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Sample records for human gait time

  1. Balzac and human gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, S; Carrillo, J M

    2015-05-01

    People have been interested in movement analysis in general, and gait analysis in particular, since ancient times. Aristotle, Hippocrates, Galen, Leonardo da Vinci and Honoré de Balzac all used observation to analyse the gait of human beings. The purpose of this study is to compare Honoré de Balzac's writings with a scientific analysis of human gait. Honoré de Balzac's Theory of walking and other works by that author referring to gait. Honoré de Balzac had an interest in gait analysis, as demonstrated by his descriptions of characters which often include references to their way of walking. He also wrote a treatise entitled Theory of walking (Théorie de la demarche) in which he employed his keen observation skills to define gait using a literary style. He stated that the walking process is divided into phases and listed the factors that influence gait, such as personality, mood, height, weight, profession and social class, and also provided a description of the correct way of walking. Balzac considered gait analysis to be very important and this is reflected in both his character descriptions and Theory of walking, his analytical observation of gait. In our own technology-dominated times, this serves as a reminder of the importance of observation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Human gait recognition via deterministic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Wang, Cong

    2012-11-01

    Recognition of temporal/dynamical patterns is among the most difficult pattern recognition tasks. Human gait recognition is a typical difficulty in the area of dynamical pattern recognition. It classifies and identifies individuals by their time-varying gait signature data. Recently, a new dynamical pattern recognition method based on deterministic learning theory was presented, in which a time-varying dynamical pattern can be effectively represented in a time-invariant manner and can be rapidly recognized. In this paper, we present a new model-based approach for human gait recognition via the aforementioned method, specifically for recognizing people by gait. The approach consists of two phases: a training (learning) phase and a test (recognition) phase. In the training phase, side silhouette lower limb joint angles and angular velocities are selected as gait features. A five-link biped model for human gait locomotion is employed to demonstrate that functions containing joint angle and angular velocity state vectors characterize the gait system dynamics. Due to the quasi-periodic and symmetrical characteristics of human gait, the gait system dynamics can be simplified to be described by functions of joint angles and angular velocities of one side of the human body, thus the feature dimension is effectively reduced. Locally-accurate identification of the gait system dynamics is achieved by using radial basis function (RBF) neural networks (NNs) through deterministic learning. The obtained knowledge of the approximated gait system dynamics is stored in constant RBF networks. A gait signature is then derived from the extracted gait system dynamics along the phase portrait of joint angles versus angular velocities. A bank of estimators is constructed using constant RBF networks to represent the training gait patterns. In the test phase, by comparing the set of estimators with the test gait pattern, a set of recognition errors are generated, and the average L(1) norms

  3. A non linear analysis of human gait time series based on multifractal analysis and cross correlations

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    Munoz-Diosdado, A [Department of Mathematics, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnologia, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Acueducto s/n, 07340, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed databases with gait time series of adults and persons with Parkinson, Huntington and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseases. We obtained the staircase graphs of accumulated events that can be bounded by a straight line whose slope can be used to distinguish between gait time series from healthy and ill persons. The global Hurst exponent of these series do not show tendencies, we intend that this is because some gait time series have monofractal behavior and others have multifractal behavior so they cannot be characterized with a single Hurst exponent. We calculated the multifractal spectra, obtained the spectra width and found that the spectra of the healthy young persons are almost monofractal. The spectra of ill persons are wider than the spectra of healthy persons. In opposition to the interbeat time series where the pathology implies loss of multifractality, in the gait time series the multifractal behavior emerges with the pathology. Data were collected from healthy and ill subjects as they walked in a roughly circular path and they have sensors in both feet, so we have one time series for the left foot and other for the right foot. First, we analyzed these time series separately, and then we compared both results, with direct comparison and with a cross correlation analysis. We tried to find differences in both time series that can be used as indicators of equilibrium problems.

  4. A stochastic model of human gait dynamics

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    Ashkenazy, Yosef; M. Hausdorff, Jeffrey; Ch. Ivanov, Plamen; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a stochastic model of gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, that reproduces distinctive statistical properties of normal human walking. By tuning one model parameter, the transition (hopping) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood-including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation. The model also generates time series with multifractal spectra whose broadness depends only on this parameter. Moreover, we find that the volatility exponent increases monotonically as a function of the width of the multifractal spectrum, suggesting the possibility of a change in multifractality with maturation.

  5. UWB micro-doppler radar for human gait analysis using joint range-time-frequency representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Fathy, Aly E.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel, standalone ultra wideband (UWB) micro-Doppler radar sensor that goes beyond simple range or micro-Doppler detection to combined range-time-Doppler frequency analysis. Moreover, it can monitor more than one human object in both line-of-sight (LOS) and through wall scenarios, thus have full human objects tracking capabilities. The unique radar design is based on narrow pulse transceiver, high speed data acquisition module, and wideband antenna array. For advanced radar post-data processing, joint range-time-frequency representation has been performed. Characteristics of human walking activity have been analyzed using the radar sensor by precisely tracking the radar object and acquiring range-time-Doppler information simultaneously. The UWB micro-Doppler radar prototype is capable of detecting Doppler frequency range from -180 Hz to +180 Hz, which allows a maximum target velocity of 9 m/s. The developed radar sensor can also be extended for many other applications, such as respiration and heartbeat detection of trapped survivors under building debris.

  6. Average Gait Differential Image Based Human Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference between adjacent frames of human walking contains useful information for human gait identification. Based on the previous idea a silhouettes difference based human gait recognition method named as average gait differential image (AGDI is proposed in this paper. The AGDI is generated by the accumulation of the silhouettes difference between adjacent frames. The advantage of this method lies in that as a feature image it can preserve both the kinetic and static information of walking. Comparing to gait energy image (GEI, AGDI is more fit to representation the variation of silhouettes during walking. Two-dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA is used to extract features from the AGDI. Experiments on CASIA dataset show that AGDI has better identification and verification performance than GEI. Comparing to PCA, 2DPCA is a more efficient and less memory storage consumption feature extraction method in gait based recognition.

  7. Analysis of gait using a treadmill and a Time-of-flight camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    We present a system that analyzes human gait using a treadmill and a Time-of-flight camera. The camera provides spatial data with local intensity measures of the scene, and data are collected over several gait cycles. These data are then used to model and analyze the gait. For each frame...

  8. Quantifying dynamic characteristics of human walking for comprehensive gait cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummolo, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2013-09-01

    Normal human walking typically consists of phases during which the body is statically unbalanced while maintaining dynamic stability. Quantifying the dynamic characteristics of human walking can provide better understanding of gait principles. We introduce a novel quantitative index, the dynamic gait measure (DGM), for comprehensive gait cycle. The DGM quantifies the effects of inertia and the static balance instability in terms of zero-moment point and ground projection of center of mass and incorporates the time-varying foot support region (FSR) and the threshold between static and dynamic walking. Also, a framework of determining the DGM from experimental data is introduced, in which the gait cycle segmentation is further refined. A multisegmental foot model is integrated into a biped system to reconstruct the walking motion from experiments, which demonstrates the time-varying FSR for different subphases. The proof-of-concept results of the DGM from a gait experiment are demonstrated. The DGM results are analyzed along with other established features and indices of normal human walking. The DGM provides a measure of static balance instability of biped walking during each (sub)phase as well as the entire gait cycle. The DGM of normal human walking has the potential to provide some scientific insights in understanding biped walking principles, which can also be useful for their engineering and clinical applications.

  9. Allometric control of human gait

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    Griffin, Lori Ann

    results suggest the need to change the interpretation of ``noise'' in such time series data. Suggesting the concept of how the gait data will be analyzed, with regards to treating strides as being random, may need to be rethought.

  10. Analyzing Gait Using a Time-of-Flight Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm is created, which performs human gait analysis using spatial data and amplitude images from a Time-of-flight camera. For each frame in a sequence the camera supplies cartesian coordinates in space for every pixel. By using an articulated model the subject pose is estimated in the depth...... on this model. The output data are: Speed, Cadence (steps per minute), Step length, Stride length (stride being two consecutive steps also known as a gait cycle), and Range of motion (angles of joints). The created system produces good output data of the described output parameters and requires no user...

  11. Analyzing Gait Using a Time-of-Flight Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm is created, which performs human gait analysis using spatial data and amplitude images from a Time-of-flight camera. For each frame in a sequence the camera supplies cartesian coordinates in space for every pixel. By using an articulated model the subject pose is estimated in the depth...... map in each frame. The pose estimation is based on likelihood, contrast in the amplitude image, smoothness and a shape prior used to solve a Markov random field. Based on the pose estimates, and the prior that movement is locally smooth, a sequential model is created, and a gait analysis is done...

  12. Stratification of the phase clouds and statistical effects of the non-Markovity in chaotic time series of human gait for healthy people and Parkinson patients

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    Yulmetyev, Renat; Demin, Sergey; Emelyanova, Natalya; Gafarov, Fail; Hänggi, Peter

    2003-03-01

    In this work we develop a new method of diagnosing the nervous system diseases and a new approach in studying human gait dynamics with the help of the theory of discrete non-Markov random processes (Phys. Rev. E 62 (5) (2000) 6178, Phys. Rev. E 64 (2001) 066132, Phys. Rev. E 65 (2002) 046107, Physica A 303 (2002) 427). The stratification of the phase clouds and the statistical non-Markov effects in the time series of the dynamics of human gait are considered. We carried out the comparative analysis of the data of four age groups of healthy people: children (from 3 to 10 year olds), teenagers (from 11 to 14 year olds), young people (from 21 up to 29 year olds), elderly persons (from 71 to 77 year olds) and Parkinson patients. The full data set are analyzed with the help of the phase portraits of the four dynamic variables, the power spectra of the initial time correlation function and the memory functions of junior orders, the three first points in the spectra of the statistical non-Markov parameter. The received results allow to define the predisposition of the probationers to deflections in the central nervous system caused by Parkinson's disease. We have found out distinct differences between the five submitted groups. On this basis we offer a new method of diagnostics and forecasting Parkinson's disease.

  13. Stratification of the phase clouds and statistical effects of the non-Markovity in chaotic time series of human gait for healthy people and Parkinson patients

    CERN Document Server

    Yulmetyev, R M; Emelyanova, N; Gafarov, F; Hänggi, P; Yulmetyev, Renat; Demin, Sergey; Emelyanova, Natalya; Gafarov, Fail; Hanggi, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In this work we develop a new method of diagnosing the nervous system diseases and a new approach in studying human gait dynamics with the help of the theory of discrete non-Markov random processes. The stratification of the phase clouds and the statistical non-Markov effects in the time series of the dynamics of human gait are considered. We carried out the comparative analysis of the data of four age groups of healthy people: children (from 3 to 10 year olds), teenagers (from 11 to 14 year oulds), young people (from 21 up to 29 year oulds), elderly persons (from 71 to 77 year olds) and Parkinson patients. The full data set are analyzed with the help of the phase portraits of the four dynamic variables, the power spectra of the initial time correlation function and the memory functions of junior orders, the three first points in the spectra of the statistical non-Markov parameter. The received results allow to define the predisposition of the probationers to deflections in the central nervous system caused b...

  14. Deterioration of gait and balance over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreisel, Stefan H; Blahak, Christian; Bäzner, Hansjörg

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown an association between the severity of age-related white matter change (ARWMC) and lower body motor function. However, the association between prevalent ARWMC and incident deterioration of balance and gait remains insufficiently investigated. This study...... relevance: given the increasing use of neuroimaging, incidental white matter pathology is common; being able to delineate natural trajectories of balance and gait function given ARWMC may improve patient advice and help optimize allocation of care....... investigates if the degree of prevalent ARWMC has a differential effect on lower body motor function as it changes over time, hypothesizing that individuals with more severe baseline white matter pathology experience greater clinical deterioration independent of potential confounders. This is of clinical...

  15. Gait Correlation Analysis Based Human Identification

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    Jinyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human gait identification aims to identify people by a sequence of walking images. Comparing with fingerprint or iris based identification, the most important advantage of gait identification is that it can be done at a distance. In this paper, silhouette correlation analysis based human identification approach is proposed. By background subtracting algorithm, the moving silhouette figure can be extracted from the walking images sequence. Every pixel in the silhouette has three dimensions: horizontal axis (x, vertical axis (y, and temporal axis (t. By moving every pixel in the silhouette image along these three dimensions, we can get a new silhouette. The correlation result between the original silhouette and the new one can be used as the raw feature of human gait. Discrete Fourier transform is used to extract features from this correlation result. Then, these features are normalized to minimize the affection of noise. Primary component analysis method is used to reduce the features’ dimensions. Experiment based on CASIA database shows that this method has an encouraging recognition performance.

  16. Human Gait Recognition Based on Kernel PCA Using Projections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat Ekinci; Murat Aykut

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for human identification at a distance using gait recognition. Recog- nition of a person from their gait is a biometric of increasing interest. The proposed work introduces a nonlinear machine learning method, kernel Principal Component Analysis (PCA), to extract gait features from silhouettes for individual recognition. Binarized silhouette of a motion object is first represented by four 1-D signals which are the basic image features called the distance vectors. Fourier transform is performed to achieve translation invariant for the gait patterns accumulated from silhouette sequences which are extracted from different circumstances. Kernel PCA is then used to extract higher order relations among the gait patterns for future recognition. A fusion strategy is finally executed to produce a final decision. The experiments are carried out on the CMU and the USF gait databases and presented based on the different training gait cycles.

  17. Human Gait Gender Classification in Spatial and Temporal Reasoning

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    Kohei Arai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Biometrics technology already becomes one of many application needs for identification. Every organ in the human body might be used as an identification unit because they tend to be unique characteristics. Many researchers had their focus on human organ biometrics physical characteristics such as fingerprint, human face, palm print, eye iris, DNA, and even behavioral characteristics such as a way of talk, voice and gait walking. Human Gait as the recognition object is the famous biometrics system recently. One of the important advantage in this recognition compare to other is it does not require observed subject’s attention and assistance. This paper proposed Gender classification using Human Gait video data. There are many human gait datasets created within the last 10 years. Some databases that widely used are University of South Florida (USF Gait Dataset, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CASIA Gait Dataset, and Southampton University (SOTON Gait Dataset. This paper classifies human gender in Spatial Temporal reasoning using CASIA Gait Database. Using Support Vector Machine as a Classifier, the classification result is 97.63% accuracy.

  18. Detection of abnormalities in a human gait using smart shoes

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    Kong, Kyoungchul; Bae, Joonbum; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    Health monitoring systems require a means for detecting and quantifying abnormalities from measured signals. In this paper, a new method for detecting abnormalities in a human gait is proposed for an improved gait monitoring system for patients with walking problems. In the previous work, we introduced a fuzzy logic algorithm for detecting phases in a human gait based on four foot pressure sensors for each of the right and left foot. The fuzzy logic algorithm detects the gait phases smoothly and continuously, and retains all information obtained from sensors. In this paper, a higher level algorithm for detecting abnormalities in the gait phases obtained from the fuzzy logic is discussed. In the proposed algorithm, two major abnormalities are detected 1) when the sensors measure improper foot pressure patterns, and 2) when the human does not follow a natural sequence of gait phases. For mathematical realization of the algorithm, the gait phases are dealt with by a vector analysis method. The proposed detection algorithm is verified by experiments on abnormal gaits as well as normal gaits. The experiment makes use of the Smart Shoes that embeds four bladders filled with air, the pressure changes in which are detected by pressure transducers.

  19. Optimality principles for model-based prediction of human gait.

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    Ackermann, Marko; van den Bogert, Antonie J

    2010-04-19

    Although humans have a large repertoire of potential movements, gait patterns tend to be stereotypical and appear to be selected according to optimality principles such as minimal energy. When applied to dynamic musculoskeletal models such optimality principles might be used to predict how a patient's gait adapts to mechanical interventions such as prosthetic devices or surgery. In this paper we study the effects of different performance criteria on predicted gait patterns using a 2D musculoskeletal model. The associated optimal control problem for a family of different cost functions was solved utilizing the direct collocation method. It was found that fatigue-like cost functions produced realistic gait, with stance phase knee flexion, as opposed to energy-related cost functions which avoided knee flexion during the stance phase. We conclude that fatigue minimization may be one of the primary optimality principles governing human gait.

  20. A portable measurement system for the evaluation of human gait

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    Stefanović Filip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A tool has been developed which can be used to evaluate human gait in a more detailed manner. Its purpose is to record data from an individual during gait then categorize and analyze the intrinsic phases with neuro-fuzzy techniques. The system is simple to use, adaptive, highly mobile, and does not require calibration. The hardware consists of four accelerometers and four force sensitive resistors to record data during walking which is then prepared and collected by a digital device and PDA computer. The gait data is passed into an intelligent fuzzy inference system managed by custom defined fuzzy rules to be classified into four stance phases (heel strike, flat foot, heel lift, toe push-off, and three swing phases (initial flexion, terminal flexion, and terminal extension. After the fuzzy system was trained using data from five healthy subjects, the system's representative gait classification root mean squared error dropped from 0.2975 to 0.1200, showing a much improved ability to categorize human gait, despite its varied nature. The system represents a robust tool, which can be used in a clinical environment for the analysis of human gait in rehabilitative applications such as rule based control generation for functional electrical stimulation, and gait quality analysis.

  1. Effect of gait speed on gait rhythmicity in Parkinson's disease: variability of stride time and swing time respond differently

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    Peretz Chava

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to maintain a steady gait rhythm is impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. This aspect of locomotor dyscontrol, which likely reflects impaired automaticity in PD, can be quantified by measuring the stride-to-stride variability of gait timing. Previous work has shown an increase in both the variability of the stride time and swing time in PD, but the origins of these changes are not fully understood. Patients with PD also generally walk with a reduced gait speed, a potential confounder of the observed changes in variability. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between walking speed and gait variability. Methods Stride time variability and swing time variability were measured in 36 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2–2.5 and 30 healthy controls who walked on a treadmill at four different speeds: 1 Comfortable walking speed (CWS, 2 80% of CWS 3 90% of CWS, and 4 110% of CWS. In addition, we studied the effects of walking slowly on level ground, both with and without a walker. Results Consistent with previous findings, increased variability of stride time and swing time was observed in the patients with PD in CWS, compared to controls. In both groups, there was a small but significant association between treadmill gait speed and stride time variability such that higher speeds were associated with lower (better values of stride time variability (p = 0.0002. In contrast, swing time variability did not change in response to changes in gait speed. Similar results were observed with walking on level ground. Conclusion The present results demonstrate that swing time variability is independent of gait speed, at least over the range studied, and therefore, that it may be used as a speed-independent marker of rhythmicity and gait steadiness. Since walking speed did not affect stride time variability and swing time variability in the same way, it appears that these two aspects of

  2. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

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    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  3. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

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    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  4. The integrative role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in human gait.

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    Lau, Brian; Welter, Marie-Laure; Belaid, Hayat; Fernandez Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Grabli, David; Karachi, Carine

    2015-05-01

    The brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus has a likely, although unclear, role in gait control, and is a potential deep brain stimulation target for treating resistant gait disorders. These disorders are a major therapeutic challenge for the ageing population, especially in Parkinson's disease where gait and balance disorders can become resistant to both dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Here, we present electrophysiological evidence that the pedunculopontine and subthalamic nuclei are involved in distinct aspects of gait using a locomotor imagery task in 14 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing surgery for the implantation of pedunculopontine or subthalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation electrodes. We performed electrophysiological recordings in two phases, once during surgery, and again several days after surgery in a subset of patients. The majority of pedunculopontine nucleus neurons (57%) recorded intrasurgically exhibited changes in activity related to different task components, with 29% modulated during visual stimulation, 41% modulated during voluntary hand movement, and 49% modulated during imaginary gait. Pedunculopontine nucleus local field potentials recorded post-surgically were modulated in the beta and gamma bands during visual and motor events, and we observed alpha and beta band synchronization that was sustained for the duration of imaginary gait and spatially localized within the pedunculopontine nucleus. In contrast, significantly fewer subthalamic nucleus neurons (27%) recorded intrasurgically were modulated during the locomotor imagery, with most increasing or decreasing activity phasically during the hand movement that initiated or terminated imaginary gait. Our data support the hypothesis that the pedunculopontine nucleus influences gait control in manners extending beyond simply driving pattern generation. In contrast, the subthalamic nucleus seems to control movement execution that is not likely to be gait

  5. The mental representation of the human gait in patients with severe knee osteoarthrosis: a clinical study to aid understanding of impairment and disability.

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    Jacksteit, Robert; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Behrens, Martin; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Skripitz, Ralf; Stöckel, Tino

    2017-07-01

    Objectives were (1) to explore differences in gait-specific long-term memory structures and gait performance between knee osteoarthrosis patients and healthy subjects and (2) to identify the extent to which the gait-specific mental representation is associated with gait performance. Cross-sectional study. In total, 18 knee osteoarthrosis patients and 18 control subjects. Spatio-temporal (gait speed, step length) and temporophasic (stance time, swing time, single support time, total double support time) gait parameters and gait variability were measured with an electronic walkway (OptoGait). The mental representation was assessed using the structural dimensional analysis of mental representations (SDA-M). (1) Patients showed significantly longer stance times ( P representation as compared with the healthy controls. (2) Correlation analyses revealed the mental representation of the human gait to be associated with actual gait performance in osteoarthrosis patients. Double support times were positively associated with the structural quality of the mental representation and step length variability was positively associated with the number of sequencing errors in the representation. The gait-specific mental representation and actual gait performance differ between patients with severe knee osteoarthrosis and healthy controls, and both are linked to one another. This finding suggests that musculoskeletal disorders can lead to changes in the mental representation of the gait, and as such the SDA-M could provide useful information to improve the rehabilitation following osteoarthrosis.

  6. Analysis of Gait Pattern to Recognize the Human Activities

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    Jay Prakash Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human activity recognition based on the computer vision is the process of labelling image sequences with action labels. Accurate systems for this problem are applied in areas such as visual surveillance, human computer interaction and video retrieval. The challenges are due to variations in motion, recording settings and gait differences. Here we propose an approach to recognize the human activities through gait. Activity recognition through Gait is the process of identifying an activity by the manner in which they walk. The identification of human activities in a video, such as a person is walking, running, jumping, jogging etc are important activities in video surveillance. We contribute the use of Model based approach for activity recognition with the help of movement of legs only. Experimental results suggest that our method are able to recognize the human activities with a good accuracy rate and robust to shadows present in the videos.

  7. Emotion recognition using Kinect motion capture data of human gaits

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    Li, Shun; Cui, Liqing; Zhu, Changye; Li, Baobin

    2016-01-01

    Automatic emotion recognition is of great value in many applications, however, to fully display the application value of emotion recognition, more portable, non-intrusive, inexpensive technologies need to be developed. Human gaits could reflect the walker’s emotional state, and could be an information source for emotion recognition. This paper proposed a novel method to recognize emotional state through human gaits by using Microsoft Kinect, a low-cost, portable, camera-based sensor. Fifty-nine participants’ gaits under neutral state, induced anger and induced happiness were recorded by two Kinect cameras, and the original data were processed through joint selection, coordinate system transformation, sliding window gauss filtering, differential operation, and data segmentation. Features of gait patterns were extracted from 3-dimentional coordinates of 14 main body joints by Fourier transformation and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The classifiers NaiveBayes, RandomForests, LibSVM and SMO (Sequential Minimal Optimization) were trained and evaluated, and the accuracy of recognizing anger and happiness from neutral state achieved 80.5% and 75.4%. Although the results of distinguishing angry and happiness states were not ideal in current study, it showed the feasibility of automatically recognizing emotional states from gaits, with the characteristics meeting the application requirements. PMID:27672492

  8. Emotion recognition using Kinect motion capture data of human gaits.

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    Li, Shun; Cui, Liqing; Zhu, Changye; Li, Baobin; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Tingshao

    2016-01-01

    Automatic emotion recognition is of great value in many applications, however, to fully display the application value of emotion recognition, more portable, non-intrusive, inexpensive technologies need to be developed. Human gaits could reflect the walker's emotional state, and could be an information source for emotion recognition. This paper proposed a novel method to recognize emotional state through human gaits by using Microsoft Kinect, a low-cost, portable, camera-based sensor. Fifty-nine participants' gaits under neutral state, induced anger and induced happiness were recorded by two Kinect cameras, and the original data were processed through joint selection, coordinate system transformation, sliding window gauss filtering, differential operation, and data segmentation. Features of gait patterns were extracted from 3-dimentional coordinates of 14 main body joints by Fourier transformation and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The classifiers NaiveBayes, RandomForests, LibSVM and SMO (Sequential Minimal Optimization) were trained and evaluated, and the accuracy of recognizing anger and happiness from neutral state achieved 80.5% and 75.4%. Although the results of distinguishing angry and happiness states were not ideal in current study, it showed the feasibility of automatically recognizing emotional states from gaits, with the characteristics meeting the application requirements.

  9. Silhouette extraction from human gait images sequence using cosegmentation

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    Chen, Jinyan; Zhang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    Gait based human identification is very useful for automatic person recognize through visual surveillance and has attracted more and more researchers. A key step in gait based human identification is to extract human silhouette from images sequence. Current silhouette extraction methods are mainly based on simple color subtraction. These methods have a very poor performance when the color of some body parts is similar to the background. In this paper a cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction method is proposed. Cosegmentation is typically defined as the task of jointly segmenting "something similar" in a given set of images. We can divide the human gait images sequence into several step cycles and every step cycle consist of 10-15 frames. The frames in human gait images sequence have following similarity: every frame is similar to the next or previous frame; every frame is similar to the corresponding frame in the next or previous step cycle; every pixel can find similar pixel in other frames. The progress of cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction can be described as follows: Initially only points which have high contrast to background are used as foreground kernel points, the points in the background are used as background kernel points, then points similar to foreground points will be added to foreground points set and the points similar to background points will be added to background points set. The definition of the similarity consider the context of the point. Experimental result shows that our method has a better performance comparing to traditional human silhouette extraction methods. Keywords: Human gait

  10. The effects of listening to music or viewing television on human gait

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    Sejdić, Ervin; Findlay, Briar; Merey, Celeste; Chau, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-part study with walking conditions involving music and television (TV) to investigate their effects on human gait. In the first part, we observed seventeen able-bodied adults as they participated in three 15-minute walking trials: 1. without music, 2. with music and 3. without music again. In the second part, we observed fifteen able-bodied adults as they walked on a treadmill for fifteen minutes while watching 1. TV with sound 2. TV without sound and 3. TV with subtitles but no sound. Gait timing was recorded via bilateral heel sensors and center-of-mass accelerations were measured by tri-axial accelerometers. Measures of statistical persistence, dynamic stability and gait variability were calculated. Our results showed that none of the considered gait measures were statistically different when comparing music with no-music trials. Therefore, walking to music did not appear to affect intrinsic walking dynamics in the able-bodied adult population. However, stride interval variability and stride interval dynamics were significantly greater in the TV with sound walking condition when compared to the TV with subtitles condition. Treadmill walking while watching TV with subtitles alters intinsic gait dynamics but potentially offers greater gait stability. PMID:24034741

  11. The effects of listening to music or viewing television on human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Findlay, Briar; Merey, Celeste; Chau, Tom

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a two-part study with walking conditions involving music and television (TV) to investigate their effects on human gait. In the first part, we observed seventeen able-bodied adults as they participated in three 15-minute walking trials: (1) without music, (2) with music and (3) without music again. In the second part, we observed fifteen able-bodied adults as they walked on a treadmill for 15 min while watching (1) TV with sound (2) TV without sound and (3) TV with subtitles but no sound. Gait timing was recorded via bilateral heel sensors and center-of-mass accelerations were measured by tri-axial accelerometers. Measures of statistical persistence, dynamic stability and gait variability were calculated. Our results showed that none of the considered gait measures were statistically different when comparing music with no-music trials. Therefore, walking to music did not appear to affect intrinsic walking dynamics in the able-bodied adult population. However, stride interval variability and stride interval dynamics were significantly greater in the TV with sound walking condition when compared to the TV with subtitles condition. Treadmill walking while watching TV with subtitles alters intrinsic gait dynamics but potentially offers greater gait stability.

  12. Least Action Principle in Gait

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Xu, Zongxiang; Li, Zhiyu; Luo, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    We apply the laws of human gait vertical ground reaction force and discover the existence of the phenomenon of least action principle in gait. Using a capacitive mat transducer system, we obtain the variations of human gait vertical ground reaction force and establish a structure equation for the resultant of such a force. Defining the deviation of vertical force as an action function, we observe from our gait optimization analysis the least action principle at half of the stride time. We develop an evaluation index of mechanical energy consumption based upon the least action principle in gait. We conclude that these observations can be employed to enhance the accountability of gait evaluation.

  13. Regional neuromuscular regulation within human rectus femoris muscle during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Kouzaki, Motoki; Moritani, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution pattern of neuromuscular activation within the human rectus femoris (RF) muscle was investigated during gait by multi-channel surface electromyography (surface EMG). Eleven healthy men walked on a treadmill with three gait speeds (4, 5, and 6 km/h) and gradients (0°, 12.5°, and 25°). The spatial distribution of surface EMG was tested by central locus activation (CLA), which is calculated from 2-D multi-channel surface EMG with 46 surface electrodes. For all conditions, CLA was around the middle regions during the swing-to-stance transition and moved in a proximal direction during the stance phase and stance-to-swing transition (pphase significantly moved to proximal site with increasing gait speed (pphases, with increasing grade, CLA significantly moved distally (pgait cycle and is non-uniformly regulated longitudinally.

  14. Gait variability and basal ganglia disorders: stride-to-stride variations of gait cycle timing in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Firtion, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The basal ganglia are thought to play an important role in regulating motor programs involved in gait and in the fluidity and sequencing of movement. We postulated that the ability to maintain a steady gait, with low stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing and its subphases, would be diminished with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). To test this hypothesis, we obtained quantitative measures of stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing in subjects with PD (n = 15), HD (n = 20), and disease-free controls (n = 16). All measures of gait variability were significantly increased in PD and HD. In subjects with PD and HD, gait variability measures were two and three times that observed in control subjects, respectively. The degree of gait variability correlated with disease severity. In contrast, gait speed was significantly lower in PD, but not in HD, and average gait cycle duration and the time spent in many subphases of the gait cycle were similar in control subjects, HD subjects, and PD subjects. These findings are consistent with a differential control of gait variability, speed, and average gait cycle timing that may have implications for understanding the role of the basal ganglia in locomotor control and for quantitatively assessing gait in clinical settings.

  15. Entrainment to a real time fractal visual stimulus modulates fractal gait dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; D'Andrea, Susan E; Warren, William H; Aaron, Roy K

    2014-08-01

    Fractal patterns characterize healthy biological systems and are considered to reflect the ability of the system to adapt to varying environmental conditions. Previous research has shown that fractal patterns in gait are altered following natural aging or disease, and this has potential negative consequences for gait adaptability that can lead to increased risk of injury. However, the flexibility of a healthy neurological system to exhibit different fractal patterns in gait has yet to be explored, and this is a necessary step toward understanding human locomotor control. Fifteen participants walked for 15min on a treadmill, either in the absence of a visual stimulus or while they attempted to couple the timing of their gait with a visual metronome that exhibited a persistent fractal pattern (contained long-range correlations) or a random pattern (contained no long-range correlations). The stride-to-stride intervals of the participants were recorded via analog foot pressure switches and submitted to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to determine if the fractal patterns during the visual metronome conditions differed from the baseline (no metronome) condition. DFA α in the baseline condition was 0.77±0.09. The fractal patterns in the stride-to-stride intervals were significantly altered when walking to the fractal metronome (DFA α=0.87±0.06) and to the random metronome (DFA α=0.61±0.10) (both p<.05 when compared to the baseline condition), indicating that a global change in gait dynamics was observed. A variety of strategies were identified at the local level with a cross-correlation analysis, indicating that local behavior did not account for the consistent global changes. Collectively, the results show that a gait dynamics can be shifted in a prescribed manner using a visual stimulus and the shift appears to be a global phenomenon.

  16. Gait curves for human recognition, backpack detection, and silhouette correction in a nighttime environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCann, Brian; Ross, Arun

    2010-04-01

    The need for an automated surveillance system is pronounced at night when the capability of the human eye to detect anomalies is reduced. While there have been significant efforts in the classification of individuals using human metrology and gait, the majority of research assumes a day-time environment. The aim of this study is to move beyond traditional image acquisition modalities and explore the issues of object detection and human identification at night. To address these issues, a spatiotemporal gait curve that captures the shape dynamics of a moving human silhouette is employed. Initially proposed by Wang et al., this representation of the gait is expanded to incorporate modules for individual classification, backpack detection, and silhouette restoration. Evaluation of these algorithms is conducted on the CASIA Night Gait Database, which includes 10 video sequences for each of 153 unique subjects. The video sequences were captured using a low resolution thermal camera. Matching performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated using a nearest neighbor classifier. The outcome of this work is an efficient algorithm for backpack detection and human identification, and a basis for further study in silhouette enhancement.

  17. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  18. Action and gait recognition from recovered 3-D human joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junxia; Ding, Xiaoqing; Wang, Shengjin; Wu, Youshou

    2010-08-01

    A common viewpoint-free framework that fuses pose recovery and classification for action and gait recognition is presented in this paper. First, a markerless pose recovery method is adopted to automatically capture the 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences from volume data. Second, multiple configuration features (combination of joints) and movement features (position, orientation, and height of the body) are extracted from the recovered 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences. A hidden Markov model (HMM) and an exemplar-based HMM are then used to model the movement features and configuration features, respectively. Finally, actions are classified by a hierarchical classifier that fuses the movement features and the configuration features, and persons are recognized from their gait sequences with the configuration features. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated with experiments on the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique Xmas Motion Acquisition Sequences data set.

  19. Acoustic micro-Doppler radar for human gait imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaonian; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Waxman, Allen; Andreou, Andreas G

    2007-03-01

    A portable acoustic micro-Doppler radar system for the acquisition of human gait signatures in indoor and outdoor environments is reported. Signals from an accelerometer attached to the leg support the identification of the components in the measured micro-Doppler signature. The acoustic micro-Doppler system described in this paper is simpler and offers advantages over the widely used electromagnetic wave micro-Doppler radars.

  20. Diffusion entropy analysis on the stride interval fluctuation of human gait

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, S M; Yang, H J; Zhao, F C; Zhou, P L; Zhou, T; Cai, Shi-Min; Wang, Bing-Hong; Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhao, Fang-Cui; Zhou, Pei-Ling; Zhou, Tao

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the diffusion entropy technique is applied to investigate the scaling behavior of stride interval fluctuations of human gait. The scaling behavior of the stride interval of human walking at normal, slow and fast rate are similar; with the scale-invariance exponents in the interval $[0.663,0.955]$, of which the mean value is $0.821\\pm0.011$. Dynamical analysis of these stride interval fluctuations reveals a self-similar pattern: Fluctuation at one time scale are statistically similar to those at multiple other time scales, at least over hundreds of steps, while the healthy subjects walk at their normal rate. The long-range correlations are observed during the spontaneous walking after the removal of the trend in the time series with Fourier filter. These findings uncover that the fractal dynamics of stride interval of human gait are normally intrinsic to the locomotor systems.

  1. Reflex control of robotic gait using human walking data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Macleod

    Full Text Available Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation.

  2. Video Analysis of Human Gait and Posture to Determine Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Lee

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the application of digital image processing techniques to the detection of neurological disorder. Visual information extracted from the postures and movements of a human gait cycle can be used by an experienced neurologist to determine the mental health of the person. However, the current visual assessment of diagnosing neurological disorder is based very much on subjective observation, and hence the accuracy of diagnosis heavily relies on experience. Other diagnostic techniques employed involve the use of imaging systems which can only be operated under highly constructed environment. A prototype has been developed in this work that is able to capture the subject's gait on video in a relatively simple setup, and from which to process the selected frames of the gait in a computer. Based on the static visual features such as swing distances and joint angles of human limbs, the system identifies patients with Parkinsonism from the test subjects. To our knowledge, it is the first time swing distances are utilized and identified as an effective means for characterizing human gait. The experimental results have shown a promising potential in medical application to assist the clinicians in diagnosing Parkinsonism.

  3. A computational model for dynamic analysis of the human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimieiro, Claysson; Andrada, Emanuel; Witte, Hartmut; Pinotti, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical models are important tools in the study of human motion. This work proposes a computational model to analyse the dynamics of lower limb motion using a kinematic chain to represent the body segments and rotational joints linked by viscoelastic elements. The model uses anthropometric parameters, ground reaction forces and joint Cardan angles from subjects to analyse lower limb motion during the gait. The model allows evaluating these data in each body plane. Six healthy subjects walked on a treadmill to record the kinematic and kinetic data. In addition, anthropometric parameters were recorded to construct the model. The viscoelastic parameter values were fitted for the model joints (hip, knee and ankle). The proposed model demonstrated that manipulating the viscoelastic parameters between the body segments could fit the amplitudes and frequencies of motion. The data collected in this work have viscoelastic parameter values that follow a normal distribution, indicating that these values are directly related to the gait pattern. To validate the model, we used the values of the joint angles to perform a comparison between the model results and previously published data. The model results show a same pattern and range of values found in the literature for the human gait motion.

  4. Withdrawal reflexes examined during human gait by ground reaction forces: site and gait phase dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emborg, Jonas; Spaich, Erika G; Andersen, Ole K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the modulation of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex during gait measured using Force Sensitive Resistors (FSR). Electrical stimulation was delivered to four locations on the sole of the foot at three different time points between heel-off and toe-off. Peak force changes were measured by FSRs attached to the big toe, distal to the first and fourth metatarsophalangeal joints, and the medial process of the calcaneus on both feet. Force changes were assessed in five gait sub-phases. The painful stimulation led to increased ipsilateral unloading (10 +/- 1 N) and contralateral loading (12 +/- 1 N), which were dependent on stimulation site and phase. In contrast, the hallux of the ipsilateral foot plantar flexed, thus facilitating the push-off. The highest degree of plantar flexion (23 +/- 10 N; range, 8-44 N) was seen in the second double support phase following the stimulation. Site and phase modulation of the reflex were detected in the force signals from all selected anatomical landmarks. In the kinematic responses, both site and phase modulation were observed. For stimulations near toe-off, withdrawal was primarily accomplished by ankle dorsiflexion, while the strategy for stimulations at heel-off was flexion of the knee and hip joints.

  5. Predicting human walking gaits with a simple planar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne E; Schmiedeler, James P

    2014-04-11

    Models of human walking with moderate complexity have the potential to accurately capture both joint kinematics and whole body energetics, thereby offering more simultaneous information than very simple models and less computational cost than very complex models. This work examines four- and six-link planar biped models with knees and rigid circular feet. The two differ in that the six-link model includes ankle joints. Stable periodic walking gaits are generated for both models using a hybrid zero dynamics-based control approach. To establish a baseline of how well the models can approximate normal human walking, gaits were optimized to match experimental human walking data, ranging in speed from very slow to very fast. The six-link model well matched the experimental step length, speed, and mean absolute power, while the four-link model did not, indicating that ankle work is a critical element in human walking models of this type. Beyond simply matching human data, the six-link model can be used in an optimization framework to predict normal human walking using a torque-squared objective function. The model well predicted experimental step length, joint motions, and mean absolute power over the full range of speeds.

  6. Lower Limb Wearable Capacitive Sensing and Its Applications to Recognizing Human Gaits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qining Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an approach to sense human body capacitance and apply it to recognize lower limb locomotion modes. The proposed wearable sensing system includes sensing bands, a signal processing circuit and a gait event detection module. Experiments on long-term working stability, adaptability to disturbance and locomotion mode recognition are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Twelve able-bodied subjects are recruited, and eleven normal gait modes are investigated. With an event-dependent linear discriminant analysis classifier and feature selection procedure, four time-domain features are used for pattern recognition and satisfactory recognition accuracies (97:3% ± 0:5%, 97:0% ± 0:4%, 95:6% ± 0:9% and 97:0% ± 0:4% for four phases of one gait cycle respectively are obtained. The accuracies are comparable with that from electromyography-based systems and inertial-based systems. The results validate the effectiveness of the proposed lower limb capacitive sensing approach in recognizing human normal gaits.

  7. Real-time gait event detection for transfemoral amputees during ramp ascending and descending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, H F; Husman, M A B; Awad, M I; Abouhossein, A; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2015-01-01

    Events and phases detection of the human gait are vital for controlling prosthesis, orthosis and functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems. Wearable sensors are inexpensive, portable and have fast processing capability. They are frequently used to assess spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters of the human gait which in turn provide more details about the human voluntary control and ampute-eprosthesis interaction. This paper presents a reliable real-time gait event detection algorithm based on simple heuristics approach, applicable to signals from tri-axial gyroscope for lower limb amputees during ramp ascending and descending. Experimental validation is done by comparing the results of gyroscope signal with footswitches. For healthy subjects, the mean difference between events detected by gyroscope and footswitches is 14 ms and 10.5 ms for initial contact (IC) whereas for toe off (TO) it is -5 ms and -25 ms for ramp up and down respectively. For transfemoral amputee, the error is slightly higher either due to the placement of footswitches underneath the foot or the lack of proper knee flexion and ankle plantarflexion/dorsiflexion during ramp up and down. Finally, repeatability tests showed promising results.

  8. Real-time feedback of dynamic foot pressure index for gait training of toe-walking children with spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Weiyan; Fan, Xiaoya; Chen, Wei; Li, Shuyu; Li, Deyu; Wang, Yu; Fan, Yubo

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether and how real-time feedback of dynamic foot pressure index (DFPI) could be used to correct toe-walking gait in spastic diplegic children with dynamic equinus. Thirteen spastic diplegic children with dynamic equinus were asked to wear a monitoring device to record their ambulation during daily gait, conventional training gait, and feedback training gait. Parameters based on their DFPI and stride duration were compared among the three test conditions. The results with feedback training were significantly better for all DFPI parameters in comparison to patients' daily gait and showed significant improvements in DFPI for toe-walking gait and percentage of normal gait in comparison to conventional training methods. Moreover, stride duration under two training gaits was longer than patient's daily gait, but there was no significant difference between the two training gaits. Although the stride duration for the two training gaits was similar, gait training with real-time feedback of DFPI did produce noticeably superior results by increasing heel-loading impulse of toe-walking gait and percentage of normal gait in comparison to convention training methods. However, its effectiveness was still impacted by the motion limitations of diplegic children. Implications for Rehabilitation The DFPI-based gait training feedback system introduced in this study was shown to be more effective at toe-walking gait rehabilitation training over conventional training methods. The feedback system accomplished superior improvement in correcting toe-walking gait, but its effectiveness in an increasing heel-loading impulse in normal gait was still limited by the motion limitations of diplegic children. Stride duration of normal gait and toe-walking gait was similar under conventional and feedback gait training.

  9. Biofeedback for Gait Retraining Based on Real-Time Estimation of Tibiofemoral Joint Contact Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Claudio; Reggiani, Monica; Saxby, David J; Ceseracciu, Elena; Modenese, Luca; Lloyd, David G

    2017-09-01

    Biofeedback assisted rehabilitation and intervention technologies have the potential to modify clinically relevant biomechanics. Gait retraining has been used to reduce the knee adduction moment, a surrogate of medial tibiofemoral joint loading often used in knee osteoarthritis research. In this paper, we present an electromyogram-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the lower-limb to estimate, in real-time, the tibiofemoral joint loads. The model included 34 musculotendon units spanning the hip, knee, and ankle joints. Full-body inverse kinematics, inverse dynamics, and musculotendon kinematics were solved in real-time from motion capture and force plate data to estimate the knee medial tibiofemoral contact force (MTFF). We analyzed five healthy subjects while they were walking on an instrumented treadmill with visual biofeedback of their MTFF. Each subject was asked to modify their gait in order to vary the magnitude of their MTFF. All subjects were able to increase their MTFF, whereas only three subjects could decrease it, and only after receiving verbal suggestions about possible gait modification strategies. Results indicate the important role of knee muscle activation patterns in modulating the MTFF. While this paper focused on the knee, the technology can be extended to examine the musculoskeletal tissue loads at different sites of the human body.

  10. Effect of treadmill walking on the stride interval dynamics of human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Matthew D; Shaikh, Sameer; Chau, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Metronomic walking has been found to diminish the statistical persistence intrinsic to the stride interval time series of human gait. Since treadmill walking (TW) possesses a similar form of external pacing, we proposed to study the disruptions in the natural neuromuscular rhythms of gait during TW. Treadmill walking is a widespread rehabilitative tool, however, its effect on an individual's stride dynamics is not well understood. To better elucidate potential effects, we tested the hypothesis that TW without handrails would diminish the statistical persistence in an individual's stride interval time series. The scaling exponent (alpha) was employed in this study as a measure of the statistical persistence of the stride interval time series. Sixteen able-bodied young adults (mean age: 23.3+/-3.3 years) were instructed to walk at a self-selected comfortable pace for 15 min in three different conditions in a randomized order: (1) overground walking, (2) TW without holding a handrail (NoRail) and (3) TW while holding a front handrail (Rail). The alpha did not differ significantly between the overground and NoRail conditions (P>0.5). However, the alpha of the Rail condition (alpha=0.92+/-0.10) differed significantly from both the overground (alpha=0.83+/-0.06; Pwalking conditions (P>0.5). These findings indicate that comfortable-paced TW does not diminish the intrinsic stride dynamics of human gait.

  11. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q.; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected. PMID:27916817

  12. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Teja Nukala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS. The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC, two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN, support vector machine (SVM, k-nearest neighbors (KNN and binary decision trees (BDT, based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  13. Real-Time Classification of Patients with Balance Disorders vs. Normal Subjects Using a Low-Cost Small Wireless Wearable Gait Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Bhargava Teja; Nakano, Taro; Rodriguez, Amanda; Tsay, Jerry; Lopez, Jerry; Nguyen, Tam Q; Zupancic, Steven; Lie, Donald Y C

    2016-11-29

    Gait analysis using wearable wireless sensors can be an economical, convenient and effective way to provide diagnostic and clinical information for various health-related issues. In this work, our custom designed low-cost wireless gait analysis sensor that contains a basic inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to collect the gait data for four patients diagnosed with balance disorders and additionally three normal subjects, each performing the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) tests while wearing the custom wireless gait analysis sensor (WGAS). The small WGAS includes a tri-axial accelerometer integrated circuit (IC), two gyroscopes ICs and a Texas Instruments (TI) MSP430 microcontroller and is worn by each subject at the T4 position during the DGI tests. The raw gait data are wirelessly transmitted from the WGAS to a near-by PC for real-time gait data collection and analysis. In order to perform successful classification of patients vs. normal subjects, we used several different classification algorithms, such as the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN), support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (KNN) and binary decision trees (BDT), based on features extracted from the raw gait data of the gyroscopes and accelerometers. When the range was used as the input feature, the overall classification accuracy obtained is 100% with BP-ANN, 98% with SVM, 96% with KNN and 94% using BDT. Similar high classification accuracy results were also achieved when the standard deviation or other values were used as input features to these classifiers. These results show that gait data collected from our very low-cost wearable wireless gait sensor can effectively differentiate patients with balance disorders from normal subjects in real time using various classifiers, the success of which may eventually lead to accurate and objective diagnosis of abnormal human gaits and their underlying etiologies in the future, as more patient data are being collected.

  14. A short investigation of the effect of an energy harvesting backpack on the human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheou, Evangelos; Green, Peter; Racic, Vitomir; Brownjohn, James M. W.; Sims, Neil D.

    2012-04-01

    Exploiting human motion for the purpose of energy harvesting has been a popular idea for some time. Many of the approaches proposed can be uncomfortable or they impose a significant burden on the person's gait. In the current paper a hardware in-the-loop simulator of an energy harvesting backpack is employed in order to investigate the effect of a suspended-load backpack on the human gait. The idea is based on the energy produced by a suspended-load which moves vertically on a backpack while a person walks. The energy created from such a linear system can be maximised when it resonates with the walking frequency of the person. However, such a configuration can also cause great forces to be applied on the back of the user. The system which is presented here consists of a mass attached on a rucksack, which is controlled by a motor in order to simulate the suspended-load backpack. The advantage of this setup is the ability to test different settings, regarding the spring stiffness or the damping coefficient, of the backpack harvester, and study their effect on the energy harvesting potential, as well as on the human gait. The present contribution describes the preliminary results and analysis of the testing of the system with the help of nine male volunteers who carried it on a treadmill.

  15. Switched Control of a Time Delayed Compass Gait Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyes Maherzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available the analysis and control of delayed systems are becoming more and more research topics in progress. This is mainly due to the fact that the delay is frequently encountered in technological systems. Most control command laws are based on current digital computers and delays are intrinsic to the process or in the control loop caused by the transmission time control sequences, or computing time. In other hand, the controls of humanoid walking robot present a common problem in robotics because it involves physical interaction between an articulated system and its environment. This close relationship is actually a common set of fundamental problems such as the implementation of robust stable dynamic control. This paper presents acomplete approach, based on switched system theory, for the stabilization of a compass gait robot subject to time delays transmission. The multiple feedback gains designed are based on multiple linear systems governed by a switching control law. The establishment of control law in real time is affected by the unknown pounded random delay. The results obtained from this method show that the control law stabilize the compass robot walk despite a varying delay reaching six times sampling period.

  16. Real-Time Knee Adduction Moment Feedback for Gait Retraining Through Visual and Tactile Displays

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Jason W.

    2011-01-01

    The external knee adduction moment (KAM) measured during gait is an indicator of tibiofemoral joint osteoarthritis progression and various strategies have been proposed to lower it. Gait retraining has been shown to be an effective, noninvasive approach for lowering the KAM. We present a new gait retraining approach in which the KAM is fed back to subjects in real-time during ambulation. A study was conducted in which 16 healthy subjects learned to alter gait patterns to lower the KAM through visual or tactile (vibration) feedback. Participants converged on a comfortable gait in just a few minutes by using the feedback to iterate on various kinematic modifications. All subjects adopted altered gait patterns with lower KAM compared with normal ambulation (average reduction of 20.7%). Tactile and visual feedbacks were equally effective for real-time training, although subjects using tactile feedback took longer to converge on an acceptable gait. This study shows that real-time feedback of the KAM can greatly increase the effectiveness and efficiency of subject-specific gait retraining compared with conventional methods. © 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  17. [Real-time Gait Training System with Embedded Functional Electrical Stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Linyan; Ruan, Zhaomin; Jia, Guifeng; Xla, Jing; Qiu, Lijian; Wu, Changwang; Jin, Xiaoqing; Ning, Gangmin

    2015-07-01

    To solve the problem that mostly gait analysis is independent from the treatment, this work proposes a system that integrates the functions of gait training and assessment for foot drop treatment. The system uses a set of sensors to collect gait parameters and designes multi-mode functional electrical stimulators as actuator. Body area network technology is introduced to coordinate the data communication and execution of the sensors and stimulators, synchronize the gait analysis and foot drop treatment. Bluetooth 4.0 is applied to low the power consumption of the system. The system realizes the synchronization of treatment and gait analysis. It is able to acquire and analyze the dynamic parameters of ankle, knee and hip in real-time, and treat patients by guiding functional electrical stimulation delivery to the specific body locations of patients.

  18. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Nguyen Nguyen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  19. Involvement of the corticospinal tract in the control of human gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Grey, Michael James; Nielsen, Jens Bo;

    2011-01-01

    Given the inherent mechanical complexity of human bipedal locomotion, and that complete spinal cord lesions in human leads to paralysis with no recovery of gait, it is often suggested that the corticospinal tract (CST) has a more predominant role in the control of walking in humans than in other...... animals. However, what do we actually know about the contribution of the CST to the control of gait? This chapter will provide an overview of this topic based on the premise that a better understanding of the role of the CST in gait will be essential for the design of evidence-based approaches...

  20. A patient-specific EMG-driven neuromuscular model for the potential use of human-inspired gait rehabilitation robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ye; Xie, Shengquan; Zhang, Yanxin

    2016-03-01

    A patient-specific electromyography (EMG)-driven neuromuscular model (PENm) is developed for the potential use of human-inspired gait rehabilitation robots. The PENm is modified based on the current EMG-driven models by decreasing the calculation time and ensuring good prediction accuracy. To ensure the calculation efficiency, the PENm is simplified into two EMG channels around one joint with minimal physiological parameters. In addition, a dynamic computation model is developed to achieve real-time calculation. To ensure the calculation accuracy, patient-specific muscle kinematics information, such as the musculotendon lengths and the muscle moment arms during the entire gait cycle, are employed based on the patient-specific musculoskeletal model. Moreover, an improved force-length-velocity relationship is implemented to generate accurate muscle forces. Gait analysis data including kinematics, ground reaction forces, and raw EMG signals from six adolescents at three different speeds were used to evaluate the PENm. The simulation results show that the PENm has the potential to predict accurate joint moment in real-time. The design of advanced human-robot interaction control strategies and human-inspired gait rehabilitation robots can benefit from the application of the human internal state provided by the PENm.

  1. Recognition using gait.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Mark William

    2007-09-01

    Gait or an individual's manner of walking, is one approach for recognizing people at a distance. Studies in psychophysics and medicine indicate that humans can recognize people by their gait and have found twenty-four different components to gait that taken together make it a unique signature. Besides not requiring close sensor contact, gait also does not necessarily require a cooperative subject. Using video data of people walking in different scenarios and environmental conditions we develop and test an algorithm that uses shape and motion to identify people from their gait. The algorithm uses dynamic time warping to match stored templates against an unknown sequence of silhouettes extracted from a person walking. While results under similar constraints and conditions are very good, the algorithm quickly degrades with varying conditions such as surface and clothing.

  2. Modulation of the startle response during human gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Schillings, A.M.; Galen, G.P. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2000-01-01

    While many studies have shown that there is a phase-dependent modulation of proprioceptive and exteroceptive reflexes during gait, little is known about such modulation for auditory reflexes. To examine how startle reactions are incorporated in an ongoing gait pattern, unexpected auditory stimuli we

  3. When human walking becomes random walking: fractal analysis and modeling of gait rhythm fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Peng, Chang-K.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2001-12-01

    We present a random walk, fractal analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations in the human gait rhythm. The gait of healthy young adults is scale-free with long-range correlations extending over hundreds of strides. This fractal scaling changes characteristically with maturation in children and older adults and becomes almost completely uncorrelated with certain neurologic diseases. Stochastic modeling of the gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, reproduces distinctive statistical properties of the gait pattern. By tuning one model parameter, the hopping (transition) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood - including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation.

  4. Human Gait Feature Extraction Including a Kinematic Analysis Toward Robotic Power Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario I. Chacon-Murguia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes a method for human gait and kinematic analysis. Gait analysis consists of the determination of hip, knee and ankle positions through video analysis. Gait kinematic for the thigh and knee is then generated from this data. Evaluations of the gait analysis method indicate an acceptable performance of 86.66% for hip and knee position estimation, and comparable findings with other reported works for gait kinematic. A coordinate systems assignment is performed according to the DH algorithm and a direct kinematic model of the legs is obtained. The legs’ angles obtained from the video analysis are applied to the kinematic model in order to revise the application of this model to robotic legs in a power assisted system.

  5. Gait parameters predicted by Timed Up and Go performance in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnyaud, Céline; Pradon, Didier; Zory, Raphael; Bensmail, Djamel; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Roche, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Timed Up and Go (TUG) is a test of functional mobility which is routinely used in the assessment of hemiparetic patients. This easy and rapid to perform test includes motor tasks which occur frequently in daily life (stand up, walk, turn, sit down). Correlations between TUG performance and kinematic and kinetic gait parameters have never been studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether kinematic and kinetic gait parameters would be more related to TUG performance than spatio-temporal parameters in stroke patients. Sixty hemiparetic patients able to walk alone performed the TUG test and underwent 3D gait analysis and a clinical evaluation. A stepwise regression analysis was used to select the gait variables that best explained the variability in TUG performance. The percentage of the gait cycle spent in single support phase on the paretic limb was the factor which was the most predictive and correlated with TUG performance, explaining 67% of the variance. No kinematic or kinetic gait parameters explained TUG performance. The results also suggested that TUG performance is mainly related to paretic lower limb motor function. TUG performance in hemiparetic patients mainly depends on the motor ability of the paretic lower limb, particularly the single support phase on the paretic side. Kinematic and kinetic gait parameters do not predict the TUG performance in stroke patients.

  6. A multisegment computer simulation of normal human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, L A; Winter, D A

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a computer simulation of normal human walking that would use as driving moments resultant joint moments from a gait analysis. The system description, initial conditions and driving moments were taken from an inverse dynamics analysis of a normal walking trial. A nine-segment three-dimensional (3-D) model, including a two-part foot, was used. Torsional, linear springs and dampers were used at the hip joints to keep the trunk vertical and at the knee and ankle joints to prevent nonphysiological motion. Dampers at other joints were required to ensure a smooth and realistic motion. The simulated human successfully completed one step (550 ms), including both single and double support phases. The model proved to be sensitive to changes in the spring stiffness values of the trunk controllers. Similar sensitivity was found with the springs used to prevent hyperextension of the knee at heel contact and of the metatarsal-phalangeal joint at push-off. In general, there was much less sensitivity to the damping coefficients. This simulation improves on previous efforts because it incorporates some features necessary in simulations designed to answer clinical science questions. Other control algorithms are required, however, to ensure that the model can be realistically adapted to different subjects.

  7. Automated detection of instantaneous gait events using time frequency analysis and manifold embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Min S H; Thies, Sibylle B; Kenney, Laurence P J; Howard, David; Selles, Ruud W; Findlow, Andrew H; Goulermas, John Y

    2013-11-01

    Accelerometry is a widely used sensing modality in human biomechanics due to its portability, non-invasiveness, and accuracy. However, difficulties lie in signal variability and interpretation in relation to biomechanical events. In walking, heel strike and toe off are primary gait events where robust and accurate detection is essential for gait-related applications. This paper describes a novel and generic event detection algorithm applicable to signals from tri-axial accelerometers placed on the foot, ankle, shank or waist. Data from healthy subjects undergoing multiple walking trials on flat and inclined, as well as smooth and tactile paving surfaces is acquired for experimentation. The benchmark timings at which heel strike and toe off occur, are determined using kinematic data recorded from a motion capture system. The algorithm extracts features from each of the acceleration signals using a continuous wavelet transform over a wide range of scales. A locality preserving embedding method is then applied to reduce the high dimensionality caused by the multiple scales while preserving salient features for classification. A simple Gaussian mixture model is then trained to classify each of the time samples into heel strike, toe off or no event categories. Results show good detection and temporal accuracies for different sensor locations and different walking terrains.

  8. Identification of muscle synergies associated with gait transition in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota eHagio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is no theoretical or empirical evidence to suggest how the central nervous system (CNS controls a variety of muscles associated with gait transition between walking and running. Here, we examined the motor control during a gait transition based on muscle synergies, which modularly organize functionally similar muscles. To this end, the subjects walked or ran on a treadmill and performed a gait transition spontaneously as the treadmill speed increased or decreased (a changing speed condition or voluntarily following an experimenter’s instruction at constant treadmill speed (a constant speed condition. Surface electromyograms (EMGs were recorded from 11 lower limb muscles bilaterally. We then extracted the muscle weightings of synergies and their activation coefficients from the EMG data using non-negative matrix factorization. As a result, the gait transition was controlled by approximately 9 muscle synergies, which were common during a walking and running, and their activation profiles were changed before and after a gait transition. Near a gait transition, the peak activation phases of the synergies, which were composed of plantar flexor muscles, were shifted to an earlier phase at the walk-to-run transition, and vice versa. The shifts were gradual in the changing speed condition, but an abrupt change was observed in the constant speed condition. These results suggest that the CNS low-dimensionally regulate the activation profiles of the specific synergies based on afferent information (spontaneous gait transition or by changing only the descending neural input to the muscle synergies (voluntary gait transition to achieve a gait transition.

  9. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  10. Seven phases of gait detected in real-time using shank attached gyroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behboodi, A; Wright, H; Zahradka, N; Lee, S C K

    2015-08-01

    A new gyroscope-based gait phase detection system (GPDS) with ability to detect all seven phases of gait was proposed in this study. Gyroscopes were attached to each shank. Shank angular velocity, about the medio-lateral axis, was streamed to a PC and a rule-based algorithm was used to identify characteristics of the signals. Five subjects were asked to walk on treadmill at their self-selected speed while using this system. All 7 phases of gait: LR, MSt, TSt, PSw, ISw, MSw, and TSw were detected in real-time using only shank angular velocities. To quantify system performance, sensor data was compared to simultaneously collected motion capture data. Average gait phase detection delays of the system were less than 40ms except TSw (74ms). The present system, consisting of minimal sensors and decreased processing, is precise, cosmetic, economical, and a good alternative for portable stand-alone applications.

  11. Symmetrical gait descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunajewski, Adam; Dusza, Jacek J.; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The article presents a proposal for the description of human gait as a periodic and symmetric process. Firstly, the data for researches was obtained in the Laboratory of Group SATI in the School of Engineering of University of Valencia. Then, the periodical model - Mean Double Step (MDS) was made. Finally, on the basis of MDS, the symmetrical models - Left Mean Double Step and Right Mean Double Step (LMDS and RMDS) could be created. The method of various functional extensions was used. Symmetrical gait models can be used to calculate the coefficients of asymmetry at any time or phase of the gait. In this way it is possible to create asymmetry, function which better describes human gait dysfunction. The paper also describes an algorithm for calculating symmetric models, and shows exemplary results based on the experimental data.

  12. Active disturbance rejection control based human gait tracking for lower extremity rehabilitation exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yi; Du, Zhijiang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Weidong; Zhang, Zhiming; Dong, Wei

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based strategy, which is applied to track the human gait trajectory for a lower limb rehabilitation exoskeleton. The desired human gait trajectory is derived from the Clinical Gait Analysis (CGA). In ADRC, the total external disturbance can be estimated by the extended state observer (ESO) and canceled by the designed control law. The observer bandwidth and the controller bandwidth are determined by the practical principles. We simulated the proposed methodology in MATLAB. The numerical simulation shows the tracking error comparison and the estimated errors of the extended state observer. Two experimental tests were carried out to prove the performance of the algorithm presented in this paper. The experiment results show that the proposed ADRC behaves a better performance than the regular proportional integral derivative (PID) controller. With the proposed ADRC, the rehabilitation system is capable of tracking the target gait more accurately.

  13. Decrease in Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Jian-Jun; Ning Xin-Bao; Yang Xiao-Dong; Hou Feng-Zhen; Huo Cheng-Yu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the decrease in the Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases was observed by using an improved rescaled range (R/S) analysis method. It indicates that the long-range correlations of gait rhythm from young healthy people are stronger than those from the healthy elderly and the diseased.The result further implies that fractal dynamics in human gait will be altered due to weakening or impairment of neural control on locomotion resulting from aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Due to analysing short-term data sequences rather than long datasets required by most nonlinear methods, the algorithm has the characteristics of simplicity and sensitivity, most importantly, fast calculation as well as powerful anti-noise capacities. These findings have implications for modelling locomotor control and also for quantifying gait dynamics in varying physiologic and pathologic states.

  14. Decrease in Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jian-Jun; Ning, Xin-Bao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Hou, Feng-Zhen; Huo, Cheng-Yu

    2008-03-01

    In this paper the decrease in the Hurst exponent of human gait with aging and neurodegenerative diseases was observed by using an improved rescaled range (R/S) analysis method. It indicates that the long-range correlations of gait rhythm from young healthy people are stronger than those from the healthy elderly and the diseased. The result further implies that fractal dynamics in human gait will be altered due to weakening or impairment of neural control on locomotion resulting from aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Due to analysing short-term data sequences rather than long datasets required by most nonlinear methods, the algorithm has the characteristics of simplicity and sensitivity, most importantly, fast calculation as well as powerful anti-noise capacities. These findings have implications for modelling locomotor control and also for quantifying gait dynamics in varying physiologic and pathologic states.

  15. Assessment of Human Bio-Behavior During Gait Process Using LifeMOD Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Rogozea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a set of observations concerning the
    analysis and assessment of human bio-behavior during gait process. In the first part of the paper the fundamental and theoretical considerations of the gait process are approached and aspects connected to malfunctions are expressed. In the second part of the paper we present the modeling methodology using
    the LifeMOD software, while in the third part the results and conclusions are presented.

  16. Adaptive method for real-time gait phase detection based on ground contact forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lie; Zheng, Jianbin; Wang, Yang; Song, Zhengge; Zhan, Enqi

    2015-01-01

    A novel method is presented to detect real-time gait phases based on ground contact forces (GCFs) measured by force sensitive resistors (FSRs). The traditional threshold method (TM) sets a threshold to divide the GCFs into on-ground and off-ground statuses. However, TM is neither an adaptive nor real-time method. The threshold setting is based on body weight or the maximum and minimum GCFs in the gait cycles, resulting in different thresholds needed for different walking conditions. Additionally, the maximum and minimum GCFs are only obtainable after data processing. Therefore, this paper proposes a proportion method (PM) that calculates the sums and proportions of GCFs wherein the GCFs are obtained from FSRs. A gait analysis is then implemented by the proposed gait phase detection algorithm (GPDA). Finally, the PM reliability is determined by comparing the detection results between PM and TM. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed PM is highly reliable in all walking conditions. In addition, PM could be utilized to analyze gait phases in real time. Finally, PM exhibits strong adaptability to different walking conditions.

  17. Trotting Gait of a Quadruped Robot Based on the Time-Pose Control Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai RunBin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the Time-Pose control method for the trotting gait of a quadruped robot on flat ground and up a slope. The method, with brief control structure, real-time operation ability and high adaptability, divides quadruped robot control into gait control and pose control. Virtual leg and intuitive controllers are introduced to simplify the model and generate the trajectory of mass centre and location of supporting legs in gait control, while redundancy optimization is used for solving the inverse kinematics in pose control. The models both on flat ground and up a slope are fully analysed, and different kinds of optimization methods are compared using the manipulability measure in order to select the best option. Simulations are performed, which prove that the Time-Pose control method is realizable for these two kinds of environment.

  18. Multi-complexity ensemble measures for gait time series analysis: application to diagnostics, monitoring and biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy; Senyukova, Olga; Davis, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have proposed to use complementary complexity measures discovered by boosting-like ensemble learning for the enhancement of quantitative indicators dealing with necessarily short physiological time series. We have confirmed robustness of such multi-complexity measures for heart rate variability analysis with the emphasis on detection of emerging and intermittent cardiac abnormalities. Recently, we presented preliminary results suggesting that such ensemble-based approach could be also effective in discovering universal meta-indicators for early detection and convenient monitoring of neurological abnormalities using gait time series. Here, we argue and demonstrate that these multi-complexity ensemble measures for gait time series analysis could have significantly wider application scope ranging from diagnostics and early detection of physiological regime change to gait-based biometrics applications.

  19. Trotting Gait of a Quadruped Robot Based on the Time-Pose Control Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai RunBin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the Time-Pose control method for the trotting gait of a quadruped robot on flat ground and up a slope. The method, with brief control structure, real-time operation ability and high adaptability, divides quadruped robot control into gait control and pose control. Virtual leg and intuitive controllers are introduced to simplify the model and generate the trajectory of mass centre and location of supporting legs in gait control, while redundancy optimization is used for solving the inverse kinematics in pose control. The models both on flat ground and up a slope are fully analysed, and different kinds of optimization methods are compared using the manipulability measure in order to select the best option. Simulations are performed, which prove that the Time-Pose control method is realizable for these two kinds of environment.

  20. Vector diagrams in the evaluation of human gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R H; Heerkens, Y F; van Ingen Schenau, G J; van Ravensberg, C D; van der Woude, L H

    1985-01-01

    From recordings of reaction forces on the feet in the vertical (z) and horizontal for-aft (x) direction during walking, x-z vector-diagrams (VDG) are constructed for the purpose of clinical use in the evaluation of gait. Such use presupposes the existence of reference values. The parameters of VDG,

  1. Intra-individual gait patterns across different time-scales as revealed by means of a supervised learning model using kernel-based discriminant regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Fabian; Eekhoff, Alexander; Newell, Karl M; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, gait analysis has been centered on the idea of average behavior and normality. On one hand, clinical diagnoses and therapeutic interventions typically assume that average gait patterns remain constant over time. On the other hand, it is well known that all our movements are accompanied by a certain amount of variability, which does not allow us to make two identical steps. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the intra-individual gait patterns across different time-scales (i.e., tens-of-mins, tens-of-hours). Nine healthy subjects performed 15 gait trials at a self-selected speed on 6 sessions within one day (duration between two subsequent sessions from 10 to 90 mins). For each trial, time-continuous ground reaction forces and lower body joint angles were measured. A supervised learning model using a kernel-based discriminant regression was applied for classifying sessions within individual gait patterns. Discernable characteristics of intra-individual gait patterns could be distinguished between repeated sessions by classification rates of 67.8 ± 8.8% and 86.3 ± 7.9% for the six-session-classification of ground reaction forces and lower body joint angles, respectively. Furthermore, the one-on-one-classification showed that increasing classification rates go along with increasing time durations between two sessions and indicate that changes of gait patterns appear at different time-scales. Discernable characteristics between repeated sessions indicate continuous intrinsic changes in intra-individual gait patterns and suggest a predominant role of deterministic processes in human motor control and learning. Natural changes of gait patterns without any externally induced injury or intervention may reflect continuous adaptations of the motor system over several time-scales. Accordingly, the modelling of walking by means of average gait patterns that are assumed to be near constant over time needs to be reconsidered in the context of

  2. A Mobile Kalman-Filter Based Solution for the Real-Time Estimation of Spatio-Temporal Gait Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Alberto; Ginis, Pieter; Hardegger, Michael; Casamassima, Filippo; Rocchi, Laura; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Gait impairments are among the most disabling symptoms in several musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, severely limiting personal autonomy. Wearable gait sensors have been attracting attention as diagnostic tool for gait and are emerging as promising tool for tutoring and guiding gait execution. If their popularity is continuously growing, still there is room for improvement, especially towards more accurate solutions for spatio-temporal gait parameters estimation. We present an implementation of a zero-velocity-update gait analysis system based on a Kalman filter and off-the-shelf shoe-worn inertial sensors. The algorithms for gait events and step length estimation were specifically designed to comply with pathological gait patterns. More so, an Android app was deployed to support fully wearable and stand-alone real-time gait analysis. Twelve healthy subjects were enrolled to preliminarily tune the algorithms; afterwards sixteen persons with Parkinson's disease were enrolled for a validation study. Over the 1314 strides collected on patients at three different speeds, the total root mean square difference on step length estimation between this system and a gold standard was 2.9%. This shows that the proposed method allows for an accurate gait analysis and paves the way to a new generation of mobile devices usable anywhere for monitoring and intervention.

  3. Compressive Sensing of Foot Gait Signals and Its Application for the Estimation of Clinically Relevant Time Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Jeevan K; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2016-07-01

    A new signal reconstruction algorithm for compressive sensing based on the minimization of a pseudonorm which promotes block-sparse structure on the first-order difference of the signal is proposed. Involved optimization is carried out by using a sequential version of Fletcher-Reeves' conjugate-gradient algorithm, and the line search is based on Banach's fixed-point theorem. The algorithm is suitable for the reconstruction of foot gait signals which admit block-sparse structure on the first-order difference. An additional algorithm for the estimation of stride-interval, swing-interval, and stance-interval time series from the reconstructed foot gait signals is also proposed. This algorithm is based on finding zero crossing indices of the foot gait signal and using the resulting indices for the computation of time series. Extensive simulation results demonstrate that the proposed signal reconstruction algorithm yields improved signal-to-noise ratio and requires significantly reduced computational effort relative to several competing algorithms over a wide range of compression ratio. For a compression ratio in the range from 88% to 94%, the proposed algorithm is found to offer improved accuracy for the estimation of clinically relevant time-series parameters, namely, the mean value, variance, and spectral index of stride-interval, stance-interval, and swing-interval time series, relative to its nearest competitor algorithm. The improvement in performance for compression ratio as high as 94% indicates that the proposed algorithms would be useful for designing compressive sensing-based systems for long-term telemonitoring of human gait signals.

  4. Towards Real-Time Detection of Gait Events on Different Terrains Using Time-Frequency Analysis and Peak Heuristics Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Real-time detection of gait events can be applied as a reliable input to control drop foot correction devices and lower-limb prostheses. Among the different sensors used to acquire the signals associated with walking for gait event detection, the accelerometer is considered as a preferable sensor due to its convenience of use, small size, low cost, reliability, and low power consumption. Based on the acceleration signals, different algorithms have been proposed to detect toe off (TO and heel strike (HS gait events in previous studies. While these algorithms could achieve a relatively reasonable performance in gait event detection, they suffer from limitations such as poor real-time performance and are less reliable in the cases of up stair and down stair terrains. In this study, a new algorithm is proposed to detect the gait events on three walking terrains in real-time based on the analysis of acceleration jerk signals with a time-frequency method to obtain gait parameters, and then the determination of the peaks of jerk signals using peak heuristics. The performance of the newly proposed algorithm was evaluated with eight healthy subjects when they were walking on level ground, up stairs, and down stairs. Our experimental results showed that the mean F1 scores of the proposed algorithm were above 0.98 for HS event detection and 0.95 for TO event detection on the three terrains. This indicates that the current algorithm would be robust and accurate for gait event detection on different terrains. Findings from the current study suggest that the proposed method may be a preferable option in some applications such as drop foot correction devices and leg prostheses.

  5. Influence of Spinal Cord Integrity on Gait Control in Human Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awai, Lea; Bolliger, Marc; Ferguson, Adam R; Courtine, Grégoire; Curt, Armin

    2016-07-01

    Background Clinical trials in spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily rely on simplified outcome metrics (ie, speed, distance) to obtain a global surrogate for the complex alterations of gait control. However, these assessments lack sufficient sensitivity to identify specific patterns of underlying impairment and to target more specific treatment interventions. Objective To disentangle the differential control of gait patterns following SCI beyond measures of time and distance. Methods The gait of 22 individuals with motor-incomplete SCI and 21 healthy controls was assessed using a high-resolution 3-dimensional motion tracking system and complemented by clinical and electrophysiological evaluations applying unbiased multivariate analysis. Results Motor-incomplete SCI patients showed varying degrees of spinal cord integrity (spinal conductivity) with severe limitations in walking speed and altered gait patterns. Principal component (PC) analysis applied on all the collected data uncovered robust coherence between parameters related to walking speed, distortion of intralimb coordination, and spinal cord integrity, explaining 45% of outcome variance (PC 1). Distinct from the first PC, the modulation of gait-cycle variables (step length, gait-cycle phases, cadence; PC 2) remained normal with respect to regained walking speed, whereas hip and knee ranges of motion were distinctly altered with respect to walking speed (PC 3). Conclusions In motor-incomplete SCI, distinct clusters of discretely controlled gait parameters can be discerned that refine the evaluation of gait impairment beyond outcomes of walking speed and distance. These findings are specifically different from that in other neurological disorders (stroke, Parkinson) and are more discrete at targeting and disentangling the complex effects of interventions to improve walking outcome following motor-incomplete SCI.

  6. An intermittent control model of flexible human gait using a stable manifold of saddle-type unstable limit cycle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chunjiang; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Ken; Morasso, Pietro; Nomura, Taishin

    2014-12-06

    Stability of human gait is the ability to maintain upright posture during walking against external perturbations. It is a complex process determined by a number of cross-related factors, including gait trajectory, joint impedance and neural control strategies. Here, we consider a control strategy that can achieve stable steady-state periodic gait while maintaining joint flexibility with the lowest possible joint impedance. To this end, we carried out a simulation study of a heel-toe footed biped model with hip, knee and ankle joints and a heavy head-arms-trunk element, working in the sagittal plane. For simplicity, the model assumes a periodic desired joint angle trajectory and joint torques generated by a set of feed-forward and proportional-derivative feedback controllers, whereby the joint impedance is parametrized by the feedback gains. We could show that a desired steady-state gait accompanied by the desired joint angle trajectory can be established as a stable limit cycle (LC) for the feedback controller with an appropriate set of large feedback gains. Moreover, as the feedback gains are decreased for lowering the joint stiffness, stability of the LC is lost only in a few dimensions, while leaving the remaining large number of dimensions quite stable: this means that the LC becomes saddle-type, with a low-dimensional unstable manifold and a high-dimensional stable manifold. Remarkably, the unstable manifold remains of low dimensionality even when the feedback gains are decreased far below the instability point. We then developed an intermittent neural feedback controller that is activated only for short periods of time at an optimal phase of each gait stride. We characterized the robustness of this design by showing that it can better stabilize the unstable LC with small feedback gains, leading to a flexible gait, and in particular we demonstrated that such an intermittent controller performs better if it drives the state point to the stable manifold, rather

  7. Acoustic Gaits: Gait Analysis With Footstep Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, M Umair Bin; Butko, Taras; Juang, Biing-Hwang Fred

    2015-08-01

    We describe the acoustic gaits-the natural human gait quantitative characteristics derived from the sound of footsteps as the person walks normally. We introduce the acoustic gait profile, which is obtained from temporal signal analysis of sound of footsteps collected by microphones and illustrate some of the spatio-temporal gait parameters that can be extracted from the acoustic gait profile by using three temporal signal analysis methods-the squared energy estimate, Hilbert transform and Teager-Kaiser energy operator. Based on the statistical analysis of the parameter estimates, we show that the spatio-temporal parameters and gait characteristics obtained using the acoustic gait profile can consistently and reliably estimate a subset of clinical and biometric gait parameters currently in use for standardized gait assessments. We conclude that the Teager-Kaiser energy operator provides the most consistent gait parameter estimates showing the least variation across different sessions and zones. Acoustic gaits use an inexpensive set of microphones with a computing device as an accurate and unintrusive gait analysis system. This is in contrast to the expensive and intrusive systems currently used in laboratory gait analysis such as the force plates, pressure mats and wearable sensors, some of which may change the gait parameters that are being measured.

  8. The effects of rhythmic sensory cues on the temporal dynamics of human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Fu, Yingying; Pak, Alison; Fairley, Jillian A; Chau, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Walking is a complex, rhythmic task performed by the locomotor system. However, natural gait rhythms can be influenced by metronomic auditory stimuli, a phenomenon of particular interest in neurological rehabilitation. In this paper, we examined the effects of aural, visual and tactile rhythmic cues on the temporal dynamics associated with human gait. Data were collected from fifteen healthy adults in two sessions. Each session consisted of five 15-minute trials. In the first trial of each session, participants walked at their preferred walking speed. In subsequent trials, participants were asked to walk to a metronomic beat, provided through visually, aurally, tactile or all three cues (simultaneously and in sync), the pace of which was set to the preferred walking speed of the first trial. Using the collected data, we extracted several parameters including: gait speed, mean stride interval, stride interval variability, scaling exponent and maximum Lyapunov exponent. The extracted parameters showed that rhythmic sensory cues affect the temporal dynamics of human gait. The auditory rhythmic cue had the greatest influence on the gait parameters, while the visual cue had no statistically significant effect on the scaling exponent. These results demonstrate that visual rhythmic cues could be considered as an alternative cueing modality in rehabilitation without concern of adversely altering the statistical persistence of walking.

  9. The effects of rhythmic sensory cues on the temporal dynamics of human gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Sejdić

    Full Text Available Walking is a complex, rhythmic task performed by the locomotor system. However, natural gait rhythms can be influenced by metronomic auditory stimuli, a phenomenon of particular interest in neurological rehabilitation. In this paper, we examined the effects of aural, visual and tactile rhythmic cues on the temporal dynamics associated with human gait. Data were collected from fifteen healthy adults in two sessions. Each session consisted of five 15-minute trials. In the first trial of each session, participants walked at their preferred walking speed. In subsequent trials, participants were asked to walk to a metronomic beat, provided through visually, aurally, tactile or all three cues (simultaneously and in sync, the pace of which was set to the preferred walking speed of the first trial. Using the collected data, we extracted several parameters including: gait speed, mean stride interval, stride interval variability, scaling exponent and maximum Lyapunov exponent. The extracted parameters showed that rhythmic sensory cues affect the temporal dynamics of human gait. The auditory rhythmic cue had the greatest influence on the gait parameters, while the visual cue had no statistically significant effect on the scaling exponent. These results demonstrate that visual rhythmic cues could be considered as an alternative cueing modality in rehabilitation without concern of adversely altering the statistical persistence of walking.

  10. Subspace identification and classification of healthy human gait.

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    Vinzenz von Tscharner

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The classification between different gait patterns is a frequent task in gait assessment. The base vectors were usually found using principal component analysis (PCA is replaced by an iterative application of the support vector machine (SVM. The aim was to use classifyability instead of variability to build a subspace (SVM space that contains the information about classifiable aspects of a movement. The first discriminant of the SVM space will be compared to a discriminant found by an independent component analysis (ICA in the SVM space. METHODS: Eleven runners ran using shoes with different midsoles. Kinematic data, representing the movements during stance phase when wearing the two shoes, was used as input to a PCA and SVM. The data space was decomposed by an iterative application of the SVM into orthogonal discriminants that were able to classify the two movements. The orthogonal discriminants spanned a subspace, the SVM space. It represents the part of the movement that allowed classifying the two conditions. The data in the SVM space was reconstructed for a visual assessment of the movement difference. An ICA was applied to the data in the SVM space to obtain a single discriminant. Cohen's d effect size was used to rank the PCA vectors that could be used to classify the data, the first SVM discriminant or the ICA discriminant. RESULTS: The SVM base contains all the information that discriminates the movement of the two shod conditions. It was shown that the SVM base contains some redundancy and a single ICA discriminant was found by applying an ICA in the SVM space. CONCLUSIONS: A combination of PCA, SVM and ICA is best suited to extract all parts of the gait pattern that discriminates between the two movements and to find a discriminant for the classification of dichotomous kinematic data.

  11. On the energetics of the walking gait of a human operator using a passive exoskeleton apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrovskii, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    We study the energy expenditures and the peak values of control torques which a human operator must apply in the process of exoskeleton displacement for various types of regular, plane, and single-support gaits. The obtained results allow us to estimate the performance of the passive exoskeleton apparatus.

  12. Research the Gait Characteristics of Human Walking Based on a Robot Model and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H. J.; Zhang, D. N.; Yin, Z. W.; Shi, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    In order to research the gait characteristics of human walking in different walking ways, a robot model with a single degree of freedom is put up in this paper. The system control models of the robot are established through Matlab/Simulink toolbox. The gait characteristics of straight, uphill, turning, up the stairs, down the stairs up and down areanalyzed by the system control models. To verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, an experiment was carried out. The comparison between theoretical results and experimental results shows that theoretical results are better agreement with the experimental ones. Analyze the reasons leading to amplitude error and phase error and give the improved methods. The robot model and experimental ways can provide foundation to further research the various gait characteristics of the exoskeleton robot.

  13. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed.

  14. Computational stability of human knee joint at early stance in Gait: Effects of muscle coactivity and anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2017-08-20

    As one of the most complex and vulnerable structures of body, the human knee joint should maintain dynamic equilibrium and stability in occupational and recreational activities. The evaluation of its stability and factors affecting it is vital in performance evaluation/enhancement, injury prevention and treatment managements. Knee stability often manifests itself by pain, hypermobility and giving-way sensations and is usually assessed by the passive joint laxity tests. Mechanical stability of both the human knee joint and the lower extremity at early stance periods of gait (0% and 5%) were quantified here for the first time using a hybrid musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. The roles of muscle coactivity, simulated by setting minimum muscle activation at 0-10% levels and ACL deficiency, simulated by reducing ACL resistance by up to 85%, on the stability margin as well as joint biomechanics (contact/muscle/ligament forces) were investigated. Dynamic stability was analyzed using both linear buckling and perturbation approaches at the final deformed configurations in gait. The knee joint was much more stable at 0% stance than at 5% due to smaller ground reaction and contact forces. Muscle coactivity, when at lower intensities (knee joint at the heel strike. It also markedly diminishes forces in lateral hamstrings (by up to 39%) and contact forces on the lateral plateau (by up to 17%). Current work emphasizes the need for quantification of the lower extremity stability margin in gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a lower limb rehabilitation exoskeleton based on real-time gait detection and gait tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemiplegia, apoplexia, or traffic accidents often lead to unilateral lower limb movement disorders. Traditional lower limb rehabilitation equipments usually execute walk training based on fixed gait trajectory; however, this type is unsuitable for unilateral lower limb disorders because they still have athletic ability and initiative walking intention on the healthy side. This article describes a wearable lower limb rehabilitation exoskeleton with a walk-assisting platform for safety and anti-gravity support. The exoskeleton detects and tracks the motion of the healthy leg, which is then used as the control input of the dyskinetic leg with half a gate-cycle delay. The patient can undergo walk training on his own intention, including individual walking habit, stride length, and stride frequency, which likely contribute to the training initiative. The series elastic actuator is chosen for the exoskeleton because the torque output can be accurately detected and used to calculate the assisted torque on the dyskinetic leg. This parameter corresponds to the recovery level of a patient’s muscle force. Finally, the walk-assisting experiments reveal that the rehabilitation exoskeleton in this article can provide the necessary assisting torques on the dyskinetic leg, which can be accurately monitored in real time to evaluate a patient’s rehabilitation status.

  16. Towards Real-Time Detection of Freezing of Gait Using Wavelet Transform on Wireless Accelerometer Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvanian, Saba; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2016-04-02

    Injuries associated with fall incidences continue to pose a significant burden to persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) both in terms of human suffering and economic loss. Freezing of gait (FOG), which is one of the symptoms of PD, is a common cause of falls in this population. Although a significant amount of work has been performed to characterize/detect FOG using both qualitative and quantitative methods, there remains paucity of data regarding real-time detection of FOG, such as the requirements for minimum sensor nodes, sensor placement locations, and appropriate sampling period and update time. Here, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is employed to define an index for correctly identifying FOG. Since the CWT method uses both time and frequency components of a waveform in comparison to other methods utilizing only the frequency component, we hypothesized that using this method could lead to a significant improvement in the accuracy of FOG detection. We tested the proposed index on the data of 10 PD patients who experience FOG. Two hundred and thirty seven (237) FOG events were identified by the physiotherapists. The results show that the index could discriminate FOG in the anterior-posterior axis better than other two axes, and is robust to the update time variability. These results suggest that real time detection of FOG may be realized by using CWT of a single shank sensor with window size of 2 s and update time of 1 s (82.1% and 77.1% for the sensitivity and specificity, respectively). Although implicated, future studies should examine the utility of this method in real-time detection of FOG.

  17. Towards Real-Time Detection of Freezing of Gait Using Wavelet Transform on Wireless Accelerometer Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Rezvanian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Injuries associated with fall incidences continue to pose a significant burden to persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD both in terms of human suffering and economic loss. Freezing of gait (FOG, which is one of the symptoms of PD, is a common cause of falls in this population. Although a significant amount of work has been performed to characterize/detect FOG using both qualitative and quantitative methods, there remains paucity of data regarding real-time detection of FOG, such as the requirements for minimum sensor nodes, sensor placement locations, and appropriate sampling period and update time. Here, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT is employed to define an index for correctly identifying FOG. Since the CWT method uses both time and frequency components of a waveform in comparison to other methods utilizing only the frequency component, we hypothesized that using this method could lead to a significant improvement in the accuracy of FOG detection. We tested the proposed index on the data of 10 PD patients who experience FOG. Two hundred and thirty seven (237 FOG events were identified by the physiotherapists. The results show that the index could discriminate FOG in the anterior–posterior axis better than other two axes, and is robust to the update time variability. These results suggest that real time detection of FOG may be realized by using CWT of a single shank sensor with window size of 2 s and update time of 1 s (82.1% and 77.1% for the sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Although implicated, future studies should examine the utility of this method in real-time detection of FOG.

  18. Human Skeleton Model Based Dynamic Features for Walking Speed Invariant Gait Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Kovač

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to recognize small number of people they know well by the way they walk. This ability represents basic motivation for using human gait as the means for biometric identification. Such biometrics can be captured at public places from a distance without subject's collaboration, awareness, and even consent. Although current approaches give encouraging results, we are still far from effective use in real-life applications. In general, methods set various constraints to circumvent the influence of covariate factors like changes of walking speed, view, clothing, footwear, and object carrying, that have negative impact on recognition performance. In this paper we propose a skeleton model based gait recognition system focusing on modelling gait dynamics and eliminating the influence of subjects appearance on recognition. Furthermore, we tackle the problem of walking speed variation and propose space transformation and feature fusion that mitigates its influence on recognition performance. With the evaluation on OU-ISIR gait dataset, we demonstrate state of the art performance of proposed methods.

  19. A method for extracting human gait series from accelerometer signals based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mao-Jing; Zhuang, Jian-Jun; Hou, Feng-Zhen; Zhan, Qing-Bo; Shao, Yi; Ning, Xin-Bao

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied to analyse accelerometer signals collected during normal human walking. First, the self-adaptive feature of EEMD is utilised to decompose the accelerometer signals, thus sifting out several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) at disparate scales. Then, gait series can be extracted through peak detection from the eigen IMF that best represents gait rhythmicity. Compared with the method based on the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), the EEMD-based method has the following advantages: it remarkably improves the detection rate of peak values hidden in the original accelerometer signal, even when the signal is severely contaminated by the intermittent noises; this method effectively prevents the phenomenon of mode mixing found in the process of EMD. And a reasonable selection of parameters for the stop-filtering criteria can improve the calculation speed of the EEMD-based method. Meanwhile, the endpoint effect can be suppressed by using the auto regressive and moving average model to extend a short-time series in dual directions. The results suggest that EEMD is a powerful tool for extraction of gait rhythmicity and it also provides valuable clues for extracting eigen rhythm of other physiological signals.

  20. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-time gait event detection for lower limb amputees using a single wearable sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Maqbool, HF; Husman, MAB; Awad, MI; Abouhossein, A; Mehryar, P; Iqbal, N.; Dehghani-Sanij, AA

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rule-based real-time gait event/phase detection system (R-GEDS) using a shank mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU) for lower limb amputees during the level ground walking. Development of the algorithm is based on the shank angular velocity in the sagittal plane and linear acceleration signal in the shank longitudinal direction. System performance was evaluated with four control subjects (CS) and one transfemoral amputee (TFA) and the results were validated with four F...

  2. Real-time gait event detection for lower limb amputees using a single wearable sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, H F; Husman, M A B; Awad, M I; Abouhossein, A; Mehryar, P; Iqbal, N; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a rule-based real-time gait event/phase detection system (R-GEDS) using a shank mounted inertial measurement unit (IMU) for lower limb amputees during the level ground walking. Development of the algorithm is based on the shank angular velocity in the sagittal plane and linear acceleration signal in the shank longitudinal direction. System performance was evaluated with four control subjects (CS) and one transfemoral amputee (TFA) and the results were validated with four FlexiForce footswitches (FSW). The results showed a data latency for initial contact (IC) and toe off (TO) within a range of ± 40 ms for both CS and TFA. A delay of about 3.7 ± 62 ms for a foot-flat start (FFS) and an early detection of -9.4 ± 66 ms for heel-off (HO) was found for CS. Prosthetic side showed an early detection of -105 ± 95 ms for FFS whereas intact side showed a delay of 141 ±73 ms for HO. The difference in the kinematics of the TFA and CS is one of the potential reasons for high variations in the time difference. Overall, detection accuracy was 99.78% for all the events in both groups. Based on the validated results, the proposed system can be used to accurately detect the temporal gait events in real-time that leads to the detection of gait phase system and therefore, can be utilized in gait analysis applications and the control of lower limb prostheses.

  3. The effects of gait time and trunk acceleration ratio during stair climbing in old-old adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun-Shil; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of gait time and trunk acceleration ratio in old-old adult females during stair climbing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five older adult females who were able to walk independently volunteered for this study and were categorized into two age groups (older adults or old-old adults). Gait time and trunk acceleration ratio were measured using an accelerometer during stair climbing. [Results] Gait time and trunk acceleration ratio when climbing stairs were significantly higher in the old-old age group than in the older adults group. [Conclusions] These findings suggest that old-old females have decreased upper trunk control. In addition, gait time and the trunk acceleration ratio during stair climbing are useful clinical markers for predicting function and balance control ability in old-old elderly populations.

  4. Appraising the Recital of Joints in Human Running Gait through 3D Optical Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Ali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recital costing of Joints in human running is biometrics evaluation technology. It has skillful series of realizations in scientific research in the last decade. In this work, we present a human running joints (hip, knee and ankle valuation recital based on the statistical computation techniques. We use the One-way ANOVA, least significant difference (LSD test and Bartlett's test for equality of variances to determine which joint has more variation with others joints during human running gait. These three joints rotation angle data were computed from the Biovision Hierarchical data (BVH motion file, because these joints provide the richest information of the human lower body joints (hip, knee and ankle. The use of BVH file to estimate the participation and performance of the joints during running gait is a novel feature of our study. The experimental results indicated that, the knee joint has the decisive influence (variation as compared to the other two joints, hip and ankle, during running gait.

  5. Gait changes over time in stance control orthosis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Steven E; Bernhardt, Kathie A; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2007-12-01

    This report presents objective motion analysis measurements of 14 stance control orthoses (SCO) users during a prospective open-enrollment 6-month clinical field trial. Participants were fitted with a Dynamic Knee Brace System (DKBS) which is a novel electromechanical SCO developed by the authors. Seven of the 14 subjects that had been prescribed but did not use a KAFO at the time of enrollment were defined as novice users. Those subjects who at the time of enrollment were using a locked KAFO for ambulation were defined as experienced users. Results showed that all subjects significantly increased peak knee flexion from 49.0 +/- 15.5 degrees to 55.9 +/- 11.4 degrees between the initial and six month tests (p = 0.02). They also tended to increase peak hip flexion from 39.6 +/- 13.4 degrees to 46.0 +/- 14.5 degrees between the 3 month and 6 month tests (p = 0.09). Novice users significantly increased velocity from 74.7 +/- 19.4 cm/s to 81.2 +/- 19.0 cm/sec between the initial and 3-month tests (p = 0.005). These same users increased stride length from 109 +/- 15.3 cm to 112 +/- 16.6 cm over the same time period (p = 0.008). Experienced KAFO users, however, tended to increase velocity from 68.8 +/- 20.5 cm/s to 83.2 +/- 16.8 cm/s at 3 months (p = 0.06). This was combined with a significant increase in cadence from 76.2 +/- 14.1 steps/min to 83.9 +/- 8.3 steps/min between the initial and 3 month tests (p = 0.05). Joint kinetics showed no changes for users over the duration of the testing period. These results indicate that KAFO users make significant gains in temporodistance measures, while changes in joint kinematics take longer to develop.

  6. Musically cued gait-training improves both perceptual and motor timing in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles-Etienne eBenoit

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that auditory cueing improves gait in patients with Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (IPD. Disease-related reductions in speed and step length can be improved by providing rhythmical auditory cues via a metronome or music. However, effects on cognitive aspects of motor control have yet to be thoroughly investigated. If synchronization of movement to an auditory cue relies on a supramodal timing system involved in perceptual, motor and sensorimotor integration, auditory cueing can be expected to affect both motor and perceptual timing. Here we tested this hypothesis by assessing perceptual and motor timing in 15 IPD patients before and after a four-week music training program with rhythmic auditory cueing. Long-term effects were assessed one month after the end of the training. Perceptual and motor timing was evaluated with the Battery for the Assessment of Auditory Sensorimotor and Timing Abilities (BAASTA and compared to that of age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls. Prior to training, IPD patients exhibited impaired perceptual and motor timing. Training improved patients’ performance in tasks requiring synchronization with isochronous sequences, and enhanced their ability to adapt to durational changes in a sequence in hand tapping tasks. Benefits of cueing extended to time perception (duration discrimination and detection of misaligned beats in musical excerpts. The current results demonstrate that auditory cueing leads to benefits beyond gait and support the idea that coupling gait to rhythmic auditory cues in IPD patients relies on a neuronal network engaged in both perceptual and motor timing.

  7. Compass gait mechanics account for top walking speeds in ducks and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, James R; Szymanek, Katie L; Daley, Monica A

    2008-12-01

    The constraints to maximum walking speed and the underlying cause of the walk-run transition remains controversial. However, the motions of the body and legs can be reduced to a few mechanical principles, which, if valid, impose simple physics-based limits to walking speed. Bipedal walking may be viewed as a vaulting gait, with the centre of mass (CoM) passing over a stiff stance leg (an 'inverted pendulum'), while the swing leg swings forward (as a pendulum). At its simplest, this forms a 'compass gait' walker, which has a maximum walking speed constrained by simple mechanics: walk too fast, or with too high a step length, and gravity fails to keep the stance foot attached to the floor. But how useful is such an extremely reductionist model? In the present study, we report measurements on a range of duck breeds as example unspecialized, non-planar, crouch-limbed walkers and contrast these findings with previous measurements on humans, using the theoretical framework of compass gait walking. Ducks walked as inverted pendulums with near-passive swing legs up to relative velocities around 0.5, remarkably consistent with the theoretical model. By contrast, top walking speeds in humans cannot be achieved with passive swing legs: humans, while still constrained by compass gait mechanics, extend their envelope of walking speeds by using relatively high step frequencies. Therefore, the capacity to drive the swing leg forward by walking humans may be a specialization for walking, allowing near-passive vaulting of the CoM at walking speeds 4/3 that possible with a passive (duck-like) swing leg.

  8. Gait Transitions in Human Infants: Coping with Extremes of Treadmill Speed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin V Vasudevan

    Full Text Available Spinal pattern generators in quadrupedal animals can coordinate different forms of locomotion, like trotting or galloping, by altering coordination between the limbs (interlimb coordination. In the human system, infants have been used to study the subcortical control of gait, since the cerebral cortex and corticospinal tract are immature early in life. Like other animals, human infants can modify interlimb coordination to jump or step. Do human infants possess functional neuronal circuitry necessary to modify coordination within a limb (intralimb coordination in order to generate distinct forms of alternating bipedal gait, such as walking and running? We monitored twenty-eight infants (7-12 months stepping on a treadmill at speeds ranging between 0.06-2.36 m/s, and seventeen adults (22-47 years walking or running at speeds spanning the walk-to-run transition. Six of the adults were tested with body weight support to mimic the conditions of infant stepping. We found that infants could accommodate a wide range of speeds by altering stride length and frequency, similar to adults. Moreover, as the treadmill speed increased, we observed periods of flight during which neither foot was in ground contact in infants and in adults. However, while adults modified other aspects of intralimb coordination and the mechanics of progression to transition to a running gait, infants did not make comparable changes. The lack of evidence for distinct walking and running patterns in infants suggests that the expression of different functional, alternating gait patterns in humans may require neuromuscular maturation and a period of learning post-independent walking.

  9. Kinematic and Gait Similarities between Crawling Human Infants and Other Quadruped Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Ludovic; Nylén, Anna; Rosander, Kerstin; Ijspeert, Auke Jan

    2015-01-01

    Crawling on hands and knees is an early pattern of human infant locomotion, which offers an interesting way of studying quadrupedalism in one of its simplest form. We investigate how crawling human infants compare to other quadruped mammals, especially primates. We present quantitative data on both the gait and kinematics of seven 10-month-old crawling infants. Body movements were measured with an optoelectronic system giving precise data on 3-dimensional limb movements. Crawling on hands and knees is very similar to the locomotion of non-human primates in terms of the quite protracted arm at touch-down, the coordination between the spine movements in the lateral plane and the limbs, the relatively extended limbs during locomotion and the strong correlation between stance duration and speed of locomotion. However, there are important differences compared to primates, such as the choice of a lateral-sequence walking gait, which is similar to most non-primate mammals and the relatively stiff elbows during stance as opposed to the quite compliant gaits of primates. These finding raise the question of the role of both the mechanical structure of the body and neural control on the determination of these characteristics.

  10. 'Human paced' walking: Followers adopt stride time dynamics of leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmelat, V.C.M.; Delignières, D.; Torre, K.; Beek, P.J.; Daffertshofer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Isochronous cueing is widely used in gait rehabilitation even though it alters the stride-time dynamics toward anti-persistent rather than the persistent, fractal fluctuations characteristic of human walking. In the present experiment we tested an alternative cueing method: pacing by a human. To thi

  11. Design, simulation and modelling of auxiliary exoskeleton to improve human gait cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkani, O; Maleki, A; Jamshidi, N

    2016-11-28

    Exoskeleton is a walking assistance device that improves human gait cycle through providing auxiliary force and transferring physical load to the stronger muscles. This device takes the natural state of organ and follows its natural movement. Exoskeleton functions as an auxiliary device to help those with disabilities in hip and knee such as devotees, elderly farmers and agricultural machinery operators who suffer from knee complications. In this research, an exoskeleton designed with two screw jacks at knee and hip joints. To simulate extension and flexion movements of the leg joints, bearings were used at the end of hip and knee joints. The generated torque and motion angles of these joints obtained as well as the displacement curves of screw jacks in the gait cycle. Then, the human gait cycle was simulated in stance and swing phases and the obtained torque curves were compared. The results indicated that they followed the natural circle of the generated torque in joints with a little difference from each other. The maximum displacement obtained 4 and 6 cm in hip and knee joints jack respectively. The maximum torques in hip and knee joints were generated in foot contact phase. Also the minimum torques in hip and knee joints were generated in toe off and heel off phases respectively.

  12. An IMU-to-Body Alignment Method Applied to Human Gait Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Susana Vargas-Valencia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel calibration procedure as a simple, yet powerful, method to place and align inertial sensors with body segments. The calibration can be easily replicated without the need of any additional tools. The proposed method is validated in three different applications: a computer mathematical simulation; a simplified joint composed of two semi-spheres interconnected by a universal goniometer; and a real gait test with five able-bodied subjects. Simulation results demonstrate that, after the calibration method is applied, the joint angles are correctly measured independently of previous sensor placement on the joint, thus validating the proposed procedure. In the cases of a simplified joint and a real gait test with human volunteers, the method also performs correctly, although secondary plane errors appear when compared with the simulation results. We believe that such errors are caused by limitations of the current inertial measurement unit (IMU technology and fusion algorithms. In conclusion, the presented calibration procedure is an interesting option to solve the alignment problem when using IMUs for gait analysis.

  13. Reliability of surface electromyography timing parameters in gait in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malone, Ailish

    2012-02-01

    The aims of this study were to validate a computerised method to detect muscle activity from surface electromyography (SEMG) signals in gait in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), and to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the activation times designated by this method. SEMG signals were recorded from rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG), during gait in 12 participants with CSM on two separate test days. Four computerised activity detection methods, based on the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator (TKEO), were applied to a subset of signals and compared to visual interpretation of muscle activation. The most accurate method was then applied to all signals for evaluation of test-retest reliability. A detection method based on a combined slope and amplitude threshold showed the highest agreement (87.5%) with visual interpretation. With respect to reliability, the standard error of measurement (SEM) of the timing of RF, TA and MG between test days was 5.5% stride duration or less, while the SEM of BF was 9.4%. The timing parameters of RF, TA and MG designated by this method were considered sufficiently reliable for use in clinical practice, however the reliability of BF was questionable.

  14. Spinal motor outputs during step-to-step transitions of diverse human gaits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eLa Scaleia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of human motor control can be inferred from the coordination of muscles during movement. For instance, by combining multimuscle electromyographic (EMG recordings with human neuroanatomy, it is possible to estimate alpha-motoneuron (MN pool activations along the spinal cord. It has previously been shown that the spinal motor output fluctuates with the body’s center-of-mass motion, with bursts of activity around foot-strike and foot lift-off during walking. However, it is not known whether these MN bursts are generalizable to other ambulation tasks, nor is it clear if the spatial locus of the activity (along the rostrocaudal axis of the spinal cord is fixed or variable. Here we sought to address these questions by investigating the spatiotemporal characteristics of the spinal motor output during various tasks: walking forward, backward, tiptoe and uphill. We reconstructed spinal maps from 26 leg muscle EMGs, including some intrinsic foot muscles. We discovered that the various walking tasks shared qualitative similarities in their temporal spinal activation profiles, exhibiting peaks around foot-strike and foot-lift. However, we also observed differences in the segmental level and intensity of spinal activations, particularly following foot-strike. For example, forward level-ground walking exhibited a mean motor output roughly 2 times lower than the other gaits. Finally, we found that the reconstruction of the spinal motor output from multimuscle EMG recordings was relatively insensitive to the subset of muscles analyzed. In summary, our results suggested temporal similarities, but spatial differences in the segmental spinal motor outputs during the step-to-step transitions of disparate walking behaviors.

  15. Effect of Human Movement on Galvanic Intra-Body Communication during Single Gait Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I. W.; Razak, A. H. A.; Ahmad, A.; Salleh, M. K. M.

    2015-11-01

    Intra-body communication (IBC) is a communication system that uses human body as a signal transmission medium. From previous research, two coupling methods of IBC were concluded which are capacitive coupling and galvanic coupling. This paper investigates the effect of human movement on IBC using the galvanic coupling method. Because the human movement is control by the limb joint, the knee flexion angle during gait cycle was used to examine the influence of human movement on galvanic coupling IBC. The gait cycle is a cycle of people walking that start from one foot touch the ground till that foot touch the ground again. Frequency range from 300 kHz to 200MHz was swept in order to investigate the signal transmission loss and the result was focused on operating frequency 70MHz to 90MHz. Results show that the transmission loss varies when the knee flexion angle increased. The highest loss of signal at frequency range between 70MHz to 90 MHz was 69dB when the knee flexion angle is 50° and the minimum loss was 51dB during the flexion angle is 5°.

  16. Loadcell supports for a dynamic force plate. [using piezoelectric tranducers and electromyography to study human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, C. W.; Musil, L. M.; Hagy, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus was developed to accurately measure components of force along three mutually perpendicular axes, torque, and the center of pressure imposed by the foot of a subject walking over its surface. The data obtained were used to supplement high-speed motion picture and electromyographic (EMG) data for in-depth studies of normal or abnormal human gait. Significant features of the design (in particular, the mechanisms used to support the loadcell transducers) are described. Results of the development program and typical data obtained with the device are presented and discussed.

  17. 基于图像处理的人体步态信息采集与处理%Human Gait Acquisition and Handling Based on Image Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳阳; 刘永久; 聂余满; 张磊杰; 宋全军

    2013-01-01

    为了获取健康人体的正常步态信息,提出了一种快捷有效的获取方法.通过在下肢关节点处粘贴标记点,利用摄像机获取正常人行走的图像,对图像进行二值化处理,提取出标记点坐标.经过最小二乘拟合分析可得到人体脚心在一个步态周期内的运动轨迹及运动速度.最后对下肢康复机器人进行步态规划,得到下肢康复机器人的步态轨迹及其速度,并对不同年龄人群的步态速度曲线进行了分析.实验结果表明,该系统可行性好,工作稳定,为下肢康复机器人的运动学分析与控制提供有力的理论依据和验证方法.%In order to obtain gait features of human foot in normal walking process.This paper presents a fast and effective system for gait features acquisition.Feature points were attached to the specific parts of human lower limbs and a video camera was used to acquire images of a walking process.In addition,axis values of feature points can be acquired by image binarization processing.At the same time,foot trajectory of fixed center of mass and gait speed were abstracted based on the least square method (LSM).Finally,the gait of lower limb rehabilitation robot was planned according to the gait features,abstracting the gait trajectory of rehabilitation robot,Moreover,gait speed of different ages were analyzed.Experiments results show that the system is feasible and stable,which provides a powerful data basis and authentication methods for the analysis of movement and control of lower limb rehabilitation robot.

  18. Time course of changes in the development of gait disorders in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the time course of changes in foot biomechanical function as multiple sclerosis (MS progresses in patients with different degrees of disability compared to a control group. Patients and methods. To estimate the time course of changes in gait disorders in MS, changes in foot biomechanical function were explored in 30 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Their neurological status was evaluated using the expanded disability status scale (EDSS; pedographic examination was made applying a plantar pressure distribution system; all the patients were examined twice. During the first examination, the patients were divided into two groups: 1 minimal neurological disorders (EDSS scores of < 3.0 and 2 moderate ones (EDSS scores of ≥3.0. Results and discussion. The patients with a mild neurological deficit showed increases in foot load and its lateralization by elevating pressure on the heads of the fourth and fifth metatarsal bones, as evidenced by a significant rise in mean pressure, maximum force, and force-time integral. These changes occurred in the absence of the patients’ complaints of changes in movements. Pedographic examination revealed the changes indicating an enlarged anterior transverse arch and the lower role of the hallux in body weight transfer in the patients with a moderate neurological deficit despite the fact that there were no further visible negative changes in a motor process or progression in neurological deficit. The pedographic examination makes it possible to estimate the degree of gait disorders caused by pyramidal and/or cerebellar lesions and to identify a leading role of this or that functional system in their genesis. Pyramidal dysfunction has impact on the pressurization of the heads of the second and third metatarsal bones. Computed pedography can identify clinically subtle movement changes and estimate the time course of changes in movement disorders in MS patients, including those to evaluate

  19. Feasibility of a gait retraining strategy for reducing knee joint loading: increased trunk lean guided by real-time biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Simic, Milena; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L; Wrigley, Tim V

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to examine changes in frontal plane knee and hip walking biomechanics following a gait retraining strategy focused on increasing lateral trunk lean and to quantify reports of difficulty and joint discomfort when performing such a gait modification. After undergoing a baseline analysis of normal walking, 9 young, healthy participants were trained to modify their gait to exhibit small (4°), medium (8°), and large (12°) amounts of lateral trunk lean. Training was guided by the use of real-time biofeedback of the actual trunk lean angle. Peak frontal plane external knee and hip joint moments were compared across conditions. Participants were asked to report the degree of difficulty and the presence of any joint discomfort for each amount of trunk lean modification. Small (4°), medium (8°), and large (12°) amounts of lateral trunk lean reduced the peak external knee adduction moment (KAM) by 7%, 21%, and 25%, respectively, though the peak KAM was only significantly less in the medium and large conditions (pknee, hip, and/or lower spine discomfort. Results from this study indicate that a gait pattern with increased lateral trunk lean can effectively reduce frontal plane joint moments. Though these findings have implications for pathological populations, learning this gait pattern was associated with some difficulty and joint discomfort.

  20. Effect of arm swing strategy on local dynamic stability of human gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd; Wittink, Harriët; Dieen, Jaap van

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Falling causes long term disability and can even lead to death. Most falls occur during gait. Therefore improving gait stability might be beneficial for people at risk of falling. Recently arm swing has been shown to influence gait stability. However at present it remains unknown which

  1. Gait adaptation to visual kinematic perturbations using a real-time closed-loop brain-computer interface to a virtual reality avatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phat Luu, Trieu; He, Yongtian; Brown, Samuel; Nakagame, Sho; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. The control of human bipedal locomotion is of great interest to the field of lower-body brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for gait rehabilitation. While the feasibility of closed-loop BCI systems for the control of a lower body exoskeleton has been recently shown, multi-day closed-loop neural decoding of human gait in a BCI virtual reality (BCI-VR) environment has yet to be demonstrated. BCI-VR systems provide valuable alternatives for movement rehabilitation when wearable robots are not desirable due to medical conditions, cost, accessibility, usability, or patient preferences. Approach. In this study, we propose a real-time closed-loop BCI that decodes lower limb joint angles from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) during treadmill walking to control a walking avatar in a virtual environment. Fluctuations in the amplitude of slow cortical potentials of EEG in the delta band (0.1-3 Hz) were used for prediction; thus, the EEG features correspond to time-domain amplitude modulated potentials in the delta band. Virtual kinematic perturbations resulting in asymmetric walking gait patterns of the avatar were also introduced to investigate gait adaptation using the closed-loop BCI-VR system over a period of eight days. Main results. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using a closed-loop BCI to learn to control a walking avatar under normal and altered visuomotor perturbations, which involved cortical adaptations. The average decoding accuracies (Pearson’s r values) in real-time BCI across all subjects increased from (Hip: 0.18 ± 0.31 Knee: 0.23 ± 0.33 Ankle: 0.14 ± 0.22) on Day 1 to (Hip: 0.40 ± 0.24 Knee: 0.55 ± 0.20 Ankle: 0.29 ± 0.22) on Day 8. Significance. These findings have implications for the development of a real-time closed-loop EEG-based BCI-VR system for gait rehabilitation after stroke and for understanding cortical plasticity induced by a closed-loop BCI-VR system.

  2. Impact on the gait time cycle of ischemic stroke in the treatment with yinyang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旗

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference in the efficacy on gait time cycle of ischemic stroke between yin-yang respiratory reinforcing and reducing needling technique(yin-yang needling)and the conventional acupuncture.Methods Sixty cases of ischemic stroke between yin-yang

  3. Experimental studies on the human gait using a tethered pelvic assist device (T-PAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashista, Vineet; Mustafa, S K; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the prototype of a novel tethered pelvic assist device (T-PAD). This is a purely passive device, consisting of a set of elastic tethers with one end attached to a hip brace worn by a subject walking on a treadmill, and the other end attached to a fixed frame surrounding the subject. T-PAD offers the flexibility of varying the assistance required on the pelvis by changing the configuration of the tether attachment locations, number of tethers and tether elasticity. Experimental studies were conducted using a full and a partial pelvic constraint configuration of T-PAD, with varying tether elasticity. The studies were aimed at observing the effect of T-PAD on the human gait. Results show that T-PAD reduced the range-of-motion for the pelvic angles with increase of tether elasticity. However, it had mixed effects on the range-of-motion of the hip angles, but negligible effect on the knee and ankle joint angles. Overall, T-PAD shows potential as a low-cost pelvic support device with pelvic motion control capabilities, and can work in tandem with existing gait trainers.

  4. Perception of Gait Patterns that Deviate from Normal and Symmetric Biped Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet eHandzic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the range of gait patterns that are perceived as healthy and human-like with the goal of understanding how much asymmetry is allowable in a gait pattern before other people start to notice a gait impairment. Specifically, this study explores if certain abnormal walking patterns can be dismissed as unimpaired or not uncanny. Altering gait biomechanics is generally done in the fields of prosthetics and rehabilitation, however the perception of gait is often neglected. Although a certain gait can be functional, it may not be considered as normal by observers. On the other hand, an abnormally perceived gait may be more practical or necessary in some situations, such as limping after an injury or stroke and when wearing a prosthesis. This research will help to find the balance between the form and function of gait. Gait patterns are synthetically created using a passive dynamic walker (PDW model that allows gait patterns to be systematically changed without the confounding influence from human sensorimotor feedback during walking. This standardized method allows the perception of specific changes in gait to be studied. The PDW model was used to produce walking patterns that showed a degree of abnormality in gait cadence, knee height, step length, and swing time created by changing the foot roll-over-shape, knee damping, knee location, and leg masses. The gait patterns were shown to participants who rated them according to separate scales of impairment and uncanniness. The results indicate that some pathological and asymmetric gait patterns are perceived as unimpaired and normal. Step time and step length asymmetries less than 5%, small knee location differences, and gait cadence changes of 25% do not result in a change in perception. The results also show that the parameters of a pathologically or uncanny perceived gait can be beneficially altered by increasing other independent parameters, in some sense masking the initial

  5. Comparison of gait parameters across three attentional loading conditions during timed up and go test in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Haidzir; Justine, Maria; Ting, Goh Hui; Latiff, Lydia Abd

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of attentional loading on performance of turning during walking in individuals with stroke. The authors used a cross-sectional experimental design to compare gait parameters in stroke survivors across 3 attentional loading conditions (single, dual-motor, and dual-cognitive conditions) during a Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. Data were collected from 20 stroke survivors (12 males, 8 females; mean age, 60.5 ± 10.6 years). We compared the number of steps and time measured during the TUG test under 3 attentional loading conditions and 2 turning directions (nonparetic and paretic sides). We further divided the TUG test into straight walking and turning phases. The number of steps and the time taken during TUG test increased significantly from single- to dual-task conditions (dual motor and dual cognitive). However, there were no significant differences in gait parameters between turning toward the nonparetic and paretic sides. These findings suggested that gait performance was compromised during dual-task conditions for individuals with stroke. Attentional loading may be incorporated into routine gait assessment and rehabilitation to ensure a successful recovery.

  6. Detrended fluctuation analysis and adaptive fractal analysis of stride time data in Parkinson's disease: stitching together short gait trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Marietta; Schubert, Patric; Liebherr, Magnus; Haas, Christian T

    2014-01-01

    Variability indicates motor control disturbances and is suitable to identify gait pathologies. It can be quantified by linear parameters (amplitude estimators) and more sophisticated nonlinear methods (structural information). Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is one method to measure structural information, e.g., from stride time series. Recently, an improved method, Adaptive Fractal Analysis (AFA), has been proposed. This method has not been applied to gait data before. Fractal scaling methods (FS) require long stride-to-stride data to obtain valid results. However, in clinical studies, it is not usual to measure a large number of strides (e.g., [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] strides). Amongst others, clinical gait analysis is limited due to short walkways, thus, FS seem to be inapplicable. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate FS under clinical conditions. Stride time data of five self-paced walking trials ([Formula: see text] strides each) of subjects with PD and a healthy control group (CG) was measured. To generate longer time series, stride time sequences were stitched together. The coefficient of variation (CV), fractal scaling exponents [Formula: see text] (DFA) and [Formula: see text] (AFA) were calculated. Two surrogate tests were performed: A) the whole time series was randomly shuffled; B) the single trials were randomly shuffled separately and afterwards stitched together. CV did not discriminate between PD and CG. However, significant differences between PD and CG were found concerning [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Surrogate version B yielded a higher mean squared error and empirical quantiles than version A. Hence, we conclude that the stitching procedure creates an artificial structure resulting in an overestimation of true [Formula: see text]. The method of stitching together sections of gait seems to be appropriate in order to distinguish between PD and CG with FS. It provides an approach to integrate FS as

  7. Imagined gait modulates neuronal network dynamics in the human pedunculopontine nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Timothy L; Stratton, Peter G; Coyne, Terry J; Cook, Raymond; Silberstein, Paul; Silburn, Peter A; Windels, François; Sah, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a part of the mesencephalic locomotor region and is thought to be important for the initiation and maintenance of gait. Lesions of the PPN induce gait deficits, and the PPN has therefore emerged as a target for deep brain stimulation for the control of gait and postural disability. However, the role of the PPN in gait control is not understood. Using extracellular single-unit recordings in awake patients, we found that neurons in the PPN discharged as synchronous functional networks whose activity was phase locked to alpha oscillations. Neurons in the PPN responded to limb movement and imagined gait by dynamically changing network activity and decreasing alpha phase locking. Our results indicate that different synchronous networks are activated during initial motor planning and actual motion, and suggest that changes in gait initiation in Parkinson's disease may result from disrupted network activity in the PPN.

  8. Current Evidence of Gait Modification with Real-time Biofeedback to Alter Kinetic, Temporospatial, and Function-Related Outcomes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladipo Eddo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gait retraining using real-time biofeedback (RTB may have positive outcomes in decreasing knee adduction moment (KAM in healthy individuals and has shown equal likelihood in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the most effective gait modification strategy, mode of biofeedback or treatment dosage. Objective: The purpose of this review was: i to assess if gait retraining interventions using RTB are valuable to reduce KAM, pain, and improve function in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, ii to evaluate the effectiveness of different gait modifications and modes of RTB in reducing KAM in healthy individuals, and iii to assess the impact of gait retraining interventions with RTB on other variables that may affect clinical outcomes. Methods: Seven electronic databases were searched using five search terms. Studies that utilized any form of gait retraining with RTB to improve one or a combination of the following measures were included: KAM, knee pain, and function. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, evaluating eleven distinctive gait modifications and three modes of RTB. Results: All but one study showed positive outcomes. Self-selected and multi-parameter gait modifications showed the greatest reductions in KAM with visual and haptic RTB being more effective than auditory. Conclusions: Current evidence suggests that gait modification using RTB can Positively alter KAM in asymptomatic and symptomatic participants. However, the existing literature is limited and of low quality, with the optimal combination strategies remaining unclear (gait and biofeedback mode. Future studies should employ randomized controlled study designs to compare the effects of different gait modification strategies and biofeedback modes on individuals with knee OA.

  9. Research prospect of biomechanics of human loading gait%人体负重行走的生物力学研究及前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丽华; 陈民盛

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: If human back takes too heavy objects for long time, a series of injury problems would occur. At present, there have been few studies describing the biomechanics of human loading gait. OBJECTIVE: To review the gait parameter changes, reaction force changes, pressure sensors and EMG applications in human loading gait. METHODS: A computer-based retrieval was performed by the first author using the key words "gait, load carriage, backpack" to search the manuscripts published between 2005-2010 describing "weight loading, walking and packpack" in Chinese and English. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The current studies regarding loading walking are concluded as follows: all indicators are relatively simple and comprehensive studies are not enough. There are more studies regarding young people and children and there are few studies regarding soldiers who bear loads in marching. There are more studies regarding weight-bearing waling gait, backpack commercial test, and there are few studies describing the biomechanical mechanism of loading-caused injury as well foot pressure change and biomechanical test of shoes. Some studies have conflicting conclusions, resulting in unclear mechanism underlying effects of loading gait on human gait.%背景:人体背部负重行走时若背负重物过重或长时间地承担质量,容易导致一系列的损伤问题,目前有关人体负重行走状态下的生物力学研究较少.目的:综述人体负重行走的步态参数变化、足-地反作用力变化、压力传感器及肌电的应用.方法:由第一作者检索2005/2010 PubMed 数据库及中国知网数据库有关负重、行走、背包方面的文章.英文检索词为"gait,load carriage,backpack",中文检索词为"负重行走、背包、步态".结果与结论:目前对于负重行走的研究:①在研究指标上,各种指标比较单一,综合研究还不够.②在研究对象上,针对青年人群和儿童的相关研究比较多,有关士兵负重行军的

  10. Design of a biologically inspired lower limb exoskeleton for human gait rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Mingxing; Chen, Weihai; Ding, Xilun; Wang, Jianhua; Bai, Shaoping; Ren, Huichao

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel bionic model of the human leg according to the theory of physiology. Based on this model, we present a biologically inspired 3-degree of freedom (DOF) lower limb exoskeleton for human gait rehabilitation, showing that the lower limb exoskeleton is fully compatible with the human knee joint. The exoskeleton has a hybrid serial-parallel kinematic structure consisting of a 1-DOF hip joint module and a 2-DOF knee joint module in the sagittal plane. A planar 2-DOF parallel mechanism is introduced in the design to fully accommodate the motion of the human knee joint, which features not only rotation but also relative sliding. Therefore, the design is consistent with the requirements of bionics. The forward and inverse kinematic analysis is studied and the workspace of the exoskeleton is analyzed. The structural parameters are optimized to obtain a larger workspace. The results using MATLAB-ADAMS co-simulation are shown in this paper to demonstrate the feasibility of our design. A prototype of the exoskeleton is also developed and an experiment performed to verify the kinematic analysis. Compared with existing lower limb exoskeletons, the designed mechanism has a large workspace, while allowing knee joint rotation and small amount of sliding.

  11. Muscle reflexes during gait elicited by electrical stimulation of the posterior cruciate ligament in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer-Rasmussen, T; Krogsgaard, M R; Jensen, D B

    2002-01-01

    muscle activity in both the quadriceps and the hamstrings. The latency of the inhibition ranged between 78 and 148 ms in the quadriceps, between 88 and 110 ms in the hamstrings and between 189 and 258 ms in m. gastrocnemius. Stimulation of the fat pad of the knee did not influence the thigh and calf......We investigated the influence of electrical stimulation of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) on the motoneuron pool of the thigh and calf muscle during gait. The study group comprised eight young men without any history of injury to the knee joints. Multistranded teflon-insulated stainless...... over the vastus medialis, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris caput longum, and semitendinosus muscles. The stimuli consisted of four pulses delivered at 200 Hz; the stimulus amplitude was two to three times the sensory threshold. The electrical stimulation of the PCL inhibited the ongoing...

  12. GaitKeeper: A System for Measuring Canine Gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassim Ladha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It is understood gait has the potential to be used as a window into neurodegenerative disorders, identify markers of subclinical pathology, inform diagnostic algorithms of disease progression and measure the efficacy of interventions. Dogs’ gaits are frequently assessed in a veterinary setting to detect signs of lameness. Despite this, a reliable, affordable and objective method to assess lameness in dogs is lacking. Most described canine lameness assessments are subjective, unvalidated and at high risk of bias. This means reliable, early detection of canine gait abnormalities is challenging, which may have detrimental implications for dogs’ welfare. In this paper, we draw from approaches and technologies used in human movement science and describe a system for objectively measuring temporal gait characteristics in dogs (step-time, swing-time, stance-time. Asymmetries and variabilities in these characteristics are of known clinical significance when assessing lameness but presently may only be assessed on coarse scales or under highly instrumented environments. The system consists an inertial measurement unit, containing a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope coupled with a standardized walking course. The measurement unit is attached to each leg of the dog under assessment before it is walked around the course. The data by the measurement unit is then processed to identify steps and subsequently, micro-gait characteristics. This method has been tested on a cohort of 19 healthy dogs of various breeds ranging in height from 34.2 cm to 84.9 cm. We report the system as capable of making precise step delineations with detections of initial and final contact times of foot-to-floor to a mean precision of 0.011 s and 0.048 s, respectively. Results are based on analysis of 12,678 foot falls and we report a sensitivity, positive predictive value and F-score of 0.81, 0.83 and 0.82 respectively. To investigate the effect of gait on system performance

  13. Gait variability: methods, modeling and meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausdorff Jeffrey M

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of gait variability, the stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking, offers a complementary way of quantifying locomotion and its changes with aging and disease as well as a means of monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions and rehabilitation. Previous work has suggested that measures of gait variability may be more closely related to falls, a serious consequence of many gait disorders, than are measures based on the mean values of other walking parameters. The Current JNER series presents nine reports on the results of recent investigations into gait variability. One novel method for collecting unconstrained, ambulatory data is reviewed, and a primer on analysis methods is presented along with a heuristic approach to summarizing variability measures. In addition, the first studies of gait variability in animal models of neurodegenerative disease are described, as is a mathematical model of human walking that characterizes certain complex (multifractal features of the motor control's pattern generator. Another investigation demonstrates that, whereas both healthy older controls and patients with a higher-level gait disorder walk more slowly in reduced lighting, only the latter's stride variability increases. Studies of the effects of dual tasks suggest that the regulation of the stride-to-stride fluctuations in stride width and stride time may be influenced by attention loading and may require cognitive input. Finally, a report of gait variability in over 500 subjects, probably the largest study of this kind, suggests how step width variability may relate to fall risk. Together, these studies provide new insights into the factors that regulate the stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking and pave the way for expanded research into the control of gait and the practical application of measures of gait variability in the clinical setting.

  14. Assessment of spatio-temporal gait parameters from trunk accelerations during human walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of an analysis of spatio-temporal gait parameters based upon accelerometry. To this purpose, acceleration patterns of the trunk and their relationships with spatio-temporal gait parameters were analysed in healthy subjects. Based on model predictions of the body's

  15. Assessment of spatio-temporal gait parameters from trunk accelerations during human walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Hof, AL

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of an analysis of spatio-temporal gait parameters based upon accelerometry. To this purpose, acceleration patterns of the trunk and their relationships with spatio-temporal gait parameters were analysed in healthy subjects. Based on model predictions of the body's

  16. Climbing favours the tripod gait over alternative faster insect gaits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdya, Pavan; Thandiackal, Robin; Cherney, Raphael; Asselborn, Thibault; Benton, Richard; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Floreano, Dario

    2017-02-01

    To escape danger or catch prey, running vertebrates rely on dynamic gaits with minimal ground contact. By contrast, most insects use a tripod gait that maintains at least three legs on the ground at any given time. One prevailing hypothesis for this difference in fast locomotor strategies is that tripod locomotion allows insects to rapidly navigate three-dimensional terrain. To test this, we computationally discovered fast locomotor gaits for a model based on Drosophila melanogaster. Indeed, the tripod gait emerges to the exclusion of many other possible gaits when optimizing fast upward climbing with leg adhesion. By contrast, novel two-legged bipod gaits are fastest on flat terrain without adhesion in the model and in a hexapod robot. Intriguingly, when adhesive leg structures in real Drosophila are covered, animals exhibit atypical bipod-like leg coordination. We propose that the requirement to climb vertical terrain may drive the prevalence of the tripod gait over faster alternative gaits with minimal ground contact.

  17. Design of a wearable perturbator for human knee impedance estimation during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Michael R; Moser, Adrian; Lambercy, Olivier; Sulzer, James; Gassert, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Mechanical impedance modulation is the key to natural, stable and efficient human locomotion. An improved understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of the next generation of intelligent prosthetic and orthotic devices. This paper documents the design methodologies that were employed to realize a knee perturbator that can experimentally estimate human knee impedance during gait through the application of angular velocity perturbations. The proposed experiment requires a light, transparent, wearable, and remotely actuated device that closely follows the movement of the biological joint. A genetic algorithm was used to design a polycentric hinge whose instantaneous center of rotation is optimized to be kinematically compatible with the human knee. A wafer disc clutch was designed to switch between a high transparency passive mode and a high impedance actuated mode. A remote actuation and transmission scheme was designed to enable high power output perturbations while minimizing the device's mass. Position and torque sensors were designed for device control and to provide data for post-processing and joint impedance estimation. Pending the fabrication and mechanical testing of the device, we expect this knee perturbator to be a valuable tool for experimental investigation of locomotive joint impedance modulation.

  18. Gait Variability and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Socie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait variability, that is, fluctuations in movement during walking, is an indicator of walking function and has been associated with various adverse outcomes such as falls. In this paper, current research concerning gait variability in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS is discussed. It is well established that persons with MS have greater gait variability compared to age and gender matched controls without MS. The reasons for the increase in gait variability are not completely understood. Evidence indicates that disability level, assistive device use, attentional requirement, and fatigue are related to gait variability in persons with MS. Future research should address the time-evolving structure (i.e., temporal characteristics of gait variability, the clinical importance of gait variability, and underlying mechanisms that drive gait variability in individuals with MS.

  19. A Mobile Kalman-Filter Based Solution for the Real-Time Estimation of Spatio-Temporal Gait Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Alberto; Ginis, Pieter; Hardegger, Michael; Casamassima, Filippo; Rocchi, Laura; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Gait impairments are among the most disabling symptoms in several musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, severely limiting personal autonomy. Wearable gait sensors have been attracting attention as diagnostic tool for gait and are emerging as promising tool for tutoring and guiding gait execution. If their popularity is continuously growing, still there is room for improvement, especially towards more accurate solutions for spatio-temporal gait parameters estimation. We present an imple...

  20. Functional assessment in older adults: should we use timed up and go or gait speed test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Alexandre

    2014-08-08

    In order to assess functional skills of older adults, both timed up and go (TUG) test and gait speed (GS) test are well validated concerning their predictive capacities. However, the question remains unclear which one of these tests represents better the whole physical performance of older adults. The aim of this study is to determine the more representative test, between TUG and GS, of the whole motor control quality. To study links between locomotion capacities and arm function, we measured, in a population of frail aged patients, the locomotion tests and the mean arm maximal velocity developed during a speed-accuracy trade-off. This arm movement consisted in reaching the hand toward a target in a virtual game scene. We plotted the different couples of variables obtained on graphs, and calculate Pearson correlation coefficients between each couple. The Pearson correlation between GS and hand maximal velocity was significant (r=0.495; p=0.046). Interestingly, we found a non significant Pearson correlation between timed up and go score (TUG) and hand maximal velocity (r=-0.139; p=0.243). Our results suggest that GS score is more representative of the whole motor ability of frail patients than the TUG. We propose that the relative complexity of the TUG motor sequence could be involved in this difference. For a few patients with motor automatisms deficiencies, this motor sequence complexity could leads to a dual task perturbation. In this way, we conclude that GS should be preferred over the TUG with older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toward understanding the limits of gait recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zongyi; Malave, Laura; Osuntogun, Adebola; Sudhakar, Preksha; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2004-08-01

    Most state of the art video-based gait recognition algorithms start from binary silhouettes. These silhouettes, defined as foreground regions, are usually detected by background subtraction methods, which results in holes or missed parts due to similarity of foreground and background color, and boundary errors due to video compression artifacts. Errors in low-level representation make it hard to understand the effect of certain conditions, such as surface and time, on gait recognition. In this paper, we present a part-level, manual silhouette database consisting of 71 subjects, over one gait cycle, with differences in surface, shoe-type, carrying condition, and time. We have a total of about 11,000 manual silhouette frames. The purpose of this manual silhouette database is twofold. First, this is a resource that we make available at http://www.GaitChallenge.org for use by the gait community to test and design better silhouette detection algorithms. These silhouettes can also be used to learn gait dynamics. Second, using the baseline gait recognition algorithm, which was specified along with the HumanID Gait Challenge problem, we show that performance from manual silhouettes is similar and only sometimes better than that from automated silhouettes detected by statistical background subtraction. Low performances when comparing sequences with differences in walking surfaces and time-variation are not fully explained by silhouette quality. We also study the recognition power in each body part and show that recognition based on just the legs is equal to that from the whole silhouette. There is also significant recognition power in the head and torso shape.

  2. Assessment of Foot Trajectory for Human Gait Phase Detection Using Wireless Ultrasonic Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new highly accurate gait phase detection system using wearable wireless ultrasonic sensors, which can be used in gait analysis or rehabilitation applications. The gait phase detection system uses the foot displacement information during walking to extract the following gait phases: heel-strike, heel-off, toe-off, and mid-swing. The displacement of foot-mounted ultrasonic sensor is obtained from several passive anchors placed at known locations by employing local spherical positioning technique, which is further enhanced by the combination of recursive Newton-Gauss method and Kalman Filter. The algorithm performance is examined by comparing with a commercial optical motion tracking system with ten healthy subjects and two foot injured subjects. Accurate estimates of gait cycle (with an error of -0.02 ±0.01 s), stance phase(with an error of 0.04±0.03 s), and swing phase (with an error of -0.05±0.03 s) compared to the reference system are obtained. We have also investigated the influence of walking velocities on the performance of the proposed gait phase detection algorithm. Statistical analysis shows that there is no significant difference between both systems during different walking speeds. Moreover, we have tested and discussed the possibility of the proposed system for clinical applications by analyzing the experimental results for both healthy and injured subjects. The experiments show that the estimated gait phases have the potential to become indicators for sports and rehabilitation engineering.

  3. Biomechanical organization of gait initiation depends on the timing of affective processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stins, J.F.; Van Gelder, M.A.; Oudenhoven, L.M.; Beek, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) from a quiet bipedal posture has been shown to be influenced by the emotional state of the actor. The literature suggests that the biomechanical organization of forward GI is facilitated when pleasant pictures are shown, as compared to unpleasant pictures. However, there are inc

  4. The influence of rifle carriage on the kinetics of human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrell, S A; Haslam, R A

    2008-06-01

    The influence that rifle carriage has on human gait has received little attention in the published literature. Rifle carriage has two main effects, to add load to the anterior of the body and to restrict natural arm swing patterns. Kinetic data were collected from 15 male participants, with 10 trials in each of four experimental conditions. The conditions were: walking without a load (used as a control condition); carrying a lightweight rifle simulator, which restricted arm movements but applied no additional load; wearing a 4.4 kg diving belt, which allowed arms to move freely; carrying a weighted (4.4 kg) replica SA80 rifle. Walking speed was fixed at 1.5 m/s (+/-5%) and data were sampled at 400 Hz. Results showed that rifle carriage significantly alters the ground reaction forces produced during walking, the most important effects being an increase in the impact peak and mediolateral forces. This study suggests that these effects are due to the increased range of motion of the body's centre of mass caused by the impeding of natural arm swing patterns. The subsequent effect on the potential development of injuries in rifle carriers is unknown.

  5. Use of an instrumented treadmill for real-time gait symmetry evaluation and feedback in normal and trans-tibial amputee subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwell, J B; Davis, B L; Frazier, D M

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate a newly developed system for assessing and providing feedback of gait symmetry information in real time to subjects walking on a motorised treadmill (the CCF Treadmill). The advantages of the system are that it allows the rapid collection and comparison of temporal and kinetic parameters of gait for multiple successive strides, at a constant known speed, without forcing subjects to target their footsteps. Gait asymmetries of six normal (mean age 42.7 years) and six unilateral transtibial amputee subjects (mean age 41.7, and average 6.0 years using a prosthesis) were quantified. The amputee group was the reevaluated after receiving five minutes of training with each of three different types of real-time visual feedback (RTVF). Asymmetries in the measured parameters before feedback were 4.6 times greater in the amputee population than in the normal group, and were consistent with the finding of previous authors. Significant decreases in gait asymmetry were demonstrated for all forms of feedback after amputees received feedback training. Results, however, indicated that gait asymmetries for different variables are not necessarily related, and that more work needs to be done to identify those variables for which attaining a more symmetrical gait pattern is most beneficial. Further work also needs to be done to determine the long term effects of such RTVF training. The CCF Treadmill and RTVF were shown to be potentially useful tools both for defining rehabilitation targets and for quantifying patients' progress towards those goals.

  6. Performance of an inverted pendulum model directly applied to normal human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, Frank L; Cooney, Kevin M; Walker, Matthew R; Rainbow, Michael J; Concha, M Cecilia; Sanders, James O

    2006-03-01

    In clinical gait analysis, we strive to understand contributions to body support and propulsion as this forms a basis for treatment selection, yet the relative importance of gravitational forces and joint powers can be controversial even for normal gait. We hypothesized that an inverted pendulum model, propelled only by gravity, would be inadequate to predict velocities and ground reaction forces during gait. Unlike previous ballistic and passive dynamic walking studies, we directly compared model predictions to gait data for 24 normal children. We defined an inverted pendulum from the average center-of-pressure to the instantaneous center-of-mass, and derived equations of motion during single support that allowed a telescoping action. Forward and inverse dynamics predicted pendulum velocities and ground reaction forces, and these were statistically and graphically compared to actual gait data for identical strides. Results of forward dynamics replicated those in the literature, with reasonable predictions for velocities and anterior ground reaction forces, but poor predictions for vertical ground reaction forces. Deviations from actual values were explained by joint powers calculated for these subjects. With a telescoping action during inverse dynamics, predicted vertical forces improved dramatically and gained a dual-peak pattern previously missing in the literature, yet expected for normal gait. These improvements vanished when telescoping terms were set to zero. Because this telescoping action is difficult to explain without muscle activity, we believe these results support the need for both gravitational forces and joint powers in normal gait. Our approach also begins to quantify the relative contributions of each.

  7. ANTICIPATORY POSTURAL CONTROL OF STABILITY DURING GAIT INITIATION OVER OBSTACLES OF DIFFERENT HEIGHT AND DISTANCE MADE UNDER REACTION-TIME AND SELF-INITIATED INSTRUCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Yiou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundant literature on obstacle crossing in humans, the question of how the central nervous system (CNS controls postural stability during gait initiation with the goal to clear an obstacle remains unclear. Stabilizing features of gait initiation include anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs and lateral swing foot placement. To answer the above question, fourteen participants initiated gait as fast as possible in three conditions of obstacle height, three conditions of obstacle distance, and one obstacle-free (control condition. Each of these conditions was performed with two levels of temporal pressure: reaction-time (high-pressure and self-initiated (low-pressure movements. A mechanical model of the body falling laterally under the influence of gravity and submitted to an elastic restoring force is proposed to assess the effect of initial (foot-off center-of-mass position and velocity (or initial center-of-mass set on stability at foot-contact. Results showed that the anticipatory peak of mediolateral center-of-pressure shif, the initial mediolateral center-of-mass velocity and the duration of the swing phase of gait initiation increased with obstacle height, but not with obstacle distance. These results suggest that mediolateral APAs are scaled with swing duration in order to maintain an equivalent stability across experimental conditions. This statement is strengthened by the results obtained with the mechanical model, which showed how stability would be degraded if there was no adaptation of the initial center-of-mass set to swing duration. The anteroposterior component of APAs varied also according to obstacle height and distance, but in an opposite way to the mediolateral component. Indeed, results showed that the anticipatory peak of backward center-of-pressure shift and the initial forward center-of-mass set decreased with obstacle height, probably in order to limit the risk to trip over the obstacle, while the forward

  8. Anticipatory Postural Control of Stability during Gait Initiation Over Obstacles of Different Height and Distance Made Under Reaction-Time and Self-Initiated Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiou, Eric; Artico, Romain; Teyssedre, Claudine A.; Labaune, Ombeline; Fourcade, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the abundant literature on obstacle crossing in humans, the question of how the central nervous system (CNS) controls postural stability during gait initiation with the goal to clear an obstacle remains unclear. Stabilizing features of gait initiation include anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and lateral swing foot placement. To answer the above question, 14 participants initiated gait as fast as possible in three conditions of obstacle height, three conditions of obstacle distance and one obstacle-free (control) condition. Each of these conditions was performed with two levels of temporal pressure: reaction-time (high-pressure) and self-initiated (low-pressure) movements. A mechanical model of the body falling laterally under the influence of gravity and submitted to an elastic restoring force is proposed to assess the effect of initial (foot-off) center-of-mass position and velocity (or “initial center-of-mass set”) on the stability at foot-contact. Results showed that the anticipatory peak of mediolateral (ML) center-of-pressure shift, the initial ML center-of-mass velocity and the duration of the swing phase, of gait initiation increased with obstacle height, but not with obstacle distance. These results suggest that ML APAs are scaled with swing duration in order to maintain an equivalent stability across experimental conditions. This statement is strengthened by the results obtained with the mechanical model, which showed how stability would be degraded if there was no adaptation of the initial center-of-mass set to swing duration. The anteroposterior (AP) component of APAs varied also according to obstacle height and distance, but in an opposite way to the ML component. Indeed, results showed that the anticipatory peak of backward center-of-pressure shift and the initial forward center-of-mass set decreased with obstacle height, probably in order to limit the risk to trip over the obstacle, while the forward center-of-mass velocity at foot

  9. Kinect as a tool for gait analysis: validation of a real-time joint extraction algorithm working in side view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cippitelli, Enea; Gasparrini, Samuele; Spinsante, Susanna; Gambi, Ennio

    2015-01-14

    The Microsoft Kinect sensor has gained attention as a tool for gait analysis for several years. Despite the many advantages the sensor provides, however, the lack of a native capability to extract joints from the side view of a human body still limits the adoption of the device to a number of relevant applications. This paper presents an algorithm to locate and estimate the trajectories of up to six joints extracted from the side depth view of a human body captured by the Kinect device. The algorithm is then applied to extract data that can be exploited to provide an objective score for the "Get Up and Go Test", which is typically adopted for gait analysis in rehabilitation fields. Starting from the depth-data stream provided by the Microsoft Kinect sensor, the proposed algorithm relies on anthropometric models only, to locate and identify the positions of the joints. Differently from machine learning approaches, this solution avoids complex computations, which usually require significant resources. The reliability of the information about the joint position output by the algorithm is evaluated by comparison to a marker-based system. Tests show that the trajectories extracted by the proposed algorithm adhere to the reference curves better than the ones obtained from the skeleton generated by the native applications provided within the Microsoft Kinect (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond,WA, USA, 2013) and OpenNI (OpenNI organization, Tel Aviv, Israel, 2013) Software Development Kits.

  10. Kinect as a Tool for Gait Analysis: Validation of a Real-Time Joint Extraction Algorithm Working in Side View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Cippitelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Microsoft Kinect sensor has gained attention as a tool for gait analysis for several years. Despite the many advantages the sensor provides, however, the lack of a native capability to extract joints from the side view of a human body still limits the adoption of the device to a number of relevant applications. This paper presents an algorithm to locate and estimate the trajectories of up to six joints extracted from the side depth view of a human body captured by the Kinect device. The algorithm is then applied to extract data that can be exploited to provide an objective score for the “Get Up and Go Test”, which is typically adopted for gait analysis in rehabilitation fields. Starting from the depth-data stream provided by the Microsoft Kinect sensor, the proposed algorithm relies on anthropometric models only, to locate and identify the positions of the joints. Differently from machine learning approaches, this solution avoids complex computations, which usually require significant resources. The reliability of the information about the joint position output by the algorithm is evaluated by comparison to a marker-based system. Tests show that the trajectories extracted by the proposed algorithm adhere to the reference curves better than the ones obtained from the skeleton generated by the native applications provided within the Microsoft Kinect (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond,WA, USA, 2013 and OpenNI (OpenNI organization, Tel Aviv, Israel, 2013 Software Development Kits.

  11. Comparison of trunk activity during gait initiation and walking in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Charles Ceccato

    Full Text Available To understand the role of trunk muscles in maintenance of dynamic postural equilibrium we investigate trunk movements during gait initiation and walking, performing trunk kinematics analysis, Erector spinae muscle (ES recordings and dynamic analysis. ES muscle expressed a metachronal descending pattern of activity during walking and gait initiation. In the frontal and horizontal planes, lateroflexion and rotation occur before in the upper trunk and after in the lower trunk. Comparison of ES muscle EMGs and trunk kinematics showed that trunk muscle activity precedes corresponding kinematics activity, indicating that the ES drive trunk movement during locomotion and thereby allowing a better pelvis mobilization. EMG data showed that ES activity anticipates propulsive phases in walking with a repetitive pattern, suggesting a programmed control by a central pattern generator. Our findings also suggest that the programs for gait initiation and walking overlap with the latter beginning before the first has ended.

  12. Comparison of Trunk Activity during Gait Initiation and Walking in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Christine; Cazalets, Jean-René

    2009-01-01

    To understand the role of trunk muscles in maintenance of dynamic postural equilibrium we investigate trunk movements during gait initiation and walking, performing trunk kinematics analysis, Erector spinae muscle (ES) recordings and dynamic analysis. ES muscle expressed a metachronal descending pattern of activity during walking and gait initiation. In the frontal and horizontal planes, lateroflexion and rotation occur before in the upper trunk and after in the lower trunk. Comparison of ES muscle EMGs and trunk kinematics showed that trunk muscle activity precedes corresponding kinematics activity, indicating that the ES drive trunk movement during locomotion and thereby allowing a better pelvis mobilization. EMG data showed that ES activity anticipates propulsive phases in walking with a repetitive pattern, suggesting a programmed control by a central pattern generator. Our findings also suggest that the programs for gait initiation and walking overlap with the latter beginning before the first has ended. PMID:19997606

  13. Probing human response times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders

    2004-07-01

    In a recent preprint (Dialog in e-mail traffic, preprint cond-mat/0304433), the temporal dynamics of an e-mail network has been investigated by Eckmann, Moses and Sergi. Specifically, the time period between an e-mail message and its reply were recorded. It will be shown here that their data agrees quantitatively with the frame work proposed to explain a recent experiment on the response of “internauts” to a news publication (Physica A 296(3-4) (2001) 539) despite differences in communication channels, topics, time-scale and socio-economic characteristics of the two population. This suggest a generalized response time distribution ∼ t-1 for human populations in the absence of deadlines with important implications for psychological and social studies as well the study of dynamical networks.

  14. Very low cost stand-off suicide bomber detection system using human gait analysis to screen potential bomb carrying individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greneker, Gene, III

    2005-05-01

    Individuals who carry bombs on their bodies and detonate those bombs in public places are a security problem. There is belief that suicide bombings currently used in the mid-east may spread to the United States if the organized terrorist groups operating in the United States are not identified and the cell members arrested. While bombs in vehicles are the primary method currently used to spread terror in Iraq, U. S. warfighters are starting to face suicide bombers. This may become more of the situation if a stand-off detection capability is developed for the vehicle bomb case. This paper presents a concept, that if developed and commercialized, could provide an inexpensive suicide bomber screening system that could be used to screen individuals approaching a checkpoint while the individual is still 500 to 1,000 feet from the checkpoint. The proposed system measures both the radar cross-section of the individual and the radar derived gait characteristics that are associated with individuals carrying a bomb on their body. GTRI researchers propose to use human gait characteristics, as detected by radar, to determine if a human subject who is carrying no visible load on the body is actually carrying a concealed load under their clothes. The use of radar gait as a metric for the detection (as opposed to a video system) of a suicide bomber is being proposed because detection of gait characteristics are thought to be less sensitive to where the bomb is located on the body, lighting conditions, and the fact that the legs may be shrouded in a robe. The detection of a bomb using radar gait analysis may also prove to be less sensitive to changing tactics regarding where the bomb is placed on the body. An inert suicide bomb vest was constructed using water pipes to simulate the explosive devices. Wiring was added to simulated detonators. The vest weighs approximately 35 pounds. Radar data was taken on the volunteer subject wearing the vest that simulated the suicide bomb. This

  15. Measurement and Analysis of Gait by Using a Time-Of Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, C.; Turkmen, F.; Ucar, A.; Akgul, Y. A.

    2016-06-01

    Biomedical applications generally needs measurement the human body parts in motion. On the other hand, the analysis of the human motion includes mobile measurements. The mobile measurement is complicated task because it needs two or more sensor combination, specific measurement techniques and huge computation. Thus, it is actual research topic in photogrammetry and computer sciences community. Time-of-flight (ToF) camera can make measurement the moving object. It can be used for robotic and simultaneous localization and mapping applications. Human motion capture is recent application area for ToF camera. In this study analysis of the body motion were made with time-of-flight camera. We made measurement to runner on treadmill. The motion was analysed with computing the angle between body parts.

  16. Gait Retraining With Real-Time Biofeedback to Reduce Knee Adduction Moment: Systematic Review of Effects and Methods Used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosie; van den Noort, Josien C; Dekker, Joost; Harlaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    To review the current literature regarding methods and effects of real-time biofeedback used as a method for gait retraining to reduce knee adduction moment (KAM), with intended application for patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials with the keywords gait, feedback, and knee osteoarthritis from inception to May 2015. Titles and abstracts were screened by 1 individual for studies aiming to reduce KAM. Full-text articles were assessed by 2 individuals against predefined criteria. Data were extracted by 1 individual according to a predefined list, including participant demographics and training methods and effects. Electronic searches resulted in 190 potentially eligible studies, from which 12 met all inclusion criteria. Within-group standardized mean differences (SMDs) for reduction of KAM in healthy controls ranged from .44 to 2.47 and from .29 to .37 in patients with KOA. In patients with KOA, improvements were reported in pain and function, with SMDs ranging from .55 to 1.16. Methods of implementation of biofeedback training varied between studies, but in healthy controls increased KAM reduction was noted with implicit, rather than explicit, instructions. This review suggests that biofeedback gait training is effective primarily for reducing KAM but also for reducing pain and improving function in patients with KOA. The review was limited by the small number of studies featuring patients with KOA and the lack of controlled studies. The results suggest there is value and a need in further researching biofeedback training for reducing KAM. Future studies should include larger cohorts of patients, long-term follow-up, and controlled trials. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation of temporal gait parameters using Bayesian models on acceleration signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Nava, I H; Muñoz-Meléndez, A; Pérez Sanpablo, A I; Alessi Montero, A; Quiñones Urióstegui, I; Núñez Carrera, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system capable of performing calculation of temporal gait parameters using two low-cost wireless accelerometers and artificial intelligence-based techniques as part of a larger research project for conducting human gait analysis. Ten healthy subjects of different ages participated in this study and performed controlled walking tests. Two wireless accelerometers were placed on their ankles. Raw acceleration signals were processed in order to obtain gait patterns from characteristic peaks related to steps. A Bayesian model was implemented to classify the characteristic peaks into steps or nonsteps. The acceleration signals were segmented based on gait events, such as heel strike and toe-off, of actual steps. Temporal gait parameters, such as cadence, ambulation time, step time, gait cycle time, stance and swing phase time, simple and double support time, were estimated from segmented acceleration signals. Gait data-sets were divided into two groups of ages to test Bayesian models in order to classify the characteristic peaks. The mean error obtained from calculating the temporal gait parameters was 4.6%. Bayesian models are useful techniques that can be applied to classification of gait data of subjects at different ages with promising results.

  18. Clinical usefulness of augmented reality using infrared camera based real-time feedback on gait function in cerebral palsy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of real-time feedback using infrared camera recognition technology-based augmented reality in gait training for children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects] Two subjects with cerebral palsy were recruited. [Methods] In this study, augmented reality based real-time feedback training was conducted for the subjects in two 30-minute sessions per week for four weeks. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were used to measure the effect of augmented reality-based real-time feedback training. [Results] Velocity, cadence, bilateral step and stride length, and functional ambulation improved after the intervention in both cases. [Conclusion] Although additional follow-up studies of the augmented reality based real-time feedback training are required, the results of this study demonstrate that it improved the gait ability of two children with cerebral palsy. These findings suggest a variety of applications of conservative therapeutic methods which require future clinical trials. PMID:27190489

  19. Clinical usefulness of augmented reality using infrared camera based real-time feedback on gait function in cerebral palsy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of real-time feedback using infrared camera recognition technology-based augmented reality in gait training for children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects] Two subjects with cerebral palsy were recruited. [Methods] In this study, augmented reality based real-time feedback training was conducted for the subjects in two 30-minute sessions per week for four weeks. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were used to measure the effect of augmented reality-based real-time feedback training. [Results] Velocity, cadence, bilateral step and stride length, and functional ambulation improved after the intervention in both cases. [Conclusion] Although additional follow-up studies of the augmented reality based real-time feedback training are required, the results of this study demonstrate that it improved the gait ability of two children with cerebral palsy. These findings suggest a variety of applications of conservative therapeutic methods which require future clinical trials.

  20. Can real-time visual feedback during gait retraining reduce metabolic demand for individuals with transtibial amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Choi, Harmony S; Darter, Benjamin J; Wilken, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic demand of walking generally increases following lower extremity amputation. This study used real-time visual feedback to modify biomechanical factors linked to an elevated metabolic demand of walking in individuals with transtibial amputation. Eight persons with unilateral, traumatic transtibial amputation and 8 uninjured controls participated. Two separate bouts of real-time visual feedback were provided during a single session of gait retraining to reduce 1) center of mass sway and 2) thigh muscle activation magnitudes and duration. Baseline and post-intervention data were collected. Metabolic rate, heart rate, frontal plane center of mass sway, quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activity, and co-contraction indices were evaluated during steady state walking at a standardized speed. Visual feedback successfully decreased center of mass sway 12% (p = 0.006) and quadriceps activity 12% (p = 0.041); however, thigh muscle co-contraction indices were unchanged. Neither condition significantly affected metabolic rate during walking and heart rate increased with center-of-mass feedback. Metabolic rate, center of mass sway, and integrated quadriceps muscle activity were all not significantly different from controls. Attempts to modify gait to decrease metabolic demand may actually adversely increase the physiological effort of walking in individuals with lower extremity amputation who are young, active and approximate metabolic rates of able-bodied adults.

  1. Estimation of Human Hip and Knee Multi-Joint Dynamics Using the LOPES Gait Trainer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present and evaluate a novel method to estimate multi-joint leg impedance, using a robotic gait training device. The method is based on multi-input–multi-output system identification techniques and is designed for continuous torque perturbations at the hip and knee joint

  2. Invariant Classification of Gait Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method of classifying human gait in an invariant manner based on silhouette comparison. A database of artificially generated silhouettes is created representing the three main types of gait, i.e. walking, jogging, and running. Silhouettes generated from different camera angles...

  3. Estimating the Mechanical Behavior of the Knee Joint During Crouch Gait: Implications for Real-Time Motor Control of Robotic Knee Orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Zachary F; Damiano, Diane L; Bulea, Thomas C

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy frequently exhibit crouch gait, a pathological walking pattern characterized by excessive knee flexion. Knowledge of the knee joint moment during crouch gait is necessary for the design and control of assistive devices used for treatment. Our goal was to 1) develop statistical models to estimate knee joint moment extrema and dynamic stiffness during crouch gait, and 2) use the models to estimate the instantaneous joint moment during weight-acceptance. We retrospectively computed knee moments from 10 children with crouch gait and used stepwise linear regression to develop statistical models describing the knee moment features. The models explained at least 90% of the response value variability: peak moment in early (99%) and late (90%) stance, and dynamic stiffness of weight-acceptance flexion (94%) and extension (98%). We estimated knee extensor moment profiles from the predicted dynamic stiffness and instantaneous knee angle. This approach captured the timing and shape of the computed moment (root-mean-squared error: 2.64 Nm); including the predicted early-stance peak moment as a correction factor improved model performance (root-mean-squared error: 1.37 Nm). Our strategy provides a practical, accurate method to estimate the knee moment during crouch gait, and could be used for real-time, adaptive control of robotic orthoses.

  4. 基于视频图像边缘检测的人体下肢运动步态*☆%Normal human gaits based on image edge detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟青云; 谈士力; 喻洪流; 沈力行

    2013-01-01

      结果与结论:基于视频图像边缘检测人体下肢的运动步态,成本相对低廉,数据误差较小,精度与进口设备较接近。应用该测量结果初步构建了人体步态行走数据库,为建立步态评定标准、异常步态判别以及进一步的康复治疗提供了依据。%BACKGROUND: The parameters of kinematics and dynamics are usual y used to describe the law of gaits. Up to now, in the fields of sports medicine, rehabilitation engineering and bionics, gait analysis can provide important basis for ascertaining the scenario of diagnosis disease, the scenario of treatment and recovery. OBJECTIVE: To acquire the lower extremity motion gaits video on the treadmil by the image measuring device system based on the human motion in order to analyze the regular pattern of human gaits. METHODS: The identification points were set on the right and left hip joints, knee joints and foot plate by the image-gathering system in order to acquire the lower extremity motion gait while the subject walked on a treadmil . After processing and analyzing the data based on the theory of image edge detection, angle between the right and left thighs and vertical direction, angle between leg and vertical direction, angle between foot plate and vertical direction and the changes of the angles of identification points of knee joints and ankle joints were obtained. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The human lower extremity motion gait obtained according to the theory of image edge detection has relatively low cost and smal error, and the accuracy was similar to the imported equipment. Final y, a database of human gait was built based on the measurement results, and it provided a basis for the further establishment of assessing standard for human gait, better analysis of abnormal gait and rehabilitation treatments.

  5. An EMG-to-force processing approach for determining ankle muscle forces during normal human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogey, R A; Perry, J; Gitter, A J

    2005-09-01

    Muscle forces move our limbs. These forces must be estimated with indirect techniques, as direct measurements are neither generally possible nor practical. An electromyography (EMG)-to-force processing technique was developed. Ankle joint moments and, by extension, ankle muscle forces were calculated. The ankle moment obtained by inverse dynamics was calculated for ten normal adults during free speed gait. There was close correlation between inverse dynamics ankle moments and moments determined by the EMG-to-force processing approach. Muscle forces were determined. The gait peak Achilles tendon force occurred in late single limb support. Peak force observed (2.9 kN) closely matched values obtained where force transducers were used to obtain in vivo muscle forces (2.6 kN). The EMG-to-force processing model presented here appears to be a practical means to determine in vivo muscle forces.

  6. Is walking a random walk? Evidence for long-range correlations in stride interval of human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Peng, C.-K.; Ladin, Zvi; Wei, Jeanne Y.; Goldberger, Ary L.

    1995-01-01

    Complex fluctuation of unknown origin appear in the normal gait pattern. These fluctuations might be described as being (1) uncorrelated white noise, (2) short-range correlations, or (3) long-range correlations with power-law scaling. To test these possibilities, the stride interval of 10 healthy young men was measured as they walked for 9 min at their usual rate. From these time series we calculated scaling indexes by using a modified random walk analysis and power spectral analysis. Both indexes indicated the presence of long-range self-similar correlations extending over hundreds of steps; the stride interval at any time depended on the stride interval at remote previous times, and this dependence decayed in a scale-free (fractallike) power-law fashion. These scaling indexes were significantly different from those obtained after random shuffling of the original time series, indicating the importance of the sequential ordering of the stride interval. We demonstrate that conventional models of gait generation fail to reproduce the observed scaling behavior and introduce a new type of central pattern generator model that sucessfully accounts for the experimentally observed long-range correlations.

  7. Associations between physical performance and executive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: gait speed and the timed "up & go" test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Ellen L; Kelly, Valerie E; Logsdon, Rebecca G; McCurry, Susan M; Cochrane, Barbara B; Engel, Joyce M; Teri, Linda

    2011-08-01

    Older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are at higher risk for developing Alzheimer disease. Physical performance decline on gait and mobility tasks in conjunction with executive dysfunction has implications for accelerated functional decline, disability, and institutionalization in sedentary older adults with aMCI. The purpose of this study was to examine whether performance on 2 tests commonly used by physical therapists (usual gait speed and Timed "Up & Go" Test [TUG]) are associated with performance on 2 neuropsychological tests of executive function (Trail Making Test, part B [TMT-B], and Stroop-Interference, calculated from the Stroop Word Color Test) in sedentary older adults with aMCI. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 201 sedentary older adults with memory impairment participating in a longitudinal intervention study of cognitive function, aging, exercise, and health promotion. Physical performance speed on gait and mobility tasks was measured via usual gait speed and the TUG (at fast pace). Executive function was measured with the TMT-B and Stroop-Interference measures. Applying multiple linear regression, usual gait speed was associated with executive function on both the TMT-B (β=-0.215, P=.003) and Stroop-Interference (β=-0.195, P=.01) measures, indicating that slower usual gait speed was associated with lower executive function performance. Timed "Up & Go" Test scores (in logarithmic transformation) also were associated with executive function on both the TMT-B (β=0.256, Ptime on the TUG was associated with lower executive function performance. All associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, sex, depressive symptoms, medical comorbidity, and body mass index. The cross-sectional nature of this study does not allow for inferences of causation. Physical performance speed was associated with executive function after adjusting for age, sex, and age-related factors in sedentary older adults with

  8. Gait velocity and the Timed-Up-and-Go test were sensitive to changes in mobility in frail elderly patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, M.B. van; Munneke, M.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Benraad, C.E.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate clinically relevant changes in functional mobility tests and quantitative gait measures at group and individual level in frail elderly patients. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: This study was a cohort study of consecutively admitted frail elderly patients. Gait velocity,

  9. Gait Dynamics Sensing Using IMU Sensor Array System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomir Kardos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a progressive approach in gait sensing. It is incorporated by IMU (Inertia Measurement Unit complex sensors whose field of acting is mainly the motion sensing in medicine, automotive and other industry, self-balancing systems, etc. They allow acquiring the position and orientation of an object in 3D space. Using several IMU units the sensing array for gait dynamics was made. Based on human gait analysis the 7-sensor array was designed to build a gait motion dynamics sensing system with the possibility of graphical interpretation of data from the sensing modules in real-time graphical application interface under the LabVIEW platform. The results of analyses can serve as the information for medical diagnostic purposes. The main control part of the system is microcontroller, whose function is to control the data collection and flow, provide the communication and power management.

  10. Human olfactory mesenchymal stromal cell transplants promote remyelination and earlier improvement in gait co‐ordination after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Susan L.; Toft, Andrew; Griffin, Jacob; M. M. Emraja, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Autologous cell transplantation is a promising strategy for repair of the injured spinal cord. Here we have studied the repair potential of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from the human olfactory mucosa after transplantation into a rodent model of incomplete spinal cord injury. Investigation of peripheral type remyelination at the injury site using immunocytochemistry for P0, showed a more extensive distribution in transplanted compared with control animals. In addition to the typical distribution in the dorsal columns (common to all animals), in transplanted animals only, P0 immunolabelling was consistently detected in white matter lateral and ventral to the injury site. Transplanted animals also showed reduced cavitation. Several functional outcome measures including end‐point electrophysiological testing of dorsal column conduction and weekly behavioural testing of BBB, weight bearing and pain, showed no difference between transplanted and control animals. However, gait analysis revealed an earlier recovery of co‐ordination between forelimb and hindlimb stepping in transplanted animals. This improvement in gait may be associated with the enhanced myelination in ventral and lateral white matter, where fibre tracts important for locomotion reside. Autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells from the olfactory mucosa may therefore be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of spinal cord injury. GLIA 2017 GLIA 2017;65:639–656 PMID:28144983

  11. Are the Timed Up and Go Test and Functional Reach Test Useful Predictors of Temporal and Spatial Gait Parameters in Elderly People?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadowska Dorota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The study aim was to analyse the relationships between the results of the Timed Up and Go (TUG test and the Functional Reach Test (FRT, and the temporal and spatial gait parameters determined with the GAITRite system.

  12. Using a body-fixed sensor to identify subclinical gait difficulties in older adults with IADL disability: maximizing the output of the timed up and go.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aner Weiss

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The identification and documentation of subclinical gait impairments in older adults may facilitate the appropriate use of interventions for preventing or delaying mobility disability. We tested whether measures derived from a single body-fixed sensor worn during traditional Timed Up and Go (TUG testing could identify subclinical gait impairments in community dwelling older adults without mobility disability. METHODS: We used data from 432 older adults without dementia (mean age 83.30 ± 7.04 yrs, 76.62% female participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. The traditional TUG was conducted while subjects wore a body-fixed sensor. We derived measures of overall TUG performance and different subtasks including transitions (sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, walking, and turning. Multivariate analysis was used to compare persons with and without mobility disability and to compare individuals with and without Instrumental Activities of Daily Living disability (IADL-disability, all of whom did not have mobility disability. RESULTS: As expected, individuals with mobility disability performed worse on all TUG subtasks (p<0.03, compared to those who had no mobility disability. Individuals without mobility disability but with IADL disability had difficulties with turns, had lower yaw amplitude (p<0.004 during turns, were slower (p<0.001, and had less consistent gait (p<0.02. CONCLUSIONS: A single body-worn sensor can be employed in the community-setting to complement conventional gait testing. It provides a wide range of quantitative gait measures that appear to help to identify subclinical gait impairments in older adults.

  13. Using a Body-Fixed Sensor to Identify Subclinical Gait Difficulties in Older Adults with IADL Disability: Maximizing the Output of the Timed Up and Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Aner; Mirelman, Anat; Buchman, Aron S.; Bennett, David A.; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The identification and documentation of subclinical gait impairments in older adults may facilitate the appropriate use of interventions for preventing or delaying mobility disability. We tested whether measures derived from a single body-fixed sensor worn during traditional Timed Up and Go (TUG) testing could identify subclinical gait impairments in community dwelling older adults without mobility disability. Methods We used data from 432 older adults without dementia (mean age 83.30±7.04 yrs, 76.62% female) participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. The traditional TUG was conducted while subjects wore a body-fixed sensor. We derived measures of overall TUG performance and different subtasks including transitions (sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit), walking, and turning. Multivariate analysis was used to compare persons with and without mobility disability and to compare individuals with and without Instrumental Activities of Daily Living disability (IADL-disability), all of whom did not have mobility disability. Results As expected, individuals with mobility disability performed worse on all TUG subtasks (p<0.03), compared to those who had no mobility disability. Individuals without mobility disability but with IADL disability had difficulties with turns, had lower yaw amplitude (p<0.004) during turns, were slower (p<0.001), and had less consistent gait (p<0.02). Conclusions A single body-worn sensor can be employed in the community-setting to complement conventional gait testing. It provides a wide range of quantitative gait measures that appear to help to identify subclinical gait impairments in older adults. PMID:23922665

  14. Kalman smoothing improves the estimation of joint kinematics and kinetics in marker-based human gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, F; De Laet, T; Jonkers, I; De Schutter, J

    2008-12-05

    We developed a Kalman smoothing algorithm to improve estimates of joint kinematics from measured marker trajectories during motion analysis. Kalman smoothing estimates are based on complete marker trajectories. This is an improvement over other techniques, such as the global optimisation method (GOM), Kalman filtering, and local marker estimation (LME), where the estimate at each time instant is only based on part of the marker trajectories. We applied GOM, Kalman filtering, LME, and Kalman smoothing to marker trajectories from both simulated and experimental gait motion, to estimate the joint kinematics of a ten segment biomechanical model, with 21 degrees of freedom. Three simulated marker trajectories were studied: without errors, with instrumental errors, and with soft tissue artefacts (STA). Two modelling errors were studied: increased thigh length and hip centre dislocation. We calculated estimation errors from the known joint kinematics in the simulation study. Compared with other techniques, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint positions, by more than 50% for the simulated marker trajectories without errors and with instrumental errors. Compared with GOM, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint moments by more than 35%. Compared with Kalman filtering and LME, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint accelerations by at least 50%. Our simulation results show that the use of Kalman smoothing substantially improves the estimates of joint kinematics and kinetics compared with previously proposed techniques (GOM, Kalman filtering, and LME) for both simulated, with and without modelling errors, and experimentally measured gait motion.

  15. Human-Robot Interfaces in Exoskeletons for Gait Training after Stroke: State of the Art and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Lagoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic rehabilitation of CVA (stroke survivors is an emerging field. However, the development of effective gait rehabilitation robots used to treat stroke survivors is and remains a challenging task. This article discusses existing approaches and gives an overview of limitations with existing wearable robots. Challenges and potential solutions are being discussed in this article. Most difficulties lie in the implementation of physical and cognitive human robot interfaces. Many issues like actuation principles, control strategies, portability and wearing comfort, such as correct determination of user intention and effective guidance have to be tackled in future designs. Different solutions are being proposed. Clever anthropometric design and smart brain computer interfaces are key factors in effective exoskeleton design.

  16. Quantified self and human movement: a review on the clinical impact of wearable sensing and feedback for gait analysis and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Pete B; Jirattigalachote, Wisit; Hunt, Michael A; Cutkosky, Mark R; Delp, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of miniaturized electronics has fueled a shift toward wearable sensors and feedback devices for the mass population. Quantified self and other similar movements involving wearable systems have gained recent interest. However, it is unclear what the clinical impact of these enabling technologies is on human gait. The purpose of this review is to assess clinical applications of wearable sensing and feedback for human gait and to identify areas of future research. Four electronic databases were searched to find articles employing wearable sensing or feedback for movements of the foot, ankle, shank, thigh, hip, pelvis, and trunk during gait. We retrieved 76 articles that met the inclusion criteria and identified four common clinical applications: (1) identifying movement disorders, (2) assessing surgical outcomes, (3) improving walking stability, and (4) reducing joint loading. Characteristics of knee and trunk motion were the most frequent gait parameters for both wearable sensing and wearable feedback. Most articles performed testing on healthy subjects, and the most prevalent patient populations were osteoarthritis, vestibular loss, Parkinson's disease, and post-stroke hemiplegia. The most widely used wearable sensors were inertial measurement units (accelerometer and gyroscope packaged together) and goniometers. Haptic (touch) and auditory were the most common feedback sensations. This review highlights the current state of the literature and demonstrates substantial potential clinical benefits of wearable sensing and feedback. Future research should focus on wearable sensing and feedback in patient populations, in natural human environments outside the laboratory such as at home or work, and on continuous, long-term monitoring and intervention.

  17. Microprocessor-based gait analysis system to retrain Trendelenburg gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, J S

    2001-01-01

    A microprocessor-based gait analysis system is described that uses two electromyogram (EMG) amplifiers, two foot switches and an audio feedback device to allow the retraining of one type of improper gait, where the hip abductors (gluteus medius muscles) are weak on one side of the body, causing the opposite hip to drop during the swing phase of gait (Trendelenburg gait). As the abnormality is strictly on one side of the body in most people, the circuitry is minimised, as gait can be analysed by only comparing muscle activity in the affected gluteus medius muscle with that in the unaffected gluteus medius muscle, through the EMG. Two foot contact switches are used to help assess timing of the step cycle. If gait is different on the two sides of the body, an audio cue directs the patient to correct the abnormality by increasing activity on the affected side. The device is tested on five patients. Trendelenburg gait is reduced by an average of 29 degrees through the use of the device. The average stride length at the beginning of the study is 0.32 +/- 0.3 m. By the end of the study, the stride length is increased to 0.45 +/- 0.2 m for the entire group of five subjects. The speed of gait has increased from 1.6 +/- 0.4 kmh(-1) to 3.1 +/- 0.5km h(-1).

  18. Assessment of transmission in specific descending pathways in relation to gait and balance following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lundell, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Human bipedal gait requires supraspinal control and gait is consequently severely impaired in most persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Little is known of the contribution of lesion of specific descending pathways to the clinical manifestations of gait deficits. Here, we assessed transmission...... in descending pathways using imaging and electrophysiological techniques and correlated them with clinical measures of impaired gait in persons with SCI. Twenty-five persons with SCI participated in the study. Functional assessment of gait included the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI), the Timed......-Up and Go (TUG), the 6-Min Walking Test (6MWT), and the maximal treadmill gait speed. Balance was evaluated clinically by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). The amplitude of tibialis anterior (TA) motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at rest elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation as a measure of corticospinal...

  19. A real-time system for biomechanical analysis of human movement and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Antonie J; Geijtenbeek, Thomas; Even-Zohar, Oshri; Steenbrink, Frans; Hardin, Elizabeth C

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical analysis of movement plays an important role in clinical management of neurological and orthopedic conditions. There has been increasing interest in performing movement analysis in real-time, to provide immediate feedback to both therapist and patient. However, such work to date has been limited to single-joint kinematics and kinetics. Here we present a software system, named human body model (HBM), to compute joint kinematics and kinetics for a full body model with 44 degrees of freedom, in real-time, and to estimate length changes and forces in 300 muscle elements. HBM was used to analyze lower extremity function during gait in 12 able-bodied subjects. Processing speed exceeded 120 samples per second on standard PC hardware. Joint angles and moments were consistent within the group, and consistent with other studies in the literature. Estimated muscle force patterns were consistent among subjects and agreed qualitatively with electromyography, to the extent that can be expected from a biomechanical model. The real-time analysis was integrated into the D-Flow system for development of custom real-time feedback applications and into the gait real-time analysis interactive lab system for gait analysis and gait retraining.

  20. Stability in skipping gaits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrada, Emanuel; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    As an alternative to walking and running, humans are able to skip. However, adult humans avoid it. This fact seems to be related to the higher energetic costs associated with skipping. Still, children, some birds, lemurs and lizards use skipping gaits during daily locomotion. We combined experimental data on humans with numerical simulations to test whether stability and robustness motivate this choice. Parameters for modelling were obtained from 10 male subjects. They locomoted using unilateral skipping along a 12 m runway. We used a bipedal spring loaded inverted pendulum to model and to describe the dynamics of skipping. The subjects displayed higher peak ground reaction forces and leg stiffness in the first landing leg (trailing leg) compared to the second landing leg (leading leg). In numerical simulations, we found that skipping is stable across an amazing speed range from skipping on the spot to fast running speeds. Higher leg stiffness in the trailing leg permits longer strides at same system energy. However, this strategy is at the same time less robust to sudden drop perturbations than skipping with a stiffer leading leg. A slightly higher stiffness in the leading leg is most robust, but might be costlier.

  1. Daily changes of individual gait patterns identified by means of support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, F; Kramer, F; Schäfer, B; Eekhoff, A; Hegen, P; Nigg, B M; Schöllhorn, W I

    2016-09-01

    Despite the common knowledge about the individual character of human gait patterns and about their non-repeatability, little is known about their stability, their interactions and their changes over time. Variations of gait patterns are typically described as random deviations around a stable mean curve derived from groups, which appear due to noise or experimental insufficiencies. The purpose of this study is to examine the nature of intrinsic inter-session variability in more detail by proving separable characteristics of gait patterns between individuals as well as within individuals in repeated measurement sessions. Eight healthy subjects performed 15 gait trials at a self-selected speed on eight days within two weeks. For each trial, the time-continuous ground reaction forces and lower body kinematics were quantified. A total of 960 gait patterns were analysed by means of support vector machines and the coefficient of multiple correlation. The results emphasise the remarkable amount of individual characteristics in human gait. Support vector machines results showed an error-free assignment of gait patterns to the corresponding individual. Thus, differences in gait patterns between individuals seem to be persistent over two weeks. Within the range of individual gait patterns, day specific characteristics could be distinguished by classification rates of 97.3% and 59.5% for the eight-day classification of lower body joint angles and ground reaction forces, respectively. Hence, gait patterns can be assumed not to be constant over time and rather exhibit discernible daily changes within previously stated good repeatability. Advantages for more individual and situational diagnoses or therapy are identified.

  2. An Efficient Gait Recognition with Backpack Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heesung; Hong, Sungjun; Kim, Euntai

    2009-12-01

    Gait-based human identification is a paradigm to recognize individuals using visual cues that characterize their walking motion. An important requirement for successful gait recognition is robustness to variations including different lighting conditions, poses, and walking speed. Deformation of the gait silhouette caused by objects carried by subjects also has a significant effect on the performance of gait recognition systems; a backpack is the most common of these objects. This paper proposes methods for eliminating the effect of a carried backpack for efficient gait recognition. We apply simple, recursive principal component analysis (PCA) reconstructions and error compensation to remove the backpack from the gait representation and then conduct gait recognition. Experiments performed with the CASIA database illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Optics in gait analysis and anthropometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Moreno, Alejandra Alicia

    2013-11-01

    Since antiquity, human gait has been studied to understand human movement, the kind of gait, in some cases, can cause musculoskeletal disorders or other health problems; in addition, also from antiquity, anthropometry has been important for the design of human items such as workspaces, tools, garments, among others. Nowadays, thanks to the development of optics and electronics, more accurate studies of gait and anthropometry can be developed. This work will describe the most important parameters for gait analysis, anthropometry and the optical systems used.

  4. Is Timed Up and Go Better Than Gait Speed in Predicting Health, Function, and Falls in Older Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viccaro, Laura J.; Perera, Subashan; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES While gait speed (GS) predicts many outcomes in older adults, Timed Up and Go (TUG) is recommended for clinical assessment of mobility and fall risk. The two measures are rarely compared. We assessed whether TUG is superior to GS in predicting multiple geriatric outcomes. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Medicare health maintenance organization and Veterans’ Affairs primary care clinics. PARTICIPANTS Adults aged 65 years and older (N = 457). MEASUREMENTS Baseline GS and TUG were used to predict health decline by EuroQol and SF-36 global health; functional decline by NHIS ADL score and SF-36 physical function index; hospitalization; and single and recurrent falls over 1 year. RESULTS Mean age was 74 years and 44% were female. Odds ratios for all outcomes were equivalent for GS and TUG. Using area under the ROC curve ≥ 0.7 for acceptable predictive ability, GS and TUG each alone predicted decline in global health, new ADL difficulty, and falls, with no difference in predictive ability between performance measures. Neither performance measure predicted hospitalization, EuroQol decline, or physical function decline. As continuous variables, TUG did not add predictive ability to GS for any outcome. CONCLUSION GS predicts most geriatric outcomes, including falls, as does the TUG. The time alone in TUG may not add to information provided by GS, although its qualitative elements may have other utility. PMID:21410448

  5. Human Gait Gender Classification using 3D Discrete Wavelet Transform Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction for gait recognition has been created widely. The ancestor for this task is divided into two parts, model based and free-model based. Model-based approaches obtain a set of static or dynamic skeleton parameters via modeling or tracking body components such as limbs, legs, arms and thighs. Model-free approaches focus on shapes of silhouettes or the entire movement of physical bodies. Model-free approaches are insensitive to the quality of silhouettes. Its advantage is a low computational costs comparing to model-based approaches. However, they are usually not robust to viewpoints and scale. Imaging technology also developed quickly this decades. Motion capture (mocap device integrated with motion sensor has an expensive price and can only be owned by big animation studio. Fortunately now already existed Kinect camera equipped with depth sensor image in the market with very low price compare to any mocap device. Of course the accuracy not as good as the expensive one, but using some preprocessing method we can remove the jittery and noisy in the 3D skeleton points. Our proposed method is to analyze the effectiveness of 3D skeleton feature extraction using 3D Discrete Wavelet Transforms (3D DWT. We use Kinect Camera to get the depth data. We use Ipisoft mocap software to extract 3d skeleton model from Kinect video. From the experimental results shows 83.75% correctly classified instances using SVM.

  6. Associations Between Physical Performance and Executive Function in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment: Gait Speed and the Timed “Up & Go” Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Valerie E.; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; McCurry, Susan M.; Cochrane, Barbara B.; Engel, Joyce M.; Teri, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Background Older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) are at higher risk for developing Alzheimer disease. Physical performance decline on gait and mobility tasks in conjunction with executive dysfunction has implications for accelerated functional decline, disability, and institutionalization in sedentary older adults with aMCI. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine whether performance on 2 tests commonly used by physical therapists (usual gait speed and Timed “Up & Go” Test [TUG]) are associated with performance on 2 neuropsychological tests of executive function (Trail Making Test, part B [TMT-B], and Stroop-Interference, calculated from the Stroop Word Color Test) in sedentary older adults with aMCI. Design The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 201 sedentary older adults with memory impairment participating in a longitudinal intervention study of cognitive function, aging, exercise, and health promotion. Methods Physical performance speed on gait and mobility tasks was measured via usual gait speed and the TUG (at fast pace). Executive function was measured with the TMT-B and Stroop-Interference measures. Results Applying multiple linear regression, usual gait speed was associated with executive function on both the TMT-B (β=−0.215, P=.003) and Stroop-Interference (β=−0.195, P=.01) measures, indicating that slower usual gait speed was associated with lower executive function performance. Timed “Up & Go” Test scores (in logarithmic transformation) also were associated with executive function on both the TMT-B (β=0.256, Ptime on the TUG was associated with lower executive function performance. All associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, sex, depressive symptoms, medical comorbidity, and body mass index. Limitations The cross-sectional nature of this study does not allow for inferences of causation. Conclusions Physical performance speed was associated with executive function

  7. Functional Balance and Motor Impairment Correlations with Gait Parameters during Timed Up and Go Test across Three Attentional Loading Conditions in Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidzir Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether stroke survivor’s gait performance during dual-task Timed Up and Go (TUG test is correlated with the level of functional balance and motor impairment. Thirty stroke survivors (22 men, 8 women were recruited for this study. The level of functional balance (Berg Balance Scale and motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer assessment lower extremity were assessed prior to the TUG test. TUG test was conducted under three attentional loading conditions (single, dual motor, and dual-cognitive. The time and number of steps were used to quantify gait parameters. The Spearmen’s rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between these variables. There was moderate to strong negative correlation between functional balance and gait parameters (range −0.53 to −0.73, P<0.05. There was a weak negative correlation observed between the time taken to complete the single task and motor impairment (rs=-0.43; P=0.02 dual motor task and motor impairment (rs=-0.41; P=0.02. However, there were no significant correlations between lower limb motor impairment and the number of steps in all conditions. These findings suggest that functional balance may be an influential domain of successful dual-task TUG in stroke.

  8. Functional Balance and Motor Impairment Correlations with Gait Parameters during Timed Up and Go Test across Three Attentional Loading Conditions in Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mazlifah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether stroke survivor's gait performance during dual-task Timed Up and Go (TUG) test is correlated with the level of functional balance and motor impairment. Thirty stroke survivors (22 men, 8 women) were recruited for this study. The level of functional balance (Berg Balance Scale) and motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer assessment lower extremity) were assessed prior to the TUG test. TUG test was conducted under three attentional loading conditions (single, dual motor, and dual-cognitive). The time and number of steps were used to quantify gait parameters. The Spearmen's rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between these variables. There was moderate to strong negative correlation between functional balance and gait parameters (range −0.53 to −0.73, P time taken to complete the single task and motor impairment (r s = −0.43; P = 0.02) dual motor task and motor impairment (r s = −0.41; P = 0.02). However, there were no significant correlations between lower limb motor impairment and the number of steps in all conditions. These findings suggest that functional balance may be an influential domain of successful dual-task TUG in stroke. PMID:24757575

  9. Functional Balance and Motor Impairment Correlations with Gait Parameters during Timed Up and Go Test across Three Attentional Loading Conditions in Stroke Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Haidzir; Justine, Maria; Omar, Mazlifah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether stroke survivor's gait performance during dual-task Timed Up and Go (TUG) test is correlated with the level of functional balance and motor impairment. Thirty stroke survivors (22 men, 8 women) were recruited for this study. The level of functional balance (Berg Balance Scale) and motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer assessment lower extremity) were assessed prior to the TUG test. TUG test was conducted under three attentional loading conditions (single, dual motor, and dual-cognitive). The time and number of steps were used to quantify gait parameters. The Spearmen's rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between these variables. There was moderate to strong negative correlation between functional balance and gait parameters (range -0.53 to -0.73, P time taken to complete the single task and motor impairment (r s = -0.43; P = 0.02) dual motor task and motor impairment (r s = -0.41; P = 0.02). However, there were no significant correlations between lower limb motor impairment and the number of steps in all conditions. These findings suggest that functional balance may be an influential domain of successful dual-task TUG in stroke.

  10. Open source platform for collaborative construction of wearable sensor datasets for human motion analysis and an application for gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, César; González, Manuel A; Hernández, Carmen; Vegas, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Nearly every practical improvement in modeling human motion is well founded in a properly designed collection of data or datasets. These datasets must be made publicly available for the community could validate and accept them. It is reasonable to concede that a collective, guided enterprise could serve to devise solid and substantial datasets, as a result of a collaborative effort, in the same sense as the open software community does. In this way datasets could be complemented, extended and expanded in size with, for example, more individuals, samples and human actions. For this to be possible some commitments must be made by the collaborators, being one of them sharing the same data acquisition platform. In this paper, we offer an affordable open source hardware and software platform based on inertial wearable sensors in a way that several groups could cooperate in the construction of datasets through common software suitable for collaboration. Some experimental results about the throughput of the overall system are reported showing the feasibility of acquiring data from up to 6 sensors with a sampling frequency no less than 118Hz. Also, a proof-of-concept dataset is provided comprising sampled data from 12 subjects suitable for gait analysis.

  11. MOTOR MODULES OF HUMAN LOCOMOTION: INFLUENCE OF EMG AVERAGING, CONCATENATION AND NUMBER OF GAIT CYCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Souza Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Locomotion can be investigated by factorization of electromyographic (EMG signals, e.g. with non-negative matrix factorization (NMF. This approach is a convenient concise representation of muscle activities as distributed in motor modules, activated in specific gait phases. For applying NMF, the EMG signals are analysed either as single trials, or as averaged EMG, or as concatenated EMG (data structure. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the data structure on the extracted motor modules. Twelve healthy men walked at their preferred speed on a treadmill while surface EMG signals were recorded for 60 s from 10 lower limb muscles. Motor modules representing relative weightings of synergistic muscle activations were extracted by NMF from 40 step cycles separately (EMGSNG, from averaging 2, 3, 5, 10, 20 and 40 consecutive cycles (EMGAVR, and from the concatenation of the same sets of consecutive cycles (EMGCNC. Five motor modules were sufficient to reconstruct the original EMG datasets (reconstruction quality > 90%, regardless of the type of data structure used. However, EMGCNC was associated with a slightly reduced reconstruction quality with respect to EMGAVR. Most motor modules were similar when extracted from different data structures (similarity > 0.85. However, the quality of the reconstructed 40-step EMGCNC datasets when using the muscle weightings from EMGAVR was low (reconstruction quality ~ 40%. On the other hand, the use of weightings from EMGCNC for reconstructing this long period of locomotion provided higher quality, especially using 20 concatenated steps (reconstruction quality ~ 80%. Although EMGSNG and EMGAVR showed a higher reconstruction quality for short signal intervals, these data structures did not account for step-to-step variability. The results of this study provide practical guidelines on the methodological aspects of synergistic muscle activation extraction from EMG during locomotion.

  12. Micro-Doppler characteristics of elderly gait patterns with walking aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Moeness G.; Ahmad, Fauzia; Zhang, Yimin D.; Boashash, Boualem

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the micro-Doppler signatures of elderly gait patterns in the presence of walking aids using radars. The signatures are based on real data experiments conducted in a laboratory environment using human subjects walking with a walking cane and a walker. Short-time Fourier transform is used to provide the local signal behavior over frequency and to detail the changes in the micro-Doppler signatures over time. Intrinsic differences in the Doppler and micro-Doppler signatures of the elderly gait observed with and without the use of a walking aid are highlighted. Features that capture these differences can be effective in discriminating gait with walking aids from normal human gait.

  13. Modeling and simulation of normal and hemiparetic gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengas, Lely A.; Camargo, Esperanza; Sanchez, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Gait is the collective term for the two types of bipedal locomotion, walking and running. This paper is focused on walking. The analysis of human gait is of interest to many different disciplines, including biomechanics, human-movement science, rehabilitation and medicine in general. Here we present a new model that is capable of reproducing the properties of walking, normal and pathological. The aim of this paper is to establish the biomechanical principles that underlie human walking by using Lagrange method. The constraint forces of Rayleigh dissipation function, through which to consider the effect on the tissues in the gait, are included. Depending on the value of the factor present in the Rayleigh dissipation function, both normal and pathological gait can be simulated. First of all, we apply it in the normal gait and then in the permanent hemiparetic gait. Anthropometric data of adult person are used by simulation, and it is possible to use anthropometric data for children but is necessary to consider existing table of anthropometric data. Validation of these models includes simulations of passive dynamic gait that walk on level ground. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective of gait analysis, focusing on the kinematics and kinetics of gait. There have been studies and simulations to show normal human gait, but few of them have focused on abnormal, especially hemiparetic gait. Quantitative comparisons of the model predictions with gait measurements show that the model can reproduce the significant characteristics of normal gait.

  14. Gait Recognition based on Dynamic Texture descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Abdolahi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The human movement analysis is an attractive topic in biometric research. Recent studies indicate that people have considerable ability to recognize others by their natural walking. Therefore, gait recognition has obtained great interest in biometric systems. The common biometrics is usually time-consuming, limited and collaborative. These drawbacks pose major challenges to the recognition process. Gait analysis is inconspicuous, needs no contact, is difficult to hide and can be evaluated at distance. This paper presents a bag of word method for gait recognition based on dynamic textures. Dynamic textures combine appearance and motion information. Since human walking has statistical variations in both spatial and temporal space, it can be described with dynamic texture features. To obtain these features, we extract spatiotemporal interest points and describe them by a dynamic texture descriptor. Afterwards, the hierarchical K-means as a clustering algorithm is applied to obtain the visual dictionary of video-words. As a result, human walking is represented as a histogram of video-words occurrences. The performance of our method is evaluated on two dataset: the KTH and IXMAS multiview datasets.

  15. Gait-related cerebral alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Anke H; Leunissen, Inge; Bakker, Maaike; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Freezing of gait is a common, debilitating feature of Parkinson's disease. We have studied gait planning in patients with freezing of gait, using motor imagery of walking in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging. This approach exploits the large neural overlap that exists between planning and imagining a movement. In addition, it avoids confounds introduced by brain responses to altered motor performance and somatosensory feedback during actual freezing episodes. We included 24 patients with Parkinson's disease: 12 patients with freezing of gait, 12 matched patients without freezing of gait and 21 matched healthy controls. Subjects performed two previously validated tasks--motor imagery of gait and a visual imagery control task. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, we quantified imagery performance by measuring the time required to imagine walking on paths of different widths and lengths. In addition, we used voxel-based morphometry to test whether between-group differences in imagery-related activity were related to structural differences. Imagery times indicated that patients with freezing of gait, patients without freezing of gait and controls engaged in motor imagery of gait, with matched task performance. During motor imagery of gait, patients with freezing of gait showed more activity than patients without freezing of gait in the mesencephalic locomotor region. Patients with freezing of gait also tended to have decreased responses in mesial frontal and posterior parietal regions. Furthermore, patients with freezing of gait had grey matter atrophy in a small portion of the mesencephalic locomotor region. The gait-related hyperactivity of the mesencephalic locomotor region correlated with clinical parameters (freezing of gait severity and disease duration), but not with the degree of atrophy. These results indicate that patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait have structural and functional alterations in the

  16. Variability and similarity of gait as evaluated by joint angles: implications for forensic gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-03-01

    Closed-circuit television (CCTV) footage is used in criminal investigations to compare perpetrators with suspects. Usually, incomplete gait cycles are collected, making evidential gait analysis challenging. This study aimed to analyze the discriminatory power of joint angles throughout a gait cycle. Six sets from 12 men were collected. For each man, a variability range VR (mean ± 1SD) of a specific joint angle at a specific time point (a gait cycle was 100 time points) was calculated. In turn, each individual was compared with the 11 others, and whenever 1 of these 11 had a value within this individual’s VR, it counted as positive. By adding the positives throughout the gait cycle, we created simple bar graphs; tall bars indicated a small discriminatory power, short bars indicated a larger one. The highest discriminatory power was at time points 60–80 in the gait cycle. We show how our data can assess gait data from an actual case.

  17. Performing gait analysis within the timed up & go assessment test: comparison of aTUG to a marker-based tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenken, Thomas; Lohmann, Okko; Frenken, Melina; Steen, Enno-Edzard; Hein, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Results from a technical validation of the aTUG (ambient Timed Up & Go) system are presented. The approach's gait analysis capabilities were compared to a gold standard: SIMI Motion, a marker-based motion tracking system. Seven people participated and computation of step length and step duration happened with a median error of 3 cm (IQR 3 cm) respectively 0.08 s (IQR 0.07 s). These results show that aTUG has a measurement precision which is sufficient for use in clinical gait analysis and enables the use of the device without a gold standard, i.e. in hospitals outside laboratories or in the homes of patients. aTUG is an approach and system that utilizes only ambient sensor technologies to support the execution of geriatric mobility assessment tests and to perform a gait analysis simultaneously. Such capabilities are strongly demanded in order to support physicians in executing the geriatric assessment tests frequently and objectively in professional and domestic environments. The latter may enable more early prevention and more sustainable rehabilitation.

  18. Fractional Langevin model of gait variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latka Miroslaw

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The stride interval in healthy human gait fluctuates from step to step in a random manner and scaling of the interstride interval time series motivated previous investigators to conclude that this time series is fractal. Early studies suggested that gait is a monofractal process, but more recent work indicates the time series is weakly multifractal. Herein we present additional evidence for the weakly multifractal nature of gait. We use the stride interval time series obtained from ten healthy adults walking at a normal relaxed pace for approximately fifteen minutes each as our data set. A fractional Langevin equation is constructed to model the underlying motor control system in which the order of the fractional derivative is itself a stochastic quantity. Using this model we find the fractal dimension for each of the ten data sets to be in agreement with earlier analyses. However, with the present model we are able to draw additional conclusions regarding the nature of the control system guiding walking. The analysis presented herein suggests that the observed scaling in interstride interval data may not be due to long-term memory alone, but may, in fact, be due partly to the statistics.

  19. Kinematic simulation of human gait with a multi-rigid-body foot model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yan; HU Xiaochun; LI Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    The paper builds a multi-rigid-body model of human with a 4-rigid-body foot in the 3D CAD software Solidworks, based on human anatomy. By controlling the rotation of the ankle and major joints of human body while walking, the Kinematic simulation was performed in the dynamics simulation software ADAMS. The paper analyzes the simulate results and points out deficiencies in the current work and the direction of research efforts in future.

  20. Patterns of Selection of Human Movements III: Energy Efficiency, Mechanical Advantage, and Walking Gait

    OpenAIRE

    Hagler, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Human movements are physical processes combining the classical mechanics of the human body moving in space and the biomechanics of the muscles generating the forces acting on the body under sophisticated sensory-motor control. One way to characterize movement performance is through measures of energy efficiency that relate the mechanical energy of the body and metabolic energy expended by the muscles. We expect the practical utility of such measures to be greater when human subjects execute m...

  1. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait.

  2. Influence of Power Delivery Timing on the Energetics and Biomechanics of Humans Wearing a Hip Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J.; Foss, Jessica; Gannon, Hannah; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2017-01-01

    A broad goal in the field of powered lower limb exoskeletons is to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. Ankle exoskeletons have successfully achieved this goal by correctly timing a plantarflexor torque during late stance phase. Hip exoskeletons have the potential to assist with both flexion and extension during walking gait, but the optimal timing for maximally reducing metabolic cost is unknown. The focus of our study was to determine the best assistance timing for applying hip assistance through a pneumatic exoskeleton on human subjects. Ten non-impaired subjects walked with a powered hip exoskeleton, and both hip flexion and extension assistance were separately provided at different actuation timings using a simple burst controller. The largest average across-subject reduction in metabolic cost for hip extension was at 90% of the gait cycle (just prior to heel contact) and for hip flexion was at 50% of the gait cycle; this resulted in an 8.4 and 6.1% metabolic reduction, respectively, compared to walking with the unpowered exoskeleton. However, the ideal timing for both flexion and extension assistance varied across subjects. When selecting the assistance timing that maximally reduced metabolic cost for each subject, average metabolic cost for hip extension was 10.3% lower and hip flexion was 9.7% lower than the unpowered condition. When taking into account user preference, we found that subject preference did not correlate with metabolic cost. This indicated that user feedback was a poor method of determining the most metabolically efficient assistance power timing. The findings of this study are relevant to developers of exoskeletons that have a powered hip component to assist during human walking gait. PMID:28337434

  3. Evaluation of a Gait Assessment Module Using 3D Motion Capture Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskwill, Amanda J.; Belli, Patricia; Kelleher, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Background Gait analysis is the study of human locomotion. In massage therapy, this observation is part of an assessment process that informs treatment planning. Massage therapy students must apply the theory of gait assessment to simulated patients. At Humber College, the gait assessment module traditionally consists of a textbook reading and a three-hour, in-class session in which students perform gait assessment on each other. In 2015, Humber College acquired a three-dimensional motion capture system. Purpose The purpose was to evaluate the use of 3D motion capture in a gait assessment module compared to the traditional gait assessment module. Participants Semester 2 massage therapy students who were enrolled in Massage Theory 2 (n = 38). Research Design Quasi-experimental, wait-list comparison study. Intervention The intervention group participated in an in-class session with a Qualisys motion capture system. Main Outcome Measure(s) The outcomes included knowledge and application of gait assessment theory as measured by quizzes, and students’ satisfaction as measured through a questionnaire. Results There were no statistically significant differences in baseline and post-module knowledge between both groups (pre-module: p = .46; post-module: p = .63). There was also no difference between groups on the final application question (p = .13). The intervention group enjoyed the in-class session because they could visualize the content, whereas the comparison group enjoyed the interactivity of the session. The intervention group recommended adding the assessment of gait on their classmates to their experience. Both groups noted more time was needed for the gait assessment module. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the gait assessment module combine both the traditional in-class session and the 3D motion capture system. PMID:28293329

  4. Gait analysis by high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.; van Dongen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of

  5. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via…

  6. Improved Gait Classification with Different Smoothing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Ng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait as a biometric has received great attention nowadays as it can offer human identification at a distance without any contact with the feature capturing device. This is motivated by the increasing number of synchronised closed-circuit television (CCTV cameras which have been installed in many major towns, in order to monitor and prevent crime by identifying the criminal or suspect. This paper present a method to improve gait classification results by applying smoothing techniques on the extracted gait features. The proposed approach is consisted of three parts: extraction of human gait features from enhanced human silhouette, smoothing process on extracted gait features and classification by fuzzy k-nearest neighbours (KNN. The extracted gait features are height, width, crotch height, step-size of the human silhouette and joint trajectories. To improve the recognition rate, two of these extracted gait features are smoothened before the classification process in order to alleviate the effect of outliers. The proposed approach has been applied on a dataset of nine subjects walking bidirectionally on an indoor pathway with twelve different covariate factors. From the experimental results, it can be concluded that the proposed approach is effective in gait classification.

  7. Trabecular evidence for a human-like gait in Australopithecus africanus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meir M Barak

    Full Text Available Although the earliest known hominins were apparently upright bipeds, there has been mixed evidence whether particular species of hominins including those in the genus Australopithecus walked with relatively extended hips, knees and ankles like modern humans, or with more flexed lower limb joints like apes when bipedal. Here we demonstrate in chimpanzees and humans a highly predictable and sensitive relationship between the orientation of the ankle joint during loading and the principal orientation of trabecular bone struts in the distal tibia that function to withstand compressive forces within the joint. Analyses of the orientation of these struts using microCT scans in a sample of fossil tibiae from the site of Sterkfontein, of which two are assigned to Australopithecus africanus, indicate that these hominins primarily loaded their ankles in a relatively extended posture like modern humans and unlike chimpanzees. In other respects, however, trabecular properties in Au africanus are distinctive, with values that mostly fall between those of chimpanzees and humans. These results indicate that Au. africanus, like Homo, walked with an efficient, extended lower limb.

  8. Neuroplasticity in post-stroke gait recovery and noninvasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait disorders drastically affect the quality of life of stroke survivors, making post-stroke rehabilitation an important research focus. Noninvasive brain stimulation has potential in facilitating neuroplasticity and improving post-stroke gait impairment. However, a large inter-individual variability in the response to noninvasive brain stimulation interventions has been increasingly recognized. We first review the neurophysiology of human gait and post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery, and then discuss how noninvasive brain stimulation techniques could be utilized to enhance gait recovery. While post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery is characterized by use-dependent plasticity, it evolves over time, is idiosyncratic, and may develop maladaptive elements. Furthermore, noninvasive brain stimulation has limited reach capability and is facilitative-only in nature. Therefore, we recommend that noninvasive brain stimulation be used adjunctively with rehabilitation training and other concurrent neuroplasticity facilitation techniques. Additionally, when noninvasive brain stimulation is applied for the rehabilitation of gait impairment in stroke survivors, stimulation montages should be customized according to the specific types of neuroplasticity found in each individual. This could be done using multiple mapping techniques.

  9. Effectiveness of slow motion video compared to real time video in improving the accuracy and consistency of subjective gait analysis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D M; Hill, S A; Huntingford, J L; Lafuente, P; Wall, R; Jones, K A

    2015-01-01

    Objective measures of canine gait quality via force plates, pressure mats or kinematic analysis are considered superior to subjective gait assessment (SGA). Despite research demonstrating that SGA does not accurately detect subtle lameness, it remains the most commonly performed diagnostic test for detecting lameness in dogs. This is largely because the financial, temporal and spatial requirements for existing objective gait analysis equipment makes this technology impractical for use in general practice. The utility of slow motion video as a potential tool to augment SGA is currently untested. To evaluate a more accessible way to overcome the limitations of SGA, a slow motion video study was undertaken. Three experienced veterinarians reviewed video footage of 30 dogs, 15 with a diagnosis of primary limb lameness based on history and physical examination, and 15 with no indication of limb lameness based on history and physical examination. Four different videos were made for each dog, demonstrating each dog walking and trotting in real time, and then again walking and trotting in 50% slow motion. For each video, the veterinary raters assessed both the degree of lameness, and which limb(s) they felt represented the source of the lameness. Spearman's rho, Cramer's V, and t-tests were performed to determine if slow motion video increased either the accuracy or consistency of raters' SGA relative to real time video. Raters demonstrated no significant increase in consistency or accuracy in their SGA of slow motion video relative to real time video. Based on these findings, slow motion video does not increase the consistency or accuracy of SGA values. Further research is required to determine if slow motion video will benefit SGA in other ways.

  10. The human foot and heel–sole–toe walking strategy: a mechanism enabling an inverted pendular gait with low isometric muscle force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, J. R.; Channon, A. J.; Myatt, J. P.; Rankin, J. W.; Hubel, T. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically, the most economical gait for slow bipedal locomotion requires walking as an ‘inverted pendulum’, with: I, an impulsive, energy-dissipating leg compression at the beginning of stance; II, a stiff-limbed vault; and III, an impulsive, powering push-off at the end of stance. The characteristic ‘M’-shaped vertical ground reaction forces of walking in humans reflect this impulse–vault–impulse strategy. Humans achieve this gait by dissipating energy during the heel-to-sole transition in early stance, approximately stiff-limbed, flat-footed vaulting over midstance and ankle plantarflexion (powering the toes down) in late stance. Here, we show that the ‘M’-shaped walking ground reaction force profile does not require the plantigrade human foot or heel–sole–toe stance; it is maintained in tip–toe and high-heel walking as well as in ostriches. However, the unusual, stiff, human foot structure—with ground-contacting heel behind ankle and toes in front—enables both mechanically economical inverted pendular walking and physiologically economical muscle loading, by producing extreme changes in mechanical advantage between muscles and ground reaction forces. With a human foot, and heel–sole–toe strategy during stance, the shin muscles that dissipate energy, or calf muscles that power the push-off, need not be loaded at all—largely avoiding the ‘cost of muscle force’—during the passive vaulting phase. PMID:22572024

  11. The human foot and heel-sole-toe walking strategy: a mechanism enabling an inverted pendular gait with low isometric muscle force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, J R; Channon, A J; Myatt, J P; Rankin, J W; Hubel, T Y

    2012-10-07

    Mechanically, the most economical gait for slow bipedal locomotion requires walking as an 'inverted pendulum', with: I, an impulsive, energy-dissipating leg compression at the beginning of stance; II, a stiff-limbed vault; and III, an impulsive, powering push-off at the end of stance. The characteristic 'M'-shaped vertical ground reaction forces of walking in humans reflect this impulse-vault-impulse strategy. Humans achieve this gait by dissipating energy during the heel-to-sole transition in early stance, approximately stiff-limbed, flat-footed vaulting over midstance and ankle plantarflexion (powering the toes down) in late stance. Here, we show that the 'M'-shaped walking ground reaction force profile does not require the plantigrade human foot or heel-sole-toe stance; it is maintained in tip-toe and high-heel walking as well as in ostriches. However, the unusual, stiff, human foot structure--with ground-contacting heel behind ankle and toes in front--enables both mechanically economical inverted pendular walking and physiologically economical muscle loading, by producing extreme changes in mechanical advantage between muscles and ground reaction forces. With a human foot, and heel-sole-toe strategy during stance, the shin muscles that dissipate energy, or calf muscles that power the push-off, need not be loaded at all--largely avoiding the 'cost of muscle force'--during the passive vaulting phase.

  12. Gait Training with Real-Time Augmented Toe-Ground Clearance Information Decreases Tripping Risk in Older Adults and a Person with Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaul K Begg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Falls risk increases with ageing but is substantially higher in people with stroke. Tripping-related balance loss is the primary cause of falls, and Minimum Toe Clearance (MTC during walking is closely linked to tripping risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether real-time augmented information of toe-ground clearance at MTC can increase toe clearance, and reduce tripping risk. Nine healthy older adults (76±9 years and one 71 year old female stroke patient participated. Vertical toe displacement was displayed in real-time such that participants could adjust their toe clearance during treadmill walking. Participants undertook a session of unconstrained walking (no-feedback baseline and, in a subsequent Feedback condition, were asked to modify their swing phase trajectory to match a target increased MTC. Tripping probability (PT pre- and post-training was calculated by modelling MTC distributions. Older adults showed significantly higher mean MTC for the post-training retention session (27.7 ±3.79mm compared to the normal walking trial (14.1± 8.3 mm. The PT on a 1cm obstacle for the older adults reduced from 1 in 578 strides to 1 in 105,988 strides. With gait training the stroke patient increased MTC and reduced variability (baseline 16±12 mm, post-training 24±8 mm which reduced obstacle contact probability from 1 in 3 strides in baseline to 1 in 161 strides post-training. The findings confirm that concurrent visual feedback of a lower limb kinematic gait parameter is effective in changing foot trajectory control and reducing tripping probability in older adults. There is potential for further investigation of augmented feedback training across a range of gait-impaired populations, such as stroke.

  13. How crouch gait can dynamically induce stiff-knee gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bregman, Daan J J; Wisse, Martijn; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap; Collins, Steven H

    2010-04-01

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on excessive knee muscle activity during (pre)swing, but the passive dynamics of the limbs may also have an important effect. To examine the effects of a crouched posture on swing knee flexion, we developed a forward-dynamic model of human walking with a passive swing knee, capable of stable cyclic walking for a range of stance knee crouch angles. As crouch angle during stance was increased, the knee naturally flexed much less during swing, resulting in a 'stiff-knee' gait pattern and reduced foot clearance. Reduced swing knee flexion was primarily due to altered gravitational moments around the joints during initial swing. We also considered the effects of increased push-off strength and swing hip flexion torque, which both increased swing knee flexion, but the effect of crouch angle was dominant. These findings demonstrate that decreased knee flexion during swing can occur purely as the dynamical result of crouch, rather than from altered muscle function or pathoneurological control alone.

  14. Isolating gait-related movement artifacts in electroencephalography during human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Julia E.; Huang, Helen J.; Snyder, Kristine L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. High-density electroencephelography (EEG) can provide an insight into human brain function during real-world activities with walking. Some recent studies have used EEG to characterize brain activity during walking, but the relative contributions of movement artifact and electrocortical activity have been difficult to quantify. We aimed to characterize movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes at a range of walking speeds and to test the efficacy of artifact removal methods. We also quantified the similarity between movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes and a head-mounted accelerometer. Approach. We used a novel experimental method to isolate and record movement artifact with EEG electrodes during walking. We blocked electrophysiological signals using a nonconductive layer (silicone swim cap) and simulated an electrically conductive scalp on top of the swim cap using a wig coated with conductive gel. We recorded motion artifact EEG data from nine young human subjects walking on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4 to 1.6 m s-1. We then tested artifact removal methods including moving average and wavelet-based techniques. Main results. Movement artifact recorded with EEG electrodes varied considerably, across speed, subject, and electrode location. The movement artifact measured with EEG electrodes did not correlate well with head acceleration. All of the tested artifact removal methods attenuated low-frequency noise but did not completely remove movement artifact. The spectral power fluctuations in the movement artifact data resembled data from some previously published studies of EEG during walking. Significance. Our results suggest that EEG data recorded during walking likely contains substantial movement artifact that: cannot be explained by head accelerations; varies across speed, subject, and channel; and cannot be removed using traditional signal processing methods. Future studies should focus on more sophisticated methods for removal of EEG

  15. Segmentation and classification of gait cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Valentina; Balestra, Gabriella; Knaflitz, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Gait abnormalities can be studied by means of instrumented gait analysis. Foot-switches are useful to study the foot-floor contact and for timing the gait phases in many gait disorders, provided that a reliable foot-switch signal may be collected. Considering long walks allows reducing the intra-subject variability, but requires automatic and user-independent methods to analyze a large number of gait cycles. The aim of this work is to describe and validate an algorithm for the segmentation of the foot-switch signal and the classification of the gait cycles. The performance of the algorithm was assessed comparing its results against the manual segmentation and classification performed by a gait analysis expert on the same signal. The performance was found to be equal to 100% for healthy subjects and over 98% for pathological subjects. The algorithm allows determining the atypical cycles (cycles that do not match the standard sequence of gait phases) for many different kinds of pathological gait, since it is not based on pathology-specific templates.

  16. DeepGait: A Learning Deep Convolutional Representation for View-Invariant Gait Recognition Using Joint Bayesian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human gait, as a soft biometric, helps to recognize people through their walking. To further improve the recognition performance, we propose a novel video sensor-based gait representation, DeepGait, using deep convolutional features and introduce Joint Bayesian to model view variance. DeepGait is generated by using a pre-trained “very deep” network “D-Net” (VGG-D without any fine-tuning. For non-view setting, DeepGait outperforms hand-crafted representations (e.g., Gait Energy Image, Frequency-Domain Feature and Gait Flow Image, etc.. Furthermore, for cross-view setting, 256-dimensional DeepGait after PCA significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods on the OU-ISR large population (OULP dataset. The OULP dataset, which includes 4007 subjects, makes our result reliable in a statistically reliable way.

  17. Computational intelligence in gait research: a perspective on current applications and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel T H; Begg, Rezaul K; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2009-09-01

    Our mobility is an important daily requirement so much so that any disruption to it severely degrades our perceived quality of life. Studies in gait and human movement sciences, therefore, play a significant role in maintaining the well-being of our mobility. Current gait analysis involves numerous interdependent gait parameters that are difficult to adequately interpret due to the large volume of recorded data and lengthy assessment times in gait laboratories. A proposed solution to these problems is computational intelligence (CI), which is an emerging paradigm in biomedical engineering most notably in pathology detection and prosthesis design. The integration of CI technology in gait systems facilitates studies in disorders caused by lower limb defects, cerebral disorders, and aging effects by learning data relationships through a combination of signal processing and machine learning techniques. Learning paradigms, such as supervised learning, unsupervised learning, and fuzzy and evolutionary algorithms, provide advanced modeling capabilities for biomechanical systems that in the past have relied heavily on statistical analysis. CI offers the ability to investigate nonlinear data relationships, enhance data interpretation, design more efficient diagnostic methods, and extrapolate model functionality. These are envisioned to result in more cost-effective, efficient, and easy-to-use systems, which would address global shortages in medical personnel and rising medical costs. This paper surveys current signal processing and CI methodologies followed by gait applications ranging from normal gait studies and disorder detection to artificial gait simulation. We review recent systems focusing on the existing challenges and issues involved in making them successful. We also examine new research in sensor technologies for gait that could be combined with these intelligent systems to develop more effective healthcare solutions.

  18. [Three-Dimensional Ultrasonic Gait Analysis in Schizophrenic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzhammer, Albert; Heindl, Bernhard; Müller, Jürgen; Broll, Karin; Pfeiff, Liane; Perfahl, Maria; Hess, Linda; Koch, Horst

    2003-05-01

    Schizophrenic disorders as well as neuroleptic treatment can affect locomotion. The study assessed the influence of neuroleptic treatment on human gait via ultrasonic topometric gait analysis. In a control sample the test system proved high test-retest-reliability. Spatial and temporal gait parameters were assessed in schizophrenic patients without neuroleptic treatment (n = 12) and under treatment with conventional neuroleptics (n = 14) and re-assessed after treatment change to the atypical neuroleptic olanzapine in a repeated measures design. After switch from conventional neuroleptics to olanzapine patients showed an increase of gait velocity (p step length (p gait analysis.

  19. A Global Gait Asymmetry Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Silvia; Resende, Renan A; Clansey, Adam C; Deluzio, Kevin J; Selbie, W Scott; Veloso, António P

    2016-04-01

    High levels of gait asymmetry are associated with many pathologies. Our long-term goal is to improve gait symmetry through real-time biofeedback of a symmetry index. Symmetry is often reported as a single metric or a collective signature of multiple discrete measures. While this is useful for assessment, incorporating multiple feedback metrics presents too much information for most subjects to use as visual feedback for gait retraining. The aim of this article was to develop a global gait asymmetry (GGA) score that could be used as a biofeedback metric for gait retraining and to test the effectiveness of the GGA for classifying artificially-induced asymmetry. Eighteen participants (11 males; age 26.9 y [SD = 7.7]; height 1.8 m [SD = 0.1]; body mass 72.7 kg [SD = 8.9]) walked on a treadmill in 3 symmetry conditions, induced by wearing custom-made sandals: a symmetric condition (identical sandals) and 2 asymmetric conditions (different sandals). The GGA score was calculated, based on several joint angles, and compared between conditions. Significant differences were found among all conditions (P asymmetry, and may be useful for rehabilitation and assessment.

  20. Comparison between clinical gait and daily-life gait assessments of fall risk in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Matthew A; Coppens, Milou J; Ejupi, Andreas; Gschwind, Yves J; Annegarn, Janneke; Schoene, Daniel; Wieching, Rainer; Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim

    2017-02-08

    Falls are a leading cause of disability in older people. Here we investigate if daily-life gait assessments are better than clinical gait assessments at discriminating between older people with and without a history of falls. A total of 96 independent-living participants (age 75.5 ± 7.8) underwent sensorimotor, psychological and cognitive assessments, and the Timed Up and Go and 10-m walk tests. Participants wore a small pendant sensor device for a week in their home environment, from which the new remote assessments of daily-life gait were determined. During daily-life, fallers had significantly lower gait quality (lower gait endurance, higher within-walk variability and lower between-walk adaptability), but not reduced gait quantity (total steps) or gait intensity (mean cadence). In the clinic, fallers had slower Timed Up and Go, but not 10-m walk test times. After adjusting for demographics, only the daily-life assessments of gait endurance and within-walk variability remained significant. Reduced daily-life gait assessments were significantly correlated with older age, higher body mass index, multiple medications, disability, more concern about falling, poor executive function and higher physiological fall risk. The new daily-life gait assessments were better than the clinical gait assessments at identifying fall risk in our sample of independent living older people. However, further research is required to validate these findings in other populations or those living in residential aged care. Daily-life gait was not only associated with demographics and physiological capacity, but also general health, executive function and the ability to undertake a variety of activities of daily living without excessive concern about falling. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  1. Compliant bipedal model with the center of pressure excursion associated with oscillatory behavior of the center of mass reproduces the human gait dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Keun; Park, Sukyung

    2014-01-03

    Although the compliant bipedal model could reproduce qualitative ground reaction force (GRF) of human walking, the model with a fixed pivot showed overestimations in stance leg rotation and the ratio of horizontal to vertical GRF. The human walking data showed a continuous forward progression of the center of pressure (CoP) during the stance phase and the suspension of the CoP near the forefoot before the onset of step transition. To better describe human gait dynamics with a minimal expense of model complexity, we proposed a compliant bipedal model with the accelerated pivot which associated the CoP excursion with the oscillatory behavior of the center of mass (CoM) with the existing simulation parameter and leg stiffness. Owing to the pivot acceleration defined to emulate human CoP profile, the arrival of the CoP at the limit of the stance foot over the single stance duration initiated the step-to-step transition. The proposed model showed an improved match of walking data. As the forward motion of CoM during single stance was partly accounted by forward pivot translation, the previously overestimated rotation of the stance leg was reduced and the corresponding horizontal GRF became closer to human data. The walking solutions of the model ranged over higher speed ranges (~1.7 m/s) than those of the fixed pivoted compliant bipedal model (~1.5m/s) and exhibited other gait parameters, such as touchdown angle, step length and step frequency, comparable to the experimental observations. The good matches between the model and experimental GRF data imply that the continuous pivot acceleration associated with CoM oscillatory behavior could serve as a useful framework of bipedal model.

  2. Method for Walking Gait Identification in a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton based on C4.5 Decision Tree Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A gait identification method for a lower extremity exoskeleton is presented in order to identify the gait sub-phases in human-machine coordinated motion. First, a sensor layout for the exoskeleton is introduced. Taking the difference between human lower limb motion and human-machine coordinated motion into account, the walking gait is divided into five sub-phases, which are ‘double standing’, ‘right leg swing and left leg stance’, ‘double stance with right leg front and left leg back’, ‘right leg stance and left leg swing’, and ‘double stance with left leg front and right leg back’. The sensors include shoe pressure sensors, knee encoders, and thigh and calf gyroscopes, and are used to measure the contact force of the foot, and the knee joint angle and its angular velocity. Then, five sub-phases of walking gait are identified by a C4.5 decision tree algorithm according to the data fusion of the sensors’ information. Based on the simulation results for the gait division, identification accuracy can be guaranteed by the proposed algorithm. Through the exoskeleton control experiment, a division of five sub-phases for the human-machine coordinated walk is proposed. The experimental results verify this gait division and identification method. They can make hydraulic cylinders retract ahead of time and improve the maximal walking velocity when the exoskeleton follows the person’s motion.

  3. Method for Walking Gait Identification in a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton Based on C4.5 Decision Tree Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A gait identification method for a lower extremity exoskeleton is presented in order to identify the gait sub-phases in human-machine coordinated motion. First, a sensor layout for the exoskeleton is introduced. Taking the difference between human lower limb motion and human-machine coordinated motion into account, the walking gait is divided into five sub-phases, which are ‘double standing’, ‘right leg swing and left leg stance’, ‘double stance with right leg front and left leg back’, ‘right leg stance and left leg swing’, and ‘double stance with left leg front and right leg back’. The sensors include shoe pressure sensors, knee encoders, and thigh and calf gyroscopes, and are used to measure the contact force of the foot, and the knee joint angle and its angular velocity. Then, five sub-phases of walking gait are identified by a C4.5 decision tree algorithm according to the data fusion of the sensors' information. Based on the simulation results for the gait division, identification accuracy can be guaranteed by the proposed algorithm. Through the exoskeleton control experiment, a division of five sub-phases for the human-machine coordinated walk is proposed. The experimental results verify this gait division and identification method. They can make hydraulic cylinders retract ahead of time and improve the maximal walking velocity when the exoskeleton follows the person's motion.

  4. Influences of trunk flexion on mechanical energy flow in the lower extremities during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takuya; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Ogata, Yuta; Tanimoto, Kenji; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The time-series waveforms of mechanical energy generation, absorption, and transfer through the joints indicate how movements are produced and controlled. Previous studies have used these waveforms to evaluate and describe the efficiency of human movements. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of trunk flexion on mechanical energy flow in the lower extremities during gait. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 healthy young males (mean age, 21.8 ± 1.3 years, mean height, 170.5 ± 6.8 cm, and mean weight, 60.2 ± 6.8 kg). Subjects walked at a self-selected gait speed under 2 conditions: normal gait (condition N), and gait with trunk flexion formed with a brace to simulate spinal curvature (condition TF). The data collected from initial contact to the mid-stance of gait was analyzed. [Results] There were no significant differences between the 2 conditions in the mechanical energy flow in the knee joint and negative mechanical work in the knee joint. However, the positive mechanical work of the knee joint under condition TF was significantly less than that under condition N. [Conclusion] Trunk flexion led to knee flexion in a standing posture. Thus, a strategy of moving of center of mass upward by knee extension using less mechanical energy was selected during gait in the trunk flexed posture. PMID:27313351

  5. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Knaepen

    Full Text Available In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support. Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning.

  6. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Swinnen, Eva; Fernandez Tellez, Helio; Michielsen, Marc; Kerckhofs, Eric; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support). Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force) and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning.

  7. The connection between anthropometry and gait harmony unveiled through the lens of the golden ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosa, Marco; Morone, Giovanni; Bini, Fabiano; Fusco, Augusto; Paolucci, Stefano; Marinozzi, Franco

    2016-01-26

    In nature, many systems have a harmonic organization due to their fractal structure related to an irrational number called golden ratio. That is a constant proportion found in phases of human gait cycle, and is also found in the lengths of human body segments. In this study we tested if artificial alterations in anthropometric proportions may alter gait proportions. Twenty healthy subjects (29.15±5.66years) were enrolled in this study and asked to walk normally and with special shoes altering their anthropometric proportions. Further, to test if the relationship between gait phases and anthropometry could be due to the pendular mechanism of walking, subjects were also asked to walk with extra masses located on their shanks. Results showed that the artificial alteration of body segment proportions affected the gait ratio based on the proportion of time between stance and swing (p=0.015). Conversely, no changes occurred during walking in weighted condition (p=0.394). These results confirm the connection between anthropometric proportions and gait ratio, and suggest the idea that humans may have evolved into the actual anthropometric proportions for favoring a walking having a golden ratio based harmony, but research is required to verify this hypothesis.

  8. Gait analysis: clinical facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard; Esquenazi, Alberto; Benedetti, Maria G; Desloovere, Kaat

    2016-08-01

    Gait analysis is a well-established tool for the quantitative assessment of gait disturbances providing functional diagnosis, assessment for treatment planning, and monitoring of disease progress. There is a large volume of literature on the research use of gait analysis, but evidence on its clinical routine use supports a favorable cost-benefit ratio in a limited number of conditions. Initially gait analysis was introduced to clinical practice to improve the management of children with cerebral palsy. However, there is good evidence to extend its use to patients with various upper motor neuron diseases, and to lower limb amputation. Thereby, the methodology for properly conducting and interpreting the exam is of paramount relevance. Appropriateness of gait analysis prescription and reliability of data obtained are required in the clinical environment. This paper provides an overview on guidelines for managing a clinical gait analysis service and on the principal clinical domains of its application: cerebral palsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury and lower limb amputation.

  9. Intra-individual gait pattern variability in specific situations: Implications for forensic gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Oliver; Dillinger, Steffen; Marschall, Franz

    2016-07-01

    In this study, inter- and intra-individual gait pattern differences are examined in various gait situations by means of phase diagrams of the extremity angles (cyclograms). 8 test subjects walked along a walking distance of 6m under different conditions three times each: barefoot, wearing sneakers, wearing combat boots, after muscular fatigue, and wearing a full-face motorcycle helmet restricting vision. The joint angles of foot, knee, and hip were recorded in the sagittal plane. The coupling of movements was represented by time-adjusted cyclograms, and the inter- and intra-individual differences were captured by calculating the similarity between different gait patterns. Gait pattern variability was often greater between the defined test situations than between the individual test subjects. The results have been interpreted considering neurophysiological regulation mechanisms. Footwear, masking, and fatigue were interpreted as disturbance parameters, each being a cause for gait pattern variability and complicating the inference of identity of persons in video recordings.

  10. Gait analysis in a pre- and post-ischemic stroke biomedical pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duberstein, Kylee Jo; Platt, Simon R; Holmes, Shannon P; Dove, C Robert; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Kent, Marc; Stice, Steven L; Hill, William D; Hess, David C; West, Franklin D

    2014-02-10

    Severity of neural injury including stroke in human patients, as well as recovery from injury, can be assessed through changes in gait patterns of affected individuals. Similar quantification of motor function deficits has been measured in rodent animal models of such injuries. However, due to differences in fundamental structure of human and rodent brains, there is a need to develop a large animal model to facilitate treatment development for neurological conditions. Porcine brain structure is similar to that of humans, and therefore the pig may make a more clinically relevant animal model. The current study was undertaken to determine key gait characteristics in normal biomedical miniature pigs and dynamic changes that occur post-neural injury in a porcine middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion ischemic stroke model. Yucatan miniature pigs were trained to walk through a semi-circular track and were recorded with high speed cameras to detect changes in key gait parameters. Analysis of normal pigs showed overall symmetry in hindlimb swing and stance times, forelimb stance time, along with step length, step velocity, and maximum hoof height on both fore and hindlimbs. A subset of pigs were again recorded at 7, 5 and 3 days prior to MCA occlusion and then at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 30 days following surgery. MRI analysis showed that MCA occlusion resulted in significant infarction. Gait analysis indicated that stroke resulted in notable asymmetries in both temporal and spatial variables. Pigs exhibited lower maximum front hoof height on the paretic side, as well as shorter swing time and longer stance time on the paretic hindlimb. These results support that gait analysis of stroke injury is a highly sensitive detection method for changes in gait parameters in pig.

  11. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    distance up spine near T7 spinous process Spine_Rigid Intersection of spine and the point between the shoulder joints LowNeck Base of the neck near C7...spinous process UpperNeck Top of the neck near C1 spinous process LCLAV, RCLAV Approximately one-fourth distance between manubrium and acromion...capture data between the human subjects and the Santos biomechanical model that may affect the way clinicians score the gait data when using Santos

  12. How useful is satellite positioning system (GPS to track gait parameters? A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schutz Yves

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the last century, numerous techniques have been developed to analyze the movement of humans while walking and running. The combined use of kinematics and kinetics methods, mainly based on high speed video analysis and forceplate, have permitted a comprehensive description of locomotion process in terms of energetics and biomechanics. While the different phases of a single gait cycle are well understood, there is an increasing interest to know how the neuro-motor system controls gait form stride to stride. Indeed, it was observed that neurodegenerative diseases and aging could impact gait stability and gait parameters steadiness. From both clinical and fundamental research perspectives, there is therefore a need to develop techniques to accurately track gait parameters stride-by-stride over a long period with minimal constraints to patients. In this context, high accuracy satellite positioning can provide an alternative tool to monitor outdoor walking. Indeed, the high-end GPS receivers provide centimeter accuracy positioning with 5–20 Hz sampling rate: this allows the stride-by-stride assessment of a number of basic gait parameters – such as walking speed, step length and step frequency – that can be tracked over several thousand consecutive strides in free-living conditions. Furthermore, long-range correlations and fractal-like pattern was observed in those time series. As compared to other classical methods, GPS seems a promising technology in the field of gait variability analysis. However, relative high complexity and expensiveness – combined with a usability which requires further improvement – remain obstacles to the full development of the GPS technology in human applications.

  13. How useful is satellite positioning system (GPS) to track gait parameters? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Philippe; Schutz, Yves

    2005-09-02

    Over the last century, numerous techniques have been developed to analyze the movement of humans while walking and running. The combined use of kinematics and kinetics methods, mainly based on high speed video analysis and forceplate, have permitted a comprehensive description of locomotion process in terms of energetics and biomechanics. While the different phases of a single gait cycle are well understood, there is an increasing interest to know how the neuro-motor system controls gait form stride to stride. Indeed, it was observed that neurodegenerative diseases and aging could impact gait stability and gait parameters steadiness. From both clinical and fundamental research perspectives, there is therefore a need to develop techniques to accurately track gait parameters stride-by-stride over a long period with minimal constraints to patients. In this context, high accuracy satellite positioning can provide an alternative tool to monitor outdoor walking. Indeed, the high-end GPS receivers provide centimeter accuracy positioning with 5-20 Hz sampling rate: this allows the stride-by-stride assessment of a number of basic gait parameters--such as walking speed, step length and step frequency--that can be tracked over several thousand consecutive strides in free-living conditions. Furthermore, long-range correlations and fractal-like pattern was observed in those time series. As compared to other classical methods, GPS seems a promising technology in the field of gait variability analysis. However, relative high complexity and expensiveness--combined with a usability which requires further improvement--remain obstacles to the full development of the GPS technology in human applications.

  14. Zernike moments features for shape-based gait recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huanfeng; Qin, Lan; Liu, Jun; Chao, Jiang

    2011-12-01

    The paper proposes a new spatio-temporal gait representation, called cycles gait Zernike moments (CGZM), to characterize human walking properties for individual recognition. Firstly, Zernike moments as shape descriptors are used to characterize gait silhouette shape. Secondly, we generate CGZM from Zernike moments of silhouette sequences. Finally, the phase and magnitude coefficientsof CGZM are utilized to perform classification by the modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) classifier. Experimental results show that the proposed approach have an encouraging recognition performance.

  15. Detecting Gait Phases from RGB-D Images Based on Hidden Markov Model

    OpenAIRE

    Heravi, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Olyaee, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Gait contains important information about the status of the human body and physiological signs. In many medical applications, it is important to monitor and accurately analyze the gait of the patient. Since walking shows the reproducibility signs in several phases, separating these phases can be used for the gait analysis. In this study, a method based on image processing for extracting phases of human gait from RGB-Depth images is presented. The sequence of depth images from the front view h...

  16. A Human Recognition Scheme Based on Mean Gait Energy Image%一种基于平均步态能量图的身份识别算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张前进; 陈祥涛; 卜文绍

    2011-01-01

    提出一种基于步态能量图(GEI)的嵌入式隐马尔可夫模型(e-HMM)身份识别方法.首先通过预处理提取出运动人体的侧面轮廓,根据步态下肢的摆动距离统计出步态周期,得到平均步态能量图.对能量图的各区域进行分析,利用二维离散余弦变换(2D-DCT)将能量图观测块转化为观测向量,实现嵌入式隐马尔可夫模型的训练和身份识别.最后在USF和CASIA步态数据库上对所提出的算法进行实验.实验表明该方法具有较好的识别性能,是一种有效的步态识别方法.%An embedded hidden Markov model(e-HMM) human recognition scheme based on gait energy image(GEI) is proposed. First a preproeess technique is used to segment the moving silhouette from the walking figure. The algorithm obtains the gait quasi-periodicity through analyzing the width information of the lower limbs' gait contour edge, and the mean GEI is calculated from gait periodic. It makes use of an optimized set of observation vectors obtained from the two dimensional discrete cosine transform(2D-DCT) coefficients of the mean GEI regions. The e-HMM is trained and used for the gait recognition. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on USF and CASIA Gait Database. The experimental result shows that the proposed approach is valid and has encouraging recognition performance.

  17. Changes in Post-Stroke Gait Biomechanics Induced by One Session of Gait Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesar, T M; Reisman, D S; Higginson, J S; Awad, L N; Binder-Macleod, S A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether one session of targeted locomotor training can induce measurable improvements in the post-stroke gait impairments. Thirteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis participated in one locomotor training session combining fast treadmill training and functional electrical stimulation (FES) of ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexor muscles. Three dimensional gait analysis was performed to assess within-session changes (after versus before training) in gait biomechanics at the subject's self-selected speed without FES. Our results showed that one session of locomotor training resulted in significant improvements in peak anterior ground reaction force (AGRF) and AGRF integral for the paretic leg. Additionally, individual subject data showed that a majority of study participants demonstrated improvements in the primary outcome variables following the training session. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that a single session of intense, targeted post-stroke locomotor retraining can induce significant improvements in post-stroke gait biomechanics. We posit that the within-session changes induced by a single exposure to gait training can be used to predict whether an individual is responsive to a particular gait intervention, and aid with the development of individualized gait retraining strategies. Future studies are needed to determine whether these single-session improvements in biomechanics are accompanied by short-term changes in corticospinal excitability, and whether single-session responses can serve as predictors for the longer-term effects of the intervention with other targeted gait interventions.

  18. Are human interactivity times lognormal?

    CERN Document Server

    Blenn, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we are analyzing the interactivity time, defined as the duration between two consecutive tasks such as sending emails, collecting friends and followers and writing comments in online social networks (OSNs). The distributions of these times are heavy tailed and often described by a power-law distribution. However, power-law distributions usually only fit the heavy tail of empirical data and ignore the information in the smaller value range. Here, we argue that the durations between writing emails or comments, adding friends and receiving followers are likely to follow a lognormal distribution. We discuss the similarities between power-law and lognormal distributions, show that binning of data can deform a lognormal to a power-law distribution and propose an explanation for the appearance of lognormal interactivity times. The historical debate of similarities between lognormal and power-law distributions is reviewed by illustrating the resemblance of measurements in this paper with the historical...

  19. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  20. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.; Collins, S.H.

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  1. How Crouch Gait Can Dynamically Induce Stiff-Knee Gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, M.M.; Bregman, D.J.J.; Wisse, M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.; Collins, S.H.

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on

  2. Computational intelligent gait-phase detection system to identify pathological gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Chathuri M; Senanayake, S M N Arosha

    2010-09-01

    An intelligent gait-phase detection algorithm based on kinematic and kinetic parameters is presented in this paper. The gait parameters do not vary distinctly for each gait phase; therefore, it is complex to differentiate gait phases with respect to a threshold value. To overcome this intricacy, the concept of fuzzy logic was applied to detect gait phases with respect to fuzzy membership values. A real-time data-acquisition system was developed consisting of four force-sensitive resistors and two inertial sensors to obtain foot-pressure patterns and knee flexion/extension angle, respectively. The detected gait phases could be further analyzed to identify abnormality occurrences, and hence, is applicable to determine accurate timing for feedback. The large amount of data required for quality gait analysis necessitates the utilization of information technology to store, manage, and extract required information. Therefore, a software application was developed for real-time acquisition of sensor data, data processing, database management, and a user-friendly graphical-user interface as a tool to simplify the task of clinicians. The experiments carried out to validate the proposed system are presented along with the results analysis for normal and pathological walking patterns.

  3. Group Balance Training Specifically Designed for Individuals With Alzheimer Disease: Impact on Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go, Gait Speed, and Mini-Mental Status Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Julie D; Hutson, Janet; Maralit, Leslie A; Brown, Megan B

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer disease (IwAD) experience more frequent and more injurious falls than their cognitively intact peers. Evidence of balance and gait dysfunction is observed earlier in the course of Alzheimer disease (AD) than once believed. Balance training has been demonstrated to be effective in improving balance and decreasing falls in cognitively intact older adults but is not well studied in IwAD. This study was designed to analyze the effects of a group balance training program on balance and falls in IwAD. The program was developed specifically for IwAD, with explicit guidelines for communication/interaction and deliberate structure of training sessions catered to the motor learning needs of IwAD. This prospective, quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design study describes the effects of a balance training program for a cohort of IwAD. Thirty IwAD were recruited from 3 adult day health centers; 22 completed at least 1 posttest session. Participants were tested with Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), Self-Selected Gait Speed (SSGS), Fast Gait Speed (FGS), and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) immediately before and after the 3-month intervention and again 3 months later. Group training was held at the adult day health centers for 45 minutes, twice per week. Sessions were characterized by massed, constant, and blocked practice of functional, relevant activities with considerable repetition. Ratio of participant to staff member never exceeded 3:1. Physical therapist staff members assured that participants were up on their feet the majority of each session and were individually challenged as much as possible. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) for BBS was significant (F = 15.04; df = 1.67/28.40; P = .000) with post hoc tests, revealing improvement between pretest and immediate posttest (P = .000) and decline in performance between immediate and 3-month posttest (P = .012). Repeated-measures ANOVA posttest for MMSE was

  4. Walking to the beat of different drums: Practical implications for the use of acoustic rhythms in gait rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, M.; Bank, P.J.M.; Peper, C.E.; Beek, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic rhythms are frequently used in gait rehabilitation, with positive instantaneous and prolonged transfer effects on various gait characteristics. The gait modifying ability of acoustic rhythms depends on how well gait is tied to the beat, which can be assessed with measures of relative timing

  5. Characterization of gait in late onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Paul T; Case, Laura E; Chan, Justin M; Austin, Stephanie L; Kishnani, Priya

    2015-11-01

    The skeletal muscle manifestations of late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) cause significant gait impairment. However, the specific temporal and spatial characteristics of abnormal gait in LOPD have not been objectively analyzed or described in the literature. This pilot study evaluated the gait of 22 individuals with LOPD using the GAITRite® temporospatial gait analysis system. The gait parameters were compared to normal reference values, and correlations were made with standard measures of disease progression. The LOPD population demonstrated significant abnormalities in temporospatial parameters of gait including a trend towards decreased velocity and cadence, a prolonged stance phase, prolonged time in double limb support, shorter step and stride length, and a wider base of support. Precise descriptions and analyses of gait abnormalities have much potential in increasing our understanding of LOPD, especially in regards to how its natural history may be modified by the use of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and other interventions. Gait analysis may provide a sensitive early marker of the onset of clinical symptoms and signs, offer an additional objective measure of disease progression and the impact of intervention, and serve as a potentially important clinical endpoint. The additional data from comprehensive gait analysis may personalize and optimize physical therapy management, and the clarification of specific gait patterns in neuromuscular diseases could be of clinical benefit in the ranking of a differential diagnosis.

  6. In Vivo Gait Analysis During Bone Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Macías, J; Reina-Romo, E; Morgaz, J; Domínguez, J

    2015-09-01

    The load bearing characteristics of the intervened limb over time in vivo are important to know in distraction osteogenesis and bone healing for the characterization of the bone maturation process. Gait analyses were performed for a group of sheep in which bone transport was carried out. The ground reaction force was measured by means of a force platform, and the gait parameters (i.e., the peak, the mean vertical ground reaction force and the impulse) were calculated during the stance phase for each limb. The results showed that these gait parameters decreased in the intervened limb and interestingly increased in the other limbs due to the implantation of the fixator. Additionally, during the process, the gait parameters exponentially approached the values for healthy animals. Corresponding radiographies showed an increasing level of ossification in the callus. This study shows, as a preliminary approach to be confirmed with more experiments, that gait analysis could be used as an alternative method to control distraction osteogenesis or bone healing. For example, these analyses could determine the appropriate time to remove the fixator. Furthermore, gait analysis has advantages over other methods because it provides quantitative data and does not require instrumented fixators.

  7. Gait Disorders In Patients After Polytrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakušonoka Ruta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the gait of patients after polytrauma is important, as it indicates the ability of patients to the previous activities and work. The aim of our study was to evaluate the gait of patients with lower limb injuries in the medium-term after polytrauma. Three-dimensional instrumental gait analysis was performed in 26 polytrauma patients (16 women and 10 men; mean age 38.6 years, 14 to 41 months after the trauma. Spatio-temporal parameters, motions in pelvis and lower extremities joints in sagittal plane and vertical load ground reaction force were analysed. Gait parameters in polytrauma patients were compared with a healthy control group. Polytrauma patients in the injured side had decreased step length, cadence, hip extension, maximum knee flexion, vertical load ground reaction force, and increased stance time and pelvic anterior tilt; in the uninjured side they had decreased step length, cadence, maximum knee flexion, vertical load ground reaction force and increased stance time (p < 0.05. The use of the three-dimensional instrumental gait analysis in the evaluation of polytrauma patients with lower limb injuries consequences makes it possible to identify the gait disorders not only in the injured, but also in the uninjured side.

  8. Who creates the Time: Nature or Human?

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    The paper defends the thesis that analysis of time meaning in a context of philosophy of physical and mathematical natural sciences and philosophical anthropology allows to clear basis of human being and to construct special model of general understanding of time as a creation of nature or creation of human. Regulations on discretization and virtual nature of cultural interaction, mutual tension of limits of cultural and historical process allow connecting philosophy of the nature and philosophical anthropology with system of categories (energy, weight, distance, etc.). It finds application both in the physical and mathematical sphere and in the field of humanitarian studies. We can make a conclusion that neither nature nor human create the time. Time is an imaginary phenomenon connecting human activity and natural processes in the limits of human consciousness.

  9. Classification of Gait Types Based on the Duty-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with classification of human gait types based on the notion that different gait types are in fact different types of locomotion, i.e., running is not simply walking done faster. We present the duty-factor, which is a descriptor based on this notion. The duty-factor is independent...

  10. Multidirectional transparent support for overground gait training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallery, H; Lutz, P; von Zitzewitz, J; Rauter, G; Fritschi, M; Everarts, C; Ronsse, R; Curt, A; Bolliger, M

    2013-06-01

    Gait and balance training is an essential ingredient for locomotor rehabilitation of patients with neurological impairments. Robotic overhead support systems may help these patients train, for example by relieving them of part of their body weight. However, there are only very few systems that provide support during overground gait, and these suffer from limited degrees of freedom and/or undesired interaction forces due to uncompensated robot dynamics, namely inertia. Here, we suggest a novel mechanical concept that is based on cable robot technology and that allows three-dimensional gait training while reducing apparent robot dynamics to a minimum. The solution does not suffer from the conventional drawback of cable robots, which is a limited workspace. Instead, displaceable deflection units follow the human subject above a large walking area. These deflection units are not actuated, instead they are implicitly displaced by means of the forces in the cables they deflect. This leads to an underactuated design, because the deflection units cannot be moved arbitrarily. However, the design still allows accurate control of a three-dimensional force vector acting on a human subject during gait. We describe the mechanical concept, the control concept, and we show first experimental results obtained with the device, including the force control performance during robot-supported overground gait of five human subjects without motor impairments.

  11. GAIT VARIATION IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A CONTROLLED STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Jayalath J.L.R; Dassanayake T.D.M.S.B; Dissanayake M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most common chronic diseases which increase the individual’s disability and affects the patients gait as the disease progress. Thus identifying the changes in gait variables in knee osteoarthritis patients is important. Objectives: To compare the gait variables such as walking velocity, cadence, step length, walking base, and single support time, in both control group of people and in the disease group. Method: This descriptive cross sectional study conduc...

  12. Children with lower limb length inequality: The measurement of inequality, the timing of physiodesis and gait analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.I.H. Lampe

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe symmetry of the human locomotion apparatus makes inequality of the limbs an aberrant finding for both patient and doctor. 4-15% of the healthy, adult population, has a limb length inequality (LLI) of one cm or more. A minor discrepancy of less than one cm is therefore common and many

  13. One-year persistence of individual gait patterns identified in a follow-up study - A call for individualised diagnose and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, F; Mildner, M; Schöllhorn, W I

    2017-09-06

    Although a hunch about the individuality of human movements generally exists, differences in gait patterns between individuals are often neglected. To date, only a few studies distinguished individual gait patterns in terms of uniqueness and emphasised the relevance of individualised diagnoses and therapy. However, small sample sizes have been a limitation on identifying subjects based on gait patterns, and little is known about the permanence of subject-specific characteristics over time. The purpose of this study was (1) to prove the uniqueness of individual gait patterns within a larger sample and (2) to prove the long-term permanence of individual gait patterns. A sample of 128 healthy participants each walked a distance of 10m barefoot 10 times. Two force plates recorded the ground reaction forces during a double step at a self-selected walking speed. A subsample of 46 participants repeated this procedure after a period of 7-16 months. The application of support vector machines resulted in classification rates of 99.8% (1278 out of 1280) and 99.4% (914 out of 920) for the initial subject-classification and the subsample follow-up-classification, respectively. The results showed that gait patterns based on time-continuous ground reaction forces were unique to an individual and could be differentiated from those of other individuals. Support vector machines classified gait patterns to the corresponding individual almost error-free. Hence, human gait is not only different between individuals but also exhibits unique individual characteristics that are persistent over years. Our findings provide evidence for the individual nature of human walking and emphasise the need to evaluate individualised clinical approaches for diagnoses and therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluctuation and synchronization of gait intervals and gait force profiles distinguish stages of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny; Plotnik, Meir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2007-09-01

    We study the effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) on the long-term fluctuation and phase synchronization properties of gait timing (series of interstride intervals) as well as gait force profiles (series characterizing the morphological changes between the steps). We find that the fluctuations in the gait timing are significantly larger for PD patients and early PD patients, who were not treated yet with medication, compared to age-matched healthy controls. Simultaneously, the long-term correlations and the phase synchronization of right and left leg are significantly reduced in both types of PD patients. Surprisingly, long-term correlations of the gait force profiles are relatively weak for treated PD patients and healthy controls, while they are significantly larger for early PD patients. The results support the idea that timing and morphology of recordings obtained from a complex system can contain complementary information.

  15. Importance of Gait Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amputation exercises done under the supervision of a physical therapist, the initial training is provided by the prosthetist ... this stage, it is best to involve a physical therapist for regular gait training sessions. Once it is ...

  16. Effect of Interpersonal Interaction on Festinating Gait Rehabilitation in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Uchitomi

    Full Text Available Although human walking gait rhythms are generated by native individual gait dynamics, these gait dynamics change during interactions between humans. A typical phenomenon is synchronization of gait rhythms during cooperative walking. Our previous research revealed that fluctuation characteristics in stride interval of subjects with Parkinson's disease changed from random to 1/f fluctuation as fractal characteristics during cooperative walking with the gait assist system Walk-Mate, which emulates a human interaction using interactive rhythmic cues. Moreover, gait dynamics were relearned through Walk-Mate gait training. However, the system's clinical efficacy was unclear because the previous studies did not focus on specific gait rhythm disorder symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Walk-Mate on festinating gait among subjects with Parkinson's disease. Three within-subject experimental conditions were used: (1 preinteraction condition, (2 interaction condition, and (3 postinteraction condition. The only difference between conditions was the interactive rhythmic cues generated by Walk-Mate. Because subjects with festinating gait gradually and involuntarily decreased their stride interval, the regression slope of stride interval as an index of severity of preinteraction festinating gait was elevated. The regression slope in the interaction condition was more gradual than during the preinteraction condition, indicating that the interactive rhythmic cues contributed to relieving festinating gait and stabilizing gait dynamics. Moreover, the gradual regression slope was carried over to the postinteraction condition, indicating that subjects with festinating gait have the potential to relearn stable gait dynamics. These results suggest that disordered gait dynamics are clinically restored through interactive rhythmic cues and that Walk-Mate may have the potential to assist therapists in more effective rehabilitation.UMIN Clinical

  17. Gait Phase Recognition for Lower-Limb Exoskeleton with Only Joint Angular Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du-Xin Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gait phase is widely used for gait trajectory generation, gait control and gait evaluation on lower-limb exoskeletons. So far, a variety of methods have been developed to identify the gait phase for lower-limb exoskeletons. Angular sensors on lower-limb exoskeletons are essential for joint closed-loop controlling; however, other types of sensors, such as plantar pressure, attitude or inertial measurement unit, are not indispensable.Therefore, to make full use of existing sensors, we propose a novel gait phase recognition method for lower-limb exoskeletons using only joint angular sensors. The method consists of two procedures. Firstly, the gait deviation distances during walking are calculated and classified by Fisher’s linear discriminant method, and one gait cycle is divided into eight gait phases. The validity of the classification results is also verified based on large gait samples. Secondly, we build a gait phase recognition model based on multilayer perceptron and train it with the phase-labeled gait data. The experimental result of cross-validation shows that the model has a 94.45% average correct rate of set (CRS and an 87.22% average correct rate of phase (CRP on the testing set, and it can predict the gait phase accurately. The novel method avoids installing additional sensors on the exoskeleton or human body and simplifies the sensory system of the lower-limb exoskeleton.

  18. Gait Phase Recognition for Lower-Limb Exoskeleton with Only Joint Angular Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Du-Xin; Wu, Xinyu; Du, Wenbin; Wang, Can; Xu, Tiantian

    2016-09-27

    Gait phase is widely used for gait trajectory generation, gait control and gait evaluation on lower-limb exoskeletons. So far, a variety of methods have been developed to identify the gait phase for lower-limb exoskeletons. Angular sensors on lower-limb exoskeletons are essential for joint closed-loop controlling; however, other types of sensors, such as plantar pressure, attitude or inertial measurement unit, are not indispensable.Therefore, to make full use of existing sensors, we propose a novel gait phase recognition method for lower-limb exoskeletons using only joint angular sensors. The method consists of two procedures. Firstly, the gait deviation distances during walking are calculated and classified by Fisher's linear discriminant method, and one gait cycle is divided into eight gait phases. The validity of the classification results is also verified based on large gait samples. Secondly, we build a gait phase recognition model based on multilayer perceptron and train it with the phase-labeled gait data. The experimental result of cross-validation shows that the model has a 94.45% average correct rate of set (CRS) and an 87.22% average correct rate of phase (CRP) on the testing set, and it can predict the gait phase accurately. The novel method avoids installing additional sensors on the exoskeleton or human body and simplifies the sensory system of the lower-limb exoskeleton.

  19. Gait Phase Recognition for Lower-Limb Exoskeleton with Only Joint Angular Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Du-Xin; Wu, Xinyu; Du, Wenbin; Wang, Can; Xu, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    Gait phase is widely used for gait trajectory generation, gait control and gait evaluation on lower-limb exoskeletons. So far, a variety of methods have been developed to identify the gait phase for lower-limb exoskeletons. Angular sensors on lower-limb exoskeletons are essential for joint closed-loop controlling; however, other types of sensors, such as plantar pressure, attitude or inertial measurement unit, are not indispensable.Therefore, to make full use of existing sensors, we propose a novel gait phase recognition method for lower-limb exoskeletons using only joint angular sensors. The method consists of two procedures. Firstly, the gait deviation distances during walking are calculated and classified by Fisher’s linear discriminant method, and one gait cycle is divided into eight gait phases. The validity of the classification results is also verified based on large gait samples. Secondly, we build a gait phase recognition model based on multilayer perceptron and train it with the phase-labeled gait data. The experimental result of cross-validation shows that the model has a 94.45% average correct rate of set (CRS) and an 87.22% average correct rate of phase (CRP) on the testing set, and it can predict the gait phase accurately. The novel method avoids installing additional sensors on the exoskeleton or human body and simplifies the sensory system of the lower-limb exoskeleton. PMID:27690023

  20. Gait analysis using wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications.

  1. Gait Analysis Using Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutian Feng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications.

  2. Gait characteristic analysis and identification based on the iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Yang; Banda, Jacob

    2014-09-12

    Gait identification is a valuable approach to identify humans at a distance. In this paper, gait characteristics are analyzed based on an iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer,and a new approach is proposed for gait identification. Specifically, gait datasets are collected by the triaxial accelerometer and gyrometer embedded in an iPhone. Then, the datasets are processed to extract gait characteristic parameters which include gait frequency, symmetry coefficient, dynamic range and similarity coefficient of characteristic curves. Finally, a weighted voting scheme dependent upon the gait characteristic parameters is proposed forgait identification. Four experiments are implemented to validate the proposed scheme. The attitude and acceleration solutions are verified by simulation. Then the gait characteristics are analyzed by comparing two sets of actual data, and the performance of the weighted voting identification scheme is verified by 40 datasets of 10 subjects.

  3. Gait Characteristic Analysis and Identification Based on the iPhone’s Accelerometer and Gyrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gait identification is a valuable approach to identify humans at a distance. In thispaper, gait characteristics are analyzed based on an iPhone’s accelerometer and gyrometer,and a new approach is proposed for gait identification. Specifically, gait datasets are collectedby the triaxial accelerometer and gyrometer embedded in an iPhone. Then, the datasets areprocessed to extract gait characteristic parameters which include gait frequency, symmetrycoefficient, dynamic range and similarity coefficient of characteristic curves. Finally, aweighted voting scheme dependent upon the gait characteristic parameters is proposed forgait identification. Four experiments are implemented to validate the proposed scheme. Theattitude and acceleration solutions are verified by simulation. Then the gait characteristicsare analyzed by comparing two sets of actual data, and the performance of the weightedvoting identification scheme is verified by 40 datasets of 10 subjects.

  4. 行走中股骨生物力学特性的有限元分析%Finite element analysis of biomechanics of human femur during gait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨挺; 郑建河; 姚子龙; 马立敏; 张余

    2016-01-01

    Objective To simulate the optimal boundary conditions with the utilization of finite element, and to explore biomechanics of human femur during gait.Methods Volunteer′s femoral CT data was extracted before three-di-mensional reconstruction and meshing.A computer simulation software, Anybody, was used to simulate the normal move-ments during gait and export the muscle force exerted on femur during the activity.Geomagic studio and Hypermesh were used to match the coordinates between the target model and the model provided by AnyBody and load the muscle force to femur.After that, finite element analysis in Abaqus was performed to analyze the magnitude and concentration region of von Mises stress and strain on femur in gait process.Results The magnitude of von Mises reached the maximum of 27.70 MPa during the midstance phase of the gait cycle, which was located inferoposteriorly to the lesser trochanter.The stress magnitude reached the minimum of 0.62 MPa during the contralateral loading phase.The stress on femur during the swing phase concentrated on the medial mid-diaphysis, with a magnitude of 3.52 MPa.It was also during the mid-stance phase when the maximum of strain of 0.39 mm was observed at the femoral head.The maximum strain of 0.12 mm during the swing phase concentrated on femoral mid-diaphysis.The minimum strain of femur occurred in the contralateral load-ing phase.Conclusion During the mid-stance phase of gait cycle, the magnitude of stress reaches the maximum, which is located inferoposteriorly to the lesser trochanter of femur.The maximum strain of femur is located on the femoral head.%目的:利用有限元的方法,模拟人体最佳边界条件,探寻行走过程中股骨的生物力学情况。方法根据股骨CT数据进行三维重建,并且网格化。利用计算机仿真软件AnyBody模拟正常人平地行走时的动作,导出股骨在整个运动过程中受到的肌肉力。利用Geomagic studio和Hypermesh软件完成目标模

  5. Changes in Gait symmetry, Gait velocity and self-reported function following total hip replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Hodt-Billington, Caroline; Jorunn L. Helbostad; Vervaat, Willemijn; Rognsvåg, Turid; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the magnitude of change at different time points in measures of gait symmetry, gait velocity and self-reported function following total hip replacement. Design: Longitudinal with test occasions pre-surgery and 3, 6 and 12 months post-surgery. Subjects: Thirty-four patients with hip osteoarthritis (mean age 63 years, standard deviation 11 years). Methods: Subjects walked back and forth along a 7-m walkway at slow, preferred and fast speed. Ante...

  6. DRAG: a database for recognition and analasys of gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchi, Prem; Hiremagalur, Raghu Ram V.; Huang, Helen; Carhart, Michael; He, Jiping; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2003-11-01

    A novel approach is proposed for creating a standardized and comprehensive database for gait analysis. The field of gait analysis is gaining increasing attention for applications such as visual surveillance, human-computer interfaces, and gait recognition and rehabilitation. Numerous algorithms have been developed for analyzing and processing gait data; however, a standard database for their systematic evaluation does not exist. Instead, existing gait databases consist of subsets of kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic activity recordings by different investigators, at separate laboratories, and under varying conditions. Thus, the existing databases are neither homogenous nor sufficiently populated to statistically validate the algorithms. In this paper, a methodology for creating a database is presented, which can be used as a common ground to test the performance of algorithms that rely upon external marker data, ground reaction loading data, and/or video images. The database consists of: (1) synchronized motion-capture data (3D marker data) obtained using external markers, (2) computed joint angles, and (3) ground reaction loading acquired with plantar pressure insoles. This database could be easily expanded to include synchronized video, which will facilitate further development of video-based algorithms for motion tracking. This eventually could lead to the realization of markerless gait tracking. Such a system would have extensive applications in gait recognition, as well as gait rehabilitation. The entire database (marker, angle, and force data) will be placed in the public domain, and made available for downloads over the World Wide Web.

  7. [3-D ultrasound-assisted gait analysis of schizophrenic patients. Comparison between conventional neuroleptics and olanzapine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzhammer, Albert; Heindl, Bernhard; Müller, Jürgen; Broll, Karin; Pfeiff, Liane; Perfahl, Maria; Hess, Linda; Koch, Horst

    2003-05-01

    Schizophrenic disorders as well as neuroleptic treatment can affect locomotion. The study assessed the influence of neuroleptic treatment on human gait via ultrasonic topometric gait analysis. In a control sample the test system proved high test-retest-reliability. Spatial and temporal gait parameters were assessed in schizophrenic patients without neuroleptic treatment (n = 12) and under treatment with conventional neuroleptics (n = 14) and re-assessed after treatment change to the atypical neuroleptic olanzapine in a repeated measures design. After switch from conventional neuroleptics to olanzapine patients showed an increase of gait velocity (p step length (p gait analysis.

  8. Summary measures for clinical gait analysis: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela

    2014-04-01

    Instrumented 3D-gait analysis (3D-GA) is an important method used to obtain information that is crucial for establishing the level of functional limitation due to pathology, observing its evolution over time and evaluating rehabilitative intervention effects. However, a typical 3D-GA evaluation produces a vast amount of data, and despite its objectivity, its use is complicated, and the data interpretation is difficult. It is even more difficult to obtain an overview on patient cohorts for a comparison. Moreover, there is a growing awareness of the need for a concise index, specifically, a single measure of the 'quality' of a particular gait pattern. Several gait summary measures, which have been used in conjunction with 3D-GA, have been proposed to objectify clinical impression, quantify the degree of gait deviation from normal, stratify the severity of pathology, document the changes in gait patterns over time and evaluate interventions.

  9. What is a waddling gait?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, M.B. van; Mulley, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: A patient's gait can provide important diagnostic and functional information. Though 'waddling gait' is a long-established concept, we question whether this description is precise or clinically useful. METHODS: We searched 'waddling gait' in all main medical specialties core textbooks, in a

  10. Visualizing Human Migration Trhough Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambotti, G.; Guan, W.; Gest, J.

    2015-07-01

    Human migration has been an important activity in human societies since antiquity. Since 1890, approximately three percent of the world's population has lived outside of their country of origin. As globalization intensifies in the modern era, human migration persists even as governments seek to more stringently regulate flows. Understanding this phenomenon, its causes, processes and impacts often starts from measuring and visualizing its spatiotemporal patterns. This study builds a generic online platform for users to interactively visualize human migration through space and time. This entails quickly ingesting human migration data in plain text or tabular format; matching the records with pre-established geographic features such as administrative polygons; symbolizing the migration flow by circular arcs of varying color and weight based on the flow attributes; connecting the centroids of the origin and destination polygons; and allowing the user to select either an origin or a destination feature to display all flows in or out of that feature through time. The method was first developed using ArcGIS Server for world-wide cross-country migration, and later applied to visualizing domestic migration patterns within China between provinces, and between states in the United States, all through multiple years. The technical challenges of this study include simplifying the shapes of features to enhance user interaction, rendering performance and application scalability; enabling the temporal renderers to provide time-based rendering of features and the flow among them; and developing a responsive web design (RWD) application to provide an optimal viewing experience. The platform is available online for the public to use, and the methodology is easily adoptable to visualizing any flow, not only human migration but also the flow of goods, capital, disease, ideology, etc., between multiple origins and destinations across space and time.

  11. Robot-Crawler: Statically Balanced Gaits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parasuraman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new statically balanced walking technique for a robot‐crawler. The gait design and the control of the robot crawler aim to achieve stability while walking. This statically balanced gait has to be designed in a different fashion to a wheeled robot, as there are discrete changes in the support of the robot when its legs are lifted or placed on the ground. The stability of the robot depends on how the legs are positioned relative to the body and also on the sequence and timing with which the legs are lifted and placed. In order to reduce the risk of stability loss while walking, a measure for the robot stability (so‐called stability margin is typically used in the gait and motion planning. In this paper different biological behaviours of four‐legged animals are studied and mapped on a quad-legrobot‐crawler. Experiments were carried out on the forward walking gaits of lizards and horses. Based on these results, the stability margins of different gaits are discussed and compared.

  12. Gait abnormalities following slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kit M; Halliday, Suzanne; Reilly, Chris; Keezel, William

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluated 30 subjects with treated unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis and a range of severity from mild to severe to characterize gait and strength abnormalities using instrumented three-dimensional gait analysis and isokinetic muscle testing. For slip angles less than 30 degrees, kinematic, kinetic, and strength variables were not significantly different from age- and weight-matched controls. For moderate to severe slips, as slip angle increased, passive hip flexion, hip abduction, and internal rotation in the flexed and extended positions decreased significantly. Persistent pelvic obliquity, medial lateral trunk sway, and trunk obliquity in stance increased, as did extension, adduction, and external rotation during gait. Gait velocity and step length decreased with increased amount of time spent in double limb stance. Hip abductor moment, hip extension moment, knee flexion moment, and ankle dorsiflexion moment were all decreased on the involved side. Hip and knee strength also decreased with increasing slip severity. All of these changes were present on the affected and to a lesser degree the unaffected side. Body center of mass translation or pelvic obliquity in mid-stance greater than one standard deviation above normal correlated well with the impression of compensated or uncompensated Trendelenburg gait.

  13. 辅以功能电刺激的实时步态训练与反馈分析系统%Real-time Gait Training System with Embedded Functional Electrical Stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾琳燕; 阮兆明; 贾桂锋; 夏静; 裘利坚; 吴长旺; 金肖青; 宁钢民

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem that mostly gait analysis is independent from the treatment, this work proposes a system that integrates the functions of gait training and assessment for foot drop treatment. The system uses a set of sensors to col ect gait parameters and designes multi-mode functional electrical stimulators as actuator. Body area network technology is introduced to coordinate the data communication and execution of the sensors and stimulators, synchronize the gait analysis and foot drop treatment. Bluetooth 4.0 is applied to low the power consumption of the system. The system realizes the synchronization of treatment and gait analysis. It is able to acquire and analyze the dynamic parameters of ankle, knee and hip in real-time, and treat patients by guiding functional electrical stimulation delivery to the specific body locations of patients.%该文研究设计了同步实现足下垂患者步态训练和康复评估的综合系统,以解决目前存在的足下垂治疗与步态分析分离的不足。系统采用多传感器采集各运动部位的参数,并设计了多重模式的功能性电刺激装置,引入了体域网技术协调传感器和刺激器的数据通讯及控制,同步实现步态实时分析与足下垂治疗。体域网应用了蓝牙4.0技术以降低系统功耗。系统实现了治疗与评估的同步,能够实时采集并分析训练时踝、膝、髋等部位运动参数,并同时对患病部位进行功能性电刺激治疗。

  14. Gait as evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Larsen, Peter Kastmand

    2014-01-01

    This study examines what in Denmark may constitute evidence based on forensic anthropological gait analyses, in the sense of pointing to a match (or not) between a perpetrator and a suspect, based on video and photographic imagery. Gait and anthropometric measures can be used when direct facial...... comparison is not possible because of perpetrators masking their faces. The nature of judicial and natural scientific forms of evidence is discussed, and rulings dealing with the admissibility of video footage and forensic evidence in general are given. Technical issues of video materials are discussed...

  15. Gait in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: kinematics and electromyographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaudens, P; Banse, X; Mousny, M; Detrembleur, C

    2009-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a progressive growth disease that affects spinal anatomy, mobility, and left-right trunk symmetry. Consequently, AIS can modify human locomotion. Very few studies have investigated a simple activity like walking in a cohort of well-defined untreated patients with scoliosis. The first goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of scoliosis and scoliosis severity on kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) gait variables compared to an able-bodied population. The second goal is to look for any asymmetry in these parameters during walking. Thirteen healthy girls and 41 females with untreated AIS, with left thoracolumbar or lumbar primary structural curves were assessed. AIS patients were divided into three clinical subgroups (group 1 40 degrees). Gait analysis included synchronous bilateral kinematic and EMG measurements. The subjects walked on a treadmill at 4 km/h (comfortable speed). The tridimensional (3D) shoulder, pelvis, and lower limb motions were measured using 22 reflective markers tracked by four infrared cameras. The EMG timing activity was measured using bipolar surface electrodes on quadratus lumborum, erector spinae, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, semitendinosus, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles. Statistical comparisons (ANOVA) were performed across groups and sides for kinematic and EMG parameters. The step length was reduced in AIS compared to normal subjects (7% less). Frontal shoulder, pelvis, and hip motion and transversal hip motion were reduced in scoliosis patients (respectively, 21, 27, 28, and 22% less). The EMG recording during walking showed that the quadratus lumborum, erector spinae, gluteus medius, and semitendinosus muscles contracted during a longer part of the stride in scoliotic patients (46% of the stride) compared with normal subjects (35% of the stride). There was no significant difference between scoliosis groups 1, 2, and 3 for any of the kinematic and EMG parameters, meaning

  16. Gait adjustments in obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination after a recent lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Aline H.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Hof, At L.; Otten, Bert; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the adjustments in gait characteristics of obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination that occur in subjects with a recent lower limb amputation during the rehabilitation process. Design: Prospective and descriptive study. Subjects: Fourteen subjects with a recent

  17. Frequencies of initial gait disturbances and falls in 100 Wilson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieżyc, Karolina; Litwin, Tomasz; Chabik, Grzegorz; Członkowska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an inherited copper metabolism disorder. Gait disturbances may present with both extrapyramidal and cerebellar patterns. The frequencies of particular types of gait abnormalities have not been established; thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of initial gait disturbances among our neurological WD patients. We analyzed 103 WD patients with neurological features at the time of diagnosis, between 2005 and 2014. The neurological and gait assessments were based on the Unified Wilson's Disease Score Scale (UWDRS), from which, we distinguished three main patterns of gait: dystonic, ataxic, or Parkinsonian. All types of gait impairment were assessed using four stages of severity (0=normal, 4=severe). We also obtained each patient's history of falls. Three patients had severe dystonia of limbs and were unable to stand or walk. Gait abnormalities were noted in 59% (59/100) of the remaining group of patients. The most common observed pattern was ataxic gait (45%; 27/59), which presented as impaired tandem in most cases. A mixed gait impairment was observed in 25% (15/59) of patients (ataxic, dystonic, and Parkinsonian, n=8; ataxic and Parkinsonian, n=7), a Parkinsonian gait in 18% (11/59), and a dystonic gait in 10% (6/59) of patients. Falls were noted in 35% of patients, but were occasionally observed in most cases. Gait disturbances are frequent in WD, and reflect the involvement of many brain structures.

  18. Responses of human hip abductor muscles to lateral balance perturbations during walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, A. L.; Duysens, J.

    2013-01-01

    Lateral stability during gait is of utmost importance to maintain balance. This was studied on human subjects walking on a treadmill who were given 100-ms perturbations of known magnitude and timing with respect to the gait cycle by means of a computer-controlled pneumatic device. This method has th

  19. Responses of human hip abductor muscles to lateral balance perturbations during walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, A. L.; Duysens, J.

    2013-01-01

    Lateral stability during gait is of utmost importance to maintain balance. This was studied on human subjects walking on a treadmill who were given 100-ms perturbations of known magnitude and timing with respect to the gait cycle by means of a computer-controlled pneumatic device. This method has th

  20. Change Energy Image for Gait Recognition: An Approach Based on Symbolic Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Kumar H P; Nagendraswamy H S

    2014-01-01

    Gait can be identified by observing static and dynamic parts of human body. In this paper a variant of gait energy image called change energy images (CEI) are generated to capture detailed static and dynamic information of human gait. Radon transform is applied to CEI in four different directions (vertical, horizontal and two opposite cross sections) considering four different angles to compute discriminative feature values. The extracted features are represented in the form of interval –valu...

  1. Coordinated control strategy for robotic-assisted gait training with partial body weight support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦涛; 张立勋

    2015-01-01

    Walking is the most basic and essential part of the activities of daily living. To enable the elderly and non-ambulatory gait-impaired patients, the repetitive practice of this task, a novel gait training robot (GTR) was designed followed the end-effector principle, and an active partial body weight support (PBWS) system was introduced to facilitate successful gait training. For successful establishment of a walking gait on the GTR with PBWS, the motion laws of the GTR were planned to enable the phase distribution relationships of the cycle step, and the center of gravity (COG) trajectory of the human body during gait training on the GTR was measured. A coordinated control strategy was proposed based on the impedance control principle. A robotic prototype was developed as a platform for evaluating the design concepts and control strategies. Preliminary gait training with a healthy subject was implemented by the robotic-assisted gait training system and the experimental results are encouraging.

  2. Gait Deviation Index, Gait Profile Score and Gait Variable Score in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Mätzke; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg; Pedersen, Niels Wisbech;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) and Gait Profile Score (GPS) are the most used summary measures of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). However, the reliability and agreement of these indices have not been investigated, limiting their clinimetric quality for research and clinical...... practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the intra-rater reliability and agreement of summary measures of gait (GDI; GPS; and the Gait Variable Score (GVS) derived from the GPS). The intra-rater reliability and agreement were investigated across two repeated sessions in 18 children aged 5...

  3. Evidence for a time-invariant phase variable in human ankle control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Gregg

    Full Text Available Human locomotion is a rhythmic task in which patterns of muscle activity are modulated by state-dependent feedback to accommodate perturbations. Two popular theories have been proposed for the underlying embodiment of phase in the human pattern generator: a time-dependent internal representation or a time-invariant feedback representation (i.e., reflex mechanisms. In either case the neuromuscular system must update or represent the phase of locomotor patterns based on the system state, which can include measurements of hundreds of variables. However, a much simpler representation of phase has emerged in recent designs for legged robots, which control joint patterns as functions of a single monotonic mechanical variable, termed a phase variable. We propose that human joint patterns may similarly depend on a physical phase variable, specifically the heel-to-toe movement of the Center of Pressure under the foot. We found that when the ankle is unexpectedly rotated to a position it would have encountered later in the step, the Center of Pressure also shifts forward to the corresponding later position, and the remaining portion of the gait pattern ensues. This phase shift suggests that the progression of the stance ankle is controlled by a biomechanical phase variable, motivating future investigations of phase variables in human locomotor control.

  4. Kinematic analysis quantifies gait abnormalities associated with lameness in broiler chickens and identifies evolutionary gait differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C; Nicol, Christine J; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E; Weeks, Claire A; Colborne, G Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12) and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with

  5. Kinematic analysis quantifies gait abnormalities associated with lameness in broiler chickens and identifies evolutionary gait differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Caplen

    Full Text Available This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10 would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12 and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult. Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated

  6. Real time imaging of human progenitor neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Keenan

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitors are increasingly being employed in drug screens and emerging cell therapies targeted towards neurological disorders where neurogenesis is thought to play a key role including developmental disorders, Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Key to the success of these applications is understanding the mechanisms by which neurons arise. Our understanding of development can provide some guidance but since little is known about the specifics of human neural development and the requirement that cultures be expanded in vitro prior to use, it is unclear whether neural progenitors obey the same developmental mechanisms that exist in vivo. In previous studies we have shown that progenitors derived from fetal cortex can be cultured for many weeks in vitro as undifferentiated neurospheres and then induced to undergo neurogenesis by removing mitogens and exposing them to supportive substrates. Here we use live time lapse imaging and immunocytochemical analysis to show that neural progenitors use developmental mechanisms to generate neurons. Cells with morphologies and marker profiles consistent with radial glia and recently described outer radial glia divide asymmetrically and symmetrically to generate multipolar intermediate progenitors, a portion of which express ASCL1. These multipolar intermediate progenitors subsequently divide symmetrically to produce CTIP2(+ neurons. This 3-cell neurogenic scheme echoes observations in rodents in vivo and in human fetal slice cultures in vitro, providing evidence that hNPCs represent a renewable and robust in vitro assay system to explore mechanisms of human neurogenesis without the continual need for fresh primary human fetal tissue. Knowledge provided by this and future explorations of human neural progenitor neurogenesis will help maximize the safety and efficacy of new stem cell therapies by providing an understanding of how to generate physiologically-relevant cell types that maintain their

  7. A Low-Cost Anthropometric Walking Robot for Reproducing Gait Lab Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Eduardo da Silva Santana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human gait analysis is one of the resources that may be used in the study and treatment of pathologies of the locomotive system. This paper deals with the modelling and control aspects of the design, construction and testing of a biped walking robot conceived to, in limited extents, reproduce the human gait. Robot dimensions have been chosen in order to guarantee anthropomorphic proportions and then to help health professionals in gait studies. The robot has been assembled with low-cost components and can reproduce, in an assisted way, real-gait patterns generated from data previously acquired in gait laboratories. Part of the simulated and experimental results are addressed to demonstrate the ability of the biped robot in reproducing normal and pathological human gait.

  8. Learning new gait patterns: Exploratory muscle activity during motor learning is not predicted by motor modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Rajiv; Krishnan, Chandramouli; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Rymer, William Z

    2016-03-21

    The motor module hypothesis in motor control proposes that the nervous system can simplify the problem of controlling a large number of muscles in human movement by grouping muscles into a smaller number of modules. Here, we tested one prediction of the modular organization hypothesis by examining whether there is preferential exploration along these motor modules during the learning of a new gait pattern. Healthy college-aged participants learned a new gait pattern which required increased hip and knee flexion during the swing phase while walking in a lower-extremity robot (Lokomat). The new gait pattern was displayed as a foot trajectory in the sagittal plane and participants attempted to match their foot trajectory to this template. We recorded EMG from 8 lower-extremity muscles and we extracted motor modules during both baseline walking and target-tracking using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Results showed increased trajectory variability in the first block of learning, indicating that participants were engaged in exploratory behavior. Critically, when we examined the muscle activity during this exploratory phase, we found that the composition of motor modules changed significantly within the first few strides of attempting the new gait pattern. The lack of persistence of the motor modules under even short time scales suggests that motor modules extracted during locomotion may be more indicative of correlated muscle activity induced by the task constraints of walking, rather than reflecting a modular control strategy.

  9. Accelerometer and gyroscope based gait analysis using spectral analysis of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Wieland; Hottowitz, Ralf; Sohns, Christian; Sohns, Jan Martin; Gilbert, Fabian; Menke, Jan; Niklas, Andree; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] A wide variety of accelerometer tools are used to estimate human movement, but there are no adequate data relating to gait symmetry parameters in the context of knee osteoarthritis. This study's purpose was to evaluate a 3D-kinematic system using body-mounted sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) on the trunk and limbs. This is the first study to use spectral analysis for data post processing. [Subjects] Twelve patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) (10 male) and seven age-matched controls (6 male) were studied. [Methods] Measurements with 3-D accelerometers and gyroscopes were compared to video analysis with marker positions tracked by a six-camera optoelectronic system (VICON 460, Oxford Metrics). Data were recorded using the 3D-kinematic system. [Results] The results of both gait analysis systems were significantly correlated. Five parameters were significantly different between the knee OA and control groups. To overcome time spent in expensive post-processing routines, spectral analysis was performed for fast differentiation between normal gait and pathological gait signals using the 3D-kinematic system. [Conclusions] The 3D-kinematic system is objective, inexpensive, accurate and portable, and allows long-term recordings in clinical, sport as well as ergonomic or functional capacity evaluation (FCE) settings. For fast post-processing, spectral analysis of the recorded data is recommended.

  10. Parkinson's disease assessment based on gait analysis using an innovative RGB-D camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Ana Patrícia; Choupina, Hugo; Fernandes, José Maria; Rosas, Maria José; Vaz, Rui; Silva Cunha, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Movement-related diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), progressively affect the motor function, many times leading to severe motor impairment and dramatic loss of the patients' quality of life. Human motion analysis techniques can be very useful to support clinical assessment of this type of diseases. In this contribution, we present a RGB-D camera (Microsoft Kinect) system and its evaluation for PD assessment. Based on skeleton data extracted from the gait of three PD patients treated with deep brain stimulation and three control subjects, several gait parameters were computed and analyzed, with the aim of discriminating between non-PD and PD subjects, as well as between two PD states (stimulator ON and OFF). We verified that among the several quantitative gait parameters, the variance of the center shoulder velocity presented the highest discriminative power to distinguish between non-PD, PD ON and PD OFF states (p = 0.004). Furthermore, we have shown that our low-cost portable system can be easily mounted in any hospital environment for evaluating patients' gait. These results demonstrate the potential of using a RGB-D camera as a PD assessment tool.

  11. The golden ratio of gait harmony: repetitive proportions of repetitive gait phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosa, Marco; Fusco, Augusto; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number φ known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with φ, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from φ (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait.

  12. The Golden Ratio of Gait Harmony: Repetitive Proportions of Repetitive Gait Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Iosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with , the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (, , repeated measure analysis of variance or from (, resp., t-tests. The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait.

  13. Modeling freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease with a virtual reality paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, J M; Matar, E; Bolitho, S J; Dilda, V; Morris, T R; Naismith, S L; Moore, S T; Lewis, S J G

    2013-05-01

    Freezing of gait is a paroxysmal and disabling symptom that commonly affects patients in the latter stages of Parkinson's disease, however the intermittent nature of this symptom makes it difficult to study in the clinical setting. Our research group has previously reported a correlation between self-reported freezing of gait symptoms and performance on a seated virtual reality gait task. In this study, we sought to determine whether behavioral measures recorded on this task were correlated with actual clinical measures of freezing of gait recorded in a cohort of 38 Parkinson's disease patients whilst in their clinically defined 'off' state. Firstly, patients with freezing of gait had a significantly larger frequency of spontaneous motor arrests recorded on the virtual reality gait task than 'non-freezers'. In addition, in those 24 patients with clinically proven freezing of gait, the number and percentage of time spent with freezing on the virtual reality task were both moderately correlated with the duration of freezing of gait recorded on the timed up-and-go tasks. These findings suggest that the freezing behavior observed during a virtual reality gait task may share similar neural substrates to freezing of gait. Such a relationship could offer a potential avenue for modeling the phenomenon of freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease, allowing for the exploration of the neural correlates of freezing. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training.

  15. Self-reported gait unsteadiness in mildly impaired neurological patients: an objective assessment through statistical gait analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetti Maria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-reported gait unsteadiness is often a problem in neurological patients without any clinical evidence of ataxia, because it leads to reduced activity and limitations in function. However, in the literature there are only a few papers that address this disorder. The aim of this study is to identify objectively subclinical abnormal gait strategies in these patients. Methods Eleven patients affected by self-reported unsteadiness during gait (4 TBI and 7 MS and ten healthy subjects underwent gait analysis while walking back and forth on a 15-m long corridor. Time-distance parameters, ankle sagittal motion, and muscular activity during gait were acquired by a wearable gait analysis system (Step32, DemItalia, Italy on a high number of successive strides in the same walk and statistically processed. Both self-selected gait speed and high speed were tested under relatively unconstrained conditions. Non-parametric statistical analysis (Mann–Whitney, Wilcoxon tests was carried out on the means of the data of the two examined groups. Results The main findings, with data adjusted for velocity of progression, show that increased double support and reduced velocity of progression are the main parameters to discriminate patients with self-reported unsteadiness from healthy controls. Muscular intervals of activation showed a significant increase in the activity duration of the Rectus Femoris and Tibialis Anterior in patients with respect to the control group at high speed. Conclusions Patients with a subjective sensation of instability, not clinically documented, walk with altered strategies, especially at high gait speed. This is thought to depend on the mechanisms of postural control and coordination. The gait anomalies detected might explain the symptoms reported by the patients and allow for a more focused treatment design. The wearable gait analysis system used for long distance statistical walking assessment was able to detect

  16. Feasibility of nurses measuring gait speed in older community-dwelling Emergency Department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Paula W; Evans, Dian Dowling; Clevenger, Carolyn K; Ardisson, Michelle; Hwang, Ula

    Gait speed assessment is a rapid, simple and objective measure for predicting risk of unfavorable outcomes which may provide better prognostic and reliable information than existing geriatric ED (Emergency Department) screening tools. This descriptive pilot project was designed to determine feasibility of implementing gait speed screening into routine nursing practice by objectively identifying patients with sub-optimal gait speeds. Participants included community-dwelling adults 65 years and older with plans for discharge following ED treatment. Patients with a gait speed <1.0 m/s were identified as "high-risk" for an adverse event, and referred to the ED social worker for individualized resources prior to discharge. Thirty-five patients were screened and nurse initiated gait speed screens were completed 60% of the time. This project demonstrates ED gait speed screening may be feasible. Implications for practice should consider incorporating gait speed screening into routine nursing assessment to improve provider ED decision-making and disposition planning.

  17. [Complexity analysis of gait signal based on Jensen-Shannon divergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peicun; Wang, Jun

    2014-06-01

    When people are walking, they will produce gait signals and different people will produce different gait signals. The research of the gait signal complexity is really of great significance for medicine. By calculating people's gait signal complexity, we can assess a person's health status and thus timely detect and diagnose diseases. In this study, the Jensen-Shannon divergence (JSD), the method of complexity analysis, was used to calculate the complexity of gait signal in the healthy elderly, healthy young people and patients with Parkinson's disease. Then we detected the experimental data by variance detection. The results showed that the difference among the complexity of the three gait signals was great. Through this research, we have got gait signal complexity range of patients with Parkinson's disease, the healthy elderly and healthy young people, respectively, which would provide an important basis for clinical diagnosis.

  18. Evaluating the Contributions of Dynamic Flow to Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A. Lebold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although visual cues can improve gait in Parkinson's disease (PD, their underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Previous research suggests that cues contribute optical flow that is essential to elicit gait improvement. The present study manipulated how optic flow was provided, and how this might influence freezing of gait (FOG in PD. Therefore, three groups; 15 PD FOG, 16 PD non-FOG, and 16 healthy controls were tested in 3 narrow doorway conditions; baseline (Narrow, ground lines (Ground, and laser (Laser. Step length indicated that the PD FOG group was only able to improve with ground lines, while the laser increased gait variability and double support time. These results suggest that optic flow in itself is not enough to elicit gait improvement in PD. When PD patients use visual cues, gait becomes less automatically controlled and hence preplanned conscious control may be an important factor contributing to gait improvement.

  19. Gait as evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Larsen, Peter Kastmand

    2014-01-01

    This study examines what in Denmark may constitute evidence based on forensic anthropological gait analyses, in the sense of pointing to a match (or not) between a perpetrator and a suspect, based on video and photographic imagery. Gait and anthropometric measures can be used when direct facial...... comparison is not possible because of perpetrators masking their faces. The nature of judicial and natural scientific forms of evidence is discussed, and rulings dealing with the admissibility of video footage and forensic evidence in general are given. Technical issues of video materials are discussed......, and the study also discusses how such evidence may be presented, both in written statements and in court. © The Institution of Engineering and Technology 2014....

  20. Metatarsal Loading During Gait-A Musculoskeletal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Munajjed, Amir A; Bischoff, Jeffrey E; Dharia, Mehul A; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Carbes, Sylvain

    2016-03-01

    Detailed knowledge of the loading conditions within the human body is essential for the development and optimization of treatments for disorders and injuries of the musculoskeletal system. While loads in the major joints of the lower limb have been the subject of extensive study, relatively little is known about the forces applied to the individual bones of the foot. The objective of this study was to use a detailed musculoskeletal model to compute the loads applied to the metatarsal bones during gait across several healthy subjects. Motion-captured gait trials and computed tomography (CT) foot scans from four healthy subjects were used as the inputs to inverse dynamic simulations that allowed the computation of loads at the metatarsal joints. Low loads in the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint were predicted before terminal stance, however, increased to an average peak of 1.9 times body weight (BW) before toe-off in the first metatarsal. At the first tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint, loads of up to 1.0 times BW were seen during the early part of stance, reflecting tension in the ligaments and muscles. These loads subsequently increased to an average peak of 3.0 times BW. Loads in the first ray were higher compared to rays 2-5. The joints were primarily loaded in the longitudinal direction of the bone.

  1. Stability of an underactuated bipedal gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S; Sangwan, V; Taneja, A; Seth, B

    2007-01-01

    A self-excited biped walking mechanism consisting of two legs that are connected in series at the hip joint through a servomotor is studied as a cyclic system with collisions. A torque proportional to angle between the shank of the swinging leg and the vertical is seen to sustain a gait. Each leg has a thigh and a shank connected at a passive knee joint that has a knee stopper restricting hyperextension similar to the human knee. A mathematical model for the dynamics of the system including the impact equations is used to analyse the stability of the system through examination of phase plane plots. Attractor lines along which the system approaches stability have been identified. A leg length for optimal stability has been identified. The biological basis for the proposed system has been identified by comparison with human gait.

  2. Experimental vascular dementia rats model of real-time gait behavior analysis%实验性血管性痴呆大鼠模型的实时步态行为分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关亚兰; 董世芬; 张胜威; 孙建宁; 刘振权

    2015-01-01

    目的:建立实验性血管性痴呆大鼠模型,研究其实时步态行为。方法采用双侧颈总动脉结扎方法建立大鼠血管性痴呆模型,术后50 d进行实时步态行为训练与测试,记录步行速度、步行周期、步幅、步基、支撑时长、摆动时长等指标共计96项。结果与假手术组比较,实验性血管性痴呆模型组大鼠有19项步态指标出现了显著地统计学差异,模型动物步态行为异常主要体现在前肢步宽增加(P <0.05),各足步行周期延长(P <0.05),各足支撑时长增加(P <0.05,P <0.01),摆动时长缩短(P <0.05),同源协调性降低(P <0.05),各足足迹平均面积和平均强度增加(P <0.05,P <0.01)。结论实验性血管性痴呆大鼠模型实时步态行为异常与临床患者所见症状相似,可为该模型的建立和判断提供借鉴。%Objective To establish experimental vascular dementia rat model and evaluate gait behavior . Methods Vascular dementia rat model induced by bilateral carotid artery ligation methods , 50 days for real-time gait behavioral training and testing after surgery .Results Compared with the sham group , Experimental vascular dementia model rats had 19 gait indicators appeared significantly statistical difference , Animal model gait abnormal behavior is mainly reflected in the forelimb step width increased (P <0.05), each foot walk cycle extension (P <0.05), Each foot stance time increased (P <0.05, P <0.01), and the swing time shortened (P <0.05), Homologous coupling shortened (P<0.05), each foot average footprint area and average intensity increased (P <0.05, P <0.01).Conclusion Experimental rat model of vascular dementia in real time gait abnormal behavior and seen in patients with clinical symptoms similar, can provide a reference model for the establishment and judgment .

  3. Change Energy Image for Gait Recognition: An Approach Based on Symbolic Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Kumar H P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gait can be identified by observing static and dynamic parts of human body. In this paper a variant of gait energy image called change energy images (CEI are generated to capture detailed static and dynamic information of human gait. Radon transform is applied to CEI in four different directions (vertical, horizontal and two opposite cross sections considering four different angles to compute discriminative feature values. The extracted features are represented in the form of interval –valued type symbolic data. The proposed method is capable of recognizing an individual when he/she have variations in their gait due to different clothes they wear, in different normal conditions and carrying a bag. A similarity measure suitable for the proposed gait representation is explored for the purpose of establishing similarity match for gait recognition. Experiments are conducted on CASIA database B and the results have shown better recognition performance compared to some of the existing methods.

  4. The effects of gait velocity on the gait characteristics of hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Young Youl; Chung, Sin Ho

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effects of gait speed on temporal and spatial gait characteristics of hemiplegic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty post-stroke hemiplegic patients participated in the present study. To enhance the reliability of the analysis of the gait characteristics, the assessments were conducted three days per week at the same time every day. Each subject walked maintaining a comfortable speed for the first minute, and measurement was conducted for 30 seconds at a treadmill speed of 1 km/hour thereafter. Then, the subjects walked at a treadmill speed of 2 km/hour for 30 seconds after a 30-minute rest. The differences in the measurements were tested for significance using the paired t-test. [Results] The measures of foot rotation, step width, load response, mid stance, pre-swing, swing phase, and double stance phase showed significant difference between the gait velocities. [Conclusion] The present study provides basic data for gait velocity changes for hemiplegic patients.

  5. A Multiple Regression Approach to Normalization of Spatiotemporal Gait Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Ferdous; Begg, Rezaul; Lythgo, Noel; Hass, Chris J; Halgamuge, Saman; Ackland, David C

    2016-04-01

    Normalization of gait data is performed to reduce the effects of intersubject variations due to physical characteristics. This study reports a multiple regression normalization approach for spatiotemporal gait data that takes into account intersubject variations in self-selected walking speed and physical properties including age, height, body mass, and sex. Spatiotemporal gait data including stride length, cadence, stance time, double support time, and stride time were obtained from healthy subjects including 782 children, 71 adults, 29 elderly subjects, and 28 elderly Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Data were normalized using standard dimensionless equations, a detrending method, and a multiple regression approach. After normalization using dimensionless equations and the detrending method, weak to moderate correlations between walking speed, physical properties, and spatiotemporal gait features were observed (0.01 normalization using the multiple regression method reduced these correlations to weak values (|r| normalization using dimensionless equations and detrending resulted in significant differences in stride length and double support time of PD patients; however the multiple regression approach revealed significant differences in these features as well as in cadence, stance time, and stride time. The proposed multiple regression normalization may be useful in machine learning, gait classification, and clinical evaluation of pathological gait patterns.

  6. The gait of unilateral transfemoral amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, A M; Schrama, J; Fidler, V; Eisma, W H

    1994-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the gait of persons with a unilateral transfemoral amputation by means of a questionnaire, gait analysis and measurement of energy expenditure, and to find correlations among the variables studied. The study included 29 transfemoral amputees amputated for other reasons than a chronic vascular disease. The patients were assessed using the following methods: 1) A questionnaire rating the walking distance and walking difficulty in different circumstances. 2) Gait analysis measuring temporal variables and goniometry of hips and knees. 3) Measurement of energy expenditure during sitting and walking. Scores on the questionnaire showed a correlation with socket design, a negative correlation with age and energy expenditure, and a positive correlation with fast speed. The gait of transfemoral amputees was asymmetrical as far as temporal variables were concerned, and for most amputees also for the range of motion of hip and knee. The walking speed of the amputees was lower than that of non-amputees and showed a positive correlation with hip extension-flexion range of motion and a negative correlation with age and stride time. The energy expenditure of the amputees during ambulation was higher than that of non-amputees, and seemed to correlate with residual limb length and the hip abduction-adduction range of motion.

  7. Gait biometrics under spoofing attacks: an experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, Abdenour; Ghahramani, Mohammad; Kellokumpu, Vili; Feng, Xiaoyi; Bustard, John; Nixon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Gait is a relatively biometric modality which has a precious advantage over other modalities, such as iris and voice, in that it can be easily captured from a distance. Although it has recently become a topic of great interest in biometric research, there has been little investigation into gait spoofing attacks where a person tries to imitate the clothing or walking style of someone else. We recently analyzed for the first time the effects of spoofing attacks on silhouette-based gait biometric systems and showed that it was indeed possible to spoof gait biometric systems by clothing impersonation and the deliberate selection of a target that has a similar build to the attacker. To gain deeper insight into the performance of current gait biometric systems under spoofing attacks, we provide a thorough investigation on how clothing can be used to spoof a target and evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art recognition methods on a gait spoofing database recorded at the University of Southampton. Furthermore, we describe and evaluate an initial solution coping with gait spoofing attacks. The obtained results are very promising and point out interesting findings which can be used for future investigations.

  8. Invariant Gait Continuum Based on the Duty-Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to describe the continuum of human gait in an invariant manner. The gait description is based on the duty-factor which is adopted from the biomechanics literature. We generate a database of artificial silhouettes representing the three main types of gait, i.......e. walking, jogging, and running. By generating silhouettes from different camera angles we make the method invariant to camera viewpoint and to changing directions of movement. Silhouettes are extracted using the Code-book method and represented in a scale- and translation-invariant manner by using shape...... contexts and tangent orientations. Input silhouettes are matched to the database using the Hungarian method. We define a classifier based on the dissimilarity between the input silhouettes and the gait actions of the database. This classification achieves an overall recognition rate of 87.1% on a diverse...

  9. Human genetics in troubled times and places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter S

    2018-01-01

    The development of human genetics world-wide during the twentieth century, especially across Europe, has occurred against a background of repeated catastrophes, including two world wars and the ideological problems and repression posed by Nazism and Communism. The published scientific literature gives few hints of these problems and there is a danger that they will be forgotten. The First World War was largely indiscriminate in its carnage, but World War 2 and the preceding years of fascism were associated with widespread migration, especially of Jewish workers expelled from Germany, and of their children, a number of whom would become major contributors to the post-war generation of human and medical geneticists in Britain and America. In Germany itself, eminent geneticists were also involved in the abuses carried out in the name of 'eugenics' and 'race biology'. However, geneticists in America, Britain and the rest of Europe were largely responsible for the ideological foundations of these abuses. In the Soviet Union, geneticists and genetics itself became the object of persecution from the 1930s till as late as the mid 1960s, with an almost complete destruction of the field during this time; this extended also to Eastern Europe and China as part of the influence of Russian communism. Most recently, at the end of the twentieth century, China saw a renewal of government sponsored eugenics programmes, now mostly discarded. During the post-world war 2 decades, human genetics research benefited greatly from recognition of the genetic dangers posed by exposure to radiation, following the atomic bomb explosions in Japan, atmospheric testing and successive accidental nuclear disasters in Russia. Documenting and remembering these traumatic events, now largely forgotten among younger workers, is essential if we are to fully understand the history of human genetics and avoid the repetition of similar disasters in the future. The power of modern human genetic and genomic

  10. Gait patterns for crime fighting: statistical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulovská, Kateřina; Bělašková, Silvie; Adámek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The criminality is omnipresent during the human history. Modern technology brings novel opportunities for identification of a perpetrator. One of these opportunities is an analysis of video recordings, which may be taken during the crime itself or before/after the crime. The video analysis can be classed as identification analyses, respectively identification of a person via externals. The bipedal locomotion focuses on human movement on the basis of their anatomical-physiological features. Nowadays, the human gait is tested by many laboratories to learn whether the identification via bipedal locomotion is possible or not. The aim of our study is to use 2D components out of 3D data from the VICON Mocap system for deep statistical analyses. This paper introduces recent results of a fundamental study focused on various gait patterns during different conditions. The study contains data from 12 participants. Curves obtained from these measurements were sorted, averaged and statistically tested to estimate the stability and distinctiveness of this biometrics. Results show satisfactory distinctness of some chosen points, while some do not embody significant difference. However, results presented in this paper are of initial phase of further deeper and more exacting analyses of gait patterns under different conditions.

  11. Efficacy of clinical gait analysis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Tishya A L; Gorton, George E; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Tucker, Carole A

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and summarize the current evidence base related to the clinical efficacy of gait analysis. A literature review was conducted to identify references related to human gait analysis published between January 2000 and September 2009 plus relevant older references. The references were assessed independently by four reviewers using a hierarchical model of efficacy adapted for gait analysis, and final scores were agreed upon by at least three of the four reviewers. 1528 references were identified relating to human instrumented gait analysis. Of these, 116 original articles addressed technical accuracy efficacy, 89 addressed diagnostic accuracy efficacy, 11 addressed diagnostic thinking and treatment efficacy, seven addressed patient outcomes efficacy, and one addressed societal efficacy, with some of the articles addressing multiple levels of efficacy. This body of literature provides strong evidence for the technical, diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic thinking and treatment efficacy of gait analysis. The existing evidence also indicates efficacy at the higher levels of patient outcomes and societal cost-effectiveness, but this evidence is more sparse and does not include any randomized controlled trials. Thus, the current evidence supports the clinical efficacy of gait analysis, particularly at the lower levels of efficacy, but additional research is needed to strengthen the evidence base at the higher levels of efficacy.

  12. Effect of observation on lower limb prosthesis gait biomechanics: Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchow, Connor; Fiedler, Goeran

    2016-12-01

    The Hawthorne effect, a subcategory of reactivity, causes human behavior to change when under observation. Such an effect may apply to gait variation of persons with prosthetics or orthotics devices. This study investigated whether the presence of observers directly affects the gait pattern of users of lower limb prostheses. Within-subject intervention study. Primary outcome measures were gait parameters of initial double support time and upper body lateral tilt angle, which were collected with a mobile sensor attached to the subjects' back. To make subjects feel unwatched, a certain amount of deception was necessary, and two different conditions were created and statistically compared against each other: one in which the subjects were initially unaware of the attention of observers and another one in which the same subjects were aware of a group of observers. Data from two subjects using trans-femoral prosthesis are reported. Findings included a change in step initial double support percentage by up to 14.2% (p = 0.019). Considerable changes were also noted in secondary outcome measures including speed, stride length, and stride symmetry. A reactivity effect of observation exists in prosthetics gait analysis. More comprehensive studies may be motivated by these preliminary findings. Results of this study suggest that users of lower limb prostheses walk differently when their gait is being assessed (e.g. in the prosthetist's office) than in situations without observers. This may in part explain the clinical experience that modifications of prosthetic fit or alignment provide only short-term betterment. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  13. The Effects of Music Salience on the Gait Performance of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Natalie; Kempster, Cody; Doucette, Angelica; Doan, Jon B; Hu, Bin; Brown, Lesley A

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a rhythmic beat in the form of a metronome tone or beat-accentuated original music can modulate gait performance; however, it has yet to be determined whether gait modulation can be achieved using commercially available music. The current study investigated the effects of commercially available music on the walking of healthy young adults. Specific aims were (a) to determine whether commercially available music can be used to influence gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability), (b) to establish the effect of music salience on gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability), and (c) to examine whether music tempi differentially effected gait (i.e., gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability). Twenty-five participants walked the length of an unobstructed walkway while listening to music. Music selections differed with respect to the salience or the tempo of the music. The genre of music and artists were self-selected by participants. Listening to music while walking was an enjoyable activity that influenced gait. Specifically, salient music selections increased measures of cadence, velocity, and stride length; in contrast, gait was unaltered by the presence of non-salient music. Music tempo did not differentially affect gait performance (gait velocity, stride length, cadence, stride time variability) in these participants. Gait performance was differentially influenced by music salience. These results have implications for clinicians considering the use of commercially available music as an alternative to the traditional rhythmic auditory cues used in rehabilitation programs. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Mechanical Information of Plantar Fascia during Normal Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaodong; Li, Zhiyong

    The plantar fascia is an important foot tissue in stabilizing the longitudinal arch of human foot. Direct measurement to monitor the mechanical situation of plantar fascia at human locomotion is difficult. The purpose of this study was to construct a three-dimensional finite element model of the foot to calculate the internal stress/strain value of plantar fascia during different stage of gait. The simulated stress distribution of plantar fascia was the lowest at heel-strike, which concentrated on the medial side of calcaneal tubercle. The peak stress of plantar fascia was appeared at push-off, and the value is more than 5 times of the heel-strike position. Current FE model was able to explore the plantar fascia tension trend at the main sub-phases of foot. More detailed fascia model and intrinsic muscle forces could be developed in the further study.

  15. Gait signal analysis with similarity measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyuk; Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons.

  16. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyuk Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons.

  17. Low Power Shoe Integrated Intelligent Wireless Gait Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.; Bakar, N. A.; Anuar, A. F.; Zainol, M. Z.; Hamzah, F.

    2014-04-01

    Gait analysis measurement is a method to assess and identify gait events and the measurements of dynamic, motion and pressure parameters involving the lowest part of the body. This significant analysis is widely used in sports, rehabilitation as well as other health diagnostic towards improving the quality of life. This paper presents a new system empowered by Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU), ultrasonic sensors, piezoceramic sensors array, XBee wireless modules and Arduino processing unit. This research focuses on the design and development of a low power ultra-portable shoe integrated wireless intelligent gait measurement using MEMS and recent microelectronic devices for foot clearance, orientation, error correction, gait events and pressure measurement system. It is developed to be cheap, low power, wireless, real time and suitable for real life in-door and out-door environment.

  18. Self-calibrating view-invariant gait biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredo, Michela; Bouchrika, Imed; Carter, John N; Nixon, Mark S

    2010-08-01

    We present a new method for viewpoint independent gait biometrics. The system relies on a single camera, does not require camera calibration, and works with a wide range of camera views. This is achieved by a formulation where the gait is self-calibrating. These properties make the proposed method particularly suitable for identification by gait, where the advantages of completely unobtrusiveness, remoteness, and covertness of the biometric system preclude the availability of camera information and specific walking directions. The approach has been assessed for feature extraction and recognition capabilities on the SOTON gait database and then evaluated on a multiview database to establish recognition capability with respect to view invariance. Moreover, tests on the multiview CASIA-B database, composed of more than 2270 video sequences with 65 different subjects walking freely along different walking directions, have been performed. The obtained results show that human identification by gait can be achieved without any knowledge of internal or external camera parameters with a mean correct classification rate of 73.6% across all views using purely dynamic gait features. The performance of the proposed method is particularly encouraging for application in surveillance scenarios.

  19. Trunk's natural inclination influences stance limb kinetics, but not body kinematics, during gait initiation in able men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Leteneur

    Full Text Available The imposing mass of the trunk in relation to the whole body has an important impact on human motion. The objective of this study is to determine the influence of trunk's natural inclination--forward (FW or backward (BW with respect to the vertical--on body kinematics and stance limb kinetics during gait initiation.Twenty-five healthy males were divided based on their natural trunk inclination (FW or BW during gait initiation. Instantaneous speed was calculated at the center of mass at the first heel strike. The antero-posterior impulse was calculated by integrating the antero-posterior ground reaction force in time. Ankle, knee, hip and thoraco-lumbar (L5 moments were calculated using inverse dynamics and only peaks of the joint moments were analyzed. Among all the investigated parameters, only joint moments present significant differences between the two groups. The knee extensor moment is 1.4 times higher (P<0.001 for the BW group, before the heel contact. At the hip, although the BW group displays a flexor moment 2.4 times higher (P<0.001 before the swing limb's heel-off, the FW group displays an extensor moment 3.1 times higher (P<0.01 during the swing phase. The three L5 extensor peaks after the toe-off are respectively 1.7 (P<0.001, 1.4 (P<0.001 and 1.7 (P<0.01 times higher for the FW group. The main results support the idea that the patterns described during steady-state gait are already observable during gait initiation. This study also provides reference data to further investigate stance limb kinetics in specific or pathologic populations during gait initiation. It will be of particular interest for elderly people, knowing that this population displays atypical trunk postures and present a high risk of falling during this forward stepping.

  20. A method to standardize gait and balance variables for gait velocity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, M.B. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Borm, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    Many gait and balance variables depend on gait velocity, which seriously hinders the interpretation of gait and balance data derived from walks at different velocities. However, as far as we know there is no widely accepted method to correct for effects of gait velocity on other gait and balance mea

  1. 一种基于多传感器的步态相位实时检测系统%A real-time gait phase detection system based on multi-sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小华; 李娟; 李伟达; 李春光; 胡海燕; 张虹淼

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and real-time gait phase detection is basis of control of intelligent prosthesis and other rehabilitation robot,a real-time phase detection system is proposed. Four foot force sensors and two attitude sensors are used in the system,which can detect phases of heel strike,foot flat,heel off,toe off,swing flexion and swing extend during walking on level ground. The experimental results show that the system can adapt to different walking velocities,different stride length of different subjects,and the experiment of prosthesis control is performed to prove the gait phase detection system can be used to real control of prosthesis.%对人体步态相位进行准确实时的判断是智能假肢等康复机器人控制的基础,提出并建立了一种实时状态相位检测系统.该系统包含了4只压力传感器和2只姿态传感器,能够准确地区分出平地行走时足跟着地、足放平、足跟离地、足尖离地、摆动弯曲以及摆动伸展等五种状态相位,实验表明:该系统能够适应不同测试者的不同步幅和步速,并能够应用在假肢的实时控制中.

  2. Estimation of Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Wearable Microphone-Sensor-Based System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xiangdong; Long, Zhou; Yuan, Jing; Qian, Yueliang; Li, Jintao

    2016-12-17

    Most existing wearable gait analysis methods focus on the analysis of data obtained from inertial sensors. This paper proposes a novel, low-cost, wireless and wearable gait analysis system which uses microphone sensors to collect footstep sound signals during walking. This is the first time a microphone sensor is used as a wearable gait analysis device as far as we know. Based on this system, a gait analysis algorithm for estimating the temporal parameters of gait is presented. The algorithm fully uses the fusion of two feet footstep sound signals and includes three stages: footstep detection, heel-strike event and toe-on event detection, and calculation of gait temporal parameters. Experimental results show that with a total of 240 data sequences and 1732 steps collected using three different gait data collection strategies from 15 healthy subjects, the proposed system achieves an average 0.955 F1-measure for footstep detection, an average 94.52% accuracy rate for heel-strike detection and 94.25% accuracy rate for toe-on detection. Using these detection results, nine temporal related gait parameters are calculated and these parameters are consistent with their corresponding normal gait temporal parameters and labeled data calculation results. The results verify the effectiveness of our proposed system and algorithm for temporal gait parameter estimation.

  3. Estimation of Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Wearable Microphone-Sensor-Based System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most existing wearable gait analysis methods focus on the analysis of data obtained from inertial sensors. This paper proposes a novel, low-cost, wireless and wearable gait analysis system which uses microphone sensors to collect footstep sound signals during walking. This is the first time a microphone sensor is used as a wearable gait analysis device as far as we know. Based on this system, a gait analysis algorithm for estimating the temporal parameters of gait is presented. The algorithm fully uses the fusion of two feet footstep sound signals and includes three stages: footstep detection, heel-strike event and toe-on event detection, and calculation of gait temporal parameters. Experimental results show that with a total of 240 data sequences and 1732 steps collected using three different gait data collection strategies from 15 healthy subjects, the proposed system achieves an average 0.955 F1-measure for footstep detection, an average 94.52% accuracy rate for heel-strike detection and 94.25% accuracy rate for toe-on detection. Using these detection results, nine temporal related gait parameters are calculated and these parameters are consistent with their corresponding normal gait temporal parameters and labeled data calculation results. The results verify the effectiveness of our proposed system and algorithm for temporal gait parameter estimation.

  4. Gait Patterns in Patients with Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranavolo, Alberto; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Martino, Giovanni; Leonardi, Luca; Conte, Carmela; Varrecchia, Tiwana; Draicchio, Francesco; Coppola, Gianluca; Casali, Carlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background Spastic gait is a key feature in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis, but the gait characterization and the relationship between the gait impairment and clinical characteristics have not been investigated. Objectives To describe the gait patterns in hereditary spastic paraparesis and to identify subgroups of patients according to specific kinematic features of walking. Methods We evaluated fifty patients by computerized gait analysis and compared them to healthy participants. We computed time-distance parameters of walking and the range of angular motion at hip, knee, and ankle joints, and at the trunk and pelvis. Lower limb joint moments and muscle co-activation values were also evaluated. Results We identified three distinct subgroups of patients based on the range of motion values. Subgroup one was characterized by reduced hip, knee, and ankle joint range of motion. These patients were the most severely affected from a clinical standpoint, had the highest spasticity, and walked at the slowest speed. Subgroup three was characterized by an increased hip joint range of motion, but knee and ankle joint range of motion values close to control values. These patients were the most mildly affected and had the highest walking speed. Finally, subgroup two showed reduced knee and ankle joint range of motion, and hip range of motion values close to control values. Disease severity and gait speed in subgroup two were between those of subgroups one and three. Conclusions We identified three distinctive gait patterns in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis that correlated robustly with clinical data. Distinguishing specific features in the gait patterns of these patients may help tailor pharmacological and rehabilitative treatments and may help evaluate therapeutic effects over time. PMID:27732632

  5. Gait Planning and Stability Control of a Quadruped Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize smooth gait planning and stability control of a quadruped robot, a new controller algorithm based on CPG-ZMP (central pattern generator-zero moment point is put forward in this paper. To generate smooth gait and shorten the adjusting time of the model oscillation system, a new CPG model controller and its gait switching strategy based on Wilson-Cowan model are presented in the paper. The control signals of knee-hip joints are obtained by the improved multi-DOF reduced order control theory. To realize stability control, the adaptive speed adjustment and gait switch are completed by the real-time computing of ZMP. Experiment results show that the quadruped robot’s gaits are efficiently generated and the gait switch is smooth in the CPG control algorithm. Meanwhile, the stability of robot’s movement is improved greatly with the CPG-ZMP algorithm. The algorithm in this paper has good practicability, which lays a foundation for the production of the robot prototype.

  6. The use of artificial intelligence in the analysis of sports performance: a review of applications in human gait analysis and future directions for sports biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, A C; Bartlett, R M

    1995-06-01

    Computers have played an important supporting role in the development of experimental and theoretical sports biomechanics. The role of the computer now extends from data capture and data processing through to mathematical and statistical modelling and simulation and optimization. This paper seeks to demonstrate that elevation of the role of the computer to involvement in the decision-making process, through the use of artificial intelligence techniques, would be a potentially rewarding future direction for the discipline. In the absence of significant previous work in this area, this paper reviews experiences in a parallel field of medical informatics, namely gait analysis. Research into the application of expert systems and neural networks to gait analysis is reviewed, observations made and comparisons drawn with the biomechanical analysis of sports performance. Brief explanations of the artificial intelligence techniques discussed in the paper are provided. The paper concludes that the creation of an expert system for a specific well-defined sports technique would represent a significant advance in the development of sports biomechanics.

  7. Terminology and forensic gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy; Young, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The use of appropriate terminology is a fundamental aspect of forensic gait analysis. The language used in forensic gait analysis is an amalgam of that used in clinical practice, podiatric biomechanics and the wider field of biomechanics. The result can often be a lack of consistency in the language used, the definitions used and the clarity of the message given. Examples include the use of 'gait' and 'walking' as synonymous terms, confusion between 'step' and 'stride', the mixing of anatomical, positional and pathological descriptors, and inability to describe appropriately movements of major body segments such as the torso. The purpose of this paper is to share the well-established definitions of the fundamental parameters of gait, common to all professions, and advocate their use in forensic gait analysis to establish commonality. The paper provides guidance on the selection and use of appropriate terminology in the description of gait in the forensic context. This paper considers the established definitions of the terms commonly used, identifies those terms which have the potential to confuse readers, and suggests a framework of terminology which should be utilised in forensic gait analysis.

  8. Interactively human: Sharing time, constructing materiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Predictive processing models of cognition are promising an elegant way to unite action, perception, and learning. However, in the current formulations, they are species-unspecific and have very little particularly human about them. I propose to examine how, in this framework, humans can be able to massively interact and to build shared worlds that are both material and symbolic.

  9. Capability of 2 gait measures for detecting response to gait training in stroke survivors: Gait Assessment and Intervention Tool and the Tinetti Gait Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, Janice; Daly, Janis J; Roenigk, Kristen L; Butler, Kristi; Burdsall, Richard; Holcomb, John P

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the performance of 2 observational gait measures, the Tinetti Gait Scale (TGS) and the Gait Assessment and Intervention Tool (G.A.I.T.), in identifying improvement in gait in response to gait training. In secondary analysis from a larger study of multimodal gait training for stroke survivors, we measured gait at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment according to G.A.I.T. and TGS, assessing their capability to capture recovery of coordinated gait components. Large medical center. Cohort of stroke survivors (N=44) greater than 6 months after stroke. All subjects received 48 sessions of a multimodal gait-training protocol. Treatment consisted of 1.5 hours per session, 4 sessions per week for 12 weeks, receiving these 3 treatment aspects: (1) coordination exercise, (2) body weight-supported treadmill training, and (3) overground gait training, with 46% of subjects receiving functional electrical stimulation. All subjects were evaluated with the G.A.I.T. and TGS before and after completing the 48-session intervention. An additional evaluation was performed at midtreatment (after session 24). For the total subject sample, there were significant pre-/post-, pre-/mid-, and mid-/posttreatment gains for both the G.A.I.T. and the TGS. According to the G.A.I.T., 40 subjects (91%) showed improved scores, 2 (4%) no change, and 2 (4%) a worsening score. According to the TGS, only 26 subjects (59%) showed improved scores, 16 (36%) no change, and 1 (2%) a worsening score. For 1 treatment group of chronic stroke survivors, the TGS failed to identify a significant treatment response to gait training, whereas the G.A.I.T. measure was successful. The G.A.I.T. is more sensitive than the TGS for individual patients and group treatment response in identifying recovery of volitional control of gait components in response to gait training. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of factors impacting mobility and gait in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofoletti, Gustavo; McNeely, Marie E; Campbell, Meghan C; Duncan, Ryan P; Earhart, Gammon M

    2016-10-01

    Mobility and gait limitations are major issues for people with Parkinson disease (PD). Identification of factors that contribute to these impairments may inform treatment and intervention strategies. In this study we investigated factors that predict mobility and gait impairment in PD. Participants with mild to moderate PD and without dementia (n=114) were tested in one session 'off' medication. Mobility measures included the 6-Minute Walk test and Timed-Up-and-Go. Gait velocity was collected in four conditions: forward preferred speed, forward dual task, forward fast as possible and backward walking. The predictors analyzed were age, gender, disease severity, balance, balance confidence, fall history, self-reported physical activity, and executive function. Multiple regression models were used to assess the relationships between predictors and outcomes. The predictors, in different combinations for each outcome measure, explained 55.7% to 66.9% of variability for mobility and 39.5% to 52.8% for gait velocity. Balance was the most relevant factor (explaining up to 54.1% of variance in mobility and up to 45.6% in gait velocity). Balance confidence contributed to a lesser extent (2.0% to 8.2% of variance) in all models. Age explained a small percentage of variance in mobility and gait velocity (up to 2.9%). Executive function explained 3.0% of variance during forward walking only. The strong predictive relationships between balance deficits and mobility and gait impairment suggest targeting balance deficits may be particularly important for improving mobility and gait in people with PD, regardless of an individual's age, disease severity, fall history, or other demographic features.

  11. Do the chaotic features of gait change in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbaz, Yashar; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Jafari, Ayyoob; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar

    2012-08-21

    Some previous studies have focused on chaotic properties of Parkinson's disease (PD). It seems that considering PD from dynamical systems perspective is a relevant method that may lead to better understanding of the disease. There is some ambiguity about chaotic nature in PD symptoms and normal behaviour. Some studies claim that normal gait has somehow a chaotic behaviour and disturbed gait in PD has decreased chaotic nature. However, it is worth noting that the basis of this idea is the difference of fractal behaviour in gait of normal and PD patients, which is concluded from Long Range Correlation (LRC) indices. Our primary calculations show that a large number of normal persons and patients have similar LRC. It seems that chaotic studies on PD need a different view. Because of short time recording of symptoms, accurate calculation of chaotic features is tough. On the other hand, long time recording of symptoms is experimentally difficult. In this research, we have first designed a physiologically plausible model for normal and PD gait. Then, after validating the model with neural network classifier, we used the model for extracting long time simulation of stride in normal and PD persons. These long time simulations were then used for calculating the chaotic features of gait. According to change of phase space behaviour and alteration of three largest lyapunov exponents, it was observed that simulated normal persons act as chaotic systems in stride production, but simulated PD does not have chaotic dynamics and is stochastic. Based on our results, it may be claimed that normal gait has chaotic nature which is disturbed in PD state. Surely, long time real recordings from gait signal in normal persons and PD patients are necessary to warranty this hypothesis.

  12. The use of electromyogram biofeedback to reduce Trendelenburg gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, J S

    2001-09-01

    Ten subjects suffering from incomplete spinal cord injuries, clinically diagnosed as walking with Trendelenburg gait, underwent a 2 month therapy program to strengthen their muscles and reduce their gait abnormalities. Therapy involved muscle strengthening and gait training for 2 h a day, 5 days a week in a clinic. Biofeedback was also accomplished for 30 min each training day on all subjects. In addition, five of the subjects wore a two-channel electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback training device at home to see if neuromuscular re-education outside of the clinical setting could speed their recovery. The difference for these five subjects was that they would have continuous biofeedback therapy every time they walked and not biofeedback limited to only 30 min a day. Since weakness of the gluteus medius muscles is the prime contributor to Trendelenburg gait, the device provided warning tones giving feedback of improper gait through bilateral assessment of the use of the gluteus medius muscles. If too little gluteus medius activity was seen on the affected side or the step was too short in duration, the microprocessor provided an audio cue to the subjects alerting them to correct the deficit. Subjects only undergoing clinical therapy showed about a 50% reduction in hip drop due to therapy. However, the group that used the home training device showed almost normal gait after the 2 month period.

  13. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baitong; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Tam, Wing-Kin; Tung, Anthony K H; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment.

  14. Adaptive changes in spatiotemporal gait characteristics in women during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W; Opala-Berdzik, Agnieszka; Plewa, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal gait cycle characteristics were assessed at early (P1), and late (P2) pregnancy, as well as at 2 months (PP1) and 6 months (PP2) postpartum. A substantial decrease in walking speed was observed throughout the pregnancy, with the slowest speed (1±0.2m/s) being during the third trimester. Walking at slower velocity resulted in complex adaptive adjustments to their spatiotemporal gait pattern, including a shorter step length and an increased duration of both their stance and double-support phases. Duration of the swing phase remained the least susceptible to changes. Habitual walking velocity (1.13±0.2m/s) and the optimal gait pattern were fully recovered 6 months after childbirth. Documented here adaptive changes in the preferred gait pattern seem to result mainly from the altered body anthropometry leading to temporary balance impairments. All the observed changes within stride cycle aimed to improve gait safety by focusing on its dynamic stability. The pregnant women preferred to walk at a slower velocity which allowed them to spend more time in double-support compared with their habitual pattern. Such changes provided pregnant women with a safer and more tentative ambulation that reduced the single-support period and, hence, the possibility of instability. As pregnancy progressed a significant increase in stance width and a decrease in step length was observed. Both factors allow also for gait stability improvement.

  15. Gait Deviations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Kindregan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has become clear that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have difficulty with gross motor function and coordination, factors which influence gait. Knowledge of gait abnormalities may be useful for assessment and treatment planning. This paper reviews the literature assessing gait deviations in children with ASD. Five online databases were searched using keywords “gait” and “autism,” and 11 studies were found which examined gait in childhood ASD. Children with ASD tend to augment their walking stability with a reduced stride length, increased step width and therefore wider base of support, and increased time in the stance phase. Children with ASD have reduced range of motion at the ankle and knee during gait, with increased hip flexion. Decreased peak hip flexor and ankle plantar flexor moments in children with ASD may imply weakness around these joints, which is further exhibited by a reduction in ground reaction forces at toe-off in children with ASD. Children with ASD have altered gait patterns to healthy controls, widened base of support, and reduced range of motion. Several studies refer to cerebellar and basal ganglia involvement as the patterns described suggest alterations in those areas of the brain. Further research should compare children with ASD to other clinical groups to improve assessment and treatment planning.

  16. [The novel quantitative measures of gait and posture in Parkinson's disease: cross-sectional analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Tomoo; Nishi, Ryoji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Matsuo, Koji; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Kakehi, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Posture abnormality and gait impairments characterize of Parkinson's disease (PD), predict the risk of falling, and are important contributors to reduced quality of life. The quantitative measures of posture and gait may eventually provide usefulness as a biomarker in PD. This study included that 40 patients with PD (male 26, female 14, average age 70.4 ± 7.6 years old) and 17 normal healthy controls. We selected the quantified measures of the gait function, such as MDS-UPDRS, Timed up & go test, 5 feet walk test, 6 minutes-walk test. The posture angle of both forward flexion and lateral flexion were measured using the application of smartphone, which is capable even in a consulting room. The new posture quantitative measurement is stabile between examiners. The gait functions and the posture angles were significantly abnormal in the PD patients, compared to healthy controls (P gait but do correlate in limited univariate analyses with measures of gait function.

  17. Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Freezing of Gait in Patients After Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate spatiotemporal characteristics with gait variability in patients with freezing of gait (FOG) after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI). Eleven patients showing FOG after HIBI and 15 normal controls were consecutively enrolled. We performed gait analysis using a computerized gait system (VICON MX-T10 Motion Analysis System) and compared spatiotemporal characteristics and gait variability in both groups. Additionally, we performed correlation analysis to identify the gait parameters associated with severity of freezing, which we measured based on unified Parkinson disease Rating Scale subscore. Spatiotemporal characteristic of FOG patients showed increased stance time and double support phase and decreased swing time, single support phase, stride length, step length, and gait velocity compared with normal controls (P step length asymmetry were significantly increased in HIBI patients with FOG (P step length, and gait velocity variability in HIBI patients with FOG compared with normal controls (P step length, and single support phase to be spatiotemporal parameters related to FOG severity (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that bilateral gait coordination deterioration plays a considerable role for pathophysiology of FOG in HIBI patients. Additional studies with a larger number of subjects are needed to further investigate the neural mechanism of FOG after HIBI. PMID:27175696

  18. Gait Dynamics and Locomotor Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    field settings from simple technologies such as gps monitors and pedometers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Locomotion, gait, metabolism, body size, load...a reduction in exercise intensity. REFERENCES: 1. Alexander, RM. Sprinting and endurance for runners and cyclists . American Journal of

  19. Show me how you walk and I tell you how you feel - a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study on emotion perception based on human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sabrina; Christensen, Andrea; Häußinger, Florian B; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Giese, Martin A; Ehlis, Ann-Christine

    2014-01-15

    The ability to recognize and adequately interpret emotional states in others plays a fundamental role in regulating social interaction. Body language presents an essential element of nonverbal communication which is often perceived prior to mimic expression. However, the neural networks that underlie the processing of emotionally expressive body movement and body posture are poorly understood. 33 healthy subjects have been investigated using the optically based imaging method functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during the performance of a newly developed emotion discrimination paradigm consisting of faceless avatars expressing fearful, angry, sad, happy or neutral gait patterns. Participants were instructed to judge (a) the presented emotional state (emotion task) and (b) the observed walking speed of the respective avatar (speed task). We measured increases in cortical oxygenated haemoglobin (O2HB) in response to visual stimulation during emotion discrimination. These O2HB concentration changes were enhanced for negative emotions in contrast to neutral gait sequences in right occipito-temporal and left temporal and temporo-parietal brain regions. Moreover, fearful and angry bodies elicited higher activation increases during the emotion task compared to the speed task. Haemodynamic responses were correlated with a number of behavioural measures, whereby a positive relationship between emotion regulation strategy preference and O2HB concentration increases after sad walks was mediated by the ability to accurately categorize sad walks. Our results support the idea of a distributed brain network involved in the recognition of bodily emotion expression that comprises visual association areas as well as body/movement perception specific cortical regions that are also sensitive to emotion. This network is activated less when the emotion is not intentionally processed (i.e. during the speed task). Furthermore, activity of this perceptive network is, mediated by

  20. Gait phase varies over velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yancheng; Lu, Kun; Yan, Songhua; Sun, Ming; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-02-01

    We sought to characterize the percent (PT) of the phases of a gait cycle (GC) as velocity changes to establish norms for pathological gait characteristics with higher resolution technology. Ninety five healthy subjects (49 males and 46 females with age 34.9 ± 11.8 yrs, body weight 64.0 ± 11.7 kg and BMI 23.5 ± 3.6) were enrolled and walked comfortably on a 10-m walkway at self-selected slower, normal, and faster velocities. Walking was recorded with a high speed camera (250 frames per second) and the eight phases of a GC were determined by examination of individual frames for each subject. The correlation coefficients between the mean PT of the phases of the three velocities gaits and PT defined by previous publications were all greater than 0.99. The correlation coefficient between velocity and PT of gait phases is -0.83 for loading response (LR), -0.75 for mid stance (MSt), and -0.84 for pre-swing (PSw). While the PT of the phases of three velocities from this study are highly correlated with PT described by Dr. Jacquenlin Perry decades ago, actual PT of each phase varied amongst these individuals with the largest coefficient variation of 24.31% for IC with slower velocity. From slower to faster walk, the mean PT of MSt diminished from 35.30% to 25.33%. High resolution recording revealed ambiguity of some gait phase definitions, and these data may benefit GC characterization of normal and pathological gait in clinical practice. The study results indicate that one should consider individual variations and walking velocity when evaluating gaits of subjects using standard gait phase classification.

  1. [Clinical gait analysis: user guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo

    2015-10-14

    Clinical gait analysis has become an indispensable medical examination for the management of patients with complex gait disorders. As its name suggests, the purpose of this examination is to assess patients whilst they are walking in a laboratory setting. Measurements include: 3 dimensional joint motion, forces applied to joints, and electromyographic muscle activity. This quantitative data allows identification of walking deviations and to deduce the likely causes of these deviations thanks to the clinical data available for each patient.

  2. Massive weight loss-induced mechanical plasticity in obese gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Herring, Cortney; Pories, Walter J; Rider, Patrick; Devita, Paul

    2011-11-01

    We examined the hypothesis that metabolic surgery-induced massive weight loss causes mass-driven and behavioral adaptations in the kinematics and kinetics of obese gait. Gait analyses were performed at three time points over ∼1 yr in initially morbidly obese (mass: 125.7 kg; body mass index: 43.2 kg/m(2)) but otherwise healthy adults. Ten obese adults lost 27.1% ± 5.1 (34.0 ± 9.4 kg) weight by the first follow-up at 7.0 mo (±0.7) and 6.5 ± 4.2% (8.2 ± 6.0 kg) more by the second follow-up at 12.8 mo (±0.9), with a total weight loss of 33.6 ± 8.1% (42.2 ± 14.1 kg; P = 0.001). Subjects walked at a self-selected and a standard 1.5 m/s speed at the three time points and were also compared with an age- and gender-matched comparison group at the second follow-up. Weight loss increased swing time, stride length, gait speed, hip range of motion, maximal knee flexion, and ankle plantarflexion. Weight loss of 27% led to 3.9% increase in gait speed. An additional 6.5% weight loss led to an additional 7.3% increase in gait speed. Sagittal plane normalized knee torque increased and absolute ankle and frontal plane knee torques decreased after weight loss. We conclude that large weight loss produced mechanical plasticity by modifying ankle and knee torques and gait behavior. There may be a weight loss threshold of 30 kg limiting changes in gait kinematics. Implications for exercise prescription are also discussed.

  3. Rooting human parechovirus evolution in time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, N.R.; de Vries, M.; van Hemert, F.J.; Benschop, K.; van der Hoek, L.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Picornaviridae family contains a number of important pathogenic viruses, among which the recently reclassified human parechoviruses (HPeVs). These viruses are widespread and can be grouped in several types. Understanding the evolutionary history of HPeV could answer questio

  4. Selective hypergravity stimulation : Its effects on the human balance and gait functions. A model to assess, in normal gravity conditions, some aspects of the perturbations induced on human body by microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazerges, M.

    To assess on Earth some reactions of the muscle mechanoreceptors to transitions from normogravity to microgravity, we studied the effects of transitions from hypergravity to normogravity. Hypergravity was selectively applied to the extensor muscles by increasing their activity during half an hour by means of 2 rubber extensible springs stretched from shoulders to feet. Immediate effects and post effects of such a stimulation were measured on quantifying dynamic balance (angular or linear displacement) and gait functions (spatio-temporal parameters and inferior limb length variations). The main results are : (1) a post effect on the balance function, appearing 3 minutes after the end of the selective hypergravity stimulus and improving the efficiency of balance function compared with the basal one, (2) a post effect on the gait function, appearing immediately after the end of the selective stimulation. It concerns the measures which quantify the gait phases during which flexor muscles are active (swing phases). It decreases the efficiency of the gait function compared with the basal one. It disappears 3 minutes after the end of the selective hypergravity stimulation. According to these results, if the effects on the muscle mechanoreceptors of the transitions from normogravity to microgravity looks like those of transitions from hypergravity to normogravity, post effects could be a mechanism of the motor perturbations at the beginning of the orbital flights.

  5. Drift Removal for Improving the Accuracy of Gait Parameters Using Wearable Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Takeda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated signal noise will cause the integrated values to drift from the true value when measuring orientation angles of wearable sensors. This work proposes a novel method to reduce the effect of this drift to accurately measure human gait using wearable sensors. Firstly, an infinite impulse response (IIR digital 4th order Butterworth filter was implemented to remove the noise from the raw gyro sensor data. Secondly, the mode value of the static state gyro sensor data was subtracted from the measured data to remove offset values. Thirdly, a robust double derivative and integration method was introduced to remove any remaining drift error from the data. Lastly, sensor attachment errors were minimized by establishing the gravitational acceleration vector from the acceleration data at standing upright and sitting posture. These improvements proposed allowed for removing the drift effect, and showed an average of 2.1°, 33.3°, 15.6° difference for the hip knee and ankle joint flexion/extension angle, when compared to without implementation. Kinematic and spatio-temporal gait parameters were also calculated from the heel-contact and toe-off timing of the foot. The data provided in this work showed potential of using wearable sensors in clinical evaluation of patients with gait-related diseases.

  6. Drift Removal for Improving the Accuracy of Gait Parameters Using Wearable Sensor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Ryo; Lisco, Giulia; Fujisawa, Tadashi; Gastaldi, Laura; Tohyama, Harukazu; Tadano, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Accumulated signal noise will cause the integrated values to drift from the true value when measuring orientation angles of wearable sensors. This work proposes a novel method to reduce the effect of this drift to accurately measure human gait using wearable sensors. Firstly, an infinite impulse response (IIR) digital 4th order Butterworth filter was implemented to remove the noise from the raw gyro sensor data. Secondly, the mode value of the static state gyro sensor data was subtracted from the measured data to remove offset values. Thirdly, a robust double derivative and integration method was introduced to remove any remaining drift error from the data. Lastly, sensor attachment errors were minimized by establishing the gravitational acceleration vector from the acceleration data at standing upright and sitting posture. These improvements proposed allowed for removing the drift effect, and showed an average of 2.1°, 33.3°, 15.6° difference for the hip knee and ankle joint flexion/extension angle, when compared to without implementation. Kinematic and spatio-temporal gait parameters were also calculated from the heel-contact and toe-off timing of the foot. The data provided in this work showed potential of using wearable sensors in clinical evaluation of patients with gait-related diseases. PMID:25490587

  7. Human response times in a graphic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Yule, A

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the results obtained from measuring the response times of the users of an interactive graphics system available on the CERN central computers is presented. These results are then used to find an optimum time to wait before rolling the user's program to disc.

  8. Time trends in human fecundability in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H; Rylander, Lars; Carstensen, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    increased with age, except that for women in their late 1930s, an apparent decrease was observed, particularly among the early cohorts. CONCLUSION: We found decreasing subfertility over time. We speculate that these patterns might be related to a Sweden-specific decrease over time in sexually transmitted...

  9. Time trends in human fecundability in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H; Rylander, Lars; Carstensen, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    increased with age, except that for women in their late 1930s, an apparent decrease was observed, particularly among the early cohorts. CONCLUSION: We found decreasing subfertility over time. We speculate that these patterns might be related to a Sweden-specific decrease over time in sexually transmitted...

  10. Does anxiety cause freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaylena A Ehgoetz Martens

    Full Text Available Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW, (ii across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH. Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state. Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p < 0.001 and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p < 0.001. Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p = 0.013 and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p = 0.005 when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD.

  11. Gait Analysis in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Hirosuke; Endo, Kenji; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tanaka, Hidetoshi; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Gait analysis of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) by using a sheet-type gait analysis system. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the gait patterns of patients with CSM, evaluated by the Nurick grades, and to determine the threshold values of gait parameters predicting the occurrence of a fall by using a gait recorder. Overview of Literature Gait disorder due to CSM may progress to severe paraplegia, following even a minor trauma such as a fall. The in...

  12. Secure and Privacy Enhanced Gait Authentication on Smart Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang Hoang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR and false rejection rate (FRR of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits.

  13. Secure and privacy enhanced gait authentication on smart phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thang; Choi, Deokjai

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits.

  14. Statistical Removal of Shadow for Applications to Gait Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    methods. “Human movement analysis aims at gathering quantitative information about the mechanics of the musculo -skeletal system during the execution of...basic walking pattern, but their gaits are influence[d] by functions of their entire musculo -skeletal structure” (Post, 2006:1). The individuality of

  15. An energy efficient dynamic gait for a Nao robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Zhenglong; Roos, Nico

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a framework to generate energy efficient dynamic human-like walk for a Nao humanoid robot. We first extend the inverted pendulum model with the goal of finding an energy efficient and stable walking gait. In this model, we propose a leg control policy which utilizes joint stiffne

  16. Ambulatory estimation of foot movement during gait using inertial sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Human body movement analysis is commonly done in so-called 'gait laboratories’. In these laboratories, body movement is masured using optically based systems like Vicon, Optrotrak. The major drawback of these systems is the restriction to a laboratory environment. Therefore research is required to

  17. The Effect of Parkinson Drug Timing on Cardiovascular Response during Treadmill Exercise in a Person with Parkinson Disease and Freezing of Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Cheryl M; Nelson, Reid; Steffen, Teresa M

    2013-01-01

    Objectif : Analyser la réaction de l'oxygénation cérébrale au cours de la marche sur tapis roulant chez une personne souffrant de la maladie de Parkinson (MP) aux prises avec un blocage de la marche (freezing of gait, FOG), puis déterminer si la réaction de l'oxygène cérébral est liée à l'horaire selon lequel ses médicaments pour la MP sont administrés. Description du client : Un homme de 61 ans souffrant de la MP. Il a accompli deux tests sur tapis roulant la même journée, lorsque ses médicaments pour la MP étaient en phase et lorsqu'ils étaient hors-phase. Mesures et résultat : Le client a vécu deux épisodes de FOG au cours de la première séance de tests (en phase, avec séance de mouvements hypocinétiques). La réaction de l'oxygène cérébral (mesurée par spectroscopie proche infrarouge) était stable jusqu'à ce que le trouble de la démarche se manifeste; elle a alors décru et est demeurée telle jusqu'à la fin de l'épisode de FOG. Aucun changement à l'électrocardiogramme (ECG) ni aucun étourdissement n'ont été observés et la tension artérielle (TA) est demeurée stable. Au cours de la deuxième séance de tests avec exercice (hors phase, avec séance de mouvements dyscinétiques), le client n'a pas subi d'épisodes de FOG et la réaction de l'oxygène cérébral est demeurée stable. À la fin de la deuxième séance, il a ressenti des étourdissements et sa tension artérielle a chuté d'environ 30 mmHg, et on a aussi constaté un fléchissement appréciable du segment ST de son ECG. Conséquences : Les changements survenus à l'oxygène hémodynamique et à l'oxygène cérébral étaient directement liés au moment de la prise des médicaments pour la MP par le patient et à ses épisodes de FOG. Cette étude de cas démontre que la baisse de l'oxygénation cérébrale au cours des épisodes de FOG chez une personne souffrant de MP peut s'expliquer par sa réaction variable à la lévodopa, ou peut être

  18. Gait changes following myofascial structural integration (Rolfing) observed in 2 children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexis B; Price, Karen S; Loi, Elizabeth C; Buysse, Christina A; Jaramillo, Theresa M; Pico, Elaine L; Feldman, Heidi M

    2014-10-01

    Children with spastic cerebral palsy experience difficulty with ambulation. Structural changes in muscle and fascia may play a role in abnormal gait. Myofascial structural integration (Rolfing) is a manual therapy that manipulates muscle and soft tissues to loosen fascia layers, reposition muscles, and facilitate alignment. This study aimed to document (1) gait characteristics of 2 children with cerebral palsy and (2) effects of myofascial structural integration on their gait. Children received 3 months of weekly therapy sessions by an experienced practitioner. Gait parameters were recorded at baseline and after treatment using an electronic walkway. Children with cerebral palsy demonstrated abnormal velocity and cadence, decreased step length and single support times, and increased double support time. After treatment, both children demonstrated improvement for 3 months in cadence and double support time. The objective gait analyses demonstrated temporary improvements after myofascial structural integration in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

  19. Gait analysis and validation using voxel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Stone, Erik; Dai, Wenqing; Skubic, Marjorie; Keller, James

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for extracting gait parameters including walking speed, step time and step length from a three-dimensional voxel reconstruction, which is built from two calibrated camera views. These parameters are validated with a GAITRite Electronic mat and a Vicon motion capture system. Experiments were conducted in which subjects walked across the GAITRite mat at various speeds while the Vicon cameras recorded the motion of reflective markers attached to subjects' shoes, and our two calibrated cameras captured the images. Excellent agreements were found for walking speed. Step time and step length were also found to have good agreement given the limitation of frame rate and voxel resolution.

  20. Chronomics, human time estimation, and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Halberg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Franz Halberg, Robert B Sothern, Germaine Cornélissen, Jerzy Czaplicki1Halberg Chronobiology Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 1Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, FranceBackground: Circadian rhythm stage affects many outcomes, including those of mental aging.Methods: Estimations of 1 minute ∼5 times/day for a year, 25 years apart, by a healthy male biomedical scientist (RBS, are analyzed by the extended cosinor.Results: Cycles of a half-week, a week, ∼30 days, a half-year and a year, in self-assessed 1-minute estimation by RBS between 25 and 60 years of age in health, are mapped for the first time, compared and opposite effects are found. For RBS at 60 vs at 25 years of age, it takes less time in the morning around 10:30 (P < 0.001, but not in the evening around 19:30 (P = 0.956, to estimate 1 minute.Discussion: During the intervening decades, the time of estimating 1 minute differed greatly, dependent on circadian stage, being a linear decrease in the morning and increase in the evening, the latter modulated by a ∼33.6-year cycle.Conclusion: Circadian and infradian rhythm mapping is essential for a scrutiny of effects of aging. A ∼30-day and a circannual component apparent at 25 years of age are not found later; cycles longer than a year are detected. Rhythm stages await tests as markers for timing therapy in disease.Keywords: circadian rhythm, mental function, time estimation

  1. Perspective: Economic Human Rights: The Time Has Come!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Anuradha

    1998-01-01

    Maintains that the high poverty levels in the United States implies that the goals of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) have not yet transformed the reality of U.S. citizens. Describes the national campaign called "Economic Human Rights: The Time Has Come!" that combats the violations of basic human rights like poverty.…

  2. Automated quantitative gait analysis in animal models of movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandeputte Caroline

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate and reproducible behavioral tests in animal models are of major importance in the development and evaluation of new therapies for central nervous system disease. In this study we investigated for the first time gait parameters of rat models for Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD and stroke using the Catwalk method, a novel automated gait analysis test. Static and dynamic gait parameters were measured in all animal models, and these data were compared to readouts of established behavioral tests, such as the cylinder test in the PD and stroke rats and the rotarod tests for the HD group. Results Hemiparkinsonian rats were generated by unilateral injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine in the striatum or in the medial forebrain bundle. For Huntington's disease, a transgenic rat model expressing a truncated huntingtin fragment with multiple CAG repeats was used. Thirdly, a stroke model was generated by a photothrombotic induced infarct in the right sensorimotor cortex. We found that multiple gait parameters were significantly altered in all three disease models compared to their respective controls. Behavioural deficits could be efficiently measured using the cylinder test in the PD and stroke animals, and in the case of the PD model, the deficits in gait essentially confirmed results obtained by the cylinder test. However, in the HD model and the stroke model the Catwalk analysis proved more sensitive than the rotarod test and also added new and more detailed information on specific gait parameters. Conclusion The automated quantitative gait analysis test may be a useful tool to study both motor impairment and recovery associated with various neurological motor disorders.

  3. Gait analysis of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aenon; Park, Junhyuck; Lee, Seungwon

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate ability and muscle activities of elderly women after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare them with those of healthy ones. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen female patients with TKA due to advanced degenerative arthritis of the measured on knee joint and 19 healthy elderly females participated. Tibiofemoral angles of TKA patients were using a gait analysis system anterioposterior X-rays of the weight-bearing knee. The knee flexion angle and gait parameters were measured. Muscle activities and prolongation time were EMG system. The gait of the treated limb of each participant was evaluated in three consecutive trials at fast speed and comfortable speed. [Results] The knee flexion angle %stance phase, stride length, step length, speed, cadence, and gait cycle significantly decreased at both the fast speed and comfortable speeds, and the onset and duration time of rectus femoris activity was significantly increased at the comfortable speed in the TKA group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, elderly women who received TKA showed decreased gait ability and muscle activity compared to the healthy elderly women.

  4. Implementation An image processing technique for video motion analysis during the gait cycle canine

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, G.; Hernández, J. O.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays the analyses of human movement, more specifically of the gait have ceased to be a priority for our species. Technological advances and implementations engineering have joined to obtain data and information regarding the gait cycle in another animal species. The aim of this paper is to analyze the canine gait in order to get results that describe the behavior of the limbs during the gait cycle. The research was performed by: 1. Dog training, where it is developed the step of adaptation and trust; 2. Filming gait cycle; 3. Data acquisition, in order to obtain values that describe the motion cycle canine and 4. Results, obtaining the kinematics variables involved in the march. Which are essential to determine the behavior of the limbs, as well as for the development of prosthetic or orthotic. This project was carried out with conventional equipment and using computational tools easily accessible.

  5. Measurement instruments to assess posture, gait, and balance in Parkinson's disease: Critique and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Bastiaan R; Marinus, Johan; Almeida, Quincy; Dibble, Lee; Nieuwboer, Alice; Post, Bart; Ruzicka, Evzen; Goetz, Christopher; Stebbins, Glenn; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Schrag, Anette

    2016-09-01

    Disorders of posture, gait, and balance in Parkinson's disease (PD) are common and debilitating. This MDS-commissioned task force assessed clinimetric properties of existing rating scales, questionnaires, and timed tests that assess these features in PD. A literature review was conducted. Identified instruments were evaluated systematically and classified as "recommended," "suggested," or "listed." Inclusion of rating scales was restricted to those that could be used readily in clinical research and practice. One rating scale was classified as "recommended" (UPDRS-derived Postural Instability and Gait Difficulty score) and 2 as "suggested" (Tinetti Balance Scale, Rating Scale for Gait Evaluation). Three scales requiring equipment (Berg Balance Scale, Mini-BESTest, Dynamic Gait Index) also fulfilled criteria for "recommended" and 2 for "suggested" (FOG score, Gait and Balance Scale). Four questionnaires were "recommended" (Freezing of Gait Questionnaire, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale, Survey of Activities, and Fear of Falling in the Elderly-Modified). Four tests were classified as "recommended" (6-minute and 10-m walk tests, Timed Up-and-Go, Functional Reach). We identified several questionnaires that adequately assess freezing of gait and balance confidence in PD and a number of useful clinical tests. However, most clinical rating scales for gait, balance, and posture perform suboptimally or have been evaluated insufficiently. No instrument comprehensively and separately evaluates all relevant PD-specific gait characteristics with good clinimetric properties, and none provides separate balance and gait scores with adequate content validity for PD. We therefore recommend the development of such a PD-specific, easily administered, comprehensive gait and balance scale that separately assesses all relevant constructs. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder

  6. Multiple gait parameters derived from iPod accelerometry predict age-related gait changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosse, Nienke; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Normative data of how natural aging affects gait can serve as a frame of reference for changes in gait dynamics due to pathologies. Therefore, the present study aims (1) to identify gait variables sensitive to age-related changes in gait over the adult life span using the iPod and (2) t

  7. Fusion of sparse representation and dictionary matching for identification of humans in uncontrolled environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Steven Lawrence; Bala, G Josemin

    2016-09-01

    Biomechanics based human identification is a major area of research. Biomechanics based approaches depend on accurately recognizing humans using body movements, the accuracy of these approaches is enhanced by incorporating the knee-hip angle to angle relationships. Current biomechanics based models are developed by considering the biomechanics of human walking and running. In biomechanics the joint angle characteristics, also known as gait features play a vital role in identification of humans. In general, identification of humans can be broadly classified into two approaches: biomechanics based approach, also known as Gait Recognition and biometric based Composite Sketch Matching. Gait recognition is a biomechanics based approach which uses gait traits for person authentication, it discriminates people by the way they walk. Gait recognition uses shape and motion information of a person and identifies the individual; this information is generally acquired from an image sequence. The efficiency of gait recognition is mainly affected by covariates such as observation view, walking speed, clothing, and belongings. Biometric based approach for human identification is usually done by composite sketch matching. Composite sketches are sketches generated using a computer. This obviates the need of using a skilled sketch artist; these sketches can be easily drawn by eyewitness using face design system software in a very short time period. This doesn't require any prior specialized software training but identifying humans using only composite sketches is still a challenging task owing to the fact that human faces are not always clearly visible from a distance. Hence drawing a composite sketch at all times is not feasible. The key contribution of this paper is a fusion system developed by combining biomechanics based gait recognition and biometric based composite sketch matching for identifying humans in crowded scenes. First various existing biomechanics based approaches for

  8. GAIT VARIATION IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalath J.L.R

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is one of the most common chronic diseases which increase the individual’s disability and affects the patients gait as the disease progress. Thus identifying the changes in gait variables in knee osteoarthritis patients is important. Objectives: To compare the gait variables such as walking velocity, cadence, step length, walking base, and single support time, in both control group of people and in the disease group. Method: This descriptive cross sectional study conducted at physical therapy department National Hospital Sri Lanka. 120 participants were included for the study if they fulfill the inclusion criteria. The participants were divided in to Osteoarthritis and a control group. A walk way was used to collect data from the subjects. Participants were asked to walk once in a single direction in the walkway in their normal speed. Results: The group of females with knee osteoarthritis had significant levels between means of single support time, step length, walking velocity and cadence. Males with osteoarthritis showed significance in walking velocity. Healthy males and females showed a significant gait variation in step length and walking velocity. Osteoarthritis has an effect on the group of patients compared to healthy females. The single support time (15.62%, step length (8.5%, walking velocity (15.19% and cadence (9.25% showed reductions in gait parameters. Males with osteoarthritis showed a significant reduction in walking velocity (10.91%. Females with osteoarthritis has reduce single support time, step length, walking velocity and cadence and increase walking base compared to healthy control group of females. In the comparison among males, males with osteoarthritis have reduced step length, walking velocity, cadence and walking base but have same single support time, compared to healthy control group of males Conclusion: Osteoarthritis shows different patterns of affection in gait between genders.

  9. Analysis of Gait Disturbance in Glut 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenschine, Michelle; Montes, Jacqueline; Rao, Ashwini K; Engelstad, Kristin; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2016-11-01

    Anticipating potential therapies for Glut 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1DS) emphasizes the need for effective clinical outcome measures. The 6-minute walk test is a well-established outcome measure that evaluates walking ability in neurological diseases. Twenty-one children with Glut 1 deficiency syndrome and 21 controls performed the 6-minute walk test. Fatigue was determined by comparing distance walked in the first and sixth minutes. Gait was analyzed by stride length, velocity, cadence, base of support, and percentage time in double support. Independent sample t-tests examined differences between group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance evaluated gait parameters over time. Glut 1 deficiency syndrome patients walked less (P Glut 1 deficiency syndrome patients have impaired motor performance, walk more slowly, and have poor balance. The 6-minute walk test with gait analysis may serve as a useful outcome measure in clinical trials in Glut 1 deficiency syndrome.

  10. EEG beta suppression and low gamma modulation are different elements of human upright walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Martin; Scherer, Reinhold; Wagner, Johanna; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-01-01

    Cortical involvement during upright walking is not well-studied in humans. We analyzed non-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from able-bodied volunteers who participated in a robot-assisted gait-training experiment. To enable functional neuroimaging during walking, we applied source modeling to high-density (120 channels) EEG recordings using individual anatomy reconstructed from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. First, we analyzed amplitude differences between the conditions, walking and upright standing. Second, we investigated amplitude modulations related to the gait phase. During active walking upper μ (10-12 Hz) and β (18-30 Hz) oscillations were suppressed [event-related desynchronization (ERD)] compared to upright standing. Significant β ERD activity was located focally in central sensorimotor areas for 9/10 subjects. Additionally, we found that low γ (24-40 Hz) amplitudes were modulated related to the gait phase. Because there is a certain frequency band overlap between sustained β ERD and gait phase related modulations in the low γ range, these two phenomena are superimposed. Thus, we observe gait phase related amplitude modulations at a certain ERD level. We conclude that sustained μ and β ERD reflect a movement related state change of cortical excitability while gait phase related modulations in the low γ represent the motion sequence timing during gait. Interestingly, the center frequencies of sustained β ERD and gait phase modulated amplitudes were identified to be different. They may therefore be caused by different neuronal rhythms, which should be taken under consideration in future studies.

  11. Normative Spatiotemporal Gait Parameters in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Hollman, John H; McDade, Eric M.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    While factor analyses have characterized pace, rhythm and variability as factors that explain variance in gait performance in older adults, comprehensive analyses incorporating many gait parameters have not been undertaken and normative data for many of those parameters are lacking. The purposes of this study were to conduct a factor analysis on nearly two dozen spatiotemporal gait parameters and to contribute to the normative database of gait parameters from healthy, able-bodied men and wome...

  12. Evaluation of the elderly patient with an abnormal gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Moe R; Huang, Russel C; Wu, Anita; Girardi, Federico P; Cammisa, Frank P

    2007-02-01

    Distinguishing between the normal gait of the elderly and pathologic gaits is often difficult. Pathologic gaits with neurologic causes include frontal gait, spastic hemiparetic gait, parkinsonian gait, cerebellar ataxic gait, and sensory ataxic gait. Pathologic gaits with combined neurologic and musculoskeletal causes include myelopathic gait, stooped gait of lumbar spinal stenosis, and steppage gait. Pathologic gaits with musculoskeletal causes include antalgic gait, coxalgic gait, Trendelenburg gait, knee hyperextension gait, and other gaits caused by inadequate joint mobility. A working knowledge of the characteristics of these gaits and a systematic approach to observational gait examination can help identify the causes of abnormal gait. Patients with abnormal gait can benefit from the treatment of the primary cause of the disorder as well as by general fall-prevention interventions. Treatable causes of gait disturbance are found in a substantial proportion of patients and include normal-pressure hydrocephalus, vitamin B(12) deficiency, Parkinson's disease, alcoholism, medication toxicity, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, lumbar spinal stenosis, joint contractures, and painful disorders of the lower extremity.

  13. Unobtrusive, continuous, in-home gait measurement using the Microsoft Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Erik E; Skubic, Marjorie

    2013-10-01

    A system for capturing habitual, in-home gait measurements using an environmentally mounted depth camera, the Microsoft Kinect, is presented. Previous work evaluating the use of the Kinect sensor for in-home gait measurement in a lab setting has shown the potential of this approach. In this paper, a single Kinect sensor and computer were deployed in the apartments of older adults in an independent living facility for the purpose of continuous, in-home gait measurement. In addition, a monthly fall risk assessment protocol was conducted for each resident by a clinician, which included traditional tools such as the timed up a go and habitual gait speed tests. A probabilistic methodology for generating automated gait estimates over time for the residents of the apartments from the Kinect data is described, along with results from the apartments as compared to two of the traditionally measured fall risk assessment tools. Potential applications and future work are discussed.

  14. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS.

  15. Walking to the beat of different drums: practical implications for the use of acoustic rhythms in gait rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Bank, Paulina J M; Peper, C Lieke E; Beek, Peter J

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic rhythms are frequently used in gait rehabilitation, with positive instantaneous and prolonged transfer effects on various gait characteristics. The gait modifying ability of acoustic rhythms depends on how well gait is tied to the beat, which can be assessed with measures of relative timing of auditory-motor coordination. We examined auditory-motor coordination in 20 healthy elderly individuals walking to metronome beats with pacing frequencies slower than, equal to, and faster than their preferred cadence. We found that more steps were required to adjust gait to the beat, the more the metronome rate deviated from the preferred cadence. Furthermore, participants anticipated the beat with their footfalls to various degrees, depending on the metronome rate; the faster the tempo, the smaller the phase advance or phase lead. Finally, the variability in the relative timing between footfalls and the beat was smaller for metronome rates closer to the preferred cadence, reflecting superior auditory-motor coordination. These observations have three practical implications. First, instantaneous effects of acoustic stimuli on gait characteristics may typically be underestimated given the considerable number of steps required to attune gait to the beat in combination with the usual short walkways. Second, a systematic phase lead of footfalls to the beat does not necessarily reflect a reduced ability to couple gait to the metronome. Third, the efficacy of acoustic rhythms to modify gait depends on metronome rate. Gait is coupled best to the beat for metronome rates near the preferred cadence.

  16. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  17. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  18. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  19. Nonstandard Gaits in Unsteady Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Michael; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    Marine biology has long inspired the design and engineering of underwater vehicles. The literature examining the kinematics and dynamics of fishes, ranging from undulatory anguilliform swimmers to oscillatory ostraciiform ones, is vast. Past numerical studies of these organisms have principally focused on gaits characterized by sinusoidal pitching and heaving motions. It is conceivable that more sophisticated gaits could perform better in some respects, for example as measured by thrust generation or by cost of transport. This work uses an unsteady boundary-element method to numerically investigate the hydrodynamics and propulsive efficiency of high-Reynolds-number swimmers whose gaits are encoded by Fourier series or by Jacobi elliptic functions. Numerical results are presented with an emphasis on identifying particular wake structures and modes of motion that are associated with optimal swimming. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research through MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  20. Shedding light on walking in the dark: the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a higher-level gait disorder and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruendlinger Leor

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To study the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a high level gait disorder (HLGD and to compare their response to that of healthy elderly controls. Methods 22 patients with a HLGD and 20 age-matched healthy controls were studied under usual lighting conditions (1000 lumens and in near darkness (5 lumens. Gait speed and gait dynamics were measured under both conditions. Cognitive function, co-morbidities, depressive symptoms, and vision were also evaluated. Results Under usual lighting conditions, patients walked more slowly, with reduced swing times, and increased stride-to-stride variability, compared to controls. When walking under near darkness conditions, both groups slowed their gait. All other measures of gait were not affected by lighting in the controls. In contrast, patients further reduced their swing times and increased their stride-to-stride variability, both stride time variability and swing time variability. The unique response of the patients was not explained by vision, mental status, co-morbidities, or the values of walking under usual lighting conditions. Conclusion Walking with reduced lighting does not affect the gait of healthy elderly subjects, except for a reduction in speed. On the other hand, the gait of older adults with a HLGD becomes more variable and unsteady when they walk in near darkness, despite adapting a slow and cautious gait. Further work is needed to identify the causes of the maladaptive response among patients with a HLGD and the potential connection between this behavior and the increased fall risk observed in these patients.

  1. Gait feature extraction in Parkinson's disease using low-cost accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, Julien; Crémers, Julien; Maquet, Didier; Macq, Benoit; Garraux, Gaëtan

    2011-01-01

    The clinical hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) are movement poverty and slowness (i.e. bradykinesia), muscle rigidity, limb tremor or gait disturbances. Parkinson's gait includes slowness, shuffling, short steps, freezing of gait (FoG) and/or asymmetries in gait. There are currently no validated clinical instruments or device that allow a full characterization of gait disturbances in PD. As a step towards this goal, a four accelerometer-based system is proposed to increase the number of parameters that can be extracted to characterize parkinsonian gait disturbances such as FoG or gait asymmetries. After developing the hardware, an algorithm has been developed, that automatically epoched the signals on a stride-by-stride basis and quantified, among others, the gait velocity, the stride time, the stance and swing phases, the single and double support phases or the maximum acceleration at toe-off, as validated by visual inspection of video recordings during the task. The results obtained in a PD patient and a healthy volunteer are presented. The FoG detection will be improved using time-frequency analysis and the system is about to be validated with a state-of-the-art 3D movement analysis system.

  2. Kinematic gait patterns in healthy runners: A hierarchical cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Osis, Sean; Hettinga, Blayne A; Ferber, Reed

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated distinct clusters of gait patterns in both healthy and pathological groups, suggesting that different movement strategies may be represented. However, these studies have used discrete time point variables and usually focused on only one specific joint and plane of motion. Therefore, the first purpose of this study was to determine if running gait patterns for healthy subjects could be classified into homogeneous subgroups using three-dimensional kinematic data from the ankle, knee, and hip joints. The second purpose was to identify differences in joint kinematics between these groups. The third purpose was to investigate the practical implications of clustering healthy subjects by comparing these kinematics with runners experiencing patellofemoral pain (PFP). A principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the entire gait waveform data and then a hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) determined group sets of similar gait patterns and homogeneous clusters. The results show two distinct running gait patterns were found with the main between-group differences occurring in frontal and sagittal plane knee angles (Pgait strategies. These results suggest care must be taken when selecting samples of subjects in order to investigate the pathomechanics of injured runners.

  3. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  4. A Microsoft Kinect-Based Point-of-Care Gait Assessment Framework for Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Farnood; Trojan, Daria; Kovecses, Jozsef; Haddad, Wassim; Gholami, Behnood

    2016-07-21

    Gait impairment is a prevalent and important difficulty for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a common neurological disorder. An easy to use tool to objectively evaluate gait in MS patients in a clinical setting can assist clinicians to perform an objective assessment. The overall objective of this study is to develop a framework to quantify gait abnormalities in MS patients using the Microsoft Kinect for Windows sensor; an inexpensive, easy to use, portable camera. Specifically, we aim to evaluate its feasibility for utilization in a clinical setting, assess its reliability, evaluate the validity of gait indices obtained, and evaluate a novel set of gait indices based on the concept of dynamic time warping. In this study, 10 ambulatory MS patients, and 10 age and sex-matched normal controls were studied at one session in a clinical setting with gait assessment using a Kinect camera. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) clinical ambulation score was calculated for the MS subjects, and patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS). Based on this study, we established the potential feasibility of using a Microsoft Kinect camera in a clinical setting. Seven out of the eight gait indices obtained using the proposed method were reliable with intra-class correlation coefficients ranging from 0.61 to 0.99. All eight MS gait indices were significantly different from those of the controls (p-values less than 0.05). Finally, seven out of the eight MS gait indices were correlated with the objective and subjective gait measures (Pearson's correlation coefficients greater than 0.40). The study shows that the Kinect camera is as an easy to use tool to assess gait in MS patients in a clinical setting.

  5. Quantitative and qualitative gait assessments in Parkinson’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić-Jovičić Milica D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Postural impairments and gait disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD affect limits of stability, impaire postural adjustment, and evoke poor responses to perturbation. In the later stage of the disease, some patients can suffer from episodic features such as freezing of gait (FOG. Objective gait assessment and monitoring progress of the disease can give clinicians and therapist important information about changes in gait pattern and potential gait deviations, in order to prevent concomitant falls. The aim of this study was to propose a method for identification of freezing episodes and gait disturbances in patients with PD. A wireless inertial sensor system can be used to provide follow-up of the treatment effects or progress of the disease. Methods. The system is simple for mounting a subject, comfortable, simple for installing and recording, reliable and provides high-quality sensor data. A total of 12 patients were recorded and tested. Software calculates various gait parameters that could be estimated. User friendly visual tool provides information about changes in gait characteristics, either in a form of spectrogram or by observing spatiotemporal parameters. Based on these parameters, the algorithm performs classification of strides and identification of FOG types. Results. The described stride classification was merged with an algorithm for stride reconstruction resulting in a useful graphical tool that allows clinicians to inspect and analyze subject’s movements. Conclusion. The described gait assessment system can be used for detection and categorization of gait disturbances by applying rule-based classification based on stride length, stride time, and frequency of the shank segment movements. The method provides an valuable graphical interface which is easy to interpret and provides clinicians and therapists with valuable information regarding the temporal changes in gait. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije

  6. Gait analysis in forensic medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter K; Simonsen, Erik B; Lynnerup, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Recordings from video surveillance systems are used as evidence from crime scenes. It would be useful to perform comparisons between disguised perpetrators and suspects based on their gait. We applied functional anatomical and biomechanical knowledge to analyze the gait of perpetrators, as recorded...... than the other. Based on these characteristic features, we are able to state with reasonable certainty whether the suspect could be the perpetrator, but it is not possible to identify the perpetrator positively. Nevertheless, we have been involved in several cases where the court has found...

  7. Effect of Task Specific Exercises, Gait Training, and Visual Biofeedback on Equinovarus Gait among Individuals with Stroke: Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elsayed Khallaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Equinovarus foot is a common sign after stroke. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on correcting equinovarus gait among individuals with stroke. Subjects and Methods. Sixteen subjects with ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to two equal groups (G1 and G2. All the patients were at stage 4 of motor recovery of foot according to Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment without any cognitive dysfunction. E-med pedography was used to measure contact time, as well as force underneath hind and forefoot during walking. Outcome measures were collected before randomization, one week after the last session, and four weeks later. Participants in G1 received task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback and a traditional physical therapy program was applied for participants in G2 for 8 weeks. Results. Significant improvement was observed among G1 patients (P≤0.05 which lasts one month after therapy termination. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between measurements of the participants in G2. Between groups comparison also revealed a significant improvement in G1 with long lasting effect. Conclusion. The results of this study showed a positive long lasting effect of the task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on equinovarus gait pattern among individuals with stroke.

  8. Coupled oscillators utilised as gait rhythm generators of a two-legged walking machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, T

    1996-03-01

    The gait of current two-legged walking machines differs from that of humans, although the kinematic structures of these machines' legs frequently imitate human limbs. This paper presents a method of generating the trajectories of hip and knee joint angles resulting in a gait pattern similar to that of a human. For this purpose the solutions of coupled van der Pol oscillator equations are utilised. There is much evidence that these equations can be treated as a good model of the central pattern generator generating functional (also locomotional) rhythms in living creatures. The oscillator equations are solved by numerical integration. The method of changing the type of gait by changing appropriate parameter values in the oscillator equations is presented (change of velocity and trajectory of leg-ends). The results obtained enable enhanced control of two-legged walking systems by including gait pattern generators which will assume a similar role to that of biological generators.

  9. A wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Tsai, An-Chih; Chang, Cha-Wei; Ho, Ka-Hou; Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Ta-Te

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, both hardware and software design to develop a wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis are presented. For hardware, the mechanism proposed is adaptive to different individuals to wear, and the portability of the design makes it easy to perform outdoor experiments. Four force sensors and two angle displacement sensors were used to measure plantar force distribution and the angles of hip and knee joints. For software design, a novel algorithm was developed to detect different gait phases and the four gait periods during the stance phase. Furthermore, the center of ground contact force was calculated based on the relationships of the force sensors. The results were compared with the VICON motion capture system and a force plate for validation. Experiments showed the behavior of the joint angles are similar to VICON system, and the average error in foot strike time is less than 90 ms.

  10. Analysis of gait patterns in normal school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkveld, S R; Knipstein, E A; Quinn, J R

    1988-01-01

    The continuing development of gait in 60 children aged 7-16 years was studied with plantar surface-attached transducers to describe the time pressure profiles of foot segments during stance. Decreased pronation/supination of the subtalar and midtarsal joints was shown by simultaneous onset and simultaneous peak on medial and lateral heel sensors. The resultant midstance showed a rapid lateral-to-medial loading of the forefoot. The foot-flat position with decreased rotation about the longitudinal axis of the foot persists even after the temporal parameters of gait attain mature values.

  11. Difficulties in post-stroke gait improvement caused by post-stroke depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanislaw Kijowski

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a common problem impeding post-stroke rehabilitation.Up to 70% of patients show depression symptoms during the first twelve months after stroke onset.However,the depression and its effect on functional recovery can be difficult to diagnose.The purpose of this study was to use gait analysis as a tool to compare the recovery after stroke in patients with and without depression and to assess the impact of the initiation time of rehabilitation after stroke onset.Methods One hundred and forty five consecutive patients after first ever stroke admitted for designed rehabilitation program within 2 to 31 months after stroke onset participated.All patients received 4 weeks treatment program included comprehensive rehabilitation consisted of multipurpose activities 5 days a week.These included individual and group exercises,physiotherapy,occupational therapy and gait training.Gait analysis with Kistler force plates was employed to assess gait pattern symmetry before and after the treatment.Gait symmetry was evaluated based on seven gait parameters.Regaining of gait pattern symmetry was assumed as a measure of rehabilitation outcome.Results After rehabilitation program gait symmetry w()ined in patients without depression.Gait asymmetry remained unchanged in patients diagnosed with depression.No major differences in outcome from rehabilitation were noted in regards to the initiation time of rehabilitation after the stroke onset.Conclusions Depression limits gait recovery after stroke.The time of initiation of rehabilitation after stroke onset does not limit the motor recovery after rehabilitation program.

  12. An Ambulatory System for Gait Monitoring Based on Wireless Sensorized Insoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván; Fontecha, Jesús; Hervás, Ramón; Bravo, José

    2015-07-09

    A new gait phase detection system for continuous monitoring based on wireless sensorized insoles is presented. The system can be used in gait analysis mobile applications, and it is designed for real-time demarcation of gait phases. The system employs pressure sensors to assess the force exerted by each foot during walking. A fuzzy rule-based inference algorithm is implemented on a smartphone and used to detect each of the gait phases based on the sensor signals. Additionally, to provide a solution that is insensitive to perturbations caused by non-walking activities, a probabilistic classifier is employed to discriminate walking forward from other low-level activities, such as turning, walking backwards, lateral walking, etc. The combination of these two algorithms constitutes the first approach towards a continuous gait assessment system, by means of the avoidance of non-walking influences.

  13. An Ambulatory System for Gait Monitoring Based on Wireless Sensorized Insoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván González

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new gait phase detection system for continuous monitoring based on wireless sensorized insoles is presented. The system can be used in gait analysis mobile applications, and it is designed for real-time demarcation of gait phases. The system employs pressure sensors to assess the force exerted by each foot during walking. A fuzzy rule-based inference algorithm is implemented on a smartphone and used to detect each of the gait phases based on the sensor signals. Additionally, to provide a solution that is insensitive to perturbations caused by non-walking activities, a probabilistic classifier is employed to discriminate walking forward from other low-level activities, such as turning, walking backwards, lateral walking, etc. The combination of these two algorithms constitutes the first approach towards a continuous gait assessment system, by means of the avoidance of non-walking influences.

  14. Gait Characteristics in a Canine Model of X-linked Myotubular Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Melissa A.; Burlingame, Emily; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Childers, Martin K.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Kelly, Valerie E.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a fatal pediatric disease where affected boys display profound weakness of the skeletal muscles. Possible therapies are under development but robust outcome measures in animal models are required for effective translation to human patients. We established a naturally-occuring canine model, where XLMTM dogs display clinical symptoms similar to those observed in humans. The aim of this study was to determine potential endpoints for the assessment of future treatments in this model. Video-based gait analysis was selected, as it is a well-established method of assessing limb function in neuromuscular disease and measures have been correlated to patient quality of life. XLMTM dogs (N=3) and their true littermate wild type controls (N=3) were assessed at 4–5 time points, beginning at 10 weeks and continuing through 17 weeks. Motion capture and an instrumented carpet were used separately to evaluate spatiotemporal and kinematic changes over time. XLMTM dogs walk more slowly and with shorter stride lengths than wild type dogs, and these differences became greater over time. However, there was no clear difference in angular measures between affected and unaffected dogs. These data demonstrate that spatiotemporal parameters capture functional changes in gait in an XLMTM canine model and support their utility in future therapeutic trials. PMID:25281397

  15. A Portable Gait Asymmetry Rehabilitation System for Individuals with Stroke Using a Vibrotactile Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Raheel Afzal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait asymmetry caused by hemiparesis results in reduced gait efficiency and reduced activity levels. In this paper, a portable rehabilitation device is proposed that can serve as a tool in diagnosing gait abnormalities in individuals with stroke and has the capability of providing vibration feedback to help compensate for the asymmetric gait. Force-sensitive resistor (FSR based insoles are used to detect ground contact and estimate stance time. A controller (Arduino provides different vibration feedback based on the gait phase measurement. It also allows wireless interaction with a personal computer (PC workstation using the XBee transceiver module, featuring data logging capabilities for subsequent analysis. Walking trials conducted with healthy young subjects allowed us to observe that the system can influence abnormality in the gait. The results of trials showed that a vibration cue based on temporal information was more effective than intensity information. With clinical experiments conducted for individuals with stroke, significant improvement in gait symmetry was observed with minimal disturbance caused to the balance and gait speed as an effect of the biofeedback. Future studies of the long-term rehabilitation effects of the proposed system and further improvements to the system will result in an inexpensive, easy-to-use, and effective rehabilitation device.

  16. Gait speed and related factors in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Goksenoglu, Goksen; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Kesiktas, Nur; Ince, Nurhan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gait speed and various factors in ambulatory patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. [Subjects] Fifty ambulatory patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease who were admitted to an outpatient clinic were included in this cross-sectional study. [Methods] The Hoehn and Yahr Scale was used for measurement of the disease severity. Gait speed was measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test. Mobility status was assessed by Timed Up and Go Test. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used for evaluation of emotional state. Cognitive status was examined with the Mini-Mental State Examination. The Downton Index was used for fall risk assessment. Balance was evaluated with the Berg Balance Scale. Comorbidity was measured with the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey was completed for measurement of quality of life. [Results] The mean age was 66.7 (47–83) years. Twenty-eight (56%) patients were men. Gait speed was correlated positively with height, male gender, Mini-Mental Examination score, Berg Balance Scale score and physical summary scores of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. On the other hand, there was a negative correlation between gait speed and age, disease severity, TUG time, Downton Index, fear of falling, previous falls and the anxiety and depression scores of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. There was no correlation between gait speed and comorbidity. [Conclusion] The factors related with the slower gait speed are, elder age, clinically advanced disease, poor mobility, fear of falling, falling history, higher falling risk, and mood disorder. PMID:26834330

  17. Objective assessment of gait in xylazine-induced ataxic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nout-Lomas, Y S; Page, K M; Kang, H G; Aanstoos, M E; Greene, H M

    2017-05-01

    There is poor agreement between observers of equine neurological gait abnormalities using the modified Mayhew grading scale. To stimulate a dose-dependent ataxia in horses through xylazine administration and identify quantifiable relevant gait parameters. Balanced, randomised, 2-way crossover design. Eight horses were assessed before and after administration of xylazine (low dose and high dose). Gait analyses performed before and after xylazine administration included: 1) kinematic data collected on an equine high-speed treadmill (flat and 10% decline) and from accelerometers placed on head and sacrum; and 2) kinetic data collected on a force plate. All horses developed dose-dependent ataxia. Horses developed a dose-dependent increased stride time, stride length, and time of contact (Pwalked on the treadmill, this movement decreased when walking over ground after administration of xylazine (P<0.05). Furthermore, centre of pressure and path length indices changed significantly in horses following administration of xylazine (P<0.05). This study examined one breed of horse (Arabian), all of similar height and weight. Accelerometers were attached to skin, not bone; no correction was made for artefacts from skin displacement. The sedative drug effect is of certain duration, limiting the data collection period. Administration of xylazine induced a dose-dependent ataxia in horses and resulted in significant changes of gait parameters, pelvic accelerations, and stabilographic variables, some of which changed in a dose-dependent fashion. Some of the altered gait parameters in this model were probably a result of overall slowing down of the stride cycle secondary to the sedative effect. Continued efforts to discover and evaluate quantifiable gait parameters that are susceptible to change following development of clinical neurological disease in horses is warranted. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  18. Detecting Gait Phases from RGB-D Images Based on Hidden Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Olyaee, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Gait contains important information about the status of the human body and physiological signs. In many medical applications, it is important to monitor and accurately analyze the gait of the patient. Since walking shows the reproducibility signs in several phases, separating these phases can be used for the gait analysis. In this study, a method based on image processing for extracting phases of human gait from RGB-Depth images is presented. The sequence of depth images from the front view has been processed to extract the lower body depth profile and distance features. Feature vector extracted from image is the same as observation vector of hidden Markov model, and the phases of gait are considered as hidden states of the model. After training the model using the images which are randomly selected as training samples, the phase estimation of gait becomes possible using the model. The results confirm the rate of 60-40% of two major phases of the gait and also the mid-stance phase is recognized with 85% precision.

  19. Interactive rhythmic cue facilitates gait relearning in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ota, Leo; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    To develop a method for cooperative human gait training, we investigated whether interactive rhythmic cues could improve the gait performance of Parkinson's disease patients. The interactive rhythmic cues ware generated based on the mutual entrainment between the patient's gait rhythms and the cue rhythms input to the patient while the patient walked. Previously, we found that the dynamic characteristics of stride interval fluctuation in Parkinson's disease patients were improved to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level using interactive rhythmic cues and that this effect was maintained in the short term. However, two problems remained in our previous study. First, it was not clear whether the key factor underpinning the effect was the mutual entrainment between the gait rhythms and the cue rhythms or the rhythmic cue fluctuation itself. Second, it was not clear whether or not the gait restoration was maintained longitudinally and was relearned after repeating the cue-based gait training. Thus, the present study clarified these issues using 32 patients who participated in a four-day experimental program. The patients were assigned randomly to one of four experimental groups with the following rhythmic cues: (a) interactive rhythmic cue, (b) fixed tempo cue, (c) 1/f fluctuating tempo cue, and (d) no cue. It has been reported that the 1/f fluctuation of stride interval in healthy gait is absent in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, we used this dynamic characteristic as an evaluation index to analyze gait relearning in the four different conditions. We observed a significant effect in condition (a) that the gait fluctuation of the patients gradually returned to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level, whereas this did not occur in the other conditions. This result suggests that the mutual entrainment can facilitate gait relearning effectively. It is expected that interactive rhythmic cues will be widely applicable in the fields of rehabilitation and assistive technology.

  20. The association between intersegmental coordination in the lower limb and gait speed in elderly females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaya, Shinya; Iwata, Akira; Higuchi, Yumi; Fuchioka, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Human multi-segmental motion is a complex task requiring motor coordination. Uncoordinated motor control may contribute to the decline in mobility; however, it is unknown whether the age-related decline in intersegmental coordination relates to the decline in gait performance. The aim of this study was to clarify the association between intersegmental coordination and gait speed in elderly females. Gait measurements were performed in 91 community-dwelling elderly females over 60 years old. Foot, shank, and thigh sagittal motions were assessed. Intersegmental coordination was analyzed using the mean value of the continuous relative phase (mCRP) during four phases of the gait cycle to investigate phase differences in foot-shank and shank-thigh motions during a normal gait. The results showed that foot-shank mCRP at late stance had negative correlations with gait speed (r=-0.53) and cadence (r=-0.54) and a positive correlation with age (r=0.25). In contrast, shank-thigh mCRP at late stance had positive correlations with gait speed (r=0.37) and cadence (r=0.56). Moreover, partial correlation, controlling age, height, and weight, revealed that foot-shank mCRP at late stance had negative correlations with gait speed (r=-0.52) and cadence (r=-0.54). Shank-thigh mCRP at late stance had a positive correlation with gait speed (r=0.28) and cadence (r=0.51). These findings imply that the foot-shank and shank-thigh coordination patterns at late stance relate to gait speed, and uncoordinated lower limb motion is believed to be associated with the age-related decline in cadence.

  1. 基于人体步态的下肢外骨骼动力学仿真研究%Dynamics simulation of lower extremity exoskeleton based on human gait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 管小荣; 徐诚

    2015-01-01

    In order to optimize the design of lower extremity exoskeleton,the dynamic simulation of lower extremity exoskeleton is carried out based on the analysis of human gaits. The dynamic data of each joint of lower extremity exoskeleton and the driving parameters of the needed hydraulic driving system are gained and analyzed combining zero torque point ( ZMP ) . The results prove that the traditional stability criterion of the ZMP is too conservative to be suitable for the motion control of lower extremity exoskeleton.%为了对下肢外骨骼助力装置的设计进行优化,在对人体步态分析的基础上,进行了下肢外骨骼动力学仿真研究。获得了下肢外骨骼各关节的动力学数据和所需液压系统驱动参数,并结合零点力矩( ZMP)理论进行分析。指出传统人形机器人常用的ZMP稳定性判据过于保守,不适用于下肢外骨骼助力装置的运动控制。

  2. Altered spatiotemporal characteristics of gait in older adults with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Gregory E; Sions, J Megan; Coyle, Peter C; Pohlig, Ryan T

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies in older adults have identified that chronic low back pain (CLBP) is associated with slower gait speed. Given that slower gait speed is a predictor of greater morbidity and mortality among older adults, it is important to understand the underlying spatiotemporal characteristics of gait among older adults with CLBP. The purposes of this study were to determine (1) if there are differences in spatiotemporal parameters of gait between older adults with and without CLBP during self-selected and fast walking and (2) whether any of these gait characteristics are correlated with performance of a challenging walking task, e.g. stair negotiation. Spatiotemporal characteristics of gait were evaluated using a computerized walkway in 54 community-dwelling older adults with CLBP and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Older adults with CLBP walked slower than their pain-free peers during self-selected and fast walking. After controlling for body mass index and gait speed, step width was significantly greater in the CLBP group during the fast walking condition. Within the CLBP group, step width and double limb support time are significantly correlated with stair ascent/descent times. From a clinical perspective, these gait characteristics, which may be indicative of balance performance, may need to be addressed to improve overall gait speed, as well as stair-climbing performance. Future longitudinal studies confirming our findings are needed, as well as investigations focused on developing interventions to improve gait speed and decrease subsequent risk of mobility decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased gait unsteadiness in community-dwelling elderly fallers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Edelberg, H. K.; Mitchell, S. L.; Goldberger, A. L.; Wei, J. Y.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of gait unsteadiness are increased in community-dwelling elderly fallers. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective, case-control study. SETTING: General community. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-five community-dwelling elderly subjects older than 70 years of age who were capable of ambulating independently for 6 minutes were categorized as fallers (age, 82.2 +/- 4.9 yrs [mean +/- SD]; n = 18) and nonfallers (age, 76.5 +/- 4.0 yrs; n = 17) based on history; 22 young (age, 24.6 +/- 1.9 yrs), healthy subjects also participated as a second reference group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Stride-to-stride variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of stride time, stance time, swing time, and percent stance time measured during a 6-minute walk. RESULTS: All measures of gait variability were significantly greater in the elderly fallers compared with both the elderly nonfallers and the young subjects (p < .0002). In contrast, walking speed of the elderly fallers was similar to that of the nonfallers. There were little or no differences in the variability measures of the elderly nonfallers compared with the young subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Stride-to-stride temporal variations of gait are relatively unchanged in community-dwelling elderly nonfallers, but are significantly increased in elderly fallers. Quantitative measurement of gait unsteadiness may be useful in assessing fall risk in the elderly.

  4. Use of gait parameters of persons in video surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Merlijn, Menno; de Groot, Gert; Bijhold, Jurrien

    2002-07-01

    The gait parameters of eleven subjects were evaluated to provide data for recognition purposes of subjects. Video images of these subjects were acquired in frontal, transversal, and sagittal (a plane parallel to the median of the body) view. The subjects walked by at their usual walking speed. The measured parameters were hip, knee and ankle joint angle and their time averaged values, thigh, foot and trunk angle, step length and width, cycle time and walking speed. Correlation coefficients within and between subjects for the hip, knee and ankle rotation pattern in the sagittal aspect and for the trunk rotation pattern in the transversal aspect were almost similar. (were similar or were almost identical) This implies that the intra and inter individual variance were equal. Therefore, these gait parameters could not distinguish between subjects. A simple ANOVA with a follow-up test was used to detect significant differences for the mean hip, knee and ankle joint angle, thigh angle, step length, step width, walking speed, cycle time and foot angle. The number of significant differences between subjects defined the usefulness of the gait parameter. The parameter with the most significant difference between subjects was the foot angle (64 % - 73 % of the maximal attainable significant differences), followed by the time average hip joint angle (58 %) and the step length (45 %). The other parameters scored less than 25 %, which is poor for recognition purposes. The use of gait for identification purposes it not yet possible based on this research.

  5. Preferred gait and walk-run transition speeds in ostriches measured using GPS-IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Monica A; Channon, Anthony J; Nolan, Grant S; Hall, Jade

    2016-10-15

    The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is widely appreciated as a fast and agile bipedal athlete, and is a useful comparative bipedal model for human locomotion. Here, we used GPS-IMU sensors to measure naturally selected gait dynamics of ostriches roaming freely over a wide range of speeds in an open field and developed a quantitative method for distinguishing walking and running using accelerometry. We compared freely selected gait-speed distributions with previous laboratory measures of gait dynamics and energetics. We also measured the walk-run and run-walk transition speeds and compared them with those reported for humans. We found that ostriches prefer to walk remarkably slowly, with a narrow walking speed distribution consistent with minimizing cost of transport (CoT) according to a rigid-legged walking model. The dimensionless speeds of the walk-run and run-walk transitions are slower than those observed in humans. Unlike humans, ostriches transition to a run well below the mechanical limit necessitating an aerial phase, as predicted by a compass-gait walking model. When running, ostriches use a broad speed distribution, consistent with previous observations that ostriches are relatively economical runners and have a flat curve for CoT against speed. In contrast, horses exhibit U-shaped curves for CoT against speed, with a narrow speed range within each gait for minimizing CoT. Overall, the gait dynamics of ostriches moving freely over natural terrain are consistent with previous lab-based measures of locomotion. Nonetheless, ostriches, like humans, exhibit a gait-transition hysteresis that is not explained by steady-state locomotor dynamics and energetics. Further study is required to understand the dynamics of gait transitions.

  6. Gait post-stroke: Pathophysiology and rehabilitation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaert, C; Vasa, R; Frykberg, G E

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed neural control and biomechanical description of gait in both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects. In addition, we reviewed most of the gait rehabilitation strategies currently in use or in development and observed their principles in relation to recent pathophysiology of post-stroke gait. In both non-disabled and post-stroke subjects, motor control is organized on a task-oriented basis using a common set of a few muscle modules to simultaneously achieve body support, balance control, and forward progression during gait. Hemiparesis following stroke is due to disruption of descending neural pathways, usually with no direct lesion of the brainstem and cerebellar structures involved in motor automatic processes. Post-stroke, improvements of motor activities including standing and locomotion are variable but are typically characterized by a common postural behaviour which involves the unaffected side more for body support and balance control, likely in response to initial muscle weakness of the affected side. Various rehabilitation strategies are regularly used or in development, targeting muscle activity, postural and gait tasks, using more or less high-technology equipment. Reduced walking speed often improves with time and with various rehabilitation strategies, but asymmetric postural behaviour during standing and walking is often reinforced, maintained, or only transitorily decreased. This asymmetric compensatory postural behaviour appears to be robust, driven by support and balance tasks maintaining the predominant use of the unaffected side over the initially impaired affected side. Based on these elements, stroke rehabilitation including affected muscle strengthening and often stretching would first need to correct the postural asymmetric pattern by exploiting postural automatic processes in various particular motor tasks secondarily beneficial to gait.

  7. Effects of Postprandial Blood Pressure on Gait Parameters in Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Nair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Postprandial hypotension (PPH, a fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP within 2 h of a meal, may detrimentally affect gait parameters and increase the falls risk in older people. We aimed to determine the effects of postprandial SBP on heart rate (HR, gait speed, and stride length, double-support time and swing time variability in older subjects with and without PPH. Twenty-nine subjects were studied on three days: glucose (“G”, water and walk (“WW”, glucose and walk (“GW”. Subjects consumed a glucose drink on “G” and “GW” and water on “WW”. The “G” day determined which subjects had PPH. On “WW” and “GW” gait was analyzed. Sixteen subjects demonstrated PPH. In this group, there were significant changes in gait speed (p = 0.040 on “WW” and double-support time variability (p = 0.027 on “GW”. The area under the curve for the change in gait parameters from baseline was not significant on any study day. Among subjects without PPH, SBP increased on “WW” (p < 0.005 and all gait parameters remained unchanged on all study days. These findings suggest that by changing gait parameters, PPH may contribute to an increased falls risk in the older person with PPH.

  8. Gait Training in Chronic Stroke Using Walk-Even Feedback Device: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical gait and a reduction in weight bearing on the affected side are a common finding in chronic stroke survivors. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of a shoe insole device that we developed, called Walk-Even, in correcting asymmetric gait in chronic stroke survivors. Six individuals with chronic (>6 months stroke underwent 8 weeks of intervention with 2 sessions/week, each consisting of 20 minutes of gait training and 20 minutes of lower-extremity strength training. The 2 control participants underwent conventional gait training, while 4 participants underwent gait training using the Walk-Even. Following intervention, all the participants improved on most of the gait measures: peak pressure of the foot, time of transfer of weight from heel-to-forefoot, center of pressure (COP trajectory, COP velocity, asymmetry ratio of stance, mean-force-heel, mean-force-metatarsals, Timed “Up and Go,” and Activities-specific Balance Scale. The improvement was more pronounced in the 4 participants that underwent training with Walk-Even compared to the control participants. This pilot study suggests that a combination of strength and gait training with real-time feedback may reduce temporal asymmetry and enhance weight-bearing on the affected side in chronic stroke survivors. A large randomized controlled study is needed to confirm its efficacy.

  9. Feature selection gait-based gender classification under different circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Azhin; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Jassim, Sabah

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a gender classification based on human gait features and investigates the problem of two variations: clothing (wearing coats) and carrying bag condition as addition to the normal gait sequence. The feature vectors in the proposed system are constructed after applying wavelet transform. Three different sets of feature are proposed in this method. First, Spatio-temporal distance that is dealing with the distance of different parts of the human body (like feet, knees, hand, Human Height and shoulder) during one gait cycle. The second and third feature sets are constructed from approximation and non-approximation coefficient of human body respectively. To extract these two sets of feature we divided the human body into two parts, upper and lower body part, based on the golden ratio proportion. In this paper, we have adopted a statistical method for constructing the feature vector from the above sets. The dimension of the constructed feature vector is reduced based on the Fisher score as a feature selection method to optimize their discriminating significance. Finally k-Nearest Neighbor is applied as a classification method. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach is providing more realistic scenario and relatively better performance compared with the existing approaches.

  10. Gait analysis of slope walking: a study on step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura,Kenji

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination was made of step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure during up- and downslope walking in 17 healthy men between the ages of 19 and 34 using a force plate. Slope inclinations were set at 3, 6, 9 and 12 degrees. At 12 degrees, walking speed, the product of step length and cadence, decreased significantly (p less than 0.01 in both up- and downslope walking. The most conspicuous phenomenon in upslope walking was in cadence. The steeper the slope, the smaller was the cadence. The most conspicuous phenomenon in downslope walking was in step length. The steeper the slope, the shorter was the step length.

  11. Gait analysis of slope walking: a study on step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K; Tokuhiro, A; Takechi, H

    1991-06-01

    Determination was made of step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure during up- and downslope walking in 17 healthy men between the ages of 19 and 34 using a force plate. Slope inclinations were set at 3, 6, 9 and 12 degrees. At 12 degrees, walking speed, the product of step length and cadence, decreased significantly (p less than 0.01) in both up- and downslope walking. The most conspicuous phenomenon in upslope walking was in cadence. The steeper the slope, the smaller was the cadence. The most conspicuous phenomenon in downslope walking was in step length. The steeper the slope, the shorter was the step length.

  12. Assessment of changes in gait parameters and vertical ground reaction forces after total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal objectives of arthroplasty are relief of pain and enhancement of range of motion. Currently, postoperative pain and functional capacity are assessed largely on the basis of subjective evaluation scores. Because of the lack of control inherent in this method it is often difficult to interpret data presented by different observers in the critical evaluation of surgical method, new components and modes of rehabilitation. Gait analysis is a rapid, simple and reliable method to assess functional outcome. This study was undertaken in an effort to evaluate the gait characteristics of patients who underwent arthroplasty, using an Ultraflex gait analyzer. Materials and Methods: The study was based on the assessment of gait and weight-bearing pattern of both hips in patients who underwent total hip replacement and its comparison with an age and sex-matched control group. Twenty subjects of total arthroplasty group having unilateral involvement, operated by posterior approach at our institution with a minimum six-month postoperative period were selected. Control group was age and sex-matched, randomly selected from the general population. Gait analysis was done using Ultraflex gait analyzer. Gait parameters and vertical ground reaction forces assessment was done by measuring the gait cycle properties, step time parameters and VGRF variables. Data of affected limb was compared with unaffected limb as well as control group to assess the weight-bearing pattern. Statistical analysis was done by′t′ test. Results: Frequency is reduced and gait cycle duration increased in total arthroplasty group as compared with control. Step time parameters including Step time, Stance time and Single support time are significantly reduced ( P value < .05 while Double support time and Single swing time are significantly increased ( P value < .05 in the THR group. Forces over each sensor are increased more on the unaffected limb of the THR group as compared to

  13. Gait analysis in hip viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Di Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hip is a site very commonly affected by osteoarthritis and the intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid in the management of osteoarthritic pain is increasingly used. However, the debate about its usefulness is still ongoing, as not all results of clinical trials confirm its effectiveness. In order to achieve the best outcome, clinical assessment and treatment choices should be based on subjective outcome, pathological and mechanical findings that should be integrated with qualitative analysis of human movement. After viscosupplementation, clinical trials often evaluate as endpoint subjective outcomes (i.e. pain visual analogic scale and static imaging such as radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In our clinical practice we use gait analysis as part of rehabilitation protocol to measure performance, enhancement and changes of several biomechanical factors. Taking advantage of available resources (BTS Bioengineering gait analysis Elite System we studied a patient’s gait after ultrasound guided hip injections for viscosupplementation. He showed an early clinical and biomechanical improvement during walking after a single intra articular injection of hyaluronic acid. Gait analysis parameters obtained suggest that the pre-treatment slower speed may be caused by antalgic walking patterns, the need for pain control and muscle weakness. After hip viscosupplementation, the joint displayed different temporal, kinetic and kinematic parameters associated with improved pain patterns.

  14. Gait analysis in hip viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, L

    2013-10-31

    Hip is a site very commonly affected by osteoarthritis and the intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid in the management of osteoarthritic pain is increasingly used. However, the debate about its usefulness is still ongoing, as not all results of clinical trials confirm its effectiveness. In order to achieve the best outcome, clinical assessment and treatment choices should be based on subjective outcome, pathological and mechanical findings that should be integrated with qualitative analysis of human movement. After viscosupplementation, clinical trials often evaluate as endpoint subjective outcomes (i.e. pain visual analogic scale) and static imaging such as radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In our clinical practice we use gait analysis as part of rehabilitation protocol to measure performance, enhancement and changes of several biomechanical factors. Taking advantage of available resources (BTS Bioengineering gait analysis Elite System) we studied a patient's gait after ultrasound guided hip injections for viscosupplementation. He showed an early clinical and biomechanical improvement during walking after a single intra articular injection of hyaluronic acid. Gait analysis parameters obtained suggest that the pre-treatment slower speed may be caused by antalgic walking patterns, the need for pain control and muscle weakness. After hip viscosupplementation, the joint displayed different temporal, kinetic and kinematic parameters associated with improved pain patterns.

  15. Android Platform for Realtime Gait Tracking Using Inertial Measurement Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueveque, Pablo; Sobarzo, Sergio; Saavedra, Francisco; Maldonado, Claudio; Gómez, Britam

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important movements performed by the humans is gait. Biomechanical Gait analysis is usually by optical capture systems. However, such systems are expensive and sensitive to light and obstacles. In order to reduce those costs a system based on Inertial Measurements Units (IMU) is proposed. IMU are a good option to make movement analisys indoor with a low post-processing data, allowing to connect those systems to an Android platform. The design is based on two elements: a) The IMU sensors and the b) Android device. The IMU sensor is simple, small (35 x 35 mm), portable and autonomous (7.8 hrs). A resolution of 0.01° in their measurements is obtained, and sends data via Bluetooth link. The Android application works for Android 4.2 or higher, and it is compatible with Bluetooth devices 2.0 or higher. Three IMU sensors send data to a Tablet wirelessly, in order to evaluate the angles evolution for each joint of the leg (hip, knee and ankle). This information is used to calculate gait index and evaluate the gait quality online during the physical therapist is working with the patient. PMID:27990241

  16. Android platform for realtime gait tracking using inertial measurement units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Aqueveque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important movements performed by the humans is gait. Biomechanical Gait analysis is usually by optical capture systems. However, such systems are expensive and sensitive to light and obstacles. In order to reduce those costs a system based on Inertial Measurements Units (IMU is proposed. IMU are a good option to make movement analisys indoor with a low post-processing data, allowing to connect those systems to an Android platform. The design is based on two elements: a The IMU sensors and the b Android device. The IMU sensor is simple, small (35 x 35 mm, portable and autonomous (7.8 hrs. A resolution of 0.01° in their measurements is obtained, and sends data via Bluetooth link. The Android application works for Android 4.2 or higher, and it is compatible with Bluetooth devices 2.0 or higher. Three IMU sensors send data to a Tablet wirelessly, in order to evaluate the angles evolution for each joint of the leg (hip, knee and ankle. This information is used to calculate gait index and evaluate the gait quality online during the physical therapist is working with the patient.

  17. Android Platform for Realtime Gait Tracking Using Inertial Measurement Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueveque, Pablo; Sobarzo, Sergio; Saavedra, Francisco; Maldonado, Claudio; Gómez, Britam

    2016-06-13

    One of the most important movements performed by the humans is gait. Biomechanical Gait analysis is usually by optical capture systems. However, such systems are expensive and sensitive to light and obstacles. In order to reduce those costs a system based on Inertial Measurements Units (IMU) is proposed. IMU are a good option to make movement analisys indoor with a low post-processing data, allowing to connect those systems to an Android platform. The design is based on two elements: a) The IMU sensors and the b) Android device. The IMU sensor is simple, small (35 x 35 mm), portable and autonomous (7.8 hrs). A resolution of 0.01° in their measurements is obtained, and sends data via Bluetooth link. The Android application works for Android 4.2 or higher, and it is compatible with Bluetooth devices 2.0 or higher. Three IMU sensors send data to a Tablet wirelessly, in order to evaluate the angles evolution for each joint of the leg (hip, knee and ankle). This information is used to calculate gait index and evaluate the gait quality online during the physical therapist is working with the patient.

  18. Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Freezing of Gait in Patients After Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Yong Wook

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spatiotemporal characteristics with gait variability in patients with freezing of gait (FOG) after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI).Eleven patients showing FOG after HIBI and 15 normal controls were consecutively enrolled. We performed gait analysis using a computerized gait system (VICON MX-T10 Motion Analysis System) and compared spatiotemporal characteristics and gait variability in both groups. Additionally, we performed correlation analysis to identify the gait parameters associated with severity of freezing, which we measured based on unified Parkinson disease Rating Scale subscore.Spatiotemporal characteristic of FOG patients showed increased stance time and double support phase and decreased swing time, single support phase, stride length, step length, and gait velocity compared with normal controls (P step length asymmetry were significantly increased in HIBI patients with FOG (P step length, and gait velocity variability in HIBI patients with FOG compared with normal controls (P step length, and single support phase to be spatiotemporal parameters related to FOG severity (P < 0.05).Our findings suggest that bilateral gait coordination deterioration plays a considerable role for pathophysiology of FOG in HIBI patients. Additional studies with a larger number of subjects are needed to further investigate the neural mechanism of FOG after HIBI.

  19. EEG Single-Trial Detection of Gait Speed Changes during Treadmill Walk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lisi

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyse the electroencephalography (EEG signal associated with gait speed changes (i.e. acceleration or deceleration. For data acquisition, healthy subjects were asked to perform volitional speed changes between 0, 1, and 2 Km/h, during treadmill walk. Simultaneously, the treadmill controller modified the speed of the belt according to the subject's linear speed. A classifier is trained to distinguish between the EEG signal associated with constant speed gait and with gait speed changes, respectively. Results indicate that the classification performance is fair to good for the majority of the subjects, with accuracies always above chance level, in both batch and pseudo-online approaches. Feature visualisation and equivalent dipole localisation suggest that the information used by the classifier is associated with increased activity in parietal areas, where mu and beta rhythms are suppressed during gait speed changes. Specifically, the parietal cortex may be involved in motor planning and visuomotor transformations throughout the online gait adaptation, which is in agreement with previous research. The findings of this study may help to shed light on the cortical involvement in human gait control, and represent a step towards a BMI for applications in post-stroke gait rehabilitation.

  20. EEG Single-Trial Detection of Gait Speed Changes during Treadmill Walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Giuseppe; Morimoto, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyse the electroencephalography (EEG) signal associated with gait speed changes (i.e. acceleration or deceleration). For data acquisition, healthy subjects were asked to perform volitional speed changes between 0, 1, and 2 Km/h, during treadmill walk. Simultaneously, the treadmill controller modified the speed of the belt according to the subject's linear speed. A classifier is trained to distinguish between the EEG signal associated with constant speed gait and with gait speed changes, respectively. Results indicate that the classification performance is fair to good for the majority of the subjects, with accuracies always above chance level, in both batch and pseudo-online approaches. Feature visualisation and equivalent dipole localisation suggest that the information used by the classifier is associated with increased activity in parietal areas, where mu and beta rhythms are suppressed during gait speed changes. Specifically, the parietal cortex may be involved in motor planning and visuomotor transformations throughout the online gait adaptation, which is in agreement with previous research. The findings of this study may help to shed light on the cortical involvement in human gait control, and represent a step towards a BMI for applications in post-stroke gait rehabilitation.

  1. Inertial Sensor-Based Robust Gait Analysis in Non-Hospital Settings for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tunca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The gold standards for gait analysis are instrumented walkways and marker-based motion capture systems, which require costly infrastructure and are only available in hospitals and specialized gait clinics. Even though the completeness and the accuracy of these systems are unquestionable, a mobile and pervasive gait analysis alternative suitable for non-hospital settings is a clinical necessity. Using inertial sensors for gait analysis has been well explored in the literature with promising results. However, the majority of the existing work does not consider realistic conditions where data collection and sensor placement imperfections are imminent. Moreover, some of the underlying assumptions of the existing work are not compatible with pathological gait, decreasing the accuracy. To overcome these challenges, we propose a foot-mounted inertial sensor-based gait analysis system that extends the well-established zero-velocity update and Kalman filtering methodology. Our system copes with various cases of data collection difficulties and relaxes some of the assumptions invalid for pathological gait (e.g., the assumption of observing a heel strike during a gait cycle. The system is able to extract a rich set of standard gait metrics, including stride length, cadence, cycle time, stance time, swing time, stance ratio, speed, maximum/minimum clearance and turning rate. We validated the spatio-temporal accuracy of the proposed system by comparing the stride length and swing time output with an IR depth-camera-based reference system on a dataset comprised of 22 subjects. Furthermore, to highlight the clinical applicability of the system, we present a clinical discussion of the extracted metrics on a disjoint dataset of 17 subjects with various neurological conditions.

  2. Experimental tests for foot pressure analysis during orthostatic position and gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganea Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human body postural deviation during normal activities such as gait or orthostatic position can cause injuries. The paper presents an experimental study regarding the distribution of contact pressures during gait and orthostatic position, aiming to evaluate the load distribution between forefoot (FF and rear-foot (RF, the projection of center of gravity and the support area variation while conducting stability metering and feet load distribution tests.

  3. Biomechanical consequences of gait impairment at the ankle and foot : Injury, malalignment, and co-contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ruoli

    2012-01-01

    The human foot contributes significantly to the function of the whole lower extremity during standing and locomotion. Nevertheless, the foot and ankle often suffer injuries and are affected by many musculoskeletal and neurological pathologies. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate gait parameters and muscle function change due to foot and ankle injury, malalignment and co-contraction. Using 3D gait analysis, analytical analyses and computational simulations, biomechanical consequence...

  4. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Gery

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback

  5. Gait analysis methods in rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Richard

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Brand's four reasons for clinical tests and his analysis of the characteristics of valid biomechanical tests for use in orthopaedics are taken as a basis for determining what methodologies are required for gait analysis in a clinical rehabilitation context. Measurement methods in clinical gait analysis The state of the art of optical systems capable of measuring the positions of retro-reflective markers placed on the skin is sufficiently advanced that they are probably no longer a significant source of error in clinical gait analysis. Determining the anthropometry of the subject and compensating for soft tissue movement in relation to the under-lying bones are now the principal problems. Techniques for using functional tests to determine joint centres and axes of rotation are starting to be used successfully. Probably the last great challenge for optical systems is in using computational techniques to compensate for soft tissue measurements. In the long term future it is possible that direct imaging of bones and joints in three dimensions (using MRI or fluoroscopy may replace marker based systems. Methods for interpreting gait analysis data There is still not an accepted general theory of why we walk the way we do. In the absence of this, many explanations of walking address the mechanisms by which specific movements are achieved by particular muscles. A whole new methodology is developing to determine the functions of individual muscles. This needs further development and validation. A particular requirement is for subject specific models incorporating 3-dimensional imaging data of the musculo-skeletal anatomy with kinematic and kinetic data. Methods for understanding the effects of intervention Clinical gait analysis is extremely limited if it does not allow clinicians to choose between alternative possible interventions or to predict outcomes. This can be achieved either by rigorously planned clinical trials or using

  6. Time-varying priority queuing models for human dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Pan, Raj Kumar; Kaski, Kimmo

    2012-06-01

    Queuing models provide insight into the temporal inhomogeneity of human dynamics, characterized by the broad distribution of waiting times of individuals performing tasks. We theoretically study the queuing model of an agent trying to execute a task of interest, the priority of which may vary with time due to the agent's "state of mind." However, its execution is disrupted by other tasks of random priorities. By considering the priority of the task of interest either decreasing or increasing algebraically in time, we analytically obtain and numerically confirm the bimodal and unimodal waiting time distributions with power-law decaying tails, respectively. These results are also compared to the updating time distribution of papers in arXiv.org and the processing time distribution of papers in Physical Review journals. Our analysis helps to understand human task execution in a more realistic scenario.

  7. Time-Varying Priority Queuing Models for Human Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kaski, Kimmo

    2011-01-01

    Queuing models provide insight into the temporal inhomogeneity of human dynamics, characterized by the broad distribution of waiting times of individuals performing tasks. We study the queuing model of an agent trying to execute a task of interest, the priority of which may vary with time due to the agent's "state of mind." However, its execution can be disrupted by other tasks of random priorities. By considering the priority of the task of interest either decreasing or increasing algebraically in time, we analytically obtain and numerically confirm the bimodal and unimodal waiting time distributions with power-law decaying tails, respectively. These results are also compared to the updating time distribution of papers in the arXiv and the processing time distribution of papers in Physical Review journals. Our analysis helps to understand the human task execution behavior in a more realistic scenario.

  8. Noise-induced transition in human reaction times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-09-01

    The human reaction/response time can be defined as the time elapsed from the onset of stimulus presentation until a response occurs in many sensory and cognitive processes. A reaction time model based on Piéron’s law is investigated. The model shows a noise-induced transition in the moments of reaction time distributions due to the presence of strong additive noise. The model also demonstrates that reaction times do not follow fluctuation scaling between the mean and the variance but follow a generalized version between the skewness and the kurtosis. The results indicate that noise-induced transitions in the moments govern fluctuations in sensory-motor transformations and open an insight into the macroscopic effects of noise in human perception and action. The conditions that lead to extreme reaction times are discussed based on the transfer of information in neurons.

  9. Delayed gait recovery in a stroke patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong Pyo Seo; Mi Young Lee; Yong Hyun Kwon; Sung Ho Jang

    2013-01-01

    We report on a stroke patient who showed delayed gait recovery between 8 and 11 months after the onset of intracerebral hemorrhage. This 32-year-old female patient underwent craniotomy and drainage for right intracerebral hemorrhage due to rupture of an arteriovenous malformation. Brain MR images revealed a large leukomalactic lesion in the right fronto-parietal cortex. Diffusion tensor tractography at 8 months after onset revealed that the right corticospinal tract was severely injured. At this time, the patient could not stand or walk despite undergoing rehabilitation from 2 months after onset. It was believed that severe spasticity of the left leg and right ankle was largely responsible, and thus, antispastic drugs, antispastic procedures (alcohol neurolysis of the motor branch of the tibial nerve and an intramuscular alcohol wash of both tibialis posterior muscles) and physical therapy were tried to control the spasticity. These measures relieved the severe spasticity, with the result that the patient was able to stand at 3 months. In addition, the improvements in sensorimotor function, visuospatial function, and cognition also seemed to contribute to gait recovery. As a result, she gained the ability to walk independently on even floor with a left ankle foot orthosis at 11 months after onset. This case illustrates that clinicians should attempt to find the months after onset.

  10. Therapeutic electrical stimulation for spasticity: quantitative gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, W S

    1998-01-01

    Improvement in motor function following electrical stimulation is related to strengthening of the stimulated spastic muscle and inhibition of the antagonist. A 26-year-old man with familial spastic paraparesis presented with gait dysfunction and bilateral lower limb spastic muscle tone. Clinically, muscle strength and sensation were normal. He was considered appropriate for a trial of therapeutic electrical stimulation following failed trials of physical therapy and baclofen. No other treatment was used concurrent with the electrical stimulation. Before treatment, quantitative gait analysis revealed 63% of normal velocity and a crouched gait pattern, associated with excessive electromyographic activity in the hamstrings and gastrocnemius muscles. Based on these findings, bilateral stimulation of the quadriceps and anterior compartment musculature was performed two to three times per week for three months. Repeat gait analysis was conducted three weeks after the cessation of stimulation treatment. A 27% increase in velocity was noted associated with an increase in both cadence and right step length. Right hip and bilateral knee stance motion returned to normal (rather than "crouched"). No change in the timing of dynamic electromyographic activity was seen. These findings suggest a role for the use of electrical stimulation for rehabilitation of spasticity. The specific mechanism of this improvement remains uncertain.

  11. Concurrent validity of the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v2 for measuring spatiotemporal gait parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatabadi, Elham; Taati, Babak; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a study to evaluate the concurrent validity of the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v2 for measuring the spatiotemporal parameters of gait. Twenty healthy adults performed several sequences of walks across a GAITRite mat under three different conditions: usual pace, fast pace, and dual task. Each walking sequence was simultaneously captured with two Kinect for Windows v2 and the GAITRite system. An automated algorithm was employed to extract various spatiotemporal features including stance time, step length, step time and gait velocity from the recorded Kinect v2 sequences. Accuracy in terms of reliability, concurrent validity and limits of agreement was examined for each gait feature under different walking conditions. The 95% Bland-Altman limits of agreement were narrow enough for the Kinect v2 to be a valid tool for measuring all reported spatiotemporal parameters of gait in all three conditions. An excellent intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) ranging from 0.9 to 0.98 was observed for all gait measures across different walking conditions. The inter trial reliability of all gait parameters were shown to be strong for all walking types (ICC3, 1 > 0.73). The results of this study suggest that the Kinect for Windows v2 has the capacity to measure selected spatiotemporal gait parameters for healthy adults.

  12. The six determinants of gait and the inverted pendulum analogy: A dynamic walking perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Arthur D

    2007-08-01

    We examine two prevailing, yet surprisingly contradictory, theories of human walking. The six determinants of gait are kinematic features of gait proposed to minimize the energetic cost of locomotion by reducing the vertical displacement of the body center of mass (COM). The inverted pendulum analogy proposes that it is beneficial for the stance leg to behave like a pendulum, prescribing a more circular arc, rather than a horizontal path, for the COM. Recent literature presents evidence against the six determinants theory, and a simple mathematical analysis shows that a flattened COM trajectory in fact increases muscle work and force requirements. A similar analysis shows that the inverted pendulum fares better, but paradoxically predicts no work or force requirements. The paradox may be resolved through the dynamic walking approach, which refers to periodic gaits produced almost entirely by the dynamics of the limbs alone. Demonstrations include passive dynamic walking machines that descend a gentle slope, and active dynamic walking robots that walk on level ground. Dynamic walking takes advantage of the inverted pendulum mechanism, but requires mechanical work to transition from one pendular stance leg to the next. We show how the step-to-step transition is an unavoidable energetic consequence of the inverted pendulum gait, and gives rise to predictions that are experimentally testable on humans and machines. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective, focusing on mechanical work rather than the kinematics or forces of gait. It is helpful for explaining human gait features in a constructive rather than interpretive manner.

  13. Melatonin and the circadian timing of human parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcese, James; Lozier, Stephen; Paradise, Courtney

    2013-02-01

    Although the onset of spontaneous human parturition has long been known to occur preferentially during the nighttime and early morning hours, no convincing physiological explanation for this pattern has yet been proposed. This review focuses on the circadian timing of mammalian parturition, particularly in the human. It is proposed that differences in the phasing of parturition among different species are likely a function of opposite uterine responses to humoral cues, in particular those coding for time of day. The brain hormone melatonin fulfills many of the prerequisites to serve as a circadian signal for initiating uterine contractions that lead to human parturition. These encompass direct actions of melatonin on myometrial smooth muscle cells that are synergistic with oxytocin in facilitating greater uterine contractions at night. This may not only help to explain the nocturnal phasing of human parturition but also open new avenues for the management of term and preterm labor.

  14. Relationship Between Head-Turn Gait Speed and Lateral Balance Function in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harshvardhan; Sanders, Ozell; McCombe Waller, Sandy; Bair, Woei-Nan; Beamer, Brock; Creath, Robert A; Rogers, Mark W

    2017-10-01

    To determine and compare gait speed during head-forward and side-to-side head-turn walking in individuals with lower versus greater lateral balance. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Older adults (N=93; 42 men, 51 women; mean age ± SD, 73 ± 6.08y) who could walk independently. (1) Balance tolerance limit (BTL), defined as the lowest perturbation intensity where a multistep balance recovery pattern was first evoked in response to randomized lateral waist-pull perturbations of standing balance to the left and right sides, at 6 different intensities (range from level 2: 4.5-cm displacement at 180cm/s(2) acceleration, to level 7: 22.5-cm displacement at 900cm/s(2) acceleration); (2) gait speed, determined using an instrumented gait mat; (3) balance, evaluated with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale; and (4) mobility, determined with the Timed Up and Go (TUG). Individuals with low versus high BTL had a slower self-selected head-forward gait speed and head-turn gait speed (P=.002 and Phead-turn gait speed than head-forward gait speed (Cohen's d=1.0 vs 0.6). Head-turn gait speed best predicted BTL. BTL was moderately and positively related (P=.003) to the ABC Scale and negatively related (P=.017) to TUG. Head-turn gait speed is affected to a greater extent than head-forward gait speed in older individuals with poorer lateral balance and at greater risk of falls. Moreover, head-turn gait speed can be used to assess the interactions of limitations in lateral balance function and gait speed in relation to fall risk in older adults. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal Change in Gait and Motor Function in Pre-manifest Huntington’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Ashwini K; Mazzoni, Pietro; Wasserman, Paula; Marder, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinal change in gait and motor function in pre-manifest Huntington’s disease (HD). We examined ten pre-manifest subjects at baseline, one and five years. Quantitative gait data were collected with an electronic mat (GAITRite®). We analyzed measures related to speed (velocity, step length, cadence), asymmetry (step length difference), dynamic balance (percent time in double support, support base) and variability in stride length and swing time. M...

  16. Biomechanics of Gait during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. During pregnancy women experience several changes in the body’s physiology, morphology, and hormonal system. These changes may affect the balance and body stability and can cause discomfort and pain. The adaptations of the musculoskeletal system due to morphological changes during pregnancy are not fully understood. Few studies clarify the biomechanical changes of gait that occur during pregnancy and in postpartum period. Purposes. The purpose of this re...

  17. The beginning of human life under time-laps Cinematography

    OpenAIRE

    Mio, Yasuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of this study was to follow and record the early stages of development of a human embryo using time-lapse cinematography, and to discuss the beginning of human life. Materials and Methods: Human ova were incubated in thermo-stabilized and pH controlled chambers and observed using an inverted microscope fitted with a CCD digital camera. Images were taken at 2-minute intervals for 5–6 days. A total of 30 consecutive images, corresponding to an hour of incubat...

  18. Computer algorithms to characterize individual subject EMG profiles during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogey, R A; Barnes, L A; Perry, J

    1992-09-01

    Three methods of precisely determining onset and cessation times of gait EMG were investigated. Subjects were 24 normal adults and 32 individuals with gait pathologies. Soleus muscle EMG during free speed level walking was obtained with fine wires, and was normalized by manual muscle test (%MMT). Linear envelopes were generated from the rectified, integrated EMG at each percent gait cycle (%GC) of each stride in individual gait trials. Three methods were used to generate EMG profiles for each tested subject. The ensemble average (EAV) was determined for each subject from the mean relative intensity of the linear envelopes. Low relative intensity or short duration EMG was removed from the ensemble average to create the intensity filtered average (IFA). The packet analysis method (PAC) created an EMG profile from the linear envelopes in successive strides whose respective centroid %GC locations were within +/- 15%GC of each other. Control values for onset and cessation times of individual gait trials were calculated after spurious outliers were removed. Mean onset and cessation times across subjects for control values and the experimental methods (EAV, IFA, and PAC) were calculated. Dunnett's test (p less than .05) was performed to compare control and experimental groups in patient and normal trials. EAV differed from control values for onsets (p less than .01), cessations (p less than .01), and durations (p less than .01) in both normal and patient trials. IFA and PAC had no significant differences from control value means. IFA was selected for clinical use as automatic analysis could be performed on all trials and a minimum number of decision rules were needed.

  19. Space, time and the limits of human understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirardi, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    In this compendium of essays, some of the world’s leading thinkers discuss their conceptions of space and time, as viewed through the lens of their own discipline. With an epilogue on the limits of human understanding, this volume hosts contributions from six or more diverse fields. It presumes only rudimentary background knowledge on the part of the reader. Time and again, through the prism of intellect, humans have tried to diffract reality into various distinct, yet seamless, atomic, yet holistic, independent, yet interrelated disciplines and have attempted to study it contextually. Philosophers debate the paradoxes, or engage in meditations, dialogues and reflections on the content and nature of space and time. Physicists, too, have been trying to mold space and time to fit their notions concerning micro- and macro-worlds. Mathematicians focus on the abstract aspects of space, time and measurement. While cognitive scientists ponder over the perceptual and experiential facets of our consciousness of spac...

  20. Monitoring gait in multiple sclerosis with novel wearable motion sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Ryan S.; Seagers, Kirsten; Motl, Robert W.; Sheth, Nirav; Wright, John A.; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Sosnoff, Jacob J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mobility impairment is common in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and there is a need to assess mobility in remote settings. Here, we apply a novel wireless, skin-mounted, and conformal inertial sensor (BioStampRC, MC10 Inc.) to examine gait characteristics of PwMS under controlled conditions. We determine the accuracy and precision of BioStampRC in measuring gait kinematics by comparing to contemporary research-grade measurement devices. Methods A total of 45 PwMS, who presented with diverse walking impairment (Mild MS = 15, Moderate MS = 15, Severe MS = 15), and 15 healthy control subjects participated in the study. Participants completed a series of clinical walking tests. During the tests participants were instrumented with BioStampRC and MTx (Xsens, Inc.) sensors on their shanks, as well as an activity monitor GT3X (Actigraph, Inc.) on their non-dominant hip. Shank angular velocity was simultaneously measured with the inertial sensors. Step number and temporal gait parameters were calculated from the data recorded by each sensor. Visual inspection and the MTx served as the reference standards for computing the step number and temporal parameters, respectively. Accuracy (error) and precision (variance of error) was assessed based on absolute and relative metrics. Temporal parameters were compared across groups using ANOVA. Results Mean accuracy±precision for the BioStampRC was 2±2 steps error for step number, 6±9ms error for stride time and 6±7ms error for step time (0.6–2.6% relative error). Swing time had the least accuracy±precision (25±19ms error, 5±4% relative error) among the parameters. GT3X had the least accuracy±precision (8±14% relative error) in step number estimate among the devices. Both MTx and BioStampRC detected significantly distinct gait characteristics between PwMS with different disability levels (p<0.01). Conclusion BioStampRC sensors accurately and precisely measure gait parameters in PwMS across diverse walking

  1. Improvement in gait following combined ankle and subtalar arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Shay; Coleman, Scott C; Brodsky, James W

    2014-11-19

    This study assessed the hypothesis that arthrodesis of both the ankle and the hindfoot joints produces an objective improvement of function as measured by gait analysis of patients with severe ankle and hindfoot arthritis. Twenty-one patients with severe ankle and hindfoot arthritis who underwent unilateral tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with an intramedullary nail were prospectively studied with three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis at a minimum of one year postoperatively. The mean age at the time of the operation was fifty-nine years, and the mean duration of follow-up was seventeen months (range, twelve to thirty-one months). Temporospatial measurements included cadence, step length, walking velocity, and total support time. The kinematic parameters were sagittal plane motion of the ankle, knee, and hip. The kinetic parameters were sagittal plane ankle power and moment and hip power. Symmetry of gait was analyzed by comparing the step lengths on the affected and unaffected sides. There was significant improvement in multiple parameters of postoperative gait as compared with the patients' own preoperative function. Temporospatial data showed significant increases in cadence (p = 0.03) and walking speed (p = 0.001) and decreased total support time (p = 0.02). Kinematic results showed that sagittal plane ankle motion had decreased, from 13.2° preoperatively to 10.2° postoperatively, in the operatively treated limb (p = 0.02), and increased from 22.2° to 24.1° (p = 0.01) in the contralateral limb. Hip motion on the affected side increased from 39° to 43° (p = 0.007), and knee motion increased from 56° to 60° (p = 0.054). Kinetic results showed significant increases in ankle moment (p < 0.0001) of the operatively treated limb, ankle power of the contralateral limb (p = 0.009), and hip power on the affected side (p = 0.005) postoperatively. There was a significant improvement in gait symmetry (p = 0.01). There was a small loss of sagittal plane motion in the

  2. Early presentation of gait impairment in Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickett Kristen A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically characterized by early onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, diabetes insipidus, and neurological abnormalities, Wolfram syndrome (WFS is also associated with atypical brainstem and cerebellar findings in the first decade of life. As such, we hypothesized that gait differences between individuals with WFS and typically developing (TD individuals may be detectable across the course of the disease. Methods Gait was assessed for 13 individuals with WFS (min 6.4 yrs, max 25.8 yrs and 29 age-matched, typically developing individuals (min 5.6 yrs, max 28.5 yrs using a GAITRite ® walkway system. Velocity, cadence, step length, base of support and double support time were compared between groups. Results Across all tasks, individuals with WFS walked slower (p = 0.03, took shorter (p ≤ 0.001 and wider (p ≤ 0.001 steps and spent a greater proportion of the gait cycle in double support (p = 0.03 compared to TD individuals. Cadence did not differ between groups (p = 0.62. Across all tasks, age was significantly correlated with cadence and double support time in the TD group but only double support time was correlated with age in the WFS group and only during preferred pace forward (rs= 0.564, p = 0.045 and dual task forward walking (rs= 0.720, p = 0.006 tasks. Individuals with WFS also had a greater number of missteps during tandem walking (p ≤ 0.001. Within the WFS group, spatiotemporal measures of gait did not correlate with measures of visual acuity. Balance measures negatively correlated with normalized gait velocity during fast forward walking (rs = −0.59, p = 0.03 and percent of gait cycle in double support during backward walking (rs = −0.64, p = 0.03. Conclusions Quantifiable gait impairments can be detected in individuals with WFS earlier than previous clinical observations suggested. These impairments are not fully accounted for by the visual or balance deficits

  3. Modulation of the Left Prefrontal Cortex with High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Facilitates Gait in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer M. Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic central nervous system (CNS demyelinating disease. Gait abnormalities are common and disabling in patients with MS with limited treatment options available. Emerging evidence suggests a role of prefrontal attention networks in modulating gait. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is known to enhance cortical excitability in stimulated cortex and its correlates. We investigated the effect of high-frequency left prefrontal rTMS on gait parameters in a 51-year-old Caucasian male with chronic relapsing/remitting MS with residual disabling attention and gait symptoms. Patient received 6 Hz, rTMS at 90% motor threshold using figure of eight coil centered on F3 location (using 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG lead localization system. GAITRite gait analysis system was used to collect objective gait measures before and after one session and in another occasion three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Two-tailed within subject repeated measure t-test showed significant enhancement in ambulation time, gait velocity, and cadence after three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Modulating left prefrontal cortex excitability using rTMS resulted in significant change in gait parameters after three sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates the effect of rTMS applied to the prefrontal cortex on gait in MS patients.

  4. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    OpenAIRE

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending p...

  5. The Pathomechanics Of Calcaneal Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, David H.; Cooper, Les

    1980-07-01

    The data acquisition system employed in our laboratory includes optical, electronic and computer subsystems. Three movie camera freeze the motion for analysis. The film is displayed on a motion analyzer, and the body segment positions are recorded in a three dimensional coordinate system with Graf/pen sonic digitizer. The angular rotations are calculated by computer and automatically plotted. The force plate provides measurements of vertical force, foreaft shear, medial-lateral shear, torque, and center of pressure. Electromyograms are superimposed upon gait movies to permit measurement of muscle phasic activity. The Hycam movie camera si-multaneously films (through separate lens) the subject and oscilloscope. Movement measurements, electromyograms, and floor reaction forces provide the data base for analysis. From a study of the gait changes in five normal subjects following tibial nerve block, and from additional studies of patients with paralysis of the ankle plantar flexors, the pathomechanics of calcaneal gait can be described. Inability to transfer weight to the forward part of the foot produces ankle instability and reduction of contralateral step length. Excessive drop of the center of mass necessitates com-pensatory increased lift energy output through the sound limb to restore the height of the center of mass. Excessive stance phase ankle dorsiflexion produces knee instability requiring prolonged quadriceps muscle phasic activity.

  6. First published record of urban malaria in Puerto Gaitán, Meta, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, Luz Stella; Brochero, Helena Luisa; McKeon, Sascha N; Lainhart, William; Conn, Jan E

    2013-12-01

    Patterns of malaria cases were compared between the department of Meta and the municipality of Puerto Gaitán, Colombia, to examine temporal change in malaria from 2005-2010. During this time frame in Meta the mean ratio was 2.53; in contrast, in Puerto Gaitán it was 1.41, meaning that a surprisingly high proportion of Plasmodium falciparum cases were reported from this municipality. A detailed analysis of data from Puerto Gaitán for 2009 and 2010 detected a significant difference (χ2, p conflict.

  7. Gait and upper limb variability in Parkinson's disease patients with and without freezing of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbe, M.T.; Amarell, M.; Snijders, A.H.; Florin, E.; Quatuor, E.L.; Schonau, E.; Fink, G.R.; Bloem, B.R.; Timmermann, L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and freezing of gait (FOG) (freezers) demonstrate high gait variability. The objective of this study was to determine whether freezers display a higher variability of upper limb movements and elucidate if these changes correlate with gait. We were the first gro

  8. Pyroelectric infrared alarm system based on human gait recognition%基于人体步态识别的热释电红外传感报警系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张涛; 钟舜聪

    2011-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of difficult detecting the motionless human body using pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensor, a passive PIR alarm system based on human gait recognition was investigated to enhance the intelligence of the system and to reduce the false alarm rate. As the detector, PIR sensor was employed in the system for non-contact monitoring the human body within a certain distance. The PIR signal was filtered, amplified, and then converted to a digital signal by an analog-to-digital converter. Consequently, the digital signal was sent to a microcomputer ( MCU ) for processing. The human body movement characteristics were analyzed to achieve accurate security alarm purpose. The experimental results demonstrate the stable performance, high sensitivity and low false alarm rate of the developed PIR alarm system, therefore, it can be recommended for the applications in security system of home, shopping center, and warehouse.%针对热释电红外传感器对运动后静止的人体无法感应的缺点,设计了一种基于人体步态识别的热释电红外报警系统,大大提高了系统感知智能度,减少了报警的误报率.该系统利用热释电红外传感器(PIR)作为探头,将感测到人体的红外信息转换成电压信号,通过滤波、放大等信号调理以及经过数据采集后,将信号传递给单片机处理,结合人体运动特征进行步态识别,从而实现智能报警,达到安全防护的目的.研究结果表明,基于人体步态识别的热释电红外报警系统具有性能稳定、灵敏度高、误报率低等优点,适合各种安全报警的场合,具有广泛的应用前景.

  9. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease.

  10. Time and temporality: linguistic distribution in human life-games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowley, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    While clock-time can be used to clarify facts, all living systems construct their own temporalities. Having illustrated the claim for foxtail grasses, it is argued that, with motility and brains, organisms came to use temporalities that build flexibility into behavior. With the rise of human...... culture, individuals developed a knack of using linguistic distribution to link metabolism with collective ways of assessing and managing experience. Of human temporal management, the best known case is the mental time travel enabled by, among other functions, autobiographical memory. One contribution...

  11. Fall-related gait characteristics on the treadmill and in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispens, Sietse M; Van Dieën, Jaap H; Van Schooten, Kimberley S; Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Beek, Peter J; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2016-02-02

    Body-worn sensors allow assessment of gait characteristics that are predictive of fall risk, both when measured during treadmill walking and in daily life. The present study aimed to assess differences as well as associations between fall-related gait characteristics measured on a treadmill and in daily life. In a cross-sectional study, trunk accelerations of 18 older adults (72.3 ± 4.5 years) were recorded during walking on a treadmill (Dynaport Hybrid sensor) and during daily life (Dynaport MoveMonitor). A comprehensive set of 32 fall-risk-related gait characteristics was estimated and compared between both settings. For 25 gait characteristics, a systematic difference between treadmill and daily-life measurements was found. Gait was more variable, less symmetric, and less stable during daily life. Fourteen characteristics showed a significant correlation between treadmill and daily-life measurements, including stride time and regularity (0.48 life measurements was found for stride-time variability, acceleration range and sample entropy in vertical and mediolateral direction, gait symmetry in vertical direction, and stability estimated as the local divergence exponent by Rosenstein's method in mediolateral direction (r  0.25). Gait characteristics revealed less stable, less symmetric, and more variable gait during daily life than on a treadmill, yet about half of the characteristics were significantly correlated between conditions. These results suggest that daily-life gait analysis is sensitive to static personal factors (i.e., physical and cognitive capacity) as well as dynamic situational factors (i.e., behavior and environment), which may both represent determinants of fall risk.

  12. Gait, posture and cognition in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferreira Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Gait disorders and postural instability are the leading causes of falls and disability in Parkinson's disease (PD. Cognition plays an important role in postural control and may interfere with gait and posture assessment and treatment. It is important to recognize gait, posture and balance dysfunctions by choosing proper assessment tools for PD. Patients at higher risk of falling must be referred for rehabilitation as early as possible, because antiparkinsonian drugs and surgery do not improve gait and posture in PD.

  13. Skeletal and Clinical Effects of Exoskeleton-Assisted Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    moments generated by the subject arise from one of three possible sources: 1) passive muscle resistance, which may be worse if contractures are present; 2...assisted gait on bone health, muscle mass, and functional outcomes. Specific Aim 1 is associated with three major tasks: 1) to obtain human subject...assume that subject’s joint moments arise from active spasticity Page | 4 contractions. In this approach, we calculate muscle length change based on

  14. Gait unsteadiness and fall risk in two affective disorders: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chung-Kang

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In older adults, depression has been associated with increased fall risk, but the reasons for this link are not fully clear. Given parallels between major depression and Parkinson's disease, we hypothesized that major depression and related affective disorders would be associated with impairment in the ability to regulate the stride-to-stride fluctuations in gait cycle timing. Methods We measured stride-to-stride fluctuations of patients with two forms of mood disorders, unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar disorder, and compared their gait to that of a healthy control group. The primary outcomes were two measures of gait unsteadiness that have been associated with fall risk: stride time variability and swing time variability. Results Compared to the control group, the two patient groups tended to walk more slowly and with decreased swing time and increased stride time. However, none of these differences was statistically significant. Compared to the control group, swing time variability was significantly larger in the subjects with bipolar disorder (p Conclusions Patients with MDD and patients with bipolar disorder display gait unsteadiness. This perturbation in gait may provide a mechanistic link connecting depression and falls. The present findings also suggest the possibility that measurement of variability of gait may provide a readily quantifiable objective approach to monitoring depression and related affective disorders.

  15. Improved kinect-based spatiotemporal and kinematic treadmill gait assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoukhy, Moataz; Oh, Jeonghoon; Kuenze, Christopher; Signorile, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    A cost-effective, clinician friendly gait assessment tool that can automatically track patients' anatomical landmarks can provide practitioners with important information that is useful in prescribing rehabilitative and preventive therapies. This study investigated the validity and reliability of the Microsoft Kinect v2 as a potential inexpensive gait analysis tool. Ten healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.3 and 1.6m·s(-1), as spatiotemporal parameters and kinematics were extracted concurrently using the Kinect and three-dimensional motion analysis. Spatiotemporal measures included step length and width, step and stride times, vertical and mediolateral pelvis motion, and foot swing velocity. Kinematic outcomes included hip, knee, and ankle joint angles in the sagittal plane. The absolute agreement and relative consistency between the two systems were assessed using interclass correlations coefficients (ICC2,1), while reproducibility between systems was established using Lin's Concordance Correlation Coefficient (rc). Comparison of ensemble curves and associated 90% confidence intervals (CI90) of the hip, knee, and ankle joint angles were performed to investigate if the Kinect sensor could consistently and accurately assess lower extremity joint motion throughout the gait cycle. Results showed that the Kinect v2 sensor has the potential to be an effective clinical assessment tool for sagittal plane knee and hip joint kinematics, as well as some spatiotemporal temporal variables including pelvis displacement and step characteristics during the gait cycle.

  16. White matter microstructural organization and gait stability in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd M. Bruijn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding age-related decline in gait stability and the role of alterations in brain structure is crucial. Here, we studied the relationship between white matter microstructural organization using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI and advanced gait stability measures in 15 healthy young adults (range 18-30 years and 25 healthy older adults (range 62-82 years.Among the different gait stability measures, only stride time and the maximum Lyapunov exponent (which quantifies how well participants are able to attenuate small perturbations were found to decline with age. White matter microstructural organization (FA was lower throughout the brain in older adults. We found a strong correlation between FA in the left anterior thalamic radiation and left corticospinal tract on the one hand, and step width and safety margin (indicative of how close participants are to falling over on the other. These findings suggest that white matter FA in tracts connecting subcortical and prefrontal areas is associated with the implementation of an effective stabilization strategy during gait.

  17. An online gait generator for quadruped walking using motor primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlin Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents implementation of an online gait generator on a quadruped robot. Firstly, the design of a quadruped robot is presented. The robot contains four leg modules each of which is constructed by a 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF five-bar parallel linkage mechanism. Together with other two rotational DOF, the leg module is able to perform 4-DOF movement. The parallel mechanism of the robot allows all the servos attached on the body frame, so that the leg mass is decreased and motor load can be balanced. Secondly, an online gait generator based on dynamic movement primitives for the walking control is presented. Dynamic movement primitives provide an approach to generate periodic trajectories and they can be modulated in real time, which makes the online adjustment of walking gaits possible. This gait controller is tested by the quadruped robot in regulating walking speed, switching between forward\\backward movements and steering. The controller is easy to apply, expand and is quite effective on phase coordination and online trajectory modulation. Results of simulated experiments are presented.

  18. Evaluation of a visual feedback system in gait retraining: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Daniel; Bertram, Dietrich; Fölsch, Cassandra; Schega, Lutz

    2012-06-01

    Abnormal gait pattern of the frontal plane (i.e. Duchenne gait and Trendelenburg gait) may be caused by a variety of diseases. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of a visual feedback system on frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements in order to use it in patients with THR in subsequent studies. A total of 24 women (45-65 years) were included in the study. According to acute functional impairments the subjects were assigned to the control group (CG, no gait disorders, n=15, age=59±11 years, BMI=27±4) or to the intervention group (IG, n=9, age=61±4, BMI=29±5), respectively. First, in Measurement 1 (M1) kinematic reference values were captured in a standardized clinical gait analysis (MVN, XSens). Afterwards, the influence of a visual real-time feedback on gait pattern was examined while using the feedback system (M2). While there was a significant difference of IG vs. CG in M1 in the mean inclination regarding pelvis and trunk movements, this was not detected in M2. Therefore it is concluded, especially in subjects with abnormal gait pattern, that the visualization leads to an improvement of the movement pattern of pelvis and trunk in the frontal plane while using the device.

  19. Robot-assisted practice of gait and stair climbing in nonambulatory stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Stefan; Tomelleri, Christopher; Bardeleben, Anita; Werner, Cordula; Waldner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A novel gait robot enabled nonambulatory patients the repetitive practice of gait and stair climbing. Thirty nonambulatory patients with subacute stroke were allocated to two groups. During 60 min sessions every workday for 4 weeks, the experimental group received 30 min of robot training and 30 min of physiotherapy and the control group received 60 min of physiotherapy. The primary variable was gait and stair climbing ability (Functional Ambulation Categories [FAC] score 0-5); secondary variables were gait velocity, Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI), and leg strength and tone blindly assessed at onset, intervention end, and follow-up. Both groups were comparable at onset and functionally improved over time. The improvements were significantly larger in the experimental group with respect to the FAC, RMI, velocity, and leg strength during the intervention. The FAC gains (mean +/- standard deviation) were 2.4 +/- 1.2 (experimental group) and 1.2 +/- 1.5 (control group), p = 0.01. At the end of the intervention, seven experimental group patients and one control group patient had reached an FAC score of 5, indicating an ability to climb up and down one flight of stairs. At follow-up, this superior gait ability persisted. In conclusion, the therapy on the novel gait robot resulted in a superior gait and stair climbing ability in nonambulatory patients with subacute stroke; a higher training intensity was the most likely explanation. A large randomized controlled trial should follow.

  20. Positive outcomes following gait therapy intervention for hip osteoarthritis: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonow-Avnon, Deborah; Herman, Amir; Levin, Daniel; Rozen, Nimrod; Peled, Eli; Wolf, Alon

    2017-01-04

    Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulation of lower-limb joints was shown to beneficially impact gait and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis patients, but has not been tested in hip osteoarthritis patients. We examined a customized gait treatment program using a biomechanical device shown in previous investigations to be capable of manipulating hip biomechanics via foot center of pressure (COP) modulation. The objective of this study was to assess the treatment program for hip osteoarthritis patients, enrolled in a 1-year prospective investigation, by means of objective gait and spatiotemporal parameters, and subjective quality of life measures. Gait analysis and completion of questionnaires were performed at the start of the treatment (baseline), and after 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome parameters were evaluated over time using linear mixed effects models, and association between improvement in quality of life measures and change in objective outcomes was tested using mixed effect linear regression models. Quality of life measures improved compared to baseline, accompanied by increased gait speed and cadence. Sagittal-plane hip joint kinetics, kinematics, and spatiotemporal parameters changed throughout the study compared to baseline, in a manner suggesting improvement of gait. The most substantial improvement occurred within 3 months after treatment initiation, after which improvement approximately plateaued, but was sustained at 12 months. Speed and cadence, as well as several sagittal-plane gait parameters, were significant predictors of improvement in quality of life.

  1. Effects of unilateral robotic limb loading on gait characteristics in subjects with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebs Hermano I

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemiparesis after stroke often leads to impaired ankle motor control that impacts gait function. In recent studies, robotic devices have been developed to address this impairment. While capable of imparting forces to assist during training and gait, these devices add mass to the paretic leg which might encumber patients' gait pattern. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of the added mass of one of these robots, the MIT's Anklebot, while unpowered, on gait of chronic stroke survivors during overground and treadmill walking. Methods Nine chronic stroke survivors walked overground and on a treadmill with and without the anklebot mounted on the paretic leg. Gait parameters, interlimb symmetry, and joint kinematics were collected for the four conditions. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA tests were conducted to examine for possible differences across four conditions for the paretic and nonparetic leg. Results The added inertia and friction of the unpowered anklebot had no statistically significant effect on spatio-temporal parameters of gait, including paretic and nonparetic step time and stance percentage, in both overground and treadmill conditions. Noteworthy, interlimb symmetry as characterized by relative stance duration was greater on the treadmill than overground regardless of loading conditions. The presence of the unpowered robot loading reduced the nonparetic knee peak flexion on the treadmill and paretic peak dorsiflexion overground (p Conclusions Our results suggest that for these subjects the added inertia and friction of this backdriveable robot did not significantly alter their gait pattern.

  2. Robot-assisted gait training in multiple sclerosis patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Isabella; Sajin, Anna; Moreh, Elior; Fisher, Iris; Neeb, Martin; Forest, Adina; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Karusis, Dimitrios; Meiner, Zeev

    2012-06-01

    Preservation of locomotor activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is of utmost importance. Robotic-assisted body weight-supported treadmill training is a promising method to improve gait functions in neurologically impaired patients, although its effectiveness in MS patients is still unknown. To compare the effectiveness of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) with that of conventional walking treatment (CWT) on gait and generalized functions in a group of stable MS patients. A prospective randomized controlled trial of 12 sessions of RAGT or CWT in MS patients of EDSS score 5-7. Primary outcome measures were gait parameters and the secondary outcomes were functional and quality of life parameters. All tests were performed at baseline, 3 and 6 months post-treatment by a blinded rater. Fifteen and 17 patients were randomly allocated to RAGT and CWT, respectively. Both groups were comparable at baseline in all parameters. As compared with baseline, although some gait parameters improved significantly following the treatment at each time point there was no difference between the groups. Both FIM and EDSS scores improved significantly post-treatment with no difference between the groups. At 6 months, most gait and functional parameters had returned to baseline. Robot-assisted gait training is feasible and safe and may be an effective additional therapeutic option in MS patients with severe walking disabilities.

  3. Musical motor feedback (MMF) in walking hemiparetic stroke patients: randomized trials of gait improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Michael; Mauritz, Karl-Heinz

    2003-11-01

    To demonstrate the effect of rhythmical auditory stimulation in a musical context for gait therapy in hemiparetic stroke patients, when the stimulation is played back measure by measure initiated by the patient's heel-strikes (musical motor feedback). Does this type of musical feedback improve walking more than a less specific gait therapy? The randomized controlled trial considered 23 registered stroke patients. Two groups were created by randomization: the control group received 15 sessions of conventional gait therapy and the test group received 15 therapy sessions with musical motor feedback. Inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Median post-stroke interval was 44 days and the patients were able to walk without technical aids with a speed of approximately 0.71 m/s. Gait velocity, step duration, gait symmetry, stride length and foot rollover path length (heel-on-toe-off distance). The test group showed more mean improvement than the control group: stride length increased by 18% versus 0%, symmetry deviation decreased by 58% versus 20%, walking speed increased by 27% versus 4% and rollover path length increased by 28% versus 11%. Musical motor feedback improves the stroke patient's walk in selected parameters more than conventional gait therapy. A fixed memory in the patient's mind about the song and its timing may stimulate the improvement of gait even without the presence of an external pacemaker.

  4. Footwear and Foam Surface Alter Gait Initiation of Typical Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fraga Vieira

    Full Text Available Gait initiation is the task commonly used to investigate the anticipatory postural adjustments necessary to begin a new gait cycle from the standing position. In this study, we analyzed whether and how foot-floor interface characteristics influence the gait initiation process. For this purpose, 25 undergraduate students were evaluated while performing a gait initiation task in three experimental conditions: barefoot on a hard surface (barefoot condition, barefoot on a soft surface (foam condition, and shod on a hard surface (shod condition. Two force plates were used to acquire ground reaction forces and moments for each foot separately. A statistical parametric mapping (SPM analysis was performed in COP time series. We compared the anterior-posterior (AP and medial-lateral (ML resultant center of pressure (COP paths and average velocities, the force peaks under the right and left foot, and the COP integral x force impulse for three different phases: the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA phase (Phase 1, the swing-foot unloading phase (Phase 2, and the support-foot unloading phase (Phase 3. In Phase 1, significantly smaller ML COP paths and velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. Significantly smaller ML COP paths were also found in Phase 2 for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. In Phase 3, increased AP COP velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. SPM analysis revealed significant differences for vector COP time series in the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. The foam condition limited the impulse-generating capacity of COP shift and produced smaller ML force peaks, resulting in limitations to body-weight transfer from the swing to the support foot. The results suggest that footwear and a soft surface affect COP and impose certain features of gait initiation, especially in the ML

  5. Footwear and Foam Surface Alter Gait Initiation of Typical Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Sacco, Isabel de Camargo Neves; Nora, Fernanda Grazielle da Silva Azevedo; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Lobo da Costa, Paula Hentschel

    2015-01-01

    Gait initiation is the task commonly used to investigate the anticipatory postural adjustments necessary to begin a new gait cycle from the standing position. In this study, we analyzed whether and how foot-floor interface characteristics influence the gait initiation process. For this purpose, 25 undergraduate students were evaluated while performing a gait initiation task in three experimental conditions: barefoot on a hard surface (barefoot condition), barefoot on a soft surface (foam condition), and shod on a hard surface (shod condition). Two force plates were used to acquire ground reaction forces and moments for each foot separately. A statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis was performed in COP time series. We compared the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) resultant center of pressure (COP) paths and average velocities, the force peaks under the right and left foot, and the COP integral x force impulse for three different phases: the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) phase (Phase 1), the swing-foot unloading phase (Phase 2), and the support-foot unloading phase (Phase 3). In Phase 1, significantly smaller ML COP paths and velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. Significantly smaller ML COP paths were also found in Phase 2 for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. In Phase 3, increased AP COP velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. SPM analysis revealed significant differences for vector COP time series in the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. The foam condition limited the impulse-generating capacity of COP shift and produced smaller ML force peaks, resulting in limitations to body-weight transfer from the swing to the support foot. The results suggest that footwear and a soft surface affect COP and impose certain features of gait initiation, especially in the ML direction of

  6. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  7. Jet-Ricci Geometry of Time-Dependent Human Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.

    2009-01-01

    We propose the time-dependent generalization of an `ordinary' autonomous human biomechanics, in which total mechanical + biochemical energy is not conserved. We introduce a general framework for time-dependent biomechanics in terms of jet manifolds derived from the extended musculo-skeletal configuration manifold. The corresponding Riemannian geometrical evolution follows the Ricci flow diffusion. In particular, we show that the exponential-like decay of total biomechanical energy (due to exh...

  8. Differences in auditory timing between human and nonhuman primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; Merchant, H.

    2014-01-01

    The gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis is proposed as an alternative interpretation to the auditory timing mechanisms discussed in Ackermann et al.'s article. This hypothesis accommodates the fact that the performance of nonhuman primates is comparable to humans in single-interval tasks (such

  9. A passive dynamic walking robot that has a deterministic nonlinear gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Max J; Judkins, Timothy N; Arellano, Chris; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that the step-to-step variations present in human walking are related to the biomechanics of the locomotive system. However, we still have limited understanding of what biomechanical variables influence the observed nonlinear gait variations. It is necessary to develop reliable models that closely resemble the nonlinear gait dynamics in order to advance our knowledge in this scientific field. Previously, Goswami et al. [1998. A study of the passive gait of a compass-like biped robot: symmetry and chaos. International Journal of Robotic Research 17(12)] and Garcia et al. [1998. The simplest walking model: stability, complexity, and scaling. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering 120(2), 281-288] have demonstrated that passive dynamic walking computer models can exhibit a cascade of bifurcations in their gait pattern that lead to a deterministic nonlinear gait pattern. These computer models suggest that the intrinsic mechanical dynamics may be at least partially responsible for the deterministic nonlinear gait pattern; however, this has not been shown for a physical walking robot. Here we use the largest Laypunov exponent and a surrogation analysis method to confirm and extend Garcia et al.'s and Goswami et al.'s original results to a physical passive dynamic walking robot. Experimental outcomes from our walking robot further support the notion that the deterministic nonlinear step-to-step variations present in gait may be partly governed by the intrinsic mechanical dynamics of the locomotive system. Furthermore the nonlinear analysis techniques used in this investigation offer novel methods for quantifying the nature of the step-to-step variations found in human and robotic gait.

  10. Application of the Gillette Gait Index, Gait Deviation Index and Gait Profile Score to multiple clinical pediatric populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMulkin, Mark L; MacWilliams, Bruce A

    2015-02-01

    Gait indices are now commonly used to assess overall pathology and outcomes from studies with instrumented gait analyses. There are differences in how these indices are calculated and therefore inherent differences in their sensitivities to detect changes or differences between groups. The purpose of the current study was to examine the three most commonly used gait indices, Gillette Gait Index (GGI), Gait Deviation Index (GDI), and Gait Profile Score (GPS), comparing the statistical sensitivity and the ability to make meaningful interpretations of the clinical results. In addition, the GDI*, a log transformed and scaled version of the GPS score which closely matches the GDI was examined. For seven previous or ongoing studies representing varying gait pathologies seen in clinical laboratories, the GGI, GDI, and GPS/GDI* were calculated retrospectively. The GDI and GPS/GDI* proved to be the most sensitive measures in assessing differences pre/post-treatment or from a control population. A power analysis revealed the GDI and GDI* to be the most sensitive statistical measures (lowest sample sizes required). Subjectively, the GDI and GDI* interpretation seemed to be the most intuitive measure for assessing clinical changes. However, the gait variable sub-scores of the GPS determined several statistical differences which were not previously noted and was the only index tool for quantifying the relative contributions of specific joints or planes of motion. The GGI did not offer any advantages over the other two indices.

  11. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  12. Forming Human-Robot Teams Across Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambuchen, Kimberly; Burridge, Robert R.; Ambrose, Robert O.; Bluethmann, William J.; Diftler, Myron A.; Radford, Nicolaus A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA pushes telerobotics to distances that span the Solar System. At this scale, time of flight for communication is limited by the speed of light, inducing long time delays, narrow bandwidth and the real risk of data disruption. NASA also supports missions where humans are in direct contact with robots during extravehicular activity (EVA), giving a range of zero to hundreds of millions of miles for NASA s definition of "tele". . Another temporal variable is mission phasing. NASA missions are now being considered that combine early robotic phases with later human arrival, then transition back to robot only operations. Robots can preposition, scout, sample or construct in advance of human teammates, transition to assistant roles when the crew are present, and then become care-takers when the crew returns to Earth. This paper will describe advances in robot safety and command interaction approaches developed to form effective human-robot teams, overcoming challenges of time delay and adapting as the team transitions from robot only to robots and crew. The work is predicated on the idea that when robots are alone in space, they are still part of a human-robot team acting as surrogates for people back on Earth or in other distant locations. Software, interaction modes and control methods will be described that can operate robots in all these conditions. A novel control mode for operating robots across time delay was developed using a graphical simulation on the human side of the communication, allowing a remote supervisor to drive and command a robot in simulation with no time delay, then monitor progress of the actual robot as data returns from the round trip to and from the robot. Since the robot must be responsible for safety out to at least the round trip time period, the authors developed a multi layer safety system able to detect and protect the robot and people in its workspace. This safety system is also running when humans are in direct contact with the robot

  13. [Quantification of gait using insole type foot pressure monitor : clinical application for chronic hemiplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yutaro; Kimura, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Mori, Masao; Takemoto, Yoshimi

    2014-03-01

    Home-based stroke hemiplegia patients tend to fall easily. Poor toe clearance is reported to be one of the causes of falling, although there are many other related factors. We developed a low-priced insole type portable foot pressure measurement device, and measured the foot pressure distribution and the foot pressure-time curve of 20 chronic hemiplegia patients and compared them with 36 healthy controls. We also analyzed the outdoor gait of a chronic hemiplegia patient on flat ground, on rough terrain, walking up stairs and on a downward slope. The result was that the load rate of the unaffected heel was significantly increased in hemiplegic gait, and there was a significant negative correlation between the affected side stance phase rate and gait time for 10 m distance (r = -0.73, P hemiplegia patients tend to be highly dependent on their unaffected side during indoor and outdoor gait.

  14. Effect of Mild and Severe Unilateral Knee Joint Pain on Gait in Elderly Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sugiura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait change in the elderly may be a strategy to maintain postural stability while walking. However, gait laterality is accompanied by back pain or an increased risk of a fall. This study aimed to examine group-related differences and gait laterality in elderly females with mild or severe unilateral knee pain. Seventy-five elderly females (66–87 years old were included, which comprised the following groups: 47 with mild unilateral knee pain and 28 with severe unilateral knee pain. They completed a 12 m walk test with maximum effort. Stance time, swing time, and step length were selected as evaluation parameters. A two-way ANOVA (group × leg was used for analysis. No significant differences were found in interaction or in either main factor of the group and leg. In conclusion, elderly females do not show group-related differences or gait laterality regardless of the degree (mild or severe of unilateral knee pain.

  15. Gait parameters extraction by using mobile robot equipped with Kinect v2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ami; Mita, Akira; Yorozu, Ayanori; Takahashi, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    The needs for monitoring systems to be used in houses are getting stronger because of the increase of the single household population due to the low birth rate and longevity. Among others, gait parameters are under the spotlight to be examined as the relations with several diseases have been reported. It is known that the gait parameters obtained at a walk test are different from those obtained under the daily life. Thus, the system which can measure the gait parameters in the real living environment is needed. Generally, gait abilities are evaluated by a measurement test, such as Timed Up and Go test and 6-minute walking test. However, these methods need measurers, so the accuracy depends on them and the lack of objectivity is pointed out. Although, a precise motion capture system is used for more objective measurement, it is hard to be used in daily measurement, because the subjects have to put the markers on their body. To solve this problem, marker less sensors, such as Kinect, are developed and used for gait information acquisition. When they are attached to a mobile robot, there is no limitation of distance. However, they still have challenges of calibration for gait parameters, and the important gait parameters to be acquired are not well examined. Therefore, in this study, we extract the important parameters for gait analysis, which have correlations with diseases and age differences, and suggest the gait parameters extraction from depth data by Kinect v2 which is mounted on a mobile robot aiming at applying to the living environment.

  16. Gait Variability Related to Muscle Quality and Muscle Power Output in Frail Nonagenarian Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinikorena, Ion; Martínez-Ramírez, Alicia; Gómez, Marisol; Lecumberri, Pablo; Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Cadore, Eduardo L; Millor, Nora; Zambom-Ferraresi, Fabricio; Idoate, Fernando; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2016-02-01

    Frailty has become the center of attention of basic, clinical, and demographic research because of its incidence level and the gravity of adverse outcomes with age. Moreover, with advanced age, motor variability increases, particularly in gait. Muscle quality and muscle power seem to be closely associated with performance on functional tests in frail populations. Insight into the relationships among muscle power, muscle quality, and functional capacity could improve the quality of life in this population. In this study, the relationship between the quality of the muscle mass and muscle strength with gait performance in a frail population was examined. Twenty-two institutionalized frail elderly individuals (93.1 ± 3.6) participated in this study. Muscle quality was measured by segmenting areas of high- and low-density fibers as observed in computed tomography images. The assessed functional outcomes were leg strength and power, velocity of gait, and kinematic gait parameters obtained from a tri-axial inertial sensor. Our results showed that a greater number of high-density fibers, specifically those of the quadriceps femoris muscle, were associated with better gait performance in terms of step time variability, regularity, and symmetry. Additionally, gait variability was associated with muscle power. In contrast, no significant relationship was observed between gait velocity and either muscle quality or muscle power. Gait pattern disorders could be explained by a deterioration of the lower limb muscles. It is known that an impaired gait is an important predictor of falls in older populations; thus, the loss of muscle quality and power could underlie the impairments in motor control and balance that lead to falls and adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation of spatial-temporal gait parameters in level walking based on a single accelerometer: validation on normal subjects by standard gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugané, F; Benedetti, M G; Casadio, G; Attala, S; Biagi, F; Manca, M; Leardini, A

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates the ability of a single wireless inertial sensing device stuck on the lower trunk to provide spatial-temporal parameters during level walking. The 3-axial acceleration signals were filtered and the timing of the main gait events identified. Twenty-two healthy subjects were analyzed with this system for validation, and the estimated parameters were compared with those obtained with state-of-the-art gait analysis, i.e. stereophotogrammetry and dynamometry. For each side, from four to six gait cycles were measured with the device, of which two were validated by gait analysis. The new acquisition system is easy to use and does not interfere with regular walking. No statistically significant differences were found between the acceleration-based measurements and the corresponding ones from gait analysis for most of the spatial-temporal parameters, i.e. stride length, stride duration, cadence and speed, etc.; significant differences were found for the gait cycle phases, i.e. single and double support duration, etc. The system therefore shows promise also for a future routine clinical use.

  18. Towards Mobile Gait Analysis: Concurrent Validity and Test-Retest Reliability of an Inertial Measurement System for the Assessment of Spatio-Temporal Gait Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaßner, Heiko; Hannink, Julius; Pasluosta, Cristian; Klucken, Jochen; Eskofier, Björn M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the concurrent validity and test–retest reliability of a sensor-based gait analysis system. Eleven healthy subjects and four Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients were asked to complete gait tasks whilst wearing two inertial measurement units at their feet. The extracted spatio-temporal parameters of 1166 strides were compared to those extracted from a reference camera-based motion capture system concerning concurrent validity. Test–retest reliability was assessed for five healthy subjects at three different days in a two week period. The two systems were highly correlated for all gait parameters (r>0.93). The bias for stride time was 0±16 ms and for stride length was 1.4±6.7 cm. No systematic range dependent errors were observed and no significant changes existed between healthy subjects and PD patients. Test-retest reliability was excellent for all parameters (intraclass correlation (ICC) > 0.81) except for gait velocity (ICC > 0.55). The sensor-based system was able to accurately capture spatio-temporal gait parameters as compared to the reference camera-based system for normal and impaired gait. The system’s high rete