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Sample records for human genes implicated

  1. Epigenetic regulation of human DCLK-1 gene during colon-carcinogenesis: clinical and mechanistic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Malaney; Shubhashish, Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. While ~25% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise in patients with a family history (genetic predisposition), ~75% of CRCs are due to age-associated accumulation of epigenetic alterations which can result in the suppression of key tumor suppressor genes leading to mutations and activation of oncogenic pathways. Sporadic colon-carcinogenesis is facilitated by many molecular pathways of genomic instability which include chromosomal instability (CIN), micro-satellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), leading towards loss of homeostasis and onset of neoplastic transformation. The unopposed activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathways, either due to loss of APC function or up-regulation of related stimulatory pathways, results in unopposed hyperproliferation of colonic crypts, considered the single most important risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. Hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoters of specific genes can potentially inactivate DNA repair genes and/or critical tumor suppressor genes. Recently, CpG methylation of the 5’ promoter of human (h) DCLK1 gene was reported in many human epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in the loss of expression of the canonical long isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-L) in hCRCs. Instead, a shorter isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-S) was discovered to be expressed in hCRCs, from an alternate β promoter of DCLKL1-gene; the clinical and biological implications of these novel findings, in relation to recent publications is discussed. PMID:27777940

  2. Copy number variation analysis implicates the cell polarity gene glypican 5 as a human spina bifida candidate gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Boland, Riley; Smith, Tiffany L.; Hulstrand, Alissa M.; Northrup, Hope; Hakeman, Matthew; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Yung, Christina K.; Long, Abby; Brouillette, Rachel B.; Au, Kit Sing; Gurnett, Christina; Houston, Douglas W.; Cornell, Robert A.; Manak, J. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Family and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component to NTDs. However, despite more than three decades of research, the genes involved in human NTDs remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that rare copy number variants (CNVs), especially de novo germline CNVs, are a significant risk factor for NTDs. We used array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify rare CNVs in 128 Caucasian and 61 Hispanic patients with non-syndromic lumbar-sacral myelomeningocele. We also performed aCGH analysis on the parents of affected individuals with rare CNVs where parental DNA was available (42 sets). Among the eight de novo CNVs that we identified, three generated copy number changes of entire genes. One large heterozygous deletion removed 27 genes, including PAX3, a known spina bifida-associated gene. A second CNV altered genes (PGPD8, ZC3H6) for which little is known regarding function or expression. A third heterozygous deletion removed GPC5 and part of GPC6, genes encoding glypicans. Glypicans are proteoglycans that modulate the activity of morphogens such as Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), both of which have been implicated in NTDs. Additionally, glypicans function in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and several PCP genes have been associated with NTDs. Here, we show that GPC5 orthologs are expressed in the neural tube, and that inhibiting their expression in frog and fish embryos results in NTDs. These results implicate GPC5 as a gene required for normal neural tube development. PMID:23223018

  3. Function and regulation of AUTS2, a gene implicated in autism and human evolution.

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    Nir Oksenberg

    Full Text Available Nucleotide changes in the AUTS2 locus, some of which affect only noncoding regions, are associated with autism and other neurological disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, dyslexia, motor delay, language delay, visual impairment, microcephaly, and alcohol consumption. In addition, AUTS2 contains the most significantly accelerated genomic region differentiating humans from Neanderthals, which is primarily composed of noncoding variants. However, the function and regulation of this gene remain largely unknown. To characterize auts2 function, we knocked it down in zebrafish, leading to a smaller head size, neuronal reduction, and decreased mobility. To characterize AUTS2 regulatory elements, we tested sequences for enhancer activity in zebrafish and mice. We identified 23 functional zebrafish enhancers, 10 of which were active in the brain. Our mouse enhancer assays characterized three mouse brain enhancers that overlap an ASD-associated deletion and four mouse enhancers that reside in regions implicated in human evolution, two of which are active in the brain. Combined, our results show that AUTS2 is important for neurodevelopment and expose candidate enhancer sequences in which nucleotide variation could lead to neurological disease and human-specific traits.

  4. An approximation to the temporal order in endogenous circadian rhythms of genes implicated in human adipose tissue metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaulet, Marta; Ordovás, José M; Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Martínez, Jose A; Madrid, Juan A

    2011-08-01

    Although it is well established that human adipose tissue (AT) shows circadian rhythmicity, published studies have been discussed as if tissues or systems showed only one or few circadian rhythms at a time. To provide an overall view of the internal temporal order of circadian rhythms in human AT including genes implicated in metabolic processes such as energy intake and expenditure, insulin resistance, adipocyte differentiation, dyslipidemia, and body fat distribution. Visceral and subcutaneous abdominal AT biopsies (n=6) were obtained from morbid obese women (BMI≥40 kg/m(2) ). To investigate rhythmic expression pattern, AT explants were cultured during 24-h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 08:00, 14:00, 20:00, 02:00 h using quantitative real-time PCR. Clock genes, glucocorticoid metabolism-related genes, leptin, adiponectin and their receptors were studied. Significant differences were found both in achrophases and relative-amplitude among genes (P30%). When interpreting the phase map of gene expression in both depots, data indicated that circadian rhythmicity of the genes studied followed a predictable physiological pattern, particularly for subcutaneous AT. Interesting are the relationships between adiponectin, leptin, and glucocorticoid metabolism-related genes circadian profiles. Their metabolic significance is discussed. Visceral AT behaved in a different way than subcutaneous for most of the genes studied. For every gene, protein mRNA levels fluctuated during the day in synchrony with its receptors. We have provided an overall view of the internal temporal order of circadian rhythms in human adipose tissue.

  5. Copy number polymorphism of the salivary amylase gene: implications in human nutrition research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J L; Saus, E; Smalley, S V; Cataldo, L R; Alberti, G; Parada, J; Gratacòs, M; Estivill, X

    2012-01-01

    The salivary α-amylase is a calcium-binding enzyme that initiates starch digestion in the oral cavity. The α-amylase genes are located in a cluster on the chromosome that includes salivary amylase genes (AMY1), two pancreatic α-amylase genes (AMY2A and AMY2B) and a related pseudogene. The AMY1 genes show extensive copy number variation which is directly proportional to the salivary α-amylase content in saliva. The α-amylase amount in saliva is also influenced by other factors, such as hydration status, psychosocial stress level, and short-term dietary habits. It has been shown that the average copy number of AMY1 gene is higher in populations that evolved under high-starch diets versus low-starch diets, reflecting an intense positive selection imposed by diet on amylase copy number during evolution. In this context, a number of different aspects can be considered in evaluating the possible impact of copy number variation of the AMY1 gene on nutrition research, such as issues related to human diet gene evolution, action on starch digestion, effect on glycemic response after starch consumption, modulation of the action of α-amylases inhibitors, effect on taste perception and satiety, influence on psychosocial stress and relation to oral health.

  6. Gene identification using exon amplification on human chromosome 18q21: implications for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Huo, Y; Patel, S; Zhu, X; Swift-Scanlan, T; Reeves, R H; DePaulo, R; Ross, C A; McInnis, M G

    2000-09-01

    We previously reported linkage between bipolar disorder and a region on human chromosome (HC) 18q21. To identify genes in this region, exon trapping was performed on cosmids isolated from an HC18-specific cosmid library (LL18NC02) using 47 sequence tagged site (STS) markers from 18q21 as hybridization probes. A total of 285 unique sequences (exons) were obtained from 850 sequenced clones. Homology searching of the databases using NCBI's BLAST algorithms revealed that 31 exons have identity to known genes and/or ESTs, seven are identical to regions of finished genomic sequences in the 18q21 region, 20 have significant similarity (>30% sequence identity) to genes from human and/or other species, 19 were repetitive sequences, and 208 sequences (72%) are novel. Seventy per cent of the trapped sequences were predicted to be derived from genes using library screening and RT-PCR analyses. This represents an initial stage in characterizing genes in a susceptibility region for further study in bipolar disorder or other diseases that map to this region.

  7. A combined analysis of microarray gene expression studies of the human prefrontal cortex identifies genes implicated in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Diez-Alarcia, Rebeca; Callado, Luis F; Zhang, Jin X; Chana, Gursharan; White, Cory H; Glatt, Stephen J; Tsuang, Ming T; Everall, Ian P; Meana, J Javier; Woelk, Christopher H

    2012-11-01

    Small cohort sizes and modest levels of gene expression changes in brain tissue have plagued the statistical approaches employed in microarray studies investigating the mechanism of schizophrenia. To combat these problems a combined analysis of six prior microarray studies was performed to facilitate the robust statistical analysis of gene expression data from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 107 patients with schizophrenia and 118 healthy subjects. Multivariate permutation tests identified 144 genes that were differentially expressed between schizophrenia and control groups. Seventy of these genes were identified as differentially expressed in at least one component microarray study but none of these individual studies had the power to identify the remaining 74 genes, demonstrating the utility of a combined approach. Gene ontology terms and biological pathways that were significantly enriched for differentially expressed genes were related to neuronal cell-cell signaling, mesenchymal induction, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, which have all previously been associated with the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia. The differential expression of BAG3, C4B, EGR1, MT1X, NEUROD6, SST and S100A8 was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR in an independent cohort using postmortem human prefrontal cortex samples. Comparison of gene expression between schizophrenic subjects with and without detectable levels of antipsychotics in their blood suggests that the modulation of MT1X and S100A8 may be the result of drug exposure. In conclusion, this combined analysis has resulted in a statistically robust identification of genes whose dysregulation may contribute to the mechanism of schizophrenia.

  8. Gene mapping and leader polypeptide sequence of human glucocerebrosidase: implications for Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, E I; Choudary, P V; Tsuji, S; Martin, B; Stubblefield, B; Sawyer, J; Hozier, J; Barranger, J A

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of immunologic cross-reacting material in Chinese hamster-human somatic cell hybrids allowed assignment of the structural gene for glucocerebrosidase (glucosylceramidase; beta-D-glucosyl-N-acylsphingosine glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.45) to chromosome 1 bands q21-q32. In situ hybridization of a radiolabeled human glucocerebrosidase cDNA to high resolution human chromosomes demonstrated that a single locus encoding glucocerebrosidase is on 1q21, adjacent to a region of chromosome 1 (1qh) abundant in structural heteromorphisms. We also have identified a hydrophobic leader polypeptide encoded by this locus, permitting a more complete description of the biosynthesis of the enzyme. These results suggest that the type-specific protein polymorphisms in Gaucher disease result from mutations at this single locus, whose segregation might be followed by linkage to visible chromosomal heteromorphisms. Images PMID:3863141

  9. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  10. Prognostic implications of RB1 tumour suppressor gene alterations in the clinical outcome of human osteosarcoma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, W; Gu, G

    2017-01-01

    Primary osteosarcoma is the most frequent malignant bone cancer in children and teenagers. Genetic alterations at the retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) gene has been implicated in the development and progression of human osteosarcoma. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to examine the impact of RB1 mutations on the survival of osteosarcoma patients, the risk of metastasis and the histological response of osteosarcoma to chemotherapy. A systemic review of the Medline, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane Library yielded 12 eligible studies with 491 patients for this study. Forest plots resulting from our meta-analyses illustrate that loss of RB1 function results in a 1.62-fold increase in the mortality rate for osteosarcoma patients (RR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.23-2.13; Z = 3.44, P = 0.0006), a significant increase in osteosarcoma metastasis (OR = 3.95, 95% CI: 1.86-8.38; Z = 3.57; P = 0.0004), and a significant reduction in the histological response of osteosarcoma to chemotherapy (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.13-0.94; Z = -2.08; P = 0.038). Additionally, the nearly symmetrical funnel plot (Egger's test, t = 1.15, P = 0.288) indicates absence of publication bias regarding the meta-analysis that examined the correlation of RB1 alterations with the survival rate for osteosarcoma patients. Our findings suggest that RB1 alterations may serve as a prognostic marker for the management of osteosarcoma patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset Distinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    subsets. Methods Gene expression measured in skin from mice with sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (sclGVHD), bleomycin-induced fibrosis, Tsk1... penetrant .) In) addition) to) a) readily) apparent) skin ) fibrosis) resulting) from) ECM) anomalies,) Tsk2/+) mice) show) more) autoimmune) and... penetrant in Tsk2/þ heterozygotes and it is homozygous embryonic lethal. Tsk2/þ mice have many features of human disease including tight skin , dysregulated

  12. Genetic gating of human fear learning and extinction: possible implications for gene-environment interaction in anxiety disorder.

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    Lonsdorf, Tina B; Weike, Almut I; Nikamo, Pernilla; Schalling, Martin; Hamm, Alfons O; Ohman, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Pavlovian fear conditioning is a widely used model of the acquisition and extinction of fear. Neural findings suggest that the amygdala is the core structure for fear acquisition, whereas prefrontal cortical areas are given pivotal roles in fear extinction. Forty-eight volunteers participated in a fear-conditioning experiment, which used fear potentiation of the startle reflex as the primary measure to investigate the effect of two genetic polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and COMTval158met) on conditioning and extinction of fear. The 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, located in the serotonin transporter gene, is associated with amygdala reactivity and neuroticism, whereas the COMTval158met polymorphism, which is located in the gene coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), a dopamine-degrading enzyme, affects prefrontal executive functions. Our results show that only carriers of the 5-HTTLPR s allele exhibited conditioned startle potentiation, whereas carriers of the COMT met/met genotype failed to extinguish conditioned fear. These results may have interesting implications for understanding gene-environment interactions in the development and treatment of anxiety disorders.

  13. Human gene control by vital oncogenes: revisiting a theoretical model and its implications for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  14. Sequential use of transcriptional profiling, expression quantitative trait mapping, and gene association implicates MMP20 in human kidney aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E Wheeler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Kidneys age at different rates, such that some people show little or no effects of aging whereas others show rapid functional decline. We sequentially used transcriptional profiling and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL mapping to narrow down which genes to test for association with kidney aging. We first performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to find 630 genes that change expression with age in the kidney. Using two methods to detect eQTLs, we found 101 of these age-regulated genes contain expression-associated SNPs. We tested the eQTLs for association with kidney aging, measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR using combined data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA and the InCHIANTI study. We found a SNP association (rs1711437 in MMP20 with kidney aging (uncorrected p = 3.6 x 10(-5, empirical p = 0.01 that explains 1%-2% of the variance in GFR among individuals. The results of this sequential analysis may provide the first evidence for a gene association with kidney aging in humans.

  15. Sequential use of transcriptional profiling, expression quantitative trait mapping, and gene association implicates MMP20 in human kidney aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Heather E; Metter, E Jeffrey; Tanaka, Toshiko; Absher, Devin; Higgins, John; Zahn, Jacob M; Wilhelmy, Julie; Davis, Ronald W; Singleton, Andrew; Myers, Richard M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kim, Stuart K

    2009-10-01

    Kidneys age at different rates, such that some people show little or no effects of aging whereas others show rapid functional decline. We sequentially used transcriptional profiling and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping to narrow down which genes to test for association with kidney aging. We first performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling to find 630 genes that change expression with age in the kidney. Using two methods to detect eQTLs, we found 101 of these age-regulated genes contain expression-associated SNPs. We tested the eQTLs for association with kidney aging, measured by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using combined data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) and the InCHIANTI study. We found a SNP association (rs1711437 in MMP20) with kidney aging (uncorrected p = 3.6 x 10(-5), empirical p = 0.01) that explains 1%-2% of the variance in GFR among individuals. The results of this sequential analysis may provide the first evidence for a gene association with kidney aging in humans.

  16. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can...... spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found...... that tumorigenic transformation of hMSC-TERT20 cells induced the expression of members of several cancer-germline antigen gene families (ie, GAGE, MAGE-A, and XAGE-1), with promoter hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the corresponding genes. Both in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts derived from...

  17. The FKBP5 Gene Affects Alcohol Drinking in Knockout Mice and Is Implicated in Alcohol Drinking in Humans

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    Bin Qiu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available FKBP5 encodes FK506-binding protein 5, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR-binding protein implicated in various psychiatric disorders and alcohol withdrawal severity. The purpose of this study is to characterize alcohol preference and related phenotypes in Fkbp5 knockout (KO mice and to examine the role of FKBP5 in human alcohol consumption. The following experiments were performed to characterize Fkpb5 KO mice. (1 Fkbp5 KO and wild-type (WT EtOH consumption was tested using a two-bottle choice paradigm; (2 The EtOH elimination rate was measured after intraperitoneal (IP injection of 2.0 g/kg EtOH; (3 Blood alcohol concentration (BAC was measured after 3 h limited access of alcohol; (4 Brain region expression of Fkbp5 was identified using LacZ staining; (5 Baseline corticosterone (CORT was assessed. Additionally, two SNPs, rs1360780 (C/T and rs3800373 (T/G, were selected to study the association of FKBP5 with alcohol consumption in humans. Participants were college students (n = 1162 from 21–26 years of age with Chinese, Korean or Caucasian ethnicity. The results, compared to WT mice, for KO mice exhibited an increase in alcohol consumption that was not due to differences in taste sensitivity or alcohol metabolism. Higher BAC was found in KO mice after 3 h of EtOH access. Fkbp5 was highly expressed in brain regions involved in the regulation of the stress response, such as the hippocampus, amygdala, dorsal raphe and locus coeruleus. Both genotypes exhibited similar basal levels of plasma corticosterone (CORT. Finally, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in FKBP5 were found to be associated with alcohol drinking in humans. These results suggest that the association between FKBP5 and alcohol consumption is conserved in both mice and humans.

  18. The FKBP5 Gene Affects Alcohol Drinking in Knockout Mice and Is Implicated in Alcohol Drinking in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Luczak, Susan E; Wall, Tamara L; Kirchhoff, Aaron M; Xu, Yuxue; Eng, Mimy Y; Stewart, Robert B; Shou, Weinian; Boehm, Stephen L; Chester, Julia A; Yong, Weidong; Liang, Tiebing

    2016-08-05

    FKBP5 encodes FK506-binding protein 5, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-binding protein implicated in various psychiatric disorders and alcohol withdrawal severity. The purpose of this study is to characterize alcohol preference and related phenotypes in Fkbp5 knockout (KO) mice and to examine the role of FKBP5 in human alcohol consumption. The following experiments were performed to characterize Fkpb5 KO mice. (1) Fkbp5 KO and wild-type (WT) EtOH consumption was tested using a two-bottle choice paradigm; (2) The EtOH elimination rate was measured after intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 2.0 g/kg EtOH; (3) Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was measured after 3 h limited access of alcohol; (4) Brain region expression of Fkbp5 was identified using LacZ staining; (5) Baseline corticosterone (CORT) was assessed. Additionally, two SNPs, rs1360780 (C/T) and rs3800373 (T/G), were selected to study the association of FKBP5 with alcohol consumption in humans. Participants were college students (n = 1162) from 21-26 years of age with Chinese, Korean or Caucasian ethnicity. The results, compared to WT mice, for KO mice exhibited an increase in alcohol consumption that was not due to differences in taste sensitivity or alcohol metabolism. Higher BAC was found in KO mice after 3 h of EtOH access. Fkbp5 was highly expressed in brain regions involved in the regulation of the stress response, such as the hippocampus, amygdala, dorsal raphe and locus coeruleus. Both genotypes exhibited similar basal levels of plasma corticosterone (CORT). Finally, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FKBP5 were found to be associated with alcohol drinking in humans. These results suggest that the association between FKBP5 and alcohol consumption is conserved in both mice and humans.

  19. The FKBP5 Gene Affects Alcohol Drinking in Knockout Mice and Is Implicated in Alcohol Drinking in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Luczak, Susan E.; Wall, Tamara L.; Kirchhoff, Aaron M.; Xu, Yuxue; Eng, Mimy Y.; Stewart, Robert B.; Shou, Weinian; Boehm, Stephen L.; Chester, Julia A.; Yong, Weidong; Liang, Tiebing

    2016-01-01

    FKBP5 encodes FK506-binding protein 5, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-binding protein implicated in various psychiatric disorders and alcohol withdrawal severity. The purpose of this study is to characterize alcohol preference and related phenotypes in Fkbp5 knockout (KO) mice and to examine the role of FKBP5 in human alcohol consumption. The following experiments were performed to characterize Fkpb5 KO mice. (1) Fkbp5 KO and wild-type (WT) EtOH consumption was tested using a two-bottle choice paradigm; (2) The EtOH elimination rate was measured after intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 2.0 g/kg EtOH; (3) Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was measured after 3 h limited access of alcohol; (4) Brain region expression of Fkbp5 was identified using LacZ staining; (5) Baseline corticosterone (CORT) was assessed. Additionally, two SNPs, rs1360780 (C/T) and rs3800373 (T/G), were selected to study the association of FKBP5 with alcohol consumption in humans. Participants were college students (n = 1162) from 21–26 years of age with Chinese, Korean or Caucasian ethnicity. The results, compared to WT mice, for KO mice exhibited an increase in alcohol consumption that was not due to differences in taste sensitivity or alcohol metabolism. Higher BAC was found in KO mice after 3 h of EtOH access. Fkbp5 was highly expressed in brain regions involved in the regulation of the stress response, such as the hippocampus, amygdala, dorsal raphe and locus coeruleus. Both genotypes exhibited similar basal levels of plasma corticosterone (CORT). Finally, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FKBP5 were found to be associated with alcohol drinking in humans. These results suggest that the association between FKBP5 and alcohol consumption is conserved in both mice and humans. PMID:27527158

  20. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural classes of human genes: Implication for increased non-randomness of GC3 rich genes towards protein stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pamela Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Basak; Tapash Chandra Ghosh

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between the synonymous codon usage and different protein secondary structural classes were investigated using 401 Homo sapiens proteins extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). A simple Chi-square test was used to assess the significance of deviation of the observed and expected frequencies of 59 codons at the level of individual synonymous families in the four different protein secondary structural classes. It was observed that synonymous codon families show non-randomness in codon usage in four different secondary structural classes. However, when the genes were classified according to their GC3 levels there was an increase in non-randomness in high GC3 group of genes. The non-randomness in codon usage was further tested among the same protein secondary structures belonging to four different protein folding classes of high GC3 group of genes. The results show that in each of the protein secondary structural unit there exist some synonymous family that shows class specific codonusage pattern. Moreover, there is an increased non-random behaviour of synonymous codons in sheet structure of all secondary structural classes in high GC3 group of genes. Biological implications of these results have been discussed.

  1. Pseudotyped AAV vector-mediated gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model: implications for in utero gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep G Keswani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF, making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2 gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  2. Implications of the Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitcher, P.

    1998-11-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

  3. Animal models of melanoma: a somatic cell gene delivery mouse model allows rapid evaluation of genesimplicated in human melanoma%Animal models of melanoma: a somatic cell gene delivery mouse model allows rapid evaluation of genes implicated in human melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea J. McKinney; Sheri L. Holmen

    2011-01-01

    The increasing incidence and mortality associated with advanced stages of melanoma are cause for concern. Few treatment options are available for advanced melanoma and the 5-year survival rate is less than 15%. Targeted therapies may revolutionize melanoma treatment by providing less toxic and more effective strategies. However, maximizing effectiveness requires further understanding of the molecular alterations that drive tumor formation, progression, and maintenance, as well as elucidating the mechanisms of resistance. Several different genetic alterations identified in human melanoma have been recapitulated in mice. This review outlines recent progress made in the development of mouse models of melanoma and summarizes what these findings reveal about the human disease. We begin with a discussion of traditional models and conclude with the recently developed RCAS/TVA somatic cell gene delivery mouse model of melanoma.

  4. New insights into schizophrenia disease genes interactome in the human brain: emerging targets and therapeutic implications in the postgenomics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Avijit; Latha, Narayanan

    2014-12-01

    Schizophrenia, a complex neurological disorder, is comprised of interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors wherein each of the factors individually exhibits a small effect. In this regard a network-based strategy is best suited to capture the combined effect of multiple genes with their definite pattern of interactions. Given that schizophrenia affects multiple regions of the brain, we postulated that instead of any single specific tissue, a mutual set of interactions occurs between different regions of brain in a well-defined pattern responsible for the disease phenotype. To validate, we constructed and compared tissue specific co-expression networks of schizophrenia candidate genes in twenty diverse brain tissues. As predicted, we observed a common interaction network of certain genes in all the studied brain tissues. We examined fundamental network topologies of the common network to sequester essential common candidates for schizophrenia. We also performed a gene set analysis to identify the essential biological pathways enriched by the common candidates in the network. Finally, the candidate drug targets were prioritized and scored against known available schizophrenic drugs by molecular docking studies. We distinctively identified protein kinases as the top candidates in the network that can serve as probable drug targets for the disease. Conclusively, we propose that a comprehensive study of the connectivity amongst the disease genes themselves may turn out to be more informative to understand schizophrenia disease etiology and the underlying complexity.

  5. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  6. Biological Implications of Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction (G x E) has been treated as both a statistical phenomenon and a biological reality. It is argued that, although there are important statistical issues that need to be considered, the focus has to be on the biological implications of G x E. Four reports of G x E deriving from the Dunedin longitudinal study are used as…

  7. Two types of human malignant melanoma cell lines revealed by expression patterns of mitochondrial and survival-apoptosis genes: implications for malignant melanoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, David M; Zhang, Qiuyang; Wang, Xuexi; He, Ping; Zhu, Yuelin Jack; Zhao, Jianxiong; Rennert, Owen M; Su, Yan A

    2009-05-01

    Human malignant melanoma has poor prognosis because of resistance to apoptosis and therapy. We describe identification of the expression profile of 1,037 mitochondria-focused genes and 84 survival-apoptosis genes in 21 malignant melanoma cell lines and 3 normal melanocyte controls using recently developed hMitChip3 cDNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of 1,037 informative genes, and 84 survival-apoptosis genes, classified these malignant melanoma cell lines into type A (n = 12) and type B (n = 9). Three hundred fifty-five of 1,037 (34.2%) genes displayed significant (P ≤ 0.030; false discovery rate ≤ 3.68%) differences (± ≥ 2.0-fold) in average expression, with 197 genes higher and 158 genes lower in type A than in type B. Of 84 genes with known survival-apoptosis functions, 38 (45.2%) displayed the significant (P genes expressed at higher levels in type A than in type B, whereas the different set of antiapoptotic (PSEN1, PPP2CA, API5, PPP2R1B, PPP2R1A, and FIS1), antioxidant (HSPD1, GSS, SOD1, ATOX1, and CAT), and proapoptotic (ENDOG, BAK1, CASP2, CASP4, PDCD5, HTRA2, SEPT4, TNFSF10, and PRODH) genes expressed at lower levels in type A than in type B. Microarray data were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. These results showed the presence of two types of malignant melanoma, each with a specific set of dysregulated survival-apoptosis genes, which may prove useful for development of new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention and novel diagnostic biomarkers for treatment and prognosis of malignant melanoma.

  8. Genetic diversity and gene flow of humans, Plasmodium falciparum, and Anopheles farauti s.s. of Vanuatu: inferred malaria dispersal and implications for malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, J K; Kaneko, A; Taleo, G; Amos, M; Reiff, D M

    2007-08-01

    A comparison of the patterns of gene flow within and between islands and the genetic diversities of the three species required for malaria transmission (humans, Plasmodium falciparum, and Anopheles farauti s.s.) within the model island system of Vanuatu, shows that the active dispersal of An. farauti s.s. is responsible for within island movement of parasites. In contrast, since both P. falciparum and An. farauti s.s. populations are largely restricted to islands, movement of parasites between islands is likely due to human transport. Thus, control of vectors is crucial for controlling malaria within islands, while control of human movement is essential to control malaria transmission across the archipelago.

  9. The protective role of the -1306C>T functional polymorphism in matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene is associated with cervical cancer: implication of human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Hussain, Showket; Sharma, Upma; Suri, Vanita; Nijhawan, Raje; Bharadwaj, Mausumi; Sobti, R C

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the major reproductive health problem among women caused by persistent infection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an endopeptidase highly expressed in cervical cancer; however, the genetic link between aberrant expression of MMP-2 and cervical carcinogenesis is not known. The genotypic distribution, expression pattern of MMP-2 and HPV infection, was analyzed in a total of 300 fresh surgically resected cervical tissue biopsies. The MMP-2 C1306T (rs243865) promoter polymorphism dominant model (CC v/s CT + CT + TT) revealed that the CC genotype had a 4.33-fold significant increased risk for development of cervical cancer (OR = 4.33; 95 % CI = 2.36-4.02, p = 0.0001) compared to those with variant genotypes (-1306 CT + TT). The C allele was associated with 3-fold significant increased risk (OR = 2.95; 95 % CI = 1.90-4.60, p = 0.0002) compared to T allele. Interestingly, a significant correlation was found between high expression of MMP-2 protein and CC genotype in cancer patients (p = 0.001) compared to normal controls (p = 0.012). Further analysis showed that the risk of cancer was extremely pronounced in HPV positive patients (OR = 9.33; 95 % CI = 2.88-30.20, p = 0.0001) compared to HPV negative ones, implicating the possible interaction between -1306CC genotype and HPV infection in increasing the cancer risk (p = 0.0001). The leads from the present study suggest the protective role of gene variant -1306C>T at the promoter region of the MMP-2 against HPV-mediated cervical cancer. These findings substantiate the functional role of MMP-2 C1306T polymorphism in a significant downregulation of MMP-2 protein in women with variant genotype (CT/TT) compared to the normal wild CC genotype.

  10. Some Implications of Human-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    On structures, humans may be active which may cause structural vibrations as human activity can excite structural vibration modes. However, humans may also be passive (sitting or standing on the structure). The paper addresses this subject and explores the implications of having passive humans pr...

  11. Tissue-specific gene expression templates for accurate molecular characterization of the normal physiological states of multiple human tissues with implication in development and cancer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Pei-Ing; Wu, Huan-Bin; Wang, Chin-Di; Lin, Bai-Ling; Chen, Cheng-Tao; Yuan, Shinsheng; Wu, Guani; Li, Ker-Chau

    2011-09-01

    To elucidate the molecular complications in many complex diseases, we argue for the priority to construct a model representing the normal physiological state of a cell/tissue. By analyzing three independent microarray datasets on normal human tissues, we established a quantitative molecular model GET, which consists of 24 tissue-specific Gene Expression Templates constructed from a set of 56 genes, for predicting 24 distinct tissue types under disease-free condition. 99.2% correctness was reached when a large-scale validation was performed on 61 new datasets to test the tissue-prediction power of GET. Network analysis based on molecular interactions suggests a potential role of these 56 genes in tissue differentiation and carcinogenesis.Applying GET to transcriptomic datasets produced from tissue development studies the results correlated well with developmental stages. Cancerous tissues and cell lines yielded significantly lower correlation with GET than the normal tissues. GET distinguished melanoma from normal skin tissue or benign skin tumor with 96% sensitivity and 89% specificity. These results strongly suggest that a normal tissue or cell may uphold its normal functioning and morphology by maintaining specific chemical stoichiometry among genes. The state of stoichiometry can be depicted by a compact set of representative genes such as the 56 genes obtained here. A significant deviation from normal stoichiometry may result in malfunction or abnormal growth of the cells.

  12. Tissue-specific gene expression templates for accurate molecular characterization of the normal physiological states of multiple human tissues with implication in development and cancer studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Shinsheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate the molecular complications in many complex diseases, we argue for the priority to construct a model representing the normal physiological state of a cell/tissue. Results By analyzing three independent microarray datasets on normal human tissues, we established a quantitative molecular model GET, which consists of 24 tissue-specific Gene Expression Templates constructed from a set of 56 genes, for predicting 24 distinct tissue types under disease-free condition. 99.2% correctness was reached when a large-scale validation was performed on 61 new datasets to test the tissue-prediction power of GET. Network analysis based on molecular interactions suggests a potential role of these 56 genes in tissue differentiation and carcinogenesis. Applying GET to transcriptomic datasets produced from tissue development studies the results correlated well with developmental stages. Cancerous tissues and cell lines yielded significantly lower correlation with GET than the normal tissues. GET distinguished melanoma from normal skin tissue or benign skin tumor with 96% sensitivity and 89% specificity. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that a normal tissue or cell may uphold its normal functioning and morphology by maintaining specific chemical stoichiometry among genes. The state of stoichiometry can be depicted by a compact set of representative genes such as the 56 genes obtained here. A significant deviation from normal stoichiometry may result in malfunction or abnormal growth of the cells.

  13. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Haney

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  14. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Steven; Zhao, Juan; Tiwari, Shiwani; Eng, Kurt; Guey, Lin T; Tien, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response) and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  15. Monoallelic expression of the human FOXP2 speech gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbola, Abidemi A; Cox, Gerald F; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Hafler, David A; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Chess, Andrew

    2015-06-02

    The recent descriptions of widespread random monoallelic expression (RMAE) of genes distributed throughout the autosomal genome indicate that there are more genes subject to RMAE on autosomes than the number of genes on the X chromosome where X-inactivation dictates RMAE of X-linked genes. Several of the autosomal genes that undergo RMAE have independently been implicated in human Mendelian disorders. Thus, parsing the relationship between allele-specific expression of these genes and disease is of interest. Mutations in the human forkhead box P2 gene, FOXP2, cause developmental verbal dyspraxia with profound speech and language deficits. Here, we show that the human FOXP2 gene undergoes RMAE. Studying an individual with developmental verbal dyspraxia, we identify a deletion 3 Mb away from the FOXP2 gene, which impacts FOXP2 gene expression in cis. Together these data suggest the intriguing possibility that RMAE impacts the haploinsufficiency phenotypes observed for FOXP2 mutations.

  16. Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-17

    The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

  17. Cloning and characterization of CLCN5, the human kidney chloride channel gene implicated in Dent disease (an X-linked hereditary nephrolithiasis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, S.E.; Van Bakel, I.; Craig, I.W. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-10

    Dent disease, an X-linked familial renal tubular disorder, is a form of Fanconi syndrome associated with proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, and eventual renal failure. We have previously used positional cloning to identify the 3{prime} part of a novel kidney-specific gene (initially termed hClC-K2, but now referred to as CLCN5), which is deleted in patients from one pedigree segregating Dent disease. Mutations that disrupt this gene have been identified in other patients with this disorder. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of the complete open reading frame of the human CLCN5 gene, which is predicted to encode a protein of 746 amino acids, with significant homology to all known members of the ClC family of voltage-gated chloride channels. CLCN5 belongs to a distinct branch of this family, which also includes the recently identified genes CLCN3 and CLCN4. We have shown that the coding region of CLCN5 is organized into 12 exons, spanning 25-30 kb of genomic DNA, and have determined the sequence of each exon-intron boundary. The elucidation of the coding sequence and exon-intron organization of CLCN5 will both expedite the evaluation of structure/function relationships of these ion channels and facilitate the screening of other patients with renal tubular dysfunction for mutations at this locus. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  18. DDEC: Dragon database of genes implicated in esophageal cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2009-07-06

    Background: Esophageal cancer ranks eighth in order of cancer occurrence. Its lethality primarily stems from inability to detect the disease during the early organ-confined stage and the lack of effective therapies for advanced-stage disease. Moreover, the understanding of molecular processes involved in esophageal cancer is not complete, hampering the development of efficient diagnostics and therapy. Efforts made by the scientific community to improve the survival rate of esophageal cancer have resulted in a wealth of scattered information that is difficult to find and not easily amendable to data-mining. To reduce this gap and to complement available cancer related bioinformatic resources, we have developed a comprehensive database (Dragon Database of Genes Implicated in Esophageal Cancer) with esophageal cancer related information, as an integrated knowledge database aimed at representing a gateway to esophageal cancer related data. Description: Manually curated 529 genes differentially expressed in EC are contained in the database. We extracted and analyzed the promoter regions of these genes and complemented gene-related information with transcription factors that potentially control them. We further, precompiled text-mined and data-mined reports about each of these genes to allow for easy exploration of information about associations of EC-implicated genes with other human genes and proteins, metabolites and enzymes, toxins, chemicals with pharmacological effects, disease concepts and human anatomy. The resulting database, DDEC, has a useful feature to display potential associations that are rarely reported and thus difficult to identify. Moreover, DDEC enables inspection of potentially new \\'association hypotheses\\' generated based on the precompiled reports. Conclusion: We hope that this resource will serve as a useful complement to the existing public resources and as a good starting point for researchers and physicians interested in EC genetics. DDEC is

  19. Gene conversion in human rearranged immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, John M; Stott, David I

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, many DNA sequences have been published suggesting that all or part of the V(H) segment of a rearranged immunoglobulin gene may be replaced in vivo. Two different mechanisms appear to be operating. One of these is very similar to primary V(D)J recombination, involving the RAG proteins acting upon recombination signal sequences, and this has recently been proven to occur. Other sequences, many of which show partial V(H) replacements with no addition of untemplated nucleotides at the V(H)-V(H) joint, have been proposed to occur by an unusual RAG-mediated recombination with the formation of hybrid (coding-to-signal) joints. These appear to occur in cells already undergoing somatic hypermutation in which, some authors are convinced, RAG genes are silenced. We recently proposed that the latter type of V(H) replacement might occur by homologous recombination initiated by the activity of AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), which is essential for somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. The latter has been observed in other species, but not in human Ig genes, so far. In this paper, we present a new analysis of sequences published as examples of the second type of rearrangement. This not only shows that AID recognition motifs occur in recombination regions but also that some sequences show replacement of central sections by a sequence from another gene, similar to gene conversion in the immunoglobulin genes of other species. These observations support the proposal that this type of rearrangement is likely to be AID-mediated rather than RAG-mediated and is consistent with gene conversion.

  20. Expression of innate immunity genes and damage of primary human pancreatic islets by epidemic strains of Echovirus: implication for post-virus islet autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sarmiento

    Full Text Available Three large-scale Echovirus (E epidemics (E4,E16,E30, each differently associated to the acute development of diabetes related autoantibodies, have been documented in Cuba. The prevalence of islet cell autoantibodies was moderate during the E4 epidemic but high in the E16 and E30 epidemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of epidemic strains of echovirus on beta-cell lysis, beta-cell function and innate immunity gene expression in primary human pancreatic islets. Human islets from non-diabetic donors (n = 7 were infected with the virus strains E4, E16 and E30, all isolated from patients with aseptic meningitis who seroconverted to islet cell antibody positivity. Viral replication, degree of cytolysis, insulin release in response to high glucose as well as mRNA expression of innate immunity genes (IFN-b, RANTES, RIG-I, MDA5, TLR3 and OAS were measured. The strains of E16 and E30 did replicate well in all islets examined, resulting in marked cytotoxic effects. E4 did not cause any effects on cell lysis, however it was able to replicate in 2 out of 7 islet donors. Beta-cell function was hampered in all infected islets (P<0.05; however the effect of E16 and E30 on insulin secretion appeared to be higher than the strain of E4. TLR3 and IFN-beta mRNA expression increased significantly following infection with E16 and E30 (P<0.033 and P<0.039 respectively. In contrast, the expression of none of the innate immunity genes studied was altered in E4-infected islets. These findings suggest that the extent of the epidemic-associated islet autoimmunity may depend on the ability of the viral strains to damage islet cells and induce pro-inflammatory innate immune responses within the infected islets.

  1. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  2. Identification of a novel candidate gene in the iron-sulfur pathway implicated in ataxia-susceptibility: human gene encoding HscB, a J-type co-chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guifeng; Gargus, J Jay; Ta, Dennis T; Vickery, Larry E

    2003-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins participate in a wide range of biochemical processes, including many that are central to mitochondrial electron transfer and energy metabolism. Mutations in two such proteins, frataxin and ABCB7, cause Friedreich ataxia and X-linked sideroblastic anemia with ataxia, respectively, rendering other participants in this pathway functional candidates for hereditary ataxia syndromes. Recently frataxin was shown to have an identical phylogenetic distribution with two genes and was most likely specifically involved in the same sub-process in iron-sulfur cluster assembly as one gene, designated hscB, in bacteria. To set the stage for an analysis of the potential role of this candidate gene in human disease, we defined the human HscB cDNA, its genomic locus, and its pattern of expression in normal human tissues. The isolated human HscB cDNA spans 785 bp and encodes a conserved 235-amino-acid protein, including a putative mitochondrial import leader. The HscB gene is found at chromosome 22q11-12 and is composed of six exons and five introns. Northern blot analyses of RNA from adult and fetal tissues defined a pattern of expression in mitochondria-rich tissues similar to that of frataxin, an expression pattern compatible with its implied role in mitochondrial energetics and related disease phenotypes.

  3. Health implications of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tiffany A

    2014-01-01

    Freedom is arguably the most cherished right in the United States. But each year, approximately 14,500 to 17,500 women, men and children are trafficked into the United States for the purposes of forced labor or sexual exploitation. Human trafficking has significant effects on both physical and mental health. This article describes the features of human trafficking, its physical and mental health effects and the vital role nurses can play in providing care to this vulnerable population.

  4. Immunoglobulin genes implicated in glioma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Janardan P; Kaur, Navtej; Costa, Sandra; Amorim, Julia; Nabico, Rui; Linhares, Paulo; Vaz, Rui; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Reis, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are thought to be causal in gliomagenesis. Several genes have been implicated in glioma development, but the putative role of a major immunity-related gene complex member, immunoglobulin heavy chain γ (IGHG) has not been evaluated. Prior observations that IGHG-encoded γ marker (GM) allotypes exhibit differential sensitivity to an immunoevasion strategy of cytomegalovirus, a pathogen implicated as a promoter of gliomagenesis, has lead us to hypothesize that these determinants are risk factors for glioma. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped the IGHG locus comprising the GM alleles, specifically GM alleles 3 and 17, of 120 glioma patients and 133 controls via TaqMan® genotyping assay. To assess the associations between GM genotypes and the risk of glioma, we applied an unconditional multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounding variables. In comparison to subjects who were homozygous for the GM 17 allele, the GM 3 homozygotes were over twice as likely, and the GM 3/17 heterozygotes were over three times as likely, to develop glioma. Similar results were achieved when analyzed by combining the data corresponding to alleles GM 3 and GM 3/17 in a dominant model. The GM 3/17 genotype and the combination of GM 3 and GM 3/17 were found to be further associated with over 3 times increased risk for high-grade astrocytoma (grades III-IV). Allele frequency analyses also showed an increased risk for gliomas and high-grade astrocytoma in association with GM 3. Our findings support the premise that the GM 3 allele may present risk for the development of glioma, possibly by modulating immunity to cytomegalovirus.

  5. Gene therapy: implications for craniofacial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Erica L; Villa-Diaz, Luis G; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that more than 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into a host cell has been developing since the early uses of gene therapy to alter bacterial properties for waste cleanup in the 1980s followed by successful human clinical trials in the 1990s to treat severe combined immunodeficiency. In the past 20 years, the emerging field of craniofacial tissue engineering has adopted these techniques to enhance regeneration of mineralized tissues, salivary gland, and periodontium and to reduce tumor burden of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Studies are currently pursuing research on both biomaterial-mediated gene delivery and more clinically efficacious, although potentially more hazardous, viral methods. Although hundreds of gene therapy clinical trials have taken place in the past 20 years, we must still work to ensure an ideal safety profile for each gene and delivery method combination. With adequate genotoxicity testing, we can expect gene therapy to augment protein delivery strategies and potentially allow for tissue-specific targeting, delivery of multiple signals, and increased spatial and temporal control with the goal of natural tissue replacement in the craniofacial complex.

  6. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  7. Implications of interaction between Humans and Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    as structural damping and therefore also structural vibration levels). The paper addresses this subject and explores implications of having passive humans present on the structure. In experimental tests with a laboratory floor it is examined to which degree the posture of humans passively sitting on the floor......Many civil engineering structures are occupied by humans, and often humans are considered as a static load in calculations. However, active humans on structures can cause structural vibrations. Passive humans might also be present on that structure and they do change the structural system (such...... influences the damping added to the floor. A numerical case study explores how passive humans may influence vibration levels of a floor....

  8. Novel hormone-regulated genes in visceral adipose tissue: cloning and identification of proinflammatory cytokine-like mouse and human MEDA-7: implications for obesity, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Chen, X; Sairam, M R

    2011-09-01

    We sought to characterise novel genes dysregulated by sex hormonal imbalances that induce obesity and metabolic disorder in a setting of oestrogen deficiency and androgen dominance in follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (For [also known as Fshr]) knockout female mice. Transcriptome analysis of mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) of mutants revealed novel genes. One novel gene named Meda-7 was selected for study. Meda-7 was cloned from mouse and human adipose tissue; its expression, hormonal regulation and function were characterised. Mouse Meda-7 is richly expressed in deep visceral adipose tissue and encodes a 22 kDa secreted protein with 71% homology to human mesenteric oestrogen-dependent adipose gene- 7 (MEDA-7) protein. Both have six conserved cysteines like many cytokines. In obese patients, MEDA-7 is more abundant in omental than subcutaneous fat. Meda-7 is downregulated in For-knockout female MAT at 5 months (obese state) followed by steep upregulation at 9 months (prediabetic condition) when mutants progress towards the metabolic syndrome. Meda-7 is expressed predominantly in the stromal-vascular cell fraction. In this fraction,M1-proinflammatorymacrophages are rich in Meda-7. Meda-7 dysregulation in 5-month-old For-knockout MAT is restored by oestrogen, but treatment has no effect in older mutants. Overabundance of MEDA-7 in HEK-293 cells enhances cell proliferation via p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Secreted MEDA-7 attenuates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, while downregulating glucose transporter-4 and upregulating both monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and suppressor of cytokine signalling-3. Downstream activity of the insulin signalling mediator, phospho-AKT, is also downregulated. MEDA-7 is a hormone-regulated adipokine/proinflammatory cytokine that is implicated in causing chronic inflammation, affecting cellular expansion and blunting insulin response in adipocytes.

  9. Recent genetic discoveries implicating ion channels in human cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alfred L

    2014-04-01

    The term 'channelopathy' refers to human genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their interacting proteins. Recent advances in this field have been enabled by next-generation DNA sequencing strategies such as whole exome sequencing with several intriguing and unexpected discoveries. This review highlights important discoveries implicating ion channels or ion channel modulators in cardiovascular disorders including cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility, cardiac conduction phenotypes, pulmonary and systemic hypertension. These recent discoveries further emphasize the importance of ion channels in the pathophysiology of human disease and as important druggable targets.

  10. Reg gene family and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Zhang; Liu-Song Ding; Mao-De Lai

    2003-01-01

    Regenerating gene (Reg or REG) family, within the superfamily of C-type lectin, is mainly involved in the liver,pancreatic, gastric and intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation. Considerable attention has focused on Reg family and its structurally related molecules. Over the last 15 years, 17 members of the Reg family have been cloned and sequenced. They have been considered as members of a conserved protein family sharing structural and some functional properties being involved in injury, inflammation,diabetes and carcinogenesis. We previously identified Reg Ⅳ as a strong candidate for a gene that was highly expressed in colorectal adenoma when compared to normal mucosa based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH),reverse Northern blot, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)and Northern blot. In situ hybridization results further support that overexpression of Reg Ⅳ may be an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis. We suggest that detection of Reg Ⅳ overexpression might be useful in the early diagnosis of carcinomatous transformation of adenoma.This review summarizes the roles of Reg family in diseases in the literature as well as our recent results of Reg Ⅳ in colorectal cancer. The biological properties of Reg family and its possible roles in human diseases are discussed. We particularly focus on the roles of Reg family as sensitive reactants of tissue injury, prognostic indicators of tumor survival and early biomarkers of carcinogenesis. In addition to our current understanding of Reg gene functions, we postulate that there might be relationships between Reg family and microsatellite instability, apoptosis and cancer with a poor prognosis. Investigation of the correlation between tumor Reg expression and survival rate, and analysis of the Reg gene status in human maliganancies, are required to elucidate the biologic consequences of Reg gene expression, the implications for Reg gene regulation of cell growth, tumorigenesis

  11. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  12. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: Implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis. PMID:25245072

  13. Modeling single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 genes: implications for functional and genotyping analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W Arthur

    Full Text Available Enzymes encoded by the AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 genes are responsible for the metabolism of progesterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT, respectively. The effect of amino acid substitutions, resulting from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the AKR1C2 gene, on the enzyme kinetics of the AKR1C2 gene product were determined experimentally by Takashi et al. In this paper, we used homology modeling to predict and analyze the structure of AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 genetic variants. The experimental reduction in enzyme activity in the AKR1C2 variants F46Y and L172Q, as determined by Takahashi et al., is predicted to be due to increased instability in cofactor binding, caused by disruptions to the hydrogen bonds between NADP and AKR1C2, resulting from the insertion of polar residues into largely non-polar environments near the site of cofactor binding. Other AKR1C2 variants were shown to involve either conservative substitutions or changes taking place on the surface of the molecule and distant from the active site, confirming the experimental finding of Takahashi et al. that these variants do not result in any statistically significant reduction in enzyme activity. The AKR1C1 R258C variant is predicted to have no effect on enzyme activity for similar reasons. Thus, we provide further insight into the molecular mechanism of the enzyme kinetics of these proteins. Our data also highlight previously reported difficulties with online databases.

  14. Implication of Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Proteins in Placental Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adjimon Gatien Lokossou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (ERVs represent 8% of the total human genome. Although the majority of these ancient proviral sequences have only retained non-coding long terminal repeats (LTRs, a number of “endogenized” retroviral genes encode functional proteins. Previous studies have underlined the implication of these ERV-derived proteins in the development and the function of the placenta. In this review, we summarize recent findings showing that two ERV genes, termed Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-2, which encode former envelope (Env proteins, trigger fusion events between villous cytotrophoblasts and the peripheral multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast layer. Such fusion events maintain the stability of this latter cell structure, which plays an important role in fetal development by the active secretion of various soluble factors, gas exchange and regulation of fetomaternal immunotolerance. We also highlight new studies showing that these ERV proteins, in addition to their localization at the cell surface of cytotrophoblasts, are also incorporated on the surface of various extracellular microvesicles, including exosomes. Such exosome-associated proteins could be involved in the various functions attributed to these vesicles and could provide a form of tropism. Additionally, through their immunosuppressive domains, these ERV proteins could also contribute to fetomaternal immunotolerance in a local and more distal manner. These various aspects of the implication of Syncytin-1 and -2 in placental function are also addressed in the context of the placenta-related disorder, preeclampsia.

  15. Complementation of Yeast Genes with Human Genes as an Experimental Platform for Functional Testing of Human Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Akil; Tammpere, Erik; Kofoed, Megan; Keong, Christelle; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip

    2015-11-01

    While the pace of discovery of human genetic variants in tumors, patients, and diverse populations has rapidly accelerated, deciphering their functional consequence has become rate-limiting. Using cross-species complementation, model organisms like the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be utilized to fill this gap and serve as a platform for testing human genetic variants. To this end, we performed two parallel screens, a one-to-one complementation screen for essential yeast genes implicated in chromosome instability and a pool-to-pool screen that queried all possible essential yeast genes for rescue of lethality by all possible human homologs. Our work identified 65 human cDNAs that can replace the null allele of essential yeast genes, including the nonorthologous pair yRFT1/hSEC61A1. We chose four human cDNAs (hLIG1, hSSRP1, hPPP1CA, and hPPP1CC) for which their yeast gene counterparts function in chromosome stability and assayed in yeast 35 tumor-specific missense mutations for growth defects and sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. This resulted in a set of human-yeast gene complementation pairs that allow human genetic variants to be readily characterized in yeast, and a prioritized list of somatic mutations that could contribute to chromosome instability in human tumors. These data establish the utility of this cross-species experimental approach. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Human RAG mutations: biochemistry and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kim, Min-Sung; Walter, Jolan E; Lee, Yu Nee

    2016-04-01

    The recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 proteins initiate the V(D)J recombination process, which ultimately enables the generation of T cells and B cells with a diversified repertoire of antigen-specific receptors. Mutations of the RAG genes in humans are associated with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from severe combined immunodeficiency to autoimmunity. Recently, novel insights into the phenotypic diversity of this disease have been provided by resolving the crystal structure of the RAG complex, by developing novel assays to test recombination activity of the mutant RAG proteins and by characterizing the molecular and cellular basis of immune dysregulation in patients with RAG deficiency.

  17. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huddleston JR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer R HuddlestonBiology Department, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, USAAbstract: Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed.Keywords: gut microbiome, conjugation, natural transformation, transduction

  18. LINE FUSION GENES: a database of LINE expression in human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hong-Seog

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs are the most abundant retrotransposons in humans. About 79% of human genes are estimated to contain at least one segment of LINE per transcription unit. Recent studies have shown that LINE elements can affect protein sequences, splicing patterns and expression of human genes. Description We have developed a database, LINE FUSION GENES, for elucidating LINE expression throughout the human gene database. We searched the 28,171 genes listed in the NCBI database for LINE elements and analyzed their structures and expression patterns. The results show that the mRNA sequences of 1,329 genes were affected by LINE expression. The LINE expression types were classified on the basis of LINEs in the 5' UTR, exon or 3' UTR sequences of the mRNAs. Our database provides further information, such as the tissue distribution and chromosomal location of the genes, and the domain structure that is changed by LINE integration. We have linked all the accession numbers to the NCBI data bank to provide mRNA sequences for subsequent users. Conclusion We believe that our work will interest genome scientists and might help them to gain insight into the implications of LINE expression for human evolution and disease. Availability http://www.primate.or.kr/line

  19. Genes Causing Male Infertility in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lawrence C. Layman

    2002-01-01

    There are an accumulating number of identified gene mutations that cause infertility in humans. Most of the known gene mutations impair normal puberty and subsequently cause infertility by either hypothalamic /pituitary deficiency of important tropic factors to the gonad or by gonadal genes.

  20. Update of human and mouse forkhead box (FOX gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The forkhead box (FOX proteins are transcription factors that play complex and important roles in processes from development and organogenesis to regulation of metabolism and the immune system. There are 50 FOX genes in the human genome and 44 in the mouse, divided into 19 subfamilies. All human FOX genes have close mouse orthologues, with one exception: the mouse has a single Foxd4, whereas the human gene has undergone a recent duplication to a total of seven (FOXD4 and FOXD4L1 → FOXD4L6. Evolutionarily ancient family members can be found as far back as the fungi and metazoans. The DNA-binding domain, the forkhead domain, is an example of the winged-helix domain, and is very well conserved across the FOX family and across species, with a few notable exceptions in which divergence has created new functionality. Mutations in FOX genes have been implicated in at least four familial human diseases, and differential expression may play a role in a number of other pathologies -- ranging from metabolic disorders to autoimmunity. Furthermore, FOX genes are differentially expressed in a large number of cancers; their role can be either as an oncogene or tumour suppressor, depending on the family member and cell type. Although some drugs that target FOX gene expression or activity, notably proteasome inhibitors, appear to work well, much more basic research is needed to unlock the complex interplay of upstream and downstream interactions with FOX family transcription factors.

  1. Natural selection on genes that underlie human disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blekhman, Ran; Man, Orna; Herrmann, Leslie; Boyko, Adam R.; Indap, Amit; Kosiol, Carolin; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Teshima, Kosuke M.; Przeworski, Molly

    2008-01-01

    What evolutionary forces shape genes that contribute to the risk of human disease? Do similar selective pressures act on alleles that underlie simple vs. complex disorders? [1-3]. Answers to these questions will shed light on the origin of human disorders (e.g., [4]), and help to predict the population frequencies of alleles that contribute to disease risk, with important implications for the efficient design of mapping studies [5-7]. As a first step towards addressing them, we created a hand-curated version of the Mendelian Inheritance in Man database (OMIM). We then examined selective pressures on Mendelian disease genes, genes that contribute to complex disease risk and genes known to be essential in mouse, by analyzing patterns of human polymorphism and of divergence between human and rhesus macaque. We find that Mendelian disease genes appear to be under widespread purifying selection, especially when the disease mutations are dominant (rather than recessive). In contrast, the class of genes that influence complex disease risk shows little signs of evolutionary conservation, possibly because this category includes both targets of purifying and positive selection. PMID:18571414

  2. A gene expression signature for RSV: clinical implications and limitations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J M Openshaw

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Peter Openshaw discusses the challenges in advancing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV treatments and the implications of a study by Mejias and colleagues using a newly identified gene signature for diagnosis and prediction of RSV severity. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  3. Automated discovery of functional generality of human gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg K Gerber

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An important research problem in computational biology is the identification of expression programs, sets of co-expressed genes orchestrating normal or pathological processes, and the characterization of the functional breadth of these programs. The use of human expression data compendia for discovery of such programs presents several challenges including cellular inhomogeneity within samples, genetic and environmental variation across samples, uncertainty in the numbers of programs and sample populations, and temporal behavior. We developed GeneProgram, a new unsupervised computational framework based on Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes that addresses each of the above challenges. GeneProgram uses expression data to simultaneously organize tissues into groups and genes into overlapping programs with consistent temporal behavior, to produce maps of expression programs, which are sorted by generality scores that exploit the automatically learned groupings. Using synthetic and real gene expression data, we showed that GeneProgram outperformed several popular expression analysis methods. We applied GeneProgram to a compendium of 62 short time-series gene expression datasets exploring the responses of human cells to infectious agents and immune-modulating molecules. GeneProgram produced a map of 104 expression programs, a substantial number of which were significantly enriched for genes involved in key signaling pathways and/or bound by NF-kappaB transcription factors in genome-wide experiments. Further, GeneProgram discovered expression programs that appear to implicate surprising signaling pathways or receptor types in the response to infection, including Wnt signaling and neurotransmitter receptors. We believe the discovered map of expression programs involved in the response to infection will be useful for guiding future biological experiments; genes from programs with low generality scores might serve as new drug targets that exhibit minimal

  4. Aberrant rel/nfkb genes and activity in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayet, B; Gélinas, C

    1999-11-22

    Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factors are key regulators of immune, inflammatory and acute phase responses and are also implicated in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the signal transduction pathways that lead to the activation of Rel/NF-kappaB factors and the consequent induction of gene expression. Evidence linking deregulated Rel/NF-kappaB activity to oncogenesis in mammalian systems has emerged in recent years, consistent with the acute oncogenicity of the viral oncoprotein v-Rel in animal models. Chromosomal amplification, overexpression and rearrangement of genes coding for Rel/NF-kappaB factors have been noted in many human hematopoietic and solid tumors. Persistent nuclear NF-kappaB activity was also described in several human cancer cell types, as a result of constitutive activation of upstream signaling kinases or mutations inactivating inhibitory IkappaB subunits. Studies point to a correlation between the activation of cellular gene expression by Rel/NF-kappaB factors and their participation in the malignant process. Experiments implicating NF-kappaB in the control of the apoptotic response also support a role in oncogenesis and in the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy. This review focuses on the status of the rel, nfkb and ikb genes and their activity in human tumors and their association with the onset or progression of malignancies.

  5. Advanced studies on human gene ZNF322

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongqing; WANG Yuequn; YUAN Wuzhou; DENG Yun; ZHU Chuanbing; WU Xiushan

    2007-01-01

    The human novel gene of ZNF322 is cloned from human fetal eDNA library using the primers on the basis of the ZNF322 sequence analyzed with computer.The gene is located on Chromosome 6p22.1,and encodes a protein consisting of 402 amino acid residues and containing nine tandem C2H2-type zinc-finger motifs.Northern blot result shows that the gene is expressed in all examined adult tissues.Subcellular location study indicates that ZNF322-EGFP fusion protein is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm.Reporter gene assays show that ZNF322 is a potential transcriptional activator.

  6. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  7. Genome editing for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Torsten B; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Rossi, Derrick J; Cowan, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome-editing techniques holds much promise for the field of human gene therapy. From bacteria to model organisms and human cells, genome editing tools such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZNFs), TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 have been successfully used to manipulate the respective genomes with unprecedented precision. With regard to human gene therapy, it is of great interest to test the feasibility of genome editing in primary human hematopoietic cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of human genetic disorders such as hemoglobinopathies, primary immunodeficiencies, and cancer. In this chapter, we explore the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient ablation of genes in two clinically relevant primary human cell types, CD4+ T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. By using two guide RNAs directed at a single locus, we achieve highly efficient and predictable deletions that ablate gene function. The use of a Cas9-2A-GFP fusion protein allows FACS-based enrichment of the transfected cells. The ease of designing, constructing, and testing guide RNAs makes this dual guide strategy an attractive approach for the efficient deletion of clinically relevant genes in primary human hematopoietic stem and effector cells and enables the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy.

  8. Gene expression in the aging human brain: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Adith; Mather, Karen A; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Baune, Bernhard T; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-03-01

    The review aims to provide a summary of recent developments in the study of gene expression in the aging human brain. Profiling differentially expressed genes or 'transcripts' in the human brain over the course of normal aging has provided valuable insights into the biological pathways that appear activated or suppressed in late life. Genes mediating neuroinflammation and immune system activation in particular, show significant age-related upregulation creating a state of vulnerability to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disease in the aging brain. Cellular ionic dyshomeostasis and age-related decline in a host of molecular influences on synaptic efficacy may underlie neurocognitive decline in later life. Critically, these investigations have also shed light on the mobilization of protective genetic responses within the aging human brain that help determine health and disease trajectories in older age. There is growing interest in the study of pre and posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, and the role of noncoding RNAs in particular, as mediators of the phenotypic diversity that characterizes human brain aging. Gene expression studies in healthy brain aging offer an opportunity to unravel the intricately regulated cellular underpinnings of neurocognitive aging as well as disease risk and resiliency in late life. In doing so, new avenues for early intervention in age-related neurodegenerative disease could be investigated with potentially significant implications for the development of disease-modifying therapies.

  9. Human proton/oligopeptide transporter (POT) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botka, C. W.; Wittig, T. W.; Graul, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POT) gene family currently consists of approximately 70 cloned cDNAs derived from diverse organisms. In mammals, two genes encoding peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2 have been cloned in several species including humans, in addition to a rat...... histidine/peptide transporter (rPHT1). Because the Candida elegans genome contains five putative POT genes, we searched the available protein and nucleic acid databases for additional mammalian/human POT genes, using iterative BLAST runs and the human expressed sequence tags (EST) database. The apparent...... human orthologue of rPHT1 (expression largely confined to rat brain and retina) was represented by numerous ESTs originating from many tissues. Assembly of these ESTs resulted in a contiguous sequence covering approximately 95% of the suspected coding region. The contig sequences and analyses revealed...

  10. Gene Expression in the Human Endolymphatic Sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the present study is to explore, demonstrate, and describe the expression of genes related to the solute carrier (SLC) molecules of ion transporters in the human endolymphatic sac. STUDY DESIGN: cDNA microarrays and immunohistochemistry were used for analyses...... of fresh human endolymphatic sac tissue samples. METHODS: Twelve tissue samples of the human endolymphatic sac were obtained during translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannoma. Microarray technology was used to investigate tissue sample expression of solute carrier family genes, using adjacent dura...... mater as control. Immunohistochemistry was used for verification of translation of selected genes, as well as localization of the specific protein within the sac. RESULTS: An extensive representation of the SLC family genes were upregulated in the human endolymphatic sac, including SLC26a4 Pendrin, SLC4...

  11. Epigenetic regulation of transposable element derived human gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Ahsan; Bowen, Nathan J; Conley, Andrew B; Jordan, I King

    2011-04-01

    It was previously thought that epigenetic histone modifications of mammalian transposable elements (TEs) serve primarily to defend the genome against deleterious effects associated with their activity. However, we recently showed that, genome-wide, human TEs can also be epigenetically modified in a manner consistent with their ability to regulate host genes. Here, we explore the ability of TE sequences to epigenetically regulate individual human genes by focusing on the histone modifications of promoter sequences derived from TEs. We found 1520 human genes that initiate transcription from within TE-derived promoter sequences. We evaluated the distributions of eight histone modifications across these TE-promoters, within and between the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, and related their modification status with the cell-type specific expression patterns of the genes that they regulate. TE-derived promoters are significantly enriched for active histone modifications, and depleted for repressive modifications, relative to the genomic background. Active histone modifications of TE-promoters peak at transcription start sites and are positively correlated with increasing expression within cell lines. Furthermore, differential modification of TE-derived promoters between cell lines is significantly correlated with differential gene expression. LTR-retrotransposon derived promoters in particular play a prominent role in mediating cell-type specific gene regulation, and a number of these LTR-promoter genes are implicated in lineage-specific cellular functions. The regulation of human genes mediated by histone modifications targeted to TE-derived promoters is consistent with the ability of TEs to contribute to the epigenomic landscape in a way that provides functional utility to the host genome.

  12. [Immune response genes products in human physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P

    2012-09-01

    Current data on physiological role of human immune response genes' proteomic products (antigens) are discussed. The antigens are specified by a very high level of diversity that mediates a wide specter ofphysiological functions. They actually provide integrity and biological stability of human as species. These data reveal new ideas on many pathological processes as well as drafts new approaches for prophylaxis and treatment.

  13. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  14. Mapping the genetic architecture of gene expression in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E Schadt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variants that are associated with common human diseases do not lead directly to disease, but instead act on intermediate, molecular phenotypes that in turn induce changes in higher-order disease traits. Therefore, identifying the molecular phenotypes that vary in response to changes in DNA and that also associate with changes in disease traits has the potential to provide the functional information required to not only identify and validate the susceptibility genes that are directly affected by changes in DNA, but also to understand the molecular networks in which such genes operate and how changes in these networks lead to changes in disease traits. Toward that end, we profiled more than 39,000 transcripts and we genotyped 782,476 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in more than 400 human liver samples to characterize the genetic architecture of gene expression in the human liver, a metabolically active tissue that is important in a number of common human diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. This genome-wide association study of gene expression resulted in the detection of more than 6,000 associations between SNP genotypes and liver gene expression traits, where many of the corresponding genes identified have already been implicated in a number of human diseases. The utility of these data for elucidating the causes of common human diseases is demonstrated by integrating them with genotypic and expression data from other human and mouse populations. This provides much-needed functional support for the candidate susceptibility genes being identified at a growing number of genetic loci that have been identified as key drivers of disease from genome-wide association studies of disease. By using an integrative genomics approach, we highlight how the gene RPS26 and not ERBB3 is supported by our data as the most likely susceptibility gene for a novel type 1 diabetes locus recently identified in a large

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of mir-548 Gene Family Reveals Evolutionary and Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingming Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available mir-548 is a larger, poorly conserved primate-specific miRNA gene family. 69 human mir-548 genes located in almost all human chromosomes whose widespread distribution pattern implicates the evolutionary origin from transposable elements. Higher level of nucleotide divergence was detected between these human miRNA genes, which mainly derived from divergence of multicopy pre-miRNAs and homologous miRNA genes. Products of  mir-548, miR-548-5p, and miR-548-3p showed inconsistent evolutionary patterns, which partly contributed to larger genetic distances between pre-miRNAs. “Seed shifting” events could be detected among miR-548 sequences due to various 5′ ends. The events led to shift of seed sequences and target mRNAs, even generated to new target mRNAs. Additionally, the phenomenon of miRNA:miRNA interaction in the miRNA gene family was found. The potential interaction between miRNAs may be contributed to dynamic miRNA expression profiles by complementarily binding events to form miRNA:miRNA duplex with 5′-/3′-overhangs. The miRNA gene family had important roles in multiple biological processes, including signaling pathways and some cancers. The potential abundant roles and functional implication further led to the larger and poorly conserved gene family with genetic variation based on transposable elements. The evolutionary pattern of the primate-specific gene family might contribute to dynamic expression profiles and regulatory network.

  16. MOLECULAR CLONING OF HUMAN NEUROTROPHIN-4 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Cloning and sequencing of the human neurotrophin-4(hNT-4) gene.Methods With the chromosomal DNA of human blood lymphocytes as template,hNT-4 coding genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and recombinated into phage vector pGEM-T Easy,which were sequenced by using Sanger's single stranded DNA terminal termination method.Results The sequence of the cloned gene is completely the same as that reported in the literature(GenBank data base,M86528).Conclusion This study successfully cloning and sequenced the gene of mhNT-4,and it would be convenient for us to study the expression of mhNT-4 in eukaryote,and to continue the research on the gene therapy of Alzheimer's disease intensively.This study indicate that the hNT-4 is conservative in different races and individuals.

  17. DNA repair and gene therapy: implications for translational uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limp-Foster, M; Kelley, M R

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy has been proposed to have implications in the treatment of cancer. By genetically manipulating the hematopoietic stem cell compartment with genes that confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, the dose escalation that is necessary to effectively treat the cancers could potentially be achieved. DNA repair genes are some of the potential candidates to confer increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Although initial focus in this area has been on the direct reversal protein (MGMT), its protective ability is limited to those agents that produce O(6)-methylGuanine cross-links-agents that are not extensively used clinically (e.g., nitrosoureas). Furthermore, most alkylating agents attack more sites in DNA other than O(6)-methylGuanine, such that the protections afforded by MGMT may prevent the initial cytotoxicity, but at a price of increased mutational burden and potential secondary leukemias. Therefore, some of the genes that are being tested as candidates for gene transfer are base excision repair (BER) genes. We and others have found that overexpression of selective BER genes confers resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as thiotepa, ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and other agents. As these "proof of concept" analyses mature, many more clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents can be tested for BER protective ability.

  18. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  19. Gene expression responses of threespine stickleback to salinity: implications for salt-sensitive hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang eWang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite some recent success with genome-wide association studies (GWAS, identifying hypertension (HTN-susceptibility loci in the general population remains difficult. Here, we present a novel strategy to address the challenge by studying salinity adaptation in the threespine stickleback, a fish species with diverse salt-handling ecotypes. We acclimated native freshwater (FW and anadromous, saltwater (SW threespine sticklebacks to fresh, brackish, and sea water for 30 days, and applied RNA sequencing to determine the gene expression in fish kidneys. We identified 1,844 salt-responsive genes that were differentially expressed between FW sticklebacks acclimated to different salinities and/or between SW and FW sticklebacks acclimated to full-strength sea water. Significant overlap between stickleback salt-responsive genes and human genes implicated in HTN was detected (P < 10-7, hypergeometric test, suggesting a striking similarity in genetic mechanisms of salt handling between threespine sticklebacks and humans. The overlapping genes included a newly discovered HTN gene—MAP3K15, whose expression in FW stickleback kidneys decreases with salinity. These also included genes located in the GWAS loci such as AGTRAP-PLOD1 and CYP1A1-ULK3, which contain multiple potentially causative genes contributing to HTN susceptibility that need to be prioritized for study. We show evidence that stickleback salt-responsive genes provide valuable information facilitating the identification of human HTN genes. We conclude that threespine sticklebacks may be used as a model, complementary to existing animal models, in human HTN research.

  20. Human gene therapy and imaging: cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Joseph C. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Yla-Herttuala, Seppo [University of Kuopio, A.I.Virtanen Institute, Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-12-01

    This review discusses the basics of cardiovascular gene therapy, the results of recent human clinical trials, and the rapid progress in imaging techniques in cardiology. Improved understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of coronary heart disease has made gene therapy a potential new alternative for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Experimental studies have established the proof-of-principle that gene transfer to the cardiovascular system can achieve therapeutic effects. First human clinical trials provided initial evidence of feasibility and safety of cardiovascular gene therapy. However, phase II/III clinical trials have so far been rather disappointing and one of the major problems in cardiovascular gene therapy has been the inability to verify gene expression in the target tissue. New imaging techniques could significantly contribute to the development of better gene therapeutic approaches. Although the exact choice of imaging modality will depend on the biological question asked, further improvement in image resolution and detection sensitivity will be needed for all modalities as we move from imaging of organs and tissues to imaging of cells and genes. (orig.)

  1. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J Fah; Cho, Michael H; Mancini, John D; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per S; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Beaty, Terri H; Hersh, Craig P; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A; Rennard, Stephen I; Perrella, Mark A; Choi, Augustine M K; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K

    2013-05-01

    Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis.

  2. Retroviral integration profiles: their determinants and implications for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-il Lim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have often been used for gene therapy because oftheir capacity for the long-term expression of transgenes via stableintegration into the host genome. However, retroviral integrationcan also result in the transformation of normal cells into cancercells, as demonstrated by the incidence of leukemia in a recentretroviral gene therapy trial in Europe. This unfortunate outcomehas led to the rapid initiation of studies examining variousbiological and pathological aspects of retroviral integration. Thisreview summarizes recent findings from these studies, includingthe global integration patterns of various types of retroviruses,viral and cellular determinants of integration, implications ofintegration for gene therapy and retrovirus-mediated infectiousdiseases, and strategies to shift integration to safe host genomicloci. A more comprehensive and mechanistic understanding ofretroviral integration processes will eventually make it possible togenerate safer retroviral vector platforms in the near future. [BMBreports 2012; 45(4: 207-212

  3. Genomic disorders: A window into human gene and genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplications alter the genetic constitution of organisms and can be a driving force of molecular evolution in humans and the great apes. In this context, the study of genomic disorders has uncovered the essential role played by the genomic architecture, especially low copy repeats (LCRs) or segmental duplications (SDs). In fact, regardless of the mechanism, LCRs can mediate or stimulate rearrangements, inciting genomic instability and generating dynamic and unstable regions prone to rapid molecular evolution. In humans, copy-number variation (CNV) has been implicated in common traits such as neuropathy, hypertension, color blindness, infertility, and behavioral traits including autism and schizophrenia, as well as disease susceptibility to HIV, lupus nephritis, and psoriasis among many other clinical phenotypes. The same mechanisms implicated in the origin of genomic disorders may also play a role in the emergence of segmental duplications and the evolution of new genes by means of genomic and gene duplication and triplication, exon shuffling, exon accretion, and fusion/fission events. PMID:20080665

  4. RNA interference in Entamoeba histolytica: implications for parasite biology and gene silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanbang; Pompey, Justine M; Singh, Upinder

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a major health threat to people in developing countries, where it causes invasive diarrhea and liver abscesses. The study of this important human pathogen has been hindered by a lack of tools for genetic manipulation. Recently, a number of genetic approaches based on variations of the RNAi method have been successfully developed and cloning of endogenous small-interfering RNAs from E. histolytica revealed an abundant population of small RNAs with an unusual 5′-polyphosphate structure. However, little is known about the implications of these findings to amebic biology or the mechanisms of gene silencing in this organism. In this article we review the literature relevant to RNAi in E. histolytica, discuss its implications for advances in gene silencing in this organism and outline potential future directions towards understanding the repertoire of RNAi and its impact on the biology of this deep-branching eukaryotic parasite. PMID:21162639

  5. Accelerated Recruitment of New Brain Development Genes into the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong E.; Landback, Patrick; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Long, Manyuan

    2011-01-01

    How the human brain evolved has attracted tremendous interests for decades. Motivated by case studies of primate-specific genes implicated in brain function, we examined whether or not the young genes, those emerging genome-wide in the lineages specific to the primates or rodents, showed distinct spatial and temporal patterns of transcription compared to old genes, which had existed before primate and rodent split. We found consistent patterns across different sources of expression data: there is a significantly larger proportion of young genes expressed in the fetal or infant brain of humans than in mouse, and more young genes in humans have expression biased toward early developing brains than old genes. Most of these young genes are expressed in the evolutionarily newest part of human brain, the neocortex. Remarkably, we also identified a number of human-specific genes which are expressed in the prefrontal cortex, which is implicated in complex cognitive behaviors. The young genes upregulated in the early developing human brain play diverse functional roles, with a significant enrichment of transcription factors. Genes originating from different mechanisms show a similar expression bias in the developing brain. Moreover, we found that the young genes upregulated in early brain development showed rapid protein evolution compared to old genes also expressed in the fetal brain. Strikingly, genes expressed in the neocortex arose soon after its morphological origin. These four lines of evidence suggest that positive selection for brain function may have contributed to the origination of young genes expressed in the developing brain. These data demonstrate a striking recruitment of new genes into the early development of the human brain. PMID:22028629

  6. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  7. Genes of periodontopathogens expressed during human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yo-Han; Kozarov, Emil V; Walters, Sheila M; Cao, Sam Linsen; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2002-12-01

    Since many bacterial genes are environmentally regulated, the screening for virulence-associated factors using classical genetic and molecular biology approaches can be biased under laboratory growth conditions of a given pathogen, because the required conditions for expression of many virulence factors may not occur during in vitro growth. Thus, technologies have been developed during the past several years to identify genes that are expressed during disease using animal models of human disease. However, animal models are not always truly representative of human disease, and with many pathogens, there is no appropriate animal model. A new technology, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) was thus engineered and tested in our laboratory to screen for genes of pathogenic organisms induced specifically in humans, without the use of animal or artificial models of infection. This technology uses pooled sera from patients to probe for genes expressed exclusively in vivo (or ivi, in vivo-induced genes). IVIAT was originally designed for the study of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis, but we have now extended it to other oral pathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis. One hundred seventy-one thousand (171,000) clones from P. gingivalis strain W83 were screened and 144 were confirmed positive. Over 300,000 A. actinomycetemcomitans clones were probed, and 116 were confirmed positive using a quantitative blot assay. MAT has proven useful in identifying previously unknown in vivo-induced genes that are likely involved in virulence and are thus excellent candidates for use in diagnostic : and therapeutic strategies, including vaccine design.

  8. Human proton/oligopeptide transporter (POT) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botka, C. W.; Wittig, T. W.; Graul, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POT) gene family currently consists of approximately 70 cloned cDNAs derived from diverse organisms. In mammals, two genes encoding peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2 have been cloned in several species including humans, in addition to a rat...... the presence of several possible splice variants of hPHT1. A second closely related human EST-contig displayed high identity to a recently cloned mouse cDNA encoding cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-inducible 1 protein (gi:4580995). This contig served to identify a PAC clone containing deduced exons...

  9. Gene doping: an overview and current implications for athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gronde, Toon; de Hon, Olivier; Haisma, Hidde J; Pieters, Toine

    2013-07-01

    The possibility of gene doping, defined as the transfer of nucleic acid sequences and/or the use of normal or genetically modified cells to enhance sport performance, is a real concern in sports medicine. The abuse of knowledge and techniques gained in the area of gene therapy is a form of doping, and is prohibited for competitive athletes. As yet there is no conclusive evidence that that gene doping has been practiced in sport. However, given that gene therapy techniques improve continuously, the likelihood of abuse will increase. A literature search was conducted to identify the most relevant proteins based on their current gene doping potential using articles from Pubmed, Scopus and Embase published between 2006 and 2011. The final list of selected proteins were erythropoietin, insulin-like growth factor, growth hormone, myostatin, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, endorphin and enkephalin, α actinin 3, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPARδ) and cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C). We discuss these proteins with respect to their potential benefits, existing gene therapy experience in humans, potential risks, and chances of detection in current and future anti-doping controls. We have identified PPARδ and PEPCK-C as having high potential for abuse. But we expect that for efficiency reasons, there will be a preference for inserting gene target combinations rather than single gene doping products. This will also further complicate detection.

  10. Genomics of the human carnitine acyltransferase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, FR; Huijkman, NCA; Boomsma, C; Kuipers, JRG; Bartelds, B

    2000-01-01

    Five genes in the human genome are known to encode different active forms of related carnitine acyltransferases: CPT1A for liver-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT1B for muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT2 for carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, CROT for carnitine octanoyltrans

  11. Open Marriage: Implications for Human Service Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Nena; O'Neill, George

    1973-01-01

    The authors of Open Marriage reiterate the meaning and possibilities of the open marriage concept and advance suggestions for change in the areas of residence, work, child care, and educational patterns. Human service systems must search out the universal values to be maintained in all human relationships. (Editor)

  12. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  13. Bioinformatic prediction and functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene

    OpenAIRE

    He Cui; Xi Lan; Shemin Lu; Fujun Zhang; Wanggang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that human KIAA0100 gene was a novel acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (MLAA) gene. But the functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene has remained unknown to date. Here, firstly, bioinformatic prediction of human KIAA0100 gene was carried out using online softwares; Secondly, Human KIAA0100 gene expression was downregulated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system in U937 cells...

  14. Copper induces the expression of cholesterogenic genes in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Per Arne; Englund, Mikael C O; Markström, Emilia; Ohlsson, Bertil G; Jernås, Margareta; Billig, Håkan; Torgerson, Jarl S; Wiklund, Olov; Carlsson, Lena M S; Carlsson, Björn

    2003-07-01

    Accumulation of lipids and cholesterol by macrophages and subsequent transformation into foam cells are key features in development of atherosclerosis. Serum copper concentrations have been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism behind the proatherogenic effect of copper is not clear. We used DNA microarrays to define the changes in gene expression profile in response to copper exposure of human macrophages. Expression monitoring by DNA microarray revealed 91 genes that were regulated. Copper increased the expression of seven cholesterogenic genes (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) synthase, IPP isomerase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, methyl sterol oxidase, H105e3 mRNA and sterol-C5-desaturase) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), and decreased the expression of CD36 and lipid binding proteins. The expression of LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase was also investigated using real time PCR. The expression of both of these genes was increased after copper treatment of macrophages (Pmechanism for the association between copper and atherosclerosis. The effect of copper on cholesterogenic genes may also have implications for liver steatosis in early stages of Wilson's disease.

  15. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  16. Diversity of human and mouse homeobox gene expression in development and adult tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunwell, Thomas L; Holland, Peter W H

    2016-11-03

    Homeobox genes encode a diverse set of transcription factors implicated in a vast range of biological processes including, but not limited to, embryonic cell fate specification and patterning. Although numerous studies report expression of particular sets of homeobox genes, a systematic analysis of the tissue specificity of homeobox genes is lacking. Here we analyse publicly-available transcriptome data from human and mouse developmental stages, and adult human tissues, to identify groups of homeobox genes with similar expression patterns. We calculate expression profiles for 242 human and 278 mouse homeobox loci across a combination of 59 human and 12 mouse adult tissues, early and late developmental stages. This revealed 20 human homeobox genes with widespread expression, primarily from the TALE, CERS and ZF classes. Most homeobox genes, however, have greater tissue-specificity, allowing us to compile homeobox gene expression lists for neural tissues, immune tissues, reproductive and developmental samples, and for numerous organ systems. In mouse development, we propose four distinct phases of homeobox gene expression: oocyte to zygote; 2-cell; 4-cell to blastocyst; early to mid post-implantation. The final phase change is marked by expression of ANTP class genes. We also use these data to compare expression specificity between evolutionarily-based gene classes, revealing that ANTP, PRD, LIM and POU homeobox gene classes have highest tissue specificity while HNF, TALE, CUT and CERS are most widely expressed. The homeobox genes comprise a large superclass and their expression patterns are correspondingly diverse, although in a broad sense related to an evolutionarily-based classification. The ubiquitous expression of some genes suggests roles in general cellular processes; in contrast, most human homeobox genes have greater tissue specificity and we compile useful homeobox datasets for particular tissues, organs and developmental stages. The identification of a

  17. Gene expression profiles in Parkinson disease prefrontal cortex implicate FOXO1 and genes under its transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dumitriu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with largely unknown genetic mechanisms. While the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD mainly takes place in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN region, other brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex, develop Lewy bodies, the neuropathological hallmark of PD. We generated and analyzed expression data from the prefrontal cortex Brodmann Area 9 (BA9 of 27 PD and 26 control samples using the 44K One-Color Agilent 60-mer Whole Human Genome Microarray. All samples were male, without significant Alzheimer disease pathology and with extensive pathological annotation available. 507 of the 39,122 analyzed expression probes were different between PD and control samples at false discovery rate (FDR of 5%. One of the genes with significantly increased expression in PD was the forkhead box O1 (FOXO1 transcription factor. Notably, genes carrying the FoxO1 binding site were significantly enriched in the FDR-significant group of genes (177 genes covered by 189 probes, suggesting a role for FoxO1 upstream of the observed expression changes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected from a recent meta-analysis of PD genome-wide association studies (GWAS were successfully genotyped in 50 out of the 53 microarray brains, allowing a targeted expression-SNP (eSNP analysis for 52 SNPs associated with PD affection at genome-wide significance and the 189 probes from FoxO1 regulated genes. A significant association was observed between a SNP in the cyclin G associated kinase (GAK gene and a probe in the spermine oxidase (SMOX gene. Further examination of the FOXO1 region in a meta-analysis of six available GWAS showed two SNPs significantly associated with age at onset of PD. These results implicate FOXO1 as a PD-relevant gene and warrant further functional analyses of its transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  18. The human implications of management reengineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ion VERBONCU; Aurel MANOLESCU

    2008-01-01

    Redesigning corporate management represents the most important means of managerial change and has a variety of consequences – economic, social, human etc. Expressed in terms of remodeling the methodological, organizational, decision-making and informational components of the management system, management reengineering generates substantial changes in the implementation of managerial functions and, implicitly, significant managerial and economic performances. Moreover, managerial redesign make...

  19. Security Implications of Human-Trafficking Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-15

    to those security concerns. Background How is Human Trafficking Carried Out? While trafficking victims are often found in sweatshops , domestic...labor. This type of trafficking is often found in agricultural labor, the production of goods (typically called sweatshops ) and construction labor

  20. A Gene Regulatory Program in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renhua; Campos, John; Iida, Joji

    2015-12-01

    Molecular heterogeneity in human breast cancer has challenged diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical treatment. It is well known that molecular subtypes of breast tumors are associated with significant differences in prognosis and survival. Assuming that the differences are attributed to subtype-specific pathways, we then suspect that there might be gene regulatory mechanisms that modulate the behavior of the pathways and their interactions. In this study, we proposed an integrated methodology, including machine learning and information theory, to explore the mechanisms. Using existing data from three large cohorts of human breast cancer populations, we have identified an ensemble of 16 master regulator genes (or MR16) that can discriminate breast tumor samples into four major subtypes. Evidence from gene expression across the three cohorts has consistently indicated that the MR16 can be divided into two groups that demonstrate subtype-specific gene expression patterns. For example, group 1 MRs, including ESR1, FOXA1, and GATA3, are overexpressed in luminal A and luminal B subtypes, but lowly expressed in HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes. In contrast, group 2 MRs, including FOXM1, EZH2, MYBL2, and ZNF695, display an opposite pattern. Furthermore, evidence from mutual information modeling has congruently indicated that the two groups of MRs either up- or down-regulate cancer driver-related genes in opposite directions. Furthermore, integration of somatic mutations with pathway changes leads to identification of canonical genomic alternations in a subtype-specific fashion. Taken together, these studies have implicated a gene regulatory program for breast tumor progression.

  1. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21539748

  2. Transcriptional networks implicated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hua; Liu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The transcriptome of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated in several studies. However, the implications of transcriptional networks in progressive NAFLD are not clear and mechanisms inducing transition from nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are still elusive. The aims of this study were to (1) construct networks for progressive NAFLD, (2) identify hub genes and functional modules in these networks and (3) infer potential linkages among hub genes, transcription factors and microRNAs (miRNA) for NAFLD progression. A systems biology approach by combining differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was utilized to dissect transcriptional profiles in 19 normal, 10 NAFL and 16 NASH patients. Based on this framework, 3 modules related to chromosome organization, proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and immune response were identified in NASH network. Furthermore, 9 modules of co-expressed genes associated with NAFL/NASH transition were found. Further characterization of these modules defined 13 highly connected hub genes in NAFLD progression network. Interestingly, 11 significantly changed miRNAs were predicted to target 10 of the 13 hub genes. Characterization of modules and hub genes that may be regulated by miRNAs could facilitate the identification of candidate genes and pathways responsible for NAFL/NASH transition and lead to a better understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. The identified modules and hub genes may point to potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  3. Helminth genomics: The implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Brindley

    Full Text Available More than two billion people (one-third of humanity are infected with parasitic roundworms or flatworms, collectively known as helminth parasites. These infections cause diseases that are responsible for enormous levels of morbidity and mortality, delays in the physical development of children, loss of productivity among the workforce, and maintenance of poverty. Genomes of the major helminth species that affect humans, and many others of agricultural and veterinary significance, are now the subject of intensive genome sequencing and annotation. Draft genome sequences of the filarial worm Brugia malayi and two of the human schistosomes, Schistosoma japonicum and S. mansoni, are now available, among others. These genome data will provide the basis for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in helminth nutrition and metabolism, host-dependent development and maturation, immune evasion, and evolution. They are likely also to predict new potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. In this review, we present an overview of these efforts and emphasize the potential impact and importance of these new findings.

  4. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K. [Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  5. Metals in cosmetics: implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowska, Sylwia; Brzóska, Malgorzata M

    2015-06-01

    Cosmetics, preparations repeatedly applied directly to the human skin, mucous membranes, hair and nails, should be safe for health, however, recently there has been increasing concern about their safety. Unfortunately, using these products in some cases is related to the occurrence of unfavourable effects resulting from intentional or the accidental presence of chemical substances, including toxic metals. Heavy metals such as lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic and nickel, as well as aluminium, classified as a light metal, are detected in various types of cosmetics (colour cosmetics, face and body care products, hair cosmetics, herbal cosmetics, etc.). In addition, necessary, but harmful when they occur in excessive amounts, elements such as copper, iron, chromium and cobalt are also present in cosmetic products. Metals occurring in cosmetics may undergo retention and act directly in the skin or be absorbed through the skin into the blood, accumulate in the body and exert toxic effects in various organs. Some cases of topical (mainly allergic contact dermatitis) and systemic effects owing to exposure to metals present in cosmetics have been reported. Literature data show that in commercially available cosmetics toxic metals may be present in amounts creating a danger to human health. Thus, the present review article focused on the problems related to the presence of heavy metals and aluminium in cosmetics, including their sources, concentrations and law regulations as well as danger for the health of these products users. Owing to the growing usage of cosmetics it is necessary to pay special attention to these problems.

  6. Genetic architecture for human aggression: A study of gene-phenotype relationship in OMIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-James, Yanli; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies of human aggression have mainly focused on known candidate genes and pathways regulating serotonin and dopamine signaling and hormonal functions. These studies have taught us much about the genetics of human aggression, but no genetic locus has yet achieved genome-significance. We here present a review based on a paradoxical hypothesis that studies of rare, functional genetic variations can lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex multifactorial disorders such as aggression. We examined all aggression phenotypes catalogued in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), an Online Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders. We identified 95 human disorders that have documented aggressive symptoms in at least one individual with a well-defined genetic variant. Altogether, we retrieved 86 causal genes. Although most of these genes had not been implicated in human aggression by previous studies, the most significantly enriched canonical pathways had been previously implicated in aggression (e.g., serotonin and dopamine signaling). Our findings provide strong evidence to support the causal role of these pathways in the pathogenesis of aggression. In addition, the novel genes and pathways we identified suggest additional mechanisms underlying the origins of human aggression. Genome-wide association studies with very large samples will be needed to determine if common variants in these genes are risk factors for aggression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. No Evidence of Human Leukocyte Antigen Gene Association With Rheumatic Fever Among Children in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Guliz; Seifried, Steven E

    2015-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have been implicated in rheumatic fever pathogenesis. This pilot whole genome association study compares genotypes of Samoan children with rheumatic fever to unaffected siblings and unrelated healthy controls. No risk-related genotypes were associated with HLA genes. Thirteen Regions of Interest were identified as candidates for further study.

  8. Properties of human disease genes and the role of genes linked to Mendelian disorders in complex disease aetiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataro, Nino; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Navarro, Arcadi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Do genes presenting variation that has been linked to human disease have different biological properties than genes that have never been related to disease? What is the relationship between disease and fitness? Are the evolutionary pressures that affect genes linked to Mendelian diseases the same to those acting on genes whose variation contributes to complex disorders? The answers to these questions could shed light on the architecture of human genetic disorders and may have relevant implications when designing mapping strategies in future genetic studies. Here we show that, relative to non-disease genes, human disease (HD) genes have specific evolutionary profiles and protein network properties. Additionally, our results indicate that the mutation-selection balance renders an insufficient account of the evolutionary history of some HD genes and that adaptive selection could also contribute to shape their genetic architecture. Notably, several biological features of HD genes depend on the type of pathology (complex or Mendelian) with which they are related. For example, genes harbouring both causal variants for Mendelian disorders and risk factors for complex disease traits (Complex-Mendelian genes), tend to present higher functional relevance in the protein network and higher expression levels than genes associated only with complex disorders. Moreover, risk variants in Complex-Mendelian genes tend to present higher odds ratios than those on genes associated with the same complex disorders but with no link to Mendelian diseases. Taken together, our results suggest that genetic variation at genes linked to Mendelian disorders plays an important role in driving susceptibility to complex disease. PMID:28053046

  9. Genetic dissection of acute ethanol responsive gene networks in prefrontal cortex: functional and mechanistic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R Wolen

    Full Text Available Individual differences in initial sensitivity to ethanol are strongly related to the heritable risk of alcoholism in humans. To elucidate key molecular networks that modulate ethanol sensitivity we performed the first systems genetics analysis of ethanol-responsive gene expression in brain regions of the mesocorticolimbic reward circuit (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral midbrain across a highly diverse family of 27 isogenic mouse strains (BXD panel before and after treatment with ethanol.Acute ethanol altered the expression of ~2,750 genes in one or more regions and 400 transcripts were jointly modulated in all three. Ethanol-responsive gene networks were extracted with a powerful graph theoretical method that efficiently summarized ethanol's effects. These networks correlated with acute behavioral responses to ethanol and other drugs of abuse. As predicted, networks were heavily populated by genes controlling synaptic transmission and neuroplasticity. Several of the most densely interconnected network hubs, including Kcnma1 and Gsk3β, are known to influence behavioral or physiological responses to ethanol, validating our overall approach. Other major hub genes like Grm3, Pten and Nrg3 represent novel targets of ethanol effects. Networks were under strong genetic control by variants that we mapped to a small number of chromosomal loci. Using a novel combination of genetic, bioinformatic and network-based approaches, we identified high priority cis-regulatory candidate genes, including Scn1b, Gria1, Sncb and Nell2.The ethanol-responsive gene networks identified here represent a previously uncharacterized intermediate phenotype between DNA variation and ethanol sensitivity in mice. Networks involved in synaptic transmission were strongly regulated by ethanol and could contribute to behavioral plasticity seen with chronic ethanol. Our novel finding that hub genes and a small number of loci exert major influence over the ethanol

  10. Genetic Dissection of Acute Ethanol Responsive Gene Networks in Prefrontal Cortex: Functional and Mechanistic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolen, Aaron R.; Phillips, Charles A.; Langston, Michael A.; Putman, Alex H.; Vorster, Paul J.; Bruce, Nathan A.; York, Timothy P.; Williams, Robert W.; Miles, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Individual differences in initial sensitivity to ethanol are strongly related to the heritable risk of alcoholism in humans. To elucidate key molecular networks that modulate ethanol sensitivity we performed the first systems genetics analysis of ethanol-responsive gene expression in brain regions of the mesocorticolimbic reward circuit (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral midbrain) across a highly diverse family of 27 isogenic mouse strains (BXD panel) before and after treatment with ethanol. Results Acute ethanol altered the expression of ∼2,750 genes in one or more regions and 400 transcripts were jointly modulated in all three. Ethanol-responsive gene networks were extracted with a powerful graph theoretical method that efficiently summarized ethanol's effects. These networks correlated with acute behavioral responses to ethanol and other drugs of abuse. As predicted, networks were heavily populated by genes controlling synaptic transmission and neuroplasticity. Several of the most densely interconnected network hubs, including Kcnma1 and Gsk3β, are known to influence behavioral or physiological responses to ethanol, validating our overall approach. Other major hub genes like Grm3, Pten and Nrg3 represent novel targets of ethanol effects. Networks were under strong genetic control by variants that we mapped to a small number of chromosomal loci. Using a novel combination of genetic, bioinformatic and network-based approaches, we identified high priority cis-regulatory candidate genes, including Scn1b, Gria1, Sncb and Nell2. Conclusions The ethanol-responsive gene networks identified here represent a previously uncharacterized intermediate phenotype between DNA variation and ethanol sensitivity in mice. Networks involved in synaptic transmission were strongly regulated by ethanol and could contribute to behavioral plasticity seen with chronic ethanol. Our novel finding that hub genes and a small number of loci exert major influence

  11. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2012-03-19

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural selection in West African populations where Lassa haemorrhagic fever is endemic. In this study, we provide further evidence for this notion. By applying tests for selection to genome-wide data from the International Haplotype Map Consortium and the 1000 Genomes Consortium, we demonstrate evidence for positive selection in LARGE and interleukin 21 (IL21), two genes implicated in LASV infectivity and immunity. We further localized the signals of selection, using the recently developed composite of multiple signals method, to introns and putative regulatory regions of those genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may have targeted variants giving rise to alternative splicing or differential gene expression of LARGE and IL21. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that selective pressures imposed by LASV may have led to the emergence of particular alleles conferring resistance to Lassa fever, and opens up new avenues of research pursuit.

  12. The human T cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaviner, D; Lefranc, M P

    2000-01-01

    'Human T Cell Receptor Alpha Variable (TRAV) Genes', the eighth report of the 'IMGT Locus in Focus' section, comprises four tables: (1) 'Number of human germline TRAV genes at 14q11 and potential repertoire'; (2) 'Human germline TRAV genes at 14q11'; (3) 'Human TRAV allele table', and (4) 'Correspondence between the different human TRAV gene nomenclatures'. These tables are available at the IMGT Marie-Paule page of IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics database (http://imgt.cines.fr:8104) created by Marie-Paule Lefranc, Université Montpellier II, CNRS, France. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  14. Positive selection on gene expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaitovich, Philipp; Tang, Kun; Franz, Henriette

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the expression levels of genes transcribed in the brains of humans and chimpanzees have changed less than those of genes transcribed in other tissues [1] . However, when gene expression changes are mapped onto the evolutionary lineage in which they occurred, the brain...... shows more changes than other tissues in the human lineage compared to the chimpanzee lineage [1] , [2] and [3] . There are two possible explanations for this: either positive selection drove more gene expression changes to fixation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain, or genes expressed...... in the brain experienced less purifying selection in humans than in chimpanzees, i.e. gene expression in the human brain is functionally less constrained. The first scenario would be supported if genes that changed their expression in the brain in the human lineage showed more selective sweeps than other genes...

  15. Injury, inflammation and the emergence of human specific genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    indistinguishable.6 Interestingly, just as we noted the expression of human -specific genes in human immune cells (Table 1), Long and colleagues noted the wide...nervous system, it presumably alters a7AChR activities on human cognition and memory . In other examples, the human antimicrobial defensins are highly...genes in circulating and resident human immune cells can be studied in mice after the transplantation and engraft- ment of human hemato-lymphoid immune

  16. Human genomics and microarrays: implications for the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jana; Isik, Frank

    2002-09-01

    The Human Genome Project was launched in 1989 in an effort to sequence the entire span of human DNA. Although coding sequences are important in identifying mutations, the static order of DNA does not explain how a cell or organism may respond to normal and abnormal biological processes. By examining the mRNA content of a cell, researchers can determine which genes are being activated in response to a stimulus. Traditional methods in molecular biology generally work on a "one gene: one experiment" basis, which means that the throughput is very limited and the "whole picture" of gene function is hard to obtain. To study each of the 60,000 to 80,000 genes in the human genome under each biological circumstance is not practical. Recently, microarrays (also known as gene or DNA chips) have emerged; these allow for the simultaneous determination of expression for thousands of genes and analysis of genome-wide mRNA expression. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to provide the clinical plastic surgeon with a working knowledge and understanding of the fields of genomics, microarrays, and bioinformatics and second, to present a case to illustrate how these technologies can be applied in the study of wound healing.

  17. A GENE FROM HUMAN-CHROMOSOME REGION-3P21 WITH REDUCED EXPRESSION IN SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CARRITT, B; KOK, K; van den Berg, Anke; OSINGA, J; PILZ, A; HOFSTRA, RMW; DAVIS, MB; VANDERVEEN, AY; RABBITTS, PH; GULATI, K; BUYS, CHCM

    1992-01-01

    A combination of cytogenetic and molecular studies has implicated the p21 region of human chromosome 3 as the probable site of a gene the loss of which contributes to the development of small cell lung cancer. We report here the isolation of a gene from this region which is expressed in normal lung

  18. Theory Development and Convergence of Human Resource Fields: Implications for Human Performance Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo; Yoon, Seung Won

    2010-01-01

    This study examines major theory developments in human resource (HR) fields and discusses implications for human performance technology (HPT). Differentiated HR fields are converging to improve organizational performance through knowledge-based innovations. Ruona and Gibson (2004) made a similar observation and analyzed the historical evolution…

  19. Theory Development and Convergence of Human Resource Fields: Implications for Human Performance Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo; Yoon, Seung Won

    2010-01-01

    This study examines major theory developments in human resource (HR) fields and discusses implications for human performance technology (HPT). Differentiated HR fields are converging to improve organizational performance through knowledge-based innovations. Ruona and Gibson (2004) made a similar observation and analyzed the historical evolution…

  20. Gene expression and functional annotation of the human and mouse choroid plexus epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F Janssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is possibly implicated in disorders like Alzheimer disease, hydrocephalus or glaucoma. To study human genetic diseases and potential new therapies, mouse models are widely used. This requires a detailed knowledge of similarities and differences in gene expression and functional annotation between the species. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare gene expression and functional annotation of healthy human and mouse CPE. METHODS: We performed 44k Agilent microarray hybridizations with RNA derived from laser dissected healthy human and mouse CPE cells. We functionally annotated and compared the gene expression data of human and mouse CPE using the knowledge database Ingenuity. We searched for common and species specific gene expression patterns and function between human and mouse CPE. We also made a comparison with previously published CPE human and mouse gene expression data. RESULTS: Overall, the human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar. Their major functionalities included epithelial junctions, transport, energy production, neuro-endocrine signaling, as well as immunological, neurological and hematological functions and disorders. The mouse CPE presented two additional functions not found in the human CPE: carbohydrate metabolism and a more extensive list of (neural developmental functions. We found three genes specifically expressed in the mouse CPE compared to human CPE, being ACE, PON1 and TRIM3 and no human specifically expressed CPE genes compared to mouse CPE. CONCLUSION: Human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar, and display many common functionalities. Nonetheless, we also identified a few genes and pathways which suggest that the CPE

  1. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part I. Gene delivery technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective gene delivery is a prerequisite for successful gene therapy. In the early age of human gene therapy, setbacks due to problematic gene delivery vehicles plagued the exciting therapeutic outcome. However, gene delivery technologies rapidly evolved ever since. With the advancement of gene delivery techniques, gene therapy clinical trials surged during the past decade. As the first gene therapy product (Glybera) has obtained regulatory approval and reached clinic, human gene therapy finally realized the promise that genes can be medicines. The diverse gene delivery techniques available today have laid the foundation for gene therapy applications in treating a wide range of human diseases. Some of the most urgent unmet medical needs, such as cancer and pandemic infectious diseases, have been tackled by gene therapy strategies with promising results. Furthermore, combining gene transfer with other breakthroughs in biomedical research and novel biotechnologies opened new avenues for gene therapy. Such innovative therapeutic strategies are unthinkable until now, and are expected to be revolutionary. In part I of this review, we introduced recent development of non-viral and viral gene delivery technology platforms. As cell-based gene therapy blossomed, we also summarized the diverse types of cells and vectors employed in ex vivo gene transfer. Finally, challenges in current gene delivery technologies for human use were discussed.

  2. Reclaimed water as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes: distribution system and irrigation implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Fahrenfeld

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Treated wastewater is increasingly being reused to achieve sustainable water management in arid regions. The objective of this study was to quantify the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in recycled water, particularly after it has passed through the distribution system, and to consider point-of-use implications for soil irrigation. Three separate reclaimed wastewater distribution systems in the western U.S. were examined. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to quantify ARGs corresponding to resistance to sulfonamides (sul1, sul2, macrolides (ermF, tetracycline (tet(A, tet(O, glycopeptides (vanA, and methicillin (mecA, in addition to genes present in waterborne pathogens Legionella pneumophila (Lmip, Escherichia coli (gadAB, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ecfx, gyrB. In a parallel lab study, the effect of irrigating an agricultural soil with secondary, chlorinated, or dechlorinated wastewater effluent was examined in batch microcosms. A broader range of ARGs were detected after the reclaimed water passed through the distribution systems, highlighting the importance of considering bacterial re-growth and the overall water quality at the point of use. Screening for pathogens with qPCR indicated presence of Lmip and gadAB genes, but not ecfx or gyrB. In the lab study, chlorination was observed to reduce 16S rRNA and sul2 gene copies in the wastewater effluent, while dechlorination had no apparent effect. ARGs levels did not change with time in soil slurries incubated after a single irrigation event with any of the effluents. However, when irrigated repeatedly with secondary wastewater effluent (not chlorinated or dechlorinated, elevated levels of sul1 and sul2 were observed. This study suggests that reclaimed water may be an important reservoir of ARGs, especially at the point of use, and that attention should be directed towards the fate of ARGs in irrigation water and the implications for human health.

  3. Comparative analysis of chromatin landscape in regulatory regions of human housekeeping and tissue specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Dipayan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global regulatory mechanisms involving chromatin assembly and remodelling in the promoter regions of genes is implicated in eukaryotic transcription control especially for genes subjected to spatial and temporal regulation. The potential to utilise global regulatory mechanisms for controlling gene expression might depend upon the architecture of the chromatin in and around the gene. In-silico analysis can yield important insights into this aspect, facilitating comparison of two or more classes of genes comprising of a large number of genes within each group. Results In the present study, we carried out a comparative analysis of chromatin characteristics in terms of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions, nucleosome formation potential and the occurrence of repetitive sequences, in the upstream regulatory regions of housekeeping and tissue specific genes. Our data show that putative scaffold/matrix attachment regions are more abundant and nucleosome formation potential is higher in the 5' regions of tissue specific genes as compared to the housekeeping genes. Conclusion The differences in the chromatin features between the two groups of genes indicate the involvement of chromatin organisation in the control of gene expression. The presence of global regulatory mechanisms mediated through chromatin organisation can decrease the burden of invoking gene specific regulators for maintenance of the active/silenced state of gene expression. This could partially explain the lower number of genes estimated in the human genome.

  4. Reactive oxygen species and vascular biology: implications in human hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyz, Rhian M; Briones, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    Increased vascular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS; termed oxidative stress) has been implicated in various chronic diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress is both a cause and a consequence of hypertension. Although oxidative injury may not be the sole etiology, it amplifies blood pressure elevation in the presence of other pro-hypertensive factors. Oxidative stress is a multisystem phenomenon in hypertension and involves the heart, kidneys, nervous system, vessels and possibly the immune system. Compelling experimental and clinical evidence indicates the importance of the vasculature in the pathophysiology of hypertension and as such much emphasis has been placed on the (patho)biology of ROS in the vascular system. A major source for cardiovascular, renal and neural ROS is a family of non-phagocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (Nox), including the prototypic Nox2 homolog-based NADPH oxidase, as well as other Noxes, such as Nox1 and Nox4. Nox-derived ROS is important in regulating endothelial function and vascular tone. Oxidative stress is implicated in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, hypertrophy, apoptosis, migration, fibrosis, angiogenesis and rarefaction, important processes involved in vascular remodeling in hypertension. Despite a plethora of data implicating oxidative stress as a causative factor in experimental hypertension, findings in human hypertension are less conclusive. This review highlights the importance of ROS in vascular biology and focuses on the potential role of oxidative stress in human hypertension.

  5. Chromosomal mapping, gene structure and characterization of the human and murine RAB27B gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huxley Clare

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab GTPases are regulators of intracellular membrane traffic. The Rab27 subfamily consists of Rab27a and Rab27b. Rab27a has been recently implicated in Griscelli Disease, a disease combining partial albinism with severe immunodeficiency. Rab27a plays a key role in the function of lysosomal-like organelles such as melanosomes in melanocytes and lytic granules in cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Little is known about Rab27b. Results The human RAB27B gene is organised in six exons, spanning about 69 kb in the chromosome 18q21.1 region. Exon 1 is non-coding and is separated from the others by 49 kb of DNA and exon 6 contains a long 3' untranslated sequence (6.4 kb. The mouse Rab27b cDNA shows 95% identity with the human cDNA at the protein level and maps to mouse chromosome 18. The mouse mRNA was detected in stomach, large intestine, spleen and eye by RT-PCR, and in heart, brain, spleen and kidney by Northern blot. Transient over-expression of EGF-Rab27b fusion protein in cultured melanocytes revealed that Rab27b is associated with melanosomes, as observed for EGF-Rab27a. Conclusions Our results indicate that the Rab27 subfamily of Ras-like GTPases is highly conserved in mammals. There is high degree of conservation in sequence and gene structure between RAB27A and RAB27B genes. Exogenous expression of Rab27b in melanocytes results in melanosomal association as observed for Rab27a, suggesting the two Rab27 proteins are functional homologues. As with RAB27A in Griscelli Disease, RAB27B may be also associated with human disease mapping to chromosome 18.

  6. Testing modern human out-of-Africa dispersal models and implications for modern human origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Hubbe, Mark; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Stringer, Chris; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-10-01

    The modern human expansion process out of Africa has important implications for understanding the genetic and phenotypic structure of extant populations. While intensely debated, the primary hypotheses focus on either a single dispersal or multiple dispersals out of the continent. Here, we use the human fossil record from Africa and the Levant, as well as an exceptionally large dataset of Holocene human crania sampled from Asia, to model ancestor-descendant relationships along hypothetical dispersal routes. We test the spatial and temporal predictions of competing out-of-Africa models by assessing the correlation of geographical distances between populations and measures of population differentiation derived from quantitative cranial phenotype data. Our results support a model in which extant Australo-Melanesians are descendants of an initial dispersal out of Africa by early anatomically modern humans, while all other populations are descendants of a later migration wave. Our results have implications for understanding the complexity of modern human origins and diversity.

  7. THE CLONING OF HUMAN NEUROTROPHIN-3 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we have cloned the gene of human neurotrophin-3 (hNT-3) from the genomic DNA of white blood cells (WBC) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplification products were cloned into pUC19 and sequenced. Genomic sequence comparison of the cloned fragment and the reported hNT-3 (GenBank M61180) reveals 7 base differences: 1 in the signal peptide, 3 in the prepro peptide, and 3 in the mature hNT-3. Except the 2 varied bases (16th, T to G; 285th, A to C) in the signal peptide and pro-sequence resulted in the change of their encoded amino-acids (Tyr→Asp; Gln→His), the other varied bases have no influence on their respective encoded amino-acids, and all the changes have no influence on the open reading frame (ORF) of the hNT-3.

  8. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    , from faecal samples of 124 European individuals. The gene set, ,150 times larger than the human gene complement, contains an overwhelming majority of the prevalent (more frequent) microbial genes of the cohort and probably includes a large proportion of the prevalent human intestinal microbial genes......To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...

  9. Therapeutic implications of microRNAs in human cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Rossbach

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of highly evolutionarily conserved non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that modulate gene expression. Several studies have shown that the expression of miRNAs is deregulated in human malignancies. For ncRNAs and miRNAs, such gene-profiling studies in tumorigenic tissues have identified significant signatures that are of both diagnostic and prognostic value. Addressing the functions of ncRNAs not only give insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie complex genetic...

  10. STATE-OF-THE-ART HUMAN GENE THERAPY: PART II. GENE THERAPY STRATEGIES AND APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In Part I of this Review, we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene...

  11. Mutation analysis of the MCHR1 gene in human obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermter, Anne-Kathrin; Reichwald, Kathrin; Büch, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The importance of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system for regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight has been demonstrated in rodents. We analysed the human MCH receptor 1 gene (MCHR1) with respect to human obesity....

  12. Karyotypic analysis of gene transformed human keratinocyte line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION In order to solve the difficult problem of long term in vitro culture of human keratinocytes, the technique of gene transfer was utilized to transform human keratinocytes with simian virus 40 (SV40).

  13. Analysis of gene expression during odontogenic differentiation of cultured human dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Seock Seo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives We analyzed gene-expression profiles after 14 day odontogenic induction of human dental pulp cells (DPCs using a DNA microarray and sought candidate genes possibly associated with mineralization. Materials and Methods Induced human dental pulp cells were obtained by culturing DPCs in odontogenic induction medium (OM for 14 day. Cells exposed to normal culture medium were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from cells and analyzed by microarray analysis and the key results were confirmed selectively by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. We also performed a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA of the microarray data. Results Six hundred and five genes among the 47,320 probes on the BeadChip differed by a factor of more than two-fold in the induced cells. Of these, 217 genes were upregulated, and 388 were down-regulated. GSEA revealed that in the induced cells, genes implicated in Apoptosis and Signaling by wingless MMTV integration (Wnt were significantly upregulated. Conclusions Genes implicated in Apoptosis and Signaling by Wnt are highly connected to the differentiation of dental pulp cells into odontoblast.

  14. The RNA Modification N6-methyladenosine and Its Implications in Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Batista

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Impaired gene regulation lies at the heart of many disorders, including developmental diseases and cancer. Furthermore, the molecular pathways that control gene expression are often the target of cellular parasites, such as viruses. Gene expression is controlled through multiple mechanisms that are coordinated to ensure the proper and timely expression of each gene. Many of these mechanisms target the life cycle of the RNA molecule, from transcription to translation. Recently, another layer of regulation at the RNA level involving RNA modifications has gained renewed interest of the scientific community. The discovery that N6-methyladenosine (m6A, a modification present in mRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, can be removed by the activity of RNA demethylases, launched the field of epitranscriptomics; the study of how RNA function is regulated through the addition or removal of post-transcriptional modifications, similar to strategies used to regulate gene expression at the DNA and protein level. The abundance of RNA post-transcriptional modifications is determined by the activity of writer complexes (methylase and eraser (RNA demethylase proteins. Subsequently, the effects of RNA modifications materialize as changes in RNA structure and/or modulation of interactions between the modified RNA and RNA binding proteins or regulatory RNAs. Disruption of these pathways impairs gene expression and cellular function. This review focuses on the links between the RNA modification m6A and its implications in human diseases.

  15. Bioinformatic prediction and functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Cui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that human KIAA0100 gene was a novel acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (MLAA gene. But the functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene has remained unknown to date. Here, firstly, bioinformatic prediction of human KIAA0100 gene was carried out using online softwares; Secondly, Human KIAA0100 gene expression was downregulated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas 9 system in U937 cells. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were next evaluated in KIAA0100-knockdown U937 cells. The bioinformatic prediction showed that human KIAA0100 gene was located on 17q11.2, and human KIAA0100 protein was located in the secretory pathway. Besides, human KIAA0100 protein contained a signalpeptide, a transmembrane region, three types of secondary structures (alpha helix, extended strand, and random coil , and four domains from mitochondrial protein 27 (FMP27. The observation on functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene revealed that its downregulation inhibited cell proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis in U937 cells. To summarize, these results suggest human KIAA0100 gene possibly comes within mitochondrial genome; moreover, it is a novel anti-apoptotic factor related to carcinogenesis or progression in acute monocytic leukemia, and may be a potential target for immunotherapy against acute monocytic leukemia.

  16. Epigenetic signature and enhancer activity of the human APOE gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang-En; Cudaback, Eiron; Foraker, Jessica; Thomson, Zachary; Leong, Lesley; Lutz, Franziska; Gill, James Anthony; Saxton, Aleen; Kraemer, Brian; Navas, Patrick; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas; Bekris, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    The human apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene plays an important role in lipid metabolism. It has three common genetic variants, alleles ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4, which translate into three protein isoforms of apoE2, E3 and E4. These isoforms can differentially influence total serum cholesterol levels; therefore, APOE has been linked with cardiovascular disease. Additionally, its ɛ4 allele is strongly associated with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas the ɛ2 allele appears to have a modest protective effect for AD. Despite decades of research having illuminated multiple functional differences among the three apoE isoforms, the precise mechanisms through which different APOE alleles modify diseases risk remain incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the genomic structure of APOE in search for properties that may contribute novel biological consequences to the risk of disease. We identify one such element in the ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4 allele-carrying 3′-exon of APOE. We show that this exon is imbedded in a well-defined CpG island (CGI) that is highly methylated in the human postmortem brain. We demonstrate that this APOE CGI exhibits transcriptional enhancer/silencer activity. We provide evidence that this APOE CGI differentially modulates expression of genes at the APOE locus in a cell type-, DNA methylation- and ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4 allele-specific manner. These findings implicate a novel functional role for a 3′-exon CGI and support a modified mechanism of action for APOE in disease risk, involving not only the protein isoforms but also an epigenetically regulated transcriptional program at the APOE locus driven by the APOE CGI. PMID:23892237

  17. Bioinformatics Assisted Gene Discovery and Annotation of Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    As the sequencing stage of human genome project is near the end, the work has begun for discovering novel genes from genome sequences and annotating their biological functions. Here are reviewed current major bioinformatics tools and technologies available for large scale gene discovery and annotation from human genome sequences. Some ideas about possible future development are also provided.

  18. Gene expression analysis in human breast cancer associated blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan T Jones

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5-72 fold in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of

  19. In-silico human genomics with GeneCards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzer Gil

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since 1998, the bioinformatics, systems biology, genomics and medical communities have enjoyed a synergistic relationship with the GeneCards database of human genes (http://www.genecards.org. This human gene compendium was created to help to introduce order into the increasing chaos of information flow. As a consequence of viewing details and deep links related to specific genes, users have often requested enhanced capabilities, such that, over time, GeneCards has blossomed into a suite of tools (including GeneDecks, GeneALaCart, GeneLoc, GeneNote and GeneAnnot for a variety of analyses of both single human genes and sets thereof. In this paper, we focus on inhouse and external research activities which have been enabled, enhanced, complemented and, in some cases, motivated by GeneCards. In turn, such interactions have often inspired and propelled improvements in GeneCards. We describe here the evolution and architecture of this project, including examples of synergistic applications in diverse areas such as synthetic lethality in cancer, the annotation of genetic variations in disease, omics integration in a systems biology approach to kidney disease, and bioinformatics tools.

  20. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  1. Human gene therapy: a brief overview of the genetic revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanjukta

    2013-02-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The prelude to successful gene therapy i.e. the efficient transfer and expression of a variety of human gene into target cells has already been accomplished in several systems. Safe methods have been devised to do this, using several viral and no-viral vectors. Two main approaches emerged: in vivo modification and ex vivo modification. Retrovirus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus are suitable for gene therapeutic approaches which are based on permanent expression of the therapeutic gene. Non-viral vectors are far less efficient than viral vectors, but they have advantages due to their low immunogenicity and their large capacity for therapeutic DNA. To improve the function of non-viral vectors, the addition of viral functions such as receptor mediated uptake and nuclear translocation of DNA may finally lead to the development of an artificial virus. Gene transfer protocols have been approved for human use in inherited diseases, cancers and acquired disorders. In 1990, the first successful clinical trial of gene therapy was initiated for adenosine deaminase deficiency. Since then, the number of clinical protocols initiated worldwide has increased exponentially. Although preliminary results of these trials are somewhat disappointing, but human gene therapy dreams of treating diseases by replacing or supplementing the product of defective or introducing novel therapeutic genes. So definitely human gene therapy is an effective addition to the arsenal of approaches to many human therapies in the 21st century.

  2. The structure and expression of the human neuroligin-3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibert, R A; Winfield, S L; Sandhu, H K; Martin, B M; Ginns, E I

    2000-04-04

    The neuroligins are a family of proteins that are thought to mediate cell to cell interactions between neurons. During the sequencing at an Xq13 locus associated with a mental retardation syndrome in some studies, we discovered a portion of the human orthologue of the rat neuroligin-3 gene. We now report the structure and the expression of that gene. The gene spans approximately 30kb and contains eight exons. Unlike the rat gene, it codes for at least two mRNAs and at least one of which is expressed outside the CNS. Interestingly, the putative promoter for the gene overlaps the last exon of the neighboring HOPA gene and is located less than 1kb from an OPA element in which a polymorphism associated with mental retardation is found. These findings suggest a possible role for the neuroligin gene in mental retardation and that the role of the gene in humans may differ from its role in rats.

  3. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Pan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human cytochrome P450 (CYP superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA (“Orthologous MAtrix” Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery.

  4. Evaluation of reference genes for gene expression studies in human brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Magdalena; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna C; Lindberg, Kristin; Pereira, Maria J; Gäbel, Markus; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W; Svensson, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has during the last 5 year been subjected to an increasing research interest, due to its putative function as a target for future obesity treatments. The most commonly used method for molecular studies of human BAT is the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This method requires normalization to a reference gene (genes with uniform expression under different experimental conditions, e.g. similar expression levels between human BAT and WAT), but so far no evaluation of reference genes for human BAT has been performed. Two different microarray datasets with samples containing human BAT were used to search for genes with low variability in expression levels. Seven genes (FAM96B, GNB1, GNB2, HUWE1, PSMB2, RING1 and TPT1) identified by microarray analysis, and 8 commonly used reference genes (18S, B2M, GAPDH, LRP10, PPIA, RPLP0, UBC, and YWHAZ) were selected and further analyzed by quantitative PCR in both BAT containing perirenal adipose tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Results were analyzed using 2 different algorithms (Normfinder and geNorm). Most of the commonly used reference genes displayed acceptably low variability (geNorm M-values genes identified by microarray displayed an even lower variability (M-values genes for qPCR analysis of human BAT and we recommend that they are included in future gene expression studies of human BAT.

  5. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-01

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds’ escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds’ cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  6. Different level of population differentiation among human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the colonization of the world, after dispersal out of African, modern humans encountered changeable environments and substantial phenotypic variations that involve diverse behaviors, lifestyles and cultures, were generated among the different modern human populations. Results Here, we study the level of population differentiation among different populations of human genes. Intriguingly, genes involved in osteoblast development were identified as being enriched with higher FST SNPs, a result consistent with the proposed role of the skeletal system in accounting for variation among human populations. Genes involved in the development of hair follicles, where hair is produced, were also found to have higher levels of population differentiation, consistent with hair morphology being a distinctive trait among human populations. Other genes that showed higher levels of population differentiation include those involved in pigmentation, spermatid, nervous system and organ development, and some metabolic pathways, but few involved with the immune system. Disease-related genes demonstrate excessive SNPs with lower levels of population differentiation, probably due to purifying selection. Surprisingly, we find that Mendelian-disease genes appear to have a significant excessive of SNPs with high levels of population differentiation, possibly because the incidence and susceptibility of these diseases show differences among populations. As expected, microRNA regulated genes show lower levels of population differentiation due to purifying selection. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates different level of population differentiation among human populations for different gene groups.

  7. Meis1 coordinates a network of genes implicated in eye development and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Séverine; González-Lázaro, Monica; Beccari, Leonardo; Carramolino, Laura; Martin-Bermejo, Maria Jesus; Amarie, Oana; Mateos-San Martín, Daniel; Torroja, Carlos; Bogdanović, Ozren; Doohan, Roisin; Puk, Oliver; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Graw, Jochen; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Casares, Fernando; Torres, Miguel; Bovolenta, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Microphthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by reduced eye size and visual deficits of variable degree. Sporadic and hereditary microphthalmos have been associated with heterozygous mutations in genes fundamental for eye development. Yet, many cases are idiopathic or await the identification of molecular causes. Here we show that haploinsufficiency of Meis1, which encodes a transcription factor with evolutionarily conserved expression in the embryonic trunk, brain and sensory organs, including the eye, causes microphthalmic traits and visual impairment in adult mice. By combining analysis of Meis1 loss-of-function and conditional Meis1 functional rescue with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq approaches we show that, in contrast to its preferential association with Hox-Pbx BSs in the trunk, Meis1 binds to Hox/Pbx-independent sites during optic cup development. In the eye primordium, Meis1 coordinates, in a dose-dependent manner, retinal proliferation and differentiation by regulating genes responsible for human microphthalmia and components of the Notch signaling pathway. In addition, Meis1 is required for eye patterning by controlling a set of eye territory-specific transcription factors, so that in Meis1(-/-) embryos boundaries among the different eye territories are shifted or blurred. We propose that Meis1 is at the core of a genetic network implicated in eye patterning/microphthalmia, and represents an additional candidate for syndromic cases of these ocular malformations.

  8. Altered gene expression profiles of NIH3T3 cells regulated by human lung cancer associated gene CT120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Huo HE; Jin Jun LI; Yi Hu XIE; Yun Tian TANG; Gen Fu YAO; Wen Xin QIN; Da Fang WAN; Jian Ren GU

    2004-01-01

    CT120, a novel membrane-associated gene implicated in lung carcinogenesis, was previously identified from chromosome 17p13.3 locus, a hot mutation spot involved in human malignancies. In the present study, we further determined that CT120 ectopic expression could promote cell proliferation activity of NIH3T3 cells using MTS assay, and monitored the downstream effects of CT120 in NIH3T3 cells with Atlas mouse cDNA expression arrays. Among 588known genes, 133 genes were found to be upregulated or downregulated by CT120. Two major signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and anti-apoptosis were overexpressed and activated in response to CT120:One is the Raf/MEK/Erk signal cascades and the other is the PI3K/Akt signal cascades, suggesting that CT120 might contribute, at least in part, to the constitutively activation of Erk and Akt in human lung caner cells. In addition, some tumor metastasis associated genes cathepsin B, cathepsin D, cathepsin L, MMP-2/TIMP-2 were also upregulated by CT120, upon which CT120 might be involved in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. In addition, CT120 might play an important role in tumor progression through modulating the expression of some candidate "Lung Tumor Progression"genes including B-Raf, Rab-2, BAX, BAG-1, YB-1, and Cdc42.

  9. The promoter analysis of the human C17orf25 gene, a novel chromosome 17p13.3 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The human C17orf25 gene (Accession No. AF177342) is one of thirteen genes cloned from a regiondisplaying a high score of loss of heterozygosity within chromosome 17p13.3 in human hepatocellular car-cinoma in China[1]. To unveil the underlying mechanisms for the transcription regulation of this gene andunderstand its implication to the hepatocellular carcinogenesis, we looked into the relevant aspects by bothbioinformatic and experimental executions. We found: 1, The abundant expression of the C17orf25 genewas evident in all the cell lines and tissue samples tested, showing little hepatoma-selectivity; 2, Its tran-scription starts at a single site, locating at -60 from the translation initiation codon; 3, A 58 bp fragmentcontaining the transcription start, extending from -112 to -55, represents the minimal promoter; 4, Theconsensus sequence within this fragment recognized by SP1 contributes predominantly to the activity of theminimal promoter; 5, The bioinformatic analysis suggests that the C17orf25 gene may encode a protein inthe family of the glyoxalase. Our data has provided some deep insight into both function and regulation ofthe C17orf25 gene in the context of the normal liver and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Seldin, M.F. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  11. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  12. Gene Expression Changes in Femoral Head Necrosis of Human Bone Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Balla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH is the result of an interruption of the local circulation and the injury of vascular supply of bone. Multiple factors have been implicated in the development of the disease. However the mechanism of ischemia and necrosis in non-traumatic ONFH is not clear. The aim of our investigation was to identify genes that are differently expressed in ONFH vs. non-ONFH human bone and to describe the relationships between these genes using multivariate data analysis. Six bone tissue samples from ONFH male patients and 8 bone tissue samples from non-ONFH men were examined. The expression differences of selected 117 genes were analyzed by TaqMan probe-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR system. The significance test indicated marked differences in the expression of nine genes between ONFH and non-ONFH individuals. These altered genes code for collagen molecules, an extracellular matrix digesting metalloproteinase, a transcription factor, an adhesion molecule, and a growth factor. Canonical variates analysis demonstrated that ONFH and non-ONFH bone tissues can be distinguished by the multiple expression profile analysis of numerous genes controlled via canonical TGFB pathway as well as genes coding for extracellular matrix composing collagen type molecules. The markedly altered gene expression profile observed in the ONFH of human bone tissue may provide further insight into the pathogenetic process of osteonecrotic degeneration of bone.

  13. Gene doping : an overview and current implications for athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gronde, Toon; de Hon, Olivier; Haisma, Hidde J.; Pieters, Toine

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of gene doping, defined as the transfer of nucleic acid sequences and/or the use of normal or genetically modified cells to enhance sport performance, is a real concern in sports medicine. The abuse of knowledge and techniques gained in the area of gene therapy is a form of doping, a

  14. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  15. THE GENE EXPRESSION PROFILE OF HIGHLY METASTATIC HUMAN OVARIAN CANCER CELL LINE BY GENE CHIP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕桂泉; 许沈华; 牟瀚舟; 朱赤红; 羊正炎; 高永良; 楼洪坤; 刘祥麟; 杨文; 程勇

    2001-01-01

    To study the gene expression of high metastatic human ovarian carcinoma cell line (HO-8910PM) and to screen for novel metastasis- associated genes by cDNA microarray. Methods: The cDNA was retro-transcribed from equal quantity mRNA derived from tissues of highly metastatic ovarian carcinoma cell line and normal ovarian, and was labeled with Cy5 and Cy3 fluorescence as probes. The mixed probes were hybridized with BioDoor 4096 double dot human whole gene chip. The chip was scanned by scanArray 3000 laser scanner. The acquired image was analyzed by ImaGene 3.0 software. Results: By applying the cDNA microarray we found: A total of 323 genes whose expression level were 3 times higher or lower in HO-8910PM cell than normal ovarian epithelium cell were screened out, with 71 higher and 252 lower respectively. Among these 10 were new genes. 67 genes showed expression difference bigger than 6 times between HO-8910PM cell and normal ovarian epithelium cell, among these genes 12 were higher, 55 lower, and two new genes were found. Conclusion: cDNA microarray technique is effective in screening the differentially expressed genes between human ovarian cancer cell line (HO-8910PM) and normal ovarian epithelium cell. Using the cDNA microarray to analyze of human ovarian cancer cell line gene expression profile difference will help the gene diagnosis, treatment and protection.

  16. Mutations in the human TWIST gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, K W; Zackai, E H; Stolle, C A

    2000-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a relatively common craniosynostosis disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Mutations in the TWIST gene have been identified in patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. The TWIST gene product is a transcription factor with DNA binding and helix-loop-helix domains. Numerous missense and nonsense mutations cluster in the functional domains, without any apparent mutational hot spot. Two novel point mutations and one novel polymorphism are included in this review. Large deletions including the TWIST gene have been identified in some patients with learning disabilities or mental retardation, which are not typically part of the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Comprehensive studies in patients with the clinical diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome have demonstrated a TWIST gene abnormality in about 80%, up to 37% of which may be large deletions [Johnson et al., 1998]. The gene deletions and numerous nonsense mutations are suggestive of haploinsufficiency as the disease-causing mechanism. No genotype phenotype correlation was apparent.

  17. Toxicological implications of modulation of gene expression by microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2011-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a large family of non-coding RNAs that are evolutionarily conserved, endogenous, and 21-23 nucleotides in length. miRNAs regulate gene expression by targeting messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by binding to complementary regions of transcripts to repress their translation or mRNA degradation. miRNAs are encoded by the genome, and more than 1000 human miRNAs have been identified so far. miRNAs are predicted to target ∼60% of human mRNAs and are expressed in all animal cells and have fundamental roles in cellular responses to xenobiotic stresses, which affect a large range of physiological processes such as development, immune responses, metabolism, tumor formation as well as toxicological outcomes. Recently, many reports concerning miRNAs related to cancer have been published; however, the miRNA research in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endobiotics and in toxicology has only recently been established. This review describes the current knowledge on the miRNA-dependent regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes and nuclear receptors and its potential toxicological implications. In this review, miRNAs with reference to target prediction, potential modulation of toxicology-related changes of miRNA expression, role of miRNA in immune-mediated drug-induced liver injury, miRNA in plasma as potential toxicological biomarkers, and relevance of miRNA-related genetic polymorphisms are discussed.

  18. A catalogue of human secreted proteins and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar Keerthikumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Under both normal and pathological conditions, cells secrete variety of proteins through classical and non-classical secretory pathways into the extracellular space. Majority of these proteins represent pathophysiology of the cell from which it is secreted. Recently, though more than 92% of the protein coding genes has been mapped by human proteome map project, but number of those proteins that constitutes secretome of the cell still remains elusive. Secreted proteins or the secretome can be accessible in bodily fluids and hence are considered as potential biomarkers to discriminate between healthy and diseased individuals. In order to facilitate the biomarker discovery and to further aid clinicians and scientists working in these arenas, we have compiled and catalogued secreted proteins from the human proteome using integrated bioinformatics approach. In this study, nearly 14% of the human proteome is likely to be secreted through classical and non-classical secretory pathways. Out of which, ~38% of these secreted proteins were found in extracellular vesicles including exosomes and shedding microvesicles. Among these secreted proteins, 94% were detected in human bodily fluids including blood, plasma, serum, saliva, semen, tear and urine. We anticipate that this high confidence list of secreted proteins could serve as a compendium of candidate biomarkers. In addition, the catalogue may provide functional insights in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions of the cell.

  19. Is Homo sapiens polytypic? Human taxonomic diversity and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The term race is a traditional synonym for subspecies, however it is frequently asserted that Homo sapiens is monotypic and that what are termed races are nothing more than biological illusions. In this manuscript a case is made for the hypothesis that H. sapiens is polytypic, and in this way is no different from other species exhibiting similar levels of genetic and morphological diversity. First it is demonstrated that the four major definitions of race/subspecies can be shown to be synonymous within the context of the framework of race as a correlation structure of traits. Next the issue of taxonomic classification is considered where it is demonstrated that H. sapiens possesses high levels morphological diversity, genetic heterozygosity and differentiation (F(ST)) compared to many species that are acknowledged to be polytypic with respect to subspecies. Racial variation is then evaluated in light of the phylogenetic species concept, where it is suggested that the least inclusive monophyletic units exist below the level of species within H. sapiens indicating the existence of a number of potential human phylogenetic species; and the biological species concept, where it is determined that racial variation is too small to represent differentiation at the level of biological species. Finally the implications of this are discussed in the context of anthropology where an accurate picture of the sequence and timing of events during the evolution of human taxa are required for a complete picture of human evolution, and medicine, where a greater appreciation of the role played by human taxonomic differences in disease susceptibility and treatment responsiveness will save lives in the future.

  20. Human brain evolution: from gene discovery to phenotype discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Todd M

    2012-06-26

    The rise of comparative genomics and related technologies has added important new dimensions to the study of human evolution. Our knowledge of the genes that underwent expression changes or were targets of positive selection in human evolution is rapidly increasing, as is our knowledge of gene duplications, translocations, and deletions. It is now clear that the genetic differences between humans and chimpanzees are far more extensive than previously thought; their genomes are not 98% or 99% identical. Despite the rapid growth in our understanding of the evolution of the human genome, our understanding of the relationship between genetic changes and phenotypic changes is tenuous. This is true even for the most intensively studied gene, FOXP2, which underwent positive selection in the human terminal lineage and is thought to have played an important role in the evolution of human speech and language. In part, the difficulty of connecting genes to phenotypes reflects our generally poor knowledge of human phenotypic specializations, as well as the difficulty of interpreting the consequences of genetic changes in species that are not amenable to invasive research. On the positive side, investigations of FOXP2, along with genomewide surveys of gene-expression changes and selection-driven sequence changes, offer the opportunity for "phenotype discovery," providing clues to human phenotypic specializations that were previously unsuspected. What is more, at least some of the specializations that have been proposed are amenable to testing with noninvasive experimental techniques appropriate for the study of humans and apes.

  1. [Structural organization of the human p53 gene. I. Molecular cloning of the human p53 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhman, V L; Ninkina, N N; Chumakov, P M; Khilenkova, M A; Samarina, O P

    1987-09-01

    Human p53 gene was cloned from the normal human placenta DNA and DNA from the strain of human kidney carcinoma transplanted into nude mice. Representative gene library from tumor strain of human kidney carcinoma and library of 15 kb EcoRI fragments of DNA from normal human placenta were constructed. Maniatis gene library was also used. Five clones were isolated from kidney carcinoma library; they covered 27 kb and included full-length p53 gene of 19.5 kb and flanking sequences. From normal placenta libraries three overlapped clones were obtained. Restriction map of cloned sequences was constructed and polarity of the p53 gene determined. The first intron of the gene is large (10.4 kb); polymorphic BglII site was observed in this intron, which allows to discriminate between allelic genes. One of these (BglII-) is ten times more abundant that the other (BglII+). Both allelic genes are able to synthesize the 2.8 kb p53 gene.

  2. Synchronized human skeletal myotubes of lean, obese and type 2 diabetic patients maintain circadian oscillation of clock genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, J.; Timmers, S.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Duez, H.; Staels, B.; Hesselink, M.K.; Schrauwen, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cell and animal studies have demonstrated that circadian rhythm is governed by autonomous rhythmicity of clock genes. Although disturbances in circadian rhythm have been implicated in metabolic disease development, it remains unknown whether muscle circadian rhythm is altered in human models of type

  3. Mucin gene expression in human middle ear epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Joseph Edward

    2007-09-01

    To investigate the expression of recently identified human mucin genes in human middle ear epithelial (MEE) specimens from in vivo middle ear (ME) tissue and to compare this mucin gene expression with mucin gene expression in an immortalized cell culture in vitro source of human MEE. Human MEE was harvested as in vivo specimens, and human MEE cell cultures were established for in vitro experimentation. RNA was extracted from MEE and primers designed for reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction to assess for mucin gene MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC5B, MUC6, MUC7, MUC8, MUC9, MUC11, MUC12, MUC13, MUC15, MUC16, MUC18, MUC19, and MUC20 expression. Mucin gene expression in the in vivo and in vitro ME tissue was compared against tissues with known expression of the mucin genes in question. Mucin genes MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC5B, MUC7, MUC8, MUC9, MUC11, MUC13, MUC15, MUC16, MUC18, MUC19, and MUC20 were identified and expressed in both the in vivo and in vitro samples of MEE. Mucin genes MUC6, MUC12, and MUC17 were not identified in either tissue samples. Many of the mucin genes that have been recently identified are expressed in human MEE. These genes are expressed in a similar manner in both in vivo and in vitro models. Understanding the mechanisms in which these genes regulate the physiology and pathophysiology of MEE will provide a more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanics of the MEE and disease conditions such as otitis media.

  4. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  5. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  6. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yinan; Ruis, Brian; Lin, Sherry; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair known as homologous recombination (HR). The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  7. Structure and in vitro transcription of human globin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, N J; Shander, M H; Manley, J L; Gefter, M L; Maniatis, T

    1980-09-19

    The alpha-like and beta-like subunits of human hemoglobin are encoded by a small family of genes that are differentially expressed during development. Through the use of molecular cloning procedures, each member of this gene family has been isolated and extensively characterized. Although the alpha-like and beta-like globin genes are located on different chromosomes, both sets of genes are arranged in closely linked clusters. In both clusters, each of the genes is transcribed from the same DNA strand, and the genes are arranged in the order of their expressions during development. Structural comparisons of immediately adjacent genes within each cluster have provided evidence for the occurrence of gene duplication and correction during evolution and have led to the discovery of pseudogenes, genes that have acquired numerous mutations that prevent their normal expression. Recently, in vivo and in vitro systems for studying the expression of cloned eukaryotic genes have been developed as a means of identifying DNA sequences that are necessary for normal gene function. This article describes the application of an in vitro transcription procedure to the study of human globin gene expression.

  8. Genic insights from integrated human proteomics in GeneCards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishilevich, Simon; Zimmerman, Shahar; Kohn, Asher; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Olender, Tsviya; Kolker, Eugene; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2016-01-01

    GeneCards is a one-stop shop for searchable human gene annotations (http://www.genecards.org/). Data are automatically mined from ∼120 sources and presented in an integrated web card for every human gene. We report the application of recent advances in proteomics to enhance gene annotation and classification in GeneCards. First, we constructed the Human Integrated Protein Expression Database (HIPED), a unified database of protein abundance in human tissues, based on the publically available mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics sources ProteomicsDB, Multi-Omics Profiling Expression Database, Protein Abundance Across Organisms and The MaxQuant DataBase. The integrated database, residing within GeneCards, compares favourably with its individual sources, covering nearly 90% of human protein-coding genes. For gene annotation and comparisons, we first defined a protein expression vector for each gene, based on normalized abundances in 69 normal human tissues. This vector is portrayed in the GeneCards expression section as a bar graph, allowing visual inspection and comparison. These data are juxtaposed with transcriptome bar graphs. Using the protein expression vectors, we further defined a pairwise metric that helps assess expression-based pairwise proximity. This new metric for finding functional partners complements eight others, including sharing of pathways, gene ontology (GO) terms and domains, implemented in the GeneCards Suite. In parallel, we calculated proteome-based differential expression, highlighting a subset of tissues that overexpress a gene and subserving gene classification. This textual annotation allows users of VarElect, the suite's next-generation phenotyper, to more effectively discover causative disease variants. Finally, we define the protein-RNA expression ratio and correlation as yet another attribute of every gene in each tissue, adding further annotative information. The results constitute a significant enhancement of several Gene

  9. Metabolic Genes within Cyanophage Genomes: Implications for Diversity and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E-Bin Gao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanophages, a group of viruses specifically infecting cyanobacteria, are genetically diverse and extensively abundant in water environments. As a result of selective pressure, cyanophages often acquire a range of metabolic genes from host genomes. The host-derived genes make a significant contribution to the ecological success of cyanophages. In this review, we summarize the host-derived metabolic genes, as well as their origin and roles in cyanophage evolution and important host metabolic pathways, such as the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, nutrient acquisition and nucleotide biosynthesis. We also discuss the suitability of the host-derived metabolic genes as potential diagnostic markers for the detection of genetic diversity of cyanophages in natural environments.

  10. Gene x environment interactions as dynamical systems: clinical implications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah S. Knox

    2015-01-01

    The etiology and progression of the chronic diseases that account for the highest rates of mortality in the US, namely, cardiovascular diseases and cancers, involve complex gene x environment interactions...

  11. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1.

  12. Oxytocin Pathway Genes: Evolutionary Ancient System Impacting on Human Affiliation, Sociality, and Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Ruth; Monakhov, Mikhail; Pratt, Maayan; Ebstein, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT), a nonapeptide signaling molecule originating from an ancestral peptide, appears in different variants across all vertebrate and several invertebrate species. Throughout animal evolution, neuropeptidergic signaling has been adapted by organisms for regulating response to rapidly changing environments. The family of OT-like molecules affects both peripheral tissues implicated in reproduction, homeostasis, and energy balance, as well as neuromodulation of social behavior, stress regulation, and associative learning in species ranging from nematodes to humans. After describing the OT-signaling pathway, we review research on the three genes most extensively studied in humans: the OT receptor (OXTR), the structural gene for OT (OXT/neurophysin-I), and CD38. Consistent with the notion that sociality should be studied from the perspective of social life at the species level, we address human social functions in relation to OT-pathway genes, including parenting, empathy, and using social relationships to manage stress. We then describe associations between OT-pathway genes with psychopathologies involving social dysfunctions such as autism, depression, or schizophrenia. Human research particularly underscored the involvement of two OXTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs53576, rs2254298) with fewer studies focusing on other OXTR (rs7632287, rs1042778, rs2268494, rs2268490), OXT (rs2740210, rs4813627, rs4813625), and CD38 (rs3796863, rs6449197) single nucleotide polymorphisms. Overall, studies provide evidence for the involvement of OT-pathway genes in human social functions but also suggest that factors such as gender, culture, and early environment often confound attempts to replicate first findings. We conclude by discussing epigenetics, conceptual implications within an evolutionary perspective, and future directions, especially the need to refine phenotypes, carefully characterize early environments, and integrate observations of social behavior across

  13. Seasonal variations in physical activity and implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Roy J; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi

    2009-10-01

    This review explores the implications of seasonal changes in physical activity for fitness and human health. Photosensitivity and nutrient shortages mediate animal hibernation via the hypothalamus and changes in leptin and ghrelin concentrations. Opportunities for hunting and crop cultivation determine seasonal activity in under-developed human societies, but in developed societies temperature and rainfall are dominant influences, usually over-riding innate rhythms. Both questionnaire data and objective measurements show that many groups from children to the elderly increase their physical activity from winter to spring or summer. Measurements of maximal oxygen intake and muscle strength commonly show parallel seasonal changes. However, potential effects upon body mass and body fat may be counteracted by changes of food intake; subsistence agriculturists sometimes maintain or increase physical activity at the expense of a decrease in body mass. In developed societies, body fat commonly increases during the winter, with parallel changes in blood lipids, blood pressure and blood coagulability; moreover, these changes are not always fully reversed the following summer. Most developed societies show increased all-cause and cardiac mortalities in the winter. Health consequences of seasonal variations in physical activity including an increased vulnerability to cardiac catastrophe and a year-by-year increase in total body fat seem most likely if the average level of physical activity for the year is low. Public health recommendations should underline the importance of maintaining physical activity during adverse environmental conditions by adapting clothing, modifying behaviour and exploiting any available air-conditioned indoor facilities.

  14. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part II. Gene therapy strategies and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In Part I of this Review (Wang and Gao, 2014), we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future.

  15. Colocalization of coregulated genes: a steered molecular dynamics study of human chromosome 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Stefano

    Full Text Available The connection between chromatin nuclear organization and gene activity is vividly illustrated by the observation that transcriptional coregulation of certain genes appears to be directly influenced by their spatial proximity. This fact poses the more general question of whether it is at all feasible that the numerous genes that are coregulated on a given chromosome, especially those at large genomic distances, might become proximate inside the nucleus. This problem is studied here using steered molecular dynamics simulations in order to enforce the colocalization of thousands of knowledge-based gene sequences on a model for the gene-rich human chromosome 19. Remarkably, it is found that most (≈ 88% gene pairs can be brought simultaneously into contact. This is made possible by the low degree of intra-chromosome entanglement and the large number of cliques in the gene coregulatory network. A clique is a set of genes coregulated all together as a group. The constrained conformations for the model chromosome 19 are further shown to be organized in spatial macrodomains that are similar to those inferred from recent HiC measurements. The findings indicate that gene coregulation and colocalization are largely compatible and that this relationship can be exploited to draft the overall spatial organization of the chromosome in vivo. The more general validity and implications of these findings could be investigated by applying to other eukaryotic chromosomes the general and transferable computational strategy introduced here.

  16. Gene Therapy of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    1987. Partial characterization of chicken spleen cell culture supernatants stimulated with Staphylococcus aureus. Developmental & Comparative...Immunology 1 1: 191. 8. Schoof, D. D., and C. H. Tempelis. 1 986. The role of soluble protein A in chicken spleen cell activation. Developmental...promoter upstream of the neomycin phosphotransferase gene. No other eukarjotic genes are expressed. Other sequences include an intron and poly(A) site

  17. A physical map of 30,000 human genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloukas, P; Schuler, G D; Gyapay, G; Beasley, E M; Soderlund, C; Rodriguez-Tomé, P; Hui, L; Matise, T C; McKusick, K B; Beckmann, J S; Bentolila, S; Bihoreau, M; Birren, B B; Browne, J; Butler, A; Castle, A B; Chiannilkulchai, N; Clee, C; Day, P J; Dehejia, A; Dibling, T; Drouot, N; Duprat, S; Fizames, C; Fox, S; Gelling, S; Green, L; Harrison, P; Hocking, R; Holloway, E; Hunt, S; Keil, S; Lijnzaad, P; Louis-Dit-Sully, C; Ma, J; Mendis, A; Miller, J; Morissette, J; Muselet, D; Nusbaum, H C; Peck, A; Rozen, S; Simon, D; Slonim, D K; Staples, R; Stein, L D; Stewart, E A; Suchard, M A; Thangarajah, T; Vega-Czarny, N; Webber, C; Wu, X; Hudson, J; Auffray, C; Nomura, N; Sikela, J M; Polymeropoulos, M H; James, M R; Lander, E S; Hudson, T J; Myers, R M; Cox, D R; Weissenbach, J; Boguski, M S; Bentley, D R

    1998-10-23

    A map of 30,181 human gene-based markers was assembled and integrated with the current genetic map by radiation hybrid mapping. The new gene map contains nearly twice as many genes as the previous release, includes most genes that encode proteins of known function, and is twofold to threefold more accurate than the previous version. A redesigned, more informative and functional World Wide Web site (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genemap) provides the mapping information and associated data and annotations. This resource constitutes an important infrastructure and tool for the study of complex genetic traits, the positional cloning of disease genes, the cross-referencing of mammalian genomes, and validated human transcribed sequences for large-scale studies of gene expression.

  18. Biological Activities of Extracellular Vesicles and Their Cargos from Bovine and Human Milk in Humans and Implications for Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempleni, Janos; Aguilar-Lozano, Ana; Sadri, Mahrou; Sukreet, Sonal; Manca, Sonia; Wu, Di; Zhou, Fang; Mutai, Ezra

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) in milk harbor a variety of compounds, including lipids, proteins, noncoding RNAs, and mRNAs. Among the various classes of EVs, exosomes are of particular interest, because cargo sorting in exosomes is a regulated, nonrandom process and exosomes play essential roles in cell-to-cell communication. Encapsulation in exosomes confers protection against enzymatic and nonenzymatic degradation of cargos and provides a pathway for cellular uptake of cargos by endocytosis of exosomes. Compelling evidence suggests that exosomes in bovine milk are transported by intestinal cells, vascular endothelial cells, and macrophages in human and rodent cell cultures, and bovine-milk exosomes are delivered to peripheral tissues in mice. Evidence also suggests that cargos in bovine-milk exosomes, in particular RNAs, are delivered to circulating immune cells in humans. Some microRNAs and mRNAs in bovine-milk exosomes may regulate the expression of human genes and be translated into protein, respectively. Some exosome cargos are quantitatively minor in the diet compared with endogenous synthesis. However, noncanonical pathways have been identified through which low concentrations of dietary microRNAs may alter gene expression, such as the accumulation of exosomes in the immune cell microenvironment and the binding of microRNAs to Toll-like receptors. Phenotypes observed in infant-feeding studies include higher Mental Developmental Index, Psychomotor Development Index, and Preschool Language Scale-3 scores in breastfed infants than in those fed various formulas. In mice, supplementation with plant-derived MIR-2911 improved the antiviral response compared with controls. Porcine-milk exosomes promote the proliferation of intestinal cells in mice. This article discusses the above-mentioned advances in research concerning milk exosomes and their cargos in human nutrition. Implications for infant nutrition are emphasized, where permitted, but data in infants are

  19. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  1. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  2. Cigarette smoke toxins deposited on surfaces: implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Martins-Green

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking remains a significant health threat for smokers and nonsmokers alike. Secondhand smoke (SHS is intrinsically more toxic than directly inhaled smoke. Recently, a new threat has been discovered - Thirdhand smoke (THS - the accumulation of SHS on surfaces that ages with time, becoming progressively more toxic. THS is a potential health threat to children, spouses of smokers and workers in environments where smoking is or has been allowed. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of THS on liver, lung, skin healing, and behavior, using an animal model exposed to THS under conditions that mimic exposure of humans. THS-exposed mice show alterations in multiple organ systems and excrete levels of NNAL (a tobacco-specific carcinogen biomarker similar to those found in children exposed to SHS (and consequently to THS. In liver, THS leads to increased lipid levels and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a precursor to cirrhosis and cancer and a potential contributor to cardiovascular disease. In lung, THS stimulates excess collagen production and high levels of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting propensity for fibrosis with implications for inflammation-induced diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. In wounded skin, healing in THS-exposed mice has many characteristics of the poor healing of surgical incisions observed in human smokers. Lastly, behavioral tests show that THS-exposed mice become hyperactive. The latter data, combined with emerging associated behavioral problems in children exposed to SHS/THS, suggest that, with prolonged exposure, they may be at significant risk for developing more severe neurological disorders. These results provide a basis for studies on the toxic effects of THS in humans and inform potential regulatory policies to prevent involuntary exposure to THS.

  3. Ethanol modulation of gene networks: implications for alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Sean P; Miles, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disease caused by a confluence of environmental and genetic factors influencing multiple brain pathways to produce a variety of behavioral sequelae, including addiction. Genetic factors contribute to over 50% of the risk for alcoholism and recent evidence points to a large number of genes with small effect sizes as the likely molecular basis for this disease. Recent progress in genomics (microarrays or RNA-Seq) and genetics has led to the identification of a large number of potential candidate genes influencing ethanol behaviors or alcoholism itself. To organize this complex information, investigators have begun to focus on the contribution of gene networks, rather than individual genes, for various ethanol-induced behaviors in animal models or behavioral endophenotypes comprising alcoholism. This chapter reviews some of the methods used for constructing gene networks from genomic data and some of the recent progress made in applying such approaches to the study of the neurobiology of ethanol. We show that rapid technology development in gathering genomic data, together with sophisticated experimental design and a growing collection of analysis tools are producing novel insights for understanding the molecular basis of alcoholism and that such approaches promise new opportunities for therapeutic development.

  4. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  5. Comparison of the canine and human olfactory receptor gene repertoires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quignon, P; Kirkness, E; Cadieu, E; Touleimat, N; Guyon, R; Renier, C; Hitte, C; Andre, C; Fraser, C; Galibert, F

    2003-01-01

    Background: Olfactory receptors (ORs), the first dedicated molecules with which odorants physically interact to arouse an olfactory sensation, constitute the largest gene family in vertebrates, including around 900 genes in human and 1,500 in the mouse. Whereas dogs, like many other mammals, have a

  6. Polymorphic GGC repeat differentially regulates human reelin gene expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, A M; Levitt, P; Pimenta, A F

    2006-10-01

    The human gene encoding Reelin (RELN), a pivotal protein in neurodevelopment, includes a polymorphic GGC repeat in its 5' untranslated region (UTR). CHO cells transfected with constructs encompassing the RELN 5'UTR with 4-to-13 GGC repeats upstream of the luciferase reporter gene show declining luciferase activity with increasing GGC repeat number (P autism.

  7. Hypoxia-regulated target genes implicated in tumor metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Ya-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxia is an important microenvironmental factor that induces cancer metastasis. Hypoxia/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α regulates many important steps of the metastatic processes, especially epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT that is one of the crucial mechanisms to cause early stage of tumor metastasis. To have a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia-regulated metastasis, various hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes are categorized into different classes including transcription factors, histone modifiers, enzymes, receptors, kinases, small GTPases, transporters, adhesion molecules, surface molecules, membrane proteins, and microRNAs. Different roles of these target genes are described with regards to their relationship to hypoxia-induced metastasis. We hope that this review will provide a framework for further exploration of hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes and a comprehensive view of the metastatic picture induced by hypoxia.

  8. Gene expression profiles of the developing human retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng; LI Huiming; LIU Wenwen; XU Ping; HU Gengxi; CHENG Yidong; JIA Libin; HUANG Qian

    2004-01-01

    Retina is a multilayer and highly specialized tissue important in converting light into neural signals. In humans, the critical period for the formation of complex multiplayer structure takes place during embryogenesis between 12 and 28 weeks. The morphologic changes during retinal development in humans have been studied but little is known about the molecular events essential for the formation of the retina. To gain further insights into this process, cDNA microarrays containing 16361 human gene probes were used to measure the gene expression levels in retinas. Of the 16361 genes, 68.7%, 71.4% and 69.7% showed positive hybridization with cDNAs made from 12-16 week fetal, 22-26 week fetal and adult retinas. A total of 814 genes showed a minimum of 3-fold changes between the lowest and highest expression levels among three time points and among them, 106 genes had expression levels with the hybridization intensity above 100 at one or more time points. The clustering analysis suggested that the majority of differentially expressed genes were down-regulated during the retinal development. The differentially expressed genes were further classified according to functions of known genes, and were ranked in decreasing order according to frequency: development, differentiation, signal transduction, protein synthesis and translation, metabolism, DNA binding and transcription, DNA synthesis-repair-recombination, immuno-response, ion channel- transport, cell receptor, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, pro-oncogene, stress and apoptosis related genes. Among these 106 differentially expressed genes, 60 are already present in NEI retina cDNA or EST Databank but the remaining 46 genes are absent and thus identified as "function unknown". To validate gene expression data from the microarray, real-time RT-PCR was performed for 46 "function unknown" genes and 6 known retina specific expression genes, and β-actin was used as internal control. Twenty-seven of these genes showed very similar

  9. Ocular gene transfer in the spotlight: implications of newspaper content for clinical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminy, Shelly; Bubela, Tania

    2014-07-16

    Ocular gene transfer clinical trials are raising hopes for blindness treatments and attracting media attention. News media provide an accessible health information source for patients and the public, but are often criticized for overemphasizing benefits and underplaying risks of novel biomedical interventions. Overly optimistic portrayals of unproven interventions may influence public and patient expectations; the latter may cause patients to downplay risks and over-emphasize benefits, with implications for informed consent for clinical trials. We analyze the news media communications landscape about ocular gene transfer and make recommendations for improving communications between clinicians and potential trial participants in light of media coverage. We analyzed leading newspaper articles about ocular gene transfer (1990-2012) from United States (n = 55), Canada (n = 26), and United Kingdom (n = 77) from Factiva and Canadian Newsstand databases using pre-defined coding categories. We evaluated the content of newspaper articles about ocular gene transfer for hereditary retinopathies, exploring representations of framing techniques, research design, risks/benefits, and translational timelines. The dominant frame in 61% of stories was a celebration of progress, followed by human-interest in 30% of stories. Missing from the positive frames were explanations of research design; articles conflated clinical research with treatment. Conflicts-of-interest and funding sources were similarly omitted. Attention was directed to the benefits of gene transfer, while risks were only reported in 43% of articles. A range of visual outcomes was described from slowing vision loss to cure, but the latter was the most frequently represented even though it is clinically infeasible. Despite the prominence of visual benefit portrayals, 87% of the articles failed to provide timelines for the commencement of clinical trials or for clinical implementation. Our analysis confirms

  10. Regulation of the clock gene expression in human adipose tissue by weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, O; Gögebakan, Ö; Sucher, S; Groth, J; Murahovschi, V; Kessler, K; Osterhoff, M; Rudovich, N; Kramer, A; Pfeiffer, A F H

    2016-06-01

    The circadian clock coordinates numerous metabolic processes to adapt physiological responses to light-dark and feeding regimens and is itself regulated by metabolic cues. The implication of the circadian clock in the regulation of energy balance and body weight is widely studied in rodents but not in humans. Here we investigated (1) whether the expression of clock genes in human adipose tissue is changed by weight loss and (2) whether these alterations are associated with metabolic parameters. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of weight loss on an 800 kcal per day hypocaloric diet (plus 200 g per day vegetables) at the same time of the day. Fifty overweight subjects who lost at least 8% weight after 8 weeks were selected for the study. The expression of 10 clock genes and key metabolic and inflammatory genes in adipose tissue was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The expression of core clock genes PER2 and NR1D1 was increased after the weight loss. Correlations of PERIOD expression with body mass index (BMI) and serum total, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and of NR1D1 expression with total and LDL cholesterol were found that became non-significant after correction for multiple testing. Clock gene expression levels and their weight loss-induced changes tightly correlated with each other and with genes involved in fat metabolism (FASN, CPT1A, LPL, PPARG, PGC1A, ADIPOQ), energy metabolism (SIRT1), autophagy (LC3A, LC3B) and inflammatory response (NFKB1, NFKBIA, NLRP3, EMR1). Clock gene expression in human SAT is regulated by body weight changes and associated with BMI, serum cholesterol levels and the expression of metabolic and inflammatory genes. Our data confirm the tight crosstalk between molecular clock and metabolic and inflammatory pathways involved in adapting adipose tissue metabolism to changes of the energy intake in humans.

  11. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  12. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Harold D; Booton, S Erin; Boone, Braden E; Breyer, Joan P; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P; Shappell, Scott B; Smith, Jeffrey R; Hayward, Simon W

    2009-12-21

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  13. Global gene expression profiling of individual human oocytes and embryos demonstrates heterogeneity in early development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Shaw

    Full Text Available Early development in humans is characterised by low and variable embryonic viability, reflected in low fecundity and high rates of miscarriage, relative to other mammals. Data from assisted reproduction programmes provides additional evidence that this is largely mediated at the level of embryonic competence and is highly heterogeneous among embryos. Understanding the basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in a number of areas including: the regulation of early human development, disorders of pregnancy, assisted reproduction programmes, the long term health of children which may be programmed in early development, and the molecular basis of pluripotency in human stem cell populations. We have therefore investigated global gene expression profiles using polyAPCR amplification and microarray technology applied to individual human oocytes and 4-cell and blastocyst stage embryos. In order to explore the basis of any variability in detail, each developmental stage is replicated in triplicate. Our data show that although transcript profiles are highly stage-specific, within each stage they are relatively variable. We describe expression of a number of gene families and pathways including apoptosis, cell cycle and amino acid metabolism, which are variably expressed and may be reflective of embryonic developmental competence. Overall, our data suggest that heterogeneity in human embryo developmental competence is reflected in global transcript profiles, and that the vast majority of existing human embryo gene expression data based on pooled oocytes and embryos need to be reinterpreted.

  14. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  15. Nutrition, epigenetics, and developmental plasticity: implications for understanding human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdge, Graham C; Lillycrop, Karen A

    2010-08-21

    There is considerable evidence for induction of differential risk of noncommunicable diseases in humans by variation in the quality of the early life environment. Studies in animal models show that induction and stability of induced changes in the phenotype of the offspring involve altered epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation and covalent modifications of histones. These findings indicate that such epigenetic changes are highly gene specific and function at the level of individual CpG dinucleotides. Interventions using supplementation with folic acid or methyl donors during pregnancy, or folic acid after weaning, alter the phenotype and epigenotype induced by maternal dietary constraint during gestation. This suggests a possible means for reducing risk of induced noncommunicable disease, although the design and conduct of such interventions may require caution. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent advances in understanding the mechanism that underlies the early life origins of disease and to place these studies in a broader life-course context.

  16. Novel definition files for human GeneChips based on GeneAnnot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Sergio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvements in genome sequence annotation revealed discrepancies in the original probeset/gene assignment in Affymetrix microarray and the existence of differences between annotations and effective alignments of probes and transcription products. In the current generation of Affymetrix human GeneChips, most probesets include probes matching transcripts from more than one gene and probes which do not match any transcribed sequence. Results We developed a novel set of custom Chip Definition Files (CDF and the corresponding Bioconductor libraries for Affymetrix human GeneChips, based on the information contained in the GeneAnnot database. GeneAnnot-based CDFs are composed of unique custom-probesets, including only probes matching a single gene. Conclusion GeneAnnot-based custom CDFs solve the problem of a reliable reconstruction of expression levels and eliminate the existence of more than one probeset per gene, which often leads to discordant expression signals for the same transcript when gene differential expression is the focus of the analysis. GeneAnnot CDFs are freely distributed and fully compliant with Affymetrix standards and all available software for gene expression analysis. The CDF libraries are available from http://www.xlab.unimo.it/GA_CDF, along with supplementary information (CDF libraries, installation guidelines and R code, CDF statistics, and analysis results.

  17. Structure of the human 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene (HPD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, H.; Endo, F.; Matsuda, I. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)

    1994-10-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. The activity of this enzyme is expressed mainly in the liver and developmentally regulated in mammals, and a genetic deficiency in this enzyme in humans and mice leads to hereditary tyrosinemia type 3. Using human HPD cDNA as a probe, a chromosomal gene related to HPD was isolated from human gene libraries. The human HPD gene is over 30 kb long and is split into 14 exons. The extract sizes and boundaries of exon blocks were determined, and all of the splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the GT/AG rule. Analysis of the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the gene suggests that expression of the gene is regulated by hepatocyte-specific and liver-enriched transcription factors, as well as by hormones. These features of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene are similar to those of other genes that are specifically expressed in hepatocytes and that are developmentally regulated. 41 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Translational selection in human: More pronounced in housekeeping genes

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Lina

    2014-07-10

    Background: Translational selection is a ubiquitous and significant mechanism to regulate protein expression in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. Recent evidence has shown that translational selection is weakly operative in highly expressed genes in human and other vertebrates. However, it remains unclear whether translational selection acts differentially on human genes depending on their expression patterns.Results: Here we report that human housekeeping (HK) genes that are strictly defined as genes that are expressed ubiquitously and consistently in most or all tissues, are under stronger translational selection.Conclusions: These observations clearly show that translational selection is also closely associated with expression pattern. Our results suggest that human HK genes are more efficiently and/or accurately translated into proteins, which will inevitably open up a new understanding of HK genes and the regulation of gene expression.Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Yuan Yuan, Baylor College of Medicine; Han Liang, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (nominated by Dr Laura Landweber) Eugene Koonin, NCBI, NLM, NIH, United States of America Sandor Pongor, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and biotechnology (ICGEB), Italy. © 2014 Ma et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Are mice pigmentary genes throwing light on humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose S

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the rapid advances made in the molecular genetics of inherited disorders of hypo and hyperpigmentation during the past three years are reviewed. The main focus is on studies in mice as compared to homologues in humans. The main hypomelanotic diseases included are, piebaldism (white spotting due to mutations of c-KIT, PDGF and MGF genes; vitiligo (microphathalmia mice mutations of c-Kit and c-fms genes; Waardenburg syndrome (splotch locus mutations of mice PAX-3 or human Hup-2 genes; albinism (mutations of tyrosinase genes, Menkes disease (Mottled mouse, premature graying (mutations in light/brown locus/gp75/ TRP-1; Griscelli disease (mutations in TRP-1 and steel; Prader-willi and Angelman syndromes, tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism and hypomelanosis of lto (mutations of pink-eyed dilution gene/mapping to human chromosomes 15 q 11.2 - q12; and human platelet storage pool deficiency diseases due to defects in pallidin, an erythrocyte membrane protein (pallid mouse / mapping to 4.2 pallidin gene. The genetic characterization of hypermelanosis includes, neurofibromatosis 1 (Café-au-lait spots and McCune-Albright Syndrome. Rapid evolving knowledge about pigmentary genes will increase further the knowledge about these hypo and hyperpigmentary disorders.

  20. Identification of Haemophilus ducreyi genes expressed during human infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Margaret E; Fortney, Kate R; Harrison, Alistair; Janowicz, Diane M; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2008-04-01

    To identify Haemophilus ducreyi transcripts that are expressed during human infection, we used selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) with RNA isolated from pustules obtained from three volunteers infected with H. ducreyi, and with RNA isolated from broth-grown bacteria used to infect volunteers. With SCOTS, competitive hybridization of tissue-derived and broth-derived sequences identifies genes that may be preferentially expressed in vivo. Among the three tissue specimens, we identified 531 genes expressed in vivo. Southern blot analysis of 60 genes from each tissue showed that 87 % of the identified genes hybridized better with cDNA derived from tissue specimens than with cDNA derived from broth-grown bacteria. RT-PCR on nine additional pustules confirmed in vivo expression of 10 of 11 selected genes in other volunteers. Of the 531 genes, 139 were identified in at least two volunteers. These 139 genes fell into several functional categories, including biosynthesis and metabolism, regulation, and cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, cell division, DNA replication and repair, and transport. Detection of genes involved in anaerobic and aerobic respiration indicated that H. ducreyi likely encounters both microenvironments within the pustule. Other genes detected suggest an increase in DNA damage and stress in vivo. Genes involved in virulence in other bacterial pathogens and 32 genes encoding hypothetical proteins were identified, and may represent novel virulence factors. We identified three genes, lspA1, lspA2 and tadA, known to be required for virulence in humans. This is the first study to broadly define transcripts expressed by H. ducreyi in humans.

  1. Localization of b-defensin genes in non human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ventura

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Defensins are a family of host defence peptides that play an important role in the innate immunity of mammalian and avian species. In humans, four b-defensins have been isolated so far, corresponding to the products of the genes DEFB1 (h-BD1, GenBank accession number NM_005218; DEFB4 (h-Bd2, NM_004942.2, DEFB103 (h-BD3, NM_018661; and DEFB104 (hBD4, NM_080389 mapping on chromosome 8p23.22. We have localized b- defensin genes on metaphasic chromosomes of great apes and several non-human primate species to determine their physical mapping. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization and BAC probes containing the four b-defensin genes, we have mapped the homologous regions to the b-defensin genes on chromosome 8p23-p.22 in non-human primates, while no signals were detected on prosimians chromosomes.

  2. Thermotolerance of human myometrium: implications for minimally invasive uterine therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aaron C.; Grisez, Brian T.; McMillan, Kathleen; Chill, Nicholas; Harclerode, Tyler P.; Radabaugh, Rebecca; Jones, Ryan M.; Coad, James E.

    2013-02-01

    Endometrial ablation has gained significant clinical acceptance over the last decade as a minimally invasive treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding. To improve upon current thermal injury modeling, it is important to better characterize the myometrium's thermotolerance. The extent of myometrial thermal injury was determined across a spectrum of thermal histories/doses (time-temperature combinations). Fresh extirpated human myometrium was obtained from 13 subjects who underwent a previous scheduled benign hysterectomy. Within two hours of hysterectomy, the unfixed myometrium was treated in a stabilized saline bath with temperatures ranging from 45-70 °C and time intervals from 30- 150 seconds. The time-temperature combinations were selected to simulate treatment times under 2.5 minutes. A total of six such thermal matrices, each comprised of 45 time-temperature combinations, were prepared for evaluation. The treated myometrium was cryosectioned for nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) staining to assess for thermal respiratory enzyme inactivation. Image analysis was subsequently used to quantitatively assess the stained myometrium's capacity to metabolize the tetrazolium at each time-temperature combination. This colorimetric data was then used as marker of cellular viability and determine survival parameters with implications for developing minimally invasive uterine therapies.

  3. Implication of human handling on packaged sausage rolls during sale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coolborn AKHARAIYI FRED

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In other to identify the implication of human handling of packaged sausage rolls after production, a microbiological safety evaluation was carried out on sausage rolls sold on street and in shops. Among the sausage rolls, gala purchased from street vendors has the highest bacterial load of 2.82 × 104 CFU/g and 4.3 × 106 spore/g of fungal load, followed by meaty with bacterial load of 1.71 × 104 CFU/g and fungal load of 1.6 × 105 spore/g and was least in rite sausage roll with 1.46 × 104 CFU/g and 1 × 105 spore/g bacterial and fungal loads respectively. Seventeen bacteria species were isolated from both street vended and shop sold sausage rolls, the isolates identified including: Bacillus cereus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella ozaenae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Plesiomonas shigelloides, Moraxella catarhalis, Bacillus substilis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Aeromonas anaerogenes, Aerococcus viridans and Azomonas agilis. Five fungi species were isolated from street vended sausage rolls only. The fungal species are Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium italicum and Gliocephalis spp. From this study, street vended samples have higher microbial contamination than shop sold sausage rolls due to improper handling during sales.

  4. Functional Insight From Fruit Flies on Human ADHD Candidate Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2015-01-01

    , and increased risk of mental comorbidities, makes ADHD a disorder with high individual and societal costs. We use Drosophila melanogaster as a model to investigate the phenotypic consequences of gene disruption of 14 genes with human orthologs, selected by their proposed contribution to increased risk...... for other mutants. Decreased activity level, when treated with dexamphetamine, is seen when using other ADHD animal models. Our findings suggest involvement of the proposed candidate genes Genes, Brain, and Behavior 2015 36 Talk Abstracts in hyperactivity in D. melanogaster, providing functional evidence...

  5. Clinical and ethical implications of mitochondrial gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Wolf, Don P

    2014-01-01

    Inherited diseases caused by mitochondrial gene (mtDNA) mutations affect at least 1 in 5000-10,000 children and are associated with severe clinical symptoms. Novel reproductive techniques designed to replace mutated mtDNA in oocytes or early embryos have been proposed to prevent transmission of disease from parents to their children. Here we review the efficacy and safety of these approaches and their associated ethical and regulatory issues.

  6. Evolutionary Origins of Cancer Driver Genes and Implications for Cancer Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Yi; Jiang, Ling-Han; Zhou, Xiong-Hui; Cui, Ze-Jia; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2017-07-14

    The cancer atavistic theory suggests that carcinogenesis is a reverse evolution process. It is thus of great interest to explore the evolutionary origins of cancer driver genes and the relevant mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis. Moreover, the evolutionary features of cancer driver genes could be helpful in selecting cancer biomarkers from high-throughput data. In this study, through analyzing the cancer endogenous molecular networks, we revealed that the subnetwork originating from eukaryota could control the unlimited proliferation of cancer cells, and the subnetwork originating from eumetazoa could recapitulate the other hallmarks of cancer. In addition, investigations based on multiple datasets revealed that cancer driver genes were enriched in genes originating from eukaryota, opisthokonta, and eumetazoa. These results have important implications for enhancing the robustness of cancer prognosis models through selecting the gene signatures by the gene age information.

  7. Epidemiological and functional implications of molecular variants of human papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sichero L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus genomes are classified into molecular variants when they present more than 98% of similarity to the prototype sequence within the L1 gene. Comparative nucleotide sequence analyses of these viruses have elucidated some features of their phylogenetic relationship. In addition, human papillomavirus intratype variability has also been used as an important tool in epidemiological studies of viral transmission, persistence and progression to clinically relevant cervical lesions. Until the present, little has been published concerning the functional significance of molecular variants. It has been shown that nucleotide variability within the long control region leads to differences in the binding affinity of some cellular transcriptional factors and to the enhancement of the expression of E6 and E7 oncogenes. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed differences in E6 and E7 biochemical and biological properties among molecular variants. Nevertheless, further correlation with additional functional information is needed to evaluate the significance of genome intratypic variability. These results are also important for the development of vaccines and to determine the extent to which immunization with L1 virus-like particles of one variant could induce antibodies that cross-neutralize other variants.

  8. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Michelle Ogawa; Eric Joseph Vallender

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated...

  9. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  10. Homeobox gene Dlx-2 is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Sung-Chul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to tumor-suppressive apoptosis and autophagic cell death, necrosis promotes tumor progression by releasing the pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, and its presence in tumor patients is associated with poor prognosis. Thus, necrosis has important clinical implications in tumor development; however, its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Results In the present study, we show that Distal-less 2 (Dlx-2, a homeobox gene of the Dlx family that is involved in embryonic development, is induced in cancer cell lines dependently of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to glucose deprivation (GD, one of the metabolic stresses occurring in solid tumors. Increased Dlx-2 expression was also detected in the inner regions, which experience metabolic stress, of human tumors and of a multicellular tumor spheroid, an in vitro model of solid tumors. Dlx-2 short hairpin RNA (shRNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced increase in propidium iodide-positive cell population and HMGB1 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, indicating the important role(s of Dlx-2 in metabolic stress-induced necrosis. Dlx-2 shRNA appeared to exert its anti-necrotic effects by preventing metabolic stress-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS, which are responsible for triggering necrosis. Conclusions These results suggest that Dlx-2 may be involved in tumor progression via the regulation of metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

  11. SULFs in human neoplasia: implication as progression and prognosis factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schved Jean-François

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sulfation pattern of heparan sulfate chains influences signaling events mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans located on cell surface. SULF1 and SULF2 are two endosulfatases able to cleave specific 6-O sulfate groups within the heparan chains. Their action can modulate signaling processes, many of which with key relevance for cancer development and expansion. SULF1 has been associated with tumor suppressor effects in various models of cancer, whereas SULF2 dysregulation was in relation with protumorigenic actions. However, other observations argue for contradictory effects of these sulfatases in cancer, suggesting the complexity of their action in the tumor microenvironment. Methods We compared the expression of the genes encoding SULF1, SULF2 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans in a large panel of cancer samples to their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the data obtained from two cohorts of newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma patients, the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database, the Amazonia data base and the ITTACA database. We also analysed prognosis data in relation with these databases. Results We demonstrated that SULF2 expression in primary multiple myeloma cells was associated with a poor prognosis in two independent large cohorts of patients. It remained an independent predictor when considered together with conventional multiple myeloma prognosis factors. Besides, we observed an over-representation of SULF2 gene expression in skin cancer, colorectal carcinoma, testicular teratoma and liver cancer compared to their normal tissue counterpart. We found that SULF2 was significantly over-expressed in high grade uveal melanoma compared to low grade and in patients presenting colorectal carcinoma compared to benign colon adenoma. We observed that, in addition to previous observations, SULF1 gene expression was increased in T prolymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia

  12. A gene expression signature shared by human mature oocytes and embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantesco Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first week of human pre-embryo development is characterized by the induction of totipotency and then pluripotency. The understanding of this delicate process will have far reaching implication for in vitro fertilization and regenerative medicine. Human mature MII oocytes and embryonic stem (ES cells are both able to achieve the feat of cell reprogramming towards pluripotency, either by somatic cell nuclear transfer or by cell fusion, respectively. Comparison of the transcriptome of these two cell types may highlight genes that are involved in pluripotency initiation. Results Based on a microarray compendium of 205 samples, we compared the gene expression profile of mature MII oocytes and human ES cells (hESC to that of somatic tissues. We identified a common oocyte/hESC gene expression profile, which included a strong cell cycle signature, genes associated with pluripotency such as LIN28 and TDGF1, a large chromatin remodelling network (TOP2A, DNMT3B, JARID2, SMARCA5, CBX1, CBX5, 18 different zinc finger transcription factors, including ZNF84, and several still poorly annotated genes such as KLHL7, MRS2, or the Selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SEPHS1. Interestingly, a large set of genes was also found to code for proteins involved in the ubiquitination and proteasome pathway. Upon hESC differentiation into embryoid bodies, the transcription of this pathway declined. In vitro, we observed a selective sensitivity of hESC to the inhibition of the activity of the proteasome. Conclusion These results shed light on the gene networks that are concurrently overexpressed by the two human cell types with somatic cell reprogramming properties.

  13. Human gene correlation analysis (HGCA): a tool for the identification of transcriptionally co-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Malatras, Apostolos; Karelas, Alexandros; Kostadima, Myrto-Areti; Schneider, Reinhard; Kossida, Sophia

    2012-06-06

    Bioinformatics and high-throughput technologies such as microarray studies allow the measure of the expression levels of large numbers of genes simultaneously, thus helping us to understand the molecular mechanisms of various biological processes in a cell. We calculate the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r-value) between probe set signal values from Affymetrix Human Genome Microarray samples and cluster the human genes according to the r-value correlation matrix using the Neighbour Joining (NJ) clustering method. A hyper-geometric distribution is applied on the text annotations of the probe sets to quantify the term overrepresentations. The aim of the tool is the identification of closely correlated genes for a given gene of interest and/or the prediction of its biological function, which is based on the annotations of the respective gene cluster. Human Gene Correlation Analysis (HGCA) is a tool to classify human genes according to their coexpression levels and to identify overrepresented annotation terms in correlated gene groups. It is available at: http://biobank-informatics.bioacademy.gr/coexpression/.

  14. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  15. Study of the Gene Expression Profile of Human Ovarian Carcinoma by a Gene Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenhua Xu; Hanzhou Mou; Chihong Zhu; Lijuan Qian; Zhengyan Yang; Ye Ying; Xianglin Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the difference in gene expression between human ovarian carcinoma and normal ovarian tissues, and screen the novel associated genes by cDNA microarrays.METHODS Total RNA from 10 cases of ovarian cancer and from normal ovarian tissues were extracted by a single step method. The cDNA was retro-transcribed from an equal quantity of mRNA derived from the 10 cases of ovarian carcinoma and normal ovarian tissues, followed by labeling the cDNA strands with Cy5 and Cy3 fluorescence as probes. The mixed probes were hybridized with BiostarH 8464 dot human somatic cell genes.Fluorescence signals were assessed by a ScanArray 4000 laser scanner and the images analyzed by Gene Pix Pro 3.0 software with a digital computer.RESULTS By applying the cDNA microarray we found a total of 185 genes for which expression levels differed more than 5 times comparing human ovarian carcinoma with normal ovarian epithelium. Among these genes 86 were up-regulated >5 times and 99 were down regulated <0.2.CONCLUSION The cDNA microarray technique is effective in screening the differential gene expression between human ovarian cancers and normal ovarian epithelium. It is suggested that these genes identified are related to the genesis and development of ovarian carcinoma.

  16. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  17. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  18. Therapeutic role of rifaximin in inflammatory bowel disease: clinical implication of human pregnane X receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Shah, Yatrik M; Ma, Xiaochao; Pang, Xiaoyan; Tanaka, Toshiya; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Krausz, Kristopher W; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2010-10-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a human PXR activator, is in clinical trials for treatment of IBD and has demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease and active ulcerative colitis. In the current study, the protective and therapeutic role of rifaximin in IBD and its respective mechanism were investigated. PXR-humanized (hPXR), wild-type, and Pxr-null mice were treated with rifaximin in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced IBD models to determine the protective function of human PXR activation in IBD. The therapeutic role of rifaximin was further evaluated in DSS-treated hPXR and Pxr-null mice. Results demonstrated that preadministration of rifaximin ameliorated the clinical hallmarks of colitis in DSS- and TNBS-treated hPXR mice as determined by body weight loss and assessment of diarrhea, rectal bleeding, colon length, and histology. In addition, higher survival rates and recovery from colitis symptoms were observed in hPXR mice, but not in Pxr-null mice, when rifaximin was administered after the onset of symptoms. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) target genes were markedly down-regulated in hPXR mice by rifaximin treatment. In vitro NF-κB reporter assays demonstrated inhibition of NF-κB activity after rifaximin treatment in colon-derived cell lines expressing hPXR. These findings demonstrated the preventive and therapeutic role of rifaximin on IBD through human PXR-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB signaling cascade, thus suggesting that human PXR may be an effective target for the treatment of IBD.

  19. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  20. Hidden Markov Models for Human Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the sequential structure of human genomic DNA by hidden Markov models. We apply models of widely different design: conventional left-right constructs and models with a built-in periodic architecture. The models are trained on segments of DNA sequences extracted such that they cover...

  1. Crowdsourcing the Moral Limits of Human Gene Editing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengst, Eric T

    2017-05-01

    In 2015, a flourish of "alarums and excursions" by the scientific community propelled CRISPR/Cas9 and other new gene-editing techniques into public attention. At issue were two kinds of potential gene-editing experiments in humans: those making inheritable germ-line modifications and those designed to enhance human traits beyond what is necessary for health and healing. The scientific consensus seemed to be that while research to develop safe and effective human gene editing should continue, society's moral uncertainties about these two kinds of experiments needed to be better resolved before clinical trials of either type should be attempted. In the United States, the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) convened the Committee on Human Gene Editing: Scientific, Medical and Ethical Considerations to pursue that resolution. The committee's 2017 consensus report has been widely interpreted as "opening the door" to inheritable human genetic modification and holding a line against enhancement interventions. But on a close reading it does neither. There are two reasons for this eccentric conclusion, both of which depend upon the strength of the committee's commitment to engaging diverse public voices in the gene-editing policy-making process. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  2. Analysis of Kinase Gene Expression in the Frontal Cortex of Suicide Victims: Implications of Fear and Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang eChoi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a serious public health issue that results from an interaction between multiple risk factors including individual vulnerabilities to complex feelings of hopelessness, fear and stress. Although kinase genes have been implicated in fear and stress, including the consolidation and extinction of fearful memories, expression profiles of those genes in the brain of suicide victims are less clear. Using gene expression microarray data from the Online Stanley Genomics Database (www.stanleygenomics.org and a quantitative PCR, we investigated the expression profiles of multiple kinase genes including the calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase (CAMK, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and the protein kinase C (PKC in the prefrontal cortex (PFC of mood disorder patients died with suicide (n=45 and without suicide (N=38. We also investigated the expression pattern of the same genes in the PFC of developing humans ranging in age from birth to 49 year (n=46. The expression levels of CAMK2B, CDK5, MAPK9, and PRKCI were increased in the PFC of suicide victims as compared to non-suicide controls (FDR-adjusted p < 0.05, fold change > 1.1. Those genes also showed changes in expression pattern during the postnatal development (FDR-adjusted p < 0.05. These results suggest that multiple kinase genes undergo age-dependent changes in normal brains as well as pathological changes in suicide brains. These findings may provide an important link to protein kinases known to be important for the development of fear memory, stress-associated neural plasticity and up-regulation in the PFC of suicide victims. More research is needed to better understand the functional role of these kinase genes that may be associated with the pathophysiology of suicide.

  3. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  4. Relation between HLA genes, human skin volatiles and attractiveness of humans to malaria mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Beijleveld, H.; Qiu, Y.T.; Maliepaard, C.A.; Verduyn, W.; Haasnoot, G.W.; Claas, F.H.J.; Mumm, R.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Takken, W.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Smallegange, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical cues are considered to be the most important cues for mosquitoes to find their hosts and humans can be ranked for attractiveness to mosquitoes based on the chemical cues they emit. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are considered to be involved in the regulation of human body odor and may

  5. Clinical and therapeutic implications of presymptomatic gene testing for familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Luís, Maria de Lourdes; Conceição, Isabel; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2003-08-01

    Presymptomatic gene testing for familial amyloidotic polyneuropathies (FAP) is integrated in genetic counseling protocols common to other "Later onset, hereditary, autosomal dominant, no cure diseases" namely Huntington's Disease (HD) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD). However, presymptomatic gene testing has specific clinical and therapeutic implications for FAP. Moreover, at least in Portugal, FAP ATTR Val30Met is a serious health problem. The most important implications are: the possibility of family planning including prenatal and preimplantation diagnosis; treatment with liver transplantation (TX); clinical follow-up according to protocols for early diagnosis which will allow patients to access therapy in useful time. This concept of useful time in FAP treatment is discussed. The growing possibilities of different therapeutic approaches are considered. In conclusion, presymptomatic gene testing for FAP may have a positive impact on candidate quality and prolongation of life, and on the future of disease studies.

  6. Changes of multiple genes in human gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mutual relation of the changesamong multiple genes in human gastric carcinomas (GC). Methods: By means of software package about social science (SPSS) and statistics analysis system (SAS), the mutual relation of the expression of oncogenes (p21, p185) and tumor suppressor genes (RB, p53, p16, nm23) in 78 GC is discussed. Results: There existed correlations among some genes, i.e., p21 and p185, RB and p16, p16 and p53 as well as p16 and nm23; It is relatively uncommon that the carcinogenesis of GC simultaneously related to more changes of multiple genes; The inactivation of p16 gene was independent factor to predict the metastasis of lymphaden, the mutation of p53 gene and the inactivation of p16 gene were independent factors to predict the invasive depth. Conclusion: There are not only the changes of multiple genes including oncogenes activation and tumor suppressor genes inactivation, but also they may play an important role in carcinogenesis of GC through mutual cooperation. The inactivation of p16 gene is one of the most useful index to predict the prognosis of patient with GC.

  7. ANALYSES ON DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED GENES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xu-li; DING Xiao-wen; XU Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular etiology of breast cancer by way of studying the differential expression and initial function of the related genes in the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-eight human tumor related genes were chosen for preparation of the oligochips probe. mRNA was extracted from 16 breast cancer tissues and the corresponding normal breast tissues, and cDNA probe was prepared through reverse-transcription and hybridized with the gene chip. A laser focused fluorescent scanner was used to scan the chip. The different gene expressions were thereafter automatically compared and analyzed between the two sample groups. Cy3/Cy5>3.5 meant significant up-regulation. Cy3/Cy5<0.25 meant significant down-regulation. Results: The comparison between the breast cancer tissues and their corresponding normal tissues showed that 84 genes had differential expression in the Chip. Among the differently expressed genes, there were 4 genes with significant down-regulation and 6 with significant up-regulation. Compared with normal breast tissues, differentially expressed genes did partially exist in the breast cancer tissues. Conclusion: Changes in multi-gene expression regulations take place during the occurrence and development of breast cancer; and the research on related genes can help understanding the mechanism of tumor occurrence.

  8. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  9. Origins of De Novo Genes in Human and Chimpanzee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ruiz-Orera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The birth of new genes is an important motor of evolutionary innovation. Whereas many new genes arise by gene duplication, others originate at genomic regions that did not contain any genes or gene copies. Some of these newly expressed genes may acquire coding or non-coding functions and be preserved by natural selection. However, it is yet unclear which is the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of de novo gene emergence. In order to obtain a comprehensive view of this process, we have performed in-depth sequencing of the transcriptomes of four mammalian species--human, chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse--and subsequently compared the assembled transcripts and the corresponding syntenic genomic regions. This has resulted in the identification of over five thousand new multiexonic transcriptional events in human and/or chimpanzee that are not observed in the rest of species. Using comparative genomics, we show that the expression of these transcripts is associated with the gain of regulatory motifs upstream of the transcription start site (TSS and of U1 snRNP sites downstream of the TSS. In general, these transcripts show little evidence of purifying selection, suggesting that many of them are not functional. However, we find signatures of selection in a subset of de novo genes which have evidence of protein translation. Taken together, the data support a model in which frequently-occurring new transcriptional events in the genome provide the raw material for the evolution of new proteins.

  10. Origins of De Novo Genes in Human and Chimpanzee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Orera, Jorge; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Chiva, Cristina; Sabidó, Eduard; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald; Marqués-Bonet, Tomàs; Albà, M Mar

    2015-12-01

    The birth of new genes is an important motor of evolutionary innovation. Whereas many new genes arise by gene duplication, others originate at genomic regions that did not contain any genes or gene copies. Some of these newly expressed genes may acquire coding or non-coding functions and be preserved by natural selection. However, it is yet unclear which is the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of de novo gene emergence. In order to obtain a comprehensive view of this process, we have performed in-depth sequencing of the transcriptomes of four mammalian species--human, chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse--and subsequently compared the assembled transcripts and the corresponding syntenic genomic regions. This has resulted in the identification of over five thousand new multiexonic transcriptional events in human and/or chimpanzee that are not observed in the rest of species. Using comparative genomics, we show that the expression of these transcripts is associated with the gain of regulatory motifs upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) and of U1 snRNP sites downstream of the TSS. In general, these transcripts show little evidence of purifying selection, suggesting that many of them are not functional. However, we find signatures of selection in a subset of de novo genes which have evidence of protein translation. Taken together, the data support a model in which frequently-occurring new transcriptional events in the genome provide the raw material for the evolution of new proteins.

  11. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  12. Human estrogen sulfotransferase gene (STE): Cloning, structure, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Chengtao; Aksoy, I.A.; Weinshilboum, M. [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Sulfation is an important pathway in the metabolism of estrogens. We recently cloned a human liver estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) cDNA. We have now determined the structure and chromosomal localization of the EST gene, STE, as a step toward molecular genetic studies of the regulation of EST in humans. STE spans approximately 20 kb and consists of 8 exons, ranging in length from 95 to 181 bp. The locations of most exon-intron splice junctions within STE are identical to those found in a human phenol ST (PST) gene, STM, and in a rat PST gene. In addition, the locations of five STE introns are also conserved in the human dehydroepiandrosterone (DBEA) ST gene, STD. The 5{prime} flanking region of STE contains one CCAAT and two TATA sequences. The location of one of the TATA box elements is in excellent agreement with the site of transcription initiation as determined by 5{prime}-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. STE was mapped to human chromosome 4q13.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cloning and structural characterization of STE will now make it possible to study potential molecular genetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of EST in human tissues. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Variation and evolution of the ABC transporter genes ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCG2, ABCG5 and ABCG8: implication for pharmacogenetics and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverton, Latoya; Dean, Michael; Moitra, Karobi

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes are ubiquitous in the genomes of all vertebrates. Some of these transporters play a key role in xenobiotic defense and are endowed with the capacity to efflux harmful toxic substances. A major role in the evolution of the vertebrate ABC genes is played by gene duplication. Multiple gene duplication and deletion events have been identified in ABC genes, resulting in either gene birth or gene death indicating that the process of gene evolution is still ongoing in this group of transporters. Additionally, polymorphisms in these genes are linked to variations in expression, function, drug disposition and drug response. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABC genes may be considered as markers of individual risk for adverse drug reactions or susceptibility to complex diseases as they can uniquely influence the quality and quantity of gene product. As the ABC genes continue to evolve, globalization will yield additional migration and racial admixtures that will have far reaching implications for the pharmacogenetics of this unique family of transporters in the context of human health.

  14. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannen, Rosalind F., E-mail: r.f.hannen@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Michael, Anthony E. [Centre for Developmental and Endocrine Signalling, Academic Section of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Clinical Developmental Sciences, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing, St. George' s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, Tooting, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom); Jaulim, Adil [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom); Bhogal, Ranjit [Life Science, Unilever R and D Colworth House, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Burrin, Jacky M. [Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Philpott, Michael P. [Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 2AT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  15. Cancer genes hypermethylated in human embryonic stem cells.

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    Vincenzo Calvanese

    Full Text Available Developmental genes are silenced in embryonic stem cells by a bivalent histone-based chromatin mark. It has been proposed that this mark also confers a predisposition to aberrant DNA promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs in cancer. We report here that silencing of a significant proportion of these TSGs in human embryonic and adult stem cells is associated with promoter DNA hypermethylation. Our results indicate a role for DNA methylation in the control of gene expression in human stem cells and suggest that, for genes repressed by promoter hypermethylation in stem cells in vivo, the aberrant process in cancer could be understood as a defect in establishing an unmethylated promoter during differentiation, rather than as an anomalous process of de novo hypermethylation.

  16. Impact of gene polymorphisms of gonadotropins and their receptors on human reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarini, Livio; Santi, Daniele; Marino, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Gonadotropins and their receptors' genes carry several single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in endocrine genotypes modulating reproductive parameters, diseases, and lifespan leading to important implications for reproductive success and potential relevance during human evolution. Here we illustrate common genotypes of the gonadotropins and gonadotropin receptors' genes and their clinical implications in phenotypes relevant for reproduction such as ovarian cycle length, age of menopause, testosterone levels, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We then discuss their possible role in human reproduction and adaptation to the environment. Gonadotropins and their receptors' variants are differently distributed among human populations. Some hints suggest that they may be the result of natural selection that occurred in ancient times, increasing the individual chance of successful mating, pregnancy, and effective post-natal parental cares. The gender-related differences in the regulation of the reproductive endocrine systems imply that many of these genotypes may lead to sex-dependent effects, increasing the chance of mating and reproductive success in one sex at the expenses of the other sex. Also, we suggest that sexual conflicts within the FSH and LH-choriogonadotropin receptor genes contributed to maintain genotypes linked to subfertility among humans. Because the distribution of polymorphic markers results in a defined geographical pattern due to human migrations rather than natural selection, these polymorphisms may have had only a weak impact on reproductive success. On the contrary, such genotypes could acquire relevant consequences in the modern, developed societies in which parenthood attempts often occur at a later age, during a short, suboptimal reproductive window, making clinical fertility treatments necessary.

  17. The VH and CH immunoglobulin genes of swine: implications for repertoire development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J E; Sun, J; Kacskovics, I; Brown, W R; Navarro, P

    1996-11-01

    Swine have the largest number of IgG subclass genes of all species so far studied but have a single gene for IgA which occurs in two allelic forms that differ in hinge length. Swine also have constant region genes for C mu and C epsilon, but lack a gene homologous to that which encodes IgD in rodents and primates, despite the otherwise high degree of sequence similarity of all other swine CH genes with those of humans. Swine have immunoglobulin genes among species justifies the quest of veterinary immunologists to define the system for their species of interest rather than making extrapolations from mouse and human immune systems.

  18. The Signature of Selection Mediated by Expression on Human Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Urrutia, Araxi O.; Hurst, Laurence D

    2003-01-01

    As the efficacy of natural selection is expected to be a function of population size, in humans it is usually presumed that selection is a weak force and hence that gene characteristics are mostly determined by stochastic forces. In contrast, in species with large population sizes, selection is expected to be a much more effective force. Evidence for this has come from examining how genic parameters vary with expression level, which appears to determine many of a gene's features, such as codo...

  19. Automated Identification of Core Regulatory Genes in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

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    Vipin Narang

    Full Text Available Human gene regulatory networks (GRN can be difficult to interpret due to a tangle of edges interconnecting thousands of genes. We constructed a general human GRN from extensive transcription factor and microRNA target data obtained from public databases. In a subnetwork of this GRN that is active during estrogen stimulation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we benchmarked automated algorithms for identifying core regulatory genes (transcription factors and microRNAs. Among these algorithms, we identified K-core decomposition, pagerank and betweenness centrality algorithms as the most effective for discovering core regulatory genes in the network evaluated based on previously known roles of these genes in MCF-7 biology as well as in their ability to explain the up or down expression status of up to 70% of the remaining genes. Finally, we validated the use of K-core algorithm for organizing the GRN in an easier to interpret layered hierarchy where more influential regulatory genes percolate towards the inner layers. The integrated human gene and miRNA network and software used in this study are provided as supplementary materials (S1 Data accompanying this manuscript.

  20. Retinal structure and function in achromatopsia: implications for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Venki; Wilde, Caroline; Aboshiha, Jonathan; Cowing, Jill; Han, Colin; Langlo, Christopher S; Chana, Ravinder; Davidson, Alice E; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R; Dubra, Alfredo; Rubin, Gary; Webster, Andrew R; Moore, Anthony T; Nardini, Marko; Carroll, Joseph; Michaelides, Michel

    2014-01-01

    To characterize retinal structure and function in achromatopsia (ACHM) in preparation for clinical trials of gene therapy. Cross-sectional study. Forty subjects with ACHM. All subjects underwent spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), microperimetry, and molecular genetic testing. Foveal structure on SD-OCT was graded into 5 distinct categories: (1) continuous inner segment ellipsoid (ISe), (2) ISe disruption, (3) ISe absence, (4) presence of a hyporeflective zone (HRZ), and (5) outer retinal atrophy including retinal pigment epithelial loss. Foveal and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness was measured and presence of hypoplasia determined. Photoreceptor appearance on SD-OCT imaging, foveal and ONL thickness, presence of foveal hypoplasia, retinal sensitivity and fixation stability, and association of these parameters with age and genotype. Forty subjects with a mean age of 24.9 years (range, 6-52 years) were included. Disease-causing variants were found in CNGA3 (n = 18), CNGB3 (n = 15), GNAT2 (n = 4), and PDE6C (n = 1). No variants were found in 2 individuals. In all, 22.5% of subjects had a continuous ISe layer at the fovea, 27.5% had ISe disruption, 20% had an absent ISe layer, 22.5% had an HRZ, and 7.5% had outer retinal atrophy. No significant differences in age (P = 0.77), mean retinal sensitivity (P = 0.21), or fixation stability (P = 0.34) across the 5 SD-OCT categories were evident. No correlation was found between age and foveal thickness (P = 0.84) or between age and foveal ONL thickness (P = 0.12). The lack of a clear association of disruption of retinal structure or function in ACHM with age suggests that the window of opportunity for intervention by gene therapy is wider in some individuals than previously indicated. Therefore, the potential benefit for a given subject is likely to be better predicted by specific measurement of photoreceptor structure rather than simply by age. The ability to directly assess cone photoreceptor

  1. DUF1220-domain copy number implicated in human brain-size pathology and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Laura J; O'Bleness, Majesta S; Davis, Jonathan M; Dickens, C Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Keeney, J G; Jackson, Jay; Sikela, Megan; Raznahan, Armin; Giedd, Jay; Rapoport, Judith; Nagamani, Sandesh S C; Erez, Ayelet; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Sugalski, Rachel; Lupski, James R; Fingerlin, Tasha; Cheung, Sau Wai; Sikela, James M

    2012-09-07

    DUF1220 domains show the largest human-lineage-specific increase in copy number of any protein-coding region in the human genome and map primarily to 1q21, where deletions and reciprocal duplications have been associated with microcephaly and macrocephaly, respectively. Given these findings and the high correlation between DUF1220 copy number and brain size across primate lineages (R(2) = 0.98; p = 1.8 × 10(-6)), DUF1220 sequences represent plausible candidates for underlying 1q21-associated brain-size pathologies. To investigate this possibility, we used specialized bioinformatics tools developed for scoring highly duplicated DUF1220 sequences to implement targeted 1q21 array comparative genomic hybridization on individuals (n = 42) with 1q21-associated microcephaly and macrocephaly. We show that of all the 1q21 genes examined (n = 53), DUF1220 copy number shows the strongest association with brain size among individuals with 1q21-associated microcephaly, particularly with respect to the three evolutionarily conserved DUF1220 clades CON1(p = 0.0079), CON2 (p = 0.0134), and CON3 (p = 0.0116). Interestingly, all 1q21 DUF1220-encoding genes belonging to the NBPF family show significant correlations with frontal-occipital-circumference Z scores in the deletion group. In a similar survey of a nondisease population, we show that DUF1220 copy number exhibits the strongest correlation with brain gray-matter volume (CON1, p = 0.0246; and CON2, p = 0.0334). Notably, only DUF1220 sequences are consistently significant in both disease and nondisease populations. Taken together, these data strongly implicate the loss of DUF1220 copy number in the etiology of 1q21-associated microcephaly and support the view that DUF1220 domains function as general effectors of evolutionary, pathological, and normal variation in brain size. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolutionary Conservation in Genes Underlying Human Psychiatric Disorders

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    Lisa Michelle Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago and thirty one non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in primates supports the hypothesis that schizophrenia and autism are a cost of higher brain function. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  3. Polymorphic cis- and trans-regulation of human gene expression.

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    Vivian G Cheung

    Full Text Available Expression levels of human genes vary extensively among individuals. This variation facilitates analyses of expression levels as quantitative phenotypes in genetic studies where the entire genome can be scanned for regulators without prior knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms, thus enabling the identification of unknown regulatory relationships. Here, we carried out such genetic analyses with a large sample size and identified cis- and trans-acting polymorphic regulators for about 1,000 human genes. We validated the cis-acting regulators by demonstrating differential allelic expression with sequencing of transcriptomes (RNA-Seq and the trans-regulators by gene knockdown, metabolic assays, and chromosome conformation capture analysis. The majority of the regulators act in trans to the target (regulated genes. Most of these trans-regulators were not known to play a role in gene expression regulation. The identification of these regulators enabled the characterization of polymorphic regulation of human gene expression at a resolution that was unattainable in the past.

  4. Schizophrenia susceptibility genes directly implicated in the life cycles of pathogens: cytomegalovirus, influenza, herpes simplex, rubella, and Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, C J

    2009-11-01

    Many genes implicated in schizophrenia can be related to glutamatergic transmission and neuroplasticity, oligodendrocyte function, and other families clearly related to neurobiology and schizophrenia phenotypes. Others appear rather to be involved in the life cycles of the pathogens implicated in the disease. For example, aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), PLA2, SIAT8B, GALNT7, or B3GAT1 metabolize chemical ligands to which the influenza virus, herpes simplex, cytomegalovirus (CMV), rubella, or Toxoplasma gondii bind. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGR/EGFR) is used by the CMV to gain entry to cells, and a CMV gene codes for an interleukin (IL-10) mimic that binds the host cognate receptor, IL10R. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1) is used by herpes simplex. KPNA3 and RANBP5 control the nuclear import of the influenza virus. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) controls the microtubule network that is used by viruses as a route to the nucleus, while DTNBP1, MUTED, and BLOC1S3 regulate endosomal to lysosomal routing that is also important in viral traffic. Neuregulin 1 activates ERBB receptors releasing a factor, EBP1, known to inhibit the influenza virus transcriptase. Other viral or bacterial components bind to genes or proteins encoded by CALR, FEZ1, FYN, HSPA1B, IL2, HTR2A, KPNA3, MED12, MED15, MICB, NQO2, PAX6, PIK3C3, RANBP5, or TP53, while the cerebral infectivity of the herpes simplex virus is modified by Apolipoprotein E (APOE). Genes encoding for proteins related to the innate immune response, including cytokine related (CCR5, CSF2RA, CSF2RB, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL3, IL3RA, IL4, IL10, IL10RA, IL18RAP, lymphotoxin-alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antigens (HLA-A10, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1), and genes involved in antigen processing (angiotensin-converting enzyme and tripeptidyl peptidase 2) are all concerned with defense against invading pathogens. Human microRNAs (Hsa-mir-198 and Hsa-mir-206) are predicted to bind

  5. Gene expression and functional annotation of the human ciliary body epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F Janssen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The ciliary body (CB of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE and pigmented (PE neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatures for the NPE and PE and studied possible new clues for glaucoma. METHODS: We isolated NPE and PE cells from seven healthy human donor eyes using laser dissection microscopy. Next, we performed RNA isolation, amplification, labeling and hybridization against 44×k Agilent microarrays. For microarray conformations, we used a literature study, RT-PCRs, and immunohistochemical stainings. We analyzed the gene expression data with R and with the knowledge database Ingenuity. RESULTS: The gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the NPE and PE were highly similar. We found that the most important functionalities of the NPE and PE were related to developmental processes, neural nature of the tissue, endocrine and metabolic signaling, and immunological functions. In total 1576 genes differed statistically significantly between NPE and PE. From these genes, at least 3 were cell-specific for the NPE and 143 for the PE. Finally, we observed high expression in the (NPE of 35 genes previously implicated in molecular mechanisms related to glaucoma. CONCLUSION: Our gene expression analysis suggested that the NPE and PE of the CB were quite similar. Nonetheless, cell-type specific differences were found. The molecular machineries of the human NPE and PE are involved in a range of neuro-endocrinological, developmental and immunological functions, and perhaps glaucoma.

  6. The gene for human glutaredoxin (GLRX) is localized to human chromosome 5q14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, C.A.; Holmgren, A. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Bajalica, S.; Lagercrantz, J. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-03-05

    Glutaredoxin is a small protein (12 kDa) catalyzing glutathione-dependent disulfide oxidoreduction reactions in a coupled system with NADPH, GSH, and glutathione reductase. A cDNA encoding the human glutaredoxin gene (HGMW-approved symbol GLRX) has recently been isolated and cloned from a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human genomic library in Charon 4A led to the identification of three genomic clones. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes with one genomic clone as a probe, the human glutaredoxin gene was localized to chromosomal region 5q14. This localization at chromosome 5 was in agreement with the somatic cell hybrid analysis, using DNA from a human-hamster and a human-mouse hybrid panel and using a human glutaredoxin cDNA as a probe. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Serotonergic gene variation: implications for personality traits and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesch, K P

    1999-06-01

    Serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important regulator of morphogenetic activities during early central nervous system development, including cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation as well as synapto-genesis. Serotonergic raphe neurons diffusely project to a variety of brain regions (e.g. cortex, amygdala, hippocampus) and play known roles in integrating emotion, cognition, motor function as well as in food intake, sleep, pain, and sexual activity. The diversity of physiologic functions is due to the fact that 5-HT acts as a master control neurotransmitter within a highly complex system of neural communication mediated by multiple pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT receptors, thus orchestrating the activity and interaction of several other neurotransmitter systems. Since proteins involved in the regulation of central serotonergic activity (e.g. enzymes, receptors, transporter) play pivotal role in brain 5-HT homeostasis, polymorphisms in the regulatory regions of their genes resulting in variation of expression and function are likely to influence complex traits, such as temperament/personality and psychopathology.

  8. Clinicopathologic implications of NF1 gene alterations in diffuse gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, M Adelita; Shah, Smit; Eberhart, Charles G; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have identified somatic alterations in the gene encoding for neurofibromin (NF1) in a subset of glioblastoma (GBM), usually associated with the mesenchymal molecular subtype. To understand the significance of NF1 genetic alterations in diffuse gliomas in general, we evaluated public databases and tested for NF1 copy number alterations in a cohort using fluorescence in situ hybridization. NF1 genetic loss (homozygous NF1 deletions or mutations with predicted functional consequences) was present in 30 (of 281) (11%) GBM and 21 (of 286) (7%) lower-grade gliomas in The Cancer Genome Atlas data. Furthermore, NF1 loss was associated with worse overall and disease-specific survival in the lower-grade glioma, but not GBM, Group in The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort. IDH1 or 2 mutations co-existed in lower-grade gliomas with NF1 loss (36%) but not in GBM. In our cohort studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization, NF1/17q (n = 2) or whole Ch17 (n = 3) losses were only identified in the GBM group (5/86 [6%]). Tumors with NF1/Ch17 loss were predominantly adult GBM (4/5); lacked EGFR amplification (0/4), strong p53 immunolabeling (1/5), or IDH1 (R132H) protein expression (0/5); but expressed the mesenchymal marker podoplanin in 4/5. NF1 genetic loss occurs in a subset of diffuse gliomas, and its significance deserves further exploration.

  9. Clinicopathologic implications of NF1 gene alterations in diffuse gliomas☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, M. Adelita; Shah, Smit; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have identified somatic alterations in the gene encoding for neurofibromin (NF1) in a subset of glioblastoma (GBM), usually associated with the mesenchymal molecular subtype. To understand the significance of NF1 genetic alterations in diffuse gliomas in general, we evaluated public databases and tested for NF1 copy number alterations in a cohort using fluorescence in situ hybridization. NF1 genetic loss (homozygous NF1 deletions or mutations with predicted functional consequences) was present in 30 (of 281) (11%) GBM and 21 (of 286) (7%) lower-grade gliomas in The Cancer Genome Atlas data. Furthermore, NF1 loss was associated with worse overall and disease-specific survival in the lower-grade glioma, but not GBM, Group in The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort. IDH1 or 2 mutations co-existed in lower-grade gliomas with NF1 loss (36%) but not in GBM. In our cohort studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization, NF1/17q (n = 2) or whole Ch17 (n = 3) losses were only identified in the GBM group (5/86 [6%]). Tumors with NF1/Ch17 loss were predominantly adult GBM (4/5); lacked EGFR amplification (0/4), strong p53 immunolabeling (1/5), or IDH1 (R132H) protein expression (0/5); but expressed the mesenchymal marker podoplanin in 4/5. NF1 genetic loss occurs in a subset of diffuse gliomas, and its significance deserves further exploration. PMID:26190195

  10. Turning the gene tap off; implications of regulating gene expression for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, James F; Candolfi, Marianela; Xiong, Weidong; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2008-03-01

    Cancer poses a tremendous therapeutic challenge worldwide, highlighting the critical need for developing novel therapeutics. A promising cancer treatment modality is gene therapy, which is a form of molecular medicine designed to introduce into target cells genetic material with therapeutic intent. Anticancer gene therapy strategies currently used in preclinical models, and in some cases in the clinic, include proapoptotic genes, oncolytic/replicative vectors, conditional cytotoxic approaches, inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of growth factor signaling, inactivation of oncogenes, inhibition of tumor invasion and stimulation of the immune system. The translation of these novel therapeutic modalities from the preclinical setting to the clinic has been driven by encouraging preclinical efficacy data and advances in gene delivery technologies. One area of intense research involves the ability to accurately regulate the levels of therapeutic gene expression to achieve enhanced efficacy and provide the capability to switch gene expression off completely if adverse side effects should arise. This feature could also be implemented to switch gene expression off when a successful therapeutic outcome ensues. Here, we will review recent developments related to the engineering of transcriptional switches within gene delivery systems, which could be implemented in clinical gene therapy applications directed at the treatment of cancer.

  11. Global properties and functional complexity of human gene regulatory variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Gaffney

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification and functional interpretation of gene regulatory variants is a major focus of modern genomics. The application of genetic mapping to molecular and cellular traits has enabled the detection of regulatory variation on genome-wide scales and revealed an enormous diversity of regulatory architecture in humans and other species. In this review I summarise the insights gained and questions raised by a decade of genetic mapping of gene expression variation. I discuss recent extensions of this approach using alternative molecular phenotypes that have revealed some of the biological mechanisms that drive gene expression variation between individuals. Finally, I highlight outstanding problems and future directions for development.

  12. Mechanosensitive promoter region in the human HB-GAM gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liedert, Astrid; Kassem, Moustapha; Claes, Lutz;

    2009-01-01

    expression through specific transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of mechanosensitive genes. In the present study, we demonstrate that the expression of HB-GAM, which is known to have stimulating effects on osteogenic differentiation, is rapidly induced by mechanical loading in hMSC-TERT4...... cells. Analysis of the human HB-GAM gene upstream regulatory region with luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the upregulation of HB-GAM expression occurred at the transcriptional level and was mainly dependent on the HB-GAM promoter region most upstream containing three potential AP-1 binding...

  13. Recent advances in human gene-longevity association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Benedictis, G; Tan, Q; Jeune, B;

    2001-01-01

    % of the variation in life span is genetically determined. Taking advantage of recent developments in molecular biology, researchers are now searching for candidate genes that might have an influence on life span. The data on unrelated individuals emerging from an ever-increasing number of centenarian studies makes......This paper reviews the recent literature on genes and longevity. The influence of genes on human life span has been confirmed in studies of life span correlation between related individuals based on family and twin data. Results from major twin studies indicate that approximately 25...

  14. Gene expression regulation by upstream open reading frames and human disease.

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    Cristina Barbosa

    Full Text Available Upstream open reading frames (uORFs are major gene expression regulatory elements. In many eukaryotic mRNAs, one or more uORFs precede the initiation codon of the main coding region. Indeed, several studies have revealed that almost half of human transcripts present uORFs. Very interesting examples have shown that these uORFs can impact gene expression of the downstream main ORF by triggering mRNA decay or by regulating translation. Also, evidence from recent genetic and bioinformatic studies implicates disturbed uORF-mediated translational control in the etiology of many human diseases, including malignancies, metabolic or neurologic disorders, and inherited syndromes. In this review, we will briefly present the mechanisms through which uORFs regulate gene expression and how they can impact on the organism's response to different cell stress conditions. Then, we will emphasize the importance of these structures by illustrating, with specific examples, how disturbed uORF-mediated translational control can be involved in the etiology of human diseases, giving special importance to genotype-phenotype correlations. Identifying and studying more cases of uORF-altering mutations will help us to understand and establish genotype-phenotype associations, leading to advancements in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of many human disorders.

  15. MicroRNAs located in the Hox gene clusters are implicated in huntington's disease pathogenesis.

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    Andrew G Hoss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional dysregulation has long been recognized as central to the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs represent a major system of post-transcriptional regulation, by either preventing translational initiation or by targeting transcripts for storage or for degradation. Using next-generation miRNA sequencing in prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 9 of twelve HD and nine controls, we identified five miRNAs (miR-10b-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-196b-5p, miR-615-3p and miR-1247-5p up-regulated in HD at genome-wide significance (FDR q-value<0.05. Three of these, miR-196a-5p, miR-196b-5p and miR-615-3p, were expressed at near zero levels in control brains. Expression was verified for all five miRNAs using reverse transcription quantitative PCR and all but miR-1247-5p were replicated in an independent sample (8HD/8C. Ectopic miR-10b-5p expression in PC12 HTT-Q73 cells increased survival by MTT assay and cell viability staining suggesting increased expression may be a protective response. All of the miRNAs but miR-1247-5p are located in intergenic regions of Hox clusters. Total mRNA sequencing in the same samples identified fifteen of 55 genes within the Hox cluster gene regions as differentially expressed in HD, and the Hox genes immediately adjacent to the four Hox cluster miRNAs as up-regulated. Pathway analysis of mRNA targets of these miRNAs implicated functions for neuronal differentiation, neurite outgrowth, cell death and survival. In regression models among the HD brains, huntingtin CAG repeat size, onset age and age at death were independently found to be inversely related to miR-10b-5p levels. CAG repeat size and onset age were independently inversely related to miR-196a-5p, onset age was inversely related to miR-196b-5p and age at death was inversely related to miR-615-3p expression. These results suggest these Hox-related miRNAs may be involved in neuroprotective response in HD. Recently, miRNAs have shown promise as

  16. Cloning of Integral Mature Peptide Gene of Human GDF-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万山; 顾为望; 王启伟; 朴仲贤; 朴英杰

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The integral mature peptide gene of human growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) was cloned to provide the essential foundation for study on the biological characteristics of GDF-5 at gene and protein levels. Two primers were chemosynthesized according to the hGDF-5 sequence reported in Genbank. The hGDF-5 gene was gained by RT-PCR methods from the total RNA extracted from human fetus cartilage tissue, and was cloned into vector pMD18-T. The sequence of recombinant plasmid pMD18-T-hGDF-5 was analyzed by sequence analysis. DNA agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the product of RT-PCR was about 380bp, and double enzyme digestion of the recombinant plasmid corresponded with it. The result of sequence assay was in agreement with the reported hGDF-5 sequence in Genbank. Our results showed that the integral mature peptide gene of human GDF-5 was cloned successfully from human fetal cartilage tissue, and totally identified with the sequence of human GDF-5 in Genbank.

  17. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  18. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  19. Expression Divergence of Tandemly Arrayed Genes in Human and Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valia Shoja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs account for about one third of the duplicated genes in eukaryotic genomes, yet there has not been any systematic study of their gene expression patterns. Taking advantage of recently published large-scale microarray data sets, we studied the expression divergence of 361 two-member TAGs in human and 212 two-member TAGs in mouse and examined the effect of sequence divergence, gene orientation, and chromosomal proximity on the divergence of TAG expression patterns. Our results show that there is a weak negative correlation between sequence divergence of TAG members and their expression similarity. There is also a weak negative correlation between chromosomal proximity of TAG members and their expression similarity. We did not detect any significant relationship between gene orientation and expression similarity. We also found that downstream TAG members do not show significantly narrower expression breadth than upstream members, contrary to what we predict based on TAG expression divergence hypothesis that we propose. Finally, we show that both chromosomal proximity and expression correlation in TAGs do not differ significantly from their neighboring non-TAG gene pairs, suggesting that tandem duplication is unlikely to be the cause for the higher-than-random expression association between neighboring genes on a chromosome in human and mouse.

  20. Mining the 30UTR of Autism-implicated Genes for SNPs Perturbing MicroRNA Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varadharajan Vaishnavi; Mayakannan Manikandan; Arasambattu Kannan Munirajan

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a group of childhood neurodevelopmental dis-orders with polygenic etiology. The expression of many genes implicated in ASD is tightly regulated by various factors including microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs 22 nucleotides in length that function to suppress translation by pairing with‘miRNA recognition elements’ (MREs) present in the 30untranslated region (30UTR) of target mRNAs. This emphasizes the role played by miRNAs in regulating neurogenesis, brain development and differentiation and hence any perturba-tions in this regulatory mechanism might affect these processes as well. Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present within 30UTRs of mRNAs have been shown to modulate existing MREs or even create new MREs. Therefore, we hypothesized that SNPs perturbing miRNA-medi-ated gene regulation might lead to aberrant expression of autism-implicated genes, thus resulting in disease predisposition or pathogenesis in at least a subpopulation of ASD individuals. We developed a systematic computational pipeline that integrates data from well-established databases. By following a stringent selection criterion, we identified 9 MRE-modulating SNPs and another 12 MRE-creating SNPs in the 30UTR of autism-implicated genes. These high-confidence candidate SNPs may play roles in ASD and hence would be valuable for further functional validation.

  1. Mining the 3'UTR of autism-implicated genes for SNPs perturbing microRNA regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnavi, Varadharajan; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2014-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a group of childhood neurodevelopmental disorders with polygenic etiology. The expression of many genes implicated in ASD is tightly regulated by various factors including microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs ~22 nucleotides in length that function to suppress translation by pairing with 'miRNA recognition elements' (MREs) present in the 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of target mRNAs. This emphasizes the role played by miRNAs in regulating neurogenesis, brain development and differentiation and hence any perturbations in this regulatory mechanism might affect these processes as well. Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present within 3'UTRs of mRNAs have been shown to modulate existing MREs or even create new MREs. Therefore, we hypothesized that SNPs perturbing miRNA-mediated gene regulation might lead to aberrant expression of autism-implicated genes, thus resulting in disease predisposition or pathogenesis in at least a subpopulation of ASD individuals. We developed a systematic computational pipeline that integrates data from well-established databases. By following a stringent selection criterion, we identified 9 MRE-modulating SNPs and another 12 MRE-creating SNPs in the 3'UTR of autism-implicated genes. These high-confidence candidate SNPs may play roles in ASD and hence would be valuable for further functional validation. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Analysis of kinase gene expression in the frontal cortex of suicide victims: implications of fear and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang; Le, Thien; Xing, Guoqiang; Johnson, Luke R; Ursano, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health issue that results from an interaction between multiple risk factors including individual vulnerabilities to complex feelings of hopelessness, fear, and stress. Although kinase genes have been implicated in fear and stress, including the consolidation and extinction of fearful memories, expression profiles of those genes in the brain of suicide victims are less clear. Using gene expression microarray data from the Online Stanley Genomics Database and a quantitative PCR, we investigated the expression profiles of multiple kinase genes including the calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase (CAMK), the cyclin-dependent kinase, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and the protein kinase C (PKC) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of mood disorder patients died with suicide (N = 45) and without suicide (N = 38). We also investigated the expression pattern of the same genes in the PFC of developing humans ranging in age from birth to 49 year (N = 46). The expression levels of CAMK2B, CDK5, MAPK9, and PRKCI were increased in the PFC of suicide victims as compared to non-suicide controls (false discovery rate, FDR-adjusted p 1.1). Those genes also showed changes in expression pattern during the postnatal development (FDR-adjusted p suicide brains. These findings may provide an important link to protein kinases known to be important for the development of fear memory, stress associated neural plasticity, and up-regulation in the PFC of suicide victims. More research is needed to better understand the functional role of these kinase genes that may be associated with the pathophysiology of suicide.

  3. Diversification of CYCLOIDEA-like genes in Dipsacaceae (Dipsacales: implications for the evolution of capitulum inflorescences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlson Sara E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CYCLOIDEA (CYC-like genes have been implicated in the development of capitulum inflorescences (i.e. flowering heads in Asteraceae, where many small flowers (florets are packed tightly into an inflorescence that resembles a single flower. Several rounds of duplication of CYC-like genes have occurred in Asteraceae, and this is hypothesized to be correlated with the evolution of the capitulum, which in turn has been implicated in the evolutionary success of the group. We investigated the evolution of CYC-like genes in Dipsacaceae (Dipsacales, a plant clade in which capitulum inflorescences originated independently of Asteraceae. Two main inflorescence types are present in Dipsacaceae: (1 radiate species contain two kinds of floret within the flowering head (disk and ray, and (2 discoid species contain only disk florets. To test whether a dynamic pattern of gene duplication, similar to that documented in Asteraceae, is present in Dipsacaceae, and whether these patterns are correlated with different inflorescence types, we inferred a CYC-like gene phylogeny for Dipsacaceae based on representative species from the major lineages. Results We recovered within Dipsacaceae the three major forms of CYC-like genes that have been found in most core eudicots, and identified several additional duplications within each of these clades. We found that the number of CYC-like genes in Dipsacaceae is similar to that reported for members of Asteraceae and that the same gene lineages (CYC1-like and CYC2B-like genes have duplicated in a similar fashion independently in both groups. The number of CYC-like genes recovered for radiate versus discoid species differed, with discoid species having fewer copies of CYC1-like and CYC2B-like genes. Conclusions CYC-like genes have undergone extensive duplication in Dipsacaceae, with radiate species having more copies than discoid species, suggesting a potential role for these genes in the evolution of disk and

  4. Life-Cycle Labor Supply with Human Capital: Econometric and Behavioral Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Michael P. Keane

    2015-01-01

    I examine the econometric and behavioral implications of including human capital in the life-cycle labor supply model. With human capital, the wage no longer equals the opportunity cost of time – which is, instead, the wage plus returns to work experience. This has a number of important implications, of which I highlight four: First, labor supply elasticities become functions of both preference and wage process parameters. Thus, one cannot estimate elasticities without also specifying and est...

  5. The role of the prokineticin 2 pathway in human reproduction: evidence from the study of human and murine gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cecilia; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A; Au, Margaret G; Sidis, Yisrael; Kaiser, Ursula B; Seminara, Stephanie B; Pitteloud, Nelly; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Crowley, William F

    2011-04-01

    A widely dispersed network of hypothalamic GnRH neurons controls the reproductive axis in mammals. Genetic investigation of the human disease model of isolated GnRH deficiency has revealed several key genes crucial for GnRH neuronal ontogeny and GnRH secretion. Among these genes, prokineticin 2 (PROK2), and PROK2 receptor (PROKR2) have recently emerged as critical regulators of reproduction in both mice and humans. Both prok2- and prokr2-deficient mice recapitulate the human Kallmann syndrome phenotype. Additionally, PROK2 and PROKR2 mutations are seen in humans with Kallmann syndrome, thus implicating this pathway in GnRH neuronal migration. However, PROK2/PROKR2 mutations are also seen in normosmic GnRH deficiency, suggesting a role for the prokineticin signaling system in GnRH biology that is beyond neuronal migration. This observation is particularly surprising because mature GnRH neurons do not express PROKR2. Moreover, mutations in both PROK2 and PROKR2 are predominantly detected in the heterozygous state with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity frequently seen within and across pedigrees. In some of these pedigrees, a "second hit" or oligogenicity has been documented. Besides reproduction, a pleiotropic physiological role for PROK2 is now recognized, including regulation of pain perception, circadian rhythms, hematopoiesis, and immune response. Therefore, further detailed clinical studies of patients with PROK2/PROKR2 mutations will help to map the broader biological role of the PROK2/PROKR2 pathway and identify other interacting genes/proteins that mediate its molecular effects in humans.

  6. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  7. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T [Univ. of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  9. The human insulin gene is part of a large open chromatin domain specific for human islets

    OpenAIRE

    Mutskov, Vesco; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of how insulin (INS) gene expression is regulated will lead to better understanding of normal and abnormal pancreatic β cell function. We have mapped histone modifications over the INS region, coupled with an expression profile, in freshly isolated islets from multiple human donors. Unlike many other human genes, in which active modifications tend to be concentrated within 1 kb around the transcription start site, these marks are distributed over the entire coding region of INS as w...

  10. Differentially Expressed Genes and Signature Pathways of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Myers

    Full Text Available Genomic technologies including microarrays and next-generation sequencing have enabled the generation of molecular signatures of prostate cancer. Lists of differentially expressed genes between malignant and non-malignant states are thought to be fertile sources of putative prostate cancer biomarkers. However such lists of differentially expressed genes can be highly variable for multiple reasons. As such, looking at differential expression in the context of gene sets and pathways has been more robust. Using next-generation genome sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, differential gene expression between age- and stage- matched human prostate tumors and non-malignant samples was assessed and used to craft a pathway signature of prostate cancer. Up- and down-regulated genes were assigned to pathways composed of curated groups of related genes from multiple databases. The significance of these pathways was then evaluated according to the number of differentially expressed genes found in the pathway and their position within the pathway using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. The "transforming growth factor-beta signaling" and "Ran regulation of mitotic spindle formation" pathways were strongly associated with prostate cancer. Several other significant pathways confirm reported findings from microarray data that suggest actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell cycle, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and calcium signaling are also altered in prostate cancer. Thus we have demonstrated feasibility of pathway analysis and identified an underexplored area (Ran for investigation in prostate cancer pathogenesis.

  11. The implications of relationships between human diseases and metabolic subpathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    Full Text Available One of the challenging problems in the etiology of diseases is to explore the relationships between initiation and progression of diseases and abnormalities in local regions of metabolic pathways. To gain insight into such relationships, we applied the "k-clique" subpathway identification method to all disease-related gene sets. For each disease, the disease risk regions of metabolic pathways were then identified and considered as subpathways associated with the disease. We finally built a disease-metabolic subpathway network (DMSPN. Through analyses based on network biology, we found that a few subpathways, such as that of cytochrome P450, were highly connected with many diseases, and most belonged to fundamental metabolisms, suggesting that abnormalities of fundamental metabolic processes tend to cause more types of diseases. According to the categories of diseases and subpathways, we tested the clustering phenomenon of diseases and metabolic subpathways in the DMSPN. The results showed that both disease nodes and subpathway nodes displayed slight clustering phenomenon. We also tested correlations between network topology and genes within disease-related metabolic subpathways, and found that within a disease-related subpathway in the DMSPN, the ratio of disease genes and the ratio of tissue-specific genes significantly increased as the number of diseases caused by the subpathway increased. Surprisingly, the ratio of essential genes significantly decreased and the ratio of housekeeping genes remained relatively unchanged. Furthermore, the coexpression levels between disease genes and other types of genes were calculated for each subpathway in the DMSPN. The results indicated that those genes intensely influenced by disease genes, including essential genes and tissue-specific genes, might be significantly associated with the disease diversity of subpathways, suggesting that different kinds of genes within a disease-related subpathway may play

  12. Isolation of a rice gene homologous to the human putative tumor suppressor gene QM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    QM gene was originally isolated from human by Dowdy et al during a search for a wilms′ tumor suppressor gene. Researches of QM gene focused mainly on animals and yeasts, little was known about plant QM gene. For better understanding of QM gene in rice, a QM homologous fragment was used as a probe to screen rice (Oryza sativa subsp. indica c.v. Guanglu′ ai 4) genomic DNA library,and two clones were obtained. One of them, OSQM2, encoded a highly basic protein of 184 amino acids, the sequence was about 3.1 kb long with a very special promoter region compared with other known QM genes. Seven potential G boxes could be found between -690 and -230. G box, which contains a ACGT core motif, had been reported in many plants to act as a cis acting DNA element in the regulation of genes in a variety of environmental conditions, such as ABA regulated gene expression, red light, UV light, anaerobiosis, and wounding etc. Two closely linked DRE related motifs (dehydration responsive element) could also be found between -182 and 173, which had a CCGAC conserved sequence and had been identified in many cold and drought responsive genes in Arabidopsis. Six MYC recognition sequences with the conserved motif NCANNTGN were also presented, which might be essential for ABA and drought responsive expression of the plant genes.

  13. Modulation at Age of Onset in Tunisian Huntington Disease Patients: Implication of New Modifier Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorra Hmida-Ben Brahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. The causative mutation is an expansion of more than 36 CAG repeats in the first exon of IT15 gene. Many studies have shown that the IT15 interacts with several modifier genes to regulate the age at onset (AO of HD. Our study aims to investigate the implication of CAG expansion and 9 modifiers in the age at onset variance of 15 HD Tunisian patients and to establish the correlation between these modifiers genes and the AO of this disease. Despite the small number of studied patients, this report consists of the first North African study in Huntington disease patients. Our results approve a specific effect of modifiers genes in each population.

  14. Highly expressed genes within hippocampal sector CA1: implications for the physiology of memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Meyer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As the CA1 sector has been implicated to play a key role in memory formation, a dedicated search for highly expressed genes within this region was made from an on-line atlas of gene expression within the mouse brain (GENSAT. From a data base of 1013 genes, 16 were identified that had selective localization of gene expression within the CA1 region, and included Angpt2, ARHGEF6, CCK, Cntnap1, DRD3, EMP1, Epha2, Itm2b, Lrrtm2, Mdk, PNMT, Ppm1e, Ppp2r2d, RASGRP1, Slitrk5, and Sstr4. Of the 16 identified, the most selective and intense localization for both adult and post-natal day 7 was noted for ARHGEF6, which is known to be linked to non-syndromic mental retardation, and has also been localized to dendritic spines. Further research on the role played by ARHGEF6 in memory formation is strongly advocated.

  15. Chromosomal mapping of the human M6 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinsky, S.; Loop, B.T.; DeKosky, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    M6 is a neuronal membrane glycoprotein that may have an important role in neural development. This molecule was initially defined by a monoclonal antibody that affected the survival of cultured cerebellar neurons and the outgrowth of neurites. The nature of the antigen was discovered by expression cDNA cloning using this monoclonal antibody. Two distinct murine M6 cDNAs (designated M6a and M6b) whose deduced amino acid sequences were remarkably similar to that of the myelin proteolipid protein human cDNA and genomic clones encoding M6a and M6b and have characterized them by restriction mapping, Southern hybridization with cDNA probes, and sequence analysis. We have localized these genes within the human genome by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). The human M6a gene is located at 4q34, and the M6b gene is located at Xp22.2 A number of human neurological disorders have been mapped to the Xp22 region, including Aicardi syndrome (MIM 304050), Rett syndrome (MIM 312750), X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (MIM 302801), and X-linked mental retardation syndromes (MRX1, MIM 309530). This raises the possibility that a defect in the M6b gene is responsible for one of these neurological disorders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Designer Babies? Teacher Views on Gene Technology and Human Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibeci, Renato

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the views of a sample of primary and high school teachers on the application of gene technology to human medicine. In general, high school teachers are more positive about these developments than primary teachers, and both groups of teachers are more positive than interested lay publics. Highlights ways in which this topic can be…

  17. Molecular cloning of the human excision repair gene ERCC-6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Troelstra (Christine); H. Odijk (Hanny); J. de Wit (Jan); A. Westerveld (Andries); L.H. Thompson; D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-sensitive, nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line UV61 was used to identify and clone a correcting human gene, ERCC-6. UV61, belonging to rodent complementation group 6, is only moderately UV sensitive in comparison with mutant lines in groups 1 to 5

  18. The Human Lexinome: Genes of Language and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christopher J.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Within the human genome, genetic mapping studies have identified 10 regions of different chromosomes, known as DYX loci, in genetic linkage with dyslexia, and two, known as SLI loci, in genetic linkage with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Further genetic studies have identified four dyslexia genes within the DYX loci: "DYX1C1" on 15q,…

  19. Global patterns of diversity and selection in human tyrosinase gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Hudjashov

    Full Text Available Global variation in skin pigmentation is one of the most striking examples of environmental adaptation in humans. More than two hundred loci have been identified as candidate genes in model organisms and a few tens of these have been found to be significantly associated with human skin pigmentation in genome-wide association studies. However, the evolutionary history of different pigmentation genes is rather complex: some loci have been subjected to strong positive selection, while others evolved under the relaxation of functional constraints in low UV environment. Here we report the results of a global study of the human tyrosinase gene, which is one of the key enzymes in melanin production, to assess the role of its variation in the evolution of skin pigmentation differences among human populations. We observe a higher rate of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the European sample consistent with the relaxation of selective constraints. A similar pattern was previously observed in the MC1R gene and concurs with UV radiation-driven model of skin color evolution by which mutations leading to lower melanin levels and decreased photoprotection are subject to purifying selection at low latitudes while being tolerated or even favored at higher latitudes because they facilitate UV-dependent vitamin D production. Our coalescent date estimates suggest that the non-synonymous variants, which are frequent in Europe and North Africa, are recent and have emerged after the separation of East and West Eurasian populations.

  20. The diverse origins of the human gene pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pääbo, Svante

    2015-06-01

    Analyses of the genomes of Neanderthals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of present-day humans, suggest that our ancestors were part of a web of now-extinct populations linked by limited, but intermittent or sometimes perhaps even persistent, gene flow.

  1. Identification of differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Chen; Yi-Zeng Zhang; Zong-Guang Zhou; Gang Wang; Zeng-Ni Yi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma.METHODS: The integrated approach for gene expression profiling that couples suppression subtractive hybridization, high-throughput cDNA array, sequencing,bioinformatics analysis, and reverse transcriptase realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)was carried out. A set of cDNA clones including 1260SSH inserts amplified by PCR was arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with florescent-labeled probes prepared from RNA of human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HCRAC) and normal colorectal tissues.RESULTS: A total of 86 genes were identified, 16 unknown genes and 70 known genes. The transcription factor Sox9 influencing cell differentiation was downregulated. At the same time, Heat shock protein 10 KDis downregulated and Calmoulin is up-regulated.CONCLUSION: Downregulation of heat shock protein 10 KD lost its inhibition of Ras, and then attenuated the Ras GTPase signaling pathway, increased cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis. Down-regulated transcription factor Sox9 influences cell differentiation and cell-specific gene expression. Down-regulated Sox9 also decreases its binding to calmodulin, accumulates calmodulin as receptor-activated kinase and phosphorylase kinase due to the activation of PhK.

  2. Identification of STAT5A and STAT5B target genes in human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Kanai

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT comprises a family of universal transcription factors that help cells sense and respond to environmental signals. STAT5 refers to two highly related proteins, STAT5A and STAT5B, with critical function: their complete deficiency is lethal in mice; in humans, STAT5B deficiency alone leads to endocrine and immunological problems, while STAT5A deficiency has not been reported. STAT5A and STAT5B show peptide sequence similarities greater than 90%, but subtle structural differences suggest possible non-redundant roles in gene regulation. However, these roles remain unclear in humans. We applied chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing using human CD4(+ T cells to detect candidate genes regulated by STAT5A and/or STAT5B, and quantitative-PCR in STAT5A or STAT5B knock-down (KD human CD4(+ T cells to validate the findings. Our data show STAT5A and STAT5B play redundant roles in cell proliferation and apoptosis via SGK1 interaction. Interestingly, we found a novel, unique role for STAT5A in binding to genes involved in neural development and function (NDRG1, DNAJC6, and SSH2, while STAT5B appears to play a distinct role in T cell development and function via DOCK8, SNX9, FOXP3 and IL2RA binding. Our results also suggest that one or more co-activators for STAT5A and/or STAT5B may play important roles in establishing different binding abilities and gene regulation behaviors. The new identification of these genes regulated by STAT5A and/or STAT5B has major implications for understanding the pathophysiology of cancer progression, neural disorders, and immune abnormalities.

  3. Isolation and characterization of human brain genes with (CCA){sub n} trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longshore, J.W.; Finley, W.H.; Descartes, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Expansion of trinucleotide repeats has been described as a new form of mutation. To date, only the expansion of (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats have been associated with disease. Expansion of (CAG){sub n} repeats has been found to cause Huntington`s disease, Kennedy`s disease, myotonic dystrophy, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy. (CGG){sub n} repeat expansion has been implicated in the fragile X syndrome and FRAXE mental retardation. In an effort to identify other potential repeats as candidates for expansion, a DNA linguistics approach was used to study 10 Mb of human DNA sequences in GenBank. Our study found the (CCA){sub n} repeat and the disease-associated (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats to be over-represented in the human genome. The (CCA){sub n} repeat also shares other characteristics with (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n}, making it a good candidate for expansion. Trinucleotide repeat numbers in disease-associated genes are normally polymorphic in a population. Therefore, by studying genes for polymorphisms, candidate genes may be identified. Twelve sequences previously deposited in GenBank with at least five tandem copies of (CCA) were studied and no polymorphisms were found. To identify other candidate genes, a human hippocampus cDNA library was screened with a (CCA){sub 8} probe. This approach identified 19 novel expressed sequences having long tandem (CCA){sub n} repeats which are currently under investigation for polymorphisms. Genes with polymorphic repeats may serve as markers for linkage studies or as candidate genes for genetic diseases showing anticipation.

  4. Gene expression profiling of human erythroid progenitors by micro-serial analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, Naohito; Hirokawa, Makoto; Aiba, Namiko; Ichikawa, Yoshikazu; Fujishima, Masumi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Miura, Ikuo; Sawada, Ken-ichi

    2004-10-01

    We compared the expression profiles of highly purified human CD34+ cells and erythroid progenitor cells by micro-serial analysis of gene expression (microSAGE). Human CD34+ cells were purified from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized blood stem cells, and erythroid progenitors were obtained by cultivating these cells in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, and erythropoietin. Our 10,202 SAGE tags allowed us to identify 1354 different transcripts appearing more than once. Erythroid progenitor cells showed increased expression of LRBA, EEF1A1, HSPCA, PILRB, RANBP1, NACA, and SMURF. Overexpression of HSPCA was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. MicroSAGE revealed an unexpected preferential expression of several genes in erythroid progenitor cells in addition to the known functional genes, including hemoglobins. Our results provide reference data for future studies of gene expression in various hematopoietic disorders, including myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia.

  5. Implications of the behavioural immune system for social behaviour and human health in the modern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Mark; Murray, Damian R; Bangerter, Adrian

    2015-05-26

    The 'behavioural immune system' is composed of mechanisms that evolved as a means of facilitating behaviours that minimized infection risk and enhanced fitness. Recent empirical research on human populations suggests that these mechanisms have unique consequences for many aspects of human sociality--including sexual attitudes, gregariousness, xenophobia, conformity to majority opinion and conservative sociopolitical attitudes. Throughout much of human evolutionary history, these consequences may have had beneficial health implications; but health implications in modern human societies remain unclear. This article summarizes pertinent ways in which modern human societies are similar to and different from the ecologies within which the behavioural immune system evolved. By attending to these similarities and differences, we identify a set of plausible implications-both positive and negative-that the behavioural immune system may have on health outcomes in contemporary human contexts. We discuss both individual-level infection risk and population-level epidemiological outcomes. We also discuss a variety of additional implications, including compliance with public health policies, the adoption of novel therapeutic interventions and actual immunological functioning. Research on the behavioural immune system, and its implications in contemporary human societies, can provide unique insights into relationships between fitness, sociality and health.

  6. Alterations of FHIT Gene and P16 Gene in Nickel Transformed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-DONG JI; JIA-KUN CHEN; JIA-CHUN LU; ZHONG-LIANG WU; FEI YI; SU-MEI FENG

    2006-01-01

    To study the alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene in malignant transformed human bronchial epithelial cells induced by crystalline nickel sulfide using an immoral human bronchial epithelial cell line, and to explore the molecular mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis. Methods 16HBE cells were treated 6 times with different concentrations of NiS in vitro, and the degree of malignant transformation was determined by assaying the anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity. Malignant transformed cells and tumorigenic cells were examined for alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene using RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, silver staining PCR-SSCP and Western blotting. Results NiS-treated cells exhibited overlapping growth. Compared with that of negative control cells, soft agar colony formation efficiency of NiS-treated cells showed significant increases (P<0.01) and dose-dependent effects. NiS-treated cells could form tumors in nude mice, and a squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed by histopathological examination. No mutation of exon 2 and exons 2-3, no abnormal expression in p16 gene and mutation of FHIT exons 5-8 and exons 1-4 or exons 5-9 were observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. However, aberrant transcripts or loss of expression of the FHIT gene and Fhit protein was observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. One of the aberrant transcripts in the FHIT gene was confirmed to have a deletion of exon 6, exon 7, exon 8, and an insertion of a 36 bp sequence replacing exon 6-8. Conclusions The FHIT gene rather than the P16 gene, plays a definite role in nickel carcinogenesis. Alterations of the FHIT gene induced by crystalline NiS may be a molecular event associated with carcinogen, chromosome fragile site instability and cell malignant transformation. FHIT may be an important target gene activated by nickel and other exotic carcinogens.

  7. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of eating behavior in pigs and its implications for humans obesity by comparative mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage

    2013-01-01

    are important for genetic improvement of pig feed efficiency. We have also conducted pig-human comparative gene mapping to reveal key genomic regions and/or genes on the human genome that may influence eating behavior in human beings and consequently affect the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome......This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behavior in Danish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behavior in humans. Data regarding individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of daily visits to feeder (NVD......1, PTPN4, MTMR4 and RNGTT) and positive regulation of peptide secretion genes (GHRH, NNAT and TCF7L2) were highly significantly associated with feeding behavior traits. This is the first GWAS to identify genetic variants and biological mechanisms for eating behavior in pigs and these results...

  8. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of eating behavior in pigs and its implications for humans obesity by comparative mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage;

    2013-01-01

    are important for genetic improvement of pig feed efficiency. We have also conducted pig-human comparative gene mapping to reveal key genomic regions and/or genes on the human genome that may influence eating behavior in human beings and consequently affect the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome......This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behavior in Danish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behavior in humans. Data regarding individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of daily visits to feeder (NVD......1, PTPN4, MTMR4 and RNGTT) and positive regulation of peptide secretion genes (GHRH, NNAT and TCF7L2) were highly significantly associated with feeding behavior traits. This is the first GWAS to identify genetic variants and biological mechanisms for eating behavior in pigs and these results...

  9. Human myometrial gene expression before and during parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelock, Jon C; Keller, Patrick; Muleba, Ndaya; Mayhew, Bobbie A; Casey, Brian M; Rainey, William E; Word, R Ann

    2005-03-01

    Identification of temporal and spatial changes in myometrial gene expression during parturition may further the understanding of the coordinated regulation of myometrial contractions during parturition. The objective of this study was to compare the gene expression profiles of human fundal myometrium from pregnant women before and after the onset of labor using a functional genomics approach, and to further characterize the spatial and temporal expression patterns of three genes believed to be important in parturition. Fundal myometrial mRNA was isolated from five women in labor and five women not in labor, and analyzed using human UniGEM-V microarrays with 9182 cDNA elements. Real-time polymerase chain reaction using myometrial RNA from pregnant women in labor or not in labor was used to examine mRNA levels for three of the genes; namely, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), calgranulin B (S100A9), and oxytocin receptor (OXTR). The spatial expression pattern of these genes throughout the pregnant uterus before and after labor was also determined. Immunolocalization of cyclooxygenase-2 (also known as PTGS2) and S100A9 within the uterine cervix and myometrium were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Few genes were differentially expressed in fundal myometrial tissues at term with the onset of labor. However, there appears to be a subset of genes important in the parturition cascade. The cellular properties of S100A9, its spatial localization, and dramatic increase in cervix and myometrium of women in labor suggest that this protein may be very important in the initiation or propagation of human labor.

  10. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra [Max Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Center of Molecular Medicine (CMMC) and Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); MPI for Neurological Research, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Cologne (Germany); Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro [University of California Los Angeles (United States). Department of Medicine

    2005-12-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being

  11. Syndrome to gene (S2G): in-silico identification of candidate genes for human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Avitan; Cohen, Raphael; Birk, Ohad S

    2010-03-01

    The identification of genomic loci associated with human genetic syndromes has been significantly facilitated through the generation of high density SNP arrays. However, optimal selection of candidate genes from within such loci is still a tedious labor-intensive bottleneck. Syndrome to Gene (S2G) is based on novel algorithms which allow an efficient search for candidate genes in a genomic locus, using known genes whose defects cause phenotypically similar syndromes. S2G (http://fohs.bgu.ac.il/s2g/index.html) includes two components: a phenotype Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)-based search engine that alleviates many of the problems in the existing OMIM search engine (negation phrases, overlapping terms, etc.). The second component is a gene prioritizing engine that uses a novel algorithm to integrate information from 18 databases. When the detailed phenotype of a syndrome is inserted to the web-based software, S2G offers a complete improved search of the OMIM database for similar syndromes. The software then prioritizes a list of genes from within a genomic locus, based on their association with genes whose defects are known to underlie similar clinical syndromes. We demonstrate that in all 30 cases of novel disease genes identified in the past year, the disease gene was within the top 20% of candidate genes predicted by S2G, and in most cases--within the top 10%. Thus, S2G provides clinicians with an efficient tool for diagnosis and researchers with a candidate gene prediction tool based on phenotypic data and a wide range of gene data resources. S2G can also serve in studies of polygenic diseases, and in finding interacting molecules for any gene of choice.

  12. Comparative gene expression analysis of avian embryonic facial structures reveals new candidates for human craniofacial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmann, S A; Powder, K E; Young, N M; Goodnough, L H; Hahn, S M; James, A W; Helms, J A; Lovett, M

    2010-03-01

    Mammals and birds have common embryological facial structures, and appear to employ the same molecular genetic developmental toolkit. We utilized natural variation found in bird beaks to investigate what genes drive vertebrate facial morphogenesis. We employed cross-species microarrays to describe the molecular genetic signatures, developmental signaling pathways and the spectrum of transcription factor (TF) gene expression changes that differ between cranial neural crest cells in the developing beaks of ducks, quails and chickens. Surprisingly, we observed that the neural crest cells established a species-specific TF gene expression profile that predates morphological differences between the species. A total of 232 genes were differentially expressed between the three species. Twenty-two of these genes, including Fgfr2, Jagged2, Msx2, Satb2 and Tgfb3, have been previously implicated in a variety of mammalian craniofacial defects. Seventy-two of the differentially expressed genes overlap with un-cloned loci for human craniofacial disorders, suggesting that our data will provide a valuable candidate gene resource for human craniofacial genetics. The most dramatic changes between species were in the Wnt signaling pathway, including a 20-fold up-regulation of Dkk2, Fzd1 and Wnt1 in the duck compared with the other two species. We functionally validated these changes by demonstrating that spatial domains of Wnt activity differ in avian beaks, and that Wnt signals regulate Bmp pathway activity and promote regional growth in facial prominences. This study is the first of its kind, extending on previous work in Darwin's finches and provides the first large-scale insights into cross-species facial morphogenesis.

  13. Profile of stress and toxicity gene expression in human hepatic cells treated with Efavirenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Sucerquia, Leysa J; Blas-Garcia, Ana; Marti-Cabrera, Miguel; Esplugues, Juan V; Apostolova, Nadezda

    2012-06-01

    Hepatic toxicity and metabolic disorders are major adverse effects elicited during the pharmacological treatment of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Efavirenz (EFV), the most widely used non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has been associated with these events, with recent studies implicating it in stress responses involving mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in human hepatic cells. To expand these findings, we analyzed the influence of EFV on the expression profile of selected stress and toxicity genes in these cells. Significant up-regulation was observed with Cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1), which indicated metabolic stress. Several genes directly related to oxidative stress and damage exhibited increased expression, including Methalothionein 2A (MT2A), Heat shock 70kDa protein 6 (HSPA6), Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) and DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3). In addition, Early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) was enhanced, whereas mRNA levels of the inflammatory genes Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) and Serpin peptidase inhibitor (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1), member 1 (SERPINE1) decreased and increased, respectively. This profile of gene expression supports previous data demonstrating altered mitochondrial function and presence of oxidative stress/damage in EFV-treated hepatic cells, and may be of relevance in the search for molecular targets with therapeutic potential to be employed in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the hepatic toxicity associated with HIV therapy.

  14. Human genes for U2 small nuclear RNA map to a major adenovirus 12 modification site on chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, V; Ares, M; Weiner, A M; Francke, U

    U2 RNA is one of the abundant, highly conserved species of small nuclear RNA (snRNA) molecules implicated in RNA processing. As is typical of mammalian snRNAs, human U1 and U2 are each encoded by a multigene family. In the human genome, defective copies of the genes (pseudogenes) far outnumber the authentic genes. The majority or all of the 35 to 100 bona fide U1 genes have at least 20 kilobases (kb) of nearly perfect 5' and 3' flanking homology in common with each other; these U1 genes are clustered loosely in chromosome band 1p36 (refs 5, 7) with intergenic distances exceeding 44 kb. In contrast, the 10 to 20 U2 genes are clustered tightly in a virtually perfect tandem array which has a strict 6-kb repeating unit. We report here the assignment, by in situ hybridization, of the U2 gene cluster to chromosome 17, bands q21-q22. Surprisingly, this region is one of three major adenovirus 12 modification sites which undergo chromosome decondensation ('uncoiling') in permissive human cells infected by highly oncogenic strains of adenovirus. The two other major modification sites, 1p36 and 1q21, coincide with the locations of U1 genes and class I U1 pseudogenes, respectively. We suggest that snRNA genes are the major targets of viral chromosome modification.

  15. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Molecular Cloning of Human Gene(s) Directing the Synthesis of Nervous System Cholinesterases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Report No. 4 If MOLECULAR CLONING OF O HUMAN GENE(S) DIRECTING qTHE SYNTHESIS OF NERVOUS SYSTEM CHOLINESTERASES cc Annual/Final Report 0 N November...62734A I734A875 IAl 451 MOLECULAR CLONING OF HUMAN GEME(S) DIRECTING THE SYNTHESIS OF NERVOUS SYSTEM CHOLINESTERASE 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Hermona Soreq...important roles in regulating the pace and mode of function of particular types of synapses. For example, molecular cloning of the nicotinic (44-46) and the

  17. Loss of Bloom syndrome protein destabilizes human gene cluster architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Adachi, Noritaka; Hanakahi, Les; Pierce, Andrew J

    2009-09-15

    Bloom syndrome confers strong predisposition to malignancy in multiple tissue types. The Bloom syndrome patient (BLM) protein defective in the disease biochemically functions as a Holliday junction dissolvase and human cells lacking functional BLM show 10-fold elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange. Collectively, these phenomena suggest that dysregulated mitotic recombination drives the genomic instability underpinning the development of cancer in these individuals. Here we use physical analysis of the highly repeated, highly self-similar human ribosomal RNA gene clusters as sentinel biomarkers for dysregulated homologous recombination to demonstrate that loss of BLM protein function causes a striking increase in spontaneous molecular level genomic restructuring. Analysis of single-cell derived sub-clonal populations from wild-type human cell lines shows that gene cluster architecture is ordinarily very faithfully preserved under mitosis, but is so unstable in cell lines derived from BLMs as to make gene cluster architecture in different sub-clonal populations essentially unrecognizable one from another. Human cells defective in a different RecQ helicase, the WRN protein involved in the premature aging Werner syndrome, do not exhibit the gene cluster instability (GCI) phenotype, indicating that the BLM protein specifically, rather than RecQ helicases generally, holds back this recombination-mediated genomic instability. An ataxia-telangiectasia defective cell line also shows elevated rDNA GCI, although not to the extent of BLM defective cells. Genomic restructuring mediated by dysregulated recombination between the abundant low-copy repeats in the human genome may prove to be an important additional mechanism of genomic instability driving the initiation and progression of human cancer.

  18. Gene expression and DNA repair in progeroid syndromes and human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyng, Kasper J; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-11-01

    Human progeroid syndromes are caused by mutations in single genes accelerating some but not all features of normal aging. Most progeroid disorders are linked to defects in genome maintenance, and while it remains unknown if similar processes underlie normal and premature aging, they provide useful models for the study of aging. Altered transcription is speculated to play a causative role in aging, and is involved in the pathology of most if not all progeroid syndromes. Previous studies demonstrate that there is a similar pattern of gene expression changes in primary cells from old and Werner syndrome compared to young suggesting a presence of common cellular aging mechanisms in old and progeria. Here we review the role of transcription in progeroid syndromes and discuss the implications of similar transcription aberrations in normal and premature aging.

  19. Reference genes for normalization of gene expression studies in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Reino Juan J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of gene expression is an important component of osteoarthritis (OA research, greatly improved by the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. This technique requires normalization for precise results, yet no suitable reference genes have been identified in human articular cartilage. We have examined ten well-known reference genes to determine the most adequate for this application. Results Analyses of expression stability in cartilage from 10 patients with hip OA, 8 patients with knee OA and 10 controls without OA were done with classical statistical tests and the software programs geNorm and NormFinder. Results from the three methods of analysis were broadly concordant. Some of the commonly used reference genes, GAPDH, ACTB and 18S RNA, performed poorly in our analysis. In contrast, the rarely used TBP, RPL13A and B2M genes were the best. It was necessary to use together several of these three genes to obtain the best results. The specific combination depended, to some extent, on the type of samples being compared. Conclusion Our results provide a satisfactory set of previously unused reference genes for qPCR in hip and knee OA This confirms the need to evaluate the suitability of reference genes in every tissue and experimental situation before starting the quantitative assessment of gene expression by qPCR.

  20. Reconstructability analysis as a tool for identifying gene-gene interactions in studies of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, Stephen; Kramer, Patricia L; Westaway, Shawn K; Cox, Nancy J; Zwick, Martin

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of common human diseases for which the genetic component may include an epistatic interaction of multiple genes. Detecting these interactions with standard statistical tools is difficult because there may be an interaction effect, but minimal or no main effect. Reconstructability analysis (RA) uses Shannon's information theory to detect relationships between variables in categorical datasets. We applied RA to simulated data for five different models of gene-gene interaction, and find that even with heritability levels as low as 0.008, and with the inclusion of 50 non-associated genes in the dataset, we can identify the interacting gene pairs with an accuracy of > or =80%. We applied RA to a real dataset of type 2 non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) cases and controls, and closely approximated the results of more conventional single SNP disease association studies. In addition, we replicated prior evidence for epistatic interactions between SNPs on chromosomes 2 and 15.

  1. Human dignity in the Nazi era: implications for contemporary bioethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Mathúna Dónal P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The justification for Nazi programs involving involuntary euthanasia, forced sterilisation, eugenics and human experimentation were strongly influenced by views about human dignity. The historical development of these views should be examined today because discussions of human worth and value are integral to medical ethics and bioethics. We should learn lessons from how human dignity came to be so distorted to avoid repetition of similar distortions. Discussion Social Darwinism was foremost amongst the philosophies impacting views of human dignity in the decades leading up to Nazi power in Germany. Charles Darwin's evolutionary theory was quickly applied to human beings and social structure. The term 'survival of the fittest' was coined and seen to be applicable to humans. Belief in the inherent dignity of all humans was rejected by social Darwinists. Influential authors of the day proclaimed that an individual's worth and value were to be determined functionally and materialistically. The popularity of such views ideologically prepared German doctors and nurses to accept Nazi social policies promoting survival of only the fittest humans. A historical survey reveals five general presuppositions that strongly impacted medical ethics in the Nazi era. These same five beliefs are being promoted in different ways in contemporary bioethical discourse. Ethical controversies surrounding human embryos revolve around determinations of their moral status. Economic pressures force individuals and societies to examine whether some people's lives are no longer worth living. Human dignity is again being seen as a relative trait found in certain humans, not something inherent. These views strongly impact what is taken to be acceptable within medical ethics. Summary Five beliefs central to social Darwinism will be examined in light of their influence on current discussions in medical ethics and bioethics. Acceptance of these during the Nazi

  2. The role of mitogen-activated protein kinases and sterol receptor coactivator-1 in TGF-β-regulated expression of genes implicated in macrophage cholesterol uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Rebecca C.; Foka, Pelagia; Davies, Thomas S.; Gallagher, Hayley; Michael, Daryn R.; Ashlin, Tim G.; Ramji, Dipak P.

    2016-01-01

    The anti-atherogenic cytokine TGF-β inhibits macrophage foam cell formation by suppressing the expression of key genes implicated in the uptake of modified lipoproteins. We have previously shown a critical role for p38 MAPK and JNK in the TGF-β-mediated regulation of apolipoprotein E expression in human monocytes. However, the roles of these two MAPK pathways in the control of expression of key genes involved in the uptake of modified lipoproteins in human macrophages is poorly understood and formed the focus of this study. TGF-β activated both p38 MAPK and JNK, and knockdown of p38 MAPK or c-Jun, a key downstream target of JNK action, demonstrated their requirement in the TGF-β-inhibited expression of several key genes implicated in macrophage lipoprotein uptake. The potential role of c-Jun and specific co-activators in the action of TGF-β was investigated further by studies on the lipoprotein lipase gene. c-Jun did not directly interact with the minimal promoter region containing the TGF-β response elements and a combination of transient transfection and knock down assays revealed an important role for SRC-1. These studies provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the TGF-β-mediated inhibition of macrophage gene expression associated with the control of cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:27687241

  3. The role of mitogen-activated protein kinases and sterol receptor coactivator-1 in TGF-β-regulated expression of genes implicated in macrophage cholesterol uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Rebecca C; Foka, Pelagia; Davies, Thomas S; Gallagher, Hayley; Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Ramji, Dipak P

    2016-09-30

    The anti-atherogenic cytokine TGF-β inhibits macrophage foam cell formation by suppressing the expression of key genes implicated in the uptake of modified lipoproteins. We have previously shown a critical role for p38 MAPK and JNK in the TGF-β-mediated regulation of apolipoprotein E expression in human monocytes. However, the roles of these two MAPK pathways in the control of expression of key genes involved in the uptake of modified lipoproteins in human macrophages is poorly understood and formed the focus of this study. TGF-β activated both p38 MAPK and JNK, and knockdown of p38 MAPK or c-Jun, a key downstream target of JNK action, demonstrated their requirement in the TGF-β-inhibited expression of several key genes implicated in macrophage lipoprotein uptake. The potential role of c-Jun and specific co-activators in the action of TGF-β was investigated further by studies on the lipoprotein lipase gene. c-Jun did not directly interact with the minimal promoter region containing the TGF-β response elements and a combination of transient transfection and knock down assays revealed an important role for SRC-1. These studies provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the TGF-β-mediated inhibition of macrophage gene expression associated with the control of cholesterol homeostasis.

  4. Human loci involved in drug biotransformation: worldwide genetic variation, population structure, and pharmacogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Fuselli, Silvia

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the role of inheritance in individual variation in drug response is the focus of pharmacogenetics (PGx). A key part of this understanding is quantifying the role of genetic ancestry in this phenotypic outcome. To provide insight into the relationship between ethnicity and drug response, this study first infers the global distribution of PGx variation and defines its structure. Second, the study evaluates if geographic population structure stems from all PGx loci in general, or if structure is caused by specific genes. Lastly, we identify the genetic variants contributing the greatest proportion of such structure. Our study describes the global genetic structure of PGx loci across the 52 populations of the Human Genome Diversity Cell-Line Panel, the most inclusive set of human populations freely available for studies on human genetic variation. By analysing genetic variation at 1,001 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in biotransformation of exogenous substances, we describe the between-populations PGx variation, as well geographical groupings of diversity. In addition, with discriminant analysis of principal component (DAPC), we infer how many and which groups of populations are supported by PGx variation, and identify which SNPs actually contribute to the PGx structure between such groups. Our results show that intergenic, synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs show similar levels of genetic variation across the globe. Conversely, loci coding for Cytochrome P450s (mainly metabolizing exogenous substances) show significantly higher levels of genetic diversity between populations than the other gene categories. Overall, genetic variation at PGx loci correlates with geographic distances between populations, and the apportionment of genetic variation is similar to that observed for the rest of the genome. In other words, the pattern of PGx variation has been mainly shaped by the demographic history of our species, as in the case of most of our

  5. Rescue and expression of human immunoglobulin genes to generate functional human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A P; Parry, N; Peakman, T C; Crowe, J S

    1992-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibody production has been hampered for many years by the instability of cell lines and low levels of expression of the antibodies. We describe here the rescue of human immunoglobulin genes utilizing micro-mRNA preparation from a small number of human hybridoma cells and conventional cDNA cloning. This allows cloning and immediate high-level expression from full-length human heavy and light chain cDNA molecules and provides a mechanism to rescue whole human monoclonal antibodies of proven efficacy.

  6. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettie M Lipner

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects.

  7. Prostasomes: Their Characterisation: Implications for Human Reproduction: Prostasomes and Human Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquist, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a principal accessory genital gland that is vital for normal fertility. Epithelial cells lining the prostate acini release in a defined fashion (exocytosis) organellar nanosized structures named prostasomes. They are involved in the protection of sperm cells against immune response in the female reproductive tract by modulating the complement system and by inhibiting monocyte and neutrophil phagocytosis and lymphocyte proliferation. The immunomodulatory function most probably involves small non-coding RNAs present in prostasomes. Prostasomes have also been proposed to regulate the timing of sperm cell capacitation and induction of the acrosome reaction, since they are rich in various transferable bioactive molecules (e.g. receptors and enzymes) that promote the fertilising ability of sperm cells. Antigenicity of sperm cells has been well documented and implicated in involuntary immunological infertility of human couples, and antisperm antibodies (ASA) occur in several body fluids. The propensity of sperm cells to carry attached prostasomes suggests that they are a new category of sperm antigens. Circulating human ASA recognise prostasomes, and among 12 identified prostasomal antigens, prolactin- inducible protein (95 %) and clusterin (85 %) were immunodominant at the expense of the other 10 that were sporadically occurring.

  8. Human Genome Diversity Project. Summary of planning workshop 3(B): Ethical and human-rights implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The third planning workshop of the Human Genome Diversity Project was held on the campus of the US National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, from February 16 through February 18, 1993. The second day of the workshop was devoted to an exploration of the ethical and human-rights implications of the Project. This open meeting centered on three roundtables, involving 12 invited participants, and the resulting discussions among all those present. Attendees and their affiliations are listed in the attached Appendix A. The discussion was guided by a schedule and list of possible issues, distributed to all present and attached as Appendix B. This is a relatively complete, and thus lengthy, summary of the comments at the meeting. The beginning of the summary sets out as conclusions some issues on which there appeared to be widespread agreement, but those conclusions are not intended to serve as a set of detailed recommendations. The meeting organizer is distributing his recommendations in a separate memorandum; recommendations from others who attended the meeting are welcome and will be distributed by the meeting organizer to the participants and to the Project committee.

  9. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  10. Gene expression signature of fibroblast serum response predicts human cancer progression: similarities between tumors and wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Y Chang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer invasion and metastasis have been likened to wound healing gone awry. Despite parallels in cellular behavior between cancer progression and wound healing, the molecular relationships between these two processes and their prognostic implications are unclear. In this study, based on gene expression profiles of fibroblasts from ten anatomic sites, we identify a stereotyped gene expression program in response to serum exposure that appears to reflect the multifaceted role of fibroblasts in wound healing. The genes comprising this fibroblast common serum response are coordinately regulated in many human tumors, allowing us to identify tumors with gene expression signatures suggestive of active wounds. Genes induced in the fibroblast serum-response program are expressed in tumors by the tumor cells themselves, by tumor-associated fibroblasts, or both. The molecular features that define this wound-like phenotype are evident at an early clinical stage, persist during treatment, and predict increased risk of metastasis and death in breast, lung, and gastric carcinomas. Thus, the transcriptional signature of the response of fibroblasts to serum provides a possible link between cancer progression and wound healing, as well as a powerful predictor of the clinical course in several common carcinomas.

  11. Microarray analyses of glucocorticoid and vitamin D3 target genes in differentiating cultured human podocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwen Cheng

    Full Text Available Glomerular podocytes are highly differentiated epithelial cells that are key components of the kidney filtration units. Podocyte damage or loss is the hallmark of nephritic diseases characterized by severe proteinuria. Recent studies implicate that hormones including glucocorticoids (ligand for glucocorticoid receptor and vitamin D3 (ligand for vitamin D receptor protect or promote repair of podocytes from injury. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying hormone-mediated podocyte-protecting activity from injury, we carried out microarray gene expression studies to identify the target genes and corresponding pathways in response to these hormones during podocyte differentiation. We used immortalized human cultured podocytes (HPCs as a model system and carried out in vitro differentiation assays followed by dexamethasone (Dex or vitamin D3 (VD3 treatment. Upon the induction of differentiation, multiple functional categories including cell cycle, organelle dynamics, mitochondrion, apoptosis and cytoskeleton organization were among the most significantly affected. Interestingly, while Dex and VD3 are capable of protecting podocytes from injury, they only share limited target genes and affected pathways. Compared to VD3 treatment, Dex had a broader and greater impact on gene expression profiles. In-depth analyses of Dex altered genes indicate that Dex crosstalks with a broad spectrum of signaling pathways, of which inflammatory responses, cell migration, angiogenesis, NF-κB and TGFβ pathways are predominantly altered. Together, our study provides new information and identifies several new avenues for future investigation of hormone signaling in podocytes.

  12. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper David N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease.

  13. A review of gene-environment correlations and their implications for autism: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Shantel E; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Jahromi, Laudan B; Valiente, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    A conceptual model is proposed that explains how gene-environment correlations and the multiplier effect function in the context of social development in individuals with autism. The review discusses the current state of autism genetic research, including its challenges, such as the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder, and its limitations, such as the lack of interdisciplinary work between geneticists and social scientists. We discuss literature on gene-environment correlations in the context of social development and draw implications for individuals with autism. The review expands upon genes, behaviors, types of environmental exposure, and exogenous variables relevant to social development in individuals on the autism spectrum, and explains these factors in the context of the conceptual model to provide a more in-depth understanding of how the effects of certain genetic variants can be multiplied by the environment to cause largely phenotypic individual differences. Using the knowledge gathered from gene-environment correlations and the multiplier effect, we outline novel intervention directions and implications.

  14. Cloning the human gene for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paralkar, V.; Wistow, G. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was originally identified as a lymphokine. However, recent work strongly suggests a wider role for MIF beyond the immune system. It is expressed specifically in the differentiating cells of the immunologically privileged eye lens and brain, is a delayed early response gene in fibroblasts, and is expressed in many tissues. Here, the authors report the structure of the remarkably small gene for human MIF that has three exons separated by introns of only 189 and 95 bp and covers less than 1 kb. The cloned sequence also includes 1 kb of 5[prime] flanking region. Primer extension and 5[prime] rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) of human brain RNA both indicate the presence of a single transcription start site in a TATA-less promoter. Northern blot analysis shows a single size of MIF mRNA (about 800 nt) in all human tissues examined. In contrast to previous reports, they find no evidence for multiple genes for MIF in the human genome. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Translational regulation of human p53 gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, L.; Minden, M D; Benchimol, S

    1996-01-01

    In blast cells obtained from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, p53 mRNA was present in all the samples examined while the expression of p53 protein was variable from patient to patient. Mutations in the p53 gene are infrequent in this disease and, hence, variable protein expression in the majority of the samples cannot be accounted for by mutation. In this study, we examined the regulation of p53 gene expression in human leukemic blasts and characterized the p53 transcripts in these c...

  16. Humans as Superorganisms: How Microbes, Viruses, Imprinted Genes, and Other Selfish Entities Shape Our Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Peter; Bressan, Paola

    2015-07-01

    Psychologists and psychiatrists tend to be little aware that (a) microbes in our brains and guts are capable of altering our behavior; (b) viral DNA that was incorporated into our DNA millions of years ago is implicated in mental disorders; (c) many of us carry the cells of another human in our brains; and (d) under the regulation of viruslike elements, the paternally inherited and maternally inherited copies of some genes compete for domination in the offspring, on whom they have opposite physical and behavioral effects. This article provides a broad overview, aimed at a wide readership, of the consequences of our coexistence with these selfish entities. The overarching message is that we are not unitary individuals but superorganisms, built out of both human and nonhuman elements; it is their interaction that determines who we are.

  17. Implication of a Plasmodium falciparum gene in the switch between asexual reproduction and gametocytogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Donald L; Dixon, Matthew W A; Spielmann, Tobias; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Hawthorne, Paula L; Ortega, Maria R; Kemp, David J; Trenholme, Katharine R

    2005-04-01

    Gametocytogenesis is fundamental for transmission of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum from the human host to the mosquito vector, yet very little is understood about what triggers the switch between asexual reproduction and gametocytogenesis. Arresting the progression through the sexual cycle would block transmission of this disease. Here we identify a novel gene in P. falciparum that when genetically silenced reduces gametocyte production by a factor of 6, and when complemented up-regulates gametocyte-specific gene transcription.

  18. Implication of the changing concept of genes on plant breeder’s work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio D. Dias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent genome sequencing of some species has accumulated evidence that for a large number of traits, thecontrol and action of genes are far more complex than previously thought. This article discusses possible implications of newinsights into the gene concept on the work of plant breeders. Apparently, the successful application of biotechnological techniques is not as simple as once assumed. The evident changes in the available concept of genes confirmed what the past experience had shown,i.e, selection should focus on the phenotype, under the same conditions as the plant is to be cultivated in. Advanced vocationaltraining of plant breeders must be continuously maintained, focusing on phenotype-based selection in as accurate as possibleexperiments.

  19. Suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies with human intraocular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ruoxin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR has become widely applied as a method to measure transcript abundance. In order to be reflective of biological processes during health and disease this method is dependent on normalisation of data against stable endogenous controls. However, these genes can vary in their stability in different cell types. The importance of reference gene validation for a particular cell type is now well recognised and is an important step in any gene expression study. Results Cultured primary human choroidal and retinal endothelial cells were treated with the immunostimulant polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid or untreated. qRT-PCR was used to quantify the expression levels of 10 commonly used endogenous control genes, TBP, HPRT1, GAPDH, GUSB, PPIA, RPLP0, B2M, 18S rRNA, PGK1 and ACTB. Three different mathematical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper were used to analyse gene stability to give the most representative validation. In choroidal endothelial cells the most stable genes were ranked as HPRT1 and GUSB by GeNorm and NormFinder and HPRT1 and PPIA by BestKeeper. In retinal endothelial cells the most stable genes ranked were TBP and PGK1 by GeNorm and NormFinder and HPRT1 by BestKeeper. The least stable gene for both cell types was 18S with all 3 algorithms. Conclusions We have identified the most stable endogenous control genes in intraocular endothelial cells. It is suggested future qRT-PCR studies using these cells would benefit from adopting the genes identified in this study as the most appropriate endogenous control genes.

  20. Keratin Gene Mutations in Disorders of Human Skin and its Appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Syed, Deeba N.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia, are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 21 different genes including hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been associated with diverse hereditary disorders. The exact phenotype of each disease mostly reflects the spatial level of expression and types of the mutated keratin genes, the positions of the mutations as well as their consequences at sub-cellular levels. The identification of specific mutations in keratin disorders is the basis of our understanding that lead to reclassification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe cutaneous keratin genodermatoses. A disturbance in cutaneous keratins as a result of mutation(s) in the gene(s) that encode keratin intermediate filaments (KIF) causes keratinocytes and cutaneous tissue fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by a loss of structural integrity in keratinocytes expressing mutated keratins in vivo, often manifested as keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI), pachyonychia congenital (PC), monilethrix, steatocystoma multiplex and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). These keratins also have been identified to have roles in cell growth, apoptosis, tissue polarity, wound healing and tissue remodeling. PMID:21176769

  1. The immune landscape of human tumors: Implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindea, Gabriela; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Angell, Helen K; Galon, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spontaneous immune response of cancer patients is critical for the design of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. The power of integrative tumor immunology approaches allowed for a comprehensive view of the immune system evolution in the course of tumor progression and recurrence. We have demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating immune cells are spatiotemporally regulated, a finding that has profound implications for the development of efficient anticancer immunotherapies.

  2. Exploring Writing In The Workplace: Implications For Human Resource Development

    OpenAIRE

    AKDERE, Dr. Mesut; AZEVEDO, Dr.Ross E.

    2010-01-01

    Writing in the workplace is among the understudied business topics in the field of HRD. Yet, the impacts of writing in today's workplace are significant, and organizations making it a priority benefit from it. Furthermore, writing is related to the issue of workplace literacy which is the umbrella term for basic communication skills. This literature review provides a general view on workplace writing and discusses implications to HRD within a model research proposal

  3. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Lane

    Full Text Available Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408 and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282. Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05, respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05. Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival

  4. Therapeutic Role of Rifaximin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical Implication of Human Pregnane X Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jie; Yatrik M. Shah; Ma, Xiaochao; Pang, Xiaoyan; Tanaka, Toshiya; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a human PXR activator, is in clinical trials for treatment of IBD and has demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease and active ulcerative colitis. In the current study, the protective and therapeutic role of rifaximin in IBD and its respective mechanism were investigated. PXR-humanized (hPXR), wild-type, and Pxr-null mice were treated with rifaximin in the dextran sulfate sod...

  5. Evolutionary genetic analyses of MEF2C gene: implications for learning and memory in Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmady, Sunil V; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Arasappa, Rashmi; Rao, Naren P

    2013-02-01

    MEF2C facilitates context-dependent fear conditioning (CFC) which is a salient aspect of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. CFC might have played a crucial role in human evolution because of its advantageous influence on survival of species. In this study, we analyzed 23 orthologous mammalian gene sequences of MEF2C gene to examine the evidence for positive selection on this gene in Homo sapiens using Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) and HyPhy software. Both PAML Bayes Empirical Bayes (BEB) and HyPhy Fixed Effects Likelihood (FEL) analyses supported significant positive selection on 4 codon sites in H. sapiens. Also, haplotter analysis revealed significant ongoing positive selection on this gene in Central European population. The study findings suggest that adaptive selective pressure on this gene might have influenced human evolution. Further research on this gene might unravel the potential role of this gene in learning and memory as well as its pathogenetic effect in certain hippocampal disorders with evolutionary basis like schizophrenia.

  6. Genomic discovery of potent chromatin insulators for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingdong; Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Hao; Qi, Heyuan; Song, Chao-Zhong; Navas, Patrick A; Emery, David W; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2015-02-01

    Insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity, which usually manifest as hematopoietic malignancy, represent major barriers to realizing the promise of gene therapy. Although insulator sequences that block transcriptional enhancers could mitigate or eliminate these risks, so far no human insulators with high functional potency have been identified. Here we describe a genomic approach for the identification of compact sequence elements that function as insulators. These elements are highly occupied by the insulator protein CTCF, are DNase I hypersensitive and represent only a small minority of the CTCF recognition sequences in the human genome. We show that the elements identified acted as potent enhancer blockers and substantially decreased the risk of tumor formation in a cancer-prone animal model. The elements are small, can be efficiently accommodated by viral vectors and have no detrimental effects on viral titers. The insulators we describe here are expected to increase the safety of gene therapy for genetic diseases.

  7. The ING tumor suppressor genes: status in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérillon, Claire; Bigot, Nicolas; Pedeux, Rémy

    2014-04-01

    ING genes (ING1-5) were identified has tumor suppressor genes. ING proteins are characterized as Type II TSGs since they are involved in the control of cell proliferation, apoptosis and senescence. They may also function as Type I TSGs since they are also involved in DNA replication and repair. Most studies have reported that they are frequently lost in human tumors and epigenetic mechanisms or misregulation of their transcription may be involved. Recently, studies have described that this loss may be caused by microRNA inhibition. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ING functions, their involvement in tumor suppression and, in order to give a full assessment of the current knowledge, we review all the studies that have examined ING status in human cancers.

  8. Developmental gene expression profiles of the human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Geoffrey N; Moertel, Luke; Brindley, Paul J; McManus, Donald P

    2009-01-01

    Background The schistosome blood flukes are complex trematodes and cause a chronic parasitic disease of significant public health importance worldwide, schistosomiasis. Their life cycle is characterised by distinct parasitic and free-living phases involving mammalian and snail hosts and freshwater. Microarray analysis was used to profile developmental gene expression in the Asian species, Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNAs were isolated from the three distinct environmental phases of the lifecycle – aquatic/snail (eggs, miracidia, sporocysts, cercariae), juvenile (lung schistosomula and paired but pre-egg laying adults) and adult (paired, mature males and egg-producing females, both examined separately). Advanced analyses including ANOVA, principal component analysis, and hierarchal clustering provided a global synopsis of gene expression relationships among the different developmental stages of the schistosome parasite. Results Gene expression profiles were linked to the major environmental settings through which the developmental stages of the fluke have to adapt during the course of its life cycle. Gene ontologies of the differentially expressed genes revealed a wide range of functions and processes. In addition, stage-specific, differentially expressed genes were identified that were involved in numerous biological pathways and functions including calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism and parasite defence. Conclusion The findings provide a comprehensive database of gene expression in an important human pathogen, including transcriptional changes in genes involved in evasion of the host immune response, nutrient acquisition, energy production, calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism, egg production and tegumental function during development. This resource should help facilitate the identification and prioritization of new anti-schistosome drug and vaccine targets for the control of schistosomiasis. PMID:19320991

  9. Developmental gene expression profiles of the human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManus Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The schistosome blood flukes are complex trematodes and cause a chronic parasitic disease of significant public health importance worldwide, schistosomiasis. Their life cycle is characterised by distinct parasitic and free-living phases involving mammalian and snail hosts and freshwater. Microarray analysis was used to profile developmental gene expression in the Asian species, Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNAs were isolated from the three distinct environmental phases of the lifecycle – aquatic/snail (eggs, miracidia, sporocysts, cercariae, juvenile (lung schistosomula and paired but pre-egg laying adults and adult (paired, mature males and egg-producing females, both examined separately. Advanced analyses including ANOVA, principal component analysis, and hierarchal clustering provided a global synopsis of gene expression relationships among the different developmental stages of the schistosome parasite. Results Gene expression profiles were linked to the major environmental settings through which the developmental stages of the fluke have to adapt during the course of its life cycle. Gene ontologies of the differentially expressed genes revealed a wide range of functions and processes. In addition, stage-specific, differentially expressed genes were identified that were involved in numerous biological pathways and functions including calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism and parasite defence. Conclusion The findings provide a comprehensive database of gene expression in an important human pathogen, including transcriptional changes in genes involved in evasion of the host immune response, nutrient acquisition, energy production, calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism, egg production and tegumental function during development. This resource should help facilitate the identification and prioritization of new anti-schistosome drug and vaccine targets for the control of schistosomiasis.

  10. Human Capital Linkages to Labour Productivity: Implications from Thai Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukumnuaykit, Pungpond; Pholphirul, Piriya

    2016-01-01

    Human capital investment is a necessary condition for improving labour market outcomes in most countries. Empirical studies to investigate human capital and its linkages on the labour demand side are, however, relatively scarce due to limitations of firm-level data-sets. Using firm-level data from the Thai manufacturing sector, this paper aims to…

  11. Human Capital Linkages to Labour Productivity: Implications from Thai Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukumnuaykit, Pungpond; Pholphirul, Piriya

    2016-01-01

    Human capital investment is a necessary condition for improving labour market outcomes in most countries. Empirical studies to investigate human capital and its linkages on the labour demand side are, however, relatively scarce due to limitations of firm-level data-sets. Using firm-level data from the Thai manufacturing sector, this paper aims to…

  12. Study of human dopamine sulfotransferases based on gene expression programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Hongzong; Zhao, Jiangang; Cui, Lianhua; Lian, Ning; Feng, Hanlin; Duan, Yun-Bo; Hu, Zhide

    2011-09-01

    A quantitative model is developed to predict the Km of 47 human dopamine sulfotransferases by gene expression programming. Each kind of compound is represented by several calculated structural descriptors of moment of inertia A, average electrophilic reactivity index for a C atom, relative number of triple bonds, RNCG relative negative charge, HA-dependent HDSA-1, and HBCA H-bonding charged surface area. Eight fitness functions of the gene expression programming method are used to find the best nonlinear model. The best quantitative model with squared standard error and square of correlation coefficient are 0.096 and 0.91 for training data set, and 0.102 and 0.88 for test set, respectively. It is shown that the gene expression programming-predicted results with fitness function are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  13. The distribution of SNPs in human gene regulatory regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yongjian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of high-throughput genotyping methods, millions of human genetic variants have been reported in recent years. To efficiently identify those with significant biological functions, a practical strategy is to concentrate on variants located in important sequence regions such as gene regulatory regions. Results Analysis of the most common type of variant, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, shows that in gene promoter regions more SNPs occur in close proximity to transcriptional start sites than in regions further upstream, and a disproportionate number of those SNPs represent nucleotide transversions. Additionally, the number of SNPs found in the predicted transcription factor binding sites is higher than in non-binding site sequences. Conclusion Current information about transcription factor binding site sequence patterns may not be exhaustive, and SNPs may be actively involved in influencing gene expression by affecting the transcription factor binding sites.

  14. Contemporary human-altered landscapes and oceanic barriers reduce bumble bee gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S

    2015-03-01

    Much of the world's terrestrial landscapes are being altered by humans in the form of agriculture, urbanization and pastoral systems, with major implications for biodiversity. Bumble bees are one of the most effective pollinators in both natural and cultivated landscapes, but are often the first to be extirpated in human-altered habitats. Yet, little is known about the role of natural and human-altered habitats in promoting or limiting bumble bee gene flow. In this study, I closely examine the genetic structure of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, across the southwestern US coast and find strong evidence that natural oceanic barriers, as well as contemporary human-altered habitats, limit bee gene flow. Heterozygosity and allelic richness were lower in island populations, while private allelic richness was higher in island populations compared to mainland populations. Genetic differentiation, measured for three indices across the 1000 km study region, was significantly greater than the null expectation (F(ST) = 0.041, F'(ST) = 0.044 and D(est) = 0.155) and correlated with geographic distance. Furthermore, genetic differentiation patterns were most strongly correlated with contemporary (2011) not past (2006, 2001) resistance maps calibrated for high dispersal limitation over oceans, impervious habitat and croplands. Despite the incorporation of dramatic elevation gradients, the analyses reveal that oceans and contemporary human land use, not mountains, are the primary dispersal barriers for B. vosnesenskii gene flow. These findings reinforce the importance of maintaining corridors of suitable habitat across the distribution range of native pollinators to promote their persistence and safeguard their ability to provide essential pollination services.

  15. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...... gut metagenome and the minimal gut bacterial genome in terms of functions present in all individuals and most bacteria, respectively....

  16. Genome-Wide Associations of Gene Expression Variation in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  17. Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  18. Robust, synergistic regulation of human gene expression using TALE activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Reyon, Deepak; Angstman, James F; Fu, Yanfang; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2013-03-01

    Artificial activators designed using transcription activator-like effector (TALE) technology have broad utility, but previous studies suggest that these monomeric proteins often exhibit low activities. Here we demonstrate that TALE activators can robustly function individually or in synergistic combinations to increase expression of endogenous human genes over wide dynamic ranges. These findings will encourage applications of TALE activators for research and therapy, and guide design of monomeric TALE-based fusion proteins.

  19. Gene expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in human glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novi S. Hardiany

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study analyze the MnSOD gene expression as endogenous antioxidant in human glioma cells compared with leucocyte cells as control.Methods MnSOD gene expression of 20 glioma patients was analyzed by measuring the relative expression of mRNA and enzyme activity of MnSOD in brain and leucocyte cells. The relative expression of mRNA MnSOD was determined by using quantitative Real Time RT-PCR and the enzyme activity of MnSOD using biochemical kit assay (xantine oxidase inhibition. Statistic analysis for mRNA and enzyme activity of MnSOD was performed using Kruskal Wallis test.Results mRNA of MnSOD in glioma cells of 70% sample was 0.015–0.627 lower, 10% was 1.002-1.059 and 20% was 1.409-6.915 higher than in leucocyte cells. Also the specific activity of MnSOD enzyme in glioma cells of 80% sample showed 0,064-0,506 lower and 20% sample was 1.249-2.718 higher than in leucocyte cells.Conclusion MnSOD gene expression in human glioma cells are significantly lower than its expression in leucocytes cells. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:21-5Keywords : MnSOD, glioma, gene expression

  20. Reference gene alternatives to Gapdh in rodent and human heart failure gene expression studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Finn Olav

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR is a highly sensitive method for mRNA quantification, but requires invariant expression of the chosen reference gene(s. In pathological myocardium, there is limited information on suitable reference genes other than the commonly used Gapdh mRNA and 18S ribosomal RNA. Our aim was to evaluate and identify suitable reference genes in human failing myocardium, in rat and mouse post-myocardial infarction (post-MI heart failure and across developmental stages in fetal and neonatal rat myocardium. Results The abundance of Arbp, Rpl32, Rpl4, Tbp, Polr2a, Hprt1, Pgk1, Ppia and Gapdh mRNA and 18S ribosomal RNA in myocardial samples was quantified by RT-qPCR. The expression variability of these transcripts was evaluated by the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms and by a variance component analysis method. Biological variability was a greater contributor to sample variability than either repeated reverse transcription or PCR reactions. Conclusions The most stable reference genes were Rpl32, Gapdh and Polr2a in mouse post-infarction heart failure, Polr2a, Rpl32 and Tbp in rat post-infarction heart failure and Rpl32 and Pgk1 in human heart failure (ischemic disease and cardiomyopathy. The overall most stable reference genes across all three species was Rpl32 and Polr2a. In rat myocardium, all reference genes tested showed substantial variation with developmental stage, with Rpl4 as was most stable among the tested genes.

  1. Inter-MAR association contributes to transcriptionally active looping events in human beta-globin gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Di, Li-Jun; Lv, Xiang; Zheng, Wei; Xue, Zheng; Guo, Zhi-Chen; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chi-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are important in chromatin organization and gene regulation. Although it is known that there are a number of MAR elements in the beta-globin gene cluster, it is unclear that how these MAR elements are involved in regulating beta-globin genes expression. Here, we report the identification of a new MAR element at the LCR (locus control region) of human beta-globin gene cluster and the detection of the inter-MAR association within the beta-globin gene cluster. Also, we demonstrate that SATB1, a protein factor that has been implicated in the formation of network like higher order chromatin structures at some gene loci, takes part in beta-globin specific inter-MAR association through binding the specific MARs. Knocking down of SATB1 obviously reduces the binding of SATB1 to the MARs and diminishes the frequency of the inter-MAR association. As a result, the ACH establishment and the alpha-like globin genes and beta-like globin genes expressions are affected either. In summary, our results suggest that SATB1 is a regulatory factor of hemoglobin genes, especially the early differentiation genes at least through affecting the higher order chromatin structure.

  2. FGFR-TACC gene fusions in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasorella, Anna; Sanson, Marc; Iavarone, Antonio

    2016-11-16

    Chromosomal translocations joining in-frame members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-transforming acidic coiled-coil gene families (the FGFR-TACC gene fusions) were first discovered in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and later in many other cancer types. Here, we review this rapidly expanding field of research and discuss the unique biological and clinical features conferred to isocitrate dehydrogenase wild-type glioma cells by FGFR-TACC fusions. FGFR-TACC fusions generate powerful oncogenes that combine growth-promoting effects with aneuploidy through the activation of as yet unclear intracellular signaling mechanisms. FGFR-TACC fusions appear to be clonal tumor-initiating events that confer strong sensitivity to FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Screening assays have recently been reported for the accurate identification of FGFR-TACC fusion variants in human cancer, and early clinical data have shown promising effects in cancer patients harboring FGFR-TACC fusions and treated with FGFR inhibitors. Thus, FGFR-TACC gene fusions provide a "low-hanging fruit" model for the validation of precision medicine paradigms in human GBM.

  3. Spina Bifida: Pathogenesis, Mechanisms, and Genes in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti W. Mohd-Zin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spina bifida is among the phenotypes of the larger condition known as neural tube defects (NTDs. It is the most common central nervous system malformation compatible with life and the second leading cause of birth defects after congenital heart defects. In this review paper, we define spina bifida and discuss the phenotypes seen in humans as described by both surgeons and embryologists in order to compare and ultimately contrast it to the leading animal model, the mouse. Our understanding of spina bifida is currently limited to the observations we make in mouse models, which reflect complete or targeted knockouts of genes, which perturb the whole gene(s without taking into account the issue of haploinsufficiency, which is most prominent in the human spina bifida condition. We thus conclude that the need to study spina bifida in all its forms, both aperta and occulta, is more indicative of the spina bifida in surviving humans and that the measure of deterioration arising from caudal neural tube defects, more commonly known as spina bifida, must be determined by the level of the lesion both in mouse and in man.

  4. Spina Bifida: Pathogenesis, Mechanisms, and Genes in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Zin, Siti W; Marwan, Ahmed I; Abou Chaar, Mohamad K; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M

    2017-01-01

    Spina bifida is among the phenotypes of the larger condition known as neural tube defects (NTDs). It is the most common central nervous system malformation compatible with life and the second leading cause of birth defects after congenital heart defects. In this review paper, we define spina bifida and discuss the phenotypes seen in humans as described by both surgeons and embryologists in order to compare and ultimately contrast it to the leading animal model, the mouse. Our understanding of spina bifida is currently limited to the observations we make in mouse models, which reflect complete or targeted knockouts of genes, which perturb the whole gene(s) without taking into account the issue of haploinsufficiency, which is most prominent in the human spina bifida condition. We thus conclude that the need to study spina bifida in all its forms, both aperta and occulta, is more indicative of the spina bifida in surviving humans and that the measure of deterioration arising from caudal neural tube defects, more commonly known as spina bifida, must be determined by the level of the lesion both in mouse and in man.

  5. Promoter methylation analysis of IDH genes in human gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eFlanagan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH -1 or -2 are found in the majority of WHO grade II and III astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, and secondary glioblastomas. Almost all described mutations are heterozygous missense mutations affecting a conserved arginine residue in the substrate binding site of IDH1 (R132 or IDH2 (R172. But the exact mechanism of IDH mutations in neoplasia is not understood. It has been proposed that IDH mutations impart a ‘toxic gain of function’ to the mutant protein, however a dominant-negative effect of mutant IDH has also been described, implying that IDH may function as a tumour suppressor gene. As most, if not all, tumour suppressor genes are inactivated by epigenetic silencing, in a wide variety of tumours, we asked if IDH1 or IDH2 carry the epigenetic signature of a tumour suppressor by assessing cytosine methylation at their promoters. Methylation was quantified in 68 human brain tumours, including both IDH-mutant and IDH wildtype, by bisulfite pyrosequencing. In all tumours examined, CpG methylation levels were less than 8%. Our data demonstrate that inactivation of IDH function through promoter hypermethylation is not common in human gliomas and other brain tumours. These findings do not support a tumour suppressor role for IDH genes in human gliomas.

  6. Spina Bifida: Pathogenesis, Mechanisms, and Genes in Mice and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Chaar, Mohamad K.; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina

    2017-01-01

    Spina bifida is among the phenotypes of the larger condition known as neural tube defects (NTDs). It is the most common central nervous system malformation compatible with life and the second leading cause of birth defects after congenital heart defects. In this review paper, we define spina bifida and discuss the phenotypes seen in humans as described by both surgeons and embryologists in order to compare and ultimately contrast it to the leading animal model, the mouse. Our understanding of spina bifida is currently limited to the observations we make in mouse models, which reflect complete or targeted knockouts of genes, which perturb the whole gene(s) without taking into account the issue of haploinsufficiency, which is most prominent in the human spina bifida condition. We thus conclude that the need to study spina bifida in all its forms, both aperta and occulta, is more indicative of the spina bifida in surviving humans and that the measure of deterioration arising from caudal neural tube defects, more commonly known as spina bifida, must be determined by the level of the lesion both in mouse and in man. PMID:28286691

  7. A human phenome-interactome network of protein complexes implicated in genetic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart; Størling, Zenia, Marian

    2007-01-01

    the known disease-causing protein as the top candidate, and in 870 intervals with no identified disease-causing gene, provides novel candidates implicated in disorders such as retinitis pigmentosa, epithelial ovarian cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, type...

  8. RNA Sequence Analysis of Human Huntington Disease Brain Reveals an Extensive Increase in Inflammatory and Developmental Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Labadorf

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Transcriptional dysregulation in the human HD brain has been documented but is incompletely understood. Here we present a genome-wide analysis of mRNA expression in human prefrontal cortex from 20 HD and 49 neuropathologically normal controls using next generation high-throughput sequencing. Surprisingly, 19% (5,480 of the 28,087 confidently detected genes are differentially expressed (FDR<0.05 and are predominantly up-regulated. A novel hypothesis-free geneset enrichment method that dissects large gene lists into functionally and transcriptionally related groups discovers that the differentially expressed genes are enriched for immune response, neuroinflammation, and developmental genes. Markers for all major brain cell types are observed, suggesting that HD invokes a systemic response in the brain area studied. Unexpectedly, the most strongly differentially expressed genes are a homeotic gene set (represented by Hox and other homeobox genes, that are almost exclusively expressed in HD, a profile not widely implicated in HD pathogenesis. The significance of transcriptional changes of developmental processes in the HD brain is poorly understood and warrants further investigation. The role of inflammation and the significance of non-neuronal involvement in HD pathogenesis suggest anti-inflammatory therapeutics may offer important opportunities in treating HD.

  9. Human genome and the african personality: implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickel, Elijah; Miller, Sheila D

    2011-01-01

    The integration of the human genome with the African personality should be viewed as an interdependent whole. The African personality, for purposes of this article, comprises Black experiences, Negritude, and an Africa-centered axiology and epistemology. The outcome results in a spiritual focused collective consciousness. Anthropologically, historically (and with the Human Genome Project), genetically Africa has proven to be the source of all human life. Human kind wherever they exist on the planet using the African personality must be viewed as interconnected. Although racism and its progeny discrimination preexist the human genome project (HGP), the human genome provides an evidence-based rationale for the end to all policy and subsequent practice based on race and racism. Policy must be based on evidence to be competent practice. It would be remiss if not irresponsible of social work and the other behavioral scientist concerned with intervention and prevention behaviors to not infuse the findings of the HCPs. The African personality is a concept that provides a wholistic way to evaluate human behavior from an African worldview.

  10. Muscle Gene Expression Patterns in Human Rotator Cuff Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Alexander; McCarthy, Meagan; Pichika, Rajeswari; Sato, Eugene J.; Lieber, Richard L.; Schenk, Simon; Lane, John G.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff pathology is a common source of shoulder pain with variable etiology and pathoanatomical characteristics. Pathological processes of fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis have all been invoked as causes for poor outcomes after rotator cuff tear repair. The aims of this study were to measure the expression of key genes associated with adipogenesis, myogenesis, and fibrosis in human rotator cuff muscle after injury and to compare the expression among groups of patients with varied severities of rotator cuff pathology. Methods: Biopsies of the supraspinatus muscle were obtained arthroscopically from twenty-seven patients in the following operative groups: bursitis (n = 10), tendinopathy (n = 7), full-thickness rotator cuff tear (n = 8), and massive rotator cuff tear (n = 2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to characterize gene expression pathways involved in myogenesis, adipogenesis, and fibrosis. Results: Patients with a massive tear demonstrated downregulation of the fibrogenic, adipogenic, and myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle was not in a state of active change and may have difficulty responding to stimuli. Patients with a full-thickness tear showed upregulation of fibrotic and adipogenic genes; at the tissue level, these correspond to the pathologies most detrimental to outcomes of surgical repair. Patients with bursitis or tendinopathy still expressed myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle may be attempting to accommodate the mechanical deficiencies induced by the tendon tear. Conclusions: Gene expression in human rotator cuff muscles varied according to tendon injury severity. Patients with bursitis and tendinopathy appeared to be expressing pro-myogenic genes, whereas patients with a full-thickness tear were expressing genes associated with fatty atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, patients with a massive tear appeared to have downregulation of all gene programs except inhibition of

  11. piR_015520 belongs to Piwi-associated RNAs regulates expression of the human melatonin receptor 1A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Esposito

    Full Text Available Piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs are a distinct class of 24- to 30-nucleotide-long RNAs produced by a Dicer-independent mechanism, and are associated with Piwi-class Argonaute proteins. In contrast to the several hundred species of microRNAs (miRNAs identified thus far, piRNAs consist of more than 30,000 different species in humans. Studies in flies, fish and mice implicate these piRNAs in regulating germ line development, the silencing of selfish DNA elements, and maintaining germ line DNA integrity. Most piRNAs map to unique sites in the human genome, including intergenic, intronic, and exonic sequences. However, the role of piRNAs in humans remains to be elucidated. Here, we uncover an unexpected function of the piRNA pathway in humans. We show for the first time, that the piRNA_015520, located in intron 1 of the human Melatonin receptor 1A (MTNR1A gene, is expressed in adult human tissues (testes and brain and in the human cell line HEK 293. Although the role of piR_015520 expression in brain tissue remains unknown, the testes-specific expression is consistent with previous findings in several species. Surprisingly, in contrast to the mechanism known for miRNA-mediated modulation of gene expression, piRNA_015520 negatively regulates MTNR1A gene expression by binding to its genomic region. This finding suggests that changes in individual piRNA levels could influence both autoregulatory gene expression and the expression of the gene in which the piRNA is located. These findings offer a new perspective for piRNAs functioning as gene regulators in humans.

  12. Mutation and Expression of the DCC Gene in Human Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kohno

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 18q is frequently deleted in lung cancers, a common region of 18q deletions was mapped to chromosome 18g21. Since the DCC candidate tumor suppressor gene has been mapped in this region, mutation and expression of the DCC gene were examined in 46 lung cancer cell lines, consisting of 14 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs and 32 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs, to elucidate the pathogenetic significance of DCC alterations in human lung carcinogenesis. A heterozygous missense mutation was detected in a NSCLC cell line, Ma26, while homozygous deletion was not detected in any of the cell lines. The DCC gene was expressed in 11 (24% of the 46 cell lines, the incidence of DCC expression was significantly higher in SCLCs (7/14, 50% than in NSCLCs (4/32, 13% (P = .01, Fisher's exact test. Therefore, genetic alterations of DCC are infrequent; however, the levels of DCC expression vary among lung cancer cells, in particular, between SCLCs and NSCLCs. The present result does not implicate DCC as a specific mutational target of 18q deletions in human lung cancer; however, it suggests that DCC is a potential target of inactivation by genetic defects including intron or promoter mutations and/or epigenetic alterations. The present result also suggests that DCC expression is associated with some properties of SCLCs, such as a neuroendocrine (NE feature.

  13. Cloning and characterization of the human integrin β6 gene promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyan Xu

    Full Text Available The integrin β6 (ITGB6 gene, which encodes the limiting subunit of the integrin αvβ6 heterodimer, plays an important role in wound healing and carcinogenesis. The mechanism underlying ITGB6 regulation, including the identification of DNA elements and cognate transcription factors responsible for basic transcription of human ITGB6 gene, remains unknown. This report describes the cloning and characterization of the human ITGB6 promoter. Using 5'-RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis, the transcriptional initiation site was identified. Promoter deletion analysis identified and functionally validated a TATA box located in the region -24 to -18 base pairs upstream of the ITGB6 promoter. The regulatory elements for transcription of the ITGB6 gene were predominantly located -289 to -150 from the ITGB6 promoter and contained putative binding sites for transcription factors such as STAT3 and C/EBPα. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, this study has demonstrated, for the first time, that transcription factors STAT3 and C/EBPα are involved in the positive regulation of ITGB6 transcription in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. These findings have important implications for unraveling the mechanism of abnormal ITGB6 activation in tissue remodeling and tumorigenesis.

  14. Detection of differentially methylated gene promoters in failing and nonfailing human left ventricle myocardium using computation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Christopher A; Lee, Eva K; Torres, Rebecca A; Boyd, Amy; Vega, J David; Uppal, Karan; Yuan, Fan; Fields, Earl J; Samarel, Allen M; Lewis, William

    2013-07-15

    Human dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by congestive heart failure and altered myocardial gene expression. Epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, are implicated in the development of DCM but have not been studied extensively. Clinical human DCM and nonfailing control left ventricle samples were individually analyzed for DNA methylation and expressional changes. Expression microarrays were used to identify 393 overexpressed and 349 underexpressed genes in DCM (GEO accession number: GSE43435). Gene promoter microarrays were utilized for DNA methylation analysis, and the resulting data were analyzed by two different computational methods. In the first method, we utilized subtractive analysis of DNA methylation peak data to identify 158 gene promoters exhibiting DNA methylation changes that correlated with expression changes. In the second method, a two-stage approach combined a particle swarm optimization feature selection algorithm and a discriminant analysis via mixed integer programming classifier to identify differentially methylated gene promoters. This analysis identified 51 hypermethylated promoters and six hypomethylated promoters in DCM with 100% cross-validation accuracy in the group assignment. Generation of a composite list of genes identified by subtractive analysis and two-stage computation analysis revealed four genes that exhibited differential DNA methylation by both methods in addition to altered gene expression. Computationally identified genes (AURKB, BTNL9, CLDN5, and TK1) define a central set of differentially methylated gene promoters that are important in classifying DCM. These genes have no previously reported role in DCM. This study documents that rigorous computational analysis applied to microarray analysis of healthy and diseased human heart samples helps to define clinically relevant DNA methylation and expressional changes in DCM.

  15. Dawn of ocular gene therapy: implications for molecular diagnosis in retinal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, ZANEVELD; Feng, WANG; Xia, WANG; Rui, CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to utilize genomic information about patients to tailor treatment. Gene replacement therapy for rare genetic disorders is perhaps the most extreme form of personalized medicine, in that the patients’ genome wholly determines their treatment regimen. Gene therapy for retinal disorders is poised to become a clinical reality. The eye is an optimal site for gene therapy due to the relative ease of precise vector delivery, immune system isolation, and availability for monitoring of any potential damage or side effects. Due to these advantages, clinical trials for gene therapy of retinal diseases are currently underway. A necessary precursor to such gene therapies is accurate molecular diagnosis of the mutation(s) underlying disease. In this review, we discuss the application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to obtain such a diagnosis and identify disease causing genes, using retinal disorders as a case study. After reviewing ocular gene therapy, we discuss the application of NGS to the identification of novel Mendelian disease genes. We then compare current, array based mutation detection methods against next NGS-based methods in three retinal diseases: Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis, Retinitis Pigmentosa, and Stargardt’s disease. We conclude that next-generation sequencing based diagnosis offers several advantages over array based methods, including a higher rate of successful diagnosis and the ability to more deeply and efficiently assay a broad spectrum of mutations. However, the relative difficulty of interpreting sequence results and the development of standardized, reliable bioinformatic tools remain outstanding concerns. In this review, recent advances NGS based molecular diagnoses are discussed, as well as their implications for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:23393028

  16. Identification and characterization of novel rare mutations in the planar cell polarity gene PRICKLE1 in human neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosoi, Ciprian M; Capra, Valeria; Allache, Redouane; Trinh, Vincent Quoc-Huy; De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Drapeau, Pierre; Bassuk, Alexander G; Kibar, Zoha

    2011-12-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls the process of convergent extension (CE) during gastrulation and neural tube closure, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects (NTDs) in animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we analyzed the role of one core PCP gene PRICKLE1 in these malformations. We screened this gene in 810 unrelated NTD patients and identified seven rare missense heterozygous mutations that were absent in all controls analyzed and predicted to be functionally deleterious using bioinformatics. Functional validation of five PRICKLE1 variants in a zebrafish model demonstrated that one variant, p.Arg682Cys, antagonized the CE phenotype induced by the wild-type zebrafish prickle1a (zpk1a) in a dominant fashion. Our study demonstrates that PRICKLE1 could act as a predisposing factor to human NTDs and further expands our knowledge of the role of PCP genes in the pathogenesis of these malformations.

  17. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  18. Identification of differentially regulated genes in human patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Pratik; Bai, Haiqing; Swartz, Michael F; Alfieris, George M; Dean, David A

    2016-07-27

    In order to identify differentially expressed genes that are specific to the ductus arteriosus, 18 candidate genes were evaluated in matched ductus arteriosus and aortic samples from infants with coarctation of the aorta. The cell specificity of the gene's promoters was assessed by performing transient transfection studies in primary cells derived from several patients. Segments of ductus arteriosus and aorta were isolated from infants requiring repair for coarctation of the aorta and used for mRNA quantitation and culturing of cells. Differences in expression were determined by quantitative PCR using the ΔΔCt method. Promoter regions of six of these genes were cloned into luciferase reporter plasmids for transient transfection studies in matched human ductus arteriosus and aorta cells. Transcription factor AP-2b and phospholipase A2 were significantly up-regulated in ductus arteriosus compared to aorta in whole tissues and cultured cells, respectively. In transient transfection experiments, Angiotensin II type 1 receptor and Prostaglandin E receptor 4 promoters consistently gave higher expression in matched ductus arteriosus versus aorta cells from multiple patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that several genes are differentially expressed in ductus arteriosus and that their promoters may be used to drive ductus arteriosus-enriched transgene expression.

  19. Rate of decay in admixture linkage disequilibrium and its implication in gene mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Modeling linkage disequilibria (LD) between genes usually observed in admixed natural populations has been shown an effective approach in high-resolution mapping of disease genes in humans. A prerequisite to obtain accurate estimation of recombination fraction between genes at a marker locus and the disease locus using the approach is a reliable prediction of the proportion of the admixture populations. The present study suggested the use of gene frequencies to predict the estimate of the admixture propor-tion based on the observation that the gene frequencies are much more stable quantities than the haplotype frequencies over evolution of the population. In this paper, we advanced the theory and methods by which the decay rate of nonlinear term of LD in admixed population may be used to estimate the recombination fraction between the genes. Theoretical analysis and simulation study indicate that, the larger the difference of gene frequencies between parental populations and the more closely the admixture proportion approaches 0.5, the more important the nonlinear term of the LD in the admixed population, and hence the more informative such admixed populations in the high-resolution gene mapping practice.

  20. Sex differences in brain organization: implications for human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanske-Petitpierre, V; Chen, A C

    1985-12-01

    This article reviews current knowledge in two major research domains: sex differences in neuropsychophysiology, and in human communication. An attempt was made to integrate knowledge from several areas of brain research with human communication and to clarify how such a cooperative effort may be beneficial to both fields of study. By combining findings from the area of brain research, a communication paradigm was developed which contends that brain-related sex differences may reside largely in the area of communication of emotion.

  1. Gene expression, nucleotide composition and codon usage bias of genes associated with human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of codon usage pattern is important to understand the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of genomes. We have used bioinformatic approaches to analyze the codon usage bias (CUB) of the genes located in human Y chromosome. Codon bias index (CBI) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias was low. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis suggested that approximately half of the codons out of 59 synonymous codons were most frequently used, and possessed a T or G at the third codon position. The codon usage pattern was different in different genes as revealed from correspondence analysis (COA). A significant correlation between effective number of codons (ENC) and various GC contents suggests that both mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern of genes located in human Y chromosome. In addition, Y-linked genes have significant difference in GC contents at the second and third codon positions, expression level, and codon usage pattern of some codons like the SPANX genes in X chromosome.

  2. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  3. The ycf27 genes from cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae: distribution and implications for chloroplast evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Mark K; Houmard, Jean; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2002-08-27

    The two ycf27 genes from the filamentous cyanobacterium Tolypothrix PCC 7601 have been cloned and sequenced. These two genes, previously designated rpaA and rpaB, encode putative transcriptional regulators of the 'OmpR' family. In Synechocystis PCC 6803, homologous genes have been linked to the regulation of transfer of excitation energy from the phycobilisome to photosystem (PS) I and PSII respectively. Partial clones from Spirulina platensis, Dactylococcopsis salina and Synechococcus PCC 7002 have also been sequenced. A table of identity between the proteins confirms that RpaB belongs in the same family as the algal ycf27 proteins. However, RpaA is a rather different protein and should lose the designation ycf27. The loss of rpaB from the plastid genomes of eukaryotic algae is associated with the loss of phycobiliproteins, so it is likely that this gene performs a similar role in algae to that in cyanobacteria. The implications for chloroplast evolution are discussed along with the possible identity of the cognate histidine kinase gene in the plastid genomes.

  4. Updating the Model Definition of the Gene in the Modern Genomic Era with Implications for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike U.; Adkison, Linda R.

    2010-01-01

    Gericke and Hagberg (G & H, "Sci Educ" 16:849-881, 2007) recently published in this journal a thoughtful analysis of the historical progression of our understanding of the nature of the gene for use in instruction. This analysis, however, did not include the findings of the Human Genome Project (HGP), which must be included in any introductory…

  5. Updating the Model Definition of the Gene in the Modern Genomic Era with Implications for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike U.; Adkison, Linda R.

    2010-01-01

    Gericke and Hagberg (G & H, "Sci Educ" 16:849-881, 2007) recently published in this journal a thoughtful analysis of the historical progression of our understanding of the nature of the gene for use in instruction. This analysis, however, did not include the findings of the Human Genome Project (HGP), which must be included in any introductory…

  6. Regulation of the human prostacyclin receptor gene by the cholesterol-responsive SREBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Elizebeth C; Kinsella, B Therese

    2012-11-01

    Prostacyclin and its prostacyclin receptor, the I Prostanoid (IP), play essential roles in regulating hemostasis and vascular tone and have been implicated in a range cardio-protective effects but through largely unknown mechanisms. In this study, the influence of cholesterol on human IP [(h)IP] gene expression was investigated in cultured vascular endothelial and platelet-progenitor megakaryocytic cells. Cholesterol depletion increased human prostacyclin receptor (hIP) mRNA, hIP promoter-directed reporter gene expression, and hIP-induced cAMP generation in all cell types. Furthermore, the constitutively active sterol-response element binding protein (SREBP)1a, but not SREBP2, increased hIP mRNA and promoter-directed gene expression, and deletional and mutational analysis uncovered an evolutionary conserved sterol-response element (SRE), adjacent to a known functional Sp1 element, within the core hIP promoter. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed direct cholesterol-regulated binding of SREBP1a to this hIP promoter region in vivo, and immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated that cholesterol depletion significantly increases hIP expression levels. In conclusion, the hIP gene is directly regulated by cholesterol depletion, which occurs through binding of SREBP1a to a functional SRE within its core promoter. Mechanistically, these data establish that cholesterol can regulate hIP expression, which may, at least in part, account for the combined cardio-protective actions of low serum cholesterol through its regulation of IP expression within the human vasculature.

  7. Regulation of oxidative-stress responsive genes by arecoline in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangjam, G S; Kondaiah, P

    2009-10-01

    Arecoline, an arecanut alkaloid present in the saliva of betel quid chewers, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory oral diseases, including oral submucous fibrosis and periodontitis. To understand the molecular basis of arecoline action in epithelial changes associated with these diseases, we investigated the effects of arecoline on human keratinocytes with respect to cell growth regulation and the expression of stress-responsive genes. Human keratinocyte cells (of the HaCaT cell line) were treated with arecoline, following which cell viability was assessed using the Trypan Blue dye-exclusion assay, cell growth and proliferation were analyzed using the MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation assays, cell cycle arrest and generation of reactive oxygen species were examined using flow cytometry, and gene expression changes were investigated using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique. The role of oxidative stress, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were studied using specific inhibitors. Western blot analysis was performed to study p38 MAPK activation. Arecoline induced the generation of reactive oxygen species and cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase in HaCaT cells without affecting the expression of p21/Cip1. Arecoline-induced epithelial cell death at higher concentrations was caused by oxidative trauma without eliciting apoptosis. Sublethal concentrations of arecoline upregulated the expression of the following stress-responsive genes: heme oxygenase-1; ferritin light chain; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase; glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit; and glutathione reductase. Additionally, there was a dose-dependent induction of interleukin-1alfa mRNA by arecoline via oxidative stress and p38 MAPK activation. Our data highlight the role of oxidative stress in arecoline-mediated cell death

  8. DMPD: LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11257452 LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Guha M, Mackman N. Ce...ll Signal. 2001 Feb;13(2):85-94. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS induction of gene expression in human... monocytes. PubmedID 11257452 Title LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Authors Guha M, Ma

  9. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  10. The Toll-like receptor gene family is integrated into human DNA damage and p53 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menendez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the functions that the p53 tumor suppressor plays in human biology have been greatly extended beyond "guardian of the genome." Our studies of promoter response element sequences targeted by the p53 master regulatory transcription factor suggest a general role for this DNA damage and stress-responsive regulator in the control of human Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression. The TLR gene family mediates innate immunity to a wide variety of pathogenic threats through recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular motifs. Using primary human immune cells, we have examined expression of the entire TLR gene family following exposure to anti-cancer agents that induce the p53 network. Expression of all TLR genes, TLR1 to TLR10, in blood lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages from healthy volunteers can be induced by DNA metabolic stressors. However, there is considerable inter-individual variability. Most of the TLR genes respond to p53 via canonical as well as noncanonical promoter binding sites. Importantly, the integration of the TLR gene family into the p53 network is unique to primates, a recurrent theme raised for other gene families in our previous studies. Furthermore, a polymorphism in a TLR8 response element provides the first human example of a p53 target sequence specifically responsible for endogenous gene induction. These findings-demonstrating that the human innate immune system, including downstream induction of cytokines, can be modulated by DNA metabolic stress-have many implications for health and disease, as well as for understanding the evolution of damage and p53 responsive networks.

  11. The Toll-like receptor gene family is integrated into human DNA damage and p53 networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menendez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the functions that the p53 tumor suppressor plays in human biology have been greatly extended beyond "guardian of the genome." Our studies of promoter response element sequences targeted by the p53 master regulatory transcription factor suggest a general role for this DNA damage and stress-responsive regulator in the control of human Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression. The TLR gene family mediates innate immunity to a wide variety of pathogenic threats through recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular motifs. Using primary human immune cells, we have examined expression of the entire TLR gene family following exposure to anti-cancer agents that induce the p53 network. Expression of all TLR genes, TLR1 to TLR10, in blood lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages from healthy volunteers can be induced by DNA metabolic stressors. However, there is considerable inter-individual variability. Most of the TLR genes respond to p53 via canonical as well as noncanonical promoter binding sites. Importantly, the integration of the TLR gene family into the p53 network is unique to primates, a recurrent theme raised for other gene families in our previous studies. Furthermore, a polymorphism in a TLR8 response element provides the first human example of a p53 target sequence specifically responsible for endogenous gene induction. These findings-demonstrating that the human innate immune system, including downstream induction of cytokines, can be modulated by DNA metabolic stress-have many implications for health and disease, as well as for understanding the evolution of damage and p53 responsive networks.

  12. Expression profiling of wild type and β-catenin gene disrupted human BxPC-3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Angell Olsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To study the role of WNT/β-catenin signaling in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, human BxPC-3 cell lines deficient of the central canonical WNT signaling protein β-catenin were established by using zinc-finger nuclease mediated targeted genomic disruption of the β-catenin gene (CTNNB1. Comparison of the global transcription levels in wild type cells with two β-catenin gene disrupted clones identified 85 transcripts that were the most differentially regulated. Gene ontology (GO term enrichment analysis of these transcripts identified “cell adhesion” as the most significantly enriched GO term. Here we describe the data from the transcription profiling analysis published in the article “Implications of Targeted Genomic Disruption of β-Catenin in BxPC-3 Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells” [1]. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE63072.

  13. Cdc6 and Cyclin E2 Are PTEN-Regulated Genes Associated with Human Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN is frequently inactivated in metastatic prostate cancer, yet the molecular consequences of this and their association with the metastatic phenotype are incompletely understood. We performed transcriptomic analysis and identified genes altered by conditional PTEN reexpression in C4-2, a human metastatic prostate cancer cell line with inactive PTEN. PTEN-regulated genes were disproportionately represented among genes altered in human prostate cancer progression and metastasis but not among those associated with tumorigenesis. From the former set, we identified two novel putative PTEN targets, cdc6 and cyclin E2, which were overexpressed in metastatic human prostate cancer and up-regulated as a function of PTEN depletion in poorly metastatic DU145 human prostate cancer cells harboring a wild type PTEN. Inhibition of cdc6 and cyclin E2 levels as a consequence of PTEN expression was associated with cell cycle G1 arrest, whereas use of PTEN activity mutants revealed that regulation of these genes was dependent on PTEN lipid phosphatase activity. Computational and promoter-reporter evaluations implicated the E2F transcription factor in PTEN regulation of cdc6 and cyclin E2 expression. Our results suggest a hypothetical model whereby PTEN loss upregulates cell cycle genes such as cdc6 and cyclin E2 that in turn promote metastatic colonization at distant sites.

  14. Iron deficiency alters expression of genes implicated in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Erik S; Magid, Rhamy; Petryk, Anna; Georgieff, Michael K

    2008-10-27

    Neonatal brain iron deficiency occurs after insufficient maternal dietary iron intake, maternal hypertension, and maternal diabetes mellitus and results in short and long-term neurologic and behavioral deficits. Early iron deficiency affects the genomic profile of the developing hippocampus that persists despite iron repletion. The purpose of the present study was threefold: 1) quantitative PCR confirmation of our previous microarray results, demonstrating upregulation of a network of genes leading to beta-amyloid production and implicated in Alzheimer disease etiology in iron-deficient anemic rat pups at the time of hippocampal differentiation; 2) investigation of the potential contributions of iron deficiency anemia and iron treatment to this differential gene expression in the hippocampus; and 3) investigation of these genes over a developmental time course in a mouse model where iron deficiency is limited to hippocampus, is not accompanied by anemia and is not repletable. Quantitative PCR confirmed altered regulation in 6 of 7 Alzheimer-related genes (Apbb1, C1qa, Clu, App, Cst3, Fn1, Htatip) in iron-deficient rats relative to iron-sufficient controls at P15. Comparison of untreated to treated iron-deficient animals at this age suggested the strong role of iron deficiency, not treatment, in the upregulation of this gene network. The non-anemic hippocampal iron-deficient mouse demonstrated upregulation of all 7 genes in this pathway from P5 to P25. Our results suggest a role for neonatal iron deficiency in dysregulation of genes that may set the stage for long-term neurodegenerative disease and that this may occur through a histone modification mechanism.

  15. Signals of historical interlocus gene conversion in human segmental duplications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L Dumont

    Full Text Available Standard methods of DNA sequence analysis assume that sequences evolve independently, yet this assumption may not be appropriate for segmental duplications that exchange variants via interlocus gene conversion (IGC. Here, we use high quality multiple sequence alignments from well-annotated segmental duplications to systematically identify IGC signals in the human reference genome. Our analysis combines two complementary methods: (i a paralog quartet method that uses DNA sequence simulations to identify a statistical excess of sites consistent with inter-paralog exchange, and (ii the alignment-based method implemented in the GENECONV program. One-quarter (25.4% of the paralog families in our analysis harbor clear IGC signals by the quartet approach. Using GENECONV, we identify 1477 gene conversion tracks that cumulatively span 1.54 Mb of the genome. Our analyses confirm the previously reported high rates of IGC in subtelomeric regions and Y-chromosome palindromes, and identify multiple novel IGC hotspots, including the pregnancy specific glycoproteins and the neuroblastoma breakpoint gene families. Although the duplication history of a paralog family is described by a single tree, we show that IGC has introduced incredible site-to-site variation in the evolutionary relationships among paralogs in the human genome. Our findings indicate that IGC has left significant footprints in patterns of sequence diversity across segmental duplications in the human genome, out-pacing the contributions of single base mutation by orders of magnitude. Collectively, the IGC signals we report comprise a catalog that will provide a critical reference for interpreting observed patterns of DNA sequence variation across duplicated genomic regions, including targets of recent adaptive evolution in humans.

  16. Sixteen years of change in the global terrestrial human footprint and implications for biodiversity conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Oscar; Sanderson, Eric W.; Magrach, Ainhoa; Allan, James R.; Beher, Jutta; Jones, Kendall R.; Possingham, Hugh P.; Laurance, William F.; Wood, Peter; Fekete, Balázs M.; Levy, Marc A.; Watson, James E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human pressures on the environment are changing spatially and temporally, with profound implications for the planet's biodiversity and human economies. Here we use recently available data on infrastructure, land cover and human access into natural areas to construct a globally standardized measure of the cumulative human footprint on the terrestrial environment at 1 km2 resolution from 1993 to 2009. We note that while the human population has increased by 23% and the world economy has grown 153%, the human footprint has increased by just 9%. Still, 75% the planet's land surface is experiencing measurable human pressures. Moreover, pressures are perversely intense, widespread and rapidly intensifying in places with high biodiversity. Encouragingly, we discover decreases in environmental pressures in the wealthiest countries and those with strong control of corruption. Clearly the human footprint on Earth is changing, yet there are still opportunities for conservation gains. PMID:27552116

  17. Sixteen years of change in the global terrestrial human footprint and implications for biodiversity conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Oscar; Sanderson, Eric W.; Magrach, Ainhoa; Allan, James R.; Beher, Jutta; Jones, Kendall R.; Possingham, Hugh P.; Laurance, William F.; Wood, Peter; Fekete, Balázs M.; Levy, Marc A.; Watson, James E. M.

    2016-08-01

    Human pressures on the environment are changing spatially and temporally, with profound implications for the planet's biodiversity and human economies. Here we use recently available data on infrastructure, land cover and human access into natural areas to construct a globally standardized measure of the cumulative human footprint on the terrestrial environment at 1 km2 resolution from 1993 to 2009. We note that while the human population has increased by 23% and the world economy has grown 153%, the human footprint has increased by just 9%. Still, 75% the planet's land surface is experiencing measurable human pressures. Moreover, pressures are perversely intense, widespread and rapidly intensifying in places with high biodiversity. Encouragingly, we discover decreases in environmental pressures in the wealthiest countries and those with strong control of corruption. Clearly the human footprint on Earth is changing, yet there are still opportunities for conservation gains.

  18. CULTURAL DIMENSIONS IN GLOBAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and society become in harmony. This is critical because cultural relativity and reality in organizations influence operations. The study was designed to explore possible relationships between cultural dimensions and global human resource management. The survey research design was employed and data generated through primary and secondary sources. The participants comprised of 385 respondents from a cross-section of the population in Nigeria. By Chi-Square test, it was found that culture has a significant positive relationship with global human resource management.

  19. Intracellular insulin in human tumors: examples and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulescu Razvan T

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insulin is one of the major metabolic hormones regulating glucose homeostasis in the organism and a key growth factor for normal and neoplastic cells. Work conducted primarily over the past 3 decades has unravelled the presence of insulin in human breast cancer tissues and, more recently, in human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC. These findings have suggested that intracellular insulin is involved in the development of these highly prevalent human tumors. A potential mechanism for such involvement is insulin's binding and inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB which in turn is likely controlled by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE. This model and its supporting data are collectively covered in this survey in order to provide further insight into insulin-driven oncogenesis and its reversal through future anticancer therapeutics.

  20. The human thyrotropin beta-subunit gene differs in 5' structure from murine TSH-beta genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidon, P T; Whitfield, G K; Porti, D; Kourides, I A

    1988-12-01

    The gene encoding the beta-subunit of human thyrotropin (hTSH-beta) was isolated, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene is 4.3 kb in length, consists of three exons and two introns, and is present as a single copy as determined by Southern blot analysis of total genomic DNA. The protein coding portion of the gene, which includes exons 2 and 3, was isolated from a human genomic phage library, while exon 1, which encodes only 5' untranslated mRNA sequence, was isolated from a plasmid library of size-selected genomic DNA fragments. Here we describe the isolation of the 5' untranslated exon of the hTSH-beta subunit and 5'-flanking region. The structure of the hTSH-beta gene is very similar to the previously characterized TSH-beta genes from mouse and rat. The genes from all three species have two distinct promoter regions, but while both promoters are utilized by the murine TSH-beta genes, the human TSH-beta gene apparently utilizes only the proximal promoter for transcription initiation. A striking difference in hTSH-beta gene structure compared to the murine genes is that exon 1 of the human gene is 36 nucleotides. An analysis of the mouse, rat, and human exon 1 and 5'-flanking region shows a high percentage of sequence homology, with the exception of a 9-nucleotide insertion 13 bases 3' from the proximal TATA box found in the human gene but not found in the other two species. We propose that this insertion results in the additional length of human exon 1 compared to the mouse and rat genes. By isolating the promoter region of the hTSH-beta gene, we can begin to identify specific sequences involved in the regulation of hTSH gene expression.

  1. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  2. Metabolic costs and evolutionary implications of human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzawa, Christopher W; Chugani, Harry T; Grossman, Lawrence I; Lipovich, Leonard; Muzik, Otto; Hof, Patrick R; Wildman, Derek E; Sherwood, Chet C; Leonard, William R; Lange, Nicholas

    2014-09-09

    The high energetic costs of human brain development have been hypothesized to explain distinctive human traits, including exceptionally slow and protracted preadult growth. Although widely assumed to constrain life-history evolution, the metabolic requirements of the growing human brain are unknown. We combined previously collected PET and MRI data to calculate the human brain's glucose use from birth to adulthood, which we compare with body growth rate. We evaluate the strength of brain-body metabolic trade-offs using the ratios of brain glucose uptake to the body's resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy requirements (DER) expressed in glucose-gram equivalents (glucosermr% and glucoseder%). We find that glucosermr% and glucoseder% do not peak at birth (52.5% and 59.8% of RMR, or 35.4% and 38.7% of DER, for males and females, respectively), when relative brain size is largest, but rather in childhood (66.3% and 65.0% of RMR and 43.3% and 43.8% of DER). Body-weight growth (dw/dt) and both glucosermr% and glucoseder% are strongly, inversely related: soon after birth, increases in brain glucose demand are accompanied by proportionate decreases in dw/dt. Ages of peak brain glucose demand and lowest dw/dt co-occur and subsequent developmental declines in brain metabolism are matched by proportionate increases in dw/dt until puberty. The finding that human brain glucose demands peak during childhood, and evidence that brain metabolism and body growth rate covary inversely across development, support the hypothesis that the high costs of human brain development require compensatory slowing of body growth rate.

  3. MORPHIN: a web tool for human disease research by projecting model organism biology onto a human integrated gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Yang, Sunmo; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2014-07-01

    Despite recent advances in human genetics, model organisms are indispensable for human disease research. Most human disease pathways are evolutionally conserved among other species, where they may phenocopy the human condition or be associated with seemingly unrelated phenotypes. Much of the known gene-to-phenotype association information is distributed across diverse databases, growing rapidly due to new experimental techniques. Accessible bioinformatics tools will therefore facilitate translation of discoveries from model organisms into human disease biology. Here, we present a web-based discovery tool for human disease studies, MORPHIN (model organisms projected on a human integrated gene network), which prioritizes the most relevant human diseases for a given set of model organism genes, potentially highlighting new model systems for human diseases and providing context to model organism studies. Conceptually, MORPHIN investigates human diseases by an orthology-based projection of a set of model organism genes onto a genome-scale human gene network. MORPHIN then prioritizes human diseases by relevance to the projected model organism genes using two distinct methods: a conventional overlap-based gene set enrichment analysis and a network-based measure of closeness between the query and disease gene sets capable of detecting associations undetectable by the conventional overlap-based methods. MORPHIN is freely accessible at http://www.inetbio.org/morphin.

  4. Asymptomatic brucellosis infection in humans: implications for diagnosis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Q; Lu, Y; Yuan, X; Qiu, Y; Xu, J; Li, W; Ke, Y; Yu, Y; Huang, L; Wang, Y; Chen, Z

    2013-09-01

    Human brucellosis is mainly caused by contact with Brucella-infected animals and their secretions and carcasses. Individuals who are continuously in contact with animals are considered to be at a high risk but only some show symptoms and are diagnosed as cases of brucellosis. Here, we showed that asymptomatic brucellosis infections occur among humans. Asymptomatic infections mainly result from less frequent contact with Brucella and/or contact with low-virulence Brucella. In our study, patients with asymptomatic infection had low antibody titres and different contact patterns. Awareness of asymptomatic infection is important for early diagnosis of brucellosis and prevention of chronic infection.

  5. Analysis of Kinase Gene Expression in the Frontal Cortex of Suicide Victims: Implications of Fear and Stress †

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kwang; Le, Thien; Xing, Guoqiang; Luke R Johnson; Ursano, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health issue that results from an interaction between multiple risk factors including individual vulnerabilities to complex feelings of hopelessness, fear, and stress. Although kinase genes have been implicated in fear and stress, including the consolidation and extinction of fearful memories, expression profiles of those genes in the brain of suicide victims are less clear. Using gene expression microarray data from the Online Stanley Genomics Database1 and a quan...

  6. A circadian gene expression atlas in mammals: implications for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ray; Lahens, Nicholas F; Ballance, Heather I; Hughes, Michael E; Hogenesch, John B

    2014-11-11

    To characterize the role of the circadian clock in mouse physiology and behavior, we used RNA-seq and DNA arrays to quantify the transcriptomes of 12 mouse organs over time. We found 43% of all protein coding genes showed circadian rhythms in transcription somewhere in the body, largely in an organ-specific manner. In most organs, we noticed the expression of many oscillating genes peaked during transcriptional "rush hours" preceding dawn and dusk. Looking at the genomic landscape of rhythmic genes, we saw that they clustered together, were longer, and had more spliceforms than nonoscillating genes. Systems-level analysis revealed intricate rhythmic orchestration of gene pathways throughout the body. We also found oscillations in the expression of more than 1,000 known and novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Supporting their potential role in mediating clock function, ncRNAs conserved between mouse and human showed rhythmic expression in similar proportions as protein coding genes. Importantly, we also found that the majority of best-selling drugs and World Health Organization essential medicines directly target the products of rhythmic genes. Many of these drugs have short half-lives and may benefit from timed dosage. In sum, this study highlights critical, systemic, and surprising roles of the mammalian circadian clock and provides a blueprint for advancement in chronotherapy.

  7. Sox genes in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella with their implications for genome duplication and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Jingou

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Sox gene family is found in a broad range of animal taxa and encodes important gene regulatory proteins involved in a variety of developmental processes. We have obtained clones representing the HMG boxes of twelve Sox genes from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella, one of the four major domestic carps in China. The cloned Sox genes belong to group B1, B2 and C. Our analyses show that whereas the human genome contains a single copy of Sox4, Sox11 and Sox14, each of these genes has two co-orthologs in grass carp, and the duplication of Sox4 and Sox11 occurred before the divergence of grass carp and zebrafish, which support the "fish-specific whole-genome duplication" theory. An estimation for the origin of grass carp based on the molecular clock using Sox1, Sox3 and Sox11 genes as markers indicates that grass carp (subfamily Leuciscinae and zebrafish (subfamily Danioninae diverged approximately 60 million years ago. The potential uses of Sox genes as markers in revealing the evolutionary history of grass carp are discussed.

  8. Preferential gene expression in quiescent human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppock, D L; Kopman, C; Scandalis, S; Gilleran, S

    1993-06-01

    The exit from the proliferative cell cycle into a reversible quiescence (G0) is an active process that is not yet well understood at the molecular level. Investigation of G0-specific gene expression is an important step in studying the mechanism regulating the entrance to quiescence. Using the human embryo lung fibroblast (WI38) as a model system, we have isolated complementary DNA clones that are expressed at a higher level in quiescent cells than in logarithmically growing cells. We have identified complementary DNAs from eight genes including collagen alpha 1(VI), collagen alpha 1(III), decorin, complement C1r, collagen alpha 1(I), collagen alpha 2(I), and two novel genes, Q6 and Q10. We have named this class of quiescence-inducible genes quiescins. Expression of these genes was induced just as proliferation slowed, as indicated by the level of histone H2B mRNA, [3H]-thymidine incorporation, and cell number. The level of expression of the novel genes, Q6 and Q10, increased at the same time as the other genes. Q6 has two mRNAs of 3 and 4 kb, whereas Q10 mRNA is about 1.0 kb. The expression of the quiescins was not induced by blocking the cell cycle in S phase with aphidicolin or in G1 with lovastatin. However, the genes were highly induced by trypsinization or scraping of the cells during logarithmic growth. This induction was not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. The expression of decorin and Q6 was very low in SV40-transformed cells (VA13) either in logarithmic growth or at high density, whereas the gene Q10 was expressed more highly in VA13 than in WI38 cells. The finding that expression of some components of the extracellular matrix is induced as cells enter G0 suggests that they may have a role in both the induction and the maintenance of the quiescent state. The quiescins will serve as molecular markers for the investigation of mechanisms that regulate the onset of quiescence.

  9. Microbiota diversity and gene expression dynamics in human oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Simón-Soro, Aurea; Mira, Alex

    2014-04-27

    Micro-organisms inhabiting teeth surfaces grow on biofilms where a specific and complex succession of bacteria has been described by co-aggregation tests and DNA-based studies. Although the composition of oral biofilms is well established, the active portion of the bacterial community and the patterns of gene expression in vivo have not been studied. Using RNA-sequencing technologies, we present the first metatranscriptomic study of human dental plaque, performed by two different approaches: (1) A short-reads, high-coverage approach by Illumina sequencing to characterize the gene activity repertoire of the microbial community during biofilm development; (2) A long-reads, lower-coverage approach by pyrosequencing to determine the taxonomic identity of the active microbiome before and after a meal ingestion. The high-coverage approach allowed us to analyze over 398 million reads, revealing that microbial communities are individual-specific and no bacterial species was detected as key player at any time during biofilm formation. We could identify some gene expression patterns characteristic for early and mature oral biofilms. The transcriptomic profile of several adhesion genes was confirmed through qPCR by measuring expression of fimbriae-associated genes. In addition to the specific set of gene functions overexpressed in early and mature oral biofilms, as detected through the short-reads dataset, the long-reads approach detected specific changes when comparing the metatranscriptome of the same individual before and after a meal, which can narrow down the list of organisms responsible for acid production and therefore potentially involved in dental caries. The bacteria changing activity during biofilm formation and after meal ingestion were person-specific. Interestingly, some individuals showed extreme homeostasis with virtually no changes in the active bacterial population after food ingestion, suggesting the presence of a microbial community which could be

  10. Human Rights, Cosmopolitanism and Utopias: Implications for Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Citizenship education, defined as learning to live together, requires agreement on certain common principles. One central purpose of a state education system is the transmission of common normative standards such as the human rights and fundamental freedoms that underpin liberal democratic societies. The paper identifies the conceptual roots of…

  11. The human microbiome and probiotics: implications for pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versalovic, James

    2013-01-01

    Steady advances in our knowledge of the composition and function of the human microbiome at multiple body sites including the gut, skin and airways will likely contribute to our understanding of mechanisms of probiotic action by beneficial microbes. Microbe:microbe and microbe:human interactions are important considerations as we select probiotics for pediatric patients in the future. Although our knowledge about the composition of the microbiome is progressing rapidly, many gaps exist about the functional capacity and metabolic machinery of the human microbiome. Based on a limited amount of data, probiotics appear capable of altering the composition and function of the microbiome. Probiotics may be part of dietary strategies that combine ways to enhance microbiome function with nutrients that may be converted to active compounds promoting human health. Probiotics have yielded beneficial effects in numerous studies in the context of different diseases in pediatric gastroenterology. These disease states include necrotizing enterocolitis, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis, acute gastroenteritis and irritable bowel syndrome. In the skin and airways, it is unclear if probiotics can affect the function of the microbiome to reduce the impact of diseases such as asthma and atopic dermatitis. An enhanced understanding of the effects of probiotics on the microbiome should facilitate selection of optimal probiotic strains for specific diseases in the future.

  12. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  13. Human Rights, Cosmopolitanism and Utopias: Implications for Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Citizenship education, defined as learning to live together, requires agreement on certain common principles. One central purpose of a state education system is the transmission of common normative standards such as the human rights and fundamental freedoms that underpin liberal democratic societies. The paper identifies the conceptual roots of…

  14. Educating Lone Wolves: Pedagogical Implications of Human Capital Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Educational practices based on human capital theory are unlikely to alleviate social inequities because the theory views people as isolated materialists driven by desire for goods and security. It assumes an educational meritocracy in which socioeconomic status is limited only by educational investment, and more educated people are presumed to be…

  15. Human Ecology and Health Advancement: The Newcastle Experience and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jenny; Honari, Morteza

    1992-01-01

    Argues for the necessity of adopting a human ecological framework for the advancement of health. Focusing on the Australian experience, highlights the difficulties in moving beyond the narrow mold of Western Medical Science to a more holistic, quality of life orientation, and suggests that the role of education at all levels of the community is…

  16. Development and implication of a human-volcano system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachri, Syamsul; Stötter, Johann; Monreal, Matthias; Sartohadi, Junun

    2014-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the complexity of human-environment systems, models help to define, quantify, describe, or simulate complex interactions. With regards to the human-volcano system, we develop a conceptual model in order to assist analysis of its two basic elements, the physical and the social environment. A field survey of the human environment interaction of two of the most active volcanic areas in Indonesia (Mt. Merapi and Mt. Bromo) and a corresponding literature review from other case studies was carried out. A differentiated understanding of human interaction with hazard potential elements within the human-volcano system is the main focus of the model development. We classified volcanic processes and effects as three pairs of dichotomies: positive or negative impacts, on society or environment in an indirect or direct way. Each volcanically induced process or effect characterized accordingly leads to eight distinct process/effect classes. They are positive direct effects on society (PDS); positive direct effects on natural resources (PDN); positive indirect effects on society (PIS); positive indirect effects on natural resources (PIN); negative direct effects on society (NDS); negative direct effects on natural resources (NDN); negative indirect effects on society (NIS) and lastly negative indirect effects on natural resources (NIN). Such differentiated view of volcanic process/effects bears several advantages. First, whereas volcanic processes have hitherto been viewed as hazards only, it becomes possible now to describe a particular process/effect in a particular context as negative or positive. Secondly, such a categorization makes it possible to account for processes of the human-volcano system that do not have a direct physical expression but are of socio-cultural relevance. Thirdly, the greater degree of differentiation that is made possible when evaluating volcanic processes has significant repercussions on the way volcanic risk must be

  17. Human transporter database: comprehensive knowledge and discovery tools in the human transporter genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Y Ye

    Full Text Available Transporters are essential in homeostatic exchange of endogenous and exogenous substances at the systematic, organic, cellular, and subcellular levels. Gene mutations of transporters are often related to pharmacogenetics traits. Recent developments in high throughput technologies on genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics allow in depth studies of transporter genes in normal cellular processes and diverse disease conditions. The flood of high throughput data have resulted in urgent need for an updated knowledgebase with curated, organized, and annotated human transporters in an easily accessible way. Using a pipeline with the combination of automated keywords query, sequence similarity search and manual curation on transporters, we collected 1,555 human non-redundant transporter genes to develop the Human Transporter Database (HTD (http://htd.cbi.pku.edu.cn. Based on the extensive annotations, global properties of the transporter genes were illustrated, such as expression patterns and polymorphisms in relationships with their ligands. We noted that the human transporters were enriched in many fundamental biological processes such as oxidative phosphorylation and cardiac muscle contraction, and significantly associated with Mendelian and complex diseases such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. Overall, HTD provides a well-organized interface to facilitate research communities to search detailed molecular and genetic information of transporters for development of personalized medicine.

  18. Human transporter database: comprehensive knowledge and discovery tools in the human transporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Adam Y; Liu, Qing-Rong; Li, Chuan-Yun; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Transporters are essential in homeostatic exchange of endogenous and exogenous substances at the systematic, organic, cellular, and subcellular levels. Gene mutations of transporters are often related to pharmacogenetics traits. Recent developments in high throughput technologies on genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics allow in depth studies of transporter genes in normal cellular processes and diverse disease conditions. The flood of high throughput data have resulted in urgent need for an updated knowledgebase with curated, organized, and annotated human transporters in an easily accessible way. Using a pipeline with the combination of automated keywords query, sequence similarity search and manual curation on transporters, we collected 1,555 human non-redundant transporter genes to develop the Human Transporter Database (HTD) (http://htd.cbi.pku.edu.cn). Based on the extensive annotations, global properties of the transporter genes were illustrated, such as expression patterns and polymorphisms in relationships with their ligands. We noted that the human transporters were enriched in many fundamental biological processes such as oxidative phosphorylation and cardiac muscle contraction, and significantly associated with Mendelian and complex diseases such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. Overall, HTD provides a well-organized interface to facilitate research communities to search detailed molecular and genetic information of transporters for development of personalized medicine.

  19. Expression Patterns of Glucose Transporter-1 Gene and Thyroid Specific Genes in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungeun; Chung, Junekey; Min Haesook and others

    2014-06-15

    The expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) gene and those of major thyroid-specific genes were examined in papillary carcinoma tissues, and the expressions of these genes were compared with cancer differentiation grades. Twenty-four human papillary carcinoma tissues were included in this study. The expressions of Glut-1- and thyroid-specific genes [sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, TSH receptor and pendrin] were analyzed by RT-PCR. Expression levels were expressed as ratios versus the expression of beta-actin. Pathologic differentiation of papillary carcinoma was classified into a relatively well-differentiated group (n=13) and relatively less differentiated group (n=11). Glut-1 gene expression was significantly higher in the less differentiated group (0.66±0.04) than in the well-differentiated group (0.59±0.07). The expression levels of the NIS, PD and TG genes were significantly higher in the well-differentiated group (NIS: 0.67±0.20, PD: 0.65±0.21, TG: 0.74±0.16) than in the less differentiated group (NIS: 0.36±0.05, PD: 0.49±0.08, TG: 0.60±0.11), respectively. A significant negative correlation was found between Glut-1 and NIS expression, and positive correlations were found between NIS and TG, and between NIS and PD. The NIS, PD and TG genes were highly expressed in well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas, whereas the Glut-1 gene was highly expressed in less differentiated thyroid carcinomas. These findings provide a molecular rationale for the management of papillary carcinoma, especially in the selection of FDG PET or radioiodine whole-body scan and I-131-based therapy.

  20. Ethical implications of the human-animal bond in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russow, Lilly-Marlene

    2002-01-01

    This analysis of the moral implications of a human-animal bond in a research setting begins by describing a set of criteria that delineate the human-animal bond in general and form the foundation on which moral issues rest. Questions about if, when, and how such bonds are formed are discussed briefly; the discussion focuses on how the concept of a human-animal bond fits into standard moral theories. The conclusion is that impartial theories such as utilitarianism and deontological theories must be supplemented with an ethics of caring and that the moral duties engendered by the human-animal bond are best identified with such a supplemented theory.

  1. The human insulin gene is part of a large open chromatin domain specific for human islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutskov, Vesco; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2009-10-13

    Knowledge of how insulin (INS) gene expression is regulated will lead to better understanding of normal and abnormal pancreatic beta cell function. We have mapped histone modifications over the INS region, coupled with an expression profile, in freshly isolated islets from multiple human donors. Unlike many other human genes, in which active modifications tend to be concentrated within 1 kb around the transcription start site, these marks are distributed over the entire coding region of INS as well. Moreover, a region of approximately 80 kb around the INS gene, which contains the {tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-(INS)-insulin-like growth factor 2 antisense (IGF2AS)-insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2)} gene cluster, unusually is marked by almost uniformly elevated levels of histone acetylation and H3K4 dimethylation, extending both downstream into IGF2 and upstream beyond the TH gene. This is accompanied by islet specific coordinate expression with INS of the neighboring TH and IGF2 genes. The presence of islet specific intergenic transcripts suggests their possible function in the maintenance of this unusual large open chromatin domain.

  2. Inhibition of mitochondrial gene transcription suppresses neurotensin secretion in the human carcinoid cell line BON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Wang, Qingding; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiaofu; Hellmich, Mark R; Rajaraman, Srinivasan; Greeley, George H; Townsend, Courtney M; Evers, B Mark

    2005-02-01

    Mitochondria, organelles essential for ATP production, play a central role in a number of cellular functions, including the regulation of insulin secretion. Neurotensin (NT), an important regulatory intestinal hormone, has been implicated in fatty acid translocation, gut motility and secretion, and intestinal cell growth; however, mechanisms regulating NT secretion have not been entirely defined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhibition of mitochondrial gene transcription on NT secretion. BON cells, a novel human carcinoid cell line that produces and secretes NT peptide and expresses the gene encoding NT (designated NT/N), were treated with ethidium bromide (EB; 0.05, 0.1, and 0.4 microg/ml), an inhibitor of DNA and RNA synthesis, or vehicle over a time course (1-4 days). Cells were then stimulated with either ACh (100 microM) or phorbol 12 myristate,13-acetate (PMA, 10 nM) for 30 min. Media and cells were extracted, and NT peptide measured by RIA. Treatment with EB had no effect on BON cell viability or cell cycle distribution over the 4-day course. In contrast, EB treatment produced a dose-dependent reduction of mitochondrial gene expression; however, NT/N gene expression was not altered. Mitochondrial inhibition by EB treatment suppressed NT secretion induced by ACh and PMA, both in a dose-dependent manner. EB-mediated inhibition of NT secretion and mitochondrial gene expression was reversed with removal of EB. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial gene transcription suppresses both ACh- and PMA-stimulated NT release. These findings are the first to demonstrate that mitochondrial function is important for agonist-mediated NT secretion.

  3. Genomic organization, complete sequence, and chromosomal location of the gene for human eotaxin (SCYA11), an eosinophil-specific CC chemokine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zepeda, E.A.; Sarafi, M.N.; Luster, A.D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States)]|[Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine that is a specific chemoattractant for eosinophils and is implicated in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. We describe the genomic organization, complete sequence, including 1354 bp 5{prime} of the RNA initiation site, and chromosomal localization of the human eotaxin gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis localized eotaxin to human chromosome 17, in the region q21.1-q21.2, and the human gene name SCYA11 was assigned. We also present the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the mouse eotaxin gene and have identified several regulatory elements that are conserved between the murine and the human promoters. In particular, the presence of elements such as NF-{Kappa}B, interferon-{gamma} response element, and glucocorticoid response element may explain the observed regulation of the eotaxin gene by cytokines and glucocorticoids. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Gene expression profiling gut microbiota in different races of humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiome is shaped and modified by the polymorphisms of microorganisms in the intestinal tract. Its composition shows strong individual specificity and may play a crucial role in the human digestive system and metabolism. Several factors can affect the composition of the gut microbiome, such as eating habits, living environment, and antibiotic usage. Thus, various races are characterized by different gut microbiome characteristics. In this present study, we studied the gut microbiomes of three different races, including individuals of Asian, European and American races. The gut microbiome and the expression levels of gut microbiome genes were analyzed in these individuals. Advanced feature selection methods (minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection) and four machine-learning algorithms (random forest, nearest neighbor algorithm, sequential minimal optimization, Dagging) were employed to capture key differentially expressed genes. As a result, sequential minimal optimization was found to yield the best performance using the 454 genes, which could effectively distinguish the gut microbiomes of different races. Our analyses of extracted genes support the widely accepted hypotheses that eating habits, living environments and metabolic levels in different races can influence the characteristics of the gut microbiome.

  5. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santin Bertoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P<0.0001; 2.39 times, P=0.01; 1.58 times, P=0.0003; and 1.87 times, P<0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P<0.0001; 1.75 times, P=0.037; and 1.95 times, P<0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P=0.069. These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth.

  6. Genes Associated with Human Cancers: Their Expressions, Features, Functions, and Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddaly, Ravi; Sahu, Bellona; Mohan, Divya K

    2015-01-01

    Various types of cancer continue to be subjects of intense research because of the impact of these diseases and their socioeconomic implications. Also, the complexity involved in the pathogenesis, nature of the triggers, and the progression of cancers is intriguing. An important aspect of cancers is the genetics involved, and studies involving cancer genes contributed immensely in not only understanding cancers better, but also for obtaining useful markers and therapy targets. We review the salient features, functions, and changes in gene expression for 103 carcinoma genes, 20 sarcoma genes, and 36 lymphoma genes. Apart from the three major levels of cancer type, we discuss the implications of altered gene expression at the tissue level as well. The possible uses of these gene functions and expression changes for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications are presented. Also, the 159 genes are assessed for their involvement in more than a single cancer and tissue type. Only the p53 gene is commonly implicated in carcinomas, sarcoma and lymphomas. The CHEK2 and ERBB2 (HER2) genes are commonly found to be associated with carcinomas and sarcomas, whereas the MDM2, MSH2, and MSH6 genes are commonly implicated among carcinomas and lymphomas.

  7. Human SLC26A1 Gene Variants: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dawson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney stones are a global health problem, incurring massive health costs annually. Why stones recur in many patients remains unknown but likely involves environmental, physiological, and genetic factors. The solute linked carrier (SLC 26A1 gene has previously been linked to kidney stones in mice. SLC26A1 encodes the sulfate anion transporter 1 (SAT1 protein, and its loss in mice leads to hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate renal stones. To investigate the possible involvement of SAT1 in human urolithiasis, we screened the SLC26A1 gene in a cohort of 13 individuals with recurrent calcium oxalate urolithiasis, which is the commonest type. DNA sequence analyses showed missense mutations in seven patients: one individual was heterozygous R372H; 4 individuals were heterozygous Q556R; one patient was homozygous Q556R; and one patient with severe nephrocalcinosis (requiring nephrectomy was homozygous Q556R and heterozygous M132T. The M132 amino acid in human SAT1 is conserved with 15 other species and is located within the third transmembrane domain of the predicted SAT1 protein structure, suggesting that this amino acid may be important for SAT1 function. These initial findings demonstrate genetic variants in SLC26A1 of recurrent stone formers and warrant wider independent studies of SLC26A1 in humans with recurrent calcium oxalate stones.

  8. Gene structure, DNA methylation, and imprinted expression of the human SNRPN gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, T.C.; Filbrandt, M.M. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The human SNRPN (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N) gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the smallest deletion region involved in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) within chromosome 15q11-q13. Paternal only expression of SNRPN has previously been demonstrated by use of cell lines from PWS patients (maternal allele only) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients (paternal allele only). We have characterized two previously unidentified 5{prime} exons of the SNRPN gene and demonstrate that exons -1 and 0 are included in the full-length transcript. This gene is expressed in a wide range of somatic tissues and at high, approximately equal levels in all regions of the brain. Both the first exon of SNRPN (exon -1) and the putative transcription start site are embedded within a CpG island. This CpG island is extensively methylated on the repressed maternal allele and is unmethylated on the expressed paternal allele, in a wide range of fetal and adult somatic cells. This provides a quick and highly reliable diagnostic assay for PWS and AS, which is based on DNA-methylation analysis that has been tested on >100 patients in a variety of tissues. Conversely, several CpG sites {approximately}22 kb downstream of the transcription start site in intron 5 are preferentially methylated on the expressed paternal allele in somatic tissues and male germ cells, whereas these same sites are unmethylated in fetal oocytes. These findings are consistent with a key role for DNA methylation in the imprinted inheritance and subsequent gene expression of the human SNRPN gene. 59 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Gene structural analysis and expression of human renal dipeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Susumu; Ohtsuka, Kazuyuki; Keida, Yuriko; Kusunoki, Chihiro; Niwa, Mineo; Kohsaka, Masanobu (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)); Konta, Yoshiyuki (Hirosaki Univ. (Japan))

    Human renal dipeptidase cDNA and genomic DNA were isolated from human kidney cDNA and genomic libraries, respectively. The human renal dipeptidase gene has a total length of approximately 6 kb and consists of ten exons and nine introns. The exons and cDNA each encode the 411 amino acid residues of the precursor protein, including 16 amino acid residues of signal sequence and a hydrophobic carboxyl terminal sequence for the attachment of a phosphatidylinositol glycan. Although the cDNA was slightly different from the cDNA reported by Adachi et al. (1990), the differences observed suggest, by comparison with human genomic DNA, that it may not represent an allelic variant but a cloning artifact. The recombinant human renal dipeptidase was produced on the surface of transfected L929 cells and had the same character as native renal dipeptidase. Northern blotting hybridization analysis showed that renal dipeptidase mRNA is only transcribed in kidney. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. The human BDNF gene: peripheral gene expression and protein levels as biomarkers for psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, A; Cattane, N; Begni, V; Pariante, C M; Riva, M A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the survival and growth of neurons, and influences synaptic efficiency and plasticity. The human BDNF gene consists of 11 exons, and distinct BDNF transcripts are produced through the use of alternative promoters and splicing events. The majority of the BDNF transcripts can be detected not only in the brain but also in the blood cells, although no study has yet investigated the differential expression of BDNF transcripts at the peripheral level. This review provides a description of the human BDNF gene structure as well as a summary of clinical and preclinical evidence supporting the role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. We will discuss several mechanisms as possibly underlying BDNF modulation, including epigenetic mechanisms. We will also discuss the potential use of peripheral BDNF as a biomarker for psychiatric disorders, focusing on the factors that can influence BDNF gene expression and protein levels. Within this context, we have also characterized, for we believe the first time, the expression of BDNF transcripts in the blood, with the aim to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms and signaling that may regulate peripheral BDNF gene expression levels. PMID:27874848

  11. Gene expression profiles of single human mature oocytes in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, M L; Andersen, Claus Yding; Bogstad, J

    2010-01-01

    The development competence of human oocytes declines with increasing age. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of age on gene expression profile in mature human oocytes.......The development competence of human oocytes declines with increasing age. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of age on gene expression profile in mature human oocytes....

  12. Primary function analysis of human mental retardation related gene CRBN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wang; Xiaohua, Ni; Peilin, Chen; Xin, Chen; Yaqiong, Sun; Qihan, Wu

    2008-06-01

    The mutation of human cereblon gene (CRBN) is revealed to be related with mild mental retardation. Since the molecular characteristics of CRBN have not been well presented, we investigated the general properties of CRBN. We analyzed its gene structure and protein homologues. The CRBN protein might belong to a family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent Lon protease. We also found that CRBN was widely expressed in different tissues, and the expression level in testis is significantly higher than other tissues. This may suggested it could play some important roles in several other tissues besides brain. Transient transfection experiment in AD 293 cell lines suggested that both CRBN and CRBN mutant (nucleotide position 1,274(C > T)) are located in the whole cells. This may suggest new functions of CRBN in cell nucleolus besides its mitochondria protease activity in cytoplasm.

  13. Implication of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilzer, Allison; Park, Yeonhwa

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has drawn significant attention in the last two decades for its variety of biologically beneficial effects. CLA reduces body fat, cardiovascular diseases and cancer, and modulates immune and inflammatory responses as well as improves bone mass. It has been suggested that the overall effects of CLA are the results of interactions between two major isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. This review will primarily focus on current CLA publications involving humans, which are also summarized in the tables. Along with a number of beneficial effects of CLA, there are safety considerations for CLA supplementation in humans, which include effects on liver functions, milk fat depression, glucose metabolism, and oxidative stresses.

  14. Cadmium levels in Europe: implications for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jilang; Plant, Jane A; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos; Oates, Christopher J; Ihlenfeld, Christian

    2010-02-01

    In this study we used the Forum of European Geological Surveys geochemical baseline data to examine the distribution of cadmium (Cd) in Europe, with a particular reference to the international soil and water guideline values. The highest cadmium levels were found to occur in topsoil and to follow closely the distribution of P(2)O(5), suggesting that the contamination was from the use of rock phosphate fertilizer in intensive arable agriculture. In terms of human health impacts, food (up to several hundred microg/day) was found as the only major route of exposure to Cd for the non-smoking general population. It appeared that low levels of chronic exposure to Cd resulted in completely different human health impacts than those high levels that had caused the 'itai-itai' disease. Some correlations were suggested between cadmium levels and the age-adjusted prostate or breast cancer rates distributed in the European countries under study.

  15. Senescence of T Lymphocytes: Implications for Enhancing Human Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Arne N; Henson, Sian M; Lanna, Alessio

    2016-12-01

    As humans live longer, a central concern is to find ways to maintain their health as they age. Immunity declines during ageing, as shown by the increased susceptibility to infection by both previously encountered and new pathogens and by the decreased efficacy of vaccination. It is therefore crucial to understand the mechanisms responsible for this decrease in immunity and to develop new strategies to enhance immune function in older humans. We discuss here how the induction of senescence alters leukocyte, and specifically T cell, function. An emerging concept is that senescence and nutrient sensing-signalling pathways within T cells converge to regulate functional responses, and the manipulation of these pathways may offer new ways to enhance immunity during ageing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cultural dimensions in global human resource management: implications for Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-01-01

    As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and socie...

  17. Choline Transporters in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma: Expression and Functional Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for cell survival and proliferation, however, the expression and function of choline transporters have not been well identified in cancer. In this study, we detected the mRNA and protein expression of organic cation transporter OCT3, carnitine/cation transporters OCTN 1 and OCTN2,and choline transporter-like protein CTL1 in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549, H1299 and SPC-A-1.Their expression pattern was further confirmed in 25 human primary adenocarcinoma tissues. The choline uptake in these cell lines was significantly blocked by CTL1 inhibitor, but only partially inhibited by OCT or OCTN inhibitors. The efficacy of these inhibitors on cell proliferation is closely correlated with their abilities to block choline transport. Under the native expression of these transporters, the total choline uptake was notably blocked by specific PI3K/AKT inhibitors. These results describe the expression of choline transporters and their relevant function in cell proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma, thus providing a potential"choline-starvation" strategy of cancer interference through targeting choline transporters, especially CTL1.

  18. Profiling gene expression induced by protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2 activation in human kidney cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Y Suen

    Full Text Available Protease-Activated Receptor-2 (PAR2 has been implicated through genetic knockout mice with cytokine regulation and arthritis development. Many studies have associated PAR2 with inflammatory conditions (arthritis, airways inflammation, IBD and key events in tumor progression (angiogenesis, metastasis, but they have relied heavily on the use of single agonists to identify physiological roles for PAR2. However such probes are now known not to be highly selective for PAR2, and thus precisely what PAR2 does and what mechanisms of downstream regulation are truly affected remain obscure. Effects of PAR2 activation on gene expression in Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293, a commonly studied cell line in PAR2 research, were investigated here by comparing 19,000 human genes for intersecting up- or down-regulation by both trypsin (an endogenous protease that activates PAR2 and a PAR2 activating hexapeptide (2f-LIGRLO-NH(2. Among 2,500 human genes regulated similarly by both agonists, there were clear associations between PAR2 activation and cellular metabolism (1,000 genes, the cell cycle, the MAPK pathway, HDAC and sirtuin enzymes, inflammatory cytokines, and anti-complement function. PAR-2 activation up-regulated four genes more than 5 fold (DUSP6, WWOX, AREG, SERPINB2 and down-regulated another six genes more than 3 fold (TXNIP, RARG, ITGB4, CTSD, MSC and TM4SF15. Both PAR2 and PAR1 activation resulted in up-regulated expression of several genes (CD44, FOSL1, TNFRSF12A, RAB3A, COPEB, CORO1C, THBS1, SDC4 known to be important in cancer. This is the first widespread profiling of specific activation of PAR2 and provides a valuable platform for better understanding key mechanistic roles of PAR2 in human physiology. Results clearly support the development of both antagonists and agonists of human PAR2 as potential disease modifying therapeutic agents.

  19. Blaming, praising, and protecting our humanity: the implications of everyday dehumanization for judgments of moral status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Brock; Laham, Simon M; Wilson, Sam; Haslam, Nick; Koval, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Being human implies a particular moral status: having moral value, agency, and responsibility. However, people are not seen as equally human. Across two studies, we examine the consequences that subtle variations in the perceived humanness of actors or groups have for their perceived moral status. Drawing on Haslam's two-dimensional model of humanness and focusing on three ways people may be considered to have moral status - moral patiency (value), agency, or responsibility - we demonstrate that subtly denying humanness to others has implications for whether they are blamed, praised, or considered worthy of moral concern and rehabilitation. Moreover, we show that distinct human characteristics are linked to specific judgments of moral status. This work demonstrates that everyday judgments of moral status are influenced by perceptions of humanness.

  20. Current Aspect and Future Prospect of Human Gene Therapy in Childhood (Gene Therapy : Advances in Research and Treatment)

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Almost four years have passed since the first human gene therapy for adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency had been performed. Gene therapy protocols for cystic fibrosis, familial hypercholesterolaemia and hemophilia B were also started during this period. In this review, we reported and discussed the current aspect and the future prospect of gene therapy for inherited disease in childhood.

  1. Clinical implications of microRNAs in human glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eMizoguchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is one of the most common and dismal brain tumors in adults. Further elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of GBM is mandatory to improve the overall survival of patients. A novel small non-coding RNA molecule, microRNA (miRNA, appears to represent one of the most attractive target molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of various types of tumors. Recent global analyses have revealed that several miRNAs are clinically implicated in GBM, with some reports indicating the association of miRNA dysregulation with acquired temozolomide (TMZ resistance. More recent studies have revealed that miRNAs could play a role in cancer stem cell (CSC properties, contributing to treatment resistance. In addition, greater impact might be expected from miRNA-targeted therapies based on tumor-derived exosomes that contain numerous functional miRNAs, which could be transferred between tumor cells and surrounding structures. Tumor-derived miRNAs are now considered to be a novel molecular mechanism promoting the progression of GBM. Establishment of miRNA-targeted therapies based on miRNA dysregulation of CSCs could provide effective therapeutic strategies for TMZ-resistant GBM. Recent progress has revealed that miRNAs are not only putative biological markers for diagnosis, but also one of the most promising targets for GBM treatment. Herein, we summarize the translational aspects of miRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  2. Splicing regulation of the Survival Motor Neuron genes and implications for treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bebee, Thomas W.; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2010-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. The reduced SMN levels are due to loss of the survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1) gene. Humans carry a nearly identical SMN2 gene that generates a truncated protein, due to a C to T nucleotide alteration in exon 7 that leads to inefficient RNA splicing of exon 7. This exclusion of SMN exon 7 is central to the onset of the SMA disease, however, this offers a unique ther...

  3. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lunxu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with the KDR promoter and CDglyTK genes. A recombinant adenoviral plasmid AdKDR-CDglyTK was then constructed and transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow and harvest adenoviruses. KDR-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 and KDR-negative liver cancer cell line (HepG2 were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses at different multiplicity of infection (MOI. The infection rate was measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression. The infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of prodrugs ganciclovir (GCV and/or 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC. The killing effects were measured using two different methods, i.e. annexin V-FITC staining and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and they infected ECV304 and HepG2 cells efficiently. The infection rate was dependent on MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. ECV304 cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to GCV and 5-FC. The cell survival rate was dependent on both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, there were no killing effects in the HepG2 cells. The combination of two prodrugs was much more effective in killing ECV304 cells than GCV or 5-FC alone. The growth of transgenic ECV304 cells was suppressed in the presence of prodrugs. Conclusion AdKDR-CDglyTK/double prodrog system may be a useful

  4. The Legacy of Lawrence Kohlberg: Implications for Counseling and Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that, despite great contributions by Lawrence Kohlberg to understanding of moral development, counselors are only beginning to appreciate fully implications of his developmental psychology for practice of counseling and human development. Draws on collective body of Kohlberg's work to show how seven assumptions have direct relevance for…

  5. Genetic Testing and Its Implications: Human Genetics Researchers Grapple with Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabino, Isaac

    2003-01-01

    Contributes systematic data on the attitudes of scientific experts who engage in human genetics research about the pros, cons, and ethical implications of genetic testing. Finds that they are highly supportive of voluntary testing and the right to know one's genetic heritage. Calls for greater genetic literacy. (Contains 87 references.) (Author/NB)

  6. Keratin gene mutations in disorders of human skin and its appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Syed, Deeba N; Adhami, Vaqar M; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-04-15

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 22 different genes including, the cornea, hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been implicated in a wide range of hereditary diseases. The exact phenotype of each disease usually reflects the spatial expression level and the types of mutated keratin genes, the location of the mutations and their consequences at sub-cellular levels as well as other epigenetic and/or environmental factors. The identification of specific pathogenic mutations in keratin disorders formed the basis of our understanding that led to re-classification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe keratin genodermatoses. Molecular defects in cutaneous keratin genes encoding for keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) causes keratinocytes and tissue-specific fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS; K5, K14), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI; K1, K2, K10) i.e. epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI; K1, K10) and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS; K2), pachyonychia congenita (PC; K6a, K6b, K16, K17), epidermolytic palmo-plantar keratoderma (EPPK; K9, (K1)), monilethrix (K81, K83, K86), ectodermal dysplasia (ED; K85) and steatocystoma multiplex. These keratins also have been identified to have roles in apoptosis, cell proliferation

  7. Human Decision Processes: Implications for SSA Support Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciano, P.

    2013-09-01

    Despite significant advances in computing power and artificial intelligence (AI), few critical decisions are made without a human decision maker in the loop. Space Situational Awareness (SSA) missions are both critical and complex, typically adhering to the human-in-the-loop (HITL) model. The collection of human operators injects a needed diversity of expert knowledge, experience, and authority required to successfully fulfill SSA tasking. A wealth of literature on human decision making exists citing myriad empirical studies and offering a varied set of prescriptive and descriptive models of judgment and decision making (Hastie & Dawes, 2001; Baron, 2000). Many findings have been proven sufficiently robust to allow information architects or system/interface designers to take action to improve decision processes. For the purpose of discussion, these concepts are bifurcated in two groups: 1) vulnerabilities to mitigate, and 2) capabilities to augment. These vulnerabilities and capabilities refer specifically to the decision process and should not be confused with a shortcoming or skill of a specific human operator. Thus the framing of questions and orders, the automated tools with which to collaborate, priming and contextual data, and the delivery of information all play a critical role in human judgment and choice. Evaluating the merits of any decision can be elusive; in order to constrain this discussion, ‘rational choice' will tend toward the economic model characteristics such as maximizing utility and selection consistency (e.g., if A preferred to B, and B preferred to C, than A should be preferred to C). Simple decision models often encourage one to list the pros and cons of a decision, perhaps use a weighting schema, but one way or another weigh the future benefit (or harm) of making a selection. The result (sought by the rationalist models) should drive toward higher utility. Despite notable differences in researchers' theses (to be discussed in the full

  8. Human Multidrug Resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Marcella; Scapoli, Luca; Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Carbonara, Paolo; Girardi, Ambra; Mattei, Gabriella; Rodia, Maria Teresa; Solmi, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    Background: For the first time we tested an association between the human multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) polymorphisms (SNPs) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Several MDR1 polymorphisms are associated with pathologies in which they modify the drug susceptibility and pharmacokinetics. Materials and Methods: We genotyped three MDR1 polymorphisms of 48 IPF patients and 100 control subjects with Italian origins. Results: No evidence of association was detected. Conclusion: There are 50 known MDR1 SNPs, and their role is explored in terms of the effectiveness of drug therapy. We consider our small-scale preliminary study as a starting point for further research. PMID:25767528

  9. Polymorphisms in the Human SNAIL (SNAI1) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, K; Paznekas, W A; Burstyn, T; Jabs, E W

    2001-02-01

    The human SNAIL is an important developmental protein involved in the formation of mesoderm and neural crest. The protein contains three classic and one atypical zinc-finger motif. The SNAI1 gene is composed of three exons. We have identified three SNPs in non-coding regions, two in the 5'UTR and one in intron 1, which can be detected by PCR followed by restriction enzyme digestion. We also identified a GGG/GGGG polymorphism in intron 1. We screened CEPH DNAs for these polymorphisms. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Deep divergences of human gene trees and models of human origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Michael G B; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2011-02-01

    Two competing hypotheses are at the forefront of the debate on modern human origins. In the first scenario, known as the recent Out-of-Africa hypothesis, modern humans arose in Africa about 100,000-200,000 years ago and spread throughout the world by replacing the local archaic human populations. By contrast, the second hypothesis posits substantial gene flow between archaic and emerging modern humans. In the last two decades, the young time estimates--between 100,000 and 200,000 years--of the most recent common ancestors for the mitochondrion and the Y chromosome provided evidence in favor of a recent African origin of modern humans. However, the presence of very old lineages for autosomal and X-linked genes has often been claimed to be incompatible with a simple, single origin of modern humans. Through the analysis of a public DNA sequence database, we find, similar to previous estimates, that the common ancestors of autosomal and X-linked genes are indeed very old, living, on average, respectively, 1,500,000 and 1,000,000 years ago. However, contrary to previous conclusions, we find that these deep gene genealogies are consistent with the Out-of-Africa scenario provided that the ancestral effective population size was approximately 14,000 individuals. We show that an ancient bottleneck in the Middle Pleistocene, possibly arising from an ancestral structured population, can reconcile the contradictory findings from the mitochondrion on the one hand, with the autosomes and the X chromosome on the other hand.

  11. Horizontal gene transfers link a human MRSA pathogen to contagious bovine mastitis bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brody

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance by many clinically important bacteria can be traced to horizontal gene transfer (HGT between related or evolutionarily distant microflora. Comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT DNA in emerging pathogens. We have adapted the multi-genome alignment tool EvoPrinter to facilitate discovery of HGT DNA sequences within bacterial genomes and within their mobile genetic elements. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EvoPrinter analysis of 13 different Staphylococcus aureus genomes revealed that one of the human isolates, the hospital epidemic methicillin-resistant MRSA252 strain, uniquely shares multiple putative HGT DNA sequences with different causative agents of bovine mastitis that are not found in the other human S. aureus isolates. MRSA252 shares over 14 different DNA sequence blocks with the bovine mastitis ET3 S. aureus strain RF122, and many of the HGT DNAs encode virulence factors. EvoPrinter analysis of the MRSA252 chromosome also uncovered virulence-factor encoding HGT events with the genome of Listeria monocytogenes and a Staphylococcus saprophyticus associated plasmid. Both bacteria are also causal agents of contagious bovine mastitis. CONCLUSIONS: EvoPrinter analysis reveals that the human MRSA252 strain uniquely shares multiple DNA sequence blocks with different causative agents of bovine mastitis, suggesting that HGT events may be occurring between these pathogens. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that inadvertently enhance the contact of human and livestock bacterial pathogens.

  12. Developmentally-regulated extended domains of DNA hypomethylation encompass highly transcribed genes of the human β-globin locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Melissa J.; Hsu, Mei; Richardson, Christine A.; Olivier, Emmanuel N.; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fiering, Steven; Lowrey, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective DNA methylation has long been implicated in developmental β-globin gene regulation. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation is unclear, especially since these genes do not contain CpG islands. This has led us to propose and test the hypothesis that, just as for histone modifications, developmentally-specific changes in human β-like globin gene expression are associated with long-range changes in DNA methylation. Methods Bisulfite sequencing was used to determine the methylation state of individual CpG dinucleotides across the β-globin locus in uncultured primary human erythroblasts from fetal liver and bone marrow, and in primitive-like erythroid cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. Results β-globin locus CpGs are generally highly methylated but domains of DNA hypomethylation spanning thousands of base pairs are established around the most highly expressed genes during each developmental stage. These large domains of DNA hypomethylation are found within domains of histone modifications associated with gene expression. We also find hypomethylation of a small proportion of γ-globin promoters in adult erythroid cells, suggesting a mechanism by which adult erythroid cells produce fetal hemoglobin. Conclusion This is one of the first reports to show that changes in DNA methylation patterns across large domains around non-CpG island genes correspond with changes in developmentally-regulated histone modifications and gene expression. This data supports a new model in which extended domains of DNA hypomethylation and active histone marks are coordinately established to achieve developmentally-specific gene expression of non-CpG island genes. PMID:19460471

  13. Evaluation of the GeneXpert for Human Monkeypox Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daniel; Wilkins, Kimberly; McCollum, Andrea M.; Osadebe, Lynda; Kabamba, Joelle; Nguete, Beatrice; Likafi, Toutou; Balilo, Marcel Pie; Lushima, Robert Shongo; Malekani, Jean; Damon, Inger K.; Vickery, Michael C. L.; Pukuta, Elisabeth; Nkawa, Frida; Karhemere, Stomy; Tamfum, Jean-Jacques Muyembe; Okitolonda, Emile Wemakoy; Li, Yu; Reynolds, Mary G.

    2017-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV), a zoonotic orthopoxvirus (OPX), is endemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Currently, diagnostic assays for human monkeypox (MPX) focus on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, which are typically performed in sophisticated laboratory settings. Herein, we evaluated the accuracy and utility of a multiplex MPX assay using the GeneXpert platform, a portable rapid diagnostic device that may serve as a point-of-care test to diagnose infections in endemic areas. The multiplex MPX/OPX assay includes a MPX-specific PCR test, OPX-generic PCR test, and an internal control PCR test. In total, 164 diagnostic specimens (50 crusts and 114 vesicular swabs) were collected from suspected MPX cases in Tshuapa Province, DRC, under national surveillance guidelines. The specimens were tested with the GeneXpert MPX/OPX assay and an OPX PCR assay at the Institut National de Recherche Biomedicale (INRB) in Kinshasa. Aliquots of each specimen were tested in parallel with a MPX-specific PCR assay at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The results of the MPX PCR were used as the gold standard for all analyses. The GeneXpert MPX/OPX assay performed at INRB had a sensitivity of 98.8% and specificity of 100%. The GeneXpert assay performed well with both crust and vesicle samples. The GeneXpert MPX/OPX test incorporates a simple methodology that performs well in both laboratory and field conditions, suggesting its viability as a diagnostic platform that may expand and expedite current MPX detection capabilities. PMID:27994107

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-specific methylation of human genes in gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman William B

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV is found in 10% of all gastric adenocarcinomas but its role in tumor development and maintenance remains unclear. The objective of this study was to examine EBV-mediated dysregulation of cellular factors implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods Gene expression patterns were examined in EBV-negative and EBV-positive AGS gastric epithelial cells using a low density microarray, reverse transcription PCR, histochemical stains, and methylation-specific DNA sequencing. Expression of PTGS2 (COX2 was measured in AGS cells and in primary gastric adenocarcinoma tissues. Results In array studies, nearly half of the 96 human genes tested, representing 15 different cancer-related signal transduction pathways, were dysregulated after EBV infection. Reverse transcription PCR confirmed significant impact on factors having diverse functions such as cell cycle regulation (IGFBP3, CDKN2A, CCND1, HSP70, ID2, ID4, DNA repair (BRCA1, TFF1, cell adhesion (ICAM1, inflammation (COX2, and angiogenesis (HIF1A. Demethylation using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine reversed the EBV-mediated dysregulation for all 11 genes listed here. For some promoter sequences, CpG island methylation and demethylation occurred in an EBV-specific pattern as shown by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was less sensitive than was western blot for detecting downregulation of COX2 upon EBV infection. Virus-related dysregulation of COX2 levels in vitro was not recapitulated in vivo among naturally infected gastric cancer tissues. Conclusions EBV alters human gene expression in ways that could contribute to the unique pathobiology of virus-associated cancer. Furthermore, the frequency and reversability of methylation-related transcriptional alterations suggest that demethylating agents have therapeutic potential for managing EBV-related carcinoma.

  15. Implications of human value shift and persistence for biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredo, Michael J; Teel, Tara L; Dietsch, Alia M

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale change in human values and associated behavior change is believed by some to be the ultimate solution to achieve global biodiversity conservation. Yet little is known about the dynamics of values. We contribute to this area of inquiry by examining the trajectory of values affecting views of wildlife in North America. Using data from a 19-state study in the United States and global data from the Schwartz Value Survey, we explored questions of value persistence and change and the nature of attitudinal responses regarding wildlife conservation issues. We found support, based on subjects' ancestry, for the supposition that domination is a prevalent American value orientation toward wildlife that has origins in European Judeo-Christian traditions. Independent of that effect, we also found indications of change. Modernization is contributing to a shift from domination to mutualism value orientations, which is fostering attitudes less centered on human interests and seemingly more consistent with a biocentric philosophy. Our findings suggest that if value shift could be achieved in a purposeful way, then significant and widespread behavior change believed necessary for long-term conservation success may indeed be possible. In particular, greater emphasis on mutualism values may help provide the context for more collaborative approaches to support future conservation efforts. However, given the societal forces at play, it is not at all clear that human-engineered value shift is tenable. Instead of developing strategies aimed at altering values, it may be more productive to create strategies that recognize and work within the boundaries of existing values. Whereas values appear to be in a period of flux, it will be difficult to predict future trends without a better understanding of value formation and shift, particularly under conditions of rapid social-ecological change. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Can we effectively degrade microcystins? - Implications on human health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Cruz, Armah A; Antoniou, Maria; Hiskia, Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    in cells resulting in necrosis or apoptosis. Their cyclic structure and novel amino acids enhance their stability and persistence in the environment. Humans are primarily exposed to microcystins via drinking water consumption and accidental ingestion of recreational water. Recreational exposure by skin...... contact or inhalation to microcystins is now recognized to cause a wide range of acute illnesses which can be life-threatening. Microcystins are primarily degraded by microorganisms in the environment, while sunlight can cause the isomerization of the double bonds and hydroxylation in the presence...

  17. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells: implications for human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    interest on these cells, mainly focused on animal models. Only recently, a few studies have started to address the relevance of the mRGC system in humans and related diseases. We recently discovered that mRGCs resist neurodegeneration in two inherited mitochondrial disorders that cause blindness, i.......e. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy. The mechanism leading to mRGCs sparing in these blinding disorders, characterized by extensive and selective loss of RGCs, is currently unknown and under investigation. Other studies reported on mRGCs in glaucoma, on genetic variation...

  18. DNA methylation profiling of the fibrinogen gene landscape in human cells and during mouse and zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorjohann, Silja; Pitetti, Jean-Luc; Nef, Serge; Gonelle-Gispert, Carmen; Buhler, Leo; Fish, Richard J; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    The fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG show coordinated expression in hepatocytes. Understanding the underlying transcriptional regulation may elucidate how their tissue-specific expression is maintained and explain the high variability in fibrinogen blood levels. DNA methylation of CpG-poor gene promoters is dynamic with low methylation correlating with tissue-specific gene expression but its direct effect on gene regulation as well as implications of non-promoter CpG methylation are not clear. Here we compared methylation of CpG sites throughout the fibrinogen gene cluster in human cells and mouse and zebrafish tissues. We observed low DNA methylation of the CpG-poor fibrinogen promoters and of additional regulatory elements (the liver enhancers CNC12 and PFE2) in fibrinogen-expressing samples. In a gene reporter assay, CpG-methylation in the FGA promoter reduced promoter activity, suggesting a repressive function for DNA methylation in the fibrinogen locus. In mouse and zebrafish livers we measured reductions in DNA methylation around fibrinogen genes during development that were preceded by increased fibrinogen expression and tri-methylation of Histone3 lysine4 (H3K4me3) in fibrinogen promoters. Our data support a model where changes in hepatic transcription factor expression and histone modification provide the switch for increased fibrinogen gene expression in the developing liver which is followed by reduction of CpG methylation.

  19. DNA methylation profiling of the fibrinogen gene landscape in human cells and during mouse and zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silja Vorjohann

    Full Text Available The fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG show coordinated expression in hepatocytes. Understanding the underlying transcriptional regulation may elucidate how their tissue-specific expression is maintained and explain the high variability in fibrinogen blood levels. DNA methylation of CpG-poor gene promoters is dynamic with low methylation correlating with tissue-specific gene expression but its direct effect on gene regulation as well as implications of non-promoter CpG methylation are not clear. Here we compared methylation of CpG sites throughout the fibrinogen gene cluster in human cells and mouse and zebrafish tissues. We observed low DNA methylation of the CpG-poor fibrinogen promoters and of additional regulatory elements (the liver enhancers CNC12 and PFE2 in fibrinogen-expressing samples. In a gene reporter assay, CpG-methylation in the FGA promoter reduced promoter activity, suggesting a repressive function for DNA methylation in the fibrinogen locus. In mouse and zebrafish livers we measured reductions in DNA methylation around fibrinogen genes during development that were preceded by increased fibrinogen expression and tri-methylation of Histone3 lysine4 (H3K4me3 in fibrinogen promoters. Our data support a model where changes in hepatic transcription factor expression and histone modification provide the switch for increased fibrinogen gene expression in the developing liver which is followed by reduction of CpG methylation.

  20. Human heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer lowers blood pressure and promotes growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaawy, H E; Zhang, F; Nguyen, X; ElHosseiny, A; Nasjletti, A; Schwartzman, M; Dennery, P; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    2001-08-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, with release of free iron and carbon monoxide. Both heme and carbon monoxide have been implicated in the regulation of vascular tone. A retroviral vector containing human HO-1 cDNA (LSN-HHO-1) was constructed and subjected to purification and concentration of the viral particles to achieve 5x10(9) to 1x10(10) colony-forming units per milliliter. The ability of concentrated infectious viral particles to express human HO-1 (HHO-1) in vivo was tested. A single intracardiac injection of the concentrated infectious viral particles (expressing HHO-1) to 5-day-old spontaneously hypertensive rats resulted in functional expression of the HHO-1 gene and attenuation of the development of hypertension. Rats expressing HHO-1 showed a significant decrease in urinary excretion of a vasoconstrictor arachidonic acid metabolite and a reduction in myogenic responses to increased intraluminal pressure in isolated arterioles. Unexpectedly, HHO-1 chimeric rats showed a simultaneous significant proportionate increase in somatic growth. Thus, delivery of HHO-1 gene by retroviral vector attenuates the development of hypertension and promotes body growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  1. Paleoclimate Implications for Human-Made Climate Change

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, James E

    2011-01-01

    Milankovic climate oscillations help define climate sensitivity and assess potential human-made climate effects. We conclude that Earth in the warmest interglacial periods was less than 1{\\deg}C warmer than in the Holocene. Goals to limit human-made warming to 2{\\deg}C and CO2 to 450 ppm are not sufficient -- they are prescriptions for disaster. Polar warmth in prior interglacials and the Pliocene does not imply that a significant cushion remains between today's climate and dangerous warming, but rather that Earth today is poised to experience strong amplifying polar feedbacks in response to moderate additional warming. Deglaciation, disintegration of ice sheets, is nonlinear, spurred by amplifying feedbacks. If warming reaches a level that forces deglaciation, the rate of sea level rise will depend on the doubling time for ice sheet mass loss. Satellite gravity data, though too brief to be conclusive, are consistent with a doubling time of 10 years or less, implying the possibility of multi-meter sea level r...

  2. Replacement gene therapy with a human RPGRIP1 sequence slows photoreceptor degeneration in a murine model of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlyk, Basil S; Bulgakov, Oleg V; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xiaoyun; Adamian, Michael; Sun, Xun; Khani, Shahrokh C; Berson, Eliot L; Sandberg, Michael A; Li, Tiansen

    2010-08-01

    RPGR-interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1) is localized in the photoreceptor-connecting cilium, where it anchors the RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) protein, and its function is essential for photoreceptor maintenance. Genetic defect in RPGRIP1 is a known cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe, early-onset form of retinal degeneration. We evaluated the efficacy of replacement gene therapy in a murine model of LCA carrying a targeted disruption of RPGRIP1. The replacement construct, packaged in an adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) vector, used a rhodopsin kinase gene promoter to drive RPGRIP1 expression. Both promoter and transgene were of human origin. After subretinal delivery of the replacement gene in the mutant mice, human RPGRIP1 was expressed specifically in photoreceptors, localized correctly in the connecting cilia, and restored the normal localization of RPGR. Electroretinogram and histological examinations showed better preservation of rod and cone photoreceptor function and improved photoreceptor survival in the treated eyes. This study demonstrates the efficacy of human gene replacement therapy and validates a gene therapy design for future clinical trials in patients afflicted with this condition. Our results also have therapeutic implications for other forms of retinal degenerations attributable to a ciliary defect.

  3. The regulated secretory pathway and human disease: insights from gene variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eSalton

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulated secretory pathway provides critical control of peptide, growth factor, and hormone release from neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, and neurons, maintaining physiological homeostasis. Propeptides and prohormones are packaged into dense core granules (DCGs, where they frequently undergo tissue-specific processing as the DCG matures. Proteins of the granin family are DCG components, and although their function is not fully understood, data suggest they are involved in DCG formation and regulated protein/peptide secretion, in addition to their role as precursors of bioactive peptides. Association of gene variation, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, with neuropsychiatric, endocrine and metabolic diseases, has implicated specific secreted proteins and peptides in disease pathogenesis. For example, a SNP at position 196 (G/A of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene dysregulates protein processing and secretion and leads to cognitive impairment. This suggests more generally that variants identified in genes encoding secreted growth factors, peptides, hormones, and proteins involved in DCG biogenesis, protein processing, and the secretory apparatus, could provide insight into the process of regulated secretion as well as disorders that result when it is impaired.

  4. Positive Selection of a Pre-Expansion CAG Repeat of the Human SCA2 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG(8CAA(CAG(4CAA(CAG(8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  5. Positive selection of a pre-expansion CAG repeat of the human SCA2 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuli Yu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG8CAA(CAG4CAA(CAG8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  6. Endogenous gustatory responses and gene expression profile of stably proliferating human taste cells isolated from fungiform papillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheimer, Andreas; Krohn, Michael; Rudert, Kerstin; Riedel, Katja; Becker, Sven; Thirion, Christian; Zinke, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Investigating molecular mechanisms underlying human taste sensation requires functionally dedicated and at the same time proliferating human taste cells. Here, we isolated viable human fungiform taste papillae cells from biopsy samples, adenovirally transduced proliferation promoting genes, and obtained stably proliferating cell lines. Analysis of gene expression of 1 human taste cell line termed HTC-8 revealed that these cells express 13 TAS2R bitter taste receptor genes, CD36, OXTR encoding oxytocin receptor, as well as genes implicated with signal transduction and cell fate control. Bitter tastants triggered functionally distinct signaling pathways in HTC-8 cells. Salicin elicited phospholipase C-dependent calcium signaling and no cell depolarization. In contrast, stimulation with saccharin, aristolochic acid, or phenylthiocarbamide triggered cell depolarization and phospholipase C-independent calcium influx. Simultaneous stimulation with salicin and saccharin revealed that saccharin can enhance the phospholipase C-dependent response to salicin indicating crosstalk of signaling pathways. Our results show that HTC-8 cells are programmed to bitter taste reception but are also responsive to fatty acids, oxytocin, and somatosensory stimuli, whereas HTC-8 cells are insensitive to compounds representing other basic taste qualities.

  7. Gene expression correlations in human cancer cell lines define molecular interaction networks for epithelial phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W Kohn

    Full Text Available Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute's CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1; interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3; interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP; transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2; epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2; epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B; epithelial Ca(+2 signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY; terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2; maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3. The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets.

  8. Bordetella pertussis modulates human macrophage defense gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Hugo Alberto; Oviedo, Juan Marcos; Gorgojo, Juan Pablo; Lamberti, Yanina; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough, still causes outbreaks. We recently found evidence that B. pertussis can survive and even replicate inside human macrophages, indicating that this host cell might serve as a niche for persistence. In this work, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) that differentiates into macrophages in culture in order to investigate the host cell response to the infection and the mechanisms that promote that intracellular survival. To that end, we investigated the expression profile of a selected number of genes involved in cellular bactericidal activity and the inflammatory response during the early and late phases of infection. The bactericidal and inflammatory response of infected macrophages was progressively downregulated, while the number of THP-1 cells heavily loaded with live bacteria increased over time postinfection. Two of the main toxins of B. pertussis, pertussis toxin (Ptx) and adenylate cyclase (CyaA), were found to be involved in manipulating the host cell response. Therefore, failure to express either toxin proved detrimental to the development of intracellular infections by those bacteria. Taken together, these results support the relevance of host defense gene manipulation to the outcome of the interaction between B. pertussis and macrophages.

  9. Solar variability and its implications for the human environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, G.C. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Laboratory

    1999-01-01

    Solar variability can affect human activities in a variety of ways, from changing our climate to disrupting power distribution facilities and shortening the orbital lifetime of satellites. This tutorial paper will be concerned only with effects on the surface environment that can have a direct impact on our everyday life, such as variations in the stratospheric ozone layer that shields us from harmful ultraviolet radiation, and changes in global climate that can hinder or delay the detection of climate changes that might result from our own technological activities. The emphasis is on potential mechanisms, rather than on reported correlations between solar and terrestrial parameters, but reference to certain observations will be made. Realization of a potential impact of solar variability on our local environment has progressed a long way in the last few decades, from denial to partial acceptance, but a complete assessment of its reality and magnitude remains a distant goal. (author)

  10. Commodification of human tissue: implications for feminist and development ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Donna

    2002-05-01

    One effect of late capitalism--the commodification of practically everything--is to knock down the Chinese walls between the natural and productive realms, to use a Marxist framework. Women's labour in egg extraction and 'surrogate' motherhood might then be seen as what it is, labour which produces something of value. But this does not necessarily mean that women will benefit from the commodification of practically everything, in either North or South. In the newly developing biotechnologies involving stem cells, the reverse is more likely, particular given the the shortage in the North of the egg donors who will be increasingly necessary to therapeutic cloning. Although most of the ethical debate has focused on the status of the embryo, this is to define ethics with no reference to global or gender justice. There has been little or no debate about possible exploitation of women, particularly of ovum donors from the South. Countries of the South without national ethics committees or guidelines may be particularly vulnerable: although there is increasing awareness of the susceptibility of poorer countries to abuses in research ethics, very little has been written about how they might be affected by the enormously profitable new technologies exploiting human tissue. Even in the UK, although the new Medical Research Council guidelines make a good deal of the 'gift relationship', what they are actually about is commodification. If donors believe they are demonstrating altruism, but biotechnology firms and researchers use the discourse of commodity and profit, we have not 'incomplete commodification' but complete commodification with a plausibly human face.

  11. Vitamin D and gene networks in human osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen evan de Peppel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone formation is indirectly influenced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3 through the stimulation of calcium uptake in the intestine and re-absorption in the kidneys. Direct effects on osteoblasts and bone formation have also been established. The vitamin D receptor (VDR is expressed in osteoblasts and 1,25D3 modifies gene expression of various osteoblast differentiation and mineralization-related genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALPL, osteocalcin (BGLAP and osteopontin (SPP1. 1,25D3 is known to stimulate mineralization of human osteoblasts in vitro, and recently it was shown that 1,25D3 induces mineralization via effects in the period preceding mineralization during the pre-mineralization period. For a full understanding of the action of 1,25D3 in osteoblasts it is important to get an integrated network view of the 1,25D3-regulated genes during osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. The current data will be presented and discussed alluding to future studies to fully delineate the 1,25D3 action in osteoblast. Describing and understanding the vitamin D regulatory networks and identifying the dominant players in these networks may help develop novel (personalized vitamin D-based treatments. The following topics will be discussed in this overview: 1 Bone metabolism and osteoblasts, 2 Vitamin D, bone metabolism and osteoblast function, 3 Vitamin D induced transcriptional networks in the context of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation.

  12. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  13. C/EBPδ gene targets in human keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Borrelli

    Full Text Available C/EBPs are a family of B-Zip transcription factors--TFs--involved in the regulation of differentiation in several tissues. The two most studied members--C/EBPα and C/EBPβ--play important roles in skin homeostasis and their ablation reveals cells with stem cells signatures. Much less is known about C/EBPδ which is highly expressed in the granular layer of interfollicular epidermis and is a direct target of p63, the master regular of multilayered epithelia. We identified C/EBPδ target genes in human primary keratinocytes by ChIP on chip and profiling of cells functionally inactivated with siRNA. Categorization suggests a role in differentiation and control of cell-cycle, particularly of G2/M genes. Among positively controlled targets are numerous genes involved in barrier function. Functional inactivation of C/EBPδ as well as overexpressions of two TF targets--MafB and SOX2--affect expression of markers of keratinocyte differentiation. We performed IHC on skin tumor tissue arrays: expression of C/EBPδ is lost in Basal Cell Carcinomas, but a majority of Squamous Cell Carcinomas showed elevated levels of the protein. Our data indicate that C/EBPδ plays a role in late stages of keratinocyte differentiation.

  14. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes in human neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridings, J; Nicholson, I C; Goldsworthy, W; Haslam, R; Roberton, D M; Zola, H

    1997-05-01

    The antibody response in the young infant is limited in several ways; in particular, responses generally are of low affinity and restricted to IgM. This raises the question whether the affinity maturation process, consisting of somatic mutation of immunoglobulin genes coupled with selection of high-affinity variants, is operative in the neonate. Re-arranged V(H)6 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from cord blood and from peripheral blood of infants. Heteroduplex analysis detected mutation in only 2/18 cord blood samples, while mutations were seen from about 10 days of age onwards. Cloning and sequencing of mutated neonatal V(H)6 genes showed that mutated sequences contained relatively few mutations (one to three mutations per sequence) compared with published values of about 10 in adult IgM sequences. Selection was not evident in the majority of neonatal samples. Thus mutation can occur in the human neonate, but is minimal and generally not accompanied by selection. The age at which affinity maturation develops effectively is yet to be defined.

  15. Cloning and sequencing of human lambda immunoglobulin genes by the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songsivilai, S; Bye, J M; Marks, J D; Hughes-Jones, N C

    1990-12-01

    Universal oligonucleotide primers, designed for amplifying and sequencing genes encoding the rearranged human lambda immunoglobulin variable region, were validated by amplification of the lambda light chain genes from four human heterohybridoma cell lines and in the generation of a cDNA library of human V lambda sequences from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human peripheral blood lymphocytes. This technique allows rapid cloning and sequencing of human immunoglobulin genes, and has potential applications in the rescue of unstable human antibody-producing cell lines and in the production of human monoclonal antibodies.

  16. cDNA cloning and expression of an apoptosis-related gene, human TFAR15 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉刚; 刘洪涛; 张颖妹; 马大龙

    1999-01-01

    By means of cDNA-RDA method. some cDNA fragments were found to have high levels of expression during deprivation of GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor) in a human myeloid cell line, TF-1 cells. One of these tragments was identified as a novel gene. To get the full length of cDNA, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and expressed sequence tags (EST) overlapping fragments assembling strategies were used. The novel gene was named TRAF15 (TF-1 cell apoptosis related gene-15), which consists of 1218 nueleotides and encodes 212 amino acids. The putative protein protein product of TFAR15 is partially homologous to C. elegans protein C14A4. 11. TFAR15 mRNA is expressed in fetal liver, kidney, spleen and lung. and also in some human myeloid cell lines. Both of the TFAR15 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in TF-(?) cells after GM-CSF withdrawal. In vitro analysis showed that the recombinant TFAR15 protein co(?)ld inhibit the natural cell death of 293 cells, an embryonic kidney cell

  17. Companion animal welfare and possible implications on the human-pet relationship

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The role of pets (dogs and cats in particular) in human society has changed in recent years. Nowadays pets are an integral part of the human family and this aspect has many social and emotional implications. For their positive effects on human health, pets are also employed in some special and therapeutic activities known by the generic term of “Pet Therapy”. In these programmes the animal becomes an integral part of the therapeutic plan in order to induce some physical, social, e...

  18. ACE I/D gene polymorphism in diabetic nephropathy: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaleemullah Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a major microvascular complication accounting for about 30% of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD cases. An insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism of the gene encoding angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE is reported to be a candidate gene predisposing to diabetic nephropathy. Accordingly, we investigated the ACE I/D gene polymorphism in 52 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM cases suffering from nephropathy as assessed by 24 hrs urinary protein levels. 50 age and sex matched healthy subjects served as controls. ACE I/D genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification using allele specific primers. The frequencies of ACE DD, ID and II genotypes in the diabetic nephropathy patients were 38.5% , 50% and 11.5% and in the control subjects, 22%, 38% and 40% respectively. There was an increase of 16.5% in the frequency of DD genotype in the patients compared to controls. The frequency of D allele in the patients was 63% which was found to be statistically significant (p< 0.05, Odds ratio=2.6 compared to 41% in the controls. These results indicate that Type 2 diabetic patients with D allele (those with DD & ID genotypes have more than two fold risk of developing nephropathy. Clinical implications of ACE genotyping in planning for patient’s management have been discussed.

  19. Large Scale Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Reveals Tissue-Specific, Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Benjamin T.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Buckberry, Sam; Breen, James; Clifton, Vicki; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analyzed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes), followed by the heart (375 genes), kidney (224 genes), colon (218 genes), and thyroid (163 genes). More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs, and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases.

  20. Large scale gene expression meta-analysis reveals tissue-specific, sex-biased gene expression in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mayne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analysed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes, followed by the heart (375 genes, kidney (224 genes, colon (218 genes and thyroid (163 genes. More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases.

  1. Horizontal transmission of malignancy: in-vivo fusion of human lymphomas with hamster stroma produces tumors retaining human genes and lymphoid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Goldenberg

    Full Text Available We report the in-vivo fusion of two Hodgkin lymphomas with golden hamster cheek pouch cells, resulting in serially-transplanted (over 5-6 years GW-532 and GW-584 heterosynkaryon tumor cells displaying both human and hamster DNA (by FISH, lymphoma-like morphology, aggressive metastasis, and retention of 7 human genes (CD74, CXCR4, CD19, CD20, CD71, CD79b, and VIM out of 24 tested by PCR. The prevalence of B-cell restricted genes (CD19, CD20, and CD79b suggests that this uniform population may be the clonal initiating (malignant cells of Hodgkin lymphoma, despite their not showing translation to their respective proteins by immunohistochemical analysis. This is believed to be the first report of in-vivo cell-cell fusion of human lymphoma and rodent host cells, and may be a method to disclose genes regulating both organoid and metastasis signatures, suggesting that the horizontal transfer of tumor DNA to adjacent stromal cells may be implicated in tumor heterogeneity and progression. The B-cell gene signature of the hybrid xenografts suggests that Hodgkin lymphoma, or its initiating cells, is a B-cell malignancy.

  2. Gene expression analysis of primary normal human hepatocytes infected with human hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun Mi Ryu; Sung Gyoo Park; Sung Su Yea; Won Hee Jang; Young-Il Yang; Guhung Jung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To find the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatocytes during the initial state of infection by cDNA microarray.METHODS: Primary normal human hepatocytes (PNHHs)were isolated and infected with HBV. From the PNHHs,RNA was isolated and inverted into complement DNA (cDNA) with Cy3- or Cy5- labeled dUTP for microarray analysis. The labeled cDNA was hybridized with microarray chip, including 4224 cDNAs. From the image of the microarray, expression profiles were produced and some of them were confirmed by RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and NF-κB luciferase reporter assay.RESULTS: From the cDNA microarray, we obtained 98differentially regulated genes. Of the 98 genes, 53 were up regulated and 45 down regulated. Interestingly, in the up regulated genes, we found the TNF signaling pathway-related genes: LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK. By using RT-PCR, we confirmed the up-regulation of these genes in HepG2, Huh7, and Chang liver cells, which were transfected with pHBV1.2x, a plasmid encoding all HBV messages. Moreover, these three genes participated in HBVmediated NF-κB activation.CONCLUSION: During the initial state of HBV infection,hepatocytes facilitate the activation of NF-κB through up regulation of LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK.

  3. Chromosomal localization of the gene for the human Theta class glutathione transferase (GSTT1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.; Vaska, V. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Goggan, M.; Board, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Two loci encoding Theta class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been identified in humans. In situ hybridization studies have localized the GSTT1 gene to 22q11.2. This is the same band to which we previously localized the GSTT2 gene. This finding confirms the trend for human GST genes to be found in class-specific clusters. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Prognostic implications of Kindlin proteins in human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kai Ning,* Haoshaqiang Zhang,* Zhigang Wang, Kun Li Department of Orthopedics Surgery Center, People’s Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Urumqi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The Kindlin protein family, comprising Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3, play important roles in various human cancers. Here, to explore the clinical significance of Kindlins in human osteosarcomas, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to detect the expression of Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3 mRNAs and proteins in 20 self-pairs of osteosarcoma and adjacent noncancerous tissues. Then, immunohistochemistry was performed to examine subcellular localizations and expression patterns of Kindlin proteins in 100 osteosarcoma and matched adjacent noncancerous tissues. Kindlin-1, Kindlin-2 and Kindlin-3 protein immunostainings were localized in the cytoplasm, nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively, of tumor cells in primary osteosarcoma tissues. Statistically, the expression levels of Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 mRNAs and proteins in osteosarcoma tissues were all significantly higher (both P<0.01, but those of Kindlin-3 mRNA and protein were both dramatically lower (both P<0.05, than in matched adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, the overexpressions of Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 proteins were both significantly associated with high tumor grade (both P=0.01, presence of metastasis (both P=0.006, recurrence (both P=0.006 and poor response to chemotherapy (both P=0.02. Moreover, Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 expressions were both identified as independent prognostic factors for overall (both P=0.01 and disease-free (P=0.02 and 0.01, respectively survivals of osteosarcoma patients. However, no associations were observed between Kindlin-3 expression and various clinicopathologic features and patients’ prognosis. In conclusion, aberrant expression of Kindlin-1 and Kindlin-2 may function

  5. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for innate immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cole R. Spresser; Sarah E. Marshall; Kimberly A. Carlson

    2008-08-01

    OTK18 is a human transcriptional suppressor implicated in the regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type-one infection of mononuclear phagocytes. It is ubiquitously expressed in all normal tissues, but its normal homeostatic function is yet to be characterized. One hypothesis is that OTK18 aids in the regulation of the innate immune system. To test this hypothesis, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the total RNA extracted from Drosophila melanogaster embryonic Schneider 2 (S2) cells transfected with either pEGFP-OTK18 (enhanced green fluorescent protein) or empty vector controls (pEGFP-N3) for 6, 12 and 24 h. cDNA microarray analysis revealed differential expression of genes known to be important in regulation of Drosophila innate immunity. The expression levels of two genes, Metchnikowin and CG16708 were verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. These results suggest a role for OTK18 in innate immunity.

  6. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Amandine, E-mail: amandine.vargas@voila.fr; Thiery, Maxime, E-mail: thiery.maxime@courrier.uqam.ca; Lafond, Julie, E-mail: lafond.julie@uqam.ca; Barbeau, Benoit, E-mail: barbeau.benoit@uqam.ca

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  7. Dissecting cis regulation of gene expression in human metabolic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Dobrin

    Full Text Available Complex diseases such as obesity and type II diabetes can result from a failure in multiple organ systems including the central nervous system and tissues involved in partitioning and disposal of nutrients. Studying the genetics of gene expression in tissues that are involved in the development of these diseases can provide insights into how these tissues interact within the context of disease. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL studies identify mRNA expression changes linked to proximal genetic signals (cis eQTLs that have been shown to affect disease. Given the high impact of recent eQTL studies, it is important to understand what role sample size and environment plays in identification of cis eQTLs. Here we show in a genotyped obese human population that the number of cis eQTLs obey precise scaling laws as a function of sample size in three profiled tissues, i.e. omental adipose, subcutaneous adipose and liver. Also, we show that genes (or transcripts with cis eQTL associations detected in a small population are detected at approximately 90% rate in the largest population available for our study, indicating that genes with strong cis acting regulatory elements can be identified with relatively high confidence in smaller populations. However, by increasing the sample size we allow for better detection of weaker and more distantly located cis-regulatory elements. Yet, we determined that the number of tissue specific cis eQTLs saturates in a modestly sized cohort while the number of cis eQTLs common to all tissues fails to reach a maximum value. Understanding the power laws that govern the number and specificity of eQTLs detected in different tissues, will allow a better utilization of genetics of gene expression to inform the molecular mechanism underlying complex disease traits.

  8. Human resources in science and engineering: Policy implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggon, C.B.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, there has been much debate concerning the adequacy of the United States` (U.S.) human resources base to meet its future needs for science and engineering (S/E) talent. Science policy analysts - and scientists and engineers themselves - disagree about whether there will be any shortages of scientists and engineers, and if so, what they will mean for the U.S. Whether or not these shortages materialize, it is necessary for the U.S. to expand the pool from which it recruits its S/E talent. This paper addresses the question of how to increases the diversity of the S/E talent pool to include those who are projected by the year 2000 to be the majority of entry-level workers in the U.S. workforce: women and racial/ethnic minorities. Market forces alone cannot increase the size and diversity of the U.S. S/E workforce. Policy intervention