homolog of RPB11 gene maps on chromosome 5 (band G, and encodes a single polypeptide which is identical to subunit hRPB11a. Conclusions The type hRPB11b gene appears to result from recent genomic recombination events in the evolution of primates, involving sequence elements related to the MMR apparatus.

  2. Human evolution: a tale from ancient genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2017-02-05

    The field of human ancient DNA (aDNA) has moved from mitochondrial sequencing that suffered from contamination and provided limited biological insights, to become a fully genomic discipline that is changing our conception of human history. Recent successes include the sequencing of extinct hominins, and true population genomic studies of Bronze Age populations. Among the emerging areas of aDNA research, the analysis of past epigenomes is set to provide more new insights into human adaptation and disease susceptibility through time. Starting as a mere curiosity, ancient human genetics has become a major player in the understanding of our evolutionary history.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity'.

  3. Segmenting the Human Genome into Isochores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Paolo; Milanesi, Luciano; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is a mosaic of isochores, which are long (>200 kb) DNA sequences that are fairly homogeneous in base composition and can be assigned to five families comprising 33%-59% of GC composition. Although the compartmentalized organization of the mammalian genome has been investigated for more than 40 years, no satisfactory automatic procedure for segmenting the genome into isochores is available so far. We present a critical discussion of the currently available methods and a new approach called isoSegmenter which allows segmenting the genome into isochores in a fast and completely automatic manner. This approach relies on two types of experimentally defined parameters, the compositional boundaries of isochore families and an optimal window size of 100 kb. The approach represents an improvement over the existing methods, is ideally suited for investigating long-range features of sequenced and assembled genomes, and is publicly available at https://github.com/bunop/isoSegmenter.

  4. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  5. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  6. Initial genomics of the human nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Németh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report for the first time the genomics of a nuclear compartment of the eukaryotic cell. 454 sequencing and microarray analysis revealed the pattern of nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs in the linear human genome and identified different gene families and certain satellite repeats as the major building blocks of NADs, which constitute about 4% of the genome. Bioinformatic evaluation showed that NAD-localized genes take part in specific biological processes, like the response to other organisms, odor perception, and tissue development. 3D FISH and immunofluorescence experiments illustrated the spatial distribution of NAD-specific chromatin within interphase nuclei and its alteration upon transcriptional changes. Altogether, our findings describe the nature of DNA sequences associated with the human nucleolus and provide insights into the function of the nucleolus in genome organization and establishment of nuclear architecture.

  7. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded BART MicroRNA: A Paradigm for Viral Modulation of Host Immune Response Genes and Genome Stability

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    David H. Dreyfus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, is associated through epidemiologic evidence with common autoimmune syndromes and cancers. However, specific genetic mechanisms of pathogenesis have been difficult to identify. In this review, the author summarizes evidence that recently discovered noncoding RNAs termed microRNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus BARF (BamHI A right frame termed BART (BamHI A right transcripts are modulators of human immune response genes and genome stability in infected and bystander cells. BART expression is apparently regulated by complex feedback loops with the host immune response regulatory NF-κB transcription factors. EBV-encoded BZLF-1 (ZEBRA protein could also regulate BART since ZEBRA contains a terminal region similar to ankyrin proteins such as IκBα that regulate host NF-κB. BALF-2 (BamHI A left frame transcript, a viral homologue of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene recombinase RAG-1 (recombination-activating gene-1, may also be coregulated with BART since BALF-2 regulatory sequences are located near the BART locus. Viral-encoded microRNA and viral mRNA transferred to bystander cells through vesicles, defective viral particles, or other mechanisms suggest a new paradigm in which bystander or hit-and-run mechanisms enable the virus to transiently or chronically alter human immune response genes as well as the stability of the human genome.

  8. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  9. Genome editing for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Torsten B; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Rossi, Derrick J; Cowan, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome-editing techniques holds much promise for the field of human gene therapy. From bacteria to model organisms and human cells, genome editing tools such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZNFs), TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 have been successfully used to manipulate the respective genomes with unprecedented precision. With regard to human gene therapy, it is of great interest to test the feasibility of genome editing in primary human hematopoietic cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of human genetic disorders such as hemoglobinopathies, primary immunodeficiencies, and cancer. In this chapter, we explore the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient ablation of genes in two clinically relevant primary human cell types, CD4+ T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. By using two guide RNAs directed at a single locus, we achieve highly efficient and predictable deletions that ablate gene function. The use of a Cas9-2A-GFP fusion protein allows FACS-based enrichment of the transfected cells. The ease of designing, constructing, and testing guide RNAs makes this dual guide strategy an attractive approach for the efficient deletion of clinically relevant genes in primary human hematopoietic stem and effector cells and enables the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy.

  10. Retrotransposon-Encoded Reverse Transcriptase in the Genesis, Progression and Cellular Plasticity of Human Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Matteucci, Claudia [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University ‘Tor Vergata’, Rome (Italy); Spadafora, Corrado, E-mail: cspadaf@tin.it [Italian National Institute of Health (ISS), Rome (Italy)

    2011-03-07

    LINE-1 (Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements) and HERVs (Human Endogenous Retroviruses) are two families of autonomously replicating retrotransposons that together account for about 28% of the human genome. Genes harbored within LINE-1 and HERV retrotransposons, particularly those encoding the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme, are generally expressed at low levels in differentiated cells, but their expression is upregulated in transformed cells and embryonic tissues. Here we discuss a recently discovered RT-dependent mechanism that operates in tumorigenesis and reversibly modulates phenotypic and functional variations associated with tumor progression. Downregulation of active LINE-1 elements drastically reduces the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells, paralleled by reduced proliferation and increased differentiation. Pharmacological RT inhibitors (e.g., nevirapine and efavirenz) exert similar effects on tumorigenic cell lines, both in culture and in animal models. The HERV-K family play a distinct complementary role in stress-dependent transition of melanoma cells from an adherent, non-aggressive, to a non-adherent, highly malignant, growth phenotype. In synthesis, the retrotransposon-encoded RT is increasingly emerging as a key regulator of tumor progression and a promising target in a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Genome-Wide Associations of Gene Expression Variation in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  12. Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  13. Human Genome Editing and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Singh, Bahadur

    2016-04-01

    Editing human germline genes may act as boon in some genetic and other disorders. Recent editing of the genome of the human embryo with the CRISPR/Cas9 editing tool generated a debate amongst top scientists of the world for the ethical considerations regarding its effect on the future generations. It needs to be seen as to what transformation human gene editing brings to humankind in the times to come.

  14. Three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by a 20-kb viral RNA genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rui; Folimonov, Alexey; Shintaku, Michael; Li, Wan-Xiang; Falk, Bryce W.; Dawson, William O.; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2004-11-01

    Viral infection in both plant and invertebrate hosts requires a virus-encoded function to block the RNA silencing antiviral defense. Here, we report the identification and characterization of three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by the 20-kb plus-strand RNA genome of citrus tristeza virus (CTV). When introduced by genetic crosses into plants carrying a silencing transgene, both p20 and p23, but not coat protein (CP), restored expression of the transgene. Although none of the CTV proteins prevented DNA methylation of the transgene, export of the silencing signal (capable of mediating intercellular silencing spread) was detected only from the F1 plants expressing p23 and not from the CP- or p20-expressing F1 plants, demonstrating suppression of intercellular silencing by CP and p20 but not by p23. Thus, intracellular and intercellular silencing are each targeted by a CTV protein, whereas the third, p20, inhibits silencing at both levels. Notably, CP suppresses intercellular silencing without interfering with intracellular silencing. The novel property of CP suggests a mechanism distinct to p20 and all of the other viral suppressors known to interfere with intercellular silencing and that this class of viral suppressors may not be consistently identified by Agrobacterium coinfiltration because it also induces RNA silencing against the infiltrated suppressor transgene. Our analyses reveal a sophisticated viral counter-defense strategy that targets the silencing antiviral pathway at multiple steps and may be essential for protecting CTV with such a large RNA genome from antiviral silencing in the perennial tree host. RNA interference | citrus tristeza virus | virus synergy | antiviral immunity

  15. Characterization of the Human LPIN1-encoded Phosphatidate Phosphatase Isoforms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2010-01-01

    The human LPIN1 gene encodes the protein lipin 1, which possesses phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase (3-sn-phosphatidate phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.4) activity (Han, G.-S., Wu, W.-I., and Carman, G. M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 9210–9218). In this work, we characterized human lipin 1 α, β, and γ isoforms that were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. PA phosphatase activities of the α, β, and γ isoforms were dependent on Mg2+ or Mn2+ ions at pH 7.5 at 37 °C. The activities were inhibited by concentrations of Mg2+ and Mn2+ above their optimums and by Ca2+, Zn2+, N-ethylmaleimide, propranolol, and the sphingoid bases sphingosine and sphinganine. The activities were thermally labile at temperatures above 40 °C. The α, β, and γ activities followed saturation kinetics with respect to the molar concentration of PA (Km values of 0.35, 0.24, and 0.11 mm, respectively) but followed positive cooperative (Hill number ∼2) kinetics with respect to the surface concentration of PA (Km values of 4.2, 4.5, and 4.3 mol %, respectively) in Triton X-100/PA-mixed micelles. The turnover numbers (kcat) for the α, β, and γ isoforms were 68.8 ± 3.5, 42.8 ± 2.5, and 5.7 ± 0.2 s−1, respectively, whereas their energy of activation values were 14.2, 15.5, and 18.5 kcal/mol, respectively. The isoform activities were dependent on PA as a substrate and required at least one unsaturated fatty acyl moiety for maximum activity. PMID:20231281

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence of wound tumor virus genomic segments encoding nonstructural polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzola, J V; Dall, D J; Xu, Z K; Nuss, D L

    1989-07-01

    Sequence analysis of the genomic segments which encode the five wound tumor virus nonstructural polypeptides has been completed. The complete nucleotide sequence of segments S4 (2565 bp), S6 (1700 bp), S9 (1182 bp), and S10 (1172 bp) are presented in this report while the sequence of segment S12 (851 bp) has been described previously (T. Asamizu, D. Summers, M. B. Motika, J. V. Anzola, and D. L. Nuss, 1985, Virology 144, 398-409). Comparison of the only published sequence for another member of the genus Phytoreovirus, that of rice dwarf virus segment S10, with the combined available wound tumor virus sequence data revealed similarity with WTV segment S10: 54.9 and 30.6% at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Although wound tumor virus and rice dwarf virus differ in plant host range, tissue specificity, vector range, and disease symptom expression, the level of sequence similarity shared by the two segments suggests a common origin for these viruses. The potential use of a phytoreovirus sequence database for predicting functions of viral encoded gene products is considered.

  17. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

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    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  18. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-03-18

    A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  19. Genome mining demonstrates the widespread occurrence of gene clusters encoding bacteriocins in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Fewer, David P; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products with interesting biological activities. Many of these are peptides and the end products of a non-ribosomal pathway. However, several cyanobacterial peptide classes were recently shown to be produced through the proteolytic cleavage and post-translational modification of short precursor peptides. A new class of bacteriocins produced through the proteolytic cleavage and heterocyclization of precursor proteins was recently identified from marine cyanobacteria. Here we show the widespread occurrence of bacteriocin gene clusters in cyanobacteria through comparative analysis of 58 cyanobacterial genomes. A total of 145 bacteriocin gene clusters were discovered through genome mining. These clusters encoded 290 putative bacteriocin precursors. They ranged in length from 28 to 164 amino acids with very little sequence conservation of the core peptide. The gene clusters could be classified into seven groups according to their gene organization and domain composition. This classification is supported by phylogenetic analysis, which further indicated independent evolutionary trajectories of gene clusters in different groups. Our data suggests that cyanobacteria are a prolific source of low-molecular weight post-translationally modified peptides.

  20. Genome mining demonstrates the widespread occurrence of gene clusters encoding bacteriocins in cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products with interesting biological activities. Many of these are peptides and the end products of a non-ribosomal pathway. However, several cyanobacterial peptide classes were recently shown to be produced through the proteolytic cleavage and post-translational modification of short precursor peptides. A new class of bacteriocins produced through the proteolytic cleavage and heterocyclization of precursor proteins was recently identified from marine cyanobacteria. Here we show the widespread occurrence of bacteriocin gene clusters in cyanobacteria through comparative analysis of 58 cyanobacterial genomes. A total of 145 bacteriocin gene clusters were discovered through genome mining. These clusters encoded 290 putative bacteriocin precursors. They ranged in length from 28 to 164 amino acids with very little sequence conservation of the core peptide. The gene clusters could be classified into seven groups according to their gene organization and domain composition. This classification is supported by phylogenetic analysis, which further indicated independent evolutionary trajectories of gene clusters in different groups. Our data suggests that cyanobacteria are a prolific source of low-molecular weight post-translationally modified peptides.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Stephan, Roger

    2016-08-04

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. Copyright © 2016 Zurfluh et al.

  2. Sequencing of the smallest Apicomplexan genome from the human pathogen Babesia microti†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornillot, Emmanuel; Hadj-Kaddour, Kamel; Dassouli, Amina; Noel, Benjamin; Ranwez, Vincent; Vacherie, Benoît; Augagneur, Yoann; Brès, Virginie; Duclos, Aurelie; Randazzo, Sylvie; Carcy, Bernard; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Delbecq, Stéphane; Moubri-Ménage, Karina; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Usmani-Brown, Sahar; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Vivarès, Christian P.; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Schetters, Theo P.; Krause, Peter J.; Gorenflot, André; Berry, Vincent; Barbe, Valérie; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2012-01-01

    We have sequenced the genome of the emerging human pathogen Babesia microti and compared it with that of other protozoa. B. microti has the smallest nuclear genome among all Apicomplexan parasites sequenced to date with three chromosomes encoding ∼3500 polypeptides, several of which are species specific. Genome-wide phylogenetic analyses indicate that B. microti is significantly distant from all species of Babesidae and Theileridae and defines a new clade in the phylum Apicomplexa. Furthermore, unlike all other Apicomplexa, its mitochondrial genome is circular. Genome-scale reconstruction of functional networks revealed that B. microti has the minimal metabolic requirement for intraerythrocytic protozoan parasitism. B. microti multigene families differ from those of other protozoa in both the copy number and organization. Two lateral transfer events with significant metabolic implications occurred during the evolution of this parasite. The genomic sequencing of B. microti identified several targets suitable for the development of diagnostic assays and novel therapies for human babesiosis. PMID:22833609

  3. Self-regulating genomic island encoding tandem regulators confers chromatic acclimation to marine Synechococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Joseph E; Nguyen, Adam A; Karty, Jonathan A; Shukla, Animesh; Schluchter, Wendy M; Garczarek, Laurence; Partensky, Frédéric; Kehoe, David M

    2016-05-24

    The evolutionary success of marine Synechococcus, the second-most abundant phototrophic group in the marine environment, is partly attributable to this group's ability to use the entire visible spectrum of light for photosynthesis. This group possesses a remarkable diversity of light-harvesting pigments, and most of the group's members are orange and pink because of their use of phycourobilin and phycoerythrobilin chromophores, which are attached to antennae proteins called phycoerythrins. Many strains can alter phycoerythrin chromophore ratios to optimize photon capture in changing blue-green environments using type IV chromatic acclimation (CA4). Although CA4 is common in most marine Synechococcus lineages, the regulation of this process remains unexplored. Here, we show that a widely distributed genomic island encoding tandem master regulators named FciA (for type four chromatic acclimation island) and FciB plays a central role in controlling CA4. FciA and FciB have diametric effects on CA4. Interruption of fciA causes a constitutive green light phenotype, and interruption of fciB causes a constitutive blue light phenotype. These proteins regulate all of the molecular responses occurring during CA4, and the proteins' activity is apparently regulated posttranscriptionally, although their cellular ratio appears to be critical for establishing the set point for the blue-green switch in ecologically relevant light environments. Surprisingly, FciA and FciB coregulate only three genes within the Synechococcus genome, all located within the same genomic island as fciA and fciB These findings, along with the widespread distribution of strains possessing this island, suggest that horizontal transfer of a small, self-regulating DNA region has conferred CA4 capability to marine Synechococcus throughout many oceanic areas.

  4. Identification and classification of conserved RNA secondary structures in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Bejerano, Gill; Siepel, Adam

    2006-01-01

    for identifying functional RNAs encoded in the human genome and used it to survey an eight-way genome-wide alignment of the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebra-fish, and puffer-fish genomes for deeply conserved functional RNAs. At a loose threshold for acceptance, this search resulted in a set......The discoveries of microRNAs and riboswitches, among others, have shown functional RNAs to be biologically more important and genomically more prevalent than previously anticipated. We have developed a general comparative genomics method based on phylogenetic stochastic context-free grammars......, the results nevertheless provide evidence for many new human functional RNAs and present specific predictions to facilitate their further characterization....

  5. Implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitcher, P.

    1998-11-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

  6. The Human Genome Project and Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Highlights the importance of the Human Genome Project in educating the public about genetics. Discusses four challenges that science educators must address: teaching for conceptual understanding, the nature of science, the personal and social impact of science and technology, and the principles of technology. Contains 45 references. (JRH)

  7. Patentering af det humane genom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Tine

    2004-01-01

    Direktiv 98/44/EF om retlig beskyttelse af bioteknologiske opfindelser blev gennemført i dansk ret med ikrafttrædelse den 30. juli 2000. Direktivet indeholder i artikel 5 en central bestemmelse som giver adgang til patent på humane gener. I artikel 5, stk. 3, er indføjet et skærpet krav til...

  8. [Novel bidirectional promoter from human genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, A S; Sverdlova, P S; Spirin, P V; Leonova, O G; Popenko, V I; Prasolov, V S; Rubtsov, P M

    2011-01-01

    In human and other mammalian genomes a number of closely linked gene pairs transcribed in opposite directions are found. According to bioinformatic analysis up to 10% of human genes are arranged in this way. In present work the fragment of human genome was cloned that separates genes localized at 2p13.1 and oriented "head-to-head", coding for hypothetical proteins with unknown functions--CCDC (Coiled Coil Domain Containing) 142 and TTC (TetraTricopeptide repeat Containing) 31. Intergenic CCDC142-TTC31 region overlaps with CpG-island and contains a number of potential binding sites for transcription factors. This fragment functions as bidirectional promoter in the system ofluciferase reporter gene expression upon transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. The vectors containing genes of two fluorescent proteins--green (EGFP) and red (DsRed2) in opposite orientations separated by the fragment of CCDC142-TTC31 intergenic region were constructed. In HEK293 cells transfected with these vectors simultaneous expression of two fluorescent proteins is observed. Truncated versions of intergenic region were obtained and their promoter activity measured. Minimal promoter fragment contains elements Inr, BRE, DPE characteristic for TATA-less promoters. Thus, from the human genome the novel bidirectional promoter was cloned that can be used for simultaneous constitutive expression of two genes in human cells.

  9. Viral symbiosis and the holobiontic nature of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Francis Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is a holobiontic union of the mammalian nuclear genome, the mitochondrial genome and large numbers of endogenized retroviral genomes. This article defines and explores this symbiogenetic pattern of evolution, looking at the implications for human genetics, epigenetics, embryogenesis, physiology and the pathogenesis of inborn errors of metabolism and many other diseases.

  10. Helminth genomics: The implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Brindley

    Full Text Available More than two billion people (one-third of humanity are infected with parasitic roundworms or flatworms, collectively known as helminth parasites. These infections cause diseases that are responsible for enormous levels of morbidity and mortality, delays in the physical development of children, loss of productivity among the workforce, and maintenance of poverty. Genomes of the major helminth species that affect humans, and many others of agricultural and veterinary significance, are now the subject of intensive genome sequencing and annotation. Draft genome sequences of the filarial worm Brugia malayi and two of the human schistosomes, Schistosoma japonicum and S. mansoni, are now available, among others. These genome data will provide the basis for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in helminth nutrition and metabolism, host-dependent development and maturation, immune evasion, and evolution. They are likely also to predict new potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. In this review, we present an overview of these efforts and emphasize the potential impact and importance of these new findings.

  11. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world.

  12. The phn island: A new genomic island encoding catabolism of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William James Hickey

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are key in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, which are widespread environmental pollutants. At least six genotypes of PAH-degraders are distinguishable via phylogenies of the ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHD that initiates bacterial PAH metabolism, and a given genotype has a characteristic taxonomic distribution. The latter pattern implies each genotype may have distinct pathways for horizontal gene transfer (HGT. But, while such processes are important in the function of PAH-degrader communities, mechanisms of HGT for most RHD genotypes are unknown. Here, we report in silico and functional analyses of the phenanthrene-degrader Delftia sp. Cs1-4, a representative of the phnAFK2 RHD group. The phnAFK2 genotype predominates PAH degrader communities in some soils and sediments, but, until now, their genomic biology has not been explored. In the present studies, genes for the entire phenanthrene catabolic pathway were discovered on a novel ca. 232 kb genomic island (GEI, now termed the phn island. This GEI had characteristics of an integrative and conjugative element with a mobilization/stabilization system similar to that of SXT/R391-type GEI. But, it could not be grouped with any known GEI, and was the first member of a new GEI class. The island also carried genes predicted to encode: synthesis of quorum sensing signal molecules, fatty acid/polyhydroxyalkonate biosynthesis, a type IV secretory system, a PRTRC system, DNA mobilization functions and > 50 hypothetical proteins. The 50% G+C content of the phn gene cluster differed significantly from the 66.7% G+C level of the island as a whole and the strain Cs1-4 chromosome, indicating a divergent phylogenetic origin for the phn genes. Collectively, these studies added new insights into the genetic elements affecting the PAH biodegradation capacity of microbial communities specifically, and the potential vehicles of HGT in general.

  13. RNA-guided human genome engineering via Cas9

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mali, Prashant; Yang, Luhan; Esvelt, Kevin M; Aach, John; Guell, Marc; DiCarlo, James E; Norville, Julie E; Church, George M

    2013-01-01

    .... We also compute a genome-wide resource of ~190 K unique gRNAs targeting ~40.5% of human exons. Our results establish an RNA-guided editing tool for facile, robust, and multiplexable human genome engineering.

  14. The human genome project and the future of medical practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The human genome project and the future of medical practice. ... the planning stages of the human genome project, the technology and sequence data ... the quality of healthcare available in the resource-rich and the resource-poor countries.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, Strain Cuniculi A: The Loss of Infectivity to Humans Is Associated with Genome Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmajs, David; Zobaníková, Marie; Strouhal, Michal; Čejková, Darina; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Pospíšilová, Petra; Norris, Steven J.; Albert, Tom; Qin, Xiang; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Buhay, Christian; Muzny, Donna M.; Chen, Lei; Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi is the causative agent of rabbit venereal spirochetosis. It is not infectious to humans, although its genome structure is very closely related to other pathogenic Treponema species including Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis. In this study, the genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A, was determined by a combination of several high-throughput sequencing strategies. Whereas the overall size (1,133,390 bp), arrangement, and gene content of the Cuniculi A genome closely resembled those of the T. pallidum genome, the T. paraluiscuniculi genome contained a markedly higher number of pseudogenes and gene fragments (51). In addition to pseudogenes, 33 divergent genes were also found in the T. paraluiscuniculi genome. A set of 32 (out of 84) affected genes encoded proteins of known or predicted function in the Nichols genome. These proteins included virulence factors, gene regulators and components of DNA repair and recombination. The majority (52 or 61.9%) of the Cuniculi A pseudogenes and divergent genes were of unknown function. Our results indicate that T. paraluiscuniculi has evolved from a T. pallidum-like ancestor and adapted to a specialized host-associated niche (rabbits) during loss of infectivity to humans. The genes that are inactivated or altered in T. paraluiscuniculi are candidates for virulence factors important in the infectivity and pathogenesis of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:21655244

  16. Complete genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A: the loss of infectivity to humans is associated with genome decay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Šmajs

    Full Text Available Treponema paraluiscuniculi is the causative agent of rabbit venereal spirochetosis. It is not infectious to humans, although its genome structure is very closely related to other pathogenic Treponema species including Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis. In this study, the genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A, was determined by a combination of several high-throughput sequencing strategies. Whereas the overall size (1,133,390 bp, arrangement, and gene content of the Cuniculi A genome closely resembled those of the T. pallidum genome, the T. paraluiscuniculi genome contained a markedly higher number of pseudogenes and gene fragments (51. In addition to pseudogenes, 33 divergent genes were also found in the T. paraluiscuniculi genome. A set of 32 (out of 84 affected genes encoded proteins of known or predicted function in the Nichols genome. These proteins included virulence factors, gene regulators and components of DNA repair and recombination. The majority (52 or 61.9% of the Cuniculi A pseudogenes and divergent genes were of unknown function. Our results indicate that T. paraluiscuniculi has evolved from a T. pallidum-like ancestor and adapted to a specialized host-associated niche (rabbits during loss of infectivity to humans. The genes that are inactivated or altered in T. paraluiscuniculi are candidates for virulence factors important in the infectivity and pathogenesis of T. pallidum subspecies.

  17. Illuminating the Druggable Genome (IDG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Results from the Human Genome Project revealed that the human genome contains 20,000 to 25,000 genes. A gene contains (encodes) the information that each cell uses...

  18. Characterization of the legumains encoded by the genome of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Juliano Oliveira; Freire, Laís; de Sousa, Aurizangela Oliveira; Fontes Soares, Virgínia Lúcia; Gramacho, Karina Peres; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2016-01-01

    Legumains are cysteine proteases related to plant development, protein degradation, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens. In this study, we have identified and characterized three legumains encoded by Theobroma cacao genome through in silico analyses, three-dimensional modeling, genetic expression pattern in different tissues and as a response to the inoculation of Moniliophthora perniciosa fungus. The three proteins were named TcLEG3, TcLEG6, and TcLEG9. Histidine and cysteine residue which are part of the catalytic site were conserved among the proteins, and they remained parallel in the loop region in the 3D modeling. Three-dimensional modeling showed that the propeptide, which is located in the terminal C region of legumains blocks the catalytic cleft. Comparing dendrogram data with the relative expression analysis, indicated that TcLEG3 is related to the seed legumain group, TcLEG6 is related with the group of embryogenesis activities, and protein TcLEG9, with processes regarding the vegetative group. Furthermore, the expression analyses proposes a significant role for the three legumains during the development of Theobroma cacao and in its interaction with M. perniciosa. Copyright © 2015 Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, CNPJ: 40738999/0001-95. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  19. About human genome Acerca del genoma humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojica Tobias

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The sequence ofthe human genome, an undertaking ofadvanced countries, is nearly complete. In fact The Human Genome Project has around 85% ofthe genome sequenced 4 times on the average, with an accuracy of roughly 1 in 1000 nucleotides. Celera Genomics, on the other hand, has 99% of the sequence of one person, with an accuracy of slightly less than 1 in 100. The Human Genome project trives to produce a physical map for public consumption following a step by step strategy, in which the researcher sequences short DNA fragments belonging to Iarger fragments of known relative
    position. Celera Genomics wants to have very rapidly a physical map which can be quickly used to develop genetic tests and drugs, which can be later sold. We feel that the sequence ofthe human genome is something, which will widen the gap between advanced and backward countries.En este artículo se revisan los eventos, alrededor del secuenciamiento del genoma humano, que han llevado a tanta excitación en los medios noticiosos y académicos en meses recientes. Se explican las estrategias que han llevado a que tengamos dos borradores diferentes pero complementarios, la estrategia llevada a cabo con el dinero
    de los contribuyentes que consiste en establecer el orden de fragmentos grandes de DNA antes de ser secuenciados y la estrategia llevada a cabo con dineros aportados por la industria privada, con la intención de explotar gananciosamente el conocimiento derivado del genoma humano. El genoma humano a mediados del año 2000 es
    un borrador incompleto que cubre aliededor del 85% de la secuencia con una precisión de un error en 1000 y el 99% de la secuencia con una precisión menor de 1 en 100 nucleótidos, También se discuten algunas de las posibles avenidas

  20. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  1. [Mapping and human genome sequence program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenbach, J

    1997-03-01

    Until recently, human genome programs focused primarily on establishing maps that would provide signposts to researchers seeking to identify genes responsible for inherited diseases, as well as a basis for genome sequencing studies. Preestablished gene mapping goals have been reached. The over 7,000 microsatellite markers identified to date provide a map of sufficient density to allow localization of the gene of a monogenic disease with a precision of 1 to 2 million base pairs. The physical map, based on systematically arranged overlapping sets of artificial yeast chromosomes (YACs), has also made considerable headway during the last few years. The most recently published map covers more than 90% of the genome. However, currently available physical maps cannot be used for sequencing studies because multiple rearrangements occur in YACs. The recently developed sets of radioinduced hybrids are extremely useful for incorporating genes into existing maps. A network of American and European laboratories has successfully used these radioinduced hybrids to map 15,000 gene tags from large-scale cDNA library sequencing programs. There are increasingly pressing reasons for initiating large scale human genome sequencing studies.

  2. Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tettelin, H; Masignani, [No Value; Cieslewicz, MJ; Eisen, JA; Peterson, S; Paulsen, IT; Nelson, KE; Margarit, [No Value; Read, TD; Madoff, LC; Beanan, MJ; Brinkac, LM; Daugherty, SC; DeBoy, RT; Durkin, AS; Kolonay, JF; Madupu, R; Lewis, MR; Radune, D; Fedorova, NB; Scanlan, D; Khouri, H; Mulligan, S; Carty, HA; Cline, RT; Van Aken, SE; Gill, J; Scarselli, M; Mora, M; Iacobini, ET; Brettoni, C; Galli, G; Mariani, M; Vegni, F; Maione, D; Rinaudo, D; Rappuoli, R; Telford, JL; Kasper, DL; Grandi, G; Fraser, CM

    2002-01-01

    The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the oth

  3. Complete genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of an emerging human pathogen, serotype V Streptococcus agalactiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tettelin, H; Masignani, [No Value; Cieslewicz, MJ; Eisen, JA; Peterson, S; Paulsen, IT; Nelson, KE; Margarit, [No Value; Read, TD; Madoff, LC; Beanan, MJ; Brinkac, LM; Daugherty, SC; DeBoy, RT; Durkin, AS; Kolonay, JF; Madupu, R; Lewis, MR; Radune, D; Fedorova, NB; Scanlan, D; Khouri, H; Mulligan, S; Carty, HA; Cline, RT; Van Aken, SE; Gill, J; Scarselli, M; Mora, M; Iacobini, ET; Brettoni, C; Galli, G; Mariani, M; Vegni, F; Maione, D; Rinaudo, D; Rappuoli, R; Telford, JL; Kasper, DL; Grandi, G; Fraser, CM

    2002-01-01

    The 2,160,267 bp genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae, the leading cause of bacterial sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis in neonates in the U.S. and Europe, is predicted to encode 2,175 genes. Genome comparisons among S. agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and the

  4. Sequence and annotation of the apicoplast genome of the human pathogen Babesia microti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprajita Garg

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan intraerythrocytic parasite Babesia microti is an emerging human pathogen and the primary cause of human babesiosis, a malaria-like illness endemic in the United States. The pathogen is transmitted to humans by the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, and by transfusion of blood from asymptomatic B. microti-infected donors. Whereas the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of this parasite have been sequenced, assembled and annotated, its apicoplast genome remained incomplete, mainly due to its low representation and high A+T content. Here we report the complete sequence and annotation of the apicoplast genome of the B. microti R1 isolate. The genome consists of a 28.7 kb circular molecule encoding primarily functions important for maintenance of the apicoplast DNA, transcription, translation and maturation of organellar proteins. Genome analysis and annotation revealed a unique gene structure and organization of the B. microti apicoplast genome and suggest that all metabolic and non-housekeeping functions in this organelle are nuclear-encoded. B. microti apicoplast functions are significantly different from those of the host, suggesting that they might be useful as targets for development of potent and safe therapies for the treatment of human babesiosis.

  5. An overview of the human genome project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The human genome project is one of the most ambitious scientific projects to date, with the ultimate goal being a nucleotide sequence for all four billion bases of human DNA. In the process of determining the nucleotide sequence for each base, the location, function, and regulatory regions from the estimated 100,000 human genes will be identified. The genome project itself relies upon maps of the human genetic code derived from several different levels of resolution. Genetic linkage analysis provides a low resolution genome map. The information for genetic linkage maps is derived from the analysis of chromosome specific markers such as Sequence Tagged Sites (STSs), Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTRs) or other polymorphic (highly informative) loci in a number of different-families. Using this information the location of an unknown disease gene can be limited to a region comprised of one million base pairs of DNA or less. After this point, one must construct or have access to a physical map of the region of interest. Physical mapping involves the construction of an ordered overlapping (contiguous) set of recombinant DNA clones. These clones may be derived from a number of different vectors including cosmids, Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs), P1 derived Artificial Chromosomes (PACs), somatic cell hybrids, or Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs). The ultimate goal for physical mapping is to establish a completely overlapping (contiguous) set of clones for the entire genome. After a gene or region of interest has been localized using physical mapping the nucleotide sequence is determined. The overlap between genetic mapping, physical mapping and DNA sequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for the isolation of disease genes through positional cloning.

  6. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells by simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lough John W

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of lentiviruses to reprogram human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells could limit their therapeutic usefulness due to the integration of viral DNA sequences into the genome of the recipient cell. Recent work has demonstrated that human iPS cells can be generated using episomal plasmids, excisable transposons, adeno or sendai viruses, mRNA, or recombinant proteins. While these approaches offer an advance, the protocols have some drawbacks. Commonly the procedures require either subcloning to identify human iPS cells that are free of exogenous DNA, a knowledge of virology and safe handling procedures, or a detailed understanding of protein biochemistry. Results Here we report a simple approach that facilitates the reprogramming of human somatic cells using standard techniques to transfect expression plasmids that encode OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, and LIN28 without the need for episomal stability or selection. The resulting human iPS cells are free of DNA integration, express pluripotent markers, and form teratomas in immunodeficient animals. These iPS cells were also able to undergo directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like and cardiac myocyte-like cells in culture. Conclusions Simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors is sufficient to generate human iPS cells from primary fibroblasts that are free of exogenous DNA integrations. This approach is highly accessible and could expand the use of iPS cells in the study of human disease and development.

  7. Measuring human ventilation for apnoea detection using an optical encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, G M; Webster, J G

    1998-08-01

    We have designed, built and tested a proof-of-concept system based on optical encoder technology for measuring adult or infant ventilation. It uses change in chest circumference to provide an indirect measure of ventilation. The Hewlett-Packard HEDS-9720 optical encoder senses displacement of its matching codestrip. It yields a resolution of 0.17 mm and is accurate to 0.008 mm over a 10 mm test distance. The encoder is mounted on a nylon web belt wrapped around the torso and responds to changes in circumference. Motion of the code strip during respiration is converted to direction of movement (inhalation or exhalation) as well as magnitude of circumference change. Use of two sensor bands, one on the chest and one on the abdomen, may allow detection of obstructive apnoea in which there is no air flow out of or into the subject despite respiratory movement. Applications of this technology include infant apnoea monitoring as well as long-term adult monitoring.

  8. Deorphanizing the human transmembrane genome: A landscape of uncharacterized membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has fueled the last decade of work to functionally characterize genome content. An important subset of genes encodes membrane proteins, which are the targets of many drugs. They reside in lipid bilayers, restricting their endogenous activity to a relatively specialized biochemical environment. Without a reference phenotype, the application of systematic screens to profile candidate membrane proteins is not immediately possible. Bioinformatics has begun to show its effectiveness in focusing the functional characterization of orphan proteins of a particular functional class, such as channels or receptors. Here we discuss integration of experimental and bioinformatics approaches for characterizing the orphan membrane proteome. By analyzing the human genome, a landscape reference for the human transmembrane genome is provided.

  9. 76 FR 58023 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  10. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,...

  11. 77 FR 61770 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Medicine RFAs..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: October 4, 2012. David...

  12. 77 FR 28888 - National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, ] Rockville,...

  13. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine.

  14. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome...... of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should...... shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb...

  15. Segmenting the human genome based on states of neutral genetic divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruppumullage Don, Prabhani; Ananda, Guruprasad; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D

    2013-09-03

    Many studies have demonstrated that divergence levels generated by different mutation types vary and covary across the human genome. To improve our still-incomplete understanding of the mechanistic basis of this phenomenon, we analyze several mutation types simultaneously, anchoring their variation to specific regions of the genome. Using hidden Markov models on insertion, deletion, nucleotide substitution, and microsatellite divergence estimates inferred from human-orangutan alignments of neutrally evolving genomic sequences, we segment the human genome into regions corresponding to different divergence states--each uniquely characterized by specific combinations of divergence levels. We then parsed the mutagenic contributions of various biochemical processes associating divergence states with a broad range of genomic landscape features. We find that high divergence states inhabit guanine- and cytosine (GC)-rich, highly recombining subtelomeric regions; low divergence states cover inner parts of autosomes; chromosome X forms its own state with lowest divergence; and a state of elevated microsatellite mutability is interspersed across the genome. These general trends are mirrored in human diversity data from the 1000 Genomes Project, and departures from them highlight the evolutionary history of primate chromosomes. We also find that genes and noncoding functional marks [annotations from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)] are concentrated in high divergence states. Our results provide a powerful tool for biomedical data analysis: segmentations can be used to screen personal genome variants--including those associated with cancer and other diseases--and to improve computational predictions of noncoding functional elements.

  16. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci.

  17. Positive selection on the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallender, Eric J; Lahn, Bruce T

    2004-10-01

    Positive selection has undoubtedly played a critical role in the evolution of Homo sapiens. Of the many phenotypic traits that define our species--notably the enormous brain, advanced cognitive abilities, complex vocal organs, bipedalism and opposable thumbs--most (if not all) are likely the product of strong positive selection. Many other aspects of human biology not necessarily related to the 'branding' of our species, such as host-pathogen interactions, reproduction, dietary adaptation and physical appearance, have also been the substrate of varying levels of positive selection. Comparative genetics/genomics studies in recent years have uncovered a growing list of genes that might have experienced positive selection during the evolution of human and/or primates. These genes offer valuable inroads into understanding the biological processes specific to humans, and the evolutionary forces that gave rise to them. Here, we present a comprehensive review of these genes, and their implications for human evolution.

  18. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)); Billheimer, J.T. (E.I. DuPont de Nemours, Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States))

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  19. Report on the Human Genome Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

    1987-04-01

    The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large. multi-year. multidisciplinary. technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA. major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing. theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted. broadly based. scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time. single laboratory effort into a coordinated. worldwide. comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude. but so will be the benefit to biological understanding. new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

  20. Human genome: proto-oncogenes and proretroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisselev, L L; Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Berditchevsky, F B; Tret'yakov, L D

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the studies undertaken at the Laboratory for Molecular Bases of Oncogenesis (Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow) till middle of 1984 is presented. The human genome contains multiple dispersed nucleotide sequences related to the proto-oncogene mos and to proretroviral sequences in tight juxtaposition to each other. From sequencing appropriate cloned fragments of human DNA in phage and plasmid vectors it follows that one of these regions, NV-1, is a pseudogene of proto-mos with partial duplications and two Alu elements intervening its coding sequence, and the other, CL-1, seems to be also a mos-related gene with a deletion of the internal part of the structural gene. CL-1 is flanked by a proretroviral-like sequence including tRNAiMet binding site and U5 (part of the long terminal repeat). The proretroviral-like sequences are transcribed in 21-35S poly(A)+RNA abundant in normal and malignant human cells. Two hypotheses are proposed: endogenous retroviruses take part in amplification of at least some proto-oncogenes; proto-oncogenes are inactivated via insertion of movable genetic elements and conversion into pseudogenes. Potential oncogenicity of a normal human genome undergoes two controversial influences: it increases due to proto-oncogene amplification and decreases due to inactivation of some of them.

  1. Transcriptional analyses of the region of the equine herpesvirus type 4 genome encoding glycoproteins I and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, A M; Jang, H K; Matsumura, T; Yokoyama, N; Miyazawa, T; Mikami, T

    1999-01-01

    To map the transcripts encoding the equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) glycoproteins I (gI) and E (gE), transcriptional analyses were performed at the right part of the unique short segment of EHV-4 genome. The results revealed that the gI gene is encoded by a 1.6-kb transcript which is 3' coterminal with a 3.0-kb gD mRNA while the gE gene is encoded by two transcripts of 3.5- and 2.4-kb in size. The transcriptional patterns described in this study for the EHV-4 gI and gE are similar to those found in the equivalent region of herpes simplex virus type 1 and feline herpesvirus type 1. Characterization of EHV-4 gI and gE glycoprotein genes may facilitate future studies to define their roles in the EHV-4 infection.

  2. Genome-wide identification and mapping of NBS-encoding resistance genes in Solanum tuberosum group phureja.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Lozano

    Full Text Available The majority of disease resistance (R genes identified to date in plants encode a nucleotide-binding site (NBS and leucine-rich repeat (LRR domain containing protein. Additional domains such as coiled-coil (CC and TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domains can also be present. In the recently sequenced Solanum tuberosum group phureja genome we used HMM models and manual curation to annotate 435 NBS-encoding R gene homologs and 142 NBS-derived genes that lack the NBS domain. Highly similar homologs for most previously documented Solanaceae R genes were identified. A surprising ∼41% (179 of the 435 NBS-encoding genes are pseudogenes primarily caused by premature stop codons or frameshift mutations. Alignment of 81.80% of the 577 homologs to S. tuberosum group phureja pseudomolecules revealed non-random distribution of the R-genes; 362 of 470 genes were found in high density clusters on 11 chromosomes.

  3. Bioinformatics Assisted Gene Discovery and Annotation of Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    As the sequencing stage of human genome project is near the end, the work has begun for discovering novel genes from genome sequences and annotating their biological functions. Here are reviewed current major bioinformatics tools and technologies available for large scale gene discovery and annotation from human genome sequences. Some ideas about possible future development are also provided.

  4. [Human genomic project and human genomic haplotype map project: opportunitiy, challenge and strategy in stomatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-qing; Zeng, Xin; Wang, Zhi

    2010-08-01

    The human genomic project and the international HapMap project were designed to create a genome-wide database of patterns of human genetic variation, with the expectation that these patterns would be useful for genetic association studies of common diseases, thus lead to molecular diagnosis and personnel therapy. The article briefly reviewed the creation, target and achievement of those two projects. Furthermore, the authors have given four suggestions in facing to the opportunities and challenges brought by the two projects, including cultivation improvement of elites, cross binding of multi-subjects, strengthening construction of research base and initiation of natural key scientific project.

  5. Understanding the Human Genome Project -- A Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contribute to human disease. In 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick described the double helix structure ... of sequencing whole exomes or genomes, groundbreaking comparative genomic studies are now identifiying the causes of rare ...

  6. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the US and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  7. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Deegan, Robert (Affiliation: Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences)

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the United States and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  8. A neural circuit encoding sexual preference in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Poeppl, Timm B.; Langguth, Berthold; Rupprecht, Rainer; Laird, Angela R.; Eickhoff, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Sexual preference determines mate choice for reproduction and hence guarantees conservation of species in mammals. Despite this fundamental role in human behavior, current knowledge on its target-specific neurofunctional substrate is based on lesion studies and therefore limited. We used meta-analytic remodeling of neuroimaging data from 364 human subjects with diverse sexual interests during sexual stimulation to quantify neural regions associated with sexual preference manipulations. We fou...

  9. The genomic structure of the human UFO receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Faust, M; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1993-02-01

    Using a DNA transfection-tumorigenicity assay we have recently identified the UFO oncogene. It encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by the juxtaposition of two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats in its extracellular domain. Here we describe the genomic organization of the human UFO locus. The UFO receptor is encoded by 20 exons that are distributed over a region of 44 kb. Different isoforms of UFO mRNA are generated by alternative splicing of exon 10 and differential usage of two imperfect polyadenylation sites resulting in the presence or absence of 1.5-kb 3' untranslated sequences. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses revealed multiple transcriptional initiation sites including a major site 169 bp upstream of the translation start site. The promoter region is GC rich, lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains potential recognition sites for a variety of trans-acting factors, including Sp1, AP-2 and the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Proto-UFO and its oncogenic counterpart exhibit identical cDNA and promoter regions sequences. Possible modes of UFO activation are discussed.

  10. Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Nastaran; Phanstiel, Douglas H; He, Chao; Grubert, Fabian; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Kasowski, Maya; Zhang, Michael Q; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that interactions between regulatory genomic elements play an important role in regulating gene expression. We generated a genome-wide interaction map of regulatory elements in human cells (ENCODE tier 1 cells, K562, GM12878) using Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) experiments targeting six broadly distributed factors. Bound regions covered 80% of DNase I hypersensitive sites including 99.7% of TSS and 98% of enhancers. Correlating this map with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets revealed cohesin, CTCF, and ZNF143 as key components of three-dimensional chromatin structure and revealed how the distal chromatin state affects gene transcription. Comparison of interactions between cell types revealed that enhancer-promoter interactions were highly cell-type-specific. Construction and comparison of distal and proximal regulatory networks revealed stark differences in structure and biological function. Proximal binding events are enriched at genes with housekeeping functions, while distal binding events interact with genes involved in dynamic biological processes including response to stimulus. This study reveals new mechanistic and functional insights into regulatory region organization in the nucleus. © 2014 Heidari et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Exuberant innovation: The Human Genome Project

    CERN Document Server

    Gisler, Monika; Woodard, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed synthesis of the development of the Human Genome Project (HGP) from 1986 to 2003 in order to test the "social bubble" hypothesis that strong social interactions between enthusiastic supporters of the HGP weaved a network of reinforcing feedbacks that led to a widespread endorsement and extraordinary commitment by those involved in the project, beyond what would be rationalized by a standard cost-benefit analysis in the presence of extraordinary uncertainties and risks. The vigorous competition and race between the initially public project and several private initiatives is argued to support the social bubble hypothesis. We also present quantitative analyses of the concomitant financial bubble concentrated on the biotech sector. Confirmation of this hypothesis is offered by the present consensus that it will take decades to exploit the fruits of the HGP, via a slow and arduous process aiming at disentangling the extraordinary complexity of the human complex body. The HGP has ushered other...

  12. The PCNA pseudogenes in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoimenov Ivaylo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a key protein in the eukaryotic DNA replication and cell proliferation. Following the cloning and characterisation of the human PCNA gene, the question of the existence of pseudogenes in the human genome was raised. Findings In this short communication we summarise the existing information about the PCNA pseudogenes and critically assess their status. Conclusions We propose the existence of at least four valid PCNA pseudogenes, PCNAP1, PCNAP2, LOC392454 and LOC390102. We would like to recommend assignment of a name for LOC392454 as "proliferating cell nuclear antigen pseudogene 3" (alias PCNAP3 and a name for LOC390102 as "proliferating cell nuclear antigen pseudogene 4" (alias PCNAP4. We prompt for more critical evaluation of the existence of a PCNA pseudogene, designated as PCNAP.

  13. Comparative genomics of emerging human ehrlichiosis agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie C Dunning Hotopp

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma (formerly Ehrlichia phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Neorickettsia (formerly Ehrlichia sennetsu are intracellular vector-borne pathogens that cause human ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. We present the complete genome sequences of these organisms along with comparisons to other organisms in the Rickettsiales order. Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. display a unique large expansion of immunodominant outer membrane proteins facilitating antigenic variation. All Rickettsiales have a diminished ability to synthesize amino acids compared to their closest free-living relatives. Unlike members of the Rickettsiaceae family, these pathogenic Anaplasmataceae are capable of making all major vitamins, cofactors, and nucleotides, which could confer a beneficial role in the invertebrate vector or the vertebrate host. Further analysis identified proteins potentially involved in vacuole confinement of the Anaplasmataceae, a life cycle involving a hematophagous vector, vertebrate pathogenesis, human pathogenesis, and lack of transovarial transmission. These discoveries provide significant insights into the biology of these obligate intracellular pathogens.

  14. Building the sequence map of the human pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng

    2010-01-01

    Here we integrate the de novo assembly of an Asian and an African genome with the NCBI reference human genome, as a step toward constructing the human pan-genome. We identified approximately 5 Mb of novel sequences not present in the reference genome in each of these assemblies. Most novel...... analysis of predicted genes indicated that the novel sequences contain potentially functional coding regions. We estimate that a complete human pan-genome would contain approximately 19-40 Mb of novel sequence not present in the extant reference genome. The extensive amount of novel sequence contributing...... to the genetic variation of the pan-genome indicates the importance of using complete genome sequencing and de novo assembly....

  15. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

  16. Unusual assortment of segments in 2 rare human rotavirus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Simona; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Potgieter, Christiaan A; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Banyai, Krisztian; Platia, Maria A; Colomba, Claudia; Martella, Vito

    2010-05-01

    Using full-length genome sequence analysis, we investigated 2 rare G3P[9] human rotavirus strains isolated from children with diarrhea. The genomes were recognized as assortments of genes closely related to rotaviruses originating from cats, ruminants, and humans. Results suggest multiple transmissions of genes from animal to human strains of rotaviruses.

  17. Characterization of three genomic loci encoding Rhizobium sp. strain ORS571 N2 fixation genes.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-five independent, N2 fixation-defective (Nif-) vector insertion (Vi) mutants were selected, cloned, and mapped to the ORS571 genome. The recombinant Nif::Vi plasmids obtained in this way were used as DNA hybridization probes to isolate homologous phages from a genomic library of ORS571 constructed in lambda EMBL3. Genomic maps were drawn for three ORS571 Nif gene loci. Forty-five Nif::Vi mutants in genomic Nif locus 1 defined two gene clusters separated by 8 kilobase pairs (kb) of DNA. ...

  18. A second actin-like MamK protein in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 encoded outside the genomic magnetosome island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Rioux

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria are able to swim navigating along geomagnetic field lines. They synthesize ferromagnetic nanocrystals that are embedded in cytoplasmic membrane invaginations forming magnetosomes. Regularly aligned in the cytoplasm along cytoskeleton filaments, the magnetosome chain effectively forms a compass needle bestowing on bacteria their magnetotactic behaviour. A large genomic island, conserved among magnetotactic bacteria, contains the genes potentially involved in magnetosome formation. One of the genes, mamK has been described as encoding a prokaryotic actin-like protein which when it polymerizes forms in the cytoplasm filamentous structures that provide the scaffold for magnetosome alignment. Here, we have identified a series of genes highly similar to the mam genes in the genome of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. The newly annotated genes are clustered in a genomic islet distinct and distant from the known magnetosome genomic island and most probably acquired by lateral gene transfer rather than duplication. We focused on a mamK-like gene whose product shares 54.5% identity with the actin-like MamK. Filament bundles of polymerized MamK-like protein were observed in vitro with electron microscopy and in vivo in E. coli cells expressing MamK-like-Venus fusions by fluorescence microscopy. In addition, we demonstrate that mamK-like is transcribed in AMB-1 wild-type and DeltamamK mutant cells and that the actin-like filamentous structures observed in the DeltamamK strain are probably MamK-like polymers. Thus MamK-like is a new member of the prokaryotic actin-like family. This is the first evidence of a functional mam gene encoded outside the magnetosome genomic island.

  19. Abundant 5S rRNA-Like Transcripts Encoded by the Mitochondrial Genome in Amoebozoa ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullerwell, Charles E.; Burger, Gertraud; Gott, Jonatha M.; Kourennaia, Olga; Schnare, Murray N.; Gray, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    5S rRNAs are ubiquitous components of prokaryotic, chloroplast, and eukaryotic cytosolic ribosomes but are apparently absent from mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) of many eukaryotic groups including animals and fungi. Nevertheless, a clearly identifiable, mitochondrion-encoded 5S rRNA is present in Acanthamoeba castellanii, a member of Amoebozoa. During a search for additional mitochondrial 5S rRNAs, we detected small abundant RNAs in other members of Amoebozoa, namely, in the lobose amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis and in the myxomycete slime mold Physarum polycephalum. These RNAs are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), cosediment with mitoribosomes in glycerol gradients, and can be folded into a secondary structure similar to that of bona fide 5S rRNAs. Further, in the mtDNA of another slime mold, Didymium nigripes, we identified a region that in sequence, potential secondary structure, and genomic location is similar to the corresponding region encoding the Physarum small RNA. A mtDNA-encoded small RNA previously identified in Dictyostelium discoideum is here shown to share several characteristics with known 5S rRNAs. Again, we detected genes encoding potential homologs of this RNA in the mtDNA of three other species of the genus Dictyostelium as well as in a related genus, Polysphondylium. Taken together, our results indicate a widespread occurrence of small, abundant, mtDNA-encoded RNAs with 5S rRNA-like structures that are associated with the mitoribosome in various amoebozoan taxa. Our working hypothesis is that these novel small abundant RNAs represent radically divergent mitochondrial 5S rRNA homologs. We posit that currently unrecognized 5S-like RNAs may exist in other mitochondrial systems in which a conventional 5S rRNA cannot be identified. PMID:20304999

  20. A genomic region of lactococcal temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 encoding major virion proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Mads G.; Appel, Karen Fuglede; Madsen, Hans Peter Lynge;

    1996-01-01

    Two major structural proteins, MHP (major head protein) and MTP (major tail protein), from the lactococcal temperate phage TP901-1 were sequenced at their amino acid termini, and derived degenerate oligonucleotides were used to locate the corresponding genes in the phage genome. This genomic regi...

  1. Influence of Feature Encoding and Choice of Classifier on Disease Risk Prediction in Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mittag

    Full Text Available Various attempts have been made to predict the individual disease risk based on genotype data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. However, most studies only investigated one or two classification algorithms and feature encoding schemes. In this study, we applied seven different classification algorithms on GWAS case-control data sets for seven different diseases to create models for disease risk prediction. Further, we used three different encoding schemes for the genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and investigated their influence on the predictive performance of these models. Our study suggests that an additive encoding of the SNP data should be the preferred encoding scheme, as it proved to yield the best predictive performances for all algorithms and data sets. Furthermore, our results showed that the differences between most state-of-the-art classification algorithms are not statistically significant. Consequently, we recommend to prefer algorithms with simple models like the linear support vector machine (SVM as they allow for better subsequent interpretation without significant loss of accuracy.

  2. Sequence information encoded in DNA that may influence long-range chromatin structure correlates with human chromosome functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi E Takasuka

    Full Text Available Little is known about the possible function of the bulk of the human genome. We have recently shown that long-range regular oscillation in the motif non-T, A/T, G (VWG existing at ten-nucleotide multiples influences large-scale nucleosome array formation. In this work, we have determined the locations of all 100 kb regions that are predicted to form distinctive chromatin structures throughout each human chromosome (except Y. Using these data, we found that a significantly greater fraction of 300 kb sequences lacked annotated transcripts in genomic DNA regions > or = 300 kb that contained nearly continuous chromatin organizing signals than in control regions. We also found a relationship between the meiotic recombination frequency and the presence of strong VWG chromatin organizing signals. Large (> or = 300 kb genomic DNA regions having low average recombination frequency are enriched in chromatin organizing signals. As additional controls, we show using chromosome 1 that the VWG motif signals are not enriched in randomly selected DNA regions having the mean size of the recombination coldspots, and that non-VWG motif sets do not generate signals that are enriched in recombination coldspots. We also show that tandemly repeated alpha satellite DNA contains strong VWG signals for the formation of distinctive nucleosome arrays, consistent with the low recombination activity of centromeres. Our correlations cannot be explained simply by variations in the GC content. Our findings suggest that a specific set of periodic DNA motifs encoded in genomic DNA, which provide signals for chromatin organization, influence human chromosome function.

  3. Insight into Shiga toxin genes encoded by Escherichia coli O157 from whole genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Ashton

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC to cause severe illness in humans is determined by multiple host factors and bacterial characteristics, including Shiga toxin (Stx subtype. Given the link between Stx2a subtype and disease severity, we sought to identify the stx subtypes present in whole genome sequences (WGS of 444 isolates of STEC O157. Difficulties in assembling the stx genes in some strains were overcome by using two complementary bioinformatics methods: mapping and de novo assembly. We compared the WGS analysis with the results obtained using a PCR approach and investigated the diversity within and between the subtypes. All strains of STEC O157 in this study had stx1a, stx2a or stx2c or a combination of these three genes. There was over 99% (442/444 concordance between PCR and WGS. When common source strains were excluded, 236/349 strains of STEC O157 had multiple copies of different Stx subtypes and 54 had multiple copies of the same Stx subtype. Of those strains harbouring multiple copies of the same Stx subtype, 33 had variants between the alleles while 21 had identical copies. Strains harbouring Stx2a only were most commonly found to have multiple alleles of the same subtype (42%. Both the PCR and WGS approach to stx subtyping provided a good level of sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the WGS data also showed there were a significant proportion of strains harbouring multiple alleles of the same Stx subtype associated with clinical disease in England.

  4. Outsourcing the Nucleus: Nuclear Pore Complex Genes are no Longer Encoded in Nucleomorph Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Neumann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC facilitates transport between nucleus and cytoplasm. The protein constituents of the NPC, termed nucleoporins (Nups, are conserved across a wide diversity of eukaryotes. In apparent exception to this, no nucleoporin genes have been identified in nucleomorph genomes. Nucleomorphs, nuclear remnants of once free-living eukaryotes, took up residence as secondary endosymbionts in cryptomonad and chlorarachniophyte algae. As these genomes are highly reduced, Nup genes may have been lost, or relocated to the host nucleus. However, Nup genes are often poorly conserved between species, so absence may be an artifact of low sequence similarity. We therefore constructed an evolutionary bioinformatic screen to establish whether the apparent absence of Nup genes in nucleomorph genomes is due to genuine absence or the inability of current methods to detect homologues. We searched green plant (Arabidopsis and rice, green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and red alga (Cyanidioschyzon merolae genomes, plus two nucleomorph genomes (Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta with profile hidden Markov models (HMMs from curated alignments of known vertebrate/yeast Nups. Since the plant, algal and nucleomorph genomes all belong to the kingdom Plantae, and are evolutionarily distant from the outgroup (vertebrate/yeast training set, we use the plant and algal genomes as internal positive controls for the sensitivity of the searches in nucleomorph genomes. We fi nd numerous Nup homologues in all plant and free-living algal species, but none in either nucleomorph genome. BLAST searches using identified plant and algal Nups also failed to detect nucleomorph homologues. We conclude that nucleomorph Nup genes have either been lost, being replaced by host Nup genes, or, that nucleomorph Nup genes have been transferred to the host nucleus twice independently; once in the evolution of the red algal nucleomorph and once in the green algal nucleomorph.

  5. Asymmetrical distribution of non-conserved regulatory sequences at PHOX2B is reflected at the ENCODE loci and illuminates a possible genome-wide trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallion Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulatory elements are central to development and interspecific phenotypic variation. Current regulatory element prediction tools rely heavily upon conservation for prediction of putative elements. Recent in vitro observations from the ENCODE project combined with in vivo analyses at the zebrafish phox2b locus suggests that a significant fraction of regulatory elements may fall below commonly applied metrics of conservation. We propose to explore these observations in vivo at the human PHOX2B locus, and also evaluate the potential evidence for genome-wide applicability of these observations through a novel analysis of extant data. Results Transposon-based transgenic analysis utilizing a tiling path proximal to human PHOX2B in zebrafish recapitulates the observations at the zebrafish phox2b locus of both conserved and non-conserved regulatory elements. Analysis of human sequences conserved with previously identified zebrafish phox2b regulatory elements demonstrates that the orthologous sequences exhibit overlapping regulatory control. Additionally, analysis of non-conserved sequences scattered over 135 kb 5' to PHOX2B, provides evidence of non-conserved regulatory elements positively biased with close proximity to the gene. Furthermore, we provide a novel analysis of data from the ENCODE project, finding a non-uniform distribution of regulatory elements consistent with our in vivo observations at PHOX2B. These observations remain largely unchanged when one accounts for the sequence repeat content of the assayed intervals, when the intervals are sub-classified by biological role (developmental versus non-developmental, or by gene density (gene desert versus non-gene desert. Conclusion While regulatory elements frequently display evidence of evolutionary conservation, a fraction appears to be undetected by current metrics of conservation. In vivo observations at the PHOX2B locus, supported by our analyses of in

  6. 75 FR 10488 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHGRI MAP Review... Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; LRP 2010 Teleconference. Date: April 7,...

  7. 78 FR 20933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Loan Repayment Program... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Room 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville,...

  8. 76 FR 35223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Sequencing Centers...D, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...

  9. 77 FR 60706 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Special Emphasis... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of...

  10. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Resource...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  11. 75 FR 52538 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Date: November 19-20..., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  12. 75 FR 8374 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Revolutionary..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076,...

  13. 78 FR 68856 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  14. 78 FR 14806 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel: Clinically Relevant... grant applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 4th Floor Conference Room,...

  15. Single-cell genomics reveals pyrrolysine-encoding potential in members of uncultivated archaeal candidate division MSBL1

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2017-05-11

    Pyrrolysine (Pyl), the 22nd canonical amino acid, is only decoded and synthesized by a limited number of organisms in the domains Archaea and Bacteria. Pyl is encoded by the amber codon UAG, typically a stop codon. To date, all known Pyl-decoding archaea are able to carry out methylotrophic methanogenesis. The functionality of methylamine methyltransferases, an important component of corrinoid-dependent methyltransfer reactions, depends on the presence of Pyl. Here, we present a putative pyl gene cluster obtained from single-cell genomes of the archaeal Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes group 1 (MSBL1) from the Red Sea. Functional annotation of the MSBL1 single cell amplified genomes (SAGs) also revealed a complete corrinoid-dependent methyl-transfer pathway suggesting that members of MSBL1 may possibly be capable of synthesizing Pyl and metabolizing methylated amines. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis genome contains two orthologs of the ARO10 gene encoding for phenylpyruvate decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Liberal, Anna Theresa; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis possesses important physiological traits that enable it to grow in industrial environments as either spoiling yeast of wine production or a fermenting strain used for lambic beer, or fermenting yeast in the bioethanol production process. In this work, in silico analysis of the Dekkera genome database allowed the identification of two paralogous genes encoding for phenylpyruvate decarboxylase (DbARO10) that represents a unique trait among the hemiascomycetes. The molecular analysis of the theoretical protein confirmed its protein identity. Upon cultivation of the cell in medium containing phenylpyruvate, both increases in gene expression and in phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity were observed. Both genes were differentially expressed depending on the culture condition and the type of metabolism, which indicated the difference in the biological function of their corresponding proteins. The importance of the duplicated DbARO10 genes in the D. bruxellensis genome was discussed and represents the first effort to understand the production of flavor by this yeast.

  17. Online genetic databases informing human genome epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Julian PT

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of high throughput genotyping technology and the information available via projects such as the human genome sequencing and the HapMap project, more and more data relevant to the study of genetics and disease risk will be produced. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of human genome epidemiology studies rely on the ability to identify relevant studies and to obtain suitable data from these studies. A first port of call for most such reviews is a search of MEDLINE. We examined whether this could be usefully supplemented by identifying databases on the World Wide Web that contain genetic epidemiological information. Methods We conducted a systematic search for online databases containing genetic epidemiological information on gene prevalence or gene-disease association. In those containing information on genetic association studies, we examined what additional information could be obtained to supplement a MEDLINE literature search. Results We identified 111 databases containing prevalence data, 67 databases specific to a single gene and only 13 that contained information on gene-disease associations. Most of the latter 13 databases were linked to MEDLINE, although five contained information that may not be available from other sources. Conclusion There is no single resource of structured data from genetic association studies covering multiple diseases, and in relation to the number of studies being conducted there is very little information specific to gene-disease association studies currently available on the World Wide Web. Until comprehensive data repositories are created and utilized regularly, new data will remain largely inaccessible to many systematic review authors and meta-analysts.

  18. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kevin; She, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Li-Yu; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gramann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal) or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete) of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  19. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lai

    Full Text Available Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  20. Construction of genomic libraries of Cryptosporidium parvum and identification of antigen-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, C C; Blagburn, B L; Tidwell, R R

    1991-01-01

    Genomic libraries have been constructed from bovine C. parvum DNA in the lambda ZAP and lambda DASH vectors. Based on an estimated genome size of 2 x 10(4) kilobases (kb), each recombinant library contains greater than 10 genomic equivalents. The average recombinant size for the lambda ZAP library is 2.1 kb and for the lambda DASH library is 14 kb. We have identified genes to major antigens recognized by hyperimmune bovine antiserum. These recombinants are currently being purified and characterized. Limited DNA sequence analysis of random C. parvum clones confirms suggestions that the genome is quite AT-rich. The DNA sequence of random lambda ZAP fusion proteins has identified a potential ATPase, a structural protein and a DNA-binding protein.

  1. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Katherine S; Salama, Sofie R; King, Bryan;

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 gen...... contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.......Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202...... genomic elements that are highly conserved in vertebrates but show evidence of significantly accelerated substitution rates in human. These are mostly in non-coding DNA, often near genes associated with transcription and DNA binding. Resequencing confirmed that the five most accelerated elements...

  2. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Doethideomycetes Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabien; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-03-13

    The class of Dothideomycetes is one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related species can have very diverse host plants. Eighteen genomes of Dothideomycetes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. Here we describe the results of comparative analyses of the fungi in this group.

  3. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Dothideomycetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabian; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-05

    The class of Dothideomycetes is one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops that are grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host plant, and related species can have very diverse hosts. Eighteen genomes of Dothideomycetes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. Here we describe the results of comparative analyses of the fungi in this group.

  4. The accessible chromatin landscape of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Robert E; Rynes, Eric; Humbert, Richard; Vierstra, Jeff; Maurano, Matthew T; Haugen, Eric; Sheffield, Nathan C; Stergachis, Andrew B; Wang, Hao; Vernot, Benjamin; Garg, Kavita; John, Sam; Sandstrom, Richard; Bates, Daniel; Boatman, Lisa; Canfield, Theresa K; Diegel, Morgan; Dunn, Douglas; Ebersol, Abigail K; Frum, Tristan; Giste, Erika; Johnson, Audra K; Johnson, Ericka M; Kutyavin, Tanya; Lajoie, Bryan; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Lee, Kristen; London, Darin; Lotakis, Dimitra; Neph, Shane; Neri, Fidencio; Nguyen, Eric D; Qu, Hongzhu; Reynolds, Alex P; Roach, Vaughn; Safi, Alexias; Sanchez, Minerva E; Sanyal, Amartya; Shafer, Anthony; Simon, Jeremy M; Song, Lingyun; Vong, Shinny; Weaver, Molly; Yan, Yongqi; Zhang, Zhancheng; Zhang, Zhuzhu; Lenhard, Boris; Tewari, Muneesh; Dorschner, Michael O; Hansen, R Scott; Navas, Patrick A; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Lieb, Jason D; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Akey, Joshua M; Sabo, Peter J; Kaul, Rajinder; Furey, Terrence S; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-06

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) are markers of regulatory DNA and have underpinned the discovery of all classes of cis-regulatory elements including enhancers, promoters, insulators, silencers and locus control regions. Here we present the first extensive map of human DHSs identified through genome-wide profiling in 125 diverse cell and tissue types. We identify ∼2.9 million DHSs that encompass virtually all known experimentally validated cis-regulatory sequences and expose a vast trove of novel elements, most with highly cell-selective regulation. Annotating these elements using ENCODE data reveals novel relationships between chromatin accessibility, transcription, DNA methylation and regulatory factor occupancy patterns. We connect ∼580,000 distal DHSs with their target promoters, revealing systematic pairing of different classes of distal DHSs and specific promoter types. Patterning of chromatin accessibility at many regulatory regions is organized with dozens to hundreds of co-activated elements, and the transcellular DNase I sensitivity pattern at a given region can predict cell-type-specific functional behaviours. The DHS landscape shows signatures of recent functional evolutionary constraint. However, the DHS compartment in pluripotent and immortalized cells exhibits higher mutation rates than that in highly differentiated cells, exposing an unexpected link between chromatin accessibility, proliferative potential and patterns of human variation.

  5. Widespread occurrence of organelle genome-encoded 5S rRNAs including permuted molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valach, Matus; Burger, Gertraud; Gray, Michael W; Lang, B Franz

    2014-12-16

    5S Ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) is a universal component of ribosomes, and the corresponding gene is easily identified in archaeal, bacterial and nuclear genome sequences. However, organelle gene homologs (rrn5) appear to be absent from most mitochondrial and several chloroplast genomes. Here, we re-examine the distribution of organelle rrn5 by building mitochondrion- and plastid-specific covariance models (CMs) with which we screened organelle genome sequences. We not only recover all organelle rrn5 genes annotated in GenBank records, but also identify more than 50 previously unrecognized homologs in mitochondrial genomes of various stramenopiles, red algae, cryptomonads, malawimonads and apusozoans, and surprisingly, in the apicoplast (highly derived plastid) genomes of the coccidian pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Eimeria tenella. Comparative modeling of RNA secondary structure reveals that mitochondrial 5S rRNAs from brown algae adopt a permuted triskelion shape that has not been seen elsewhere. Expression of the newly predicted rrn5 genes is confirmed experimentally in 10 instances, based on our own and published RNA-Seq data. This study establishes that particularly mitochondrial 5S rRNA has a much broader taxonomic distribution and a much larger structural variability than previously thought. The newly developed CMs will be made available via the Rfam database and the MFannot organelle genome annotator. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The genome of the amoeba symbiont "Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus" encodes an afp-like prophage possibly used for protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penz, Thomas; Horn, Matthias; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the obligate intracellular amoeba symbiont 'Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus' is unique among prokaryotic genomes due to its extremely large fraction of genes encoding proteins harboring eukaryotic domains such as ankyrin-repeats, TPR/SEL1 repeats, leucine-rich repeats, as well as F- and U-box domains, most of which likely serve in the interaction with the amoeba host. Here we provide evidence for the presence of additional proteins which are presumably presented extracellularly and should thus also be important for host cell interaction. Surprisingly, we did not find homologues of any of the well-known protein secretion systems required to translocate effector proteins into the host cell in the A. asiaticus genome, and the type six secretion systems seems to be incomplete. Here we describe the presence of a putative prophage in the A. asiaticus genome, which shows similarity to the antifeeding prophage from the insect pathogen Serratia entomophila. In S. entomophila this system is used to deliver toxins into insect hosts. This putative antifeeding-like prophage might thus represent the missing protein secretion apparatus in A. asiaticus.

  7. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs, are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Anthony J.; Kelly, Denise; Flint, Harry J;

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183(T) (= DSM 16839(T) = NCIMB 14029(T)), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-...

  9. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  10. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  11. The evolution of signaling complexity suggests a mechanism for reducing the genomic search space in human association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, K J L; Merriman, B; Bahamonde, M E; Wong, M-L; Licinio, J

    2005-01-01

    The size complexity of the human genome has been traditionally viewed as an obstacle that frustrates efforts aimed at identifying the genetic correlates of complex human phenotypes. As such complex phenotypes are attributed to the combined action of numerous genomic loci, attempts to identify the underlying multi-locus interactions may produce a combinatorial sum of false positives that drown out the real signal. Faced with such grim prospects for successfully identifying the genetic basis of complex phenotypes, many geneticists simply disregard epistatic interactions altogether. However, the emerging picture from systems biology is that the cellular programs encoded by the genome utilize nested signaling hierarchies to integrate a number of loosely coupled, semiautonomous, and functionally distinct genetic networks. The current view of these modules is that connections encoding inter-module signaling are relatively sparse, while the gene-to-gene (protein-to-protein) interactions within a particular module are typically denser. We believe that each of these modules is encoded by a finite set of discontinuous, sequence-specific, genomic intervals that are functionally linked to association rules, which correlate directly to features in the environment. Furthermore, because these environmental association rules have evolved incrementally over time, we explore theoretical models of cellular evolution to better understand the role of evolution in genomic complexity. Specifically, we present a conceptual framework for (1) reducing genomic complexity by partitioning the genome into subsets composed of functionally distinct genetic modules and (2) improving the selection of coding region SNPs, which results in an increased probability of identifying functionally relevant SNPs. Additionally, we introduce the notion of 'genomic closure,' which provides a quantitative measure of how functionally insulated a specific genetic module might be from the influence of the rest of

  12. Can visual information encoded in cortical columns be decoded from magnetoencephalography data in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Ramirez, Fernando Mario; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    It is a principal open question whether noninvasive imaging methods in humans can decode information encoded at a spatial scale as fine as the basic functional unit of cortex: cortical columns. We addressed this question in five magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiments by investigating a columnar-level encoded visual feature: contrast edge orientation. We found that MEG signals contained orientation-specific information as early as approximately 50 ms after stimulus onset even when controlling for confounds, such as overrepresentation of particular orientations, stimulus edge interactions, and global form-related signals. Theoretical modeling confirmed the plausibility of this empirical result. An essential consequence of our results is that information encoded in the human brain at the level of cortical columns should in general be accessible by multivariate analysis of electrophysiological signals.

  13. Formation of mushrooms and lignocellulose degradation encoded in the genome sequence of Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin A.; de Jong, Jan F.; Lugones, Luis G.; Aerts, Andrea; Kothe, Erika; Stajich, Jason E.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Record, Eric; Levasseur, Anthony; Baker, Scott E.; Bartholomew, Kirk A.; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Erdmann, Susann; Fowler, Thomas J.; Gathman, Allen C.; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Knabe, Nicole; Kues, Ursula; Lilly, Walt W.; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Magnuson, Jon K.; Piumi, Francois; Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Schwarze, Francis W.M.R.; van Kuyk, Patricia A.; Horton, J. Stephen; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Wosten, Han A.B.

    2010-07-12

    The wood degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune is a model system for mushroom development. Here, we describe the 38.5 Mb assembled genome of this basidiomycete and application of whole genome expression analysis to study the 13,210 predicted genes. Comparative analyses of the S. commune genome revealed unique wood degrading machinery and mating type loci with the highest number of reported genes. Gene expression analyses revealed that one third of the 471 identified transcription factor genes were differentially expressed during sexual development. Two of these transcription factor genes were deleted. Inactivation of fst4 resulted in the inability to form mushrooms, whereas inactivation of fst3 resulted in more but smaller mushrooms than wild-type. These data illustrate that mechanisms underlying mushroom formation can be dissected using S. commune as a model. This will impact commercial production of mushrooms and the industrial use of these fruiting bodies to produce enzymes and pharmaceuticals.

  14. Construction of genomic libraries of mycobacterial origin: identification of recombinants encoding mycobacterial-specific proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, P S; Munshi, A; Sinha, S; Sharma, G; Kapoor, A; Gaur, A; Talwar, G P

    1986-09-01

    A complete genomic library from Mycobacterium vaccae (2785 recombinants) and a partial genomic library of M. leprae and BCG (300 and 1750 clones, respectively) were constructed in the plasmid pBR322. Bam HI was selected as the restriction endonuclease for obtaining DNA cleavage products. Evidence was obtained for limited expression of the cloned mycobacterial DNA inserts in Escherichia coli. A recombinant has been identified which codes for antigen immunoreactive with rabbit anti-M. leprae antibody but not with anti-H37Rv antibody.

  15. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Pär G; Suzuki, Harukazu; Ninomiya, Noriko; Akalin, Altuna; Sessa, Luca; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Brozzi, Alessandro; Luzi, Lucilla; Tan, Sin Lam; Yang, Liang; Kunarso, Galih; Ng, Edwin Lian-Chong; Batalov, Serge; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wells, Christine; Bajic, Vladimir B; Orlando, Valerio; Reid, James F; Lenhard, Boris; Lipovich, Leonard

    2006-04-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs), along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  16. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär G Engström

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs, along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  17. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  18. Multi-Features Encoding and Selecting Based on Genetic Algorithm for Human Action Recognition from Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglong Yu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed multiple local features encoded for recognizing the human actions. The multiple local features were obtained from the simple feature description of human actions in video. The simple features are two kinds of important features, optical flow and edge, to represent the human perception for the video behavior. As the video information descriptors, optical flow and edge, which their computing speeds are very fast and their requirement of memory consumption is very low, can represent respectively the motion information and shape information. Furthermore, key local multi-features are extracted and encoded by GA in order to reduce the computational complexity of the algorithm. After then, the Multi-SVM classifier is applied to discriminate the human actions.

  19. Dissociations within human hippocampal subregions during encoding and retrieval of spatial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthana, Nanthia; Ekstrom, Arne; Moshirvaziri, Saba; Knowlton, Barbara; Bookheimer, Susan

    2011-07-01

    Although the hippocampus is critical for the formation and retrieval of spatial memories, it is unclear how subregions are differentially involved in these processes. Previous high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus (CA23DG) regions support the encoding of novel associations, whereas the subicular cortices support the retrieval of these learned associations. Whether these subregions are used in humans during encoding and retrieval of spatial information has yet to be explored. Using high-resolution fMRI (1.6 mm × 1.6-mm in-plane), we found that activity within the right CA23DG increased during encoding compared to retrieval. Conversely, right subicular activity increased during retrieval compared to encoding of spatial associations. These results are consistent with the previous studies illustrating dissociations within human hippocampal subregions and further suggest that these regions are similarly involved during the encoding and retrieval of spatial information.

  20. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Dothideomycetes Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohm, R.A.; Feau, N.; Henrissat, B.; Schoch, C.L.; Horwitz, B.A.; Barry, K.W.; Condon, B.J.; Copeland, A.C.; Dhillon, B.; Glaser, F.; Hesse, C.N.; Kosti, I.; LaButti, K.; Lindquist, E.A.; Lucas, S.; Salamov, A.A.; Bradshaw, R.E.; Ciuffetti, L.; Hamelin, R.C.; Kema, G.H.J.; Lawrence, C.; Scott, J.A.; Spatafora, J.W.; Turgeon, B.G.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.; Zhong, S.; Goodwin, S.B.; Grigoriev, I.V.

    2012-01-01

    The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here, we compare genome features of 18 members of this class, including 6 necrotrophs, 9 (hemi)biotrophs and 3 saprotrophs, to

  1. Diverse Lifestyles and Strategies of Plant Pathogenesis Encoded in the Genomes of Eighteen Dothideomycetes Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin A.; Feau, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Schoch, Conrad L.; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Condon, Bradford J.; Copeland, Alex C.; Dhillon, Braham; Glaser, Fabian; Hesse, Cedar N.; Kosti, Idit; LaButti, Kurt; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda; Hamelin, Richard C.; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lawrence, Christopher; Scott, James A.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Wit, Pierre J. G. M. de; Zhong, Shaobin; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-02-29

    The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here, we compare genome features of 18 members of this class, including 6 necrotrophs, 9 (hemi)biotrophs and 3 saprotrophs, to analyze genome structure, evolution, and the diverse strategies of pathogenesis. The Dothideomycetes most likely evolved from a common ancestor more than 280 million years ago. The 18 genome sequences differ dramatically in size due to variation in repetitive content, but show much less variation in number of (core) genes. Gene order appears to have been rearranged mostly within chromosomal boundaries by multiple inversions, in extant genomes frequently demarcated by adjacent simple repeats. Several Dothideomycetes contain one or more gene-poor, transposable element (TE)-rich putatively dispensable chromosomes of unknown function. The 18 Dothideomycetes offer an extensive catalogue of genes involved in cellulose degradation, proteolysis, secondary metabolism, and cysteine-rich small secreted proteins. Ancestors of the two major orders of plant pathogens in the Dothideomycetes, the Capnodiales and Pleosporales, may have had different modes of pathogenesis, with the former having fewer of these genes than the latter. Many of these genes are enriched in proximity to transposable elements, suggesting faster evolution because of the effects of repeat induced point (RIP) mutations. A syntenic block of genes, including oxidoreductases, is conserved in most Dothideomycetes and upregulated during infection in L. maculans, suggesting a possible function in response to oxidative stress.

  2. Diverse lifestyles and strategies of plant pathogenesis encoded in the genomes of eighteen Dothideomycetes fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin A Ohm

    Full Text Available The class Dothideomycetes is one of the largest groups of fungi with a high level of ecological diversity including many plant pathogens infecting a broad range of hosts. Here, we compare genome features of 18 members of this class, including 6 necrotrophs, 9 (hemibiotrophs and 3 saprotrophs, to analyze genome structure, evolution, and the diverse strategies of pathogenesis. The Dothideomycetes most likely evolved from a common ancestor more than 280 million years ago. The 18 genome sequences differ dramatically in size due to variation in repetitive content, but show much less variation in number of (core genes. Gene order appears to have been rearranged mostly within chromosomal boundaries by multiple inversions, in extant genomes frequently demarcated by adjacent simple repeats. Several Dothideomycetes contain one or more gene-poor, transposable element (TE-rich putatively dispensable chromosomes of unknown function. The 18 Dothideomycetes offer an extensive catalogue of genes involved in cellulose degradation, proteolysis, secondary metabolism, and cysteine-rich small secreted proteins. Ancestors of the two major orders of plant pathogens in the Dothideomycetes, the Capnodiales and Pleosporales, may have had different modes of pathogenesis, with the former having fewer of these genes than the latter. Many of these genes are enriched in proximity to transposable elements, suggesting faster evolution because of the effects of repeat induced point (RIP mutations. A syntenic block of genes, including oxidoreductases, is conserved in most Dothideomycetes and upregulated during infection in L. maculans, suggesting a possible function in response to oxidative stress.

  3. Lights, Camembert, Action! The Role of Human Orbitofrontal Cortex in Encoding Stimuli, Rewards, and Choices

    OpenAIRE

    O'Doherty, John P.

    2007-01-01

    This review outlines some of the main conclusions about the contributions of the orbitofrontal cortex to reward learning and decision making arising from functional neuroimaging studies in humans. It will be argued that human orbitofrontal cortex is involved in a number of distinct functions: signaling the affective value of stimuli as they are perceived, encoding expectations of future reward, and updating these expectations, either by making use of prediction error signals generated in the ...

  4. Genomics and identity: the bioinformatisation of human life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub

    2009-06-01

    The genomics "revolution" is spreading. Originating in the molecular life sciences, it initially affected a number of biomedical research fields such as cancer genomics and clinical genetics. Now, however, a new "wave" of genomic bioinformation is transforming a widening array of disciplines, including those that address the social, historical and cultural dimensions of human life. Increasingly, bioinformation is affecting "human sciences" such as psychiatry, psychology, brain research, behavioural research ("behavioural genomics"), but also anthropology and archaeology ("bioarchaeology"). Thus, bioinformatics is having an impact on how we define and understand ourselves, how identities are formed and constituted, and, finally, on how we (on the basis of these redefined identities) assess and address some of the more concrete societal issues involved in genomics governance in various settings. This article explores how genomics and bioinformation, by influencing research agendas in the human sciences and the humanities, are affecting our self-image, our identity, the way we see ourselves. The impact of bioinformation on self-understanding will be assessed on three levels: (1) the collective level (the impact of comparative genomics on our understanding of human beings as a species), (2) the individual level (the impact of behavioural genomics on our understanding of ourselves as individuals), and (3) the genealogical level (the impact of population genomics on our understanding of human history, notably early human history). This threefold impact will be assessed from two seemingly incompatible philosophical perspectives, namely a "humanistic" perspective (represented in this article by Francis Fukuyama) and a "post-humanistic" one (represented by Peter Sloterdijk). On the basis of this analysis it will be concluded that, rather than focussing on human "enhancement" by adding or deleting genes, genome-oriented practices of the Self will focus on using genomics

  5. The Past, Present, and Future of Human Centromere Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Aldrup-MacDonald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is the chromosomal locus essential for chromosome inheritance and genome stability. Human centromeres are located at repetitive alpha satellite DNA arrays that compose approximately 5% of the genome. Contiguous alpha satellite DNA sequence is absent from the assembled reference genome, limiting current understanding of centromere organization and function. Here, we review the progress in centromere genomics spanning the discovery of the sequence to its molecular characterization and the work done during the Human Genome Project era to elucidate alpha satellite structure and sequence variation. We discuss exciting recent advances in alpha satellite sequence assembly that have provided important insight into the abundance and complex organization of this sequence on human chromosomes. In light of these new findings, we offer perspectives for future studies of human centromere assembly and function.

  6. The Human Genome Project, and recent advances in personalized genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson BJ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brenda J Wilson, Stuart G Nicholls Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: The language of “personalized medicine” and “personal genomics” has now entered the common lexicon. The idea of personalized medicine is the integration of genomic risk assessment alongside other clinical investigations. Consistent with this approach, testing is delivered by health care professionals who are not medical geneticists, and where results represent risks, as opposed to clinical diagnosis of disease, to be interpreted alongside the entirety of a patient's health and medical data. In this review we consider the evidence concerning the application of such personalized genomics within the context of population screening, and potential implications that arise from this. We highlight two general approaches which illustrate potential uses of genomic information in screening. The first is a narrowly targeted approach in which genetic profiling is linked with standard population-based screening for diseases; the second is a broader targeting of variants associated with multiple single gene disorders, performed opportunistically on patients being investigated for unrelated conditions. In doing so we consider the organization and evaluation of tests and services, the challenge of interpretation with less targeted testing, professional confidence, barriers in practice, and education needs. We conclude by discussing several issues pertinent to health policy, namely: avoiding the conflation of genetics with biological determinism, resisting the “technological imperative”, due consideration of the organization of screening services, the need for professional education, as well as informed decision making and public understanding. Keywords: genomics, personalized medicine, ethics, population health, evidence, education

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; León-Narváez, Henry; Longo, Larissa V. G.; Ma, Li-Jun; Malavazi, Iran; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Morais, Flavia V.; Pereira, Maristela; Rodríguez-Brito, Sabrina; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salem-Izacc, Silvia M.; Sykes, Sean M.; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Vallejo, Milene C.; Walter, Maria Emília Machado Telles; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zucker, Jeremy; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Haas, Brian J.; McEwen, Juan G.; Nino-Vega, Gustavo; Puccia, Rosana; San-Blas, Gioconda; Soares, Celia Maria de Almeida; Birren, Bruce W.; Cuomo, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18) and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01). These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic species of

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of human fungal pathogens causing paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Desjardins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18 and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01. These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic

  9. Genomic signatures of human and animal disease in the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Lucy A; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Wang, Jinhong; Peters, Sarah E; Corander, Jukka; Jombart, Thibaut; Baig, Abiyad; Howell, Kate J; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Harris, David; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Campbell, James; Schultsz, Constance; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Langford, Paul R; Rycroft, Andrew N; Wren, Brendan W; Farrar, Jeremy; Baker, Stephen; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Holden, Matthew T G; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J

    2015-03-31

    Streptococcus suis causes disease in pigs worldwide and is increasingly implicated in zoonotic disease in East and South-East Asia. To understand the genetic basis of disease in S. suis, we study the genomes of 375 isolates with detailed clinical phenotypes from pigs and humans from the United Kingdom and Vietnam. Here, we show that isolates associated with disease contain substantially fewer genes than non-clinical isolates, but are more likely to encode virulence factors. Human disease isolates are limited to a single-virulent population, originating in the 1920, s when pig production was intensified, but no consistent genomic differences between pig and human isolates are observed. There is little geographical clustering of different S. suis subpopulations, and the bacterium undergoes high rates of recombination, implying that an increase in virulence anywhere in the world could have a global impact over a short timescale.

  10. Genomes of cryptic chimpanzee Plasmodium species reveal key evolutionary events leading to human malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Sesh A; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Liu, Weimin; Loy, Dorothy E; Learn, Gerald H; Li, Yingying; Shaw, Katharina S; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine; Speede, Sheri; Shaw, George M; Bushman, Frederic D; Brisson, Dustin; Rayner, Julian C; Sharp, Paul M; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2016-03-22

    African apes harbour at least six Plasmodium species of the subgenus Laverania, one of which gave rise to human Plasmodium falciparum. Here we use a selective amplification strategy to sequence the genome of chimpanzee parasites classified as Plasmodium reichenowi and Plasmodium gaboni based on the subgenomic fragments. Genome-wide analyses show that these parasites indeed represent distinct species, with no evidence of cross-species mating. Both P. reichenowi and P. gaboni are 10-fold more diverse than P. falciparum, indicating a very recent origin of the human parasite. We also find a remarkable Laverania-specific expansion of a multigene family involved in erythrocyte remodelling, and show that a short region on chromosome 4, which encodes two essential invasion genes, was horizontally transferred into a recent P. falciparum ancestor. Our results validate the selective amplification strategy for characterizing cryptic pathogen species, and reveal evolutionary events that likely predisposed the precursor of P. falciparum to colonize humans.

  11. Whole exome sequencing with genomic triangulation implicates CDH2-encoded N-cadherin as a novel pathogenic substrate for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkowski, Kari L; Tester, David J; Bos, J Martijn; Haugaa, Kristina H; Ackerman, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a heritable disease characterized by fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes, has a prevalence of approximately 1 in 5000 individuals, and accounts for approximately 20% of sudden cardiac death in the young (≤35 years). ACM is most often inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and variable expression. While mutations in several genes that encode key desmosomal proteins underlie about half of all ACM, the remainder is elusive genetically. Here, whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed with genomic triangulation in an effort to identify a novel explanation for a phenotype-positive, genotype-negative multi-generational pedigree with a presumed autosomal dominant, maternal inheritance of ACM. WES and genomic triangulation was performed on a symptomatic 14-year-old female proband, her affected mother and affected sister, and her unaffected father to elucidate a novel ACM-susceptibility gene for this pedigree. Following variant filtering using Ingenuity® Variant Analysis, gene priority ranking was performed on the candidate genes using ToppGene and Endeavour. The phylogenetic and physiochemical properties of candidate mutations were assessed further by 6 in silico prediction tools. Species alignment and amino acid conservation analysis was performed using the Uniprot Consortium. Tissue expression data was abstracted from Expression Atlas. Following WES and genomic triangulation, CDH2 emerged as a novel, autosomal dominant, ACM-susceptibility gene. The CDH2-encoded N-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion protein predominately expressed in the heart. Cardiac dysfunction has been demonstrated in prior CDH2 knockout and over-expression animal studies. Further in silico mutation prediction, species conservation, and protein expression analysis supported the ultra-rare (minor allele frequency <0.005%) p.Asp407Asn-CDH2 variant as a likely pathogenic variant. Herein, it is demonstrated that genetic mutations in

  12. A comparative genomics study of genetic products potentially encoding ladderane lipid biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetten Mike SM

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fatty acids of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox bacteria contain linearly concatenated cyclobutane moieties, so far unique to biology. These moieties are under high ring strain and are synthesised by a presently unknown biosynthetic pathway. Results Gene clusters encoding enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis in the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis and 137 other organisms were analysed and compared in silico to gain further insight into the pathway of (ladderane fatty acid biosynthesis. In K. stuttgartiensis four large gene clusters encode fatty acid biosynthesis. Next to the regular enzyme complex needed for fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII, the presence of four putative S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM radical enzymes, two enzymes similar to phytoene desaturases and many divergent paralogues of β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (fabF were unusual. Surprisingly, extensive synteny was observed with FASII gene clusters in the deltaproteobacterium Desulfotalea psychrophila. No ladderane lipids were detected in lipid extracts of this organism but we did find unusual polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (PUHC, not detected in K. stuttgartiensis. Conclusion We suggest that the unusual gene clusters of K. stuttgartiensis and D. psychrophila encode a novel pathway for anaerobic PUFA biosynthesis and that K. stuttgartiensis further processes PUFA into ladderane lipids, in similar fashion to the previously proposed route of ladderane lipid biosynthesis. However, the presence of divergent paralogues of fabF with radically different active site topologies may suggest an alternative pathway where ladderane moieties are synthesised externally and are recruited into the pathway of fatty acid biosynthesis. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Michael Galperin (nominated by Prof E. Koonin, Dr Andrei Osterman and Dr Jeremy Selengut.

  13. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    OpenAIRE

    Nordlund Henri R; Grapputo Alessandro; Hytönen Vesa P; Niskanen Einari A; Kulomaa Markku S; Laitinen Olli H

    2005-01-01

    Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Res...

  14. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara P Garcia

    Full Text Available Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH. Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species.

  15. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sara P; Pinho, Armando J

    2011-01-01

    Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef) than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH). Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species.

  16. Genetic variation and the de novo assembly of human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of genetic variation and the assembly of genome sequences are both inextricably linked to advances in DNA-sequencing technology. Short-read massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our ability to discover genetic variation but is insufficient to generate high-quality genome assemblies or resolve most structural variation. Full resolution of variation is only guaranteed by complete de novo assembly of a genome. Here, we review approaches to genome assembly, the nature of gaps or missing sequences, and biases in the assembly process. We describe the challenges of generating a complete de novo genome assembly using current technologies and the impact that being able to perfectly sequence the genome would have on understanding human disease and evolution. Finally, we summarize recent technological advances that improve both contiguity and accuracy and emphasize the importance of complete de novo assembly as opposed to read mapping as the primary means to understanding the full range of human genetic variation.

  17. Identification and classification of conserved RNA secondary structures in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Skou Pedersen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of microRNAs and riboswitches, among others, have shown functional RNAs to be biologically more important and genomically more prevalent than previously anticipated. We have developed a general comparative genomics method based on phylogenetic stochastic context-free grammars for identifying functional RNAs encoded in the human genome and used it to survey an eight-way genome-wide alignment of the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebra-fish, and puffer-fish genomes for deeply conserved functional RNAs. At a loose threshold for acceptance, this search resulted in a set of 48,479 candidate RNA structures. This screen finds a large number of known functional RNAs, including 195 miRNAs, 62 histone 3'UTR stem loops, and various types of known genetic recoding elements. Among the highest-scoring new predictions are 169 new miRNA candidates, as well as new candidate selenocysteine insertion sites, RNA editing hairpins, RNAs involved in transcript auto regulation, and many folds that form singletons or small functional RNA families of completely unknown function. While the rate of false positives in the overall set is difficult to estimate and is likely to be substantial, the results nevertheless provide evidence for many new human functional RNAs and present specific predictions to facilitate their further characterization.

  18. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  19. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Ballard

    Full Text Available Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH, administered either before (encoding phase or immediately after (consolidation phase study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60 were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29 or a consolidation group (N = 31. Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg either 45 min before (encoding or immediately after (consolidation viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29 or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31 prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative, compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  20. Ancient Human Genome Sequence of an Extinct Palaeo-Eskimo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Li, Yingrui; Lindgreen, Stinus;

    2010-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from approximately 4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20x, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an...... for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit....

  1. Recent and ongoing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Hellmann, Ines; Hubisz, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    The recent availability of genome-scale genotyping data has led to the identification of regions of the human genome that seem to have been targeted by selection. These findings have increased our understanding of the evolutionary forces that affect the human genome, have augmented our knowledge...... of gene function and promise to increase our understanding of the genetic basis of disease. However, inferences of selection are challenged by several confounding factors, especially the complex demographic history of human populations, and concordance between studies is variable. Although such studies...

  2. Population genetic inference from personal genome data: impact of ancestry and admixture on human genomic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Jeffrey M; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Peckham, Heather E; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G; Reese, Martin G; Lincoln, Stephen E; Butte, Atul J; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2012-10-05

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas-70% of the European ancestry in today's African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7-8 generations ago.

  3. Expression cloning of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes by histochemical screening of genomic libraries onto an indicator medium containing phenolphthalein diphosphate and methyl green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M L; Rossolini, G M; Lombardi, G; Chiesurin, A; Satta, G

    1997-02-01

    A system for expression cloning of bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes has been developed, and its potential has been investigated. The system is based on histochemical screening of bacterial genomic libraries, constructed in an Escherichia coli multicopy plasmid vector, for phosphatase-producing clones using an indicator medium (named TPMG) made of Tryptose-Phosphate agar supplemented with the phosphatase substrate phenolphthalein diphosphate and the stain methyl green. To test the performance of this system, three genomic libraries were constructed from bacterial strains of different species which showed different patterns of phosphatase activity, and were screened using the TPMG medium. Following a partial screening, three different phosphatase-encoding genes (respectively encoding a class A non-specific acid phosphatase, an acid-hexose phosphatase and a non-specific alkaline phosphatase) were shotgun-cloned from the above libraries, indicating that the TPMG-based expression cloning system can be useful for rapid isolation of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes.

  4. MC148 encoded by human molluscum contagiosum poxvirus is an antagonist for human but not murine CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Gerstoft, J; Schwartz, T W

    2001-01-01

    The viral CC chemokines MC148, encoded by the poxvirus molluscum contagiosum, and viral macrophage inflammatory protein (vMIP)-I and vMIP-II, encoded by human herpesvirus 8, were probed on the murine CC receptor (CCR) 8 in parallel with human CCR8. In calcium mobilization assays, vMIP-I acted...... as a high-affinity agonist, whereas vMIP-II acted as a low-affinity antagonist on the murine CCR8 as well as the human CCR8. MC148 was found to bind and block responses through the human CCR8 with high affinity, but surprisingly MC148 was unable to bind and block responses through the murine CCR8. Because...

  5. Dissecting the human microbiome with single-cell genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2017-06-14

    Recent advances in genome sequencing of single microbial cells enable the assignment of functional roles to members of the human microbiome that cannot currently be cultured. This approach can reveal the genomic basis of phenotypic variation between closely related strains and can be applied to the targeted study of immunogenic bacteria in disease.

  6. Genome Editing: A New Approach to Human Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteus, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the genome with precise spatial and nucleotide resolution (genome editing) has been a powerful research tool. In the past decade, the tools and expertise for using genome editing in human somatic cells and pluripotent cells have increased to such an extent that the approach is now being developed widely as a strategy to treat human disease. The fundamental process depends on creating a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the genome and then allowing the cell's endogenous DSB repair machinery to fix the break such that precise nucleotide changes are made to the DNA sequence. With the development and discovery of several different nuclease platforms and increasing knowledge of the parameters affecting different genome editing outcomes, genome editing frequencies now reach therapeutic relevance for a wide variety of diseases. Moreover, there is a series of complementary approaches to assessing the safety and toxicity of any genome editing process, irrespective of the underlying nuclease used. Finally, the development of genome editing has raised the issue of whether it should be used to engineer the human germline. Although such an approach could clearly prevent the birth of people with devastating and destructive genetic diseases, questions remain about whether human society is morally responsible enough to use this tool.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of human parasitic roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yung Chul; Kim, Won; Park, Joong-Ki

    2011-08-01

    The genome length of the Ascaris lumbricoides, human parasitic roundworm, is 14,281 bp with a nucleotide composition of 22.1% A, 49.8% T, 7.8% C, and 20.3% G. The genome consists of 12 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 1 control region.

  8. Evaluative profiling of arsenic sensing and regulatory systems in the human microbiome project genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Udensi, Udensi K; Simmons, Shaneka S; Hollman, Antoinesha L; Cain, Antia E; Olofinsae, Samson A; Hassan, Oluwabukola A; Kashim, Zainab A; Enejoh, Ojochenemi A; Fasesan, Deborah E; Nashiru, Oyekanmi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of environmental chemicals including arsenic, a type 1 carcinogen, on the composition and function of the human-associated microbiota is of significance in human health and disease. We have developed a suite of bioinformatics and visual analytics methods to evaluate the availability (presence or absence) and abundance of functional annotations in a microbial genome for seven Pfam protein families: As(III)-responsive transcriptional repressor (ArsR), anion-transporting ATPase (ArsA), arsenical pump membrane protein (ArsB), arsenate reductase (ArsC), arsenical resistance operon transacting repressor (ArsD), water/glycerol transport protein (aquaporins), and universal stress protein (USP). These genes encode function for sensing and/or regulating arsenic content in the bacterial cell. The evaluative profiling strategy was applied to 3,274 genomes from which 62 genomes from 18 genera were identified to contain genes for the seven protein families. Our list included 12 genomes in the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) from the following genera: Citrobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Providencia, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus. Gene neighborhood analysis of the arsenic resistance operon in the genome of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482, a human gut symbiont, revealed the adjacent arrangement of genes for arsenite binding/transfer (ArsD) and cytochrome c biosynthesis (DsbD_2). Visual analytics facilitated evaluation of protein annotations in 367 genomes in the phylum Bacteroidetes identified multiple genomes in which genes for ArsD and DsbD_2 were adjacently arranged. Cytochrome c, produced by a posttranslational process, consists of heme-containing proteins important for cellular energy production and signaling. Further research is desired to elucidate arsenic resistance and arsenic-mediated cellular energy production in the Bacteroidetes.

  9. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing of Epstein-Barr virus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kit-San; Chan, Chi-Ping; Wong, Nok-Hei Mickey; Ho, Chau-Ha; Ho, Ting-Hin; Lei, Ting; Deng, Wen; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a highly efficient and powerful tool for RNA-guided editing of the cellular genome. Whether CRISPR/Cas9 can also cleave the genome of DNA viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which undergo episomal replication in human cells, remains to be established. Here, we reported on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome in human cells. Two guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used to direct a targeted deletion of 558 bp in the promoter region of BART (BamHI A rightward transcript) which encodes viral microRNAs (miRNAs). Targeted editing was achieved in several human epithelial cell lines latently infected with EBV, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma C666-1 cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome was efficient. A recombinant virus with the desired deletion was obtained after puromycin selection of cells expressing Cas9 and gRNAs. No off-target cleavage was found by deep sequencing. The loss of BART miRNA expression and activity was verified, supporting the BART promoter as the major promoter of BART RNA. Although CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the multicopy episome of EBV in infected HEK293 cells was mostly incomplete, viruses could be recovered and introduced into other cells at low m.o.i. Recombinant viruses with an edited genome could be further isolated through single-cell sorting. Finally, a DsRed selectable marker was successfully introduced into the EBV genome during the course of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing. Taken together, our work provided not only the first genetic evidence that the BART promoter drives the expression of the BART transcript, but also a new and efficient method for targeted editing of EBV genome in human cells.

  10. The nucleotide sequence of a CpG island demonstrates the presence of the first exon of the gene encoding the human lysosomal membrane protein lamp2 and assigns the gene to Xq24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoni, M; Tribioli, C; Lazzari, B; DeBellis, G; Patrosso, C; Pergolizzi, R; Pellegrini, M; Maestrini, E; Rivella, S; Vezzoni, P

    1991-03-01

    An EagI-EcoRI clone of human genomic DNA, p2-7, mapped to Xq24 has been sequenced. This analysis has confirmed the presence of a CpG island and has identified the first exon of the human LAMP2 gene, encoding a glycoprotein of the lysosomal membrane. Since the p2-7 clone corresponds to single-copy DNA, we can assign the human LAMP2 gene to Xq24.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis uncovers 3 novel loci encoding type six secretion systems differentially distributed in Salmonella serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiviago Carlos A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recently described Type VI Secretion System (T6SS represents a new paradigm of protein secretion in bacteria. A number of bioinformatic studies have been conducted to identify T6SS gene clusters in the available bacterial genome sequences. According to these studies, Salmonella harbors a unique T6SS encoded in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 6 (SPI-6. Since these studies only considered few Salmonella genomes, the present work aimed to identify novel T6SS loci by in silico analysis of every genome sequence of Salmonella available. Results The analysis of sequencing data from 44 completed or in progress Salmonella genome projects allowed the identification of 3 novel T6SS loci. These clusters are located in differentially-distributed genomic islands we designated SPI-19, SPI-20 and SPI-21, respectively. SPI-19 was identified in a subset of S. enterica serotypes including Dublin, Weltevreden, Agona, Gallinarum and Enteritidis. In the later, an internal deletion eliminated most of the island. On the other hand, SPI-20 and SPI-21 were restricted to S. enterica subspecies arizonae (IIIa serotype 62:z4,z23:-. Remarkably, SPI-21 encodes a VgrG protein containing a C-terminal extension similar to S-type pyocins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This is not only the first evolved VgrG described in Salmonella, but also the first evolved VgrG including a pyocin domain described so far in the literature. In addition, the data indicate that SPI-6 T6SS is widely distributed in S. enterica and absent in serotypes Enteritidis, Gallinarum, Agona, Javiana, Paratyphi B, Virchow, IIIa 62:z4,z23:- and IIIb 61:1,v:1,5,(7. Interestingly, while some serotypes harbor multiple T6SS (Dublin, Weltvreden and IIIa 62:z4,z23:- others do not encode for any (Enteritidis, Paratyphi B, Javiana, Virchow and IIIb 61:1,v:1,5,(7. Comparative and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the 4 T6SS loci in Salmonella have a distinct evolutionary history. Finally, we

  12. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73 genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliécer eGonzález Muñoz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73 reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members.

  13. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Muñoz, Eliécer; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida-Odette; Montes, Ricardo A Chávez; de Folter, Stefan; Andrés-Hernández, Liliana; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Sawers, Ruairidh J H

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members.

  14. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  15. Comparative genomics allowed the identification of drug targets against human fungal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Natalia F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of invasive fungal infections (IFIs has increased steadily worldwide in the last few decades. Particularly, there has been a global rise in the number of infections among immunosuppressed people. These patients present severe clinical forms of the infections, which are commonly fatal, and they are more susceptible to opportunistic fungal infections than non-immunocompromised people. IFIs have historically been associated with high morbidity and mortality, partly because of the limitations of available antifungal therapies, including side effects, toxicities, drug interactions and antifungal resistance. Thus, the search for alternative therapies and/or the development of more specific drugs is a challenge that needs to be met. Genomics has created new ways of examining genes, which open new strategies for drug development and control of human diseases. Results In silico analyses and manual mining selected initially 57 potential drug targets, based on 55 genes experimentally confirmed as essential for Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus and other 2 genes (kre2 and erg6 relevant for fungal survival within the host. Orthologs for those 57 potential targets were also identified in eight human fungal pathogens (C. albicans, A. fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Paracoccidioides lutzii, Coccidioides immitis, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Of those, 10 genes were present in all pathogenic fungi analyzed and absent in the human genome. We focused on four candidates: trr1 that encodes for thioredoxin reductase, rim8 that encodes for a protein involved in the proteolytic activation of a transcriptional factor in response to alkaline pH, kre2 that encodes for α-1,2-mannosyltransferase and erg6 that encodes for Δ(24-sterol C-methyltransferase. Conclusions Our data show that the comparative genomics analysis of eight fungal pathogens enabled the identification of

  16. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular

  17. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, L.; Meyerson, M.; Aldape, K.; Bigner, D.; Mikkelsen, T.; VandenBerg, S.; Kahn, A.; Penny, R.; Gerhard, D. S.; Getz, G.; Brennan, C.; Taylor, B. S.; Winckler, W.; Park, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Hoadley, K. A.; Verhaak, R. G. W.; Hayes, D. N.; Spellman, Paul T.; Absher, D.; Weir, B. A.; Ding, L.; Wheeler, D.; Lawrence, M. S.; Cibulskis, K.; Mardis, E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wilson, R. K.; Donehower, L.; Wheeler, D. A.; Purdom, E.; Wallis, J.; Laird, P. W.; Herman, J. G.; Schuebel, K. E.; Weisenberger, D. J.; Baylin, S. B.; Schultz, N.; Yao, Jun; Wiedemeyer, R.; Weinstein, J.; Sander, C.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gray, J.; Kucherlapati, R.; Lander, E. S.; Myers, R. M.; Perou, C. M.; McLendon, Roger; Friedman, Allan; Van Meir, Erwin G; Brat, Daniel J; Mastrogianakis, Gena Marie; Olson, Jeffrey J; Lehman, Norman; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Bogler, Oliver; Berger, Mitchel; Prados, Michael; Muzny, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Scherer, Steve; Sabo, Aniko; Nazareth, Lynn; Lewis, Lora; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Ren, Yanru; Alvi, Omar; Yao, Jiqiang; Hawes, Alicia; Jhangiani, Shalini; Fowler, Gerald; San Lucas, Anthony; Kovar, Christie; Cree, Andrew; Dinh, Huyen; Santibanez, Jireh; Joshi, Vandita; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Sougnez, Carrie; Fennell, Tim; Mahan, Scott; Wilkinson, Jane; Ziaugra, Liuda; Onofrio, Robert; Bloom, Toby; Nicol, Rob; Ardlie, Kristin; Baldwin, Jennifer; Gabriel, Stacey; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Larson, David E.; Shi, Xiaoqi; Abbott, Rachel; Fulton, Lucinda; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wendl, Michael C.; Meyer, Rick; Tang, Yuzhu; Lin, Ling; Osborne, John R.; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Miner, Tracie L.; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Swift, Gary; Courtney, William; Pohl, Craig; Abbott, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Leong, Shin; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Wiechert, Maddy; Vickery, Tammi; Scott, Sacha; Dooling, David J.; Chinwalla, Asif; Weinstock, George M.; O'Kelly, Michael; Robinson, Jim; Alexe, Gabriele; Beroukhim, Rameen; Carter, Scott; Chiang, Derek; Gould, Josh; Gupta, Supriya; Korn, Josh; Mermel, Craig; Mesirov, Jill; Monti, Stefano; Nguyen, Huy; Parkin, Melissa; Reich, Michael; Stransky, Nicolas; Garraway, Levi; Golub, Todd; Protopopov, Alexei; Perna, Ilana; Aronson, Sandy; Sathiamoorthy, Narayan; Ren, Georgia; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kong, Sek Won; Xiao, Yonghong; Kohane, Isaac S.; Seidman, Jon; Cope, Leslie; Pan, Fei; Van Den Berg, David; Van Neste, Leander; Yi, Joo Mi; Li, Jun Z.; Southwick, Audrey; Brady, Shannon; Aggarwal, Amita; Chung, Tisha; Sherlock, Gavin; Brooks, James D.; Jakkula, Lakshmi R.; Lapuk, Anna V.; Marr, Henry; Dorton, Shannon; Choi, Yoon Gi; Han, Ju; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Victoria; Durinck, Steffen; Robinson, Mark; Wang, Nicholas J.; Vranizan, Karen; Peng, Vivian; Van Name, Eric; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Ngai, John; Conboy, John G.; Parvin, Bahram; Feiler, Heidi S.; Speed, Terence P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Olshen, Adam; Lash, Alex; Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Stukalov, Alexey; Gross, Benjamin; Cerami, Ethan; Wang, Wei Qing; Qin, Li-Xuan; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Villafania, Liliana; Cavatore, Magali; Borsu, Laetitia; Viale, Agnes; Gerald, William; Topal, Michael D.; Qi, Yuan; Balu, Sai; Shi, Yan; Wu, George; Bittner, Michael; Shelton, Troy; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Morris, Scott; Beasley, Debbie; Sanders, Sheri; Sfeir, Robert; Chen, Jessica; Nassau, David; Feng, Larry; Hickey, Erin; Schaefer, Carl; Madhavan, Subha; Buetow, Ken; Barker, Anna; Vockley, Joseph; Compton, Carolyn; Vaught, Jim; Fielding, Peter; Collins, Francis; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Thomson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas ( TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large- scale multi- dimensional analysis of these molecular char

  18. Isolation of expressed sequences encoded by the human Xq terminal portion using microclone probes generated by laser microdissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, H.; Kang, X. (Univ. of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, Ontario (Canada)); Hadano, Shinji; Kogi, Mieko; Wakasa, Kyo (Tokai Univ. School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)); Ikeda, J.E. (Univ. of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, Ontario (Canada) Tokai Univ. School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan) National Institute of Agrobiological Resources, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    The genes that cause a variety of neurologic and neuromuscular disorders have been mapped to the distal region of Xq. In an effort to isolate genes from this area, a regional genomic library of the distal 30% of Xq was constructed from a single metaphase spread by means of laser microdissection and single unique primer-polymerase chain reaction. Using pooled probes of 1000 clones from the genomic library, human brain cDNA libraries were screened for expressed sequences encoded by this region. From the 250,000 cDNA clones screened so far, 10 nonoverlapping sequences that mapped back to the target portion were isolated. The complete nucleotide sequences of these cDNA clones have been determined. Analysis of the sequences indicates that none has significant similarity to previously characterized primate genes. One sequence mapping to Xq27.3-qter contained an open reading frame of 281 amino acids and was expressed in every tissue tested. This gene, as well as others isolated in this manner, may prove to be a candidate gene for heritable disorders mapping to this region. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the ‘normal’ small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  20. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-12-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the 'normal' small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  1. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-08-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-binding activity. No hybridization was detected in RNA extracted from ovary, spleen, kidney, or liver, which contain relatively low levels of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein activity. Analysis of genomic clones isolated from an EcoRI bovine genomic library demonstrated that the bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein gene is composed of four exons and three introns. Two putative promoter sequences were identified in the cloned 5' sequence of the gene.

  2. A strategy for genetic modification of the spike-encoding segment of human reovirus T3D for reovirus targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wollenberg, D J M; van den Hengel, S K; Dautzenberg, I J C; Cramer, S J; Kranenburg, O; Hoeben, R C

    2008-12-01

    Human Orthoreovirus Type 3 Dearing is not pathogenic to humans and has been evaluated clinically as an oncolytic agent. Its transduction efficiency and the tumor cell selectivity may be enhanced by incorporating ligands for alternative receptors. However, the genetic modification of reoviruses has been difficult, and genetic targeting of reoviruses has not been reported so far. Here we describe a technique for generating genetically targeted reoviruses. The propagation of wild-type reoviruses on cells expressing a modified sigma 1-encoding segment embedded in a conventional RNA polymerase II transcript leads to substitution of the wild-type genome segment by the modified version. This technique was used for generating reoviruses that are genetically targeted to an artificial receptor expressed on U118MG cells. These cells lack the junction adhesion molecule-1 and therefore resist infection by wild-type reoviruses. The targeted reoviruses were engineered to carry the ligand for this receptor at the C terminus of the sigma 1 spike protein. This demonstrates that the C terminus of the sigma 1 protein is a suitable locale for the insertion of oligopeptide ligands and that targeting of reoviruses is feasible. The genetically targeted viruses can be propagated using the modified U118MG cells as helper cells. This technique may be applicable for the improvement of human reoviruses as oncolytic agents.

  3. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  4. The Human Genome Project: big science transforms biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Leroy; Rowen, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has transformed biology through its integrated big science approach to deciphering a reference human genome sequence along with the complete sequences of key model organisms. The project exemplifies the power, necessity and success of large, integrated, cross-disciplinary efforts - so-called 'big science' - directed towards complex major objectives. In this article, we discuss the ways in which this ambitious endeavor led to the development of novel technologies and analytical tools, and how it brought the expertise of engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians together with biologists. It established an open approach to data sharing and open-source software, thereby making the data resulting from the project accessible to all. The genome sequences of microbes, plants and animals have revolutionized many fields of science, including microbiology, virology, infectious disease and plant biology. Moreover, deeper knowledge of human sequence variation has begun to alter the practice of medicine. The Human Genome Project has inspired subsequent large-scale data acquisition initiatives such as the International HapMap Project, 1000 Genomes, and The Cancer Genome Atlas, as well as the recently announced Human Brain Project and the emerging Human Proteome Project.

  5. The gene encoding human intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) is located on chromosome 21q22.3 clustered with other members of the trefoil peptide family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinery, R. [Royal College of Surgeons of England, London (United Kingdom); Williamson, J.; Poulsom, R. [Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The gene coding for human intestinal trefoil factor (hITF), a recently described cellular motogen produced by gastrointestinal goblet cells and epithelia elsewhere, is a member of the rapidly growing trefoil peptide family. In a rodent-human somatic cell hybrid panel, the hITF (HGMW-approved symbol TFF3) genomic locus segregated with human chromosome 21q. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a 2.1-kb genomic probe of the hITF gene mapped this locus more precisely to the q22.3 region. Triple fluorescence in situ hybridization, together with physical mapping of human genomic DNA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, revealed that the hITF gene is tightly linked to those encoding the other known human trefoil peptides, namely the breast cancer estrogen-inducable gene pS2 (BCEI) and human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP/SML1). This gene family could become a useful marker for the genetic and physical mapping of chromosome 21 and for a better definition of the region involved in the clinical phenotype of several genetic diseases. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Functional genomics of human brain development and implications for autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziats, M N; Grosvenor, L P; Rennert, O M

    2015-10-27

    Transcription of the inherited DNA sequence into copies of messenger RNA is the most fundamental process by which the genome functions to guide development. Encoded sequence information, inherited epigenetic marks and environmental influences all converge at the level of mRNA gene expression to allow for cell-type-specific, tissue-specific, spatial and temporal patterns of expression. Thus, the transcriptome represents a complex interplay between inherited genomic structure, dynamic experiential demands and external signals. This property makes transcriptome studies uniquely positioned to provide insight into complex genetic-epigenetic-environmental processes such as human brain development, and disorders with non-Mendelian genetic etiologies such as autism spectrum disorders. In this review, we describe recent studies exploring the unique functional genomics profile of the human brain during neurodevelopment. We then highlight two emerging areas of research with great potential to increase our understanding of functional neurogenomics-non-coding RNA expression and gene interaction networks. Finally, we review previous functional genomics studies of autism spectrum disorder in this context, and discuss how investigations at the level of functional genomics are beginning to identify convergent molecular mechanisms underlying this genetically heterogeneous disorder.

  7. Open chromatin encoded in DNA sequence is the signature of 'master' replication origins in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audit, Benjamin; Zaghloul, Lamia; Vaillant, Cédric; Chevereau, Guillaume; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain

    2009-10-01

    For years, progress in elucidating the mechanisms underlying replication initiation and its coupling to transcriptional activities and to local chromatin structure has been hampered by the small number (approximately 30) of well-established origins in the human genome and more generally in mammalian genomes. Recent in silico studies of compositional strand asymmetries revealed a high level of organization of human genes around 1000 putative replication origins. Here, by comparing with recently experimentally identified replication origins, we provide further support that these putative origins are active in vivo. We show that regions approximately 300-kb wide surrounding most of these putative replication origins that replicate early in the S phase are hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated and present a significant enrichment in genomic energy barriers that impair nucleosome formation (nucleosome-free regions). This suggests that these putative replication origins are specified by an open chromatin structure favored by the DNA sequence. We discuss how this distinctive attribute makes these origins, further qualified as 'master' replication origins, priviledged loci for future research to decipher the human spatio-temporal replication program. Finally, we argue that these 'master' origins are likely to play a key role in genome dynamics during evolution and in pathological situations.

  8. Who ate whom? Adaptive Helicobacter genomic changes that accompanied a host jump from early humans to large felines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eppinger

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection of humans is so old that its population genetic structure reflects that of ancient human migrations. A closely related species, Helicobacter acinonychis, is specific for large felines, including cheetahs, lions, and tigers, whereas hosts more closely related to humans harbor more distantly related Helicobacter species. This observation suggests a jump between host species. But who ate whom and when did it happen? In order to resolve this question, we determined the genomic sequence of H. acinonychis strain Sheeba and compared it to genomes from H. pylori. The conserved core genes between the genomes are so similar that the host jump probably occurred within the last 200,000 (range 50,000-400,000 years. However, the Sheeba genome also possesses unique features that indicate the direction of the host jump, namely from early humans to cats. Sheeba possesses an unusually large number of highly fragmented genes, many encoding outer membrane proteins, which may have been destroyed in order to bypass deleterious responses from the feline host immune system. In addition, the few Sheeba-specific genes that were found include a cluster of genes encoding sialylation of the bacterial cell surface carbohydrates, which were imported by horizontal genetic exchange and might also help to evade host immune defenses. These results provide a genomic basis for elucidating molecular events that allow bacteria to adapt to novel animal hosts.

  9. Relevance of the Human Genome Project to inherited metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, J

    1994-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is an international effort to identify the complete structure of the human genome. HUGO, the Human Genome Organization, facilitates international cooperation and exchange of information while the Genome Data Base will act as the on-line information retrieval and storage system for the huge amount of information being accumulated. The clinical register MIM (Mendelian Inheritance in Man) established by Victor McKusick is now an on-line resource that will allow biochemists working with inborn errors of metabolism to access the rapidly expanding body of knowledge. Biochemical and molecular genetics are complementary and should draw together to find solutions to the academic and clinical problems posed by inborn errors of metabolism.

  10. Genome editing: a robust technology for human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Pandian; Song, Minjung; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells comprise induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells, which have tremendous potential for biological and therapeutic applications. The development of efficient technologies for the targeted genome alteration of stem cells in disease models is a prerequisite for utilizing stem cells to their full potential. Genome editing of stem cells is possible with the help of synthetic nucleases that facilitate site-specific modification of a gene of interest. Recent advances in genome editing techniques have improved the efficiency and speed of the development of stem cells for human disease models. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated system are powerful tools for editing DNA at specific loci. Here, we discuss recent technological advances in genome editing with site-specific nucleases in human stem cells.

  11. Localizing recent adaptive evolution in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, Scott H; Hubisz, Melissa J; Clark, Andrew G;

    2007-01-01

    Identifying genomic locations that have experienced selective sweeps is an important first step toward understanding the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. Using statistical methods that account for the confounding effects of population demography, recombination rate variation, and single......-nucleotide polymorphism ascertainment, while also providing fine-scale estimates of the position of the selected site, we analyzed a genomic dataset of 1.2 million human single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in African-American, European-American, and Chinese samples. We identify 101 regions of the human genome......, clusters of olfactory receptors, genes involved in nervous system development and function, immune system genes, and heat shock genes. We also observe consistent evidence of selective sweeps in centromeric regions. In general, we find that recent adaptation is strikingly pervasive in the human genome...

  12. Genomes of rumen bacteria encode atypical pathways for fermenting hexoses to short-chain fatty acids

    KAUST Repository

    Hackmann, Timothy J.

    2017-09-11

    Bacteria have been thought to follow only a few well-recognized biochemical pathways when fermenting glucose or other hexoses. These pathways have been chiseled in the stone of textbooks for decades, with most sources rendering them as they appear in the classic 1986 text by Gottschalk. Still, it is unclear how broadly these pathways apply, given that they were established and delineated biochemically with only a few model organisms. Here we show that well-recognized pathways often cannot explain fermentation products formed by bacteria. In the most extensive analysis of its kind, we reconstructed pathways for glucose fermentation from genomes of 48 species and subspecies of bacteria from one environment (the rumen). In total, 44% of these bacteria had atypical pathways, including several that are completely unprecedented for bacteria or any organism. In detail, 8% of bacteria had an atypical pathway for acetate formation; 21% for propionate or succinate formation; 6% for butyrate formation; and 33% had an atypical or incomplete Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. This study shows that reconstruction of metabolic pathways-a common goal of omics studies-could be incorrect if well-recognized pathways are used for reference. Further, it calls for renewed efforts to delineate fermentation pathways biochemically. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. [The Human Genome Project and the right to intellectual property].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambrón, A

    2000-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was designed to achieve two objectives. The scientific goal was the mapping and sequencing of the human genome and the social objective was to benefit the health and well-being of humanity. Although the first objective is nearing successful conclusion, the same cannot be said for the second, mainly because the benefits will take some time to be applicable and effective, but also due to the very nature of the project. The HGP also had a clear economic dimension, which has had a major bearing on its social side. Operating in the midst of these three dimensions is the right to intellectual property (although not just this right), which has facilitated the granting of patents on human genes. Put another way, the carrying out of the HGP has required the privatisation of knowledge of the human genome, and this can be considered an attack on the genetic heritage of mankind.

  14. Identification of human microRNA-like sequences embedded within the protein-encoding genes of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved, short (18-22 nts, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs of mRNAs. While numerous cellular microRNAs have been associated with the progression of various diseases including cancer, miRNAs associated with retroviruses have not been well characterized. Herein we report identification of microRNA-like sequences in coding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. RESULTS: Based on our earlier proteomics and bioinformatics studies, we have identified 8 cellular miRNAs that are predicted to bind to the mRNAs of multiple proteins that are dysregulated during HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells in vitro. In silico analysis of the full length and mature sequences of these 8 miRNAs and comparisons with all the genomic and subgenomic sequences of HIV-1 strains in global databases revealed that the first 18/18 sequences of the mature hsa-miR-195 sequence (including the short seed sequence, matched perfectly (100%, or with one nucleotide mismatch, within the envelope (env genes of five HIV-1 genomes from Africa. In addition, we have identified 4 other miRNA-like sequences (hsa-miR-30d, hsa-miR-30e, hsa-miR-374a and hsa-miR-424 within the env and the gag-pol encoding regions of several HIV-1 strains, albeit with reduced homology. Mapping of the miRNA-homologues of env within HIV-1 genomes localized these sequence to the functionally significant variable regions of the env glycoprotein gp120 designated V1, V2, V4 and V5. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that microRNA-like sequences are embedded within the protein-encoding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Given that the V1 to V5 regions of HIV-1 envelopes contain specific, well-characterized domains that are critical for immune responses, virus neutralization and disease progression, we propose that the newly discovered miRNA-like sequences within the HIV-1 genomes may have evolved to self-regulate survival of the

  15. Transposable element derived DNaseI-hypersensitive sites in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan I King

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements (TEs are abundant genomic sequences that have been found to contribute to genome evolution in unexpected ways. Here, we characterize the evolutionary and functional characteristics of TE-derived human genome regulatory sequences uncovered by the high throughput mapping of DNaseI-hypersensitive (HS sites. Results Human genome TEs were found to contribute substantially to HS regulatory sequences characterized in CD4+ T cells: 23% of HS sites contain TE-derived sequences. While HS sites are far more evolutionarily conserved than non HS sites in the human genome, consistent with their functional importance, TE-derived HS sites are highly divergent. Nevertheless, TE-derived HS sites were shown to be functionally relevant in terms of driving gene expression in CD4+ T cells. Genes involved in immune response are statistically over-represented among genes with TE-derived HS sites. A number of genes with both TE-derived HS sites and immune tissue related expression patterns were found to encode proteins involved in immune response such as T cell specific receptor antigens and secreted cytokines as well as proteins with clinical relevance to HIV and cancer. Genes with TE-derived HS sites have higher average levels of sequence and expression divergence between human and mouse orthologs compared to genes with non TE-derived HS sites. Conclusion The results reported here support the notion that TEs provide a specific genome-wide mechanism for generating functionally relevant gene regulatory divergence between evolutionary lineages. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Wolfgang J. Miller (nominated by Jerzy Jurka, Itai Yanai and Mikhail S.Gelfand.

  16. The human HNRPD locus maps to 4q21 and encodes a highly conserved protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, L A; Li, M J; DePace, A; Bray-Ward, P; Maizels, N

    1998-05-01

    The hnRNP D protein interacts with nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Like many other proteins that interact with RNA, it contains RBD (or "RRM") domains and arg-gly-gly (RGG) motifs. We have examined the organization and localization of the human and murine genes that encode the hnRNP D protein. Comparison of the predicted sequences of the hnRNP D proteins in human and mouse shows that they are 96.9% identical (98.9% similar). This very high level of conservation suggests a critical function for hnRNP D. Sequence analysis of the human HNRPD gene shows that the protein is encoded by eight exons and that two additional exons specify sequences in the 3' UTR. Use of two of the coding exons is determined by alternative splicing of the HNRPD mRNA. The human HNRPD gene maps to 4q21. The mouse Hnrpd gene maps to the F region of chromosome 3, which is syntenic with the human 4q21 region.

  17. Comparative metagenomic analysis of plasmid encoded functions in the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchesi Julian R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the pool of mobile genetic elements associated with the human gut microbiome. In this study we employed the culture independent TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the human gut microbiota, and a comparative metagenomic analysis to investigate the distribution and relative abundance of functions encoded by these plasmids in the human gut microbiome. Results Novel plasmids were acquired from the human gut microbiome, and homologous nucleotide sequences with high identity (>90% to two plasmids (pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were identified in the multiple human gut microbiomes analysed here. However, no homologous nucleotide sequences to these plasmids were identified in the murine gut or environmental metagenomes. Functions encoded by the plasmids pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were found to be more prevalent in the human gut microbiome when compared to microbial communities from other environments. Among the most prevalent functions identified was a putative RelBE toxin-antitoxin (TA addiction module, and subsequent analysis revealed that this was most closely related to putative TA modules from gut associated bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes. A broad phylogenetic distribution of RelE toxin genes was observed in gut associated bacterial species (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, but no RelE homologues were identified in gut associated archaeal species. We also provide indirect evidence for the horizontal transfer of these genes between bacterial species belonging to disparate phylogenetic divisions, namely Gram negative Proteobacteria and Gram positive species from the Firmicutes division. Conclusions The application of a culture independent system to capture novel plasmids from the human gut mobile metagenome, coupled with subsequent comparative metagenomic analysis, highlighted the unexpected prevalence of plasmid encoded functions in the gut microbial ecosystem. In

  18. 75 FR 52537 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  19. 75 FR 2148 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  20. 78 FR 24223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd floor Conf. Room 3146, 5635 Fishers...

  1. 76 FR 3643 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January...

  2. EYK1 encoding erythrulose kinase as a catabolic selectable marker for genome editing in the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermies, Marie; Denies, Olivia; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Fickers, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    We report here on EYK1, encoding erythrulose kinase, as an efficient catabolic selectable marker for genome editing in Y. lipolytica. Compared to auxotrophic markers, EYK1 increases the growth rate of transformants and allows improved efficiency of transformation. The utility of the marker EYK1 in a replicative vector was also demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P; Bernstein, Bradley E; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K; Ward, Lucas D; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L; Farnham, Peggy J; Feingold, Elise A; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C; Gilbert, David M; Gingeras, Thomas R; Green, Eric D; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D; Myers, Richard M; Pazin, Michael J; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P; Hardison, Ross C

    2014-04-29

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease.

  4. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Genome sequence of Candidatus Riesia pediculischaeffi, endosymbiont of chimpanzee lice, and genomic comparison of recently acquired endosymbionts from human and chimpanzee lice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Bret M; Allen, Julie M; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Reed, David L

    2014-09-11

    The obligate-heritable endosymbionts of insects possess some of the smallest known bacterial genomes. This is likely due to loss of genomic material during symbiosis. The mode and rate of this erosion may change over evolutionary time: faster in newly formed associations and slower in long-established ones. The endosymbionts of human and anthropoid primate lice present a unique opportunity to study genome erosion in newly established (or young) symbionts. This is because we have a detailed phylogenetic history of these endosymbionts with divergence dates for closely related species. This allows for genome evolution to be studied in detail and rates of change to be estimated in a phylogenetic framework. Here, we sequenced the genome of the chimpanzee louse endosymbiont (Candidatus Riesia pediculischaeffi) and compared it with the closely related genome of the human body louse endosymbiont. From this comparison, we found evidence for recent genome erosion leading to gene loss in these endosymbionts. Although gene loss was detected, it was not significantly greater than in older endosymbionts from aphids and ants. Additionally, we searched for genes associated with B-vitamin synthesis in the two louse endosymbiont genomes because these endosymbionts are believed to synthesize essential B vitamins absent in the louse's diet. All of the expected genes were present, except those involved in thiamin synthesis. We failed to find genes encoding for proteins involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin or any complete exogenous means of salvaging thiamin, suggesting there is an undescribed mechanism for the salvage of thiamin. Finally, genes encoding for the pantothenate de novo biosynthesis pathway were located on a plasmid in both taxa along with a heat shock protein. Movement of these genes onto a plasmid may be functionally and evolutionarily significant, potentially increasing production and guarding against the deleterious effects of mutation. These data add to a growing

  6. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-02-15

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses.

  7. The genome in three dimensions: a new frontier in human brain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amanda C; Bharadwaj, Rahul; Whittle, Catheryne; Krueger, Winfried; Mirnics, Karoly; Hurd, Yasmin; Rasmussen, Theodore; Akbarian, Schahram

    2014-06-15

    Less than 1.5% of the human genome encodes protein. However, vast portions of the human genome are subject to transcriptional and epigenetic regulation, and many noncoding regulatory DNA elements are thought to regulate the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes. For example, chromosomal "loopings" are pivotal for the orderly process of gene expression, by enabling distal regulatory enhancer or silencer elements to directly interact with proximal promoter and transcription start sites, potentially bypassing hundreds of kilobases of interspersed sequence on the linear genome. To date, however, epigenetic studies in the human brain are mostly limited to the exploration of DNA methylation and posttranslational modifications of the nucleosome core histones. In contrast, very little is known about the regulation of supranucleosomal structures. Here, we show that chromosome conformation capture, a widely used approach to study higher-order chromatin, is applicable to tissue collected postmortem, thereby informing about genome organization in the human brain. We introduce chromosome conformation capture protocols for brain and compare higher-order chromatin structures at the chromosome 6p22.2-22.1 schizophrenia and bipolar disorder susceptibility locus, and additional neurodevelopmental risk genes, (DPP10, MCPH1) in adult prefrontal cortex and various cell culture systems, including neurons derived from reprogrammed skin cells. We predict that the exploration of three-dimensional genome architectures and function will open up new frontiers in human brain research and psychiatric genetics and provide novel insights into the epigenetic risk architectures of regulatory noncoding DNA. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Food and human gut as reservoirs of transferable antibiotic resistance encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc eRolain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR over the past decade in human pathogens has become a worldwide health concern. Recent genomic and metagenomic studies in humans, animals, in food and in the environment have led to the discovery of a huge reservoir of AR genes called the resistome that could be mobilized and transferred from these sources to human pathogens. AR is a natural phenomenon developed by bacteria to protect antibiotic-producing bacteria from their own products and also to increase their survival in highly competitive microbial environments. Although antibiotics are used extensively in humans and animals, there is also considerable usage of antibiotics in agriculture, especially in animal feeds and aquaculture. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the sources of AR and the use of antibiotics in these reservoirs as selectors for emergence of AR bacteria in humans via the food chain.

  9. A Legionella pneumophila effector protein encoded in a region of genomic plasticity binds to Dot/Icm-modified vacuoles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Ninio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. In the environment, L. pneumophila is found in fresh water reservoirs in a large spectrum of environmental conditions, where the bacteria are able to replicate within a variety of protozoan hosts. To survive within eukaryotic cells, L. pneumophila require a type IV secretion system, designated Dot/Icm, that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. In recent years, a number of Dot/Icm substrate proteins have been identified; however, the function of most of these proteins remains unknown, and it is unclear why the bacterium maintains such a large repertoire of effectors to promote its survival. Here we investigate a region of the L. pneumophila chromosome that displays a high degree of plasticity among four sequenced L. pneumophila strains. Analysis of GC content suggests that several genes encoded in this region were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Protein translocation studies establish that this region of genomic plasticity encodes for multiple Dot/Icm effectors. Ectopic expression studies in mammalian cells indicate that one of these substrates, a protein called PieA, has unique effector activities. PieA is an effector that can alter lysosome morphology and associates specifically with vacuoles that support L. pneumophila replication. It was determined that the association of PieA with vacuoles containing L. pneumophila requires modifications to the vacuole mediated by other Dot/Icm effectors. Thus, the localization properties of PieA reveal that the Dot/Icm system has the ability to spatially and temporally control the association of an effector with vacuoles containing L. pneumophila through activities mediated by other effector proteins.

  10. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  11. The Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1 genome sequence reflects its genetic adaptation to the human oral cavity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ventura

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria, one of the relatively dominant components of the human intestinal microbiota, are considered one of the key groups of beneficial intestinal bacteria (probiotic bacteria. However, in addition to health-promoting taxa, the genus Bifidobacterium also includes Bifidobacterium dentium, an opportunistic cariogenic pathogen. The genetic basis for the ability of B. dentium to survive in the oral cavity and contribute to caries development is not understood. The genome of B. dentium Bd1, a strain isolated from dental caries, was sequenced to completion to uncover a single circular 2,636,368 base pair chromosome with 2,143 predicted open reading frames. Annotation of the genome sequence revealed multiple ways in which B. dentium has adapted to the oral environment through specialized nutrient acquisition, defences against antimicrobials, and gene products that increase fitness and competitiveness within the oral niche. B. dentium Bd1 was shown to metabolize a wide variety of carbohydrates, consistent with genome-based predictions, while colonization and persistence factors implicated in tissue adhesion, acid tolerance, and the metabolism of human saliva-derived compounds were also identified. Global transcriptome analysis demonstrated that many of the genes encoding these predicted traits are highly expressed under relevant physiological conditions. This is the first report to identify, through various genomic approaches, specific genetic adaptations of a Bifidobacterium taxon, Bifidobacterium dentium Bd1, to a lifestyle as a cariogenic microorganism in the oral cavity. In silico analysis and comparative genomic hybridization experiments clearly reveal a high level of genome conservation among various B. dentium strains. The data indicate that the genome of this opportunistic cariogen has evolved through a very limited number of horizontal gene acquisition events, highlighting the narrow boundaries that separate commensals from

  12. Human genome and open source: balancing ethics and business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has been completed thanks to a massive use of computer techniques, as well as the adoption of the open-source business and research model by the scientists involved. This model won over the proprietary model and allowed a quick propagation and feedback of research results among peers. In this paper, the author will analyse some ethical and legal issues emerging by the use of such computer model in the Human Genome property rights. The author will argue that the Open Source is the best business model, as it is able to balance business and human rights perspectives.

  13. Sequencing and analysis of an Irish human genome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tong, Pin

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies generating complete human sequences from Asian, African and European subgroups have revealed population-specific variation and disease susceptibility loci. Here, choosing a DNA sample from a population of interest due to its relative geographical isolation and genetic impact on further populations, we extend the above studies through the generation of 11-fold coverage of the first Irish human genome sequence.

  14. From hacking the human genome to editing organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In the recent decades, human genome engineering has been one of the major interesting research subjects, essentially because it raises new possibilities for personalized medicine and biotechnologies. With the development of engineered nucleases such as the Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), the Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and more recently the Clustered Regularly Interspaced short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), the field of human genome edition has evolved very rapidly. Every new genetic tool is broadening the scope of applications on human tissues, even before we can completely master each of these tools. In this review, we will present the recent advances regarding human genome edition tools, we will discuss the numerous implications they have in research and medicine, and we will mention the limits and concerns about such technologies.

  15. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  16. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  17. Genomic divergences among cattle, dog and human estimated from large-scale alignments of genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shade Larry L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 11 Mb of finished high quality genomic sequences were sampled from cattle, dog and human to estimate genomic divergences and their regional variation among these lineages. Results Optimal three-way multi-species global sequence alignments for 84 cattle clones or loci (each >50 kb of genomic sequence were constructed using the human and dog genome assemblies as references. Genomic divergences and substitution rates were examined for each clone and for various sequence classes under different functional constraints. Analysis of these alignments revealed that the overall genomic divergences are relatively constant (0.32–0.37 change/site for pairwise comparisons among cattle, dog and human; however substitution rates vary across genomic regions and among different sequence classes. A neutral mutation rate (2.0–2.2 × 10(-9 change/site/year was derived from ancestral repetitive sequences, whereas the substitution rate in coding sequences (1.1 × 10(-9 change/site/year was approximately half of the overall rate (1.9–2.0 × 10(-9 change/site/year. Relative rate tests also indicated that cattle have a significantly faster rate of substitution as compared to dog and that this difference is about 6%. Conclusion This analysis provides a large-scale and unbiased assessment of genomic divergences and regional variation of substitution rates among cattle, dog and human. It is expected that these data will serve as a baseline for future mammalian molecular evolution studies.

  18. New complete genome sequences of human rhinoviruses shed light on their phylogeny and genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdobnov Evgeny M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (HRV, the most frequent cause of respiratory infections, include 99 different serotypes segregating into two species, A and B. Rhinoviruses share extensive genomic sequence similarity with enteroviruses and both are part of the picornavirus family. Nevertheless they differ significantly at the phenotypic level. The lack of HRV full-length genome sequences and the absence of analysis comparing picornaviruses at the whole genome level limit our knowledge of the genomic features supporting these differences. Results Here we report complete genome sequences of 12 HRV-A and HRV-B serotypes, more than doubling the current number of available HRV sequences. The whole-genome maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis suggests that HRV-B and human enteroviruses (HEV diverged from the last common ancestor after their separation from HRV-A. On the other hand, compared to HEV, HRV-B are more related to HRV-A in the capsid and 3B-C regions. We also identified the presence of a 2C cis-acting replication element (cre in HRV-B that is not present in HRV-A, and that had been previously characterized only in HEV. In contrast to HEV viruses, HRV-A and HRV-B share also markedly lower GC content along the whole genome length. Conclusion Our findings provide basis to speculate about both the biological similarities and the differences (e.g. tissue tropism, temperature adaptation or acid lability of these three groups of viruses.

  19. Genome sequencing of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in conjunction with a medical school human anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akash; Dougherty, Max; Findlay, Gregory M; Geisheker, Madeleine; Klein, Jason; Lazar, John; Machkovech, Heather; Resnick, Jesse; Resnick, Rebecca; Salter, Alexander I; Talebi-Liasi, Faezeh; Arakawa, Christopher; Baudin, Jacob; Bogaard, Andrew; Salesky, Rebecca; Zhou, Qian; Smith, Kelly; Clark, John I; Shendure, Jay; Horwitz, Marshall S

    2014-01-01

    Even in cases where there is no obvious family history of disease, genome sequencing may contribute to clinical diagnosis and management. Clinical application of the genome has not yet become routine, however, in part because physicians are still learning how best to utilize such information. As an educational research exercise performed in conjunction with our medical school human anatomy course, we explored the potential utility of determining the whole genome sequence of a patient who had died following a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Medical students performed dissection and whole genome sequencing of the cadaver. Gross and microscopic findings were more consistent with the fibrosing variant of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), as opposed to IPF per se. Variants in genes causing Mendelian disorders predisposing to IPF were not detected. However, whole genome sequencing identified several common variants associated with IPF, including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs35705950, located in the promoter region of the gene encoding mucin glycoprotein MUC5B. The MUC5B promoter polymorphism was recently found to markedly elevate risk for IPF, though a particular association with NSIP has not been previously reported, nor has its contribution to disease risk previously been evaluated in the genome-wide context of all genetic variants. We did not identify additional predicted functional variants in a region of linkage disequilibrium (LD) adjacent to MUC5B, nor did we discover other likely risk-contributing variants elsewhere in the genome. Whole genome sequencing thus corroborates the association of rs35705950 with MUC5B dysregulation and interstitial lung disease. This novel exercise additionally served a unique mission in bridging clinical and basic science education.

  20. Genome sequencing of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in conjunction with a medical school human anatomy course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Kumar

    Full Text Available Even in cases where there is no obvious family history of disease, genome sequencing may contribute to clinical diagnosis and management. Clinical application of the genome has not yet become routine, however, in part because physicians are still learning how best to utilize such information. As an educational research exercise performed in conjunction with our medical school human anatomy course, we explored the potential utility of determining the whole genome sequence of a patient who had died following a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Medical students performed dissection and whole genome sequencing of the cadaver. Gross and microscopic findings were more consistent with the fibrosing variant of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, as opposed to IPF per se. Variants in genes causing Mendelian disorders predisposing to IPF were not detected. However, whole genome sequencing identified several common variants associated with IPF, including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs35705950, located in the promoter region of the gene encoding mucin glycoprotein MUC5B. The MUC5B promoter polymorphism was recently found to markedly elevate risk for IPF, though a particular association with NSIP has not been previously reported, nor has its contribution to disease risk previously been evaluated in the genome-wide context of all genetic variants. We did not identify additional predicted functional variants in a region of linkage disequilibrium (LD adjacent to MUC5B, nor did we discover other likely risk-contributing variants elsewhere in the genome. Whole genome sequencing thus corroborates the association of rs35705950 with MUC5B dysregulation and interstitial lung disease. This novel exercise additionally served a unique mission in bridging clinical and basic science education.

  1. Hepatitis A virus-encoded miRNAs attenuate the accumulation of viral genomic RNAs in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wu, Meini; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of persistent infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the common result of most HAV/cell culture systems. Previous observations show that the synthesis of viral RNAs is reduced during infection. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We characterized three HAV-encoded miRNAs in our previous study. In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of these miRNAs on the accumulation of viral RNAs. The results indicated that the synthesis of viral genomic RNAs was dramatically reduced (more than 75 % reduction, P viral miRNA mimics. Conversely, they were significantly increased (more than 3.3-fold addition, P viral miRNA inhibitors. The luciferase reporter assay of miRNA targets showed that viral miRNAs were fully complementary to specific sites of the viral plus or minus strand RNA and strongly inhibited their expressions. Further data showed that the relative abundance of viral genomic RNA fragments that contain miRNA targets was also dramatically reduced (more than 80 % reduction, P viral miRNAs were overexpressed with miRNA mimics. In contrast, they were significantly increased (approximately 2-fold addition, P viral miRNAs were inhibited with miRNA inhibitors. In conclusion, these data suggest a possible mechanism for the reduction of viral RNA synthesis during HAV infection. Thus, we propose that it is likely that RNA virus-derived miRNA could serve as a self-mediated feedback regulator during infection.

  2. Learning about human population history from ancient and modern genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Mark; Krause, Johannes

    2011-08-18

    Genome-wide data, both from SNP arrays and from complete genome sequencing, are becoming increasingly abundant and are now even available from extinct hominins. These data are providing new insights into population history; in particular, when combined with model-based analytical approaches, genome-wide data allow direct testing of hypotheses about population history. For example, genome-wide data from both contemporary populations and extinct hominins strongly support a single dispersal of modern humans from Africa, followed by two archaic admixture events: one with Neanderthals somewhere outside Africa and a second with Denisovans that (so far) has only been detected in New Guinea. These new developments promise to reveal new stories about human population history, without having to resort to storytelling.

  3. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome...... on chromosomes 3, 15, and 19, were analyzed. The relative proportion of wild-type to rearranged structures was determined in DNA samples from blood obtained from different, unrelated individuals. The results obtained indicate that recurrent genomic rearrangements occur at relatively high frequency in somatic...... cells. Interestingly, the rearrangements studied were significantly more abundant in adults than in newborn individuals, suggesting that such DNA rearrangements might start to appear during embryogenesis or fetal life and continue to accumulate after birth. The relevance of our results in regard...

  4. The diploid genome sequence of an individual human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Levy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is a genome sequence of an individual human. It was produced from approximately 32 million random DNA fragments, sequenced by Sanger dideoxy technology and assembled into 4,528 scaffolds, comprising 2,810 million bases (Mb of contiguous sequence with approximately 7.5-fold coverage for any given region. We developed a modified version of the Celera assembler to facilitate the identification and comparison of alternate alleles within this individual diploid genome. Comparison of this genome and the National Center for Biotechnology Information human reference assembly revealed more than 4.1 million DNA variants, encompassing 12.3 Mb. These variants (of which 1,288,319 were novel included 3,213,401 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, 53,823 block substitutions (2-206 bp, 292,102 heterozygous insertion/deletion events (indels(1-571 bp, 559,473 homozygous indels (1-82,711 bp, 90 inversions, as well as numerous segmental duplications and copy number variation regions. Non-SNP DNA variation accounts for 22% of all events identified in the donor, however they involve 74% of all variant bases. This suggests an important role for non-SNP genetic alterations in defining the diploid genome structure. Moreover, 44% of genes were heterozygous for one or more variants. Using a novel haplotype assembly strategy, we were able to span 1.5 Gb of genome sequence in segments >200 kb, providing further precision to the diploid nature of the genome. These data depict a definitive molecular portrait of a diploid human genome that provides a starting point for future genome comparisons and enables an era of individualized genomic information.

  5. A Human-Curated Annotation of the Candida albicans Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent sequencing and assembly of the genome for the fungal pathogen Candida albicans used simple automated procedures for the identification of putative genes. We have reviewed the entire assembly, both by hand and with additional bioinformatic resources, to accurately map and describe 6,354 genes and to identify 246 genes whose original database entries contained sequencing errors (or possibly mutations that affect their reading frame. Comparison with other fungal genomes permitted the identification of numerous fungus-specific genes that might be targeted for antifungal therapy. We also observed that, compared to other fungi, the protein-coding sequences in the C. albicans genome are especially rich in short sequence repeats. Finally, our improved annotation permitted a detailed analysis of several multigene families, and comparative genomic studies showed that C. albicans has a far greater catabolic range, encoding respiratory Complex 1, several novel oxidoreductases and ketone body degrading enzymes, malonyl-CoA and enoyl-CoA carriers, several novel amino acid degrading enzymes, a variety of secreted catabolic lipases and proteases, and numerous transporters to assimilate the resulting nutrients. The results of these efforts will ensure that the Candida research community has uniform and comprehensive genomic information for medical research as well as for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  6. CpG islands undermethylation in human genomic regions under selective pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cocozza

    Full Text Available DNA methylation at CpG islands (CGIs is one of the most intensively studied epigenetic mechanisms. It is fundamental for cellular differentiation and control of transcriptional potential. DNA methylation is involved also in several processes that are central to evolutionary biology, including phenotypic plasticity and evolvability. In this study, we explored the relationship between CpG islands methylation and signatures of selective pressure in Homo Sapiens, using a computational biology approach. By analyzing methylation data of 25 cell lines from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE Consortium, we compared the DNA methylation of CpG islands in genomic regions under selective pressure with the methylation of CpG islands in the remaining part of the genome. To define genomic regions under selective pressure, we used three different methods, each oriented to provide distinct information about selective events. Independently of the method and of the cell type used, we found evidences of undermethylation of CGIs in human genomic regions under selective pressure. Additionally, by analyzing SNP frequency in CpG islands, we demonstrated that CpG islands in regions under selective pressure show lower genetic variation. Our findings suggest that the CpG islands in regions under selective pressure seem to be somehow more "protected" from methylation when compared with other regions of the genome.

  7. Primer on Molecular Genetics; DOE Human Genome Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  8. Triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi, J Ramon; de la Cruz, Xavier; Orozco, Modesto

    2004-01-01

    The existence of sequences in the human genome which can be a target for triplex formation, and accordingly are candidates for anti-gene therapies, has been studied by using bioinformatics tools. It was found that the population of triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences (TTS) is much more abundant than that expected from simple random models. The population of TTS is large in all the genome, without major differences between chromosomes. A wide analysis along annotated regions of th...

  9. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  10. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  11. Human genome and the african personality: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickel, Elijah; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    The integration of the human genome with the African personality should be viewed as an interdependent whole. The African personality, for purposes of this article, comprises Black experiences, Negritude, and an Africa-centered axiology and epistemology. The outcome results in a spiritual focused collective consciousness. Anthropologically, historically (and with the Human Genome Project), genetically Africa has proven to be the source of all human life. Human kind wherever they exist on the planet using the African personality must be viewed as interconnected. Although racism and its progeny discrimination preexist the human genome project (HGP), the human genome provides an evidence-based rationale for the end to all policy and subsequent practice based on race and racism. Policy must be based on evidence to be competent practice. It would be remiss if not irresponsible of social work and the other behavioral scientist concerned with intervention and prevention behaviors to not infuse the findings of the HCPs. The African personality is a concept that provides a wholistic way to evaluate human behavior from an African worldview.

  12. A complex genome-microRNA interplay in human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Santosh; Bhadra, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding regulatory RNA exist in wide spectrum of organisms ranging from prokaryote bacteria to humans. In human, a systematic search for noncoding RNA is mainly limited to the nuclear and cytosolic compartments. To investigate whether endogenous small regulatory RNA are present in cell organelles, human mitochondrial genome was also explored for prediction of precursor microRNA (pre-miRNA) and mature miRNA (miRNA) sequences. Six novel miRNA were predicted from the organelle genome by bioinformatics analysis. The structures are conserved in other five mammals including chimp, orangutan, mouse, rat, and rhesus genome. Experimentally, six human miRNA are well accumulated or deposited in human mitochondria. Three of them are expressed less prominently in Northern analysis. To ascertain their presence in human skeletal muscles, total RNA was extracted from enriched mitochondria by an immunomagnetic method. The expression of six novel pre-miRNA and miRNA was confirmed by Northern blot analysis; however, low level of remaining miRNA was found by sensitive Northern analysis. Their presence is further confirmed by real time RT-PCR. The six miRNA find their multiple targets throughout the human genome in three different types of software. The luciferase assay was used to confirm that MT-RNR2 gene was the potential target of hsa-miR-mit3 and hsa-miR-mit4.

  13. Changes in the human mitochondrial genome after treatment of malignant disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardell, Theresa M.; Ferguson, Elaine; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Borthwick, Gillian M.; Taylor, Robert W.; Jackson, Graham; Craft, Alan; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Howell, Neil; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2003-04-09

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the only extrachromosomal DNA in human cells. The mitochondrial genome encodes essential information for the synthesis of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Inherited defects of this genome are an important cause of human disease. In addition, the mitochondrial genome seems to be particularly prone to DNA damage and acquired mutations may have a role in ageing, cancer and neurodegeneration. We wished to determine if radiotherapy and chemotherapy used in the treatment of cancer could induce changes in the mitochondrial genome. Such changes would be an important genetic marker of DNA damage and may explain some of the adverse effects of treatment. We studied samples from patients who had received radiotherapy and chemotherapy for point mutations within the mtDNA control region, and for large-scale deletions. In blood samples from patients, we found a significantly increased number of point mutations compared to the control subjects. In muscle biopsies from 7 of 8 patients whom had received whole body irradiation as well as chemotherapy, the level of a specific mtDNA deletion was significantly greater than in control subjects. Our studies have shown that in patients who have been treated for cancer there is an increased level of mtDNA damage.

  14. Genomic signatures of diet-related shifts during human origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Warner, Lisa R; Fedrigo, Olivier; Wall, Christine E; Wray, Gregory A

    2011-04-07

    There are numerous anthropological analyses concerning the importance of diet during human evolution. Diet is thought to have had a profound influence on the human phenotype, and dietary differences have been hypothesized to contribute to the dramatic morphological changes seen in modern humans as compared with non-human primates. Here, we attempt to integrate the results of new genomic studies within this well-developed anthropological context. We then review the current evidence for adaptation related to diet, both at the level of sequence changes and gene expression. Finally, we propose some ways in which new technologies can help identify specific genomic adaptations that have resulted in metabolic and morphological differences between humans and non-human primates.

  15. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  16. Novelty detection and encoding for declarative memory within the human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Thomas; Kurthen, Martin

    2006-10-01

    Intracranial recordings of cognitive potentials within the human hippocampal system have identified N400 potentials in the anterior mesial temporal lobe (AMTL-N400) that correlate with verbal memory performance and are associated with novelty detection. Their amplitudes to "new" but not "old" words in a verbal recognition task correlate with the neuronal density of the hippocampal CA1-region and can be reduced selectively by the NMDA-receptor blocker ketamine. Moreover, it could be shown that NMDA-receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity with Hebbian characteristics, can be readily induced in human hippocampal slices but not in patients with hippocampal sclerosis. In these latter patients, we also found a reduction of AMTL-N400 amplitudes similar to the one induced by ketamine. In addition, we could show that hippocampal novelty detection is associated with successful encoding for declarative memory. Together, our findings suggest that successful encoding for declarative memory is at least in part mediated by NMDA-receptor dependent novelty detection within the human hippocampal system.

  17. A new splice variant of the major subunit of human asialoglycoprotein receptor encodes a secreted form in hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR genomic sequence. Thus, ASGPR variant H1b transcript encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane domain. Using an H1b-specific antibody, H1b protein and a functional soluble ASGPR (sASGPR composed of H1b and H2 in human sera and in hepatoma cell culture supernatant were identified. The expression of ASGPR H1a and H1b in Hela cells demonstrated the different cellular loctions of H1a and H1b proteins at cellular membranes and in intracellular compartments, respectively. In vitro binding assays using fluorescence-labeled sASGPR or the substract ASOR revealed that the presence of sASGPR reduced the binding of ASOR to cells. However, ASOR itself was able to enhance the binding of sASGPR to cells expressing membrane-bound ASGPR. Further, H1b expression is reduced in liver tissues from patients with viral hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that two naturally occurring ASGPR H1 splice variants are produced in human hepatocytes. A hetero-oligomeric complex sASGPR consists of the secreted form of H1 and H2 and may bind to free substrates in circulation and carry them to liver tissue for uptake by ASGPR-expressing hepatocytes.

  18. Effects of Shensong Yangxin capsule on pacemaker channels encoded by human HCN4 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-ping; LI Ning; WU Yi-ling; PU Jie-lin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Shensong Yangxin (SSYX) is one of the compound recipes of Chinese materia medica including 12ingredients such as Panax ginseng, dwarf lilyturf tuber,nardostachys root, etc. Small-scale randomized multi-centre clinical trials suggested that SSYX reduced the number of ventricular extrasystoles in patients with or without structural heart disease.1 Besides excellent antiarrhythmic efficacy,2 SSYX also improved bradycardia in some patients, which was evidenced by animal studies3 as well. However, the antiarrhythmic mechanisms of SSYX have not been fully understood.Our previous studies have explored effect of SSYX on many channels except hyperpolarization-activated cation channel encoded by human hHCN4 gene.4

  19. Prospects for the Chinese Human Genome Project (HGP)at the beginning of next century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chinese Human Genome Project (CHGP) as part of the international human genome research has achieved significant progress and created a solid foundation for further development. While participating in the human genome sequencing and gene discovery, the emphasis of CHGP in the next century will be laid on functional genomics. The strategy, resources and some policy issues will be addressed.

  20. [From human genome to individualized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Barrio, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the knowledge of our genome, and a deeper understanding of the molecular basis of disease are laying the foundations of Individualised Medicine. This new approach to Medicine seeks to establish a consistent relation between the genetic profile of each individual and the clinical profile of every disease, thereby helping healthcare professionals to individualise treatment for each patient, in order to administrate the right drug at the right dose, while optimising its efficacy and safety. Translational research, Pharmacogenetics, Pharmacogenomics, biomarkers and diagnostic tests are bringing profound change already under way to our healthcare systems, and pose new ethical and social challenges that our legal framework will have to address.

  1. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the gene encoding human eosinophil differentiation factor (interleukin 5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, H.D.; Tucker, W.Q.J.; Hort, Y.; Martinson, M.E.; Mayo, G.; Clutterbuck, E.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; Young, I.G.

    1987-10-01

    The human eosinophil differentiation factor (EDF) gene was cloned from a genomic library in lambda phage EMBL3A by using a murine EDF cDNA clone as a probe. The DNA sequence of a 3.2-kilobase BamHI fragment spanning the gene was determined. The gene contains three introns. The predicted amino acid sequence of 134 amino acids is identical with that recently reported for human interleukin 5 but shows no significant homology with other known hemopoietic growth regulators. The amino acid sequence shows strong homology (approx. 70% identity) with that of murine EDF. Recombinant human EDF, expressed from the human EDF gene after transfection into monkey COS cells, stimulated the production of eosinophils and eosinophil colonies from normal human bone marrow but had no effect on the production of neutrophils or mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphoid cells). The apparent specificity of human EDF for the eosinophil lineage in myeloid hemopoiesis contrasts with the properties of human interleukin 3 and granulocyte/macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors but is directly analogous to the biological properties of murine EDF. Human EDF therefore represents a distinct hemopoietic growth factor that could play a central role in the regulation of eosinophilia.

  2. A new approach for using genome scans to detect recent positive selection in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Tang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scanning for signals of recent positive selection is essential for a comprehensive and systematic understanding of human adaptation. Here, we present a genomic survey of recent local selective sweeps, especially aimed at those nearly or recently completed. A novel approach was developed for such signals, based on contrasting the extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH profiles between populations. We applied this method to the genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data of both the International HapMap Project and Perlegen Sciences, and detected widespread signals of recent local selection across the genome, consisting of both complete and partial sweeps. A challenging problem of genomic scans of recent positive selection is to clearly distinguish selection from neutral effects, given the high sensitivity of the test statistics to departures from neutral demographic assumptions and the lack of a single, accurate neutral model of human history. We therefore developed a new procedure that is robust across a wide range of demographic and ascertainment models, one that indicates that certain portions of the genome clearly depart from neutrality. Simulations of positive selection showed that our tests have high power towards strong selection sweeps that have undergone fixation. Gene ontology analysis of the candidate regions revealed several new functional groups that might help explain some important interpopulation differences in phenotypic traits.

  3. Genome-wide approaches to understanding human ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaeberlein Matt

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of genomic technologies in biogerontology has the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of human ageing. High-throughput screens for alleles correlated with survival in long-lived people have uncovered novel genes involved in age-associated disease. Genome-wide longevity studies in simple eukaryotes are identifying evolutionarily conserved pathways that determine longevity. It is hoped that validation of these 'public' aspects of ageing in mice, along with analyses of variation in candidate human ageing genes, will provide targets for future interventions to slow the ageing process and retard the onset of age-associated pathologies.

  4. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D; Torroja, Carlos F; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T; Guerra-Assunção, José A; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F; Laird, Gavin K; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Elliot, David; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Begum, Sharmin; Mortimore, Beverley; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Lloyd, Christine; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James D; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Lanz, Christa; Raddatz, Günter; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Schuster, Stephan C; Carter, Nigel P; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M J; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J; Zon, Leonard I; Postlethwait, John H; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J P; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L

    2013-04-25

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination.

  5. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D.; Torroja, Carlos F.; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E.; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T.; Guerra-Assunção, José A.; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F.; Laird, Gavin K.; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M.; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Carter, Nigel P.; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M. J.; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J.; Zon, Leonard I.; Postlethwait, John H.; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function1,2. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease3–5. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes6, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination. PMID:23594743

  6. The complete mitochondrial genomes for three Toxocara species of human and animal health significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiang-Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying mitochondrial (mt genomics has important implications for various fundamental areas, including mt biochemistry, physiology and molecular biology. In addition, mt genome sequences have provided useful markers for investigating population genetic structures, systematics and phylogenetics of organisms. Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxocara malaysiensis cause significant health problems in animals and humans. Although they are of importance in human and animal health, no information on the mt genomes for any of Toxocara species is available. Results The sizes of the entire mt genome are 14,322 bp for T. canis, 14029 bp for T. cati and 14266 bp for T. malaysiensis, respectively. These circular genomes are amongst the largest reported to date for all secernentean nematodes. Their relatively large sizes relate mainly to an increased length in the AT-rich region. The mt genomes of the three Toxocara species all encode 12 proteins, two ribosomal RNAs and 22 transfer RNA genes, but lack the ATP synthetase subunit 8 gene, which is consistent with all other species of Nematode studied to date, with the exception of Trichinella spiralis. All genes are transcribed in the same direction and have a nucleotide composition high in A and T, but low in G and C. The contents of A+T of the complete genomes are 68.57% for T. canis, 69.95% for T. cati and 68.86% for T. malaysiensis, among which the A+T for T. canis is the lowest among all nematodes studied to date. The AT bias had a significant effect on both the codon usage pattern and amino acid composition of proteins. The mt genome structures for three Toxocara species, including genes and non-coding regions, are in the same order as for Ascaris suum and Anisakis simplex, but differ from Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus and Caenorhabditis elegans only in the location of the AT-rich region, whereas there are substantial differences when compared with Onchocerca volvulus

  7. Interacting noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems shift human brain activation patterns during encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stegeren, Anda H; Roozendaal, Benno; Kindt, Merel; Wolf, Oliver T; Joëls, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are usually well retained, an effect that depends on the release of adrenal stress hormones. Animal studies have shown that corticosterone and noradrenaline - representing the two main stress hormone systems - act in concert to enhance memory formation by actions involving the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we test whether interactions between these two stress hormone systems also affect human memory formation as well as the associated pattern of brain activation. To this end, forty-eight male human subjects received hydrocortisone, yohimbine or both before presentation of emotional and neutral pictures. Activity in the amygdala, hippocampus and PFC was monitored with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during encoding of these stimuli, when hormonal levels were elevated. Memory performance was tested 1 week later. We investigated whether an increased level of one of the two hormone systems would lead to differential effects compared to the combined application of the drugs on brain activation and memory performance. We report that the application of cortisol led to an overall enhancing effect on recognition memory, with no significant additional effect of yohimbine. However, during encoding the brain switched from amygdala/hippocampus activation with either hormone alone, to a strong deactivation of prefrontal areas under the influence of the combination of both exogenous hormones. Although we did not find evidence that exogenous stimulation of the noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems led to significant interaction effects on memory performance in this experiment, we conclude that stress hormone levels during encoding did differentially determine the activation pattern of the brain circuits here involved.

  8. Distinct patterns of mitochondrial genome diversity in bonobos (Pan paniscus and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsurka Gábor

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes of 22 Pan paniscus (bonobo, pygmy chimpanzee individuals to assess the detailed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA phylogeny of this close relative of Homo sapiens. Results We identified three major clades among bonobos that separated approximately 540,000 years ago, as suggested by Bayesian analysis. Incidentally, we discovered that the current reference sequence for bonobo likely is a hybrid of the mitochondrial genomes of two distant individuals. When comparing spectra of polymorphic mtDNA sites in bonobos and humans, we observed two major differences: (i Of all 31 bonobo mtDNA homoplasies, i.e. nucleotide changes that occurred independently on separate branches of the phylogenetic tree, 13 were not homoplasic in humans. This indicates that at least a part of the unstable sites of the mitochondrial genome is species-specific and difficult to be explained on the basis of a mutational hotspot concept. (ii A comparison of the ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous changes (dN/dS among polymorphic positions in bonobos and in 4902 Homo sapiens mitochondrial genomes revealed a remarkable difference in the strength of purifying selection in the mitochondrial genes of the F0F1-ATPase complex. While in bonobos this complex showed a similar low value as complexes I and IV, human haplogroups displayed 2.2 to 7.6 times increased dN/dS ratios when compared to bonobos. Conclusions Some variants of mitochondrially encoded subunits of the ATPase complex in humans very likely decrease the efficiency of energy conversion leading to production of extra heat. Thus, we hypothesize that the species-specific release of evolutionary constraints for the mitochondrial genes of the proton-translocating ATPase is a consequence of altered heat homeostasis in modern humans.

  9. Lights, camembert, action! The role of human orbitofrontal cortex in encoding stimuli, rewards, and choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, John P

    2007-12-01

    This review outlines some of the main conclusions about the contributions of the orbitofrontal cortex to reward learning and decision making arising from functional neuroimaging studies in humans. It will be argued that human orbitofrontal cortex is involved in a number of distinct functions: signaling the affective value of stimuli as they are perceived, encoding expectations of future reward, and updating these expectations, either by making use of prediction error signals generated in the midbrain, or by using knowledge of the rules or structure of the decision problem. It will also be suggested that this region contributes to the decision making process itself, by encoding signals that inform an individual about what action to take next. Evidence for functional specialization within orbitofrontal cortex in terms of valence will also be evaluated, and the possible contributions of the orbitofrontal cortex in representing the values of actions as well as that of stimuli will be discussed. Finally, some of the outstanding questions for future neuroimaging research of orbitofrontal cortex function will be highlighted.

  10. Cloning and expression of full-length cDNA encoding human vitamin D receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A.R.; McDonnell, D.P.; Hughes, M.; Crisp, T.M.; Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Haussler, M.R.; Pike, J.W.; Shine, J.; O' Malley, B.W. (California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding the human vitamin D receptor have been isolated from human intestine and T47D cell cDNA libraries. The nucleotide sequence of the 4605-base pair (bp) cDNA includes a noncoding leader sequence of 115 bp, a 1281-bp open reading frame, and 3209 bp of 3{prime} noncoding sequence. Two polyadenylylation signals, AATAAA, are present 25 and 70 bp upstream of the poly(A) tail, respectively. RNA blot hybridization indicates a single mRNA species of {approx} 4600 bp. Transfection of the cloned sequences into COS-1 cells results in the production of a single receptor species indistinguishable from the native receptor. Sequence comparisons demonstrate that the vitamin D receptor belongs to the steroid-receptor gene family and is closest in size and sequence to another member of this family, the thyroid hormone receptor.

  11. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans.

  12. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Pollard

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 genomic elements that are highly conserved in vertebrates but show evidence of significantly accelerated substitution rates in human. These are mostly in non-coding DNA, often near genes associated with transcription and DNA binding. Resequencing confirmed that the five most accelerated elements are dramatically changed in human but not in other primates, with seven times more substitutions in human than in chimp. The accelerated elements, and in particular the top five, show a strong bias for adenine and thymine to guanine and cytosine nucleotide changes and are disproportionately located in high recombination and high guanine and cytosine content environments near telomeres, suggesting either biased gene conversion or isochore selection. In addition, there is some evidence of directional selection in the regions containing the two most accelerated regions. A combination of evolutionary forces has contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.

  13. Genomics and the Ark: an ecocentric perspective on human history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub; Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Views of ourselves in relationship to the rest of the biosphere are changing. Theocentric and anthropocentric perspectives are giving way to more ecocentric views on the history, present, and future of humankind. Novel sciences, such as genomics, have deepened and broadened our understanding of the process of anthropogenesis, the coming into being of humans. Genomics suggests that early human history must be regarded as a complex narrative of evolving ecosystems, in which human evolution both influenced and was influenced by the evolution of companion species. During the agricultural revolution, human beings designed small-scale artificial ecosystems or evolutionary "Arks," in which networks of plants, animals, and microorganisms coevolved. Currently, our attitude towards this process seems subject to a paradoxical reversal. The boundaries of the Ark have dramatically broadened, and genomics is not only being used to increase our understanding of our ecological past, but may also help us to conserve, reconstruct, or even revivify species and ecosystems to whose degradation or (near) extinction we have contributed. This article explores the role of genomics in the elaboration of a more ecocentric view of ourselves with the help of two examples, namely the renaissance of Paleolithic diets and of Pleistocene parks. It argues that an understanding of the world in ecocentric terms requires new partnerships and mutually beneficial forms of collaboration and convergence between life sciences, social sciences, and the humanities.

  14. Isolation and expression of the full-length cDNA encoding CD59 antigen of human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, R; Ohashi, K; Anaguchi, H; Okazaki, H; Hattori, M; Minato, N; Naruto, M

    1990-04-01

    To identify the primary structure of CD59 antigen and to elucidate its function, a full-length cDNA clone of CD59 was isolated. The cDNA sequence contained an open reading frame that encodes an 128-amino-acid peptide. The amino-terminal 25 amino acids represented a typical signal peptide sequence and the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic amino acids were characteristic for phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. The predicted mature protein sequence showed 35% homology with murine Ly-6C.1 and 31% with Ly-6A.2. The number and the distribution of cysteine residues were conserved, implying that the CD59 represented a human homologue of murine Ly-6. RNA blot hybridization analysis revealed the expression of CD59 mRNA in placental, lung, and pancreatic tissues. The mRNA was not only expressed in T-cell lines but in some of monocytic, myeloid, and B-cell lines. In all of these tissues and cell lines, at least four mRNA species were detected. DNA blot hybridization analysis revealed a rather simple genomic structure, which suggested a single gene as compared with the complex multigene family of murine Ly-6.

  15. Combining two technologies for full genome sequencing of human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryabin, K G; Prokhortchouk, E B; Mazur, A M; Boulygina, E S; Tsygankova, S V; Nedoluzhko, A V; Rastorguev, S M; Matveev, V B; Chekanov, N N; D A, Goranskaya; Teslyuk, A B; Gruzdeva, N M; Velikhov, V E; Zaridze, D G; Kovalchuk, M V

    2009-10-01

    At present, the new technologies of DNA sequencing are rapidly developing allowing quick and efficient characterisation of organisms at the level of the genome structure. In this study, the whole genome sequencing of a human (Russian man) was performed using two technologies currently present on the market - Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection (SOLiD™) (Applied Biosystems) and sequencing technologies of molecular clusters using fluorescently labeled precursors (Illumina). The total number of generated data resulted in 108.3 billion base pairs (60.2 billion from Illumina technology and 48.1 billion from SOLiD technology). Statistics performed on reads generated by GAII and SOLiD showed that they covered 75% and 96% of the genome respectively. Short polymorphic regions were detected with comparable accuracy however, the absolute amount of them revealed by SOLiD was several times less than by GAII. Optimal algorithm for using the latest methods of sequencing was established for the analysis of individual human genomes. The study is the first Russian effort towards whole human genome sequencing.

  16. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost......BACKGROUND: Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than point...... mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome....

  17. Data mining and the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarbanel, Henry [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Callan, Curtis [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, William [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, Freeman [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Hwa, Terence [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Koonin, Steven [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Levine, Herbert [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Rothaus, Oscar [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, Roy [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Stubbs, Christopher [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, Peter [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    2000-01-07

    As genomics research moves from an era of data acquisition to one of both acquisition and interpretation, new methods are required for organizing and prioritizing the data. These methods would allow an initial level of data analysis to be carried out before committing resources to a particular genetic locus. This JASON study sought to delineate the main problems that must be faced in bioinformatics and to identify information technologies that can help to overcome those problems. While the current influx of data greatly exceeds what biologists have experienced in the past, other scientific disciplines and the commercial sector have been handling much larger datasets for many years. Powerful datamining techniques have been developed in other fields that, with appropriate modification, could be applied to the biological sciences.

  18. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs, population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs, as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart

  19. The ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-22

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The pilot phase of the Project is focused on a specified 30 megabases (approximately 1%) of the human genome sequence and is organized as an international consortium of computational and laboratory-based scientists working to develop and apply high-throughput approaches for detecting all sequence elements that confer biological function. The results of this pilot phase will guide future efforts to analyze the entire human genome.

  20. Genomic structure, characterization, and identification of the promotor of the human IL-8 receptor A gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprenger, H.; Lloyd, A.R.; Meyer, R.G.; Johnston, J.A.; Kelvin, D.J. [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MA (United States)

    1994-09-15

    Two unique but homologous receptors for the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 have been cloned (designated IL-8RA and IL-8RB), each of which binds IL-8 with high affinity. IL-8RA mRNA expression was found to be regulated by granulocyte-CSF and LPS. In an attempt to understand the tissue-specific expression and to identify transcriptional regulatory elements, the authors have cloned, sequenced, and characterized the human IL-8RA gene. A {lambda}-DASH clone encoding the entire human IL-8RA gene was isolated by screening a genomic library with a PCR-generated cDNA. After mapping, subcloning, and sequencing several restriction fragments, a 9.2-kb continuous DNA sequence was obtained. As the sizes of the published cDNA (1.9 kb) and the mRNA determined by Northern blot analysis (2.1 kb) were not in agreement, a full-length cDNA was cloned by using a modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. They identified a 5{prime}-untranslated region of 119 bp. After comparison with the genomic sequence, they found the gene consisted of two exons interrupted by an intron of 1.7 kb. A 1050-bp ORF was encoded entirely in the second exon together with a 834-bp 3{prime}-untranslated region. The immediate GC-rich 5{prime}-flanking region upstream of exon 1 could serve as a constitutively active promoter in chloramphenicolacetyl-transferase-expression assays. Expression analysis of additional upstream regions suggested the presence of silencer elements between positions -841 and -280. In conclusion, cloning a full-length cDNA permitted cloning of the human IL-8RA gene, identification of the genomic structure, and characterization of the promoter region. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  1. The majority of total nuclear-encoded non-ribosomal RNA in a human cell is 'dark matter' un-annotated RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Patrice

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery that the transcriptional output of the human genome is far more complex than predicted by the current set of protein-coding annotations and that most RNAs produced do not appear to encode proteins has transformed our understanding of genome complexity and suggests new paradigms of genome regulation. However, the fraction of all cellular RNA whose function we do not understand and the fraction of the genome that is utilized to produce that RNA remain controversial. This is not simply a bookkeeping issue because the degree to which this un-annotated transcription is present has important implications with respect to its biologic function and to the general architecture of genome regulation. For example, efforts to elucidate how non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs regulate genome function will be compromised if that class of RNAs is dismissed as simply 'transcriptional noise'. Results We show that the relative mass of RNA whose function and/or structure we do not understand (the so called 'dark matter' RNAs, as a proportion of all non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial human RNA (mt-RNA, can be greater than that of protein-encoding transcripts. This observation is obscured in studies that focus only on polyA-selected RNA, a method that enriches for protein coding RNAs and at the same time discards the vast majority of RNA prior to analysis. We further show the presence of a large number of very long, abundantly-transcribed regions (100's of kb in intergenic space and further show that expression of these regions is associated with neoplastic transformation. These overlap some regions found previously in normal human embryonic tissues and raises an interesting hypothesis as to the function of these ncRNAs in both early development and neoplastic transformation. Conclusions We conclude that 'dark matter' RNA can constitute the majority of non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial-RNA and a significant fraction arises from numerous very long

  2. Evolutionary forces shaping genomic islands of population differentiation in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofer Tamara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Levels of differentiation among populations depend both on demographic and selective factors: genetic drift and local adaptation increase population differentiation, which is eroded by gene flow and balancing selection. We describe here the genomic distribution and the properties of genomic regions with unusually high and low levels of population differentiation in humans to assess the influence of selective and neutral processes on human genetic structure. Methods Individual SNPs of the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP showing significantly high or low levels of population differentiation were detected under a hierarchical-island model (HIM. A Hidden Markov Model allowed us to detect genomic regions or islands of high or low population differentiation. Results Under the HIM, only 1.5% of all SNPs are significant at the 1% level, but their genomic spatial distribution is significantly non-random. We find evidence that local adaptation shaped high-differentiation islands, as they are enriched for non-synonymous SNPs and overlap with previously identified candidate regions for positive selection. Moreover there is a negative relationship between the size of islands and recombination rate, which is stronger for islands overlapping with genes. Gene ontology analysis supports the role of diet as a major selective pressure in those highly differentiated islands. Low-differentiation islands are also enriched for non-synonymous SNPs, and contain an overly high proportion of genes belonging to the 'Oncogenesis' biological process. Conclusions Even though selection seems to be acting in shaping islands of high population differentiation, neutral demographic processes might have promoted the appearance of some genomic islands since i as much as 20% of islands are in non-genic regions ii these non-genic islands are on average two times shorter than genic islands, suggesting a more rapid erosion by recombination, and iii most loci are

  3. MIR retrotransposon sequences provide insulators to the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianrong; Vicente-García, Cristina; Seruggia, Davide; Moltó, Eduardo; Fernandez-Miñán, Ana; Neto, Ana; Lee, Elbert; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Montoliu, Lluís; Lunyak, Victoria V; Jordan, I King

    2015-08-11

    Insulators are regulatory elements that help to organize eukaryotic chromatin via enhancer-blocking and chromatin barrier activity. Although there are several examples of transposable element (TE)-derived insulators, the contribution of TEs to human insulators has not been systematically explored. Mammalian-wide interspersed repeats (MIRs) are a conserved family of TEs that have substantial regulatory capacity and share sequence characteristics with tRNA-related insulators. We sought to evaluate whether MIRs can serve as insulators in the human genome. We applied a bioinformatic screen using genome sequence and functional genomic data from CD4(+) T cells to identify a set of 1,178 predicted MIR insulators genome-wide. These predicted MIR insulators were computationally tested to serve as chromatin barriers and regulators of gene expression in CD4(+) T cells. The activity of predicted MIR insulators was experimentally validated using in vitro and in vivo enhancer-blocking assays. MIR insulators are enriched around genes of the T-cell receptor pathway and reside at T-cell-specific boundaries of repressive and active chromatin. A total of 58% of the MIR insulators predicted here show evidence of T-cell-specific chromatin barrier and gene regulatory activity. MIR insulators appear to be CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) independent and show a distinct local chromatin environment with marked peaks for RNA Pol III and a number of histone modifications, suggesting that MIR insulators recruit transcriptional complexes and chromatin modifying enzymes in situ to help establish chromatin and regulatory domains in the human genome. The provisioning of insulators by MIRs across the human genome suggests a specific mechanism by which TE sequences can be used to modulate gene regulatory networks.

  4. Enhancing Biology Instruction with the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxeda, Rosa J.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2003-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a recent scientific milestone that has received notable attention. This article shows how a biology course is using the HGP to enhance students' experiences by providing awareness of cutting edge research, with information on new emerging career options, and with opportunities to consider ethical questions raised…

  5. The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; Gottesman, Kay S.; Goulding, Philip G.; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Micikas, Lynda B.; Mural, Richard J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zola, John

    This module, for high school teachers, is the second of two modules about the Human Genome Project (HGP) produced by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The first section of this module provides background information for teachers about the structure and objectives of the HGP, aspects of the science and technology that underlie the…

  6. Human Genome Project and cystic fibrosis--a symbiotic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoi, L G; Smith, C L

    1999-11-01

    When Watson and Crick determined the structure of DNA in 1953, a biological revolution began. One result of this revolution is the Human Genome Project. The primary goal of this international project is to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. Although molecular biologists and geneticists are most enthusiastic about the Human Genome Project, all areas of clinical medicine and fields of biology will be affected. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, inherited, lethal disease of white persons. In 1989, researchers located the cystic fibrosis gene on the long arm of chromosome 7 by a technique known as positional cloning. The most common mutation (a 3-base pair deletion) of the cystic fibrosis gene occurs in 70% of patients with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge gained from genetic research on cystic fibrosis will help researchers develop new therapies (e.g., gene) and improve standard therapies (e.g., pharmacologic) so that a patient's life span is increased and quality of life is improved. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, the article provides an overview of the Human Genome Project and its clinical significance in advancing interdisciplinary care for patients with cystic fibrosis. Second, the article includes a discussion of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, and management of cystic fibrosis.

  7. DOE Human Genome Program contractor-grantee workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings for the DOE Human Genome Program`s Contractor-Grantee Workshop V held in Sante Fe, New Mexico January 28, February 1, 1996. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled Sequencing; Mapping; Informatics; Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues; and Infrastructure. Reports of individual projects described herein are separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  8. Human genome program report. Part 2, 1996 research abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  9. Templated sequence insertion polymorphisms in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Aplan, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Templated Sequence Insertion Polymorphism (TSIP) is a recently described form of polymorphism recognized in the human genome, in which a sequence that is templated from a distant genomic region is inserted into the genome, seemingly at random. TSIPs can be grouped into two classes based on nucleotide sequence features at the insertion junctions; Class 1 TSIPs show features of insertions that are mediated via the LINE-1 ORF2 protein, including 1) target-site duplication (TSD), 2) polyadenylation 10-30 nucleotides downstream of a “cryptic” polyadenylation signal, and 3) preference for insertion at a 5’-TTTT/A-3’ sequence. In contrast, class 2 TSIPs show features consistent with repair of a DNA double-strand break via insertion of a DNA “patch” that is derived from a distant genomic region. Survey of a large number of normal human volunteers demonstrates that most individuals have 25-30 TSIPs, and that these TSIPs track with specific geographic regions. Similar to other forms of human polymorphism, we suspect that these TSIPs may be important for the generation of human diversity and genetic diseases.

  10. The human genome; you gain some, you lose some

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriek, Marjolein

    2007-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) in the human genome are inherent in both evolutionary progression as well as the etiology of disease. The introduction of this thesis will review CNVs that appear to be neutral as well as CNVs that appear to be related to a phenotypic trait. This will be followed by a

  11. Reconsidering democracy - History of the human genome project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijer, M

    What options are open for people-citizens, politicians, and other nonscientists-to become actively involved in and anticipate new directions in the life sciences? In addressing this question, this article focuses on the start of the Human Genome Project (1985-1990). By contrasting various models of

  12. Reconsidering democracy - History of the human genome project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijer, M

    2003-01-01

    What options are open for people-citizens, politicians, and other nonscientists-to become actively involved in and anticipate new directions in the life sciences? In addressing this question, this article focuses on the start of the Human Genome Project (1985-1990). By contrasting various models of

  13. Human Genome Program Report. Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  14. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  15. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  16. 78 FR 55752 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Sites for..., Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC...

  17. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research...

  18. 76 FR 35224 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  19. 76 FR 5390 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHGRI Sample Repository..., National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville, MD...

  20. 77 FR 58402 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; R25 DAP Sept. 2012...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Rockville, MD...

  1. 75 FR 62548 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... . Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  2. 76 FR 22112 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Special Emphasis Panel... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April...

  3. 76 FR 19780 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane... Assistance Program No. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April...

  4. 75 FR 80509 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: December 16, 2010. Jennifer S....

  5. 77 FR 8268 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome...). Contact Person: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome...

  6. 77 FR 20646 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment Program...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Rockville, MD...

  7. 77 FR 59933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; ELSI CEERS RFA (SEP... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  8. 76 FR 66731 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, DAP for CEGS-SEP. Date...@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  9. 76 FR 66076 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 19, 2011. Jennifer S....

  10. 77 FR 64816 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  11. 78 FR 56905 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; H3AFRICA ELSI Research.... Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Suite 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD...

  12. 78 FR 77477 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  13. 76 FR 9031 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  14. 75 FR 13558 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research...

  15. 75 FR 8977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  16. 75 FR 2147 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: February 8-9, 2010....

  17. 77 FR 35991 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  18. 78 FR 31953 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SEP-UDN Coordinating... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd Floor Conference Room, 3146, 5635...

  19. 75 FR 67380 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Ken D. Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome... Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 26,...

  20. 75 FR 19984 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: Camilla E. Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers...

  1. 78 FR 11898 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  2. 78 FR 70063 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH...

  3. 76 FR 36930 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, DAP R-25. Date: July...@mail.nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  4. 75 FR 8373 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, GWAS Comparing Design... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  5. 75 FR 60467 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  6. 78 FR 47715 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  7. 76 FR 50486 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  8. 76 FR 10909 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Nakamura, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...-402-0838. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  9. 77 FR 50140 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  10. 76 FR 17930 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genetic... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  11. 77 FR 2304 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... given that the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) will host a series of meetings to enable... for Human Genome Research. Background materials on the proposed reorganization and...

  12. 77 FR 2735 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of....), notice is hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: February 13-14, 2012....

  13. 78 FR 9707 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; H3Africa (RM-006, RM... Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville, MD 20852, (301)...

  14. 77 FR 22332 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, H3Africa Biorepository... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, 4076, Rockville, MD...

  15. 77 FR 74676 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Person: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute...@nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome...

  16. 77 FR 12604 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... >Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, CIDR Contract. Date...: National Human Genome Reseach Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Room 4076, Rockville, MD 20852,...

  17. 78 FR 21382 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome... Person: Camilla E. Day, PhD., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research...

  18. 75 FR 56115 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; CEGS DAP. Date... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September...

  19. 75 FR 48977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Day, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  20. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  1. 77 FR 31863 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel DAP R25 Eppig.... (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  2. 77 FR 71604 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Date: January 11, 2013..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076,...

  3. 75 FR 46951 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The meeting will be...: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: September 13-14, 2010. Open: September 13,...

  4. 78 FR 107 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd Floor Conference Room, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20851... Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers...

  5. 75 FR 32957 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Protein Resource RFA... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  6. 75 FR 44800 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... Call). Contact Person: Mark S. Guyer, Director for Extramural Research, National Human Genome...

  7. 77 FR 64816 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute... intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  8. 76 FR 22407 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment Program....172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: April 12, 2011. Jennifer...

  9. 76 FR 79199 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed...., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  10. 77 FR 6810 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; CIDR Contract Renewal... Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC 9306, Rockville,...

  11. 75 FR 35821 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed..., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  12. Human Cancer Models Initiative | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI) is an international consortium that is generating novel human tumor-derived culture models, which are annotated with genomic and clinical data. In an effort to advance cancer research and more fully understand how in vitro findings are related to clinical biology, HCMI-developed models and related data will be available as a community resource for cancer research.

  13. Linking disease associations with regulatory information in the human genome

    KAUST Repository

    Schaub, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a large number of phenotypes. However, an associated SNP is likely part of a larger region of linkage disequilibrium. This makes it difficult to precisely identify the SNPs that have a biological link with the phenotype. We have systematically investigated the association of multiple types of ENCODE data with disease-associated SNPs and show that there is significant enrichment for functional SNPs among the currently identified associations. This enrichment is strongest when integrating multiple sources of functional information and when highest confidence disease-associated SNPs are used. We propose an approach that integrates multiple types of functional data generated by the ENCODE Consortium to help identify "functional SNPs" that may be associated with the disease phenotype. Our approach generates putative functional annotations for up to 80% of all previously reported associations. We show that for most associations, the functional SNP most strongly supported by experimental evidence is a SNP in linkage disequilibrium with the reported association rather than the reported SNP itself. Our results show that the experimental data sets generated by the ENCODE Consortium can be successfully used to suggest functional hypotheses for variants associated with diseases and other phenotypes.

  14. Evolution and genomics of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reynoso, M A; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Barros-Núñez, P

    2015-08-21

    Most living beings are able to perform actions that can be considered intelligent or, at the very least, the result of an appropriate reaction to changing circumstances in their environment. However, the intelligence or intellectual processes of humans are vastly superior to those achieved by all other species. The adult human brain is a highly complex organ weighing approximately 1500g, which accounts for only 2% of the total body weight but consumes an amount of energy equal to that required by all skeletal muscle at rest. Although the human brain displays a typical primate structure, it can be identified by its specific distinguishing features. The process of evolution and humanisation of the Homo sapiens brain resulted in a unique and distinct organ with the largest relative volume of any animal species. It also permitted structural reorganization of tissues and circuits in specific segments and regions. These steps explain the remarkable cognitive abilities of modern humans compared not only with other species in our genus, but also with older members of our own species. Brain evolution required the coexistence of two adaptation mechanisms. The first involves genetic changes that occur at the species level, and the second occurs at the individual level and involves changes in chromatin organisation or epigenetic changes. The genetic mechanisms include: a) genetic changes in coding regions that lead to changes in the sequence and activity of existing proteins; b) duplication and deletion of previously existing genes; c) changes in gene expression through changes in the regulatory sequences of different genes; and d) synthesis of non-coding RNAs. Lastly, this review describes some of the main documented chromosomal differences between humans and great apes. These differences have also contributed to the evolution and humanisation process of the H. sapiens brain. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights

  15. Identification of the gene encoding the human mitochondrial RNA polymerase (h-mtRPOL) by cyberscreening of the Expressed Sequence Tags database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, V; Savoia, A; Forti, F; D'Apolito, M F; Centra, M; Rocchi, M; Zeviani, M

    1997-04-01

    A gene cloning strategy based on the screening of the Expressed Sequence Tags database (dbEST) using sequences of mitochondrial housekeeping proteins of yeast was employed to identify the cDNA encoding the precursor of the human mitochondrial RNA polymerase (h-mtRPOL). The 3831 bp h-mtRPOL cDNA is located on chromosome 19p13.3 and encodes a protein of 1230 amino acid residues. The protein sequence shows significant homologies with sequences corresponding to mitochondrial RNA polymerases from lower eukaryotes, and to RNA polymerases from several bacteriophages. The mitochondrial RNA polymerase carries out the central activity of mitochondrial gene expression and, by providing the RNA primers for replication-initiation, is also implicated in the maintenance and propagation of the mitochondrial genome. Genes involved in the control of mtDNA replication and gene expression are attractive candidates for human disorders due to abnormalities of nucleo-mitochondrial intergenomic signalling. The availability of the h-mtRPOL cDNA will allow us to test its role in mitochondrial pathology. In addition, we propose the 'cyberscreening' of dbEST, based on yeast/human cross-species comparison, as a powerful, simple, rapid and inexpensive method, that may accelerate several-fold the molecular dissection of the human mitochondrial proteome.

  16. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding human differentiation antigen 5D4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马凤蓉; 朱立平; 汪燚; 赵方萄; 史耕先; 李波; 李国燕; 张淑珍; 王讯

    2000-01-01

    A 1 846 bp cDNA is isolated from a human tonsil cell λgt 11 cDNA library (ATCC No. 37546) with mAb 5D4 reactive strongly with human B cell line 3D5, but weakly with human B cell line Daudi and human T cell line Jurkat as a probe. RT-PCR also shows a strong reaction in 3D5 cell and a weak reaction in Daudi and Jurkat cell for 5D4 mRNA. There is an open reading frame from 88 to 1 209 bp in 5D4 cDNA encoding a 374 AA protein. Both the Northern blot analysis and the two consecutive stop codens before start coden demonstrate that the cDNA is a full-length cDNA. Secondary structure prediction suggests that there are a region from 295 to 334 AA in the protein with strong hydrophobicity and a transmembrane helix region with high score from 313 to 334 AA with an orientation from the inside to the outside of the cell.

  17. Genome sequence of the stramenopile Blastocystis, a human anaerobic parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Blastocystis is a highly prevalent anaerobic eukaryotic parasite of humans and animals that is associated with various gastrointestinal and extraintestinal disorders. Epidemiological studies have identified different subtypes but no one subtype has been definitively correlated with disease. Results Here we report the 18.8 Mb genome sequence of a Blastocystis subtype 7 isolate, which is the smallest stramenopile genome sequenced to date. The genome is highly compact and contains intriguing rearrangements. Comparisons with other available stramenopile genomes (plant pathogenic oomycete and diatom genomes) revealed effector proteins potentially involved in the adaptation to the intestinal environment, which were likely acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Moreover, Blastocystis living in anaerobic conditions harbors mitochondria-like organelles. An incomplete oxidative phosphorylation chain, a partial Krebs cycle, amino acid and fatty acid metabolisms and an iron-sulfur cluster assembly are all predicted to occur in these organelles. Predicted secretory proteins possess putative activities that may alter host physiology, such as proteases, protease-inhibitors, immunophilins and glycosyltransferases. This parasite also possesses the enzymatic machinery to tolerate oxidative bursts resulting from its own metabolism or induced by the host immune system. Conclusions This study provides insights into the genome architecture of this unusual stramenopile. It also proposes candidate genes with which to study the physiopathology of this parasite and thus may lead to further investigations into Blastocystis-host interactions. PMID:21439036

  18. A user's guide to the encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The mission of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to enable the scientific and medical communities to interpret the human genome sequence and apply it to understand human biology and improve health. The ENCODE Consortium is integrating multiple technologies and approaches in a collective effort to discover and define the functional elements encoded in the human genome, including genes, transcripts, and transcriptional regulatory regions, together with their attendant chromatin states and DNA methylation patterns. In the process, standards to ensure high-quality data have been implemented, and novel algorithms have been developed to facilitate analysis. Data and derived results are made available through a freely accessible database. Here we provide an overview of the project and the resources it is generating and illustrate the application of ENCODE data to interpret the human genome.

  19. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  20. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  1. Diversity and genomic insights into the uncultured Chloroflexi from the human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alisha G; Schwientek, Patrick; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Woyke, Tanja; Levy, Shawn; Beall, Clifford J; Griffen, Ann; Leys, Eugene; Podar, Mircea

    2014-09-01

    Many microbial phyla that are widely distributed in open environments have few or no representatives within animal-associated microbiota. Among them, the Chloroflexi comprises taxonomically and physiologically diverse lineages adapted to a wide range of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. A distinct group of uncultured chloroflexi related to free-living anaerobic Anaerolineae inhabits the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and includes low-abundance human oral bacteria that appear to proliferate in periodontitis. Using a single-cell genomics approach, we obtained the first draft genomic reconstruction for these organisms and compared their inferred metabolic potential with free-living chloroflexi. Genomic data suggest that oral chloroflexi are anaerobic heterotrophs, encoding abundant carbohydrate transport and metabolism functionalities, similar to those seen in environmental Anaerolineae isolates. The presence of genes for a unique phosphotransferase system and N-acetylglucosamine metabolism suggests an important ecological niche for oral chloroflexi in scavenging material from lysed bacterial cells and the human tissue. The inferred ability to produce sialic acid for cell membrane decoration may enable them to evade the host defence system and colonize the subgingival space. As with other low abundance but persistent members of the microbiota, discerning community and host factors that influence the proliferation of oral chloroflexi may help understand the emergence of oral pathogens and the microbiota dynamics in health and disease states.

  2. The Relationship Between Transcript Expression Levels of Nuclear Encoded (TFAM, NRF1 and Mitochondrial Encoded (MT-CO1 Genes in Single Human Oocytes During Oocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Novin M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1 and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21-35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial- related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV stage oocytes (p = 0.62. On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002. A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation.

  3. Inference of distant genetic relations in humans using "1000 genomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khudhair, Ahmed; Qiu, Shuhao; Wyse, Meghan; Chowdhury, Shilpi; Cheng, Xi; Bekbolsynov, Dulat; Saha-Mandal, Arnab; Dutta, Rajib; Fedorova, Larisa; Fedorov, Alexei

    2015-01-07

    Nucleotide sequence differences on the whole-genome scale have been computed for 1,092 people from 14 populations publicly available by the 1000 Genomes Project. Total number of differences in genetic variants between 96,464 human pairs has been calculated. The distributions of these differences for individuals within European, Asian, or African origin were characterized by narrow unimodal peaks with mean values of 3.8, 3.5, and 5.1 million, respectively, and standard deviations of 0.1-0.03 million. The total numbers of genomic differences between pairs of all known relatives were found to be significantly lower than their respective population means and in reverse proportion to the distance of their consanguinity. By counting the total number of genomic differences it is possible to infer familial relations for people that share down to 6% of common loci identical-by-descent. Detection of familial relations can be radically improved when only very rare genetic variants are taken into account. Counting of total number of shared very rare single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from whole-genome sequences allows establishing distant familial relations for persons with eighth and ninth degrees of relationship. Using this analysis we predicted 271 distant familial pairwise relations among 1,092 individuals that have not been declared by 1000 Genomes Project. Particularly, among 89 British and 97 Chinese individuals we found three British-Chinese pairs with distant genetic relationships. Individuals from these pairs share identical-by-descent DNA fragments that represent 0.001%, 0.004%, and 0.01% of their genomes. With affordable whole-genome sequencing techniques, very rare SNPs should become important genetic markers for familial relationships and population stratification. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Virulence evolution of the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis by recombination in the core and accessory genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Joseph

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neisseria meningitidis is a naturally transformable, facultative pathogen colonizing the human nasopharynx. Here, we analyze on a genome-wide level the impact of recombination on gene-complement diversity and virulence evolution in N. meningitidis. We combined comparative genome hybridization using microarrays (mCGH and multilocus sequence typing (MLST of 29 meningococcal isolates with computational comparison of a subset of seven meningococcal genome sequences. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lateral gene transfer of minimal mobile elements as well as prophages are major forces shaping meningococcal population structure. Extensive gene content comparison revealed novel associations of virulence with genetic elements besides the recently discovered meningococcal disease associated (MDA island. In particular, we identified an association of virulence with a recently described canonical genomic island termed IHT-E and a differential distribution of genes encoding RTX toxin- and two-partner secretion systems among hyperinvasive and non-hyperinvasive lineages. By computationally screening also the core genome for signs of recombination, we provided evidence that about 40% of the meningococcal core genes are affected by recombination primarily within metabolic genes as well as genes involved in DNA replication and repair. By comparison with the results of previous mCGH studies, our data indicated that genetic structuring as revealed by mCGH is stable over time and highly similar for isolates from different geographic origins. CONCLUSIONS: Recombination comprising lateral transfer of entire genes as well as homologous intragenic recombination has a profound impact on meningococcal population structure and genome composition. Our data support the hypothesis that meningococcal virulence is polygenic in nature and that differences in metabolism might contribute to virulence.

  5. Genome-wide identification of expression quantitative trait loci for human telomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanseol; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A genome-wide association study was conducted to identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) for human telomerase. We tested the genetic associations of nucleotide variants with expression of the genes encoding human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase RNA components (TERC) in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 373 Europeans. Our results revealed 6 eQTLs associated with hTERT (P planar cell polarity protein 2 (PRICKLE2) gene important for the Wnt signaling pathway. This concurs with previous studies in which significant expressional relationships between hTERT and some genes (β-catenin and Wnt-3a) in the Wnt signaling pathway have been observed. This study suggested 6 novel eQTLs for hTERT and the association of hTERT with the Wnt signaling pathway. Further studies are needed to understand their underlying mechanisms to improve our understanding of the role of hTERT in cancer. PMID:27759658

  6. Digging Up the Human Genome: Current Progress in Deciphering Adverse Drug Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are a major clinical problem. In addition to their clinical impact on human health, there is an enormous cost associated with ADRs in health care and pharmaceutical industry. Increasing studies revealed that genetic variants can determine the susceptibility of individuals to ADRs. The development of modern genomic technologies has led to a tremendous advancement of improving the drug safety and efficacy and minimizing the ADRs. This review will discuss the pharmacogenomic techniques used to unveil the determinants of ADRs and summarize the current progresses concerning the identification of biomarkers for ADRs, with a focus on genetic variants for genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug-transporter proteins, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA. The knowledge gained from these cutting-edge findings will form the basis for better prediction and management for ADRs, ultimately making the medicine personalized.

  7. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Bayne, M L; Cascieri, M A; Kelder, B; Applebaum, J; Chicchi, G; Shapiro, J A; Pasleau, F.; Kopchick, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fi...

  8. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G;

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...

  9. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.O. [Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lapham, E.V. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Child Development Center

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  10. A periodic pattern of SNPs in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo Eskerod; Villesen, Palle; Wiuf, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    or alignment errors, for example, transposable elements (SINE, LINE, and LTR), tandem repeats, and large duplicated regions. However, we found that the pattern is almost entirely confined to what we define as "periodic DNA." Periodic DNA is a genomic region with a high degree of periodicity in nucleotide usage...... periodic DNA. Our results suggest that not all SNPs in the human genome are created by independent single nucleotide mutations, and that care should be taken in analysis of SNPs from periodic DNA. The latter may have important consequences for SNP and association studies....

  11. Human genomics and microarrays: implications for the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jana; Isik, Frank

    2002-09-01

    The Human Genome Project was launched in 1989 in an effort to sequence the entire span of human DNA. Although coding sequences are important in identifying mutations, the static order of DNA does not explain how a cell or organism may respond to normal and abnormal biological processes. By examining the mRNA content of a cell, researchers can determine which genes are being activated in response to a stimulus. Traditional methods in molecular biology generally work on a "one gene: one experiment" basis, which means that the throughput is very limited and the "whole picture" of gene function is hard to obtain. To study each of the 60,000 to 80,000 genes in the human genome under each biological circumstance is not practical. Recently, microarrays (also known as gene or DNA chips) have emerged; these allow for the simultaneous determination of expression for thousands of genes and analysis of genome-wide mRNA expression. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to provide the clinical plastic surgeon with a working knowledge and understanding of the fields of genomics, microarrays, and bioinformatics and second, to present a case to illustrate how these technologies can be applied in the study of wound healing.

  12. Meta-basic estimates the size of druggable human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2009-06-01

    We present here the estimation of the upper limit of the number of molecular targets in the human genome that represent an opportunity for further therapeutic treatment. We select around approximately 6300 human proteins that are similar to sequences of known protein targets collected from DrugBank database. Our bioinformatics study estimates the size of 'druggable' human genome to be around 20% of human proteome, i.e. the number of the possible protein targets for small-molecule drug design in medicinal chemistry. We do not take into account any toxicity prediction, the three-dimensional characteristics of the active site in the predicted 'druggable' protein families, or detailed chemical analysis of known inhibitors/drugs. Instead we rely on remote homology detection method Meta-BASIC, which is based on sequence and structural similarity. The prepared dataset of all predicted protein targets from human genome presents the unique opportunity for developing and benchmarking various in silico chemo/bio-informatics methods in the context of the virtual high throughput screening.

  13. Transcript encoded on the opposite strand of the human steroid 21-hydroxylase/complement component C4 gene locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, Y.; Bristow, J.; Gitelman, S.E.; Miller, W.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The gene encoding human adrenal steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) and its highly similar pseudogene are duplicated in tandem with the two genes encoding the fourth component of human serum hemolytic complement (C4). This 60-kilobase gene complex, which lies within the major histocompatibility complex on the short arm of human chromosome 6, has been studied in considerable detail because genetic disorders in steroid 21-hydroxylation and in C4 are common. The authors have cloned a cDNA encoded by a previously unidentified gene in this region. This gene lies on the strand of DNA opposite from the strand containing the P450c21 and C4 genes, and it overlaps the last exon of P450c21. The newly identified gene encodes mRNAs of 3.5 and 1.8 kilobases that are expressed in the adrenal and in a Leydig cell tumor but are not expressed in nonsteroidogenic tissues. The sequence of the longest cDNA (2.7 kilobases) shows no similarity to known sequences available in two computerized data bases. The 5{prime} end of this sequence is characterized by three repeats, each encoding about 100 amino acids flanked by potential sites for proteolytic cleavage. Although numerous studies have shown that gene deletions causing congenital adrenal hyperplasia occur in this region, none of these gene deletions extends into this newly identified gene, suggesting that it encodes an essential function.

  14. Identification, characterization, and comparative genomic distribution of the HERV-K (HML-2 group of human endogenous retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Ravi P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of retroviral DNA into a germ cell may lead to a provirus that is transmitted vertically to that host's offspring as an endogenous retrovirus (ERV. In humans, ERVs (HERVs comprise about 8% of the genome, the vast majority of which are truncated and/or highly mutated and no longer encode functional genes. The most recently active retroviruses that integrated into the human germ line are members of the Betaretrovirus-like HERV-K (HML-2 group, many of which contain intact open reading frames (ORFs in some or all genes, sometimes encoding functional proteins that are expressed in various tissues. Interestingly, this expression is upregulated in many tumors ranging from breast and ovarian tissues to lymphomas and melanomas, as well as schizophrenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and other disorders. Results No study to date has characterized all HML-2 elements in the genome, an essential step towards determining a possible functional role of HML-2 expression in disease. We present here the most comprehensive and accurate catalog of all full-length and partial HML-2 proviruses, as well as solo LTR elements, within the published human genome to date. Furthermore, we provide evidence for preferential maintenance of proviruses and solo LTR elements on gene-rich chromosomes of the human genome and in proximity to gene regions. Conclusions Our analysis has found and corrected several errors in the annotation of HML-2 elements in the human genome, including mislabeling of a newly identified group called HML-11. HML-elements have been implicated in a wide array of diseases, and characterization of these elements will play a fundamental role to understand the relationship between endogenous retrovirus expression and disease.

  15. Explicit encoding of multimodal percepts by single neurons in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2009-08-11

    Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol's famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the "ventral pathway," via both single-cell recordings in monkeys and functional imaging in humans. Interestingly, in humans, the same "concept" of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices and visual word forms. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities.

  16. A genome-to-genome analysis of associations between human genetic variation, HIV-1 sequence diversity, and viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; Carlson, Jonathan M; Brumme, Chanson J; McLaren, Paul J; Brumme, Zabrina L; John, Mina; Haas, David W; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Dalmau, Judith; López-Galíndez, Cecilio; Casado, Concepción; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Bernasconi, Enos; Vernazza, Pietro; Klimkait, Thomas; Yerly, Sabine; O'Brien, Stephen J; Listgarten, Jennifer; Pfeifer, Nico; Lippert, Christoph; Fusi, Nicolo; Kutalik, Zoltán; Allen, Todd M; Müller, Viktor; Harrigan, P Richard; Heckerman, David; Telenti, Amalio; Fellay, Jacques

    2013-10-29

    HIV-1 sequence diversity is affected by selection pressures arising from host genomic factors. Using paired human and viral data from 1071 individuals, we ran >3000 genome-wide scans, testing for associations between host DNA polymorphisms, HIV-1 sequence variation and plasma viral load (VL), while considering human and viral population structure. We observed significant human SNP associations to a total of 48 HIV-1 amino acid variants (pgenome-to-genome approach highlights sites of genomic conflict and is a strategy generally applicable to studies of host-pathogen interaction. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01123.001.

  17. Comparative evolutionary genomics of the HADH2 gene encoding Aβ-binding alcohol dehydrogenase/17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 (ABAD/HSD10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Pedro A

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Aβ-binding alcohol dehydrogenase/17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 (ABAD/HSD10 is an enzyme involved in pivotal metabolic processes and in the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in the Alzheimer's disease. Here we use comparative genomic analyses to study the evolution of the HADH2 gene encoding ABAD/HSD10 across several eukaryotic species. Results Both vertebrate and nematode HADH2 genes showed a six-exon/five-intron organization while those of the insects had a reduced and varied number of exons (two to three. Eutherian mammal HADH2 genes revealed some highly conserved noncoding regions, which may indicate the presence of functional elements, namely in the upstream region about 1 kb of the transcription start site and in the first part of intron 1. These regions were also conserved between Tetraodon and Fugu fishes. We identified a conserved alternative splicing event between human and dog, which have a nine amino acid deletion, causing the removal of the strand βF. This strand is one of the seven strands that compose the core β-sheet of the Rossman fold dinucleotide-binding motif characteristic of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family members. However, the fact that the substrate binding cleft residues are retained and the existence of a shared variant between human and dog suggest that it might be functional. Molecular adaptation analyses across eutherian mammal orthologues revealed the existence of sites under positive selection, some of which being localized in the substrate-binding cleft and in the insertion 1 region on loop D (an important region for the Aβ-binding to the enzyme. Interestingly, a higher than expected number of nonsynonymous substitutions were observed between human/chimpanzee and orangutan, with six out of the seven amino acid replacements being under molecular adaptation (including three in loop D and one in the substrate binding loop. Conclusion Our study revealed that HADH

  18. Genomic characterization of large heterochromatic gaps in the human genome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Altemose

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest gaps in the human genome assembly correspond to multi-megabase heterochromatic regions composed primarily of two related families of tandem repeats, Human Satellites 2 and 3 (HSat2,3. The abundance of repetitive DNA in these regions challenges standard mapping and assembly algorithms, and as a result, the sequence composition and potential biological functions of these regions remain largely unexplored. Furthermore, existing genomic tools designed to predict consensus-based descriptions of repeat families cannot be readily applied to complex satellite repeats such as HSat2,3, which lack a consistent repeat unit reference sequence. Here we present an alignment-free method to characterize complex satellites using whole-genome shotgun read datasets. Utilizing this approach, we classify HSat2,3 sequences into fourteen subfamilies and predict their chromosomal distributions, resulting in a comprehensive satellite reference database to further enable genomic studies of heterochromatic regions. We also identify 1.3 Mb of non-repetitive sequence interspersed with HSat2,3 across 17 unmapped assembly scaffolds, including eight annotated gene predictions. Finally, we apply our satellite reference database to high-throughput sequence data from 396 males to estimate array size variation of the predominant HSat3 array on the Y chromosome, confirming that satellite array sizes can vary between individuals over an order of magnitude (7 to 98 Mb and further demonstrating that array sizes are distributed differently within distinct Y haplogroups. In summary, we present a novel framework for generating initial reference databases for unassembled genomic regions enriched with complex satellite DNA, and we further demonstrate the utility of these reference databases for studying patterns of sequence variation within human populations.

  19. Clusters of adaptive evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B. Scheinfeldt

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable work has been devoted to identifying regions of the human genome that have been subjected to recent positive selection. Although detailed follow-up studies of putatively selected regions are critical for a deeper understanding of human evolutionary history, such studies have received comparably less attention. Recently, we have shown that ALMS1 has been the target of recent positive selection acting on standing variation in Eurasian populations. Here, we describe a careful follow-up analysis of genetic variation across the ALMS1 region, which unexpectedly revealed a cluster of substrates of positive selection. Specifically, through the analysis of SNP data from the HapMap and HGDP-CEPH samples as well sequence data from the region, we find compelling evidence for three independent and distinct signals of recent positive selection across this 3 Mb region surrounding ALMS1. Moreover, we analyzed the HapMap data to identify other putative clusters of independent selective events and conservatively discovered 19 additional clusters of adaptive evolution. This work has important implications for the interpretation of genome-scans for positive selection in humans and more broadly contributes to a better understanding of how recent positive selection has shaped genetic variation across the human genome.

  20. Genome-wide landscapes of human local adaptation in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    Full Text Available Genetic studies of human local adaptation have been facilitated greatly by recent advances in high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies. However, few studies have investigated local adaptation in Asian populations on a genome-wide scale and with a high geographic resolution. In this study, taking advantage of the dense population coverage in Southeast Asia, which is the part of the world least studied in term of natural selection, we depicted genome-wide landscapes of local adaptations in 63 Asian populations representing the majority of linguistic and ethnic groups in Asia. Using genome-wide data analysis, we discovered many genes showing signs of local adaptation or natural selection. Notable examples, such as FOXQ1, MAST2, and CDH4, were found to play a role in hair follicle development and human cancer, signal transduction, and tumor repression, respectively. These showed strong indications of natural selection in Philippine Negritos, a group of aboriginal hunter-gatherers living in the Philippines. MTTP, which has associations with metabolic syndrome, body mass index, and insulin regulation, showed a strong signature of selection in Southeast Asians, including Indonesians. Functional annotation analysis revealed that genes and genetic variants underlying natural selections were generally enriched in the functional category of alternative splicing. Specifically, many genes showing significant difference with respect to allele frequency between northern and southern Asian populations were found to be associated with human height and growth and various immune pathways. In summary, this study contributes to the overall understanding of human local adaptation in Asia and has identified both known and novel signatures of natural selection in the human genome.

  1. Statistical analysis of simple repeats in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, F.; Liò, P.

    2005-03-01

    The human genome contains repetitive DNA at different level of sequence length, number and dispersion. Highly repetitive DNA is particularly rich in homo- and di-nucleotide repeats, while middle repetitive DNA is rich of families of interspersed, mobile elements hundreds of base pairs (bp) long, among which belong the Alu families. A link between homo- and di-polymeric tracts and mobile elements has been recently highlighted. In particular, the mobility of Alu repeats, which form 10% of the human genome, has been correlated with the length of poly(A) tracts located at one end of the Alu. These tracts have a rigid and non-bendable structure and have an inhibitory effect on nucleosomes, which normally compact the DNA. We performed a statistical analysis of the genome-wide distribution of lengths and inter-tract separations of poly(X) and poly(XY) tracts in the human genome. Our study shows that in humans the length distributions of these sequences reflect the dynamics of their expansion and DNA replication. By means of general tools from linguistics, we show that the latter play the role of highly-significant content-bearing terms in the DNA text. Furthermore, we find that such tracts are positioned in a non-random fashion, with an apparent periodicity of 150 bases. This allows us to extend the link between repetitive, highly mobile elements such as Alus and low-complexity words in human DNA. More precisely, we show that Alus are sources of poly(X) tracts, which in turn affect in a subtle way the combination and diversification of gene expression and the fixation of multigene families.

  2. 78 FR 61851 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    ... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research... Human Genome Research Institute, 4076 Conference Room, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20852... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  3. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 2: Resources for Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haury, David L.

    This ERIC Digest identifies how the human genome project fits into the "National Science Education Standards" and lists Human Genome Project Web sites found on the World Wide Web. It is a resource companion to "Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators" (Haury 2001). The Web resources and…

  4. 75 FR 51828 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... for Human Genome Research. The meetings will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance..., PhD, Director for Extramural Research, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane...: National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. Date: May 16-17, 2011. Open: May 16, 2011, 8:30...

  5. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, D; Kim, J-H; Yeo, W-H; Oh, K; Lee, K-H; Kim, M-H; Ryew, S-M; Ahn, S-G; Gao, D; Cangelosi, G A; Chung, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottleneck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab and saliva samples. DNA is attracted onto a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle four microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for 1 month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery, and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol.

  6. Opening plenary speaker: Human genomics, precision medicine, and advancing human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Eric D

    2016-08-01

    Starting with the launch of the Human Genome Project in 1990, the past quarter-century has brought spectacular achievements in genomics that dramatically empower the study of human biology and disease. The human genomics enterprise is now in the midst of an important transition, as the growing foundation of genomic knowledge is being used by researchers and clinicians to tackle increasingly complex problems in biomedicine. Of particular prominence is the use of revolutionary new DNA sequencing technologies for generating prodigious amounts of DNA sequence data to elucidate the complexities of genome structure, function, and evolution, as well as to unravel the genomic bases of rare and common diseases. Together, these developments are ushering in the era of genomic medicine. Augmenting the advances in human genomics have been innovations in technologies for measuring environmental and lifestyle information, electronic health records, and data science; together, these provide opportunities of unprecedented scale and scope for investigating the underpinnings of health and disease. To capitalize on these opportunities, U.S. President Barack Obama recently announced a major new research endeavor - the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative. This bold effort will be framed around several key aims, which include accelerating the use of genomically informed approaches to cancer care, making important policy and regulatory changes, and establishing a large research cohort of >1 million volunteers to facilitate precision medicine research. The latter will include making the partnership with all participants a centerpiece feature in the cohort's design and development. The Precision Medicine Initiative represents a broad-based research program that will allow new approaches for individualized medical care to be rigorously tested, so as to establish a new evidence base for advancing clinical practice and, eventually, human health.

  7. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Hall, Lena Sørensen;

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode photocrosslin......Despite the well-established role of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in the treatment of depression, the molecular details of antidepressant drug binding are still not fully understood. Here we utilize amber codon suppression in a membrane-bound transporter protein to encode...

  8. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the human Sm-D autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokeach, L.A.; Haselby, J.A.; Hoch, S.O. (Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Antibodies to the Sm-D polypeptide antigen are closely associated with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Sm-D exists in the cell as one of the core proteins of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes implicated in RNA processing. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone, D45-2, coding for the Sm-D human nuclear antigen by screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The 1633-base-pair clone contains an open reading frame (ORF) 357 nucleotides long, capable of encoding a 13,282-dalton polypeptide. The Sm-D coding region is initiated at an AUG codon downstream from a sequence with excellent match to the consensus for the eukaryotic ribosome-binding site. The Sm-D ORF is preceded by a 150-nucleotide-long untranslated leader and followed by a 1126-nucleotide-long untranslated region containing four putative poly(A) signals. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals a (Gly-Arg){sub 9} repeated motif at the C terminus, which may constitute one of the Sm-D immunoreactive determinants. Moreover, this C terminus shows interesting features: (i) a good homology to protamines as expected for a nucleic acid binding protein and (ii) a striking similarity to a region in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen.

  9. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA; Jiahui; (夏家辉); ZHENG; Duo; (郑多),; TANG; Dongsheng; (唐冬生); DAI; Heping; (戴和平); PAN; Qian; (潘乾); LONG; Zhigao; (龙志高); LIAO; Xiaodong; (廖晓东)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  10. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  11. Common genetic variation in the human CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Z Lutz

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines was described to protect beta-cells from apoptosis, to improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance, and to prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Here, we studied whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, influence insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in humans. METHODS: We genotyped 1,771 German subjects for three CTF1 tagging SNPs (rs1046276, rs1458201, and rs8046707. The subjects were metabolically characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test. Subgroups underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging/spectroscopy and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment, the minor allele of CTF1 SNP rs8046707 was significantly associated with decreased in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. The other tested SNPs were not associated with OGTT-derived sensitivity parameters, nor did the three tested SNPs show any association with OGTT-derived parameters of insulin release. In the MR subgroup, SNP rs8046707 was nominally associated with lower visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, the SNP rs1458201 showed a nominal association with increased VLDL levels. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study, even though preliminary and awaiting further confirmation by independent replication, provides first evidence that common genetic variation in CTF1 could contribute to insulin sensitivity in humans. Our SNP data indicate an insulin-desensitizing effect of cardiotrophin-1 and underline that cardiotrophin-1 represents an interesting target to influence insulin sensitivity.

  12. The human mRNA encoding the Goodpasture antigen is alternatively spliced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, D; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1993-06-05

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domain of the human collagen alpha 3(IV)-chain is the primary target of autoantibodies produced in Goodpasture syndrome and, therefore, has been designated as the Goodpasture antigen. In this report, we show that Goodpasture antigen mRNA undergoes processing to at least two alternatively spliced forms in a variety of human tissues, resulting in the exclusion of sequence encoded by either one or two exons. Interestingly, no alternatively spliced forms were observed in bovine or rat tissues. The derived amino acid sequences of the two variant mRNA forms are identical and significantly shorter than that arising from the complete Goodpasture antigen mRNA. They lack the carboxyl-terminal region contributing to the formation of the Goodpasture epitope and all but one of the cysteines found in the complete form. These sequence characteristics suggest that, if translated, the variant Goodpasture antigen is likely to be defective in triple helix formation and no longer reactive with Goodpasture autoantibodies. Although each tissue expressing Goodpasture antigen displayed a specific mRNA pattern, the complete form was always the most abundant and was present at levels apparently unrelated to whether or not the organ of origin is a potential target in Goodpasture syndrome. Furthermore, the antigen sequence was identical in the kidneys of normal and Goodpasture-affected individuals, and no major differences in the expression of the complete and spliced forms were observed.

  13. Genomic discovery of potent chromatin insulators for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingdong; Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Hao; Qi, Heyuan; Song, Chao-Zhong; Navas, Patrick A; Emery, David W; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2015-02-01

    Insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity, which usually manifest as hematopoietic malignancy, represent major barriers to realizing the promise of gene therapy. Although insulator sequences that block transcriptional enhancers could mitigate or eliminate these risks, so far no human insulators with high functional potency have been identified. Here we describe a genomic approach for the identification of compact sequence elements that function as insulators. These elements are highly occupied by the insulator protein CTCF, are DNase I hypersensitive and represent only a small minority of the CTCF recognition sequences in the human genome. We show that the elements identified acted as potent enhancer blockers and substantially decreased the risk of tumor formation in a cancer-prone animal model. The elements are small, can be efficiently accommodated by viral vectors and have no detrimental effects on viral titers. The insulators we describe here are expected to increase the safety of gene therapy for genetic diseases.

  14. Genome Editing in Human Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. This unit describes protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases.

  15. GENOME EDITING IN HUMAN CELLS USING CRISPR/CAS NUCLEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. Here we describe protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 Endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases. PMID:26423589

  16. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzmiller, D.; Bradbury, M.; Cram, S. (comps.)

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratories Life Sciences Division and biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1991. Selected research highlights include: yeast artificial chromosome libraries from flow sorted human chromosomes 16 and 21; distances between the antigen binding sites of three murine antibody subclasses measured using neutron and x-ray scattering; NFCR 10th anniversary highlights; kinase-mediated differences found in the cell cycle regulation of normal and transformed cells; and detecting mutations that cause Gaucher's disease by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Project descriptions include: genomic structure and regulation, molecular structure, cytometry, cell growth and differentiation, radiation biology and carcinogenesis, and pulmonary biology.

  17. Concise review: Human cell engineering: cellular reprogramming and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Prashant; Cheng, Linzhao

    2012-01-01

    Cell engineering is defined here as the collective ability to both reset and edit the genome of a mammalian cell. Until recently, this had been extremely challenging to achieve as nontransformed human cells are significantly refractory to both these processes. The recent success in reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells that are self-renewable in culture, coupled with our increasing ability to effect precise and predesigned genomic editing, now readily permits cellular changes at both the genetic and epigenetic levels. These dual capabilities also make possible the generation of genetically matched, disease-free stem cells from patients for regenerative medicine. The objective of this review is to summarize the key enabling developments on these two rapidly evolving research fronts in human cell engineering, highlight unresolved issues, and outline potential future research directions.

  18. Contribution of a genomic accessory region encoding a putative cellobiose phosphotransferase system to virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren J McAllister

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is a formidable human pathogen, responsible for massive global morbidity and mortality. The ability to utilize carbohydrates in a variety of host niches appears to be integral to pneumococcal pathogenesis. In this study we investigated a genomic island, which includes a ROK family protein, a putative cellobiose phosphotransferase system (PTS and a putative sulfatase. This accessory region is widespread in the pneumococcus in strains of various serotypes and levels of virulence. We have performed simple bioinformatic analysis of the region and investigated its role in vivo in 2 strains with markedly different virulence profiles (WCH206 of serotype 3, ST180; Menzies5 of serotype 11A, ST662. Deleting and replacing the entire island with an antibiotic resistance cassette caused the virulent serotype 3 strain to become attenuated in a murine pneumonia/sepsis model. Further mutants were constructed and used to show that various components of the island contribute significantly to the fitness of WCH206 in a variety of niches of this model, including the nasopharynx, ears and blood, but especially in the lungs. In addition, the island conferred a competitive advantage in nasopharyngeal colonization for the serotype 11A strain, which was essentially avirulent in the pneumonia/sepsis model. The contribution of this island to both pathogenesis and colonization may explain why this accessory region is widespread in the pneumococcus.

  19. Comparative genomics and the evolution of pathogenicity in human pathogenic fungi.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2011-01-01

    Because most fungi have evolved to be free-living in the environment and because the infections they cause are usually opportunistic in nature, it is often difficult to identify specific traits that contribute to fungal pathogenesis. In recent years, there has been a surge in the number of sequenced genomes of human fungal pathogens, and comparison of these sequences has proved to be an excellent resource for exploring commonalities and differences in how these species interact with their hosts. In order to survive in the human body, fungi must be able to adapt to new nutrient sources and environmental stresses. Therefore, genes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and transport and genes encoding secondary metabolites tend to be overrepresented in pathogenic species (e.g., Aspergillus fumigatus). However, it is clear that human commensal yeast species such as Candida albicans have also evolved a range of specific factors that facilitate direct interaction with host tissues. The evolution of virulence across the human pathogenic fungi has occurred largely through very similar mechanisms. One of the most important mechanisms is gene duplication and the expansion of gene families, particularly in subtelomeric regions. Unlike the case for prokaryotic pathogens, horizontal transfer of genes between species and other genera does not seem to have played a significant role in the evolution of fungal virulence. New sequencing technologies promise the prospect of even greater numbers of genome sequences, facilitating the sequencing of multiple genomes and transcriptomes within individual species, and will undoubtedly contribute to a deeper insight into fungal pathogenesis.

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailao, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo; Silva Ferreira, Marcia Eliana da; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Leon-Narvaez, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasi...

  1. Detection of extracellular genomic DNA scaffold in human thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanisms underlying transition of a thrombus susceptible to tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) fibrinolysis to one that is resistant is unclear. Demonstration of a new possible thrombus scaffold may open new avenues of research in thrombolysis and may provide mechanistic insight...... thrombi. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive detection of genomic DNA associated with histones in the extracellular matrix of human and mouse thrombi suggest the presence of a new thrombus-associated scaffold....

  2. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  3. Human genome-guided identification of memory-modulating drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Gerhards, Christiane; Heck, Angela; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Schicktanz, Nathalie; Auschra, Bianca; Demougin, Philippe; Mumme, Eva; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hanser, Edveena; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Jessen, Frank; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Milnik, Annette; Paganetti, Paolo; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-11-12

    In the last decade there has been an exponential increase in knowledge about the genetic basis of complex human traits, including neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not clear, however, to what extent this knowledge can be used as a starting point for drug identification, one of the central hopes of the human genome project. The aim of the present study was to identify memory-modulating compounds through the use of human genetic information. We performed a multinational collaborative study, which included assessment of aversive memory--a trait central to posttraumatic stress disorder--and a gene-set analysis in healthy individuals. We identified 20 potential drug target genes in two genomewide-corrected gene sets: the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction and the long-term depression gene set. In a subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers, we aimed at providing a proof of concept for the genome-guided identification of memory modulating compounds. Pharmacological intervention at the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction gene set led to significant reduction of aversive memory. The findings demonstrate that genome information, along with appropriate data mining methodology, can be used as a starting point for the identification of memory-modulating compounds.

  4. Report of the second Human Genome Diversity workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The Second Human Genome Diversity Workshop was successfully held at Penn State University from October 29--31, 1992. The Workshop was essentially organized around 7 groups, each comprising approximately 10 participants, representing the sampling issues in different regions of the world. These groups worked independently, using a common format provided by the organizers; this was adjusted as needed by the individual groups. The Workshop began with a presentation of the mandate to the participants, and of the procedures to be followed during the workshop. Dr. Feldman presented a summary of the results from the First Workshop. He and the other organizers also presented brief comments giving their perspective on the objectives of the Second Workshop. Dr. Julia Bodmer discussed the study of European genetic diversity, especially in the context of the HLA experience there, and of plans to extend such studies in the coming years. She also discussed surveys of world HLA laboratories in regard to resources related to Human Genome Diversity. Dr. Mark Weiss discussed the relevance of nonhuman primate studies for understanding how demographic processes, such as mate exchange between local groups, affected the local dispersion of genetic variation. Primate population geneticists have some relevant experience in interpreting variation at this local level, in particular, with various DNA fingerprinting methods. This experience may be relevant to the Human Genome Diversity Project, in terms of practical and statistical issues.

  5. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  6. The human genome: Some assembly required. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Project promises to be one of the most rewarding endeavors in modern biology. The cost and the ethical and social implications, however, have made this project the source of considerable debate both in the scientific community and in the public at large. The 1994 Graduate Student Symposium addresses the scientific merits of the project, the technical issues involved in accomplishing the task, as well as the medical and social issues which stem from the wealth of knowledge which the Human Genome Project will help create. To this end, speakers were brought together who represent the diverse areas of expertise characteristic of this multidisciplinary project. The keynote speaker addresses the project`s motivations and goals in the larger context of biological and medical sciences. The first two sessions address relevant technical issues, data collection with a focus on high-throughput sequencing methods and data analysis with an emphasis on identification of coding sequences. The third session explores recent advances in the understanding of genetic diseases and possible routes to treatment. Finally, the last session addresses some of the ethical, social and legal issues which will undoubtedly arise from having a detailed knowledge of the human genome.

  7. Sequencing and annotated analysis of an Estonian human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleoja, Rutt; Sarapik, Aili; Reimann, Ene; Reemann, Paula; Jaakma, Ülle; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2012-02-01

    In present study we describe the sequencing and annotated analysis of the individual genome of Estonian. Using SOLID technology we generated 2,449,441,916 of 50-bp reads. The Bioscope version 1.3 was used for mapping and pairing of reads to the NCBI human genome reference (build 36, hg18). Bioscope enables also the annotation of the results of variant (tertiary) analysis. The average mapping of reads was 75.5% with total coverage of 107.72 Gb. resulting in mean fold coverage of 34.6. We found 3,482,975 SNPs out of which 352,492 were novel. 21,222 SNPs were in coding region: 10,649 were synonymous SNPs, 10,360 were nonsynonymous missense SNPs, 155 were nonsynonymous nonsense SNPs and 58 were nonsynonymous frameshifts. We identified 219 CNVs with total base pair coverage of 37,326,300 bp and 87,451 large insertion/deletion polymorphisms covering 10,152,256 bp of the genome. In addition, we found 285,864 small size insertion/deletion polymorphisms out of which 133,969 were novel. Finally, we identified 53 inversions, 19 overlapped genes and 2 overlapped exons. Interestingly, we found the region in chromosome 6 to be enriched with the coding SNPs and CNVs. This study confirms previous findings, that our genomes are more complex and variable as thought before. Therefore, sequencing of the personal genomes followed by annotation would improve the analysis of heritability of phenotypes and our understandings on the functions of genome.

  8. Standardized metadata for human pathogen/vector genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien G Dugan

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing has accelerated the determination of genome sequences for thousands of human infectious disease pathogens and dozens of their vectors. The scale and scope of these data are enabling genotype-phenotype association studies to identify genetic determinants of pathogen virulence and drug/insecticide resistance, and phylogenetic studies to track the origin and spread of disease outbreaks. To maximize the utility of genomic sequences for these purposes, it is essential that metadata about the pathogen/vector isolate characteristics be collected and made available in organized, clear, and consistent formats. Here we report the development of the GSCID/BRC Project and Sample Application Standard, developed by representatives of the Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCIDs, the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs for Infectious Diseases, and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH, informed by interactions with numerous collaborating scientists. It includes mapping to terms from other data standards initiatives, including the Genomic Standards Consortium's minimal information (MIxS and NCBI's BioSample/BioProjects checklists and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI. The standard includes data fields about characteristics of the organism or environmental source of the specimen, spatial-temporal information about the specimen isolation event, phenotypic characteristics of the pathogen/vector isolated, and project leadership and support. By modeling metadata fields into an ontology-based semantic framework and reusing existing ontologies and minimum information checklists, the application standard can be extended to support additional project-specific data fields and integrated with other data represented with comparable standards. The use of this metadata standard by all ongoing and future GSCID sequencing projects will

  9. Predicting human genetic interactions from cancer genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lu

    Full Text Available Synthetic Lethal (SL genetic interactions play a key role in various types of biological research, ranging from understanding genotype-phenotype relationships to identifying drug-targets against cancer. Despite recent advances in empirical measuring SL interactions in human cells, the human genetic interaction map is far from complete. Here, we present a novel approach to predict this map by exploiting patterns in cancer genome evolution. First, we show that empirically determined SL interactions are reflected in various gene presence, absence, and duplication patterns in hundreds of cancer genomes. The most evident pattern that we discovered is that when one member of an SL interaction gene pair is lost, the other gene tends not to be lost, i.e. the absence of co-loss. This observation is in line with expectation, because the loss of an SL interacting pair will be lethal to the cancer cell. SL interactions are also reflected in gene expression profiles, such as an under representation of cases where the genes in an SL pair are both under expressed, and an over representation of cases where one gene of an SL pair is under expressed, while the other one is over expressed. We integrated the various previously unknown cancer genome patterns and the gene expression patterns into a computational model to identify SL pairs. This simple, genome-wide model achieves a high prediction power (AUC = 0.75 for known genetic interactions. It allows us to present for the first time a comprehensive genome-wide list of SL interactions with a high estimated prediction precision, covering up to 591,000 gene pairs. This unique list can potentially be used in various application areas ranging from biotechnology to medical genetics.

  10. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Neng-zhi; Liu, Zi-xian; Qiu, Wen-yuan

    2009-02-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and correlation of 16 nearest neighboring nucleotides (AA, AC, AG, ..., TT) in 12 human chromosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (i) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ii) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coefficients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  11. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression of genome segment 7 (S7) of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) that encodes a viral structural protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2007-10-01

    The Genome segment 7 (S7) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) was converted to cDNA, cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence showed that segment 7 consisted of 1789 nucleotides with an ORF of 530 amino acids and could encode a protein of approximately 61 kDa, termed P61. The 5' terminal sequence, AGTAAT and the 3' terminal sequence, AGAGC of the plus strand was found to be the same as genome segment 10 of AmCPV encoding polyhedrin. No sequence similarity was found by searching nucleic acid and protein sequence databases using BLAST. The secondary structure prediction showed the presence of 17 alpha-helices, 18 extended beta-sheets along the entire length of P61. The ORF of segment 7 was expressed in E. coli as His-tagged fusion protein, purified through Ni-NTA chromatography, and polyclonal antibody was raised in rabbit indicating that P61 is immunogenic. Immunoblot analysis using this antibody on viral infected cells as well as purified polyhedra showed that P61 is a viral structural protein. Motif scan search showed some similarity of P61 with Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain at the C-terminus and it was hypothesized that by binding to single stranded viral RNA through its CBS domain P61 may help in virus replication or transcription.

  12. Global genomic diversity of human papillomavirus 6 based on 724 isolates and 190 complete genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelen, Mateja M; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Burt, Felicity J; Chan, Paul K S; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L; Garland, Suzanne M; Giri, Adriana A; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N M; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Zidovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D; Poljak, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV6 variant lineages

  13. RMI1/NCE4, a suppressor of genome instability, encodes a member of the RecQ helicase/Topo III complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, M; Bellaoui, M; Zhang, CY; Desai, R; Morozov, P; Delgado-Cruzata, L; Rothstein, R; Freyer, GA; Boone, C; Brown, GW

    2005-01-01

    SGS1 encodes a DNA helicase whose homologues in human cells include the BLM, WRN, and RECQ4 genes, mutations in which lead to cancer-predisposition syndromes. Clustering of synthetic genetic interactions identified by large-scale genetic network analysis revealed that the genetic interaction profile

  14. Sequence Analysis of Staphylococcus hyicus ATCC 11249T, an Etiological Agent of Exudative Epidermitis in Swine, Reveals a Type VII Secretion System Locus and a Novel 116-Kilobase Genomic Island Harboring Toxin-Encoding Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F; Hsieh, Hsin-Yeh; Adkins, Pamela R F; Stewart, George C; Middleton, John R

    2015-02-19

    Staphylococcus hyicus is the primary etiological agent of exudative epidermitis in swine. Analysis of the complete genome sequence of the type strain revealed a locus encoding a type VII secretion system and a large chromosomal island harboring the genes encoding exfoliative toxin ExhA and an EDIN toxin homolog.

  15. [Genetic individuality and the universal declaration on the human genome and human rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueiros, Jesús M; Saruwatari, Garbiñe; Oliva-Sánchez, Pablo Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the epistemic and ontological relationship between science and law through the concept of individual in the Universal Declaration of the Human Genome and Human Rights. We argue for a better understanding of this relationship in order to foresee ethical and social consequences derived from Law adopting concepts with a strong scientific meaning.

  16. The bornavirus-derived human protein EBLN1 promotes efficient cell cycle transit, microtubule organisation and genome stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Katie N.; Barone, Giancarlo; Ganesh, Anil; Staples, Christopher J.; Howard, Anna E.; Beveridge, Ryan D.; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J. Mark; Collis, Spencer J.

    2016-01-01

    It was recently discovered that vertebrate genomes contain multiple endogenised nucleotide sequences derived from the non-retroviral RNA bornavirus. Strikingly, some of these elements have been evolutionary maintained as open reading frames in host genomes for over 40 million years, suggesting that some endogenised bornavirus-derived elements (EBL) might encode functional proteins. EBLN1 is one such element established through endogenisation of the bornavirus N gene (BDV N). Here, we functionally characterise human EBLN1 as a novel regulator of genome stability. Cells depleted of human EBLN1 accumulate DNA damage both under non-stressed conditions and following exogenously induced DNA damage. EBLN1-depleted cells also exhibit cell cycle abnormalities and defects in microtubule organisation as well as premature centrosome splitting, which we attribute in part, to improper localisation of the nuclear envelope protein TPR. Our data therefore reveal that human EBLN1 possesses important cellular functions within human cells, and suggest that other EBLs present within vertebrate genomes may also possess important cellular functions. PMID:27739501

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory- Completing the Human Genome Project and Triggering Nearly $1 Trillion in U.S. Economic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The success of the Human Genome project is already nearing $1 Trillion dollars of U.S. economic activity. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was a co-leader in one of the biggest biological research effort in history, sequencing the Human Genome Project. This ambitious research effort set out to sequence the approximately 3 billion nucleotides in the human genome, an effort many thought was nearly impossible. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was discovered in 1869, and by 1943 came the discovery that DNA was a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of living organisms and many viruses. To make full use of the information, scientists needed to first sequence the billions of nucleotides to begin linking them to genetic traits and illnesses, and eventually more effective treatments. New medical discoveries and improved agriculture productivity were some of the expected benefits. While the potential benefits were vast, the timeline (over a decade) and cost ($3.8 Billion) exceeded what the private sector would normally attempt, especially when this would only be the first phase toward the path to new discoveries and market opportunities. The Department of Energy believed its best research laboratories could meet this Grand Challenge and soon convinced the National Institute of Health to formally propose the Human Genome project to the federal government. The U.S. government accepted the risk and challenge to potentially create new healthcare and food discoveries that could benefit the world and the U.S. Industry.

  18. Human and non-human primate genomes share hotspots of positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Enard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Among primates, genome-wide analysis of recent positive selection is currently limited to the human species because it requires extensive sampling of genotypic data from many individuals. The extent to which genes positively selected in human also present adaptive changes in other primates therefore remains unknown. This question is important because a gene that has been positively selected independently in the human and in other primate lineages may be less likely to be involved in human specific phenotypic changes such as dietary habits or cognitive abilities. To answer this question, we analysed heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomes of single human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque individuals using a new method aiming to identify selective sweeps genome-wide. We found an unexpectedly high number of orthologous genes exhibiting signatures of a selective sweep simultaneously in several primate species, suggesting the presence of hotspots of positive selection. A similar significant excess is evident when comparing genes positively selected during recent human evolution with genes subjected to positive selection in their coding sequence in other primate lineages and identified using a different test. These findings are further supported by comparing several published human genome scans for positive selection with our findings in non-human primate genomes. We thus provide extensive evidence that the co-occurrence of positive selection in humans and in other primates at the same genetic loci can be measured with only four species, an indication that it may be a widespread phenomenon. The identification of positive selection in humans alongside other primates is a powerful tool to outline those genes that were selected uniquely during recent human evolution.

  19. The genomic structure and developmental expression patterns of the human OPA-containing gene (HOPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibert, R A; Winfield, S L; Damschroder-Williams, P; Tengstrom, C; Martin, B M; Ginns, E I

    1999-01-01

    We determined the genomic organization of the human OPA-containing gene (HOPA) and characterized its developmental expression. The gene encoding HOPA, which contains a rare polymorphism tightly associated with non-specific mental retardation, is 25 kb in length and consists of 44 exons. A promoter scan analysis demonstrates two possible transcription initiation sites without TATA boxes upstream from the putative translation initiation start site. Several informative polymorphisms are evident in the sequence including a large pentanucleotide repeat. Northern blot analysis of the gene transcript and its murine orthologue, MOPA-1, demonstrates that only one transcript is expressed throughout the soma and the CNS, and that the transcript is highly expressed during early fetal development. We conclude that the delineation of the function of the HOPA gene locus merits further study.

  20. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  1. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  2. Experimental annotation of the human genome using microarray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, D D; Schadt, E E; Armour, C D; He, Y D; Garrett-Engele, P; McDonagh, P D; Loerch, P M; Leonardson, A; Lum, P Y; Cavet, G; Wu, L F; Altschuler, S J; Edwards, S; King, J; Tsang, J S; Schimmack, G; Schelter, J M; Koch, J; Ziman, M; Marton, M J; Li, B; Cundiff, P; Ward, T; Castle, J; Krolewski, M; Meyer, M R; Mao, M; Burchard, J; Kidd, M J; Dai, H; Phillips, J W; Linsley, P S; Stoughton, R; Scherer, S; Boguski, M S

    2001-02-15

    The most important product of the sequencing of a genome is a complete, accurate catalogue of genes and their products, primarily messenger RNA transcripts and their cognate proteins. Such a catalogue cannot be constructed by computational annotation alone; it requires experimental validation on a genome scale. Using 'exon' and 'tiling' arrays fabricated by ink-jet oligonucleotide synthesis, we devised an experimental approach to validate and refine computational gene predictions and define full-length transcripts on the basis of co-regulated expression of their exons. These methods can provide more accurate gene numbers and allow the detection of mRNA splice variants and identification of the tissue- and disease-specific conditions under which genes are expressed. We apply our technique to chromosome 22q under 69 experimental condition pairs, and to the entire human genome under two experimental conditions. We discuss implications for more comprehensive, consistent and reliable genome annotation, more efficient, full-length complementary DNA cloning strategies and application to complex diseases.

  3. Complete genome sequence of human astrovirus genotype 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernet Guy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human astroviruses (HAstVs are one of the important causes of acute gastroenteritis in children. Currently, eight HAstV genotypes have been identified and all but two (HAstV-6 and HAstV-7 have been fully sequenced. We here sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of a HAstV-6 strain (192-BJ07, which was identified in Beijing, China. Results The genome of 192-BJ07 consists of 6745 nucleotides. The 192-BJ07 strain displays a 77.2-78.0% nucleotide sequence identity with other HAstV genotypes and exhibits amino acid sequence identities of 86.5-87.4%, 94.2-95.1%, and 65.5-74.8% in the ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 regions, respectively. Homological analysis of ORF2 shows that 192-BJ07 is 96.3% identical to the documented HAstV-6 strain. Further, phylogenetic analysis indicates that different genomic regions are likely undergoing different evolutionary and selective pressures. No recombination event was observed in HAstV-6 in this study. Conclusion The completely sequenced and characterized genome of HAstV-6 (192-BJ07 provides further insight into the genetics of astroviruses and aids in the surveillance and control of HAstV gastroenteritis.

  4. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  5. Insight into different environmental niches adaptation and allergenicity from the Cladosporium sphaerospermum genome, a common human allergy-eliciting Dothideomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Su Mei; Chan, Chai Ling; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Toh, Yue Fen; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng; Kuan, Chee Sian

    2016-05-31

    Cladosporium sphaerospermum, a dematiaceous saprophytic fungus commonly found in diverse environments, has been reported to cause allergy and other occasional diseases in humans. However, its basic biology and genetic information are largely unexplored. A clinical isolate C. sphaerospermum genome, UM 843, was re-sequenced and combined with previously generated sequences to form a model 26.89 Mb genome containing 9,652 predicted genes. Functional annotation on predicted genes suggests the ability of this fungus to degrade carbohydrate and protein complexes. Several putative peptidases responsible for lung tissue hydrolysis were identified. These genes shared high similarity with the Aspergillus peptidases. The UM 843 genome encodes a wide array of proteins involved in the biosynthesis of melanin, siderophores, cladosins and survival in high salinity environment. In addition, a total of 28 genes were predicted to be associated with allergy. Orthologous gene analysis together with 22 other Dothideomycetes showed genes uniquely present in UM 843 that encode four class 1 hydrophobins which may be allergens specific to Cladosporium. The mRNA of these hydrophobins were detected by RT-PCR. The genomic analysis of UM 843 contributes to the understanding of the biology and allergenicity of this widely-prevalent species.

  6. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding "...

  7. Personal and population genomics of human regulatory variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernot, Benjamin; Stergachis, Andrew B; Maurano, Matthew T; Vierstra, Jeff; Neph, Shane; Thurman, Robert E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Akey, Joshua M

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics and evolutionary forces acting on regulatory variation in humans remains elusive because of the difficulty in defining functionally important noncoding DNA. Here, we combine genome-scale maps of regulatory DNA marked by DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) from 138 cell and tissue types with whole-genome sequences of 53 geographically diverse individuals in order to better delimit the patterns of regulatory variation in humans. We estimate that individuals likely harbor many more functionally important variants in regulatory DNA compared with protein-coding regions, although they are likely to have, on average, smaller effect sizes. Moreover, we demonstrate that there is significant heterogeneity in the level of functional constraint in regulatory DNA among different cell types. We also find marked variability in functional constraint among transcription factor motifs in regulatory DNA, with sequence motifs for major developmental regulators, such as HOX proteins, exhibiting levels of constraint comparable to protein-coding regions. Finally, we perform a genome-wide scan of recent positive selection and identify hundreds of novel substrates of adaptive regulatory evolution that are enriched for biologically interesting pathways such as melanogenesis and adipocytokine signaling. These data and results provide new insights into patterns of regulatory variation in individuals and populations and demonstrate that a large proportion of functionally important variation lies beyond the exome.

  8. Characterization and mapping to human chromosome 8q24.3 of Ly-6-related gene 9804 encoding an apparent homologue of mouse TSA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, X; Bourdeau, A; Rhoton, A; Wells, D E; Cohen, E H; Landgraf, B E; Palfree, R G

    1998-01-01

    The 9804 gene, which encodes a human Ly-6 protein most similar to mouse differentiation Ag TSA-1/Sca-2, has also been called RIG-E. Like mouse TSA-1, it has a broad tissue distribution with varied expression levels in normal human tissues and tumor cell lines. Like some members of the murine Ly-6 family, the 9804 gene is responsive to IFNs, particularly IFN-alpha. Overlapping genomic fragments spanning the 9804 gene (5543 bp) have been isolated and characterized. The gene organization is analogous to that of known mouse Ly-6 genes. The first exon, 2296 bp upstream from exon II, is entirely untranslated. The three coding exons (II, III, and IV) are separated by short introns of 321 and 131 bp, respectively. Primers were developed for specific amplification of 9804 gene fragments. Screening of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) indicated that the gene is distal to c-Myc, located in the q arm of human chromosome 8. No positives were detected from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain mega-YAC A or B panels, nor from bacterial artificial chromosome libraries; two positive cosmids (c101F1 and c157F6) were isolated from a human chromosome 8 cosmid library (LA08NC01). Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads of chromosome 8, containing hybrid cell line 706-B6 clone 17 (CL-17) with cosmid c101F1, placed the 9804 gene close to the telomere at 8q24.3. This mapping is significant, since the region shares a homology with a portion of mouse chromosome 15, which extends into band E where Ly-6 genes reside. Moreover, the gene encoding E48, the homologue of mouse Ly-6 molecule ThB, has also been mapped to 8q24.

  9. Direction of movement is encoded in the human primary motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M Toxopeus

    Full Text Available The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left and 270° (down elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180° and vertical (90°+270° axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1.

  10. Effects of eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding human tumstatin gene on endothelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ya-pei; XU Chun-xiao; HOU Guo-sheng; XIN Jia-xuan; WANG Wei; LIU Xian-xi

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumstatin is a novel endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor which is widely studied using purified protein.The current study evaluates the antiangiogenic effects of tumstatin-overexpression plasmid in vitro, reveals the mechanism underlying the vascular endothelial cell growth inhibition and searches for a novel method administering tumstatin persistently.Methods The eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA-tumstatin encoding tumstatin gene was constructed and transfected to human umbilical vein endothelial cell ECV304 and human renal carcinoma cell ACHN.Expression of tumstatin in the two cell lines was determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting.Vascular endothelial cell proliferation was assessed by CCK-8 assay and cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry.To investigate the mechanism by which pcDNA-tumstatin inhibited vascular endothelial cell proliferation in vitro, cyclin D1 protein was detected by Western blotting.Results DNA sequence confirmed that pcDNA-tumstatin was successfully constructed.RT-PCR and Western blotting indicated that tumstatin could express in the two cell lines effectively.After tumstatin gene transfer, ECV304 cell growth was significantly inhibited and the cell cycle was arrested in G1 phase.And Western blotting showed that pcDNA-tumstatin decreased the level of cyclin D1 protein.Conclusions Overexpression of tumstatin mediated by pcDNA 3.1 (+) specially inhibited vascular endothelial cells by arresting vascular endothelial cell in G1 phase resulting from downregulation of cyclin D1 and administration of tumstatin using a gene therapy might be a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  11. Secretion of human parathyroid hormone from rat pituitary cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus encoding preproparathyroid hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Hellerman, J G; Cone, R C; Potts, J. T.; Rich, A; Mulligan, R C; Kronenberg, H M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the functions of precursors to secreted proteins, we expressed cloned DNA encoding human preproparathyroid hormone (preproPTH) in rat pituitary cells. We first constructed a recombinant plasmid containing human preproPTH cDNA and retroviral control signals. This recombinant plasmid was transfected into psi-2 cells, a packaging cell line that produces Moloney murine leukemia viral particles containing no retroviral RNA. The transfected psi-2 cells generated helper-free recomb...

  12. The genomic structure of the human Charcot-Leyden crystal protein gene is analogous to those of the galectin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, K.D. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Handen, J.S.; Rosenberg, H.F. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein, or eosinophil lysophospholipase, is a characteristic protein of human eosinophils and basophils; recent work has demonstrated that the CLC protein is both structurally and functionally related to the galectin family of {beta}-galactoside binding proteins. The galectins as a group share a number of features in common, including a linear ligand binding site encoded on a single exon. In this work, we demonstrate that the intron-exon structure of the gene encoding CLC is analogous to those encoding the galectins. The coding sequence of the CLC gene is divided into four exons, with the entire {beta}-galactoside binding site encoded by exon III. We have isolated CLC {beta}-galactoside binding sites from both orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and murine (Mus musculus) genomic DNAs, both encoded on single exons, and noted conservation of the amino acids shown to interact directly with the {beta}-galactoside ligand. The most likely interpretation of these results suggests the occurrence of one or more exon duplication and insertion events, resulting in the distribution of this lectin domain to CLC as well as to the multiple galectin genes. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus from Lanzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chuanfeng; Fu, Shengfang; Zhou, Xv; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complete genome of human respiratory syncytial virus was sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the full-length human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) genome sequence belongs to gene type NA1. We sequenced the genome in order to create the full-length cDNA infectious clone and develop vaccines against HRSV.

  14. 78 FR 64222 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Committee, CEGS-- Initiative to Maximize Research Education in Genomics. Date: November 7-8, 2013. Time: 8..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research...: Camilla E. Day, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National...

  15. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these r......Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed......-immune traits to assess its applicability to complex traits in general. We find that genes in loci associated to height and lipid levels assemble into significantly connected networks but did not detect excess connectivity among Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) loci beyond chance. Taken together, our results constitute...

  16. 76 FR 3917 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, TRND--RFP... Person: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  17. 77 FR 5035 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Sequencing Technology..., Rockville, MD 20852, (301) 402-0838, nakamurk@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Human...

  18. 78 FR 47715 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The meeting will be... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human...

  19. 76 FR 29772 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; ELSI-SEP. Date: June...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human...

  20. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  1. Genomic variation landscape of the human gut microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schloissnig, Siegfried; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    Whereas large-scale efforts have rapidly advanced the understanding and practical impact of human genomic variation, the practical impact of variation is largely unexplored in the human microbiome. We therefore developed a framework for metagenomic variation analysis and applied it to 252 faecal...... metagenomes of 207 individuals from Europe and North America. Using 7.4 billion reads aligned to 101 reference species, we detected 10.3 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 107,991 short insertions/deletions, and 1,051 structural variants. The average ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous...... polymorphism rates of 0.11 was more variable between gut microbial species than across human hosts. Subjects sampled at varying time intervals exhibited individuality and temporal stability of SNP variation patterns, despite considerable composition changes of their gut microbiota. This indicates...

  2. Genome-Wide Identification of Regulatory Sequences Undergoing Accelerated Evolution in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinran; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Feng; Tian, Weidong

    2016-10-01

    Accelerated evolution of regulatory sequence can alter the expression pattern of target genes, and cause phenotypic changes. In this study, we used DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) to annotate putative regulatory sequences in the human genome, and conducted a genome-wide analysis of the effects of accelerated evolution on regulatory sequences. Working under the assumption that local ancient repeat elements of DHSs are under neutral evolution, we discovered that ∼0.44% of DHSs are under accelerated evolution (ace-DHSs). We found that ace-DHSs tend to be more active than background DHSs, and are strongly associated with epigenetic marks of active transcription. The target genes of ace-DHSs are significantly enriched in neuron-related functions, and their expression levels are positively selected in the human brain. Thus, these lines of evidences strongly suggest that accelerated evolution on regulatory sequences plays important role in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. De novo assembly and phasing of a Korean human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Rhie, Arang; Kim, Junsoo; Lee, Sangjin; Sohn, Min-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Uk; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kuk, Junho; Park, Gun Hwa; Kim, Juhyeok; Ryu, Hanna; Kim, Jongbum; Roh, Mira; Baek, Jeonghun; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Changhoon

    2016-10-13

    Advances in genome assembly and phasing provide an opportunity to investigate the diploid architecture of the human genome and reveal the full range of structural variation across population groups. Here we report the de novo assembly and haplotype phasing of the Korean individual AK1 (ref. 1) using single-molecule real-time sequencing, next-generation mapping, microfluidics-based linked reads, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequencing approaches. Single-molecule sequencing coupled with next-generation mapping generated a highly contiguous assembly, with a contig N50 size of 17.9 Mb and a scaffold N50 size of 44.8 Mb, resolving 8 chromosomal arms into single scaffolds. The de novo assembly, along with local assemblies and spanning long reads, closes 105 and extends into 72 out of 190 euchromatic gaps in the reference genome, adding 1.03 Mb of previously intractable sequence. High concordance between the assembly and paired-end sequences from 62,758 BAC clones provides strong support for the robustness of the assembly. We identify 18,210 structural variants by direct comparison of the assembly with the human reference, identifying thousands of breakpoints that, to our knowledge, have not been reported before. Many of the insertions are reflected in the transcriptome and are shared across the Asian population. We performed haplotype phasing of the assembly with short reads, long reads and linked reads from whole-genome sequencing and with short reads from 31,719 BAC clones, thereby achieving phased blocks with an N50 size of 11.6 Mb. Haplotigs assembled from single-molecule real-time reads assigned to haplotypes on phased blocks covered 89% of genes. The haplotigs accurately characterized the hypervariable major histocompatability complex region as well as demonstrating allele configuration in clinically relevant genes such as CYP2D6. This work presents the most contiguous diploid human genome assembly so far, with extensive investigation of

  4. Multiple single-cell genomes provide insight into functions of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria in the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alisha G; Campbell, James H; Schwientek, Patrick; Woyke, Tanja; Sczyrba, Alexander; Allman, Steve; Beall, Clifford J; Griffen, Ann; Leys, Eugene; Podar, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Despite a long history of investigation, many bacteria associated with the human oral cavity have yet to be cultured. Studies that correlate the presence or abundance of uncultured species with oral health or disease highlight the importance of these community members. Thus, we sequenced several single-cell genomic amplicons from Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio (class Deltaproteobacteria) to better understand their function within the human oral community and their association with periodontitis, as well as other systemic diseases. Genomic data from oral Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio species were compared to other available deltaproteobacterial genomes, including from a subset of host-associated species. While both groups share a large number of genes with other environmental Deltaproteobacteria genomes, they encode a wide array of unique genes that appear to function in survival in a host environment. Many of these genes are similar to virulence and host adaptation factors of known human pathogens, suggesting that the oral Deltaproteobacteria have the potential to play a role in the etiology of periodontal disease.

  5. Multiple single-cell genomes provide insight into functions of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria in the human oral cavity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisha G Campbell

    Full Text Available Despite a long history of investigation, many bacteria associated with the human oral cavity have yet to be cultured. Studies that correlate the presence or abundance of uncultured species with oral health or disease highlight the importance of these community members. Thus, we sequenced several single-cell genomic amplicons from Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio (class Deltaproteobacteria to better understand their function within the human oral community and their association with periodontitis, as well as other systemic diseases. Genomic data from oral Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio species were compared to other available deltaproteobacterial genomes, including from a subset of host-associated species. While both groups share a large number of genes with other environmental Deltaproteobacteria genomes, they encode a wide array of unique genes that appear to function in survival in a host environment. Many of these genes are similar to virulence and host adaptation factors of known human pathogens, suggesting that the oral Deltaproteobacteria have the potential to play a role in the etiology of periodontal disease.

  6. Characterization and distribution of repetitive elements in association with genes in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kai-Chiang; Tseng, Joseph T; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq; Sun, H Sunny

    2015-08-01

    Repetitive elements constitute more than 50% of the human genome. Recent studies implied that the complexity of living organisms is not just a direct outcome of a number of coding sequences; the repetitive elements, which do not encode proteins, may also play a significant role. Though scattered studies showed that repetitive elements in the regulatory regions of a gene control gene expression, no systematic survey has been done to report the characterization and distribution of various types of these repetitive elements in the human genome. Sequences from 5' and 3' untranslated regions and upstream and downstream of a gene were downloaded from the Ensembl database. The repetitive elements in the neighboring of each gene were identified and classified using cross-matching implemented in the RepeatMasker. The annotation and distribution of distinct classes of repetitive elements associated with individual gene were collected to characterize genes in association with different types of repetitive elements using systems biology program. We identified a total of 1,068,400 repetitive elements which belong to 37-class families and 1235 subclasses that are associated with 33,761 genes and 57,365 transcripts. In addition, we found that the tandem repeats preferentially locate proximal to the transcription start site (TSS) of genes and the major function of these genes are involved in developmental processes. On the other hand, interspersed repetitive elements showed a tendency to be accumulated at distal region from the TSS and the function of interspersed repeat-containing genes took part in the catabolic/metabolic processes. Results from the distribution analysis were collected and used to construct a gene-based repetitive element database (GBRED; http://www.binfo.ncku.edu.tw/GBRED/index.html). A user-friendly web interface was designed to provide the information of repetitive elements associated with any particular gene(s). This is the first study focusing on the gene

  7. The Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project. Summary document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    In 1991 a group of human geneticists and molecular biologists proposed to the scientific community that a world wide survey be undertaken of variation in the human genome. To aid their considerations, the committee therefore decided to hold a small series of international workshops to explore the major scientific issues involved. The intention was to define a framework for the project which could provide a basis for much wider and more detailed discussion and planning--it was recognized that the successful implementation of the proposed project, which has come to be known as the Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project, would not only involve scientists but also various national and international non-scientific groups all of which should contribute to the project`s development. The international HGD workshop held in Sardinia in September 1993 was the last in the initial series of planning workshops. As such it not only explored new ground but also pulled together into a more coherent form much of the formal and informal discussion that had taken place in the preceding two years. This report presents the deliberations of the Sardinia workshop within a consideration of the overall development of the HGD Project to date.

  8. Comparative genomics of the neglected human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Jane M.; Adams, John H.; Silva, Joana C.; Bidwell, Shelby L.; Lorenzi, Hernan; Caler, Elisabet; Crabtree, Jonathan; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Merino, Emilio F.; Amedeo, Paolo; Cheng, Qin; Coulson, Richard M. R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Essien, Kobby; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Gilson, Paul R.; Gueye, Amy H.; Guo, Xiang; Kang’a, Simon; Kooij, Taco W. A.; Korsinczky, Michael; Meyer, Esmeralda V.-S.; Nene, Vish; Paulsen, Ian; White, Owen; Ralph, Stuart A.; Ren, Qinghu; Sargeant, Tobias J.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Sullivan, Steven A.; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Galinski, Mary R.; Barnwell, John W.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.

    2008-01-01

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is responsible for 25-40% of the ~515 million annual cases of malaria worldwide. Although seldom fatal, the parasite elicits severe and incapacitating clinical symptoms and often relapses months after a primary infection has cleared. Despite its importance as a major human pathogen, P. vivax is little studied because it cannot be propagated in the laboratory except in non-human primates. We determined the genome sequence of P. vivax in order to shed light on its distinctive biologic features, and as a means to drive development of new drugs and vaccines. Here we describe the synteny and isochore structure of P. vivax chromosomes, and show that the parasite resembles other malaria parasites in gene content and metabolic potential, but possesses novel gene families and potential alternate invasion pathways not recognized previously. Completion of the P. vivax genome provides the scientific community with a valuable resource that can be used to advance scientific investigation into this neglected species. PMID:18843361

  9. Dynamic association of NUP98 with the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liang

    Full Text Available Faithful execution of developmental gene expression programs occurs at multiple levels and involves many different components such as transcription factors, histone-modification enzymes, and mRNA processing proteins. Recent evidence suggests that nucleoporins, well known components that control nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking, have wide-ranging functions in developmental gene regulation that potentially extend beyond their role in nuclear transport. Whether the unexpected role of nuclear pore proteins in transcription regulation, which initially has been described in fungi and flies, also applies to human cells is unknown. Here we show at a genome-wide level that the nuclear pore protein NUP98 associates with developmentally regulated genes active during human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Overexpression of a dominant negative fragment of NUP98 levels decreases expression levels of NUP98-bound genes. In addition, we identify two modes of developmental gene regulation by NUP98 that are differentiated by the spatial localization of NUP98 target genes. Genes in the initial stage of developmental induction can associate with NUP98 that is embedded in the nuclear pores at the nuclear periphery. Alternatively, genes that are highly induced can interact with NUP98 in the nuclear interior, away from the nuclear pores. This work demonstrates for the first time that NUP98 dynamically associates with the human genome during differentiation, revealing a role of a nuclear pore protein in regulating developmental gene expression programs.

  10. Insertion and deletion mutagenesis of the human cytomegalovirus genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaete, R.R.; Mocarski, E.S.

    1987-10-01

    Studies on human cytomegalovirus (CMV) have been limited by a paucity of molecular genetic techniques available for manipulating the viral genome. The authors have developed methods for site-specific insertion and deletion mutagenesis of CMV utilizing a modified Escherichia coli lacZ gene as a genetic marker. The lacZ gene was placed under the control of the major ..beta.. gene regulatory signals and inserted into the viral genome by homologous recombination, disrupting one of two copies of this ..beta.. gene within the L-component repeats of CMV DNA. They observed high-level expression of ..beta..-galactosidase by the recombinant in a temporally authentic manner, with levels of this enzyme approaching 1% of total protein in infected cells. Thus, CMV is an efficient vector for high-level expression of foreign gene products in human cells. Using back selection of lacZ-deficient virus in the presence of the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl ..beta..-D-galactoside, they generated random endpoint deletion mutants. Analysis of these mutant revealed that CMV DNA sequences flanking the insert had been removed, thereby establishing this approach as a means of determining whether sequences flanking a lacZ insertion are dispensable for viral growth. In an initial test of the methods, they have shown that 7800 base pairs of one copy of L-component repeat sequences can be deleted without affecting viral growth in human fibroblasts.

  11. Controls of nucleosome positioning in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Gaffney

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes are important for gene regulation because their arrangement on the genome can control which proteins bind to DNA. Currently, few human nucleosomes are thought to be consistently positioned across cells; however, this has been difficult to assess due to the limited resolution of existing data. We performed paired-end sequencing of micrococcal nuclease-digested chromatin (MNase-seq from seven lymphoblastoid cell lines and mapped over 3.6 billion MNase-seq fragments to the human genome to create the highest-resolution map of nucleosome occupancy to date in a human cell type. In contrast to previous results, we find that most nucleosomes have more consistent positioning than expected by chance and a substantial fraction (8.7% of nucleosomes have moderate to strong positioning. In aggregate, nucleosome sequences have 10 bp periodic patterns in dinucleotide frequency and DNase I sensitivity; and, across cells, nucleosomes frequently have translational offsets that are multiples of 10 bp. We estimate that almost half of the genome contains regularly spaced arrays of nucleosomes, which are enriched in active chromatin domains. Single nucleotide polymorphisms that reduce DNase I sensitivity can disrupt the phasing of nucleosome arrays, which indicates that they often result from positioning against a barrier formed by other proteins. However, nucleosome arrays can also be created by DNA sequence alone. The most striking example is an array of over 400 nucleosomes on chromosome 12 that is created by tandem repetition of sequences with strong positioning properties. In summary, a large fraction of nucleosomes are consistently positioned--in some regions because they adopt favored sequence positions, and in other regions because they are forced into specific arrangements by chromatin remodeling or DNA binding proteins.

  12. HUMAN CANCER IS A PARASITE SPREAD VIA INTRUSION IN GENOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Rumyantsev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article is devoted to further development of new paradigm about the biology of human cancer: the hypothesis of parasitic nature, origin and evolution of the phenomenon. The study included integrative reconsidering, and reinterpretation of the make-ups, traits and processes existing both in human and animal cancers. It was demonstrated that human cancer possesses nearly analogous set of traits characteristic of transmissible animal cancer. Undoubted analogies are seen in the prevalence, clinical exposure, progression of disease, origin of causative agents, immune response against invasion and especially in the intrinsic deviations of the leading traits of cancerous cells. Both human and animal cancers are highly exceptional pathogens. But in contrast to contagious animal cancers the cells of of human cancer can not pass between individuals as usual infectious agents. Exhaustive evidence of the parasitic nature and evolutionary origin of human cancer was revealed and interpreted. In contrast to animal cancer formed of solitary cell lineage, human cancer consists of a couple of lineages constructed under different genetic regulations and performed different structural and physiological functions. The complex make-up of cancer composition remains stable over sequential propagation. The subsistence of human cancer regularly includes obligatory interchange of its successive forms. Human cancer possesses its own biological watch and the ability to gobble its victim, transmit via the intrusion of the genome, perform intercommunications within the tumor components and between the dispersed subunits of cancer. Such intrinsic traits characterize human cancer as a primitively structured parasite that can be classified in Class Mammalians, Species Genomeintruder malevolent (G.malevolent.

  13. Characterization of cDNA encoding human placental anticoagulant protein (PP4): Homology with the lipocortin family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, U.; Abel, K.J.; Bohn, H.; Loebermann, H.; Lottspeich, F.; Kuepper, H. (Research Institutes, Postfach (West Germany))

    1988-06-01

    A cDNA library prepared from human placenta was screened for sequences encoding the placental protein 4 (PP4). PP4 is an anticoagulant protein that acts as an indirect inhibitor of the thromboplastin-specific complex, which is involved in the blood coagulation cascade. Partial amino acid sequence information from PP4-derived cyanogen bromide fragments was used to design three oligonucleotide probes for screening the library. From 10{sup 6} independent recombinants, 18 clones were identified that hybridized to all three probes. These 18 recombinants contained cDNA inserts encoding a protein of 320 amino acid residues. In addition to the PP4 cDNA the authors identified 9 other recombinants encoding a protein with considerable similarity (74%) to PP4, which was termed PP4-X. PP4 and PP4-X belong to the lipocortin family, as judged by their homology to lipocortin I and calpactin I.

  14. A geographically-diverse collection of 418 human gut microbiome pathway genome databases

    KAUST Repository

    Hahn, Aria S.

    2017-04-11

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing are reshaping how we perceive microbial communities inhabiting the human body, with implications for therapeutic interventions. Several large-scale datasets derived from hundreds of human microbiome samples sourced from multiple studies are now publicly available. However, idiosyncratic data processing methods between studies introduce systematic differences that confound comparative analyses. To overcome these challenges, we developed GutCyc, a compendium of environmental pathway genome databases (ePGDBs) constructed from 418 assembled human microbiome datasets using MetaPathways, enabling reproducible functional metagenomic annotation. We also generated metabolic network reconstructions for each metagenome using the Pathway Tools software, empowering researchers and clinicians interested in visualizing and interpreting metabolic pathways encoded by the human gut microbiome. For the first time, GutCyc provides consistent annotations and metabolic pathway predictions, making possible comparative community analyses between health and disease states in inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, and type 2 diabetes. GutCyc data products are searchable online, or may be downloaded and explored locally using MetaPathways and Pathway Tools.

  15. Computational Comparison of Human Genomic Sequence Assemblies for a Region of Chromosome 4

    OpenAIRE

    Semple, Colin; Stewart W. Morris; Porteous, David J.; Evans, Kathryn L.

    2002-01-01

    Much of the available human genomic sequence data exist in a fragmentary draft state following the completion of the initial high-volume sequencing performed by the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and Celera Genomics (CG). We compared six draft genome assemblies over a region of chromosome 4p (D4S394–D4S403), two consecutive releases by the IHGSC at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), two consecutive releases from the National Centre for Biotechnology Informa...

  16. A co-evolutionary arms race: trypanosomes shaping the human genome, humans shaping the trypanosome genome

    OpenAIRE

    Capewell, Paul; Cooper, Anneli; Clucas, Caroline; Weir, William; MacLeod, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness in humans and one of several pathogens that cause the related veterinary disease Nagana. A complex co-evolution has occurred between these parasites and primates that led to the emergence of trypanosome-specific defences and counter-measures. The first line of defence in humans and several other catarrhine primates is the trypanolytic protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1) found within two serum protein complexes, trypanosome l...

  17. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and mosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (ⅰ) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ⅱ) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coeffi-cients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  18. Genomic imprinting and human psychology: cognition, behavior and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Lisa M; Ragsdale, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Imprinted genes expressed in the brain are numerous and it has become clear that they play an important role in nervous system development and function. The significant influence of genomic imprinting during development sets the stage for structural and physiological variations affecting psychological function and behaviour, as well as other physiological systems mediating health and well-being. However, our understanding of the role of imprinted genes in behaviour lags far behind our understanding of their roles in perinatal growth and development. Knowledge of genomic imprinting remains limited among behavioral scientists and clinicians and research regarding the influence of imprinted genes on normal cognitive processes and the most common forms of neuropathology has been limited to date. In this chapter, we will explore how knowledge of genomic imprinting can be used to inform our study of normal human cognitive and behavioral processes as well as their disruption. Behavioural analyses of rare imprinted disorders, such as Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, provide insight regarding the phenotypic impact of imprinted genes in the brain, and can be used to guide the study of normal behaviour as well as more common but etiologically complex disorders such as ADHD and autism. Furthermore, hypotheses regarding the evolutionary development of imprinted genes can be used to derive predictions about their role in normal behavioural variation, such as that observed in food-related and social interactions.

  19. A library of TAL effector nucleases spanning the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsub; Kweon, Jiyeon; Kim, Annie; Chon, Jae Kyung; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hye Joo; Kim, Sojung; Lee, Choongil; Jeong, Euihwan; Chung, Eugene; Kim, Doyoung; Lee, Mi Seon; Go, Eun Mi; Song, Hye Jung; Kim, Hwangbeom; Cho, Namjin; Bang, Duhee; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) can be readily engineered to bind specific genomic loci, enabling the introduction of precise genetic modifications such as gene knockouts and additions. Here we present a genome-scale collection of TALENs for efficient and scalable gene targeting in human cells. We chose target sites that did not have highly similar sequences elsewhere in the genome to avoid off-target mutations and assembled TALEN plasmids for 18,740 protein-coding genes using a high-throughput Golden-Gate cloning system. A pilot test involving 124 genes showed that all TALENs were active and disrupted their target genes at high frequencies, although two of these TALENs became active only after their target sites were partially demethylated using an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase. We used our TALEN library to generate single- and double-gene-knockout cells in which NF-κB signaling pathways were disrupted. Compared with cells treated with short interfering RNAs, these cells showed unambiguous suppression of signal transduction.

  20. A hybrid approach for de novo human genome sequence assembly and phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Lam, Jessica; Lam, Ernest T; Hastie, Alex R; Marks, Patrick; Lee, Joyce; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Giorda, Kristina; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Wall, Jeffrey D; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Despite tremendous progress in genome sequencing, the basic goal of producing a phased (haplotype-resolved) genome sequence with end-to-end contiguity for each chromosome at reasonable cost and effort is still unrealized. In this study, we describe an approach to performing de novo genome assembly and experimental phasing by integrating the data from Illumina short-read sequencing, 10X Genomics linked-read sequencing, and BioNano Genomics genome mapping to yield a high-quality, phased, de novo assembled human genome.