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Sample records for human g-protein chemokine

  1. The Viral G Protein-Coupled Receptor ORF74 Hijacks β-Arrestins for Endocytic Trafficking in Response to Human Chemokines.

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    de Munnik, Sabrina M; Kooistra, Albert J; van Offenbeek, Jody; Nijmeijer, Saskia; de Graaf, Chris; Smit, Martine J; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells express the virally encoded G protein-coupled receptor ORF74. Although ORF74 is constitutively active, it binds human CXC chemokines that modulate this basal activity. ORF74-induced signaling has been demonstrated to underlie the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi's sarcoma. Whereas G protein-dependent signaling of ORF74 has been the subject of several studies, the interaction of this viral GPCR with β-arrestins has hitherto not been investigated. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer experiments demonstrate that ORF74 recruits β-arrestins and subsequently internalizes in response to human CXCL1 and CXCL8, but not CXCL10. Internalized ORF74 traffics via early endosomes to recycling and late endosomes. Site-directed mutagenesis and homology modeling identified four serine and threonine residues at the distal end of the intracellular carboxyl-terminal of ORF74 that are required for β-arrestin recruitment and subsequent endocytic trafficking. Hijacking of the human endocytic trafficking machinery is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74.

  2. Biased and G protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

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    Anne eSteen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor, different receptors (with the same ligand or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand-receptor pair. Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e. full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of classic redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confer a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor- or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the

  3. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

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    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  4. Biased and g protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    ), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand-receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may...

  5. Biased signaling of G protein-coupled receptors - From a chemokine receptor CCR7 perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Astrid Sissel; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Hjortø, Gertrud M

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) and their associated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) work in a concerted manner to govern immune cell positioning in time and space. Promiscuity of both ligands and receptors, but also biased signaling within the chemokine system, adds to the complexity of how...

  6. Rationally designed chemokine-based toxin targeting the viral G protein-coupled receptor US28 potently inhibits cytomegalovirus infection in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G.; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    to target the human viral pathogen, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), on the basis of its expression of the 7TM G protein-coupled chemokine receptor US28. The virus origin of US28 provides an exceptional chemokine-binding profile with high selectivity and improved binding for the CX3C chemokine, CX3CL1......The use of receptor-ligand interactions to direct toxins to kill diseased cells selectively has shown considerable promise for treatment of a number of cancers and, more recently, autoimmune disease. Here we move the fusion toxin protein (FTP) technology beyond cancer/autoimmune therapeutics...

  7. Dynamic Cholesterol-Conditioned Dimerization of the G Protein Coupled Chemokine Receptor Type 4.

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    Kristyna Pluhackova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs allow for the transmission of signals across biological membranes. For a number of GPCRs, this signaling was shown to be coupled to prior dimerization of the receptor. The chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4 was reported before to form dimers and their functionality was shown to depend on membrane cholesterol. Here, we address the dimerization pattern of CXCR4 in pure phospholipid bilayers and in cholesterol-rich membranes. Using ensembles of molecular dynamics simulations, we show that CXCR4 dimerizes promiscuously in phospholipid membranes. Addition of cholesterol dramatically affects the dimerization pattern: cholesterol binding largely abolishes the preferred dimer motif observed for pure phospholipid bilayers formed mainly by transmembrane helices 1 and 7 (TM1/TM5-7 at the dimer interface. In turn, the symmetric TM3,4/TM3,4 interface is enabled first by intercalating cholesterol molecules. These data provide a molecular basis for the modulation of GPCR activity by its lipid environment.

  8. Pathophysiological roles of chemokines in human reproduction: an overview.

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    Kitaya, Kotaro; Yamada, Hisao

    2011-05-01

    Chemokines are a group of small cytokines that have an ability to induce leukocyte migration. Chemokines exert their functions by binding and activating specific G protein-coupled receptors. Studies have unveiled pleiotropic bioactivities of chemokines in various phenomena ranging from immunomodulation, embryogenesis, and homeostasis to pathogenesis. In the mammalian reproductive system, chemokines unexceptionally serve in multimodal events that are closely associated with establishment, maintenance, and deterioration of fecundity. The aim of this review is to update the knowledge on chemokines in male and female genital organs, with a focus on their potential pathophysiological roles in human reproduction.

  9. A synthetic peptide derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 downregulates the expression and function of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in monocytes by activating the 7-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor FPRL1/LXA4R.

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    Deng, X; Ueda, H; Su, S B; Gong, W; Dunlop, N M; Gao, J L; Murphy, P M; Wang, J M

    1999-08-15

    Because envelope gp120 of various strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) downregulates the expression and function of a variety of chemoattractant receptors through a process of heterologous desensitization, we investigated whether epitopes derived from gp120 could mimic the effect. A synthetic peptide domain, designated F peptide, corresponding to amino acid residues 414-434 in the V4-C4 region of gp120 of the HIV-1 Bru strain, potently reduced monocyte binding and chemotaxis response to macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta) and stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha), chemokines that use the receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, respectively. Further study showed that F peptide by itself is an inducer of chemotaxis and calcium mobilization in human monocytes and neutrophils. In cross-desensitization experiments, among the numerous chemoattractants tested, only the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMLF, when used at high concentrations, partially attenuated calcium mobilization induced by F peptide in phagocytes, suggesting that this peptide domain might share a 7-transmembrane, G-protein-coupled receptor with fMLF. By using cells transfected with cDNAs encoding receptors that interact with fMLF, we found that F peptide uses an fMLF receptor variant, FPRL1, as a functional receptor. The activation of monocytes by F peptide resulted in downregulation of the cell surface expression of CCR5 and CXCR4 in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that activation of FPRL1 on human moncytes by a peptide domain derived from HIV-1 gp120 could lead to desensitization of cell response to other chemoattractants. This may explain, at least in part, the initial activation of innate immune responses in HIV-1-infected patients followed by immune suppression.

  10. G protein-coupled receptor mutations and human genetic disease.

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    Thompson, Miles D; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Percy, Maire E; Bichet, Daniel G; Cole, David E C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes (GPCRs) disrupt GPCR function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases. In vitro strategies and animal models have been used to identify the molecular pathologies underlying naturally occurring GPCR mutations. Inactive, overactive, or constitutively active receptors have been identified that result in pathology. These receptor variants may alter ligand binding, G protein coupling, receptor desensitization and receptor recycling. Receptor systems discussed include rhodopsin, thyrotropin, parathyroid hormone, melanocortin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRHR), adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, endothelin-β, purinergic, and the G protein associated with asthma (GPRA or neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1)). The role of activating and inactivating calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations is discussed in detail with respect to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and autosomal dominant hypocalemia (ADH). The CASR mutations have been associated with epilepsy. Diseases caused by the genetic disruption of GPCR functions are discussed in the context of their potential to be selectively targeted by drugs that rescue altered receptors. Examples of drugs developed as a result of targeting GPCRs mutated in disease include: calcimimetics and calcilytics, therapeutics targeting melanocortin receptors in obesity, interventions that alter GNRHR loss from the cell surface in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and novel drugs that might rescue the P2RY12 receptor congenital bleeding phenotype. De-orphanization projects have identified novel disease-associated receptors, such as NPSR1 and GPR35. The identification of variants in these receptors provides genetic reagents useful in drug screens. Discussion of the variety of GPCRs that are disrupted in monogenic Mendelian disorders provides the basis for examining the significance of common

  11. An intracellular allosteric site for a specific class of antagonists of the CC chemokine G protein-coupled receptors CCR4 and CCR5.

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    Andrews, Glen; Jones, Carolyn; Wreggett, Keith A

    2008-03-01

    A novel mechanism for antagonism of the human chemokine receptors CCR4 and CCR5 has been discovered with a series of small-molecule compounds that seems to interact with an allosteric, intracellular site on the receptor. The existence of this site is supported by a series of observations: 1) intracellular access of these antagonists is required for their activity; 2) specific, saturable binding of a radiolabeled antagonist requires the presence of CCR4; and 3) through engineering receptor chimeras by reciprocal transfer of C-terminal domains between CCR4 and CCR5, compound binding and the selective structure-activity relationships for antagonism of these receptors seem to be associated with the integrity of that intracellular region. Published antagonists from other chemical series do not seem to bind to the novel site, and their interaction with either CCR4 or CCR5 is not affected by alteration of the C-terminal domain. The precise location of the proposed binding site remains to be determined, but the known close association of the C-terminal domain, including helix 8, as a proposed intracellular region that interacts with transduction proteins (e.g., G proteins and beta-arrestin) suggests that this could be a generic allosteric site for chemokine receptors and perhaps more broadly for class A G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of such a site that can be targeted for drug discovery has implications for screening assays for receptor antagonists, which would need, therefore, to consider compound properties for access to this intracellular site.

  12. Ligand- and mutation-induced conformational selection in the CCR5 chemokine G protein-coupled receptor.

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    Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Goddard, William A; Nesterov, Alexandre; Olave, Ivan; Irons, Christopher

    2014-09-09

    We predicted the structural basis for pleiotropic signaling of the C-C chemokine type 5 (CCR5) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) by predicting the binding of several ligands to the lower-energy conformations of the CCR5 receptor and 11 mutants. For each case, we predicted the ∼ 20 most stable conformations for the receptor along with the binding sites for four anti-HIV ligands. We found that none of the ligands bind to the lowest-energy apo-receptor conformation. The three ligands with a similar pharmacophore (Maraviroc, PF-232798, and Aplaviroc) bind to a specific higher-energy receptor conformation whereas TAK-779 (with a different pharmacophore) binds to a different high-energy conformation. This result is in agreement with the very different binding-site profiles for these ligands obtained by us and others. The predicted Maraviroc binding site agrees with the recent structure of CCR5 receptor cocrystallized with Maraviroc. We performed 11 site-directed mutagenesis experiments to validate the predicted binding sites. Here, we independently predicted the lowest 10 mutant protein conformations for each of the 11 mutants and then docked the ligands to these lowest conformations. We found the predicted binding energies to be in excellent agreement with our mutagenesis experiments. These results show that, for GPCRs, each ligand can stabilize a different protein conformation, complicating the use of cocrystallized structures for ligand screening. Moreover, these results show that a single-point mutation in a GPCR can dramatically alter the available low-energy conformations, which in turn alters the binding site, potentially altering downstream signaling events. These studies validate the conformational selection paradigm for the pleiotropic function and structural plasticity of GPCRs.

  13. The human cutaneous chemokine system

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    Bernhard eMoser

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of the immune status, the vast majority of all lymphocytes reside in peripheral tissues whereas those present in blood only amount to a small fraction of the total. It has been estimated that T cells in healthy human skin outnumber those present in blood by at least a factor of two. How lymphocytes within these two compartments relate to each other is not well understood. However, mounting evidence suggest that the study of T cell subsets present in peripheral blood does not reflect the function of their counterparts at peripheral sites. This is especially true under steady-state conditions whereby long-lived memory T cells in healthy tissues, notably those in epithelial tissues at body surfaces, are thought to fulfil a critical immune surveillance function by contributing to the first line of defence against a series of local threats, including microbes, tumours and toxins, and by participating in wound healing. The relative scarcity of information regarding peripheral T cells and the factors regulating their localization is primarily due to inherent difficulties in obtaining healthy tissue for the extraction and study of immune cells on a routine basis. This is most certainly true for humans. Here, we review our current understanding of T cell homing to human skin and discuss candidate chemokines that may account for the tissue selectivity in this process.

  14. Crystal structure of the human beta2 adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Choi, Hee-Jung; Rosenbaum, Daniel M;

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for hormones and neurotransmitters has been hindered by their low natural abundance, inherent structural flexibility, and instability in detergent solutions. Here we report a structure of the human beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2AR), which...

  15. G-Protein-Coupled Chemokine Receptor Gene in Lumpy Skin Disease Virus Isolates from Cattle and Water Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt.

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    El-Tholoth, M; El-Kenawy, A A

    2016-12-01

    Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), sheep poxvirus (SPV) and goat poxvirus (GPV) are the most serious poxviruses of ruminants. In this study, we analysed the G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) genes of LSDV isolates from cattle and water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Egypt during the summer of 2011. Multiple alignments of the nucleotide sequences revealed that the water buffalo LSDV isolate differed from the cattle isolate at four nucleotide positions, and both isolates had nine nucleotide mutations from the reference strain, Egyptian tissue culture-adapted cattle LSDV/Ismailyia88 strain. Compared with the GPCR sequences of SPV and GPV strains, a 21 nucleotide insertion and a 12 nucleotide deletion were identified in the GPCR genes of our used isolates and other LSDVs. The amino acid sequences of GPCR genes of our isolates contained the unique signature of LSDV (A11 , T12 , T34 , S99 and P199 ). Phylogenetic analyses showed that the GPCR genes of cattle and water buffalo LSDVs were closest genetically, indicating a potential transmission of cattle LSDV to water buffalo.

  16. Chemokines

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    Richard Horuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a family of polypeptides that direct the migration of leukocytestoward a site of infection. They play a major role in autoimmune disease and chemokine receptors have recently been found to mediate HIV-1 fusion. In this short review we examine the role of chemokines in host defence and in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. We conclude by discussing various therapeutic approaches that target chemokine receptors and that could be beneficial in disease.

  17. Activation of nematode G protein GOA-1 by the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype. Functional coupling of G-protein-coupled receptor and G protein originated from evolutionarily distant animals.

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    Minaba, Masaomi; Ichiyama, Susumu; Kojima, Katsura; Ozaki, Mamiko; Kato, Yusuke

    2006-12-01

    Signal transduction mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins regulates a wide variety of physiological functions. We are interested in the manipulation of G-protein-mediating signal transduction using G-protein-coupled receptors, which are derived from evolutionarily distant organisms and recognize unique ligands. As a model, we tested the functionally coupling GOA-1, G alpha(i/o) ortholog in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2), which is one of the mammalian G alpha(i/o)-coupled receptors. GOA-1 and M2 were prepared as a fusion protein using a baculovirus expression system. The affinity of the fusion protein for GDP was decreased by addition of a muscarinic agonist, carbamylcholine and the guanosine 5'-[3-O-thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding was increased with an increase in the carbamylcholine concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These effects evoked by carbamylcholine were completely abolished by a full antagonist, atropine. In addition, the affinity for carbamylcholine decreased under the presence of GTP as reported for M2-G alpha(i/o) coupling. These results indicate that the M2 activates GOA-1 as well as G alpha(i/o).

  18. Prediction and Classification of Human G-protein Coupled Receptors Based on Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Fei Wang; Huan Chen; Yan-Hong Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A computational system for the prediction and classification of human G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been developed based on the support vector machine (SVM) method and protein sequence information. The feature vectors used to develop the SVM prediction models consist of statistically significant features selected from single amino acid, dipeptide, and tripeptide compositions of protein sequences. Furthermore, the length distribution difference between GPCRsand non-GPCRs has also been exploited to improve the prediction performance.The testing results with annotated human protein sequences demonstrate that this system can get good performance for both prediction and classification of human GPCRs.

  19. Biophysical characterization of G protein ectodomain of group B human respiratory syncytial virus from E. coli.

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    Khan, Wajihul Hasan; Srungaram, V L N Raghuram; Islam, Asimul; Beg, Ilyas; Haider, Md Shakir H; Ahmad, Faizan; Broor, Shobha; Parveen, Shama

    2016-07-03

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is an important pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection. The G protein of hRSV is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is a neutralizing antigen and is thus a vaccine candidate. In this study, synthetic codon optimized ectodomain G protein [G(ΔTM)] of BA genotype of group B hRSV was cloned, expressed, and characterized using biophysical techniques. The molar absorption coefficient and mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm ([θ]222) of G (ΔTM) was found to be 7950 M(-1) cm(-1) and -19701.7 deg cm(2) dmol(-1) respectively. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) mainly consist of α-helix (74.9%) with some amount of β-sheet (4%). The protein was stable up to 85°C without any transition curve. However, heat-induced denaturation of G(ΔTM) resulted in total loss of β-sheet whereas not much change was observed in the α-helix part of the secondary structure. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) is an α-helical protein and it is highly stable at high temperature, but could be easily denatured using high concentrations of GdmCl/urea or acidic condition. This is the first investigation of cloning, expression, and characterization of G(ΔTM) of BA viruses from India. Structural characterization of G protein will assist in drug designing and vaccine development for hRSV.

  20. In vitro expression and analysis of the 826 human G protein-coupled receptors

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    Xuechen Lv

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are involved in all human physiological systems where they are responsible for transducing extracellular signals into cells. GPCRs signal in response to a diverse array of stimuli including light, hormones, and lipids, where these signals affect downstream cascades to impact both health and disease states. Yet, despite their importance as therapeutic targets, detailed molecular structures of only 30 GPCRs have been determined to date. A key challenge to their structure determination is adequate protein expression. Here we report the quantification of protein expression in an insect cell expression system for all 826 human GPCRs using two different fusion constructs. Expression characteristics are analyzed in aggregate and among each of the five distinct subfamilies. These data can be used to identify trends related to GPCR expression between different fusion constructs and between different GPCR families, and to prioritize lead candidates for future structure determination feasibility.

  1. The human and mouse repertoire of the adhesion family of G-protein-coupled receptors.

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    Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Fredriksson, Robert; Höglund, Pär J; Gloriam, David E; Lagerström, Malin C; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2004-07-01

    The adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (also termed LN-7TM or EGF-7TM receptors) are membrane-bound proteins with long N-termini containing multiple domains. Here, 2 new human adhesion-GPCRs, termed GPR133 and GPR144, have been found by searches done in the human genome databases. Both GPR133 and GPR144 have a GPS domain in their N-termini, while GPR144 also has a pentraxin domain. The phylogenetic analyses of the 2 new human receptors show that they group together without close relationship to the other adhesion-GPCRs. In addition to the human genes, mouse orthologues to those 2 and 15 other mouse orthologues to human were identified (GPR110, GPR111, GPR112, GPR113, GPR114, GPR115, GPR116, GPR123, GPR124, GPR125, GPR126, GPR128, LEC1, LEC2, and LEC3). Currently the total number of human adhesion-GPCRs is 33. The mouse and human sequences show a clear one-to-one relationship, with the exception of EMR2 and EMR3, which do not seem to have orthologues in mouse. EST expression charts for the entire repertoire of adhesion-GPCRs in human and mouse were established. Over 1600 ESTs were found for these receptors, showing widespread distribution in both central and peripheral tissues. The expression patterns are highly variable between different receptors, indicating that they participate in a number of physiological processes. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc.

  2. The G-protein coupled receptor associated sorting protein GASP-1 regulates the signalling and trafficking of the viral chemokine receptor US28.

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    Tschische, Pia; Moser, Elisabeth; Thompson, Dawn; Vischer, Henry F; Parzmair, Gerald P; Pommer, Veronika; Platzer, Wolfgang; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Schaider, Helmut; Smit, Martine J; Martini, Lene; Whistler, Jennifer L; Waldhoer, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes the seven transmembrane(7TM)/G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) US28, which signals and endocytoses in a constitutive, ligand-independent manner. Here we show that, following endocytosis, US28 is targeted to the lysosomes for degradation as a consequence of its interaction with the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We find that GASP-1 binds to US28 in vitro and that disruption of the GASP-1/US28 interaction by either (i) overexpression of dominant negative cGASP-1 or by (ii) shRNA knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 is sufficient to inhibit the lysosomal targeting of US28 and slow its post-endocytic degradation. Furthermore, we found that GASP-1 affects US28-mediated signalling. The knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 impairs the US28-mediated Galphaq/PLC/inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation as well as the activation of the transcription factors Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Overexpression of GASP-1 enhances both IP accumulation and transcription factor activity. Thus, GASP-1 is an important cellular determinant that not only regulates the post-endocytic trafficking of US28, but also regulates the signalling capacities of US28.

  3. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells.

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    Tsai, Eing-Mei; Wang, Yu-Chih; Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson's disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  4. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 suppresses CXCL12-mediated migration and AKT activation in RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and plasmablasts.

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    Pak, Hyo-Kyung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Yoonkyung; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, A-Neum; Roh, Jin; Park, Chan-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Migration of plasma cells to the bone marrow is critical factor to humoral immunity and controlled by chemokines. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 (RGS1) is a GTPase-activating protein that controls various crucial functions such as migration. Here, we show that RGS1 controls the chemotactic migration of RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and human plasmablasts. LPS strongly increased RGS1 expression and retarded the migration of RPMI 8226 cells by suppressing CXCL12-mediated AKT activation. RGS1 knockdown by siRNA abolished the retardation of migration and AKT suppression by LPS. RGS1-dependent regulation of migration via AKT is also observed in cultured plasmablasts. We propose novel functions of RGS1 that suppress AKT activation and the migration of RPMI 8226 cells and plasmablasts in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis.

  5. Targeting Human Mast Cells Expressing G-Protein-Coupled Receptors in Allergic Diseases

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    Yoshimichi Okayama

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the largest known group of integral membrane receptor proteins and are the most common targets of pharmacotherapy. Mast cells (MCs have been reported to play an important role in allergic diseases, such as urticaria and bronchial asthma. There is an increasing body of clinical evidence that MCs are recruited into allergic reactions by non-IgE-dependent mechanisms. Human MCs are activated and secrete histamine in response to neuropeptides, such as substance P and somatostatin, mediated by a GPCR, MRGX2. The microenvironment surrounding MCs in their resident tissues is likely to contain multiple factors that modify antigen-dependent MC activation. MCs express various GPCRs, and since the function of human MCs is modulated by various GPCR ligands, such as adenosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate, which are present in high levels in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid of asthmatic patients, the GPCRs expressed on MCs may play an important role in human allergic diseases. The GPCRs expressed on MCs may serve as drug targets for the treatment of allergic diseases.

  6. Production of a bioengineered G-protein coupled receptor of human formyl peptide receptor 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Wang

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs participate in a wide range of vital regulations of our physiological actions. They are also of pharmaceutical importance and have become many therapeutic targets for a number of disorders and diseases. Purified GPCR-based approaches including structural study and novel biophysical and biochemical function analyses are increasingly being used in GPCR-directed drug discovery. Before these approaches become routine, however, several hurdles need to be overcome; they include overexpression, solubilization, and purification of large quantities of functional and stable receptors on a regular basis. Here we report milligram production of a human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3. FPR3 comprises a functionally distinct GPCR subfamily that is involved in leukocyte chemotaxis and activation. The bioengineered FPR3 was overexpressed in stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell lines (HEK293S. After a systematic detergent screening, fos-choline-14 (FC-14 was selected for subsequent solubilization and purification processes. A two-step purification method, immunoaffinity using anti-rho-tag monoclonal antibody 1D4 and gel filtration, was used to purify the receptors to near homogeneity. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that expressed FPR3 was predominantly displayed on cellular membrane. Secondary structural analysis using circular dichroism showed that the purified FPR3 receptor was correctly folded with >50% α-helix, which is similar to other known GPCR secondary structures. Our method can readily produce milligram quantities of human FPR3, which would facilitate in developing human FPR as therapeutic drug targets.

  7. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Structure modeling of all identified G protein-coupled receptors in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, encoded by about 5% of human genes, comprise the largest family of integral membrane proteins and act as cell surface receptors responsible for the transduction of endogenous signal into a cellular response. Although tertiary structural information is crucial for function annotation and drug design, there are few experimentally determined GPCR structures. To address this issue, we employ the recently developed threading assembly refinement (TASSER method to generate structure predictions for all 907 putative GPCRs in the human genome. Unlike traditional homology modeling approaches, TASSER modeling does not require solved homologous template structures; moreover, it often refines the structures closer to native. These features are essential for the comprehensive modeling of all human GPCRs when close homologous templates are absent. Based on a benchmarked confidence score, approximately 820 predicted models should have the correct folds. The majority of GPCR models share the characteristic seven-transmembrane helix topology, but 45 ORFs are predicted to have different structures. This is due to GPCR fragments that are predominantly from extracellular or intracellular domains as well as database annotation errors. Our preliminary validation includes the automated modeling of bovine rhodopsin, the only solved GPCR in the Protein Data Bank. With homologous templates excluded, the final model built by TASSER has a global C(alpha root-mean-squared deviation from native of 4.6 angstroms, with a root-mean-squared deviation in the transmembrane helix region of 2.1 angstroms. Models of several representative GPCRs are compared with mutagenesis and affinity labeling data, and consistent agreement is demonstrated. Structure clustering of the predicted models shows that GPCRs with similar structures tend to belong to a similar functional class even when their sequences are diverse. These results demonstrate the usefulness

  9. Partial functional complementation between human and mouse cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Helen E; Abraham, Alexander M; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (CMV) proteins US28 and UL33 are homologous to chemokine receptors (CKRs). Knockout of the mouse CMV M33 protein (UL33 homologue) results in substantial attenuation of salivary gland infection/replication and reduced efficiency of reactivation from tissue explants. M33......-mediated G protein-coupled signaling is critical for the salivary gland phenotype. In this report, we demonstrate that US28 and (to a lesser degree) UL33 restore reactivation from tissue explants and partially restore replication in salivary glands (compared to a signaling-deficient M33 mutant...

  10. An atlas of G-protein coupled receptor expression and function in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amisten, Stefan; Neville, Matt; Hawkes, Ross; Persaud, Shanta J; Karpe, Fredrik; Salehi, Albert

    2015-02-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in the regulation of adipose tissue function, but the total number of GPCRs expressed by human subcutaneous adipose tissue, as well as their function and interactions with drugs, is poorly understood. We have constructed an atlas of all GPCRs expressed by human subcutaneous adipose tissue: the 'adipose tissue GPCRome', to support the exploration of novel control nodes in metabolic and endocrine functions. This atlas describes how adipose tissue GPCRs regulate lipolysis, insulin resistance and adiponectin and leptin secretion. We also discuss how adipose tissue GPCRs interact with their endogenous ligands and with GPCR-targeting drugs, with a focus on how drug/receptor interactions may affect lipolysis, and present a model predicting how GPCRs with unknown effects on lipolysis might modulate cAMP-regulated lipolysis. Subcutaneous adipose tissue expresses 163 GPCRs, a majority of which have unknown effects on lipolysis, insulin resistance and adiponectin and leptin secretion. These GPCRs are activated by 180 different endogenous ligands, and are the targets of a large number of clinically used drugs. We identified 119 drugs, acting on 23 GPCRs, that are predicted to stimulate lipolysis and 173 drugs, acting on 25 GPCRs, that are predicted to inhibit lipolysis. This atlas highlights knowledge gaps in the current understanding of adipose tissue GPCR function, and identifies GPCR/ligand/drug interactions that might affect lipolysis, which is important for understanding and predicting metabolic side effects of drugs. This approach may aid in the design of new, safer therapeutic agents, with fewer undesired effects on lipid homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Touch of chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eBLANCHET

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractant cytokines or chemokines constitute a family of structurally related proteins found in vertebrates, bacteria or viruses. So far, 48 chemokines genes have been identified in humans, which bind to around 20 chemokine receptors. These receptors belong to the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors family. Chemokines and their receptors were originally studied for their role in cellular trafficking of leukocytes during inflammation and immune surveillance as well. It is now known that they exert different functions under physiological conditions such as homeostasis, development, tissue repair, and angiogenesis but also under pathological disorders including tumorigenesis, cancer metastasis, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Physicochemical properties of chemokines and chemokine receptors confer them the ability to homo- and hetero-oligomerize. Many efforts are currently performed in establishing new therapeutically compounds able to target the chemokine/chemokine receptors system.In this review, we are interested in the role of chemokines in inflammatory disease and leukocyte trafficking with a focus on vascular inflammatory diseases, the operating synergism and the emerging therapeutic approaches of chemokines.

  12. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A;

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound...... to the partial inverse agonist carazolol at 2.4 angstrom resolution. The structure provides a high-resolution view of a human G protein-coupled receptor bound to a diffusible ligand. Ligand-binding site accessibility is enabled by the second extracellular loop, which is held out of the binding cavity by a pair...

  13. Signaling mechanisms mediated by G-protein coupled receptors in human platelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheikh Arshad SAEED; Huma RASHEED; Faisal A Wahed FECTO; Mohammad Ilyas ACHAKZAI; Rahmat ALI; John Dennis CONNOR; Anwar-ul-Hassan GILANI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The present study deals with the investigation of mechanisms involved in the synergistic interaction between epinephrine and arachidonic acid (AA). METHODS: Venous blood was taken from healthy human volunteers reported to be free of medications for one week. Platelet aggregation was monitored at 37 ℃ using Dual-channel Lumi-aggregometer. The resulting aggregation was recorded for 5 min by the measurement of light transmission as a function of time. RESULTS: The data show that a synergism in platelet aggregation mediated by subthreshold concentrations of epinephrine (1μmol/L) and AA (0.2μmol/L) was inhibited by the α2-receptor antagonist (yohimbine, IC50=0.6 μmol/L) and an inhibitor of AA-cyclooxygenase (COX), indomethacin (IC50=0.25 μmol/L).In examining receptor influence on intraplatelet signalling pathways, it was found that the synergistic effect was inhibited by calcium channel blockers, verapamil (IC50=0.4 μtmol/L) and diltiazem (IC50=2.5 μmol/L), as well as by low concentrations of inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) (U73122; IC50=0.2 μmol/L) and mitogens activated protein kinase (MAPK) (PD 98059; IC50=3.8 μmol/L). Herbimycin A, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine light chain kinase (TLCK), showed inhibition at IC50 value of 15 μmol/L, whereas chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC)inhibitor, had no effect up to 20 μmol/L. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that synergism between epinephrine and AA in platelet aggregation is triggered through receptors coupled to G-protein, which in turn, activate PLC,COX, and MAP kinase-signaling pathways.

  14. Re: Chemokines in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate the trafficking and positioning of cells by activating the seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled chemokine receptors (GPCR) or non G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning receptors called atypical chemokine receptors (ACKR). Chemokines are basic proteins that also bind to glycosaminoglycans which play important roles in their biology. Chemokines are divided into four subfamilies based on the position of the first two N-termina...

  15. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen (Sanofi); (Michigan); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  16. Human astrocytes: secretome profiles of cytokines and chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung S Choi

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play a key role in maintenance of neuronal functions in the central nervous system by producing various cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which act as a molecular coordinator of neuron-glia communication. At the site of neuroinflammation, astrocyte-derived cytokines and chemokines play both neuroprotective and neurotoxic roles in brain lesions of human neurological diseases. At present, the comprehensive profile of human astrocyte-derived cytokines and chemokines during inflammation remains to be fully characterized. We investigated the cytokine secretome profile of highly purified human astrocytes by using a protein microarray. Non-stimulated human astrocytes in culture expressed eight cytokines, including G-CSF, GM-CSF, GROα (CXCL1, IL-6, IL-8 (CXCL8, MCP-1 (CCL2, MIF and Serpin E1. Following stimulation with IL-1β and TNF-α, activated astrocytes newly produced IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNF-α, IP-10 (CXCL10, MIP-1α (CCL3 and RANTES (CCL5, in addition to the induction of sICAM-1 and complement component 5. Database search indicated that most of cytokines and chemokines produced by non-stimulated and activated astrocytes are direct targets of the transcription factor NF-kB. These results indicated that cultured human astrocytes express a distinct set of NF-kB-target cytokines and chemokines in resting and activated conditions, suggesting that the NF-kB signaling pathway differentially regulates gene expression of cytokines and chemokines in human astrocytes under physiological and inflammatory conditions.

  17. Regulation of MMP-3 expression and secretion by the chemokine eotaxin-1 in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Pin-Zhir

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by the degradation of articular cartilage, marked by the breakdown of matrix proteins. Studies demonstrated the involvement of chemokines in this process, and some may potentially serve as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets; however, the underlying signal transductions are not well understood. Methods We investigated the effects of the CC chemokine eotaxin-1 (CCL11 on the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression and secretion in the human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and primary chondrocytes. Results Eotaxin-1 significantly induced MMP-3 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and p38 kinase were able to repress eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. On the contrary, Rp-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPs, a competitive cAMP antagonist for cAMP receptors, and H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, markedly enhanced eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. These results suggest that MMP-3 expression is specifically mediated by the G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Interestingly, little amount of MMP-3 protein was detected in the cell lysates of eotaxin-1-treated SW1353 cells, and most of MMP-3 protein was in the culture media. Furthermore we found that the eotaxin-1-dependent MMP-3 protein secretion was regulated by phospholipase C (PLC-protein kinase C (PKC cascade and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathways. These data indicate a specific regulation of MMP-3 secretion also by eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Conclusions Eotaxin-1 not only induces MMP-3 gene expression but also promotes MMP-3 protein secretion through G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Chemokines, such as eotaxin-1, could be a potential candidate in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis.

  18. CC and CX3C chemokines differentially interact with the N terminus of the human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casarosa, Paola; Waldhoer, Maria; LiWang, Patricia J;

    2005-01-01

    , that displays homology to the human chemokine receptor CCR1 and binds several chemokines of the CC family as well as the CX3C chemokine fractalkine with high affinity. Most importantly, following HCMV infection, US28 activates several intracellular pathways, either constitutively or in a chemokine-dependent...... binding to US28, whereas receptor activation depends on the presence of the N terminus of CCL4, as shown previously for CCR5.......Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the causative agent of life-threatening systemic diseases in immunocompromised patients as well as a risk factor for vascular pathologies, like atherosclerosis, in immunocompetent individuals. HCMV encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), referred to as US28...

  19. Cyclic nucleotide dependent dephosphorylation of regulator of G-protein signaling 18 in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gegenbauer, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18) is a GTPase-activating protein that turns off Gq signaling in platelets. RGS18 is regulated by binding to the adaptor protein 14-3-3 via phosphorylated serine residues S49 and S218 on RGS18. In this study we confirm that thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP stimulate the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by increasing the phosphorylation of S49. Cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP-dependent kinases (PKA, PKG) inhibit the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by phosphorylating S216. To understand the effect of S216 phosphorylation we studied the phosphorylation kinetics of S49, S216, and S218 using Phos-tag gels and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies in transfected cells and in platelets. Cyclic nucleotide-induced detachment of 14-3-3 from RGS18 coincides initially with double phosphorylation of S216 and S218. This is followed by dephosphorylation of S49 and S218. Dephosphorylation of S49 and S218 might be mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) which is linked to RGS18 by the regulatory subunit PPP1R9B (spinophilin). We conclude that PKA and PKG induced S216 phosphorylation triggers the dephosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding sites of RGS18 in platelets.

  20. Identification of novel allosteric modulators for the G-protein coupled US28 receptor of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Ana; Wetzel, Alexander; Mahmoudian, Shohreh; Stamminger, Thomas; Tschammer, Nuska; Heinrich, Markus R

    2011-09-15

    The highly constitutively active G-protein coupled receptor US28 of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an interesting pharmacological target because of its implication on viral dissemination, cardiovascular diseases and tumorigenesis. We found that dihydroisoquinolinone and tetrahydroisoquinoline scaffolds may be promising lead structures for novel US28 allosteric inverse agonists. These scaffolds were rapidly synthesized by radical carboamination reactions followed by non-radical transformations. Our novel US28 allosteric modulators provide valuable scaffolds for further ligand optimization and may be helpful chemical tools to investigate molecular mechanisms of US28 constitutive signaling and its role in pathogenesis.

  1. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  2. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human genes encoding three closely related G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao-Hui Song; Bonner, T.I. [NIMH National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Modi, W. [Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, MD (United States)

    1995-07-20

    Cosmids containing human genes for orphan G protein-coupled receptors, GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3, were isolated using their rat homologs as probes. Previous studies of the mouse and rat cDNAs have shown the receptors to be expressed primarily in brain but have failed to identify their ligands. The three receptor proteins of 334, 363, and 330 amino acids, respectively, are encoded by a single exon in each gene. Excluding the divergent sequences preceding the first transmembrane domain, they have {approximately}60% amino acid identity with each other. Flurorescence in situ hybridization of GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3 localized these three genes to human chromosomal regions 13q12, 6q21, and 1p34.3-p36.1, respectively. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Characterization of the Drosophila ortholog of the human Usher Syndrome type 1G protein sans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Demontis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Usher syndrome (USH is the most frequent deaf-blindness hereditary disease in humans. Deafness is attributed to the disorganization of stereocilia in the inner ear. USH1, the most severe subtype, is associated with mutations in genes encoding myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, protocadherin 15, and sans. Myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, and protocadherin 15 physically interact in vitro and localize to stereocilia tips in vivo, indicating that they form functional complexes. Sans, in contrast, localizes to vesicle-like structures beneath the apical membrane of stereocilia-displaying hair cells. How mutations in sans result in deafness and blindness is not well understood. Orthologs of myosin VIIa and protocadherin 15 have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster and their genetic analysis has identified essential roles in auditory perception and microvilli morphogenesis, respectively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have identified and characterized the Drosophila ortholog of human sans. Drosophila Sans is expressed in tubular organs of the embryo, in lens-secreting cone cells of the adult eye, and in microvilli-displaying follicle cells during oogenesis. Sans mutants are viable, fertile, and mutant follicle cells appear to form microvilli, indicating that Sans is dispensable for fly development and microvilli morphogenesis in the follicle epithelium. In follicle cells, Sans protein localizes, similar to its vertebrate ortholog, to intracellular punctate structures, which we have identified as early endosomes associated with the syntaxin Avalanche. CONCLUSIONS: Our work is consistent with an evolutionary conserved function of Sans in vesicle trafficking. Furthermore it provides a significant basis for further understanding of the role of this Usher syndrome ortholog in development and disease.

  5. Identification of the HIV-1 Vif and Human APOBEC3G Protein Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letko, Michael; Booiman, Thijs; Kootstra, Neeltje; Simon, Viviana; Ooms, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    Human cells express natural antiviral proteins, such as APOBEC3G (A3G), that potently restrict HIV replication. As a counter-defense, HIV encodes the accessory protein Vif, which binds A3G and mediates its proteasomal degradation. Our structural knowledge on how Vif and A3G interact is limited, because a co-structure is not available. We identified specific points of contact between Vif and A3G by using functional assays with full-length A3G, patient-derived Vif variants, and HIV forced evolution. These anchor points were used to model and validate the Vif-A3G interface. The resultant co-structure model shows that the negatively charged β4-α4 A3G loop, which contains primate-specific variation, is the core Vif binding site and forms extensive interactions with a positively charged pocket in HIV Vif. Our data present a functional map of this viral-host interface and open avenues for targeted approaches to block HIV replication by obstructing the Vif-A3G interaction.

  6. The G protein-coupled receptor subset of the dog genome is more similar to that in humans than rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiöth Helgi B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dog is an important model organism and it is considered to be closer to humans than rodents regarding metabolism and responses to drugs. The close relationship between humans and dogs over many centuries has lead to the diversity of the canine species, important genetic discoveries and an appreciation of the effects of old age in another species. The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is one of the largest gene families in most mammals and the most exploited in terms of drug discovery. An accurate comparison of the GPCR repertoires in dog and human is valuable for the prediction of functional similarities and differences between the species. Results We searched the dog genome for non-olfactory GPCRs and obtained 353 full-length GPCR gene sequences, 18 incomplete sequences and 13 pseudogenes. We established relationships between human, dog, rat and mouse GPCRs resolving orthologous pairs and species-specific duplicates. We found that 12 dog GPCR genes are missing in humans while 24 human GPCR genes are not part of the dog GPCR repertoire. There is a higher number of orthologous pairs between dog and human that are conserved as compared with either mouse or rat. In almost all cases the differences observed between the dog and human genomes coincide with other variations in the rodent species. Several GPCR gene expansions characteristic for rodents are not found in dog. Conclusion The repertoire of dog non-olfactory GPCRs is more similar to the repertoire in humans as compared with the one in rodents. The comparison of the dog, human and rodent repertoires revealed several examples of species-specific gene duplications and deletions. This information is useful in the selection of model organisms for pharmacological experiments.

  7. Positive selection results in frequent reversible amino acid replacements in the G protein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane F Botosso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age and the elderly, causing annual disease outbreaks during the fall and winter. Multiple lineages of the HRSVA and HRSVB serotypes co-circulate within a single outbreak and display a strongly temporal pattern of genetic variation, with a replacement of dominant genotypes occurring during consecutive years. In the present study we utilized phylogenetic methods to detect and map sites subject to adaptive evolution in the G protein of HRSVA and HRSVB. A total of 29 and 23 amino acid sites were found to be putatively positively selected in HRSVA and HRSVB, respectively. Several of these sites defined genotypes and lineages within genotypes in both groups, and correlated well with epitopes previously described in group A. Remarkably, 18 of these positively selected tended to revert in time to a previous codon state, producing a "flip-flop" phylogenetic pattern. Such frequent evolutionary reversals in HRSV are indicative of a combination of frequent positive selection, reflecting the changing immune status of the human population, and a limited repertoire of functionally viable amino acids at specific amino acid sites.

  8. Human cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor US28 induces migration of cells on a CX3CL1-presenting surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud M; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Selmeczi, David

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded G protein-coupled-receptor US28 is believed to participate in virus dissemination through modulation of cell migration and immune evasion. US28 binds different CC chemokines and the CX3C chemokine CX3CL1. Membrane-anchored CX3CL1 is expressed by immune......-activated endothelial cells, causing redirection of CX3CR1-expressing leukocytes in the blood to sites of infection. Here, we used stable transfected cell lines to examine how US28 expression affects cell migration on immobilized full-length CX3CL1, to model how HCMV-infected leukocytes interact with inflamed...... endothelium. We observed that US28-expressing cells migrated more than CX3CR1-expressing cells when adhering to immobilized CX3CL1. US28-induced migration was G protein-signalling dependent and was blocked by the phospholipase Cβ inhibitor U73122 and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM. In addition...

  9. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  10. Genetic Variants of GPER/GPR30, a Novel Estrogen-Related G Protein Receptor, Are Associated with Human Seminoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Paul-Bellon, Rachel; Camparo, Philippe; Michiels, Jean-François; Chevallier, Daniel; Fénichel, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common solid cancers in young men, with an increasing incidence over several years. However, their pathogenesis remains a matter of debate. Some epidemiological data suggest the involvement of both environmental and genetic factors. We reported two distinct effects of estrogens and/or xeno-estrogens on in vitro human seminoma-derived cells proliferation: (1) an antiproliferative effect via a classical estrogen receptor beta-dependent pathway, and (2) a promotive effect via a non-classical membrane G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30/GPER, which is only overexpressed in seminomas, the most common TGCT. In order to explain this overexpression, we investigated the possible association of polymorphisms in the GPER gene by using allele-specific tetra-primer polymerase chain reaction performed on tissue samples from 150 paraffin-embedded TGCT specimens (131 seminomas, 19 non seminomas). Compared to control population, loss of homozygous ancestral genotype GG in two polymorphisms located in the promoter region of GPER (rs3808350 and rs3808351) was more frequent in seminomas but not in non-seminomas (respectively, OR = 1.960 (1.172–3.277) and 7.000 (2.747–17.840); p < 0.01). These polymorphisms may explain GPER overexpression and represent a genetic factor of susceptibility supporting the contribution of environmental GPER ligands in testicular carcinogenesis. PMID:24451139

  11. Genetic Variants of GPER/GPR30, a Novel Estrogen-Related G Protein Receptor, Are Associated with Human Seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Chevalier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs are the most common solid cancers in young men, with an increasing incidence over several years. However, their pathogenesis remains a matter of debate. Some epidemiological data suggest the involvement of both environmental and genetic factors. We reported two distinct effects of estrogens and/or xeno-estrogens on in vitro human seminoma-derived cells proliferation: (1 an antiproliferative effect via a classical estrogen receptor beta-dependent pathway, and (2 a promotive effect via a non-classical membrane G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30/GPER, which is only overexpressed in seminomas, the most common TGCT. In order to explain this overexpression, we investigated the possible association of polymorphisms in the GPER gene by using allele-specific tetra-primer polymerase chain reaction performed on tissue samples from 150 paraffin-embedded TGCT specimens (131 seminomas, 19 non seminomas. Compared to control population, loss of homozygous ancestral genotype GG in two polymorphisms located in the promoter region of GPER (rs3808350 and rs3808351 was more frequent in seminomas but not in non-seminomas (respectively, OR = 1.960 (1.172–3.277 and 7.000 (2.747–17.840; p < 0.01. These polymorphisms may explain GPER overexpression and represent a genetic factor of susceptibility supporting the contribution of environmental GPER ligands in testicular carcinogenesis.

  12. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine-like, secreted protein product of the U83 gene from human herpesvirus 6, here named vCCL4, was chemically synthesized to be characterized in a complete library of the 18 known human chemokine receptors expressed individually in stably transfected cell lines. vCCL4 was found to cause...

  13. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and the model organism Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamanian Mostafa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute one of the largest groupings of eukaryotic proteins, and represent a particularly lucrative set of pharmaceutical targets. They play an important role in eukaryotic signal transduction and physiology, mediating cellular responses to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. The phylum Platyhelminthes is of considerable medical and biological importance, housing major pathogens as well as established model organisms. The recent availability of genomic data for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and the model planarian Schmidtea mediterranea paves the way for the first comprehensive effort to identify and analyze GPCRs in this important phylum. Results Application of a novel transmembrane-oriented approach to receptor mining led to the discovery of 117 S. mansoni GPCRs, representing all of the major families; 105 Rhodopsin, 2 Glutamate, 3 Adhesion, 2 Secretin and 5 Frizzled. Similarly, 418 Rhodopsin, 9 Glutamate, 21 Adhesion, 1 Secretin and 11 Frizzled S. mediterranea receptors were identified. Among these, we report the identification of novel receptor groupings, including a large and highly-diverged Platyhelminth-specific Rhodopsin subfamily, a planarian-specific Adhesion-like family, and atypical Glutamate-like receptors. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out following extensive gene curation. Support vector machines (SVMs were trained and used for ligand-based classification of full-length Rhodopsin GPCRs, complementing phylogenetic and homology-based classification. Conclusions Genome-wide investigation of GPCRs in two platyhelminth genomes reveals an extensive and complex receptor signaling repertoire with many unique features. This work provides important sequence and functional leads for understanding basic flatworm receptor biology, and sheds light on a lucrative set of anthelmintic drug targets.

  14. Diverse activation states of RhoA in human lung cancer cells: contribution of G protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touge, Hirokazu; Chikumi, Hiroki; Igishi, Tadashi; Kurai, Jun; Makino, Haruhiko; Tamura, Yoshisato; Takata, Miyako; Yoneda, Kazuhiko; Nakamoto, Masaki; Suyama, Hisashi; Gutkind, J Silvio; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    Rho GTPases play an essential role in the control of various cellular functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that RhoA overexpression contributes to human cancer development. However, the activation states of RhoA are poorly defined in cancer cells. In this study, we examined both the expression levels and the activation states of RhoA in various lung cancer cells by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in vivo Rho guanine nucleotide exchange assay, respectively. Moreover, we dissected the signaling pathway from the cell surface receptors to RhoA using a broad-spectrum G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonist, [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]Substance P (SP), and a recently reported Galphaq/11-selective inhibitor, YM-254890. We found that RhoA was expressed highly in large cell carcinoma cells but only weakly in adenocarcinoma cells. The activation states of RhoA are considerably different from its expression profiles. We found that four of six small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines exhibited a moderate to high activation rate of RhoA. The addition of [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]SP reduced RhoA activity by almost 60% in H69 SCLC cells. The addition of YM-254890 had no effect on RhoA activity in H69 cells. Our results suggest that RhoA is activated in various lung cancer cells independent of its expression levels, and the high activation state of RhoA in SCLC cells mainly depends on a neuroendocrine peptide autocrine system which signals through Galpha12 coupled GPCR to RhoA. This study provides new insights into RhoA signaling in lung cancer cells and may help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against lung cancer.

  15. Genetic diversity in the G protein gene of group A human respiratory syncytial viruses circulating in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajhdi, Fahad N; Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a frequent cause of hospitalization and mortality in children worldwide. The molecular epidemiology and circulation pattern of HRSV in Saudi Arabia is mostly uncharted. In the current study, the genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships of HRSV type A strains circulating in Riyadh Province were explored. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from hospitalized children with acute respiratory symptoms during the winter-spring seasons of 2007/08 and 2008/09. Among 175 samples analyzed, 39 (22.3 %) were positive for HRSV by one-step RT-PCR (59 % type A and 41 % type B). Propagation of positive samples in HEp-2 cells permitted the recovery of the first Saudi HRSV isolates. Genetic variability among Saudi HRSV-A strains was evaluated by sequence analysis of the complete attachment (G) protein gene. The nucleotide sequence was compared to representatives of the previously identified HRSV-A genotypes. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that the strains examined in this study were very closely related at both the nucleotide and amino acid level, and all of them are clustered in the GA2 genotype (and mostly belonged to the NA-1 subtype). A total of 23 mutation sites, 14 of which resulted in an amino acid change, were recorded only in Saudi strains. This is the first report on genetic diversity of HRSV-A strains in Saudi Arabia. Further analysis of strains on a geographical and temporal basis is needed to fully understand HRSV-A circulation patterns in Saudi Arabia.

  16. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Their Manifold Roles in Homeostasis and Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingyingLe; YeZhou; PabloIribarren; JiMingWang

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors on target cells and were originally discovered as mediators of directional migration of immune cells to sites of inflammation and injury. In recent years, it has become clear that the function of chemokines extends well beyond the role in leukocyte chemotaxis. They participate in organ development, angiogenesis/angiostasis, leukocyte trafficking and homing, tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as in immune responses to microbial infection. Therefore, chemokines and their receptors are important targets for modulation of host responses in pathophysiological conditions and for therapeutic intervention of human diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):95-104.

  17. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Their Manifold Roles in Homeostasis and Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Le; Ye Zhou; Pablo Iribarren; Ji Ming Wang

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors on target cells and were originally discovered as mediators of directional migration of immune cells to sites of inflammation and injury. In recent years, it has become clear that the function of chemokines extends well beyond the role in leukocyte chemotaxis. They participate in organ development, angiogenesis/angiostasis, leukocyte trafficking and homing, tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as in immune responses to microbial infection. Therefore,chemokines and their receptors are important targets for modulation of host responses in pathophysiological conditions and for therapeutic intervention of human diseases.

  18. Re: Chemokines in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate the trafficking and positioning of cells by activating the seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled chemokine receptors (GPCR or non G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning receptors called atypical chemokine receptors (ACKR. Chemokines are basic proteins that also bind to glycosaminoglycans which play important roles in their biology. Chemokines are divided into four subfamilies based on the position of the first two N-terminal cysteine residues, including the CC, CXC, CX3C and XC subfamilies. Nearly 50 chemokines and 20 signaling chemokine receptors and 4 AKCRs have been identified. Dysregulated expression of chemokines and their corresponding receptors is implicated in many diseases, such as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. Chemokines are essential coordinators of cellular migration and cell-cell interactions and, therefore, have great impact on tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor-associated host cells and cancer cells release an array of different chemokines, resulting in the recruitment and activation of different cell types that mediate the balance between antitumor and pro-tumor responses. In addition to their primary role as chemoattractants, chemokines are also involved in other tumor-related processes, including tumor cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, further studies of the distinctions between the pro-tumor and antitumor activities of chemokines are warranted in order to develop more effective therapies against cancer.

  19. Structure prediction of GPCRs using piecewise homologs and application to the human CCR5 chemokine receptor: validation through agonist and antagonist docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Karthik; Crouzy, Serge; Chevigne, Andy; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Schmit, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the construction and validation of a three-dimensional model of the human CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) receptor using multiple homology modeling. A new methodology is presented where we built each secondary structural model of the protein separately from distantly related homologs of known structure. The reliability of our approach for G-protein coupled receptors was assessed through the building of the human C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) receptor of known crystal structure. The models are refined using molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimizations using CHARMM, a classical force field for proteins. Finally, docking models of both the natural agonists and the antagonists of the receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are proposed. This study explores the possible binding process of ligands to the receptor cavity of chemokine receptors at molecular and atomic levels. We proposed few crucial residues in receptors binding to agonist/antagonist for further validation through experimental analysis. In particular, our study provides better understanding of the blockage mechanism of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, and may help the identification of new lead compounds for drug development in HIV infection, inflammatory diseases, and cancer metastasis.

  20. C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors regulates their agonist-induced clathrin-mediated internalization and G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Nozawa, Hiroki; Akatsu, Chizuru; Shoji, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the agonist-induced internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors from the cell surface into intracellular compartments regulates cellular responsiveness. We previously reported that Gq/11 -protein-coupled human histamine H1 receptors internalized via clathrin-dependent mechanisms upon stimulation with histamine. However, the molecular determinants of H1 receptors responsible for agonist-induced internalization remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the roles of the intracellular C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminal in histamine-induced internalization in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The histamine-induced internalization was evaluated by the receptor binding assay with [(3) H]mepyramine and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy with an anti-HA antibody. We found that histamine-induced internalization was inhibited under hypertonic conditions or by pitstop, a clathrin terminal domain inhibitor, but not by filipin or nystatin, disruptors of the caveolar structure and function. The histamine-induced internalization was also inhibited by truncation of a single amino acid, Ser487, located at the end of the intracellular C-terminal of H1 receptors, but not by its mutation to alanine. In contrast, the receptor-G-protein coupling, which was evaluated by histamine-induced accumulation of [(3) H]inositol phosphates, was potentiated by truncation of Ser487, but was lost by its mutation to alanine. These results suggest that the intracellular C-terminal of human H1 receptors, which only comprises 17 amino acids (Cys471-Ser487), plays crucial roles in both clathrin-dependent internalization of H1 receptors and G-protein signaling, in which truncation of Ser487 and its mutation to alanine are revealed to result in biased signaling toward activation of G-proteins and clathrin-mediated internalization, respectively.

  1. Activated PTHLH Coupling Feedback Phosphoinositide to G-Protein Receptor Signal-Induced Cell Adhesion Network in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Systems-Theoretic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were done on analysis of biological processes in the same high expression (fold change ≥2 activated PTHLH feedback-mediated cell adhesion gene ontology (GO network of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC compared with the corresponding low expression activated GO network of no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues (HBV or HCV infection. Activated PTHLH feedback-mediated cell adhesion network consisted of anaphase-promoting complex-dependent proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism, cell adhesion, cell differentiation, cell-cell signaling, G-protein-coupled receptor protein signaling pathway, intracellular transport, metabolism, phosphoinositide-mediated signaling, positive regulation of transcription, regulation of cyclin-dependent protein kinase activity, regulation of transcription, signal transduction, transcription, and transport in HCC. We proposed activated PTHLH coupling feedback phosphoinositide to G-protein receptor signal-induced cell adhesion network. Our hypothesis was verified by the different activated PTHLH feedback-mediated cell adhesion GO network of HCC compared with the corresponding inhibited GO network of no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues, or the same compared with the corresponding inhibited GO network of HCC. Activated PTHLH coupling feedback phosphoinositide to G-protein receptor signal-induced cell adhesion network included BUB1B, GNG10, PTHR2, GNAZ, RFC4, UBE2C, NRXN3, BAP1, PVRL2, TROAP, and VCAN in HCC from GEO dataset using gene regulatory network inference method and our programming.

  2. Eotaxin-2, a Novel CC Chemokine that Is Selective for the Chemokine Receptor CCR3, and Acts Like Eotaxin on Human Eosinophil and Basophil Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Forssmann, Ulf; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Loetscher, Pius; Dahinden, Clemens A; Langen, Hanno; Thelen, Marcus; Baggiolini, Marco

    1997-01-01

    A novel human CC chemokine consisting of 78 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 8,778.3 daltons (VVIPSPCCMF FVSKRIPENR VVSYQLSSRS TCLKAGVIFT TKKGQQ SCGD PKQEWVQRYM KNLDAKQKKA SPRARAVA) was isolated together with three minor COOH-terminally truncated variants with 73, 75, and 76 residues. The new chemokine was termed eotaxin-2 because it is functionally very similar to eotaxin. In terms of structure, however, eotaxin and eotaxin-2 are rather distant, they share only 39% identical amino ...

  3. Binding site characterization of G protein-coupled receptor by alanine-scanning mutagenesis using molecular dynamics and binding free energy approach: application to C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Swapnil; Pawar, Shirishkumar; Singh, Rajesh; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) was proved as a multidrug target in many diseases like diabetes, inflammation and AIDS, but rational drug design on this target is still lagging behind as the information on the exact binding site and the crystal structure is not yet available. Therefore, for a successful structure-based drug design, an accurate receptor model in ligand-bound state is necessary. In this study, binding-site residues of CCR2 was determined using in silico alanine scanning mutagenesis and the interactions between TAK-779 and the developed homology model of CCR2. Molecular dynamic simulation and Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Solvent Area method was applied to calculate binding free energy difference between the template and mutated protein. Upon mutating 29 amino acids of template protein and comparison of binding free energy with wild type, six residues were identified as putative hot spots of CCR2.

  4. Bone marrow-infiltrating human neuroblastoma cells express high levels of calprotectin and HLA-G proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    Full Text Available Metastases in the bone marrow (BM are grim prognostic factors in patients with neuroblastoma (NB. In spite of extensive analysis of primary tumor cells from high- and low-risk NB patients, a characterization of freshly isolated BM-infiltrating metastatic NB cells is still lacking. Our aim was to identify proteins specifically expressed by metastatic NB cells, that may be relevant for prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Sixty-six Italian children over 18 months of age, diagnosed with stage 4 NB, were included in the study. Metastatic NB cells were freshly isolated from patients' BM by positive immunomagnetic bead manipulation using anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody. Gene expression profiles were compared with those obtained from archived NB primary tumors from patients with 5 y-follow-up. After validation by RT-qPCR, expression/secretion of the proteins encoded by the up-regulated genes in the BM-infiltrating NB cells was evaluated by flow cytometry and ELISA. Compared to primary tumor cells, BM-infiltrating NB cells down-modulated the expression of CX3CL1, AGT, ATP1A2 mRNAs, whereas they up-regulated several genes commonly expressed by various lineages of BM resident cells. BM-infiltrating NB cells expressed indeed the proteins encoded by the top-ranked genes, S100A8 and A9 (calprotectin, CD177 and CD3, and secreted the CXCL7 chemokine. BM-infiltrating NB cells also expressed CD271 and HLA-G. We have identified proteins specifically expressed by BM-infiltrating NB cells. Among them, calprotectin, a potent inflammatory protein, and HLA-G, endowed with tolerogenic properties facilitating tumor escape from host immune response, may represent novel biomarkers and/or targets for therapeutic intervention in high-risk NB patients.

  5. Chemokines in the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad D

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In last few years, focus has shifted from cytokines which have pleiotropic biologic properties to chemokines with target cell selective activity. The separation has led frequently espoused proposition that chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of disease having specific infiltrates and point to possible role in Chronic skin diseases. Depending upon the structure these chemokines are divided into three subfamilies, two major subfamilies: CXC and CC, and one putative subfamily C with only one member known as lymphotactin. A recent insight into chemokine physiology comes from demonstration of interaction between chemokines and their cloned receptors. These chemokine receptors are members of the transmembrane spanning (7-TMS, G-protein- coupled receptor family. So far CXC chemokine receptors and seven CC receptors have been cloned. Recently, the importance of selective chemoattractant activity of chemokines has been overshadowed by chemokine receptors emerging as new targets for anti-HIV therapy as the connection between chemokines and HIV-I had been established. Among the CXC chemokine receptors, CXCR4, and among the CC chemokines receptors, CCRI, CCR2b, CCR3, and CCR5 have been implicated as HIV-1 coreceptors.

  6. Inflammatory Cytokines Induce Expression of Chemokines by Human Retinal Cells: Role in Chemokine Receptor Mediated Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Kommineni, Vijay K; Ganjbaksh, Nader; Nagineni, Krishnasai K; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Chemokine reeptor-3 (CCR-3) was shown to be associated with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a vision threatening retinal disease that affects the aging population world-wide. Retinal pigment epithelium and choroid in the posterior part of the retina are the key tissues targeted in the pathogenesis of CNV in AMD. We used human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) and choroidal fibroblast (HCHF) cells, prepared from aged adult human donor eyes, to evaluate the expression of major CCR-3 ligands, CCL-5, CCL -7, CCL-11,CCL-24 and CCL-26. Microarray analysis of gene expression in HRPE cells treated with inflammatory cytokine mix (ICM= IFN-γ+TNF-α+IL-1β) revealed 75 and 23-fold increase in CCL-5 and CCL-7 respectively, but not CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. Chemokine secretion studies of the production of CCL5 and CCL7 by HRPE corroborated with the gene expression analysis data. When the HRPE cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent manner. Similar to the gene expression data, the ICM did not enhance HRPE production of CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. CCL-11 and CCL-26 were increased with IL-4 treatment and this HRPE production was augmented in the presence of TNF-α and IL1β. When HCHF cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent fashion. IL-4 induced low levels of CCL-11 and CCL-26 in HCHF and this production was significantly enhanced by TNF-α. Under these conditions, neither HRPE nor HCHF were demonstrated to produce CCL-24. These data demonstrate that chronic inflammation triggers CCL-5 and CCL-7 release by HRPE and HCHF and the subsequent interactions with CCR3 may participate in pathologic processes in AMD.

  7. Cloning and characterization of a human orphan family C G-protein coupled receptor GPRC5D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, A A; Sheppard, P O

    2001-01-01

    predicted to encode an additional subtype. The full length coding regions of mouse mGprc5d and human GPRC5D were cloned and shown to contain predicted open reading frames of 300 and 345 amino acids, respectively. GPRC5D has seven putative transmembrane segments and is expressed in the cell membrane...

  8. Temporal lobe epilepsy causes selective changes in mu opioid and nociceptin receptor binding and functional coupling to G-proteins in human temporal neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa; Orozco-Suarez, Sandra; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Villeda-Hernandez, Juana; Gaona, Andres; Páldy, Eszter; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna

    2009-09-01

    There is no information concerning signal transduction mechanisms downstream of the opioid/nociceptin receptors in the human epileptic brain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the level of G-proteins activation mediated by DAMGO (a mu receptor selective peptide) and nociceptin, and the binding to mu and nociceptin (NOP) receptors and adenylyl cyclase (AC) in neocortex of patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with mesial sclerosis (MTLE) or secondary to tumor or vascular lesion showed enhanced [3H]DAMGO and [3H]forskolin binding, lower DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding and no significant changes in nociceptin-stimulated G-protein. [3H]Nociceptin binding was lower in patients with MTLE. Age of seizure onset correlated positively with [3H]DAMGO binding and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, whereas epilepsy duration correlated negatively with [3H]DAMGO and [3H]nociceptin binding, and positively with [3H]forskolin binding. In conclusion, our present data obtained from neocortex of epileptic patients provide strong evidence that a) temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with alterations in mu opioid and NOP receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors, and b) clinical aspects may play an important role on these receptor changes.

  9. Structural Insights into the Interaction Between a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Protein, Viral CC Chemokine Inhibitor (vCCI), and the Human CC Chemokine, Eotaxin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Nai-Wei; Gao, Yong; Schill, Megan S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2014-01-30

    Chemokines play important roles in the immune system, not only recruiting leukocytes to the site of infection and inflammation but also guiding cell homing and cell development. The soluble poxvirusencoded protein vCCI, a CC chemokine inhibitor, can bind to human CC chemokines tightly to impair the host immune defense. This protein has no known homologs in eukaryotes, and may represent a potent method to stop inflammation. Previously, our structure of the vCCI:MIP-1β complex indicated that vCCI uses negatively charged residues in β-sheet II to interact with positively charged residues in the MIP-1βN-terminus, 20’s region and 40’s loop. However, the interactions between vCCI and other CC chemokines have not yet been fully explored. Here, we used NMR and fluorescence anisotropy to study the interaction between vCCI and eotaxin-1 (CCL11), another CC chemokine that is an important factor in the asthma response. NMR results reveal that the binding pattern is very similar to the vCCI:MIP-1βcomplex, and suggest that electrostatic interactions provide a major contribution to binding. Fluorescence anisotropy results on variants of eotaxin-1 further confirm the critical roles of the charged residues in eotaxin. Compared to wild-type eotaxin, single, double, or triple mutations at these critical charged residues weaken the binding. One exception is the K47A mutation that exhibits increased affinity for vCCI, which can be explained structurally. In addition, the binding affinity between vCCI and other wild type CC chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β and RANTES, were determined as 1.09 nM, 1.16 nM, and 0.22 nM, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first work quantitatively measuring the binding affinity between vCCI and different CC chemokines.

  10. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when evalua

  11. Dehydroepiandrosterone Activation of G-protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Rapidly Stimulates MicroRNA-21 Transcription in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yun; Radde, Brandie N; Litchfield, Lacey M; Ivanova, Margarita M; Prough, Russell A; Clark, Barbara J; Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2015-06-19

    Little is known about the regulation of the oncomiR miR-21 in liver. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) regulates gene expression as a ligand for a G-protein-coupled receptor and as a precursor for steroids that activate nuclear receptor signaling. We report that 10 nm DHEA increases primary miR-21 (pri-miR-21) transcription and mature miR-21 expression in HepG2 cells in a biphasic manner with an initial peak at 1 h followed by a second, sustained response from 3-12 h. DHEA also increased miR-21 in primary human hepatocytes and Hep3B cells. siRNA, antibody, and inhibitor studies suggest that the rapid DHEA-mediated increase in miR-21 involves a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30), estrogen receptor α-36 (ERα36), epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway requiring activation of c-Src, ERK1/2, and PI3K. GPER antagonist G-15 attenuated DHEA- and BSA-conjugated DHEA-stimulated pri-miR-21 transcription. Like DHEA, GPER agonists G-1 and fulvestrant increased pri-miR-21 in a GPER- and ERα36-dependent manner. DHEA, like G-1, increased GPER and ERα36 mRNA and protein levels. DHEA increased ERK1/2 and c-Src phosphorylation in a GPER-responsive manner. DHEA increased c-Jun, but not c-Fos, protein expression after 2 h. DHEA increased androgen receptor, c-Fos, and c-Jun recruitment to the miR-21 promoter. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of DHEA activate a GPER intracellular signaling cascade that increases pri-miR-21 transcription mediated at least in part by AP-1 and androgen receptor miR-21 promoter interaction.

  12. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye; Johansen, Lars Dan; Wellendorph, Petrine; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Jørgensen, Christinna V; Quan, Shi; Rui, Gao; Inoue, Asuka; Linneberg, Allan; Grarup, Niels; Jun, Wang; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-27

    GPRC6A is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by l-amino acids, which, based on analyses of knock-out mice, has been suggested to have physiological functions in metabolism and testicular function. The human ortholog is, however, mostly retained intracellularly in contrast to the cell surface-expressed murine and goldfish orthologs. The latter orthologs are Gq-coupled and lead to intracellular accumulation of inositol phosphates and calcium release. In the present study we cloned the bonobo chimpanzee GPRC6A receptor, which is 99% identical to the human receptor, and show that it is cell surface-expressed and functional. By analyses of chimeric human/mouse and human/bonobo receptors, bonobo receptor mutants, and the single nucleotide polymorphism database at NCBI, we identify an insertion/deletion variation in the third intracellular loop responsible for the intracellular retention and lack of function of the human ortholog. Genetic analyses of the 1000 genome database and the Inter99 cohort of 6,000 Danes establish the distribution of genotypes among ethnic groups, showing that the cell surface-expressed and functional variant is much more prevalent in the African population than in European and Asian populations and that this variant is partly linked with a stop codon early in the receptor sequence (rs6907580, amino acid position 57). In conclusion, our data solve a more than decade-old question of why the cloned human GPRC6A receptor is not cell surface-expressed and functional and provide a genetic framework to study human phenotypic traits in large genome sequencing projects linked with physiological measurement and biomarkers.

  13. Novel human G protein-coupled receptors with long N-terminals containing GPS domains and Ser/Thr-rich regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Robert; Lagerström, Malin C; Höglund, Pär J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2002-11-20

    We report eight novel members of the superfamily of human G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found by searches in the human genome databases, termed GPR97, GPR110, GPR111, GPR112, GPR113, GPR114, GPR115 and GPR116. Phylogenetic analysis shows that these are additional members of a family of GPCRs with long N-termini, previously termed EGF-7TM, LNB-7TM, B2 or LN-7TM. Five of the receptors form their own phylogenetic cluster, while three others form a cluster with the previously reported HE6 and GPR56 (TM7XN1). All the receptors have a GPS domain in their N-terminus and long Ser/Thr-rich regions forming mucin-like stalks. GPR113 has a hormone binding domain and one EGF domain. GPR112 has over 20 Ser/Thr repeats and a pentraxin domain. GPR116 has two immunoglobulin-like repeats and a SEA box. We found several human EST sequences for most of the receptors showing differential expression patterns, which may indicate that some of these receptors participate in reproductive functions while others are more likely to have a role in the immune system.

  14. Human Brain Chemokine and Cytokine Expression in Sepsis: A Report of Three Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warford, Jordan; Lamport, Anna-Claire; Kennedy, Barry; Easton, Alexander S

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic response to infection that can affect brain function by inducing resident cells (including astrocytes and microglia) to generate brain chemokines and cytokines. However, there are few studies on the human brain. Since this information may shed further light on pathogenesis, our study objective was to measure the expression of 36 chemokines and cytokines in autopsied brain from 3 cases of sepsis and 10 controls, and to relate this to astrocyte and microglial activation. The right frontal pole was removed at autopsy and chemokine and cytokine expression measured by multiplexed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Immunohistochemistry and image analysis were carried out to determine the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of activated astrocytes, and CD68 and CD45, markers of activated microglial cells. Concentrations of the chemokines CXCL8, CXCL10, CXCL12, CCL13 and CCL22 were increased in pooled data from the three cases of sepsis (psepsis cases. Additionally, individual sepsis cases showed increases in mRNA expression for HDAC (histone deacetylase) 6 and EIF (eukaryotic translation initiation factor) 4A2. Brain GFAP expression was significantly increased (psepsis cases. Individual sepsis cases showed increases in CD68 or CD45 expression. These expression patterns add to our understanding of the pathogenesis of sepsis and its effects on the brain.

  15. Bright fluorescence monitoring system utilizing Zoanthus sp. green fluorescent protein (ZsGreen for human G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in microbial yeast cells.

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    Yasuyuki Nakamura

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are currently the most important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery because they regulate a wide variety of physiological processes. Consequently, simple and convenient detection systems for ligands that regulate the function of GPCR have attracted attention as powerful tools for new drug development. We previously developed a yeast-based fluorescence reporter ligand detection system using flow cytometry. However, using this conventional detection system, fluorescence from a cell expressing GFP and responding to a ligand is weak, making detection of these cells by fluorescence microscopy difficult. We here report improvements to the conventional yeast fluorescence reporter assay system resulting in the development of a new highly-sensitive fluorescence reporter assay system with extremely bright fluorescence and high signal-to-noise (S/N ratio. This new system allowed the easy detection of GPCR signaling in yeast using fluorescence microscopy. Somatostatin receptor and neurotensin receptor (implicated in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively were chosen as human GPCR(s. The facile detection of binding to these receptors by cognate peptide ligands was demonstrated. In addition, we established a highly sensitive ligand detection system using yeast cell surface display technology that is applicable to peptide screening, and demonstrate that the display of various peptide analogs of neurotensin can activate signaling through the neurotensin receptor in yeast cells. Our system could be useful for identifying lead peptides with agonistic activity towards targeted human GPCR(s.

  16. Acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in human lymphoma cells: a role for the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor TDAG8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Dong, Lixue; Dean, Eric; Yang, Li V

    2013-10-11

    Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65) is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  17. Acidosis Decreases c-Myc Oncogene Expression in Human Lymphoma Cells: A Role for the Proton-Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptor TDAG8

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    Zhigang Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65 is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  18. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...... with colocalization of the full-length proteins in cells and with previous studies, we suggest that the range of relevant interactions might extend to interactions with K i = 450 µM in the in vitro assays. Within this range, we identify novel PSD-95 interactions with the chemokine receptor CXCR2, the neuropeptide Y...

  19. Chemokine cooperativity is caused by competitive glycosaminoglycan binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaar, Folkert; van Offenbeek, Jody; van der Lee, Miranda M C; van Lith, Lambertus H C J; Watts, Anne O; Rops, Angelique L W M M; Aguilar, David C; Ziarek, Joshua J; van der Vlag, Johan; Handel, Tracy M; Volkman, Brian F; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Vischer, Henry F; Zaman, Guido J R; Smit, Martine J

    2014-04-15

    Chemokines comprise a family of secreted proteins that activate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and thereby control the migration of leukocytes during inflammation or immune surveillance. The positional information required for such migratory behavior is governed by the binding of chemokines to membrane-tethered glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which establishes a chemokine concentration gradient. An often observed but incompletely understood behavior of chemokines is the ability of unrelated chemokines to enhance the potency with which another chemokine subtype can activate its cognate receptor. This phenomenon has been demonstrated to occur between many chemokine combinations and across several model systems and has been dubbed chemokine cooperativity. In this study, we have used GAG binding-deficient chemokine mutants and cell-based functional (migration) assays to demonstrate that chemokine cooperativity is caused by competitive binding of chemokines to GAGs. This mechanistic explanation of chemokine cooperativity provides insight into chemokine gradient formation in the context of inflammation, in which multiple chemokines are secreted simultaneously.

  20. Heterophilic chemokine receptor interactions in chemokine signaling and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Birgit K; Sarabi, Alisina; Koenen, Rory R; Weber, Christian

    2011-03-10

    It is generally accepted that G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), like chemokine receptors, form dimers or higher order oligomers. Such homo- and heterophilic interactions have been identified not only among and between chemokine receptors of CC- or CXC-subfamilies, but also between chemokine receptors and other classes of GPCR, like the opioid receptors. Oligomerization affects different aspects of receptor physiology, like ligand affinity, signal transduction and the mode of internalization, in turn influencing physiologic processes such as cell activation and migration. As particular chemokine receptor pairs exert specific modulating effects on their individual functions, they might play particular roles in various disease types, such as cancer. Hence, chemokine receptor heteromers might represent attractive therapeutic targets. This review highlights the state-of-the-art knowledge on the technical and functional aspects of chemokine receptor multimerization in chemokine signaling and biology.

  1. GPR30, the non-classical membrane G protein related estrogen receptor, is overexpressed in human seminoma and promotes seminoma cell proliferation.

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    Nicolas Chevalier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Testicular germ cell tumours are the most frequent cancer of young men with an increasing incidence all over the world. Pathogenesis and reasons of this increase remain unknown but epidemiological and clinical data have suggested that fetal exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs with estrogenic effects, could participate to testicular germ cell carcinogenesis. However, these EEDs (like bisphenol A are often weak ligands for classical nuclear estrogen receptors. Several research groups recently showed that the non classical membrane G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 mediates the effects of estrogens and several xenoestrogens through rapid non genomic activation of signal transduction pathways in various human estrogen dependent cancer cells (breast, ovary, endometrium. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that GPER was overexpressed in testicular tumours and was able to trigger JKT-1 seminoma cell proliferation. RESULTS: We report here for the first time a complete morphological and functional characterization of GPER in normal and malignant human testicular germ cells. In normal adult human testes, GPER was expressed by somatic (Sertoli cells and germ cells (spermatogonia and spermatocytes. GPER was exclusively overexpressed in seminomas, the most frequent testicular germ cell cancer, localized at the cell membrane and triggered a proliferative effect on JKT-1 cells in vitro, which was completely abolished by G15 (a GPER selective antagonist and by siRNA invalidation. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that GPER is expressed by human normal adult testicular germ cells, specifically overexpressed in seminoma tumours and able to trigger seminoma cell proliferation in vitro. It should therefore be considered rather than classical ERs when xeno-estrogens or other endocrine disruptors are assessed in testicular germ cell cancers. It may also represent a prognosis marker and/or a therapeutic target for

  2. GPR30, the Non-Classical Membrane G Protein Related Estrogen Receptor, Is Overexpressed in Human Seminoma and Promotes Seminoma Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Vega, Aurélie; Bouskine, Adil; Siddeek, Bénazir; Michiels, Jean-François; Chevallier, Daniel; Fénichel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Background Testicular germ cell tumours are the most frequent cancer of young men with an increasing incidence all over the world. Pathogenesis and reasons of this increase remain unknown but epidemiological and clinical data have suggested that fetal exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) with estrogenic effects, could participate to testicular germ cell carcinogenesis. However, these EEDs (like bisphenol A) are often weak ligands for classical nuclear estrogen receptors. Several research groups recently showed that the non classical membrane G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) mediates the effects of estrogens and several xenoestrogens through rapid non genomic activation of signal transduction pathways in various human estrogen dependent cancer cells (breast, ovary, endometrium). The aim of this study was to demonstrate that GPER was overexpressed in testicular tumours and was able to trigger JKT-1 seminoma cell proliferation. Results We report here for the first time a complete morphological and functional characterization of GPER in normal and malignant human testicular germ cells. In normal adult human testes, GPER was expressed by somatic (Sertoli cells) and germ cells (spermatogonia and spermatocytes). GPER was exclusively overexpressed in seminomas, the most frequent testicular germ cell cancer, localized at the cell membrane and triggered a proliferative effect on JKT-1 cells in vitro, which was completely abolished by G15 (a GPER selective antagonist) and by siRNA invalidation. Conclusion These results demonstrate that GPER is expressed by human normal adult testicular germ cells, specifically overexpressed in seminoma tumours and able to trigger seminoma cell proliferation in vitro. It should therefore be considered rather than classical ERs when xeno-estrogens or other endocrine disruptors are assessed in testicular germ cell cancers. It may also represent a prognosis marker and/or a therapeutic target for seminomas. PMID

  3. GPCR-I-TASSER: A Hybrid Approach to G Protein-Coupled Receptor Structure Modeling and the Application to the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Jianyi; Jang, Richard; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Experimental structure determination remains difficult for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We propose a new hybrid protocol to construct GPCR structure models that integrates experimental mutagenesis data with ab initio transmembrane (TM) helix assembly simulations. The method was tested on 24 known GPCRs where the ab initio TM-helix assembly procedure constructed the correct fold for 20 cases. When combined with weak homology and sparse mutagenesis restraints, the method generated correct folds for all the tested cases with an average Cα root-mean-square deviation 2.4 Å in the TM regions. The new hybrid protocol was applied to model all 1,026 GPCRs in the human genome, where 923 have a high confidence score and are expected to have correct folds; these contain many pharmaceutically important families with no previously solved structures, including Trace amine, Prostanoids, Releasing hormones, Melanocortins, Vasopressin, and Neuropeptide Y receptors. The results demonstrate new progress on genome-wide structure modeling of TM proteins.

  4. Novel computational methodologies for structural modeling of spacious ligand binding sites of G-protein-coupled receptors: development and application to human leukotriene B4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  5. Novel Computational Methodologies for Structural Modeling of Spacious Ligand Binding Sites of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: Development and Application to Human Leukotriene B4 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Ishino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  6. DNA display selection of peptide ligands for a full-length human G protein-coupled receptor on CHO-K1 cells.

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    Nobuhide Doi

    Full Text Available The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, which form the largest group of transmembrane proteins involved in signal transduction, are major targets of currently available drugs. Thus, the search for cognate and surrogate peptide ligands for GPCRs is of both basic and therapeutic interest. Here we describe the application of an in vitro DNA display technology to screening libraries of peptide ligands for full-length GPCRs expressed on whole cells. We used human angiotensin II (Ang II type-1 receptor (hAT1R as a model GPCR. Under improved selection conditions using hAT1R-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells as bait, we confirmed that Ang II gene could be enriched more than 10,000-fold after four rounds of selection. Further, we successfully selected diverse Ang II-like peptides from randomized peptide libraries. The results provide more precise information on the sequence-function relationships of hAT1R ligands than can be obtained by conventional alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Completely in vitro DNA display can overcome the limitations of current display technologies and is expected to prove widely useful for screening diverse libraries of mutant peptide and protein ligands for receptors that can be expressed functionally on the surface of CHO-K1 cells.

  7. G protein-coupled receptor 30 ligand G-1 increases aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling by inhibition of tubulin assembly and cell cycle arrest in human MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is well established. Apart from the nuclear receptors ERα and ERβ, oestrogen signalling further involves an unrelated G protein-coupled receptor termed GPR30. In order to investigate potential regulatory crosstalk, this study investigated the influence of G-1 as one of the few GPR30-specific ligands on the AHR regulon in MCF-7 cells. As a well-characterised model system, these human mammary carcinoma cells co-express all three receptors (AHR, ERα and GPR30) and are thus ideally suited to study corresponding regulatory pathway interactions on transcript level. Indeed, treatment with micromolar concentrations of the GPR30-specific agonist G-1 resulted in up-regulation of AHR as well as the transcripts for cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1, two well-known targets of the AHR regulon. While this was partly attributable to G-1-mediated inhibition of tubulin assembly and subsequent cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, the effects nevertheless required functional AHR. However, G-1-induced up-regulation of CYP 1A1 was not mediated by GPR30, as G15 antagonist treatment as well as a knockdown of GPR30 and AHR failed to inhibit this effect.

  8. Staphylococcal superantigens stimulate immortalized human adipocytes to produce chemokines.

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    Bao G Vu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human adipocytes may have significant functions in wound healing and the development of diabetes through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines after stimulation by gram-negative bacterial endotoxin. Diabetic foot ulcers are most often associated with staphylococcal infections. Adipocyte responses in the area of the wound may play a role in persistence and pathology. We studied the effect of staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs on immortalized human adipocytes, alone and in the presence of bacterial endotoxin or staphylococcal α-toxin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary non-diabetic and diabetic human preadipocytes were immortalized by the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase (TERT and the E6/E7 genes of human papillomavirus. The immortal cells were demonstrated to have properties of non-immortalized pre-adipocytes and could be differentiated into mature and functional adipocytes. Differentiated adipocytes exposed to staphylococcal SAgs produced robust levels of cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, but there were no significant differences in levels between the non-diabetic and diabetic cells. Cytokine production was increased by co-incubation of adipocytes with SAgs and endotoxin together. In contrast, α-toxin alone was cytotoxic at high concentrations, but, at sub-cytotoxic doses, did not stimulate production of IL-6 and IL-8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endotoxin has been proposed to contribute to diabetes through enhanced insulin resistance after chronic exposure and stimulation of adipocytes to produce cytokines. Our data indicate staphylococcal SAgs TSST-1 and SEB alone and in combination with bacterial endotoxin also stimulate adipocytes to produce cytokines and thus may contribute to the inflammatory response found in chronic diabetic ulcers and in the systemic inflammation that is associated with the development and persistence of diabetes. The immortal human pre-adipocytes reported here will be useful for studies to

  9. Heterotrimeric G-proteins: a short history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Graeme; Kostenis, Evi

    2006-01-01

    Some 865 genes in man encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) function to transduce signals from this vast panoply of receptors to effector systems including ion channels and enzymes that alter the rate of production, release or degradation of intracellular second messengers. However, it was not until the 1970s that the existence of such transducing proteins was even seriously suggested. Combinations of bacterial toxins that mediate their effects via covalent modification of the alpha-subunit of certain G-proteins and mutant cell lines that fail to generate cyclic AMP in response to agonists because they either fail to express or express a malfunctional G-protein allowed their identification and purification. Subsequent to initial cloning efforts, cloning by homology has defined the human G-proteins to derive from 35 genes, 16 encoding alpha-subunits, five beta and 14 gamma. All function as guanine nucleotide exchange on-off switches and are mechanistically similar to other proteins that are enzymic GTPases. Although not readily accepted initially, it is now well established that beta/gamma complexes mediate as least as many functions as the alpha-subunits. The generation of chimeras between different alpha-subunits defined the role of different sections of the primary/secondary sequence and crystal structures and cocrystals with interacting proteins have given detailed understanding of their molecular structure and basis of function. Finally, further modifications of such chimeras have generated a range of G-protein alpha-subunits with greater promiscuity to interact across GPCR classes and initiated the use of such modified G-proteins in drug discovery programmes.

  10. The viral KSHV chemokine vMIP-II inhibits the migration of Naive and activated human NK cells by antagonizing two distinct chemokine receptors.

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    Rachel Yamin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate immune cells able to rapidly kill virus-infected and tumor cells. Two NK cell populations are found in the blood; the majority (90% expresses the CD16 receptor and also express the CD56 protein in intermediate levels (CD56(Dim CD16(Pos while the remaining 10% are CD16 negative and express CD56 in high levels (CD56(Bright CD16(Neg. NK cells also reside in some tissues and traffic to various infected organs through the usage of different chemokines and chemokine receptors. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human virus that has developed numerous sophisticated and versatile strategies to escape the attack of immune cells such as NK cells. Here, we investigate whether the KSHV derived cytokine (vIL-6 and chemokines (vMIP-I, vMIP-II, vMIP-III affect NK cell activity. Using transwell migration assays, KSHV infected cells, as well as fusion and recombinant proteins, we show that out of the four cytokine/chemokines encoded by KSHV, vMIP-II is the only one that binds to the majority of NK cells, affecting their migration. We demonstrate that vMIP-II binds to two different receptors, CX3CR1 and CCR5, expressed by naïve CD56(Dim CD16(Pos NK cells and activated NK cells, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the binding of vMIP-II to CX3CR1 and CCR5 blocks the binding of the natural ligands of these receptors, Fractalkine (Fck and RANTES, respectively. Finally, we show that vMIP-II inhibits the migration of naïve and activated NK cells towards Fck and RANTES. Thus, we present here a novel mechanism in which KSHV uses a unique protein that antagonizes the activity of two distinct chemokine receptors to inhibit the migration of naïve and activated NK cells.

  11. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay.

  12. Investigation of the Binding Interaction of Fatty Acids with Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor 40 Using a Site-Specific Fluorescence Probe by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Min; Cao, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Qin, Wei-Ping; Yang, Yu; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Human G protein-coupled receptor 40 (hGPR40), with medium- and long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) as its natural ligands, plays an important role in the enhancement of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. To date, information about the direct binding of FFAs to hGPR40 is very limited, and how carbon-chain length affects the activities of FFAs on hGPR40 is not yet understood. In this study, a fluorescein-fasiglifam analogue (F-TAK-875A) conjugate was designed and synthesized as a site-specific fluorescence probe to study the interaction of FFAs with hGPR40. hGPR40 was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and labeled with F-TAK-875A. By using flow cytometry, competitive binding of FFA and F-TAK-875A to hGPR40-expressed cells was measured. Binding affinities of 18 saturated FFAs, with carbon-chain lengths ranging from C6 to C23, were analyzed. The results showed that the binding potencies of FFAs to hGPR40 were dependent on carbon length. There was a positive correlation between length and binding potency for seven FFAs (C9-C15), with myristic acid (C15) showing the highest potency, 0.2% relative to TAK-875. For FFAs with a length of fewer than C9 or more than C15, they had very weak or no binding. Molecular docking results showed that the binding pocket of TAK-875 in hGPR40 could enclose FFAs with lengths of C15 or fewer. However, for FFAs with lengths longer than C15, part of the alkyl chain extended out of the binding pocket. This study provided insights into the structural dependence of FFAs binding to and activation of hGPR40.

  13. The second intracellular loop of the human cannabinoid CB2 receptor governs G protein coupling in coordination with the carboxyl terminal domain.

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    Congxia Zheng

    Full Text Available The major effects of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids are mediated via two G protein-coupled receptors, CB1 and CB2, elucidation of the mechanism and structural determinants of the CB2 receptor coupling with G proteins will have a significant impact on drug discovery. In the present study, we systematically investigated the role of the intracellular loops in the interaction of the CB2 receptor with G proteins using chimeric receptors alongside the characterization of cAMP accumulation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We provided evidence that ICL2 was significantly involved in G protein coupling in coordination with the C-terminal end. Moreover, a single alanine substitution of the Pro-139 in the CB2 receptor that corresponds to Leu-222 in the CB1 receptor resulted in a moderate impairment in the inhibition of cAMP accumulation, whereas mutants P139F, P139M and P139L were able to couple to the Gs protein in a CRE-driven luciferase assay. With the ERK activation experiments, we further found that P139L has the ability to activate ERK through both Gi- and Gs-mediated pathways. Our findings defined an essential role of the second intracellular loop of the CB2 receptor in coordination with the C-terminal tail in G protein coupling and receptor activation.

  14. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  15. A novel role for c-Myc in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (GRK4) transcriptional regulation in human kidney proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, John J; Tran, Hanh T; Van Sciver, Robert E; Bigler Wang, Dora; Carlson, Julia M; Felder, Robin A

    2013-05-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (GRK4) negatively regulates the dopaminergic system by desensitizing the dopamine-1-receptor. The expressional control of GRK4 has not been reported, but here we show that the transcription factor c-Myc binds to the promoter of GRK4 and positively regulates GRK4 protein expression in human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs). Addition of phorbol esters to RPTCs not only increased c-Myc binding to the GRK4 promoter but also increased both phospho-c-Myc and GRK4 expression. The phorbol ester-mediated increase in GRK4 expression was completely blocked by the c-Myc inhibitor, 10074-G5, indicating that GRK4 is downstream of phospho-c-Myc. The autocrine production of angiotensin II (Ang II) in RPTCs increased the phosphorylation and activation of c-Myc and subsequently GRK4 expression. 3-Amino-4-thio-butyl sulfonate, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase A, increased RPTC secretion of Ang II. 3-Amino-4-thio-butyl sulfonate or Ang II increased the expression of both phospho-c-Myc and GRK4, which was blocked by 10074-G5. Blockade of the Ang II type 1 receptor with losartan decreased phospho-c-Myc and GRK4 expression. Both inhibition of c-Myc activity and blockade of Ang II type 1 receptor restored the coupling of dopamine-1-receptor to adenylyl cyclase stimulation in uncoupled RPTCs, whereas phorbol esters or Ang II caused the uncoupling of normally coupled RPTCs. We suggest that the Ang II type 1 receptor impairs dopamine-1-receptor function via c-Myc activation of GRK4. This novel pathway may be involved in the increase in blood pressure in hypertension that is mediated by increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system and decreased activity of the renal dopaminergic system.

  16. Sequestration of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor hm1-hm5 subtypes: effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinases GRK2, GRK4, GRK5 and GRK6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Okuno, E; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-03-01

    Sequestration of porcine muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) expressed in COS-7 cells is facilitated by coexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2). We examined the effect of coexpression of GRK2, GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 on sequestration of human m1-m5 receptors expressed in COS-7 cells, which was assessed as loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity from the cell surface. Sequestration of m4 receptors as well as m2 receptors was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 and attenuated by coexpression of the dominant negative form of GRK2 (DN-GRK2). Sequestration of m3 and m5 receptors also was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 but not affected by coexpression of DN-GRK2. On the other hand, proportions of sequestered m1 receptors were not significantly different with coexpression of GRK2 and DN-GRK2. GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 did not facilitate sequestration of m1-m5 receptors in COS-7 cells, except that the sequestration of m2 receptors tended to be facilitated by coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6. However, coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5, but not GRK6, in BHK-21 cells facilitated sequestration of m2, but not m3, receptors. These results indicate that the effect of GRK2 to facilitate receptor sequestration is not restricted to m2 receptors but is generalized to other muscarinic receptors except m1 receptors and that other kinases, including GRK4 delta, GRK5 and endogenous kinase(s) in COS-7 cells, also contribute to sequestration of m2 and m4 receptors.

  17. CKbeta-8 [CCL23], a novel CC chemokine, is chemotactic for human osteoclast precursors and is expressed in bone tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votta, B J; White, J R; Dodds, R A; James, I E; Connor, J R; Lee-Rykaczewski, E; Eichman, C F; Kumar, S; Lark, M W; Gowen, M

    2000-05-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive subpopulation of mononuclear cells isolated from collagenase digests of human osteoclastoma tissue exhibits an osteoclast phenotype and can be induced to resorb bone. Using these osteoclast precursors as a model system, we have assessed the chemotactic potential of 16 chemokines. Three CC chemokines, the recently described CKbeta-8, RANTES, and MIP-1alpha elicited significant chemotactic responses. In contrast, 10 other CC chemokines (MIP-1beta, MCP-1, MCP-2, MCP-3, MCP-4, HCC-1, eotaxin-2, PARC, SLC, ELC) and 3 CXC chemokines (IL-8, GROalpha, SDF-1) were inactive. None of these chemokines showed any chemotactic activity for either primary osteoblasts derived from human bone explants or the osteoblastic MG-63 cell line. The identity of the osteoclast receptor that mediates the chemotactic response remains to be established. However, all three active chemokines have been reported to bind to CCR1 and cross-desensitization studies demonstrate that RANTES and MIP-1alpha can partially inhibit the chemotactic response elicited by CKbeta-8. CKbeta-8, the most potent of the active CC chemokines (EC(max) 0.1-0.3 nM), was further characterized with regard to expression in human bone and cartilage. Although expression is not restricted to these tissues, CKbeta-8 mRNA was shown to be highly expressed in osteoblasts and chondrocytes in human fetal bone by in situ hybridization. In addition, CKbeta-8 protein was shown to be present in human osteophytic tissue by immunolocalization. These observations suggest that CKbeta-8, and perhaps other chemokines, may play a role in the recruitment of osteoclast precursors to sites of bone resorption.

  18. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 stimulates chemokine production and induces chemotaxis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Seno, Takahiro; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2014-06-06

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is expressed by macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in immune-inflammatory disorders such as systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and several vasculopathies. However, its molecular function is not fully understood. In this study, we examined gene expression profiles and induction of chemokines in monocytes treated with recombinant human AIF (rhAIF-1). Using the high-density oligonucleotide microarray technique, we compared mRNA expression profiles of rhAIF-1-stimulated CD14(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (CD14(+) PBMCs) derived from healthy volunteers. We demonstrated upregulation of genes for several CC chemokines such as CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL7, and CCL20. Next, using ELISAs, we confirmed that rhAIF-1 promoted the secretion of CCL3/MIP-1α and IL-6 by CD14(+) PBMCs, whereas only small amounts of CCL1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL7/MCP-3 and CCL20/MIP-3α were secreted. Conditioned media from rhAIF-1stimulated CD14(+) PBMCs resulted in migration of PBMCs. These findings suggest that AIF-1, which induced chemokines and enhanced chemotaxis of monocytes, may represent a molecular target for the therapy of immune-inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High-level production, solubilization and purification of synthetic human GPCR chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ren

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors belong to a class of integral membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and are responsible for transmitting signals from the extracellular environment. However, the structural changes in the receptor, connecting ligand binding to G-protein activation, remain elusive for most GPCRs due to the difficulty to produce them for structural and functional studies. We here report high-level production in E.coli of 4 human GPCRs, namely chemokine receptors (hCRs CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 that are directly involved in HIV-1 infection, asthma and cancer metastasis. The synthetic genes of CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 were synthesized using a two-step assembly/amplification PCR method and inserted into two different kinds of expression systems. After systematic screening of growth conditions and host strains, TB medium was selected for expression of pEXP-hCRs. The low copy number pBAD-DEST49 plasmid, with a moderately strong promoter tightly regulated by L-arabinose, proved helpful for reducing toxicity of expressed membrane proteins. The synthetic Trx-hCR fusion genes in the pBAD-DEST49 vector were expressed at high levels in the Top10 strain. After a systematic screen of 96 detergents, the zwitterionic detergents of the Fos-choline series (FC9-FC16 emerged as the most effective for isolation of the hCRs. The FC14 was selected both for solubilization from bacterial lysates and for stabilization of the Trx-hCRs during purification. Thus, the FC-14 solubilized Trx-hCRs could be purified using size exclusion chromatography as monomers and dimers with the correct apparent MW and their alpha-helical content determined by circular dichroism. The identity of two of the expressed hCRs (CCR3 and CCR5 was confirmed using immunoblots using specific monoclonal antibodies. After optimization of expression systems and detergent-mediated purification procedures, we achieved large-scale, high-level production of 4 human GPCR chemokine receptor in a

  20. High-level production, solubilization and purification of synthetic human GPCR chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hui; Yu, Daoyong; Ge, Baosheng; Cook, Brian; Xu, Zhinan; Zhang, Shuguang

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to a class of integral membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are responsible for transmitting signals from the extracellular environment. However, the structural changes in the receptor, connecting ligand binding to G-protein activation, remain elusive for most GPCRs due to the difficulty to produce them for structural and functional studies. We here report high-level production in E.coli of 4 human GPCRs, namely chemokine receptors (hCRs) CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 that are directly involved in HIV-1 infection, asthma and cancer metastasis. The synthetic genes of CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 were synthesized using a two-step assembly/amplification PCR method and inserted into two different kinds of expression systems. After systematic screening of growth conditions and host strains, TB medium was selected for expression of pEXP-hCRs. The low copy number pBAD-DEST49 plasmid, with a moderately strong promoter tightly regulated by L-arabinose, proved helpful for reducing toxicity of expressed membrane proteins. The synthetic Trx-hCR fusion genes in the pBAD-DEST49 vector were expressed at high levels in the Top10 strain. After a systematic screen of 96 detergents, the zwitterionic detergents of the Fos-choline series (FC9-FC16) emerged as the most effective for isolation of the hCRs. The FC14 was selected both for solubilization from bacterial lysates and for stabilization of the Trx-hCRs during purification. Thus, the FC-14 solubilized Trx-hCRs could be purified using size exclusion chromatography as monomers and dimers with the correct apparent MW and their alpha-helical content determined by circular dichroism. The identity of two of the expressed hCRs (CCR3 and CCR5) was confirmed using immunoblots using specific monoclonal antibodies. After optimization of expression systems and detergent-mediated purification procedures, we achieved large-scale, high-level production of 4 human GPCR chemokine receptor in a two

  1. High-Level Production, Solubilization and Purification of Synthetic Human GPCR Chemokine Receptors CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hui; Yu, Daoyong; Ge, Baosheng; Cook, Brian; Xu, Zhinan; Zhang, Shuguang

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to a class of integral membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are responsible for transmitting signals from the extracellular environment. However, the structural changes in the receptor, connecting ligand binding to G-protein activation, remain elusive for most GPCRs due to the difficulty to produce them for structural and functional studies. We here report high-level production in E.coli of 4 human GPCRs, namely chemokine receptors (hCRs) CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 that are directly involved in HIV-1 infection, asthma and cancer metastasis. The synthetic genes of CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 were synthesized using a two-step assembly/amplification PCR method and inserted into two different kinds of expression systems. After systematic screening of growth conditions and host strains, TB medium was selected for expression of pEXP-hCRs. The low copy number pBAD-DEST49 plasmid, with a moderately strong promoter tightly regulated by L-arabinose, proved helpful for reducing toxicity of expressed membrane proteins. The synthetic Trx-hCR fusion genes in the pBAD-DEST49 vector were expressed at high levels in the Top10 strain. After a systematic screen of 96 detergents, the zwitterionic detergents of the Fos-choline series (FC9-FC16) emerged as the most effective for isolation of the hCRs. The FC14 was selected both for solubilization from bacterial lysates and for stabilization of the Trx-hCRs during purification. Thus, the FC-14 solubilized Trx-hCRs could be purified using size exclusion chromatography as monomers and dimers with the correct apparent MW and their alpha-helical content determined by circular dichroism. The identity of two of the expressed hCRs (CCR3 and CCR5) was confirmed using immunoblots using specific monoclonal antibodies. After optimization of expression systems and detergent-mediated purification procedures, we achieved large-scale, high-level production of 4 human GPCR chemokine receptor in a two

  2. Use of G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled CCR5 receptors by CCR5 inhibitor-resistant and -sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berro, Reem; Yasmeen, Anila; Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Abi-Habib, Sarya; Grunbeck, Amy; Lascano, Danny; Goddard, William A; Klasse, Per Johan; Sakmar, Thomas P; Moore, John P

    2013-06-01

    Small-molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as vicriviroc (VVC) and maraviroc (MVC) are allosteric modulators that impair HIV-1 entry by stabilizing a CCR5 conformation that the virus recognizes inefficiently. Viruses resistant to these compounds are able to bind the inhibitor-CCR5 complex while also interacting with the free coreceptor. CCR5 also interacts intracellularly with G proteins, as part of its signal transduction functions, and this process alters its conformation. Here we investigated whether the action of VVC against inhibitor-sensitive and -resistant viruses is affected by whether or not CCR5 is coupled to G proteins such as Gαi. Treating CD4(+) T cells with pertussis toxin to uncouple the Gαi subunit from CCR5 increased the potency of VVC against the sensitive viruses and revealed that VVC-resistant viruses use the inhibitor-bound form of Gαi-coupled CCR5 more efficiently than they use uncoupled CCR5. Supportive evidence was obtained by expressing a signaling-deficient CCR5 mutant with an impaired ability to bind to G proteins, as well as two constitutively active mutants that activate G proteins in the absence of external stimuli. The implication of these various studies is that the association of intracellular domains of CCR5 with the signaling machinery affects the conformation of the external and transmembrane domains and how they interact with small-molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry.

  3. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist promotes M1 microglia biased cytokines and chemokines following human traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri Lh; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) has demonstrated efficacy in a wide range of animal models of neuronal injury. We have previously published a randomised controlled study of IL1ra in human severe TBI, with concomitant microdialysis and plasma sampling of 42 cytokines and chemokines. In this study, we have used partial least squares discriminant analysis to model the effects of drug administration and time following injury on the cytokine milieu within the injured brain. We demonstrate that treatment with rhIL1ra causes a brain-specific modification of the cytokine and chemokine response to injury, particularly in samples from the first 48 h following injury. The magnitude of this response is dependent on the concentration of IL1ra achieved in the brain extracellular space. Chemokines related to recruitment of macrophages from the plasma compartment (MCP-1) and biasing towards a M1 microglial phenotype (GM-CSF, IL1) are increased in patient samples in the rhIL1ra-treated patients. In control patients, cytokines and chemokines biased to a M2 microglia phenotype (IL4, IL10, MDC) are relatively increased. This pattern of response suggests that a simple classification of IL1ra as an 'anti-inflammatory' cytokine may not be appropriate and highlights the importance of the microglial response to injury.

  4. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment....... A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb...... antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed human blood samples from 30 volunteer donors using multiparameter flow cytometry, and identified a subgroup of B cells producing CXCL10 in response to in vitro stimulation with antigens. T cells did not produce CXCL10, but CXCL10 production by B cells...

  5. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  6. Angiogenic peptide (AG)-30/5C activates human keratinocytes to produce cytokines/chemokines and to migrate and proliferate via MrgX receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatsurayanon, Chanisa; Niyonsaba, François; Chieosilapatham, Panjit; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2016-09-01

    In addition to their antimicrobial activities, antimicrobial peptides, also known as host defense peptides (HDPs) activate keratinocytes; promote wound healing; and improve the skin barrier. AG-30/5C is a novel angiogenic HDP that activates various functions of fibroblasts and endothelial cells, including cytokine/chemokine production and wound healing. To investigate whether AG-30/5C activates human keratinocytes and to examine the underlying mechanisms. Production of cytokines/chemokines was assessed by ELISA. Expression of Mas-related G-protein coupled receptors X (MrgXs) in keratinocytes was determined by real-time PCR and Western blot. MAPK and NF-κB activation was analysed by Western blot. Cell migration was assessed by chemotaxis microchamber and in vitro wound closure assay, whereas cell proliferation was analysed using an XTT assay. We found that AG-30/5C was more efficient than its parent peptide AG-30 in increasing the production of various cytokines/chemokines and promoting keratinocyte migration and proliferation. Furthermore, MrgX3 and MrgX4 receptors were constitutively expressed in keratinocytes at higher levels than MrgX1 and MrgX2, and were up-regulated upon stimulation with TLR ligands. Because MrgX3 and MrgX4 siRNAs suppressed AG-30/5C-mediated cytokine/chemokine production, keratinocyte migration and proliferation, we propose that AG-30/5C utilizes these MrgXs to stimulate keratinocytes. In addition, AG-30/5C-induced activation of keratinocytes was controlled by MAPK and NF-κB pathways, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of ERK-, JNK-, p38- and NF-κB-specific inhibitors. Indeed, we confirmed that AG-30/5C enhanced phosphorylation of MAPKs and IκB. Our findings provide novel evidence that AG-30/5C may be a useful therapeutic agent for wound healing by activating human keratinocytes. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Emerging Mutational Landscape of G-proteins and G-protein Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Vázquez-Prado, José; Kufareva, Irina; Stawiski, Eric W.; Handel, Tracy M.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression and activity of G proteins and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently associated with tumorigenesis. Deep sequencing studies show that 4.2% of tumors carry activating mutations in GNAS (encoding Gαs), and that oncogenic activating mutants in genes encoding Gαq family members (GNAQ or GNA11) are present in ~66% and ~6% of melanomas arising in the eye and skin, respectively. Furthermore, nearly 20% of human tumors harbor mutations in GPCRs. Many human cancer-asso...

  8. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Billard

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3 is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis.

  9. Chemokines after human ischemic stroke: From neurovascular unit to blood using protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa García-Berrocoso

    2014-06-01

    From our study, we can conclude that these chemokines do not perform a clear role of outcome biomarkers. Further studies are necessary to assess which mechanisms underlie the association of chemokines with the neurological state at distinct time points since the differences found here could be reflecting the dual role of chemokines in neuroinflammation.

  10. Cutting Edge: Activity of Human Adult Microglia in Response to CC Chemokine Ligand 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ineke M.; Hulshof, Sandra; Van Der Valk, Paul; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Biber, Knut

    2004-01-01

    The approximately 50 known chemokines are classified in distinct subfamilies: CXC, CC, CX3C, and C. Although the signaling of chemokines often is promiscuous, signaling events between members of these distinct chemokine classes are hardly observed. The only known exception so far is the murine CC ch

  11. Chemokine-Targeted Mouse Models of Human Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J.; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired sub-cutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening. PMID:26006007

  12. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V.; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel , Tracy M. (Vertex Pharm); (Leiden-MC); (USC); (BMS); (UCSD)

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  13. Human rhinovirus induced cytokine/chemokine responses in human airway epithelial and immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Rajan

    Full Text Available Infections with human rhinovirus (HRV are commonly associated with acute upper and lower respiratory tract disease and asthma exacerbations. The role that HRVs play in these diseases suggests it is important to understand host-specific or virus-specific factors that contribute to pathogenesis. Since species A HRVs are often associated with more serious HRV disease than species B HRVs, differences in immune responses they induce should inform disease pathogenesis. To identify species differences in induced responses, we evaluated 3 species A viruses, HRV 25, 31 and 36 and 3 species B viruses, HRV 4, 35 and 48 by exposing human PBMCs to HRV infected Calu-3 cells. To evaluate the potential effect of memory induced by previous HRV infection on study responses, we tested cord blood mononuclear cells that should be HRV naïve. There were HRV-associated increases (significant increase compared to mock-infected cells for one or more HRVs for IP-10 and IL-15 that was unaffected by addition of PBMCs, for MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IFN-α, and HGF only with addition of PBMCs, and for ENA-78 only without addition of PBMCs. All three species B HRVs induced higher levels, compared to A HRVs, of MIP-1α and MIP-1β with PBMCs and ENA-78 without PBMCs. In contrast, addition of CBMCs had less effect and did not induce MIP-1α, MIP-1β, or IFN-α nor block ENA-78 production. Addition of CBMCs did, however, increase IP-10 levels for HRV 35 and HRV 36 infection. The presence of an effect with PBMCs and no effect with CBMCs for some responses suggest differences between the two types of cells possibly because of the presence of HRV memory responses in PBMCs and not CBMCs or limited response capacity for the immature CBMCs relative to PBMCs. Thus, our results indicate that different HRV strains can induce different patterns of cytokines and chemokines; some of these differences may be due to differences in memory responses induced by past HRV infections, and other differences

  14. Induction of Chemokine Secretion and Monocyte Migration by Human Choroidal Melanocytes in Response to Proinflammatory Cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehs, Tina; Faber, Carsten; Udsen, Maja S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine to which extent inflammatory cytokines affect chemokine secretion by primary human choroidal melanocytes (HCMs), their capacity to attract monocytes, and whether HCMs are able to influence the proliferation of activated T cells. Methods: Primary cultures of HCMs were...... established from eyes of 13 donors. Human choroidal melanocytes were stimulated with IFN-γ and TNF-α or with supernatant from activated T cells (T-cell–conditioned media [TCM]). Gene expression analysis was performed by using microarrays. Protein levels were quantified with ELISA or cytometric bead array....... Supernatants of HCMs were assessed for the capability to attract monocytes in a transwell plate. Proliferation of activated T cells was assessed in a direct coculture with HCMs by a [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Results: Stimulation of HCMs with TCM or IFN-γ and TNF-α resulted in increased expression...

  15. Detection and localization of Mip-3alpha/LARC/Exodus, a macrophage proinflammatory chemokine, and its CCR6 receptor in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, J; Kusama, T; Rossi, D L; Ishiwata, T; Maruyama, H; Friess, H; Büchler, M W; Zlotnik, A; Korc, M

    1999-05-17

    Macrophage Proinflammatory Human Chemokine-3alpha (Mip-3alpha/LARC/Exodus) belongs to a large family of chemotactic cytokines, which participate in directing inflammatory cell migration and in modulating angiogenesis. Mip-3alpha signals through a recently identified G-protein linked 7-transmembrane receptor, CCR6. In this study, we have characterized the expression of Mip-3alpha and CCR6 in 12 normal and 16 cancerous human pancreatic tissues and in 4 cultured pancreatic cancer cell lines, and assessed the effects of Mip-3alpha on growth and invasion of these cell lines. Pancreatic cancer tissues markedly overexpressed Mip-3alpha in comparison with normal pancreatic samples. By in situ hybridization Mip-3alpha and CCR6 mRNA moieties were present in cancer cells within the tumors. In addition, Mip-3alpha was abundant in the macrophages infiltrating the tumor mass. Mip-3alpha and its receptor CCR6 were expressed in all 4 tested pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mip-3alpha stimulated the growth of one cell line, enhanced the migration of another cell line, and was without effect in the other 2 cell lines. Together, our findings suggest that Mip-3alpha has the potential to act via autocrine and paracrine mechanisms to contribute to the pathobiology of human pancreatic cancer.

  16. Human labour is associated with a decline in myometrial chemokine receptor expression: the role of prostaglandins, oxytocin and cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Renyi; Pease, James E; Cheng, Weiwei; Sooranna, Suren R; Viney, Jonathan M; Nelson, Scott M; Myatt, Les; Bennett, Philip R; Johnson, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    Human labour is an inflammatory process with a heavy infiltration of immune cells into the myometrium and cervix induced by local chemokine production. Myometrial cells also express chemokine receptors, but there is little information about their behaviour or function during pregnancy and labour. We studied the behaviour of the receptors (CCR2, CXCR1 and CXCR2) for the CCL2 and CXCL8 in human myometrium, because both have been shown to be important in labour. We found that there was a significant decline in the mRNA expression of all three receptors in the upper segment and a similar trend in the lower segment with the onset of term labour (TL). Chemokine receptor mRNA expression was increased by stretch, reduced by oxytocin and PGF(2α) acting via phospholipase C (PLC). CXCR2 declined with exposure to CXCL8, consistent with the negative relationship observed in labouring myometrial tissue. The mRNA changes were confirmed by western analysis and flow cytometry. These data show that myometrial chemokine receptor expression is reduced with the onset of term labour probably in response to the increased activity of chemokines, oxytocin and PGF(2α) . © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Regulation of human natural killer cell migration and proliferation by the exodus subfamily of CC chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, M J; Williams, B T; Christopherson, K; Brahmi, Z; Hromas, R

    2000-01-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to obligate intracellular pathogens. Nevertheless, the regulation of NK cell trafficking and migration to inflammatory sites is poorly understood. Exodus-1/MIP-3alpha/LARC, Exodus-2/6Ckine/SLC, and Exodus-3/MIP-3beta/ELC/CKbeta-11 are CC chemokines that share a unique aspartate-cysteine-cysteine-leucine motif near their amino terminus and preferentially stimulate the migration of T lymphocytes. The effects of Exodus chemokines on human NK cells were examined. Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce detectable chemotaxis of resting peripheral blood NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-2 and -3 stimulated migration of polyclonal activated peripheral blood NK cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Exodus-2 and -3 also induced dose-dependent chemotaxis of NKL, an IL-2-dependent human NK cell line. Results of modified checkerboard assays indicate that migration of NKL cells in response to Exodus-2 and -3 represents true chemotaxis and not simply chemokinesis. Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not induce NK cell proliferation in the absence of other stimuli. Nevertheless, Exodus-2 and -3 significantly augmented IL-2-induced proliferation of normal human CD56(dim) NK cells. In contrast, Exodus-1, -2, and -3 did not affect the cytolytic activity of resting or activated peripheral blood NK cells. Expression of message for CCR7, a shared receptor for Exodus-2 and -3, was detected in activated polyclonal NK cells and NKL cells but not resting NK cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Exodus-2 and -3 can participate in the recruitment and proliferation of activated NK cells. Exodus-2 and -3 may regulate interactions between T cells and NK cells that are crucial for the generation of optimal immune responses.

  18. Identification of a human CD8+ regulatory T cell subset that mediates suppression through the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, S.A.; Meijgaarden, K.E. van; Savage, N.D.; Boer, T. de; Triebel, F.; Wal, A. van der; Heer, E. de; Klein, M.R.; Geluk, A.; Ottenhoff, T.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) comprise multiple subsets and are important in controlling immunity and inflammation. However, the induction and mode of action of the various distinct Treg subsets remain ill defined, particularly in humans. Here, we describe a human CD8+ lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-

  19. Structure and Function of CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 Homologues Derived from Representative Primate Species and Subspecies of the Taxonomic Suborders Prosimii and Anthropoidea

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A chemokine receptor from the seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily is an essential coreceptor for the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains. To investigate nonhuman primate CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) homologue structure and function, we amplified CCR5 DNA sequences from peripheral blood cells obtained from 24 representative species and subspecies of the primate suborders Prosimii (family L...

  20. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  1. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  2. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    the receptors currently assigned to family C. However, our results strongly indicate that RAIG1 and GPRC5B form a new subgroup of family C characterized by short ATDs. GPRC5B mRNA is widely expressed in peripheral and central tissues with highest abundance in kidney, pancreas, and testis. This mRNA expression...... from an expressed sequence tag clone that contained the entire open reading frame of the transcript encoding a protein of 395 amino acids. Analysis of the protein sequence reveal that GPRC5B contains a signal peptide and seven transmembrane alpha-helices, which is a hallmark of G......-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPRC5B displays homology to retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RAIG1, 33% sequence identity) and to several family C (mGluR-like) GPCRs (20-25% sequence identity). Both RAIG1 and GPRC5B have short extracellular amino-terminal domains (ATDs) that contrast the very long ATDs characterizing...

  3. Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability Is Affected by the Chemokine CXCL10 in Both Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolf Segers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The chemokine CXCL10 is specifically upregulated during experimental development of plaque with an unstable phenotype. In this study we evaluated the functional consequences of these findings in mice and humans. Methods and Results. In ApoE-/- mice, we induced unstable plaque with using a flow-altering device around the carotid artery. From week 1 to 4, mice were injected with a neutralizing CXCL10 antibody. After 9 weeks, CXCL10 inhibition resulted in a more stable plaque phenotype: collagen increased by 58% (P=0.002, smooth muscle cell content increased 2-fold (P=0.03, while macrophage MHC class II expression decreased by 50% (P=0.005. Also, the size of necrotic cores decreased by 41% (P=0.01. In 106 human carotid endarterectomy specimens we found that increasing concentrations of CXCL10 strongly associate with an increase in atheromatous plaque phenotype (ANOVA, P=0.003, with high macrophage, low smooth muscle cell, and low collagen content. Conclusions. In the present study we showed that CXCL10 is associated with the development of vulnerable plaque in human and mice. We conclude that CXCL10 might provide a new lead towards plaque-stabilizing therapy.

  4. G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type calcium channels by regulators of G protein signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Wittemann, S; Herlitze, S

    2000-10-01

    1. Fast synaptic transmission is triggered by the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels which can be inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which are responsible for >100-fold increases in the GTPase activity of G proteins and might be involved in the regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels. In this study we investigated the effects of RGS2 on G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type channels expressed in a human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell line using whole-cell recordings. 2. RGS2 markedly accelerates transmitter-mediated inhibition and recovery from inhibition of Ba2+ currents (IBa) through P/Q-type channels heterologously expressed with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (mAChR M2). 3. Both RGS2 and RGS4 modulate the prepulse facilitation properties of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. G protein reinhibition is accelerated, while release from inhibition is slowed. These kinetics depend on the availability of G protein alpha and betagamma subunits which is altered by RGS proteins. 4. RGS proteins unmask the Ca2+ channel beta subunit modulation of Ca2+ channel G protein inhibition. In the presence of RGS2, P/Q-type channels containing the beta2a and beta3 subunits reveal significantly altered kinetics of G protein modulation and increased facilitation compared to Ca2+ channels coexpressed with the beta1b or beta4 subunit.

  5. Differential requirements of arrestin-3 and clathrin for ligand-dependent and -independent internalization of human G protein-coupled receptor 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing; Wu, Chun; Chen, Xiaopan; Li, Xiangmei; Ying, Guoyuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Li, Guo; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Guozheng; Zhou, Naiming

    2014-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is believed to be an attractive target to enhance insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes. GPR40 has been found to couple to Gq protein, leading to the activation of phospholipase C and subsequent increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) level. However, the underlying mechanisms that regulate the internalization and desensitization of GPR40 remain to be elucidated. In the present study, a construct of GPR40 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its C-terminus was constructed for direct imaging of the localization and internalization of GPR40 by confocal microscopy. In stably transfected HEK-293 cells, GPR40 receptors underwent rapid agonist-induced internalization and constitutive ligand-independent internalization. Our data demonstrated that the agonist-mediated internalization of GPR40 was significantly blocked by hypertonic sucrose treatment and by siRNA mediated depletion of the heavy chain of clathrin. In contrast, constitutive GPR40 internalization was not affected by hypertonic sucrose or by knock-down of clathrin expression, but it was affected by treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and nystatin. Furthermore, our results using an arrestin-3-EGFP redistribution assay and siRNA-mediated knock-down of arrestin-3 and GRK2 expression revealed that arrestin-3 and GRK2 play an essential role in the regulation of agonist-mediated GPR40 internalization, but are not involved in the regulation of constitutive GPR40 internalization. Additionally, our observation showed that upon activation by agonist, the internalized GPR40 receptors were rapidly recycled back to the plasma membrane via Rab4/Rab5 positive endosomes, whereas the constitutively internalized GPR40 receptors were recycled back to the cell surface through Rab5 positive endosomes. Because FFA receptors exhibit a high level of homology, our observations could be applicable to other members of this family.

  6. Principal component analysis of the cytokine and chemokine response to human traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Helmy

    Full Text Available There is a growing realisation that neuro-inflammation plays a fundamental role in the pathology of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. This has led to the search for biomarkers that reflect these underlying inflammatory processes using techniques such as cerebral microdialysis. The interpretation of such biomarker data has been limited by the statistical methods used. When analysing data of this sort the multiple putative interactions between mediators need to be considered as well as the timing of production and high degree of statistical co-variance in levels of these mediators. Here we present a cytokine and chemokine dataset from human brain following human traumatic brain injury and use principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis to demonstrate the pattern of production following TBI, distinct phases of the humoral inflammatory response and the differing patterns of response in brain and in peripheral blood. This technique has the added advantage of making no assumptions about the Relative Recovery (RR of microdialysis derived parameters. Taken together these techniques can be used in complex microdialysis datasets to summarise the data succinctly and generate hypotheses for future study.

  7. i-bodies, Human Single Domain Antibodies That Antagonize Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Katherine; Dolezal, Olan; Cao, Benjamin; Nilsson, Susan K; See, Heng B; Pfleger, Kevin D G; Roche, Michael; Gorry, Paul R; Pow, Andrew; Viduka, Katerina; Lim, Kevin; Lu, Bernadine G C; Chang, Denison H C; Murray-Rust, Thomas; Kvansakul, Marc; Perugini, Matthew A; Dogovski, Con; Doerflinger, Marcel; Zhang, Yuan; Parisi, Kathy; Casey, Joanne L; Nuttall, Stewart D; Foley, Michael

    2016-06-10

    CXCR4 is a G protein-coupled receptor with excellent potential as a therapeutic target for a range of clinical conditions, including stem cell mobilization, cancer prognosis and treatment, fibrosis therapy, and HIV infection. We report here the development of a fully human single-domain antibody-like scaffold termed an "i-body," the engineering of which produces an i-body library possessing a long complementarity determining region binding loop, and the isolation and characterization of a panel of i-bodies with activity against human CXCR4. The CXCR4-specific i-bodies show antagonistic activity in a range of in vitro and in vivo assays, including inhibition of HIV infection, cell migration, and leukocyte recruitment but, importantly, not the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. Epitope mapping of the three CXCR4 i-bodies AM3-114, AM4-272, and AM3-523 revealed binding deep in the binding pocket of the receptor.

  8. Chemokine Ligand 20: A Signal for Leukocyte Recruitment During Human Ovulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alem, Linah; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Rosewell, Kathy; Brännström, Mats; Akin, James; Boldt, Jeffrey; Muse, Ken; Curry, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Ovulation is one of the cornerstones of female fertility. Disruption of the ovulatory process results in infertility, which affects approximately 10% of couples. Using a unique model in which the dominant follicle is collected across the periovulatory period in women, we have identified a leukocyte chemoattractant, chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20), in the human ovary. CCL20 mRNA is massively induced after an in vivo human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulus in granulosa (>10 000-fold) and theca (>4000-fold) cells collected during the early ovulatory (12-18 h) and late ovulatory (18-34 h) periods after hCG administration. Because the LH surge sets in motion an inflammatory reaction characterized by an influx of leukocytes and CCL20 is known to recruit leukocytes in other systems, the composition of ovarian leukocytes (CD45+) containing the CCL20 receptor CCR6 was determined immediately prior to ovulation. CD45+/CCR6+ cells were primarily natural killer cells (41%) along with B cells (12%), T cells (11%), neutrophils (10%), and monocytes (9%). Importantly, exogenous CCL20 stimulated ovarian leukocyte migration 59% within 90 minutes. Due to the difficulties in obtaining human follicles, an in vitro model was developed using granulosa-lutein cells to explore CCL20 regulation. CCL20 expression increased 40-fold within 6 hours after hCG, was regulated partially by the epithelial growth factor pathway, and was positively correlated with progesterone production. These results demonstrate that hCG dramatically increases CCL20 expression in the human ovary, that ovarian leukocytes contain the CCL20 receptor, and that CCL20 stimulates leukocyte migration. Our findings raise the prospect that CCL20 may aid in the final ovulatory events and contribute to fertility in women.

  9. Neutrophil recruitment by human IL-17 via C-X-C chemokine release in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, M; Cui, Z H; Hoshino, H; Lötvall, J; Sjöstrand, M; Gruenert, D C; Skoogh, B E; Lindén, A

    1999-02-15

    IL-17 is a recently discovered cytokine that can be released from activated human CD4+ T lymphocytes. This study assessed the proinflammatory effects of human (h) IL-17 in the airways. In vitro, hIL-17 increased the release of IL-8 in human bronchial epithelial and venous endothelial cells, in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. This effect of hIL-17 was inhibited by cotreatment with an anti-hIL-17 Ab and was potentiated by hTNF-alpha. In addition, hIL-17 increased the expression of hIL-8 mRNA in bronchial epithelial cells. Conditioned medium from hIL-17-treated bronchial epithelial cells increased human neutrophil migration in vitro. This effect was blocked by an anti-hIL-8 Ab. In vivo, intratracheal instillation of hIL-17 selectively recruited neutrophils into rat airways. This recruitment of neutrophils into the airways was inhibited by an anti-hIL-17 Ab and accompanied by increased levels of rat macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (rMIP-2) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The BAL neutrophilia was also blocked by an anti-rMIP-2 Ab. The effect of hIL-17 on the release of hIL-8 and rMIP-2 was also inhibited by glucocorticoids, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. These data demonstrate that hIL-17 can specifically and selectively recruit neutrophils into the airways via the release of C-X-C chemokines from bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a novel mechanism linking the activation of T-lymphocytes to recruitment of neutrophils into the airways.

  10. Human C-C chemokine receptor 3 monoclonal antibody inhibits pulmonary inflammation in allergic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Wen LI; Hua-qiong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of C-C chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) blockade on pulmonary inflammation and mucus production in allergic mice. Methods:We used the synthetic peptide of the CCR3 NH2-terminal as the immunizing antigen and generated murine monoclonal antibody against the human CCR3. In addition,the generated antibody was administered to mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. The inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage,cytokine levels,pulmonary histopathology,and mucus secretion were examined. Results:The Western blotting analysis indicated that the generated antibody bound to CCR3 specifically. The allergic mice treated with the antihuman CCR3 antibody exhibited a significant reduction of pulmonary inflammation accompanied with the alteration of cytokine. Conclusion:The antibody we generated was specific to CCR3. The inhibition of airway inflammation and mucus overproduction by the antibody suggested that the blockade of CCR3 is an appealing therapeutical target for asthma. The present research may provide an experimental basis for the further study of this agent.

  11. Comprehensive models of human primary and metastatic colorectal tumors in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice by chemokine targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired subcutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening.

  12. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Innate recognition is essential in the antiviral response against infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Chemokines are important for control of HSV via recruitment of natural killer cells, T lymphocytes, and antigen-presenting cells. We previously found that early HSV-1......-mediated chemokine responses are not dependent on TLR2 and TLR9 in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the role of the recently identified innate IFN-inducible DNA receptor IFI16 during HSV-1 infection in human macrophages. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were purified from buffy coats...... and monocytes were differentiated to macrophages. Macrophages infected with HSV-1 were analyzed using siRNA-mediated knock-down of IFI16 by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. RESULTS: We determined that both CXCL10 and CCL3 are induced independent of HSV-1 replication. IFI16 mediates CCL3 m...

  13. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye

    2017-01-01

    -expressed and functional. By analyses of chimeric human/mouse and human/bonobo receptors, bonobo receptor mutants, and the single nucleotide polymorphism database at NCBI, we identify an insertion/deletion variation in the third intracellular loop responsible for the intracellular retention and lack of function...... of the human ortholog. Genetic analyses of the 1000 genome database and the Inter99 cohort of 6,000 Danes establish the distribution of genotypes among ethnic groups, showing that the cell surface-expressed and functional variant is much more prevalent in the African population than in European and Asian...... populations and that this variant is partly linked with a stop codon early in the receptor sequence (rs6907580, amino acid position 57). In conclusion, our data solve a more than decade-old question of why the cloned human GPRC6A receptor is not cell surface-expressed and functional and provide a genetic...

  14. The human angiotensin AT(1) receptor supports G protein-independent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Aplin, Mark; Hansen, Jonas Tind;

    2008-01-01

    The angiotensin AT(1) receptor is a key regulator of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis, and it plays a key role in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia. The importance of human angiotensi...... by the human angiotensin AT(1) receptor has clear pharmacological implications for development of drugs with pathway-specific actions and defined biological outcomes....

  15. Competing G protein-coupled receptor kinases balance G protein and β-arrestin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Domitille; Durand, Guillaume; Gallay, Nathalie; Rizk, Aurélien; Ahn, Seungkirl; Kim, Jihee; Violin, Jonathan D; Dupuy, Laurence; Gauthier, Christophe; Piketty, Vincent; Crépieux, Pascale; Poupon, Anne; Clément, Frédérique; Fages, François; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Reiter, Eric

    2012-06-26

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are involved in nearly all aspects of chemical communications and represent major drug targets. 7TMRs transmit their signals not only via heterotrimeric G proteins but also through β-arrestins, whose recruitment to the activated receptor is regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this paper, we combined experimental approaches with computational modeling to decipher the molecular mechanisms as well as the hidden dynamics governing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by the angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT(1A)R) in human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. We built an abstracted ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based model that captured the available knowledge and experimental data. We inferred the unknown parameters by simultaneously fitting experimental data generated in both control and perturbed conditions. We demonstrate that, in addition to its well-established function in the desensitization of G-protein activation, GRK2 exerts a strong negative effect on β-arrestin-dependent signaling through its competition with GRK5 and 6 for receptor phosphorylation. Importantly, we experimentally confirmed the validity of this novel GRK2-dependent mechanism in both primary vascular smooth muscle cells naturally expressing the AT(1A)R, and HEK293 cells expressing other 7TMRs.

  16. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Philippe; Bénureau, Yann; Staropoli, Isabelle; Wang, Yongjin; Gonzalez, Nuria; Alcami, Jose; Hartley, Oliver; Brelot, Anne; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2013-06-04

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp120, making chemokines weaker inhibitors of HIV infection than would be expected from their binding affinity constants for CCR5. These distinct CCR5 conformations rely on CCR5 coupling to nucleotide-free G proteins ((NF)G proteins). Whereas native CCR5 chemokines bind with subnanomolar affinity to (NF)G protein-coupled CCR5, gp120/HIV-1 does not discriminate between (NF)G protein-coupled and uncoupled CCR5. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of chemokines is G protein independent, suggesting that "low-chemokine affinity" (NF)G protein-uncoupled conformations of CCR5 represent a portal for viral entry. Furthermore, chemokines are weak inducers of CCR5 endocytosis, as is revealed by EC50 values for chemokine-mediated endocytosis reflecting their low-affinity constant value for (NF)G protein-uncoupled CCR5. Abolishing CCR5 interaction with (NF)G proteins eliminates high-affinity binding of CCR5 chemokines but preserves receptor endocytosis, indicating that chemokines preferentially endocytose low-affinity receptors. Finally, we evidenced that chemokine analogs achieve highly potent HIV-1 inhibition due to high-affinity interactions with internalizing and/or gp120-binding receptors. These data are consistent with HIV-1 evading chemokine inhibition by exploiting CCR5 conformational heterogeneity, shed light into the inhibitory mechanisms of anti-HIV-1 chemokine analogs, and provide insights for the development of unique anti-HIV molecules.

  17. Neuropeptide Y and peptide YY inhibit lipolysis in human and dog fat cells through a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Valet, P; Berlan, M.; BEAUVILLE, M.; Crampes, F.; Montastruc, J L; Lafontan, M.

    1990-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) are regulatory peptides that have considerable sequence homology with pancreatic polypeptide. Because (a) NPY has been shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in peripheral as well as central catecholaminergic neurons, and (b) alpha 2-adrenergic receptors of adipocytes play a major role in the regulation of lipolysis, we investigated the effect of NPY and PYY on isolated fat cells. In human fat cells NPY and PYY promoted a dose-dependent inhibition...

  18. Neuropeptide Y and peptide YY inhibit lipolysis in human and dog fat cells through a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, P; Berlan, M; Beauville, M; Crampes, F; Montastruc, J L; Lafontan, M

    1990-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) are regulatory peptides that have considerable sequence homology with pancreatic polypeptide. Because (a) NPY has been shown to be colocalized with noradrenaline in peripheral as well as central catecholaminergic neurons, and (b) alpha 2-adrenergic receptors of adipocytes play a major role in the regulation of lipolysis, we investigated the effect of NPY and PYY on isolated fat cells. In human fat cells NPY and PYY promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of lipolysis elicited by 2 micrograms/ml adenosine deaminase (removal of adenosine) whatever the lipolytic index used (glycerol or nonesterified fatty acids). In dog fat cells NPY and PYY inhibited adenosine deaminase-, isoproterenol- and forskolin-induced lipolysis. In humans and dogs the effects of NPY or PYY were abolished by treatment of cells with Bordetella pertussis toxin, clearly indicating the involvement of a Gi protein in the antilipolytic effects. This study indicates that, in addition to alpha 2-adrenergic agonists, NPY and PYY are also involved in the regulation of lipolysis in human and dog adipose tissue as powerful antilipolytic agents. Further studies are needed to characterize the pharmacological nature of the receptor mediating the inhibitory effect of NPY and PYY in fat cells. Images PMID:2104880

  19. Inhibitory effects of two G protein-coupled receptor kinases on the cell surface expression and signaling of the human adrenomedullin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toshio [Noto Marine Laboratory, Division of Marine Environmental Studies, Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, 927-0553 (Japan); Nagata, Sayaka [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Jiang, Danfeng; Hayashi, Hidetaka [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Murakami, Manabu [Department of Pharmacology, Hirosaki University, Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, 036-8562 (Japan); Hattori, Yuichi [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, 930-0194 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, a family B GPCR) to form the type 1 adrenomedullin receptor (AM{sub 1} receptor). Here, we investigated the effects of the five non-visual GPCR kinases (GRKs 2 through 6) on the cell surface expression of the human (h)AM{sub 1} receptor by cotransfecting each of these GRKs into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed hRAMP2. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that when coexpressed with GRK4 or GRK5, the cell surface expression of the AM{sub 1} receptor was markedly decreased prior to stimulation with AM, thereby attenuating both the specific [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-induced cAMP production. These inhibitory effects of both GRKs were abolished by the replacement of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR with that of the calcitonin receptor (a family B GPCR) or β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (a family A GPCR). Among the sequentially truncated CLR C-tail mutants, those lacking the five residues 449–453 (Ser-Phe-Ser-Asn-Ser) abolished the inhibition of the cell surface expression of CLR via the overexpression of GRK4 or GRK5. Thus, we provided new insight into the function of GRKs in agonist-unstimulated GPCR trafficking using a recombinant AM{sub 1} receptor and further determined the region of the CLR C-tail responsible for this GRK function. - Highlights: • We discovered a novel function of GRKs in GPCR trafficking using human CLR/RAMP2. • GRKs 4 and 5 markedly inhibited the cell surface expression of human CLR/RAMP2. • Both GRKs exhibited highly significant receptor signaling inhibition. • Five residues of the C-terminal tail of CLR govern this function of GRKs.

  20. G Protein-Dependent CCR5 Signaling Is Not Required for Efficient Infection of Primary T Lymphocytes and Macrophages by R5 Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The requirement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced CCR5 activation for infection by R5 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) strains remains controversial. Ectopic CCR5 expression in CD4+-transformed cells or pharmacological inhibition of Gαi proteins coupled to CCR5 left unsolved whether CCR5-dependent cell activation is necessary for the HIV life cycle. In this study, we investigated the role played by HIV-induced CCR5-dependent cell signaling during infection of primary CD4-expressing leukocytes. ...

  1. Assignment of human G-protein-coupled inward rectifier K{sup +} channel homolog GIRK3 gene to chromosome 1q21-q23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesage, F.; Fink, M.; Barhanin, J. [CNRS, Valbonne (France)] [and others

    1995-10-10

    More than 20 genes that encode voltage-gated and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent K{sup +} channels have been identified. These channels are involved in a wide variety of biological functions such as neuronal and muscle excitability, hormone secretion, and osmotic regulation. Two voltage-gated K{sup +} channel genes, KCNA1 and HERG, have been related to neurological and cardiac inherited disorders in humans. Missense mutations in the KCNA1 gene lead to episodic ataxia/myokimia syndrome. Missense, splice donor, and deletion mutations in the HERG gene have been shown to cause long QT syndrome. These two channels belong to the superfamily of cationic channels, which share the characteristic structural features of six transmembrane domains and one segment (called 115) involved in pore formation. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Constitutively active signaling by the G protein βγ-subunit mediates intrinsically increased phosphodiesterase-4 activity in human asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hu

    Full Text Available Signaling by the Gβγ subunit of Gi protein, leading to downstream c-Src-induced activation of the Ras/c-Raf1/MEK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway and its upregulation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4 activity, was recently shown to mediate the heightened contractility in proasthmatic sensitized isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM, as well as allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in an in vivo animal model of allergic asthma. This study investigated whether cultured human ASM (HASM cells derived from asthmatic donor lungs exhibit constitutively increased PDE activity that is attributed to intrinsically upregulated Gβγ signaling coupled to c-Src activation of the Ras/MEK/ERK1/2 cascade. We show that, relative to normal cells, asthmatic HASM cells constitutively exhibit markedly increased intrinsic PDE4 activity coupled to heightened Gβγ-regulated phosphorylation of c-Src and ERK1/2, and direct co-localization of the latter with the PDE4D isoform. These signaling events and their induction of heightened PDE activity are acutely suppressed by treating asthmatic HASM cells with a Gβγ inhibitor. Importantly, along with increased Gβγ activation, asthmatic HASM cells also exhibit constitutively increased direct binding of the small Rap1 GTPase-activating protein, Rap1GAP, to the α-subunit of Gi protein, which serves to cooperatively facilitate Ras activation and, thereby, enable enhanced Gβγ-regulated ERK1/2-stimulated PDE activity. Collectively, these data are the first to identify that intrinsically increased signaling via the Gβγ subunit, facilitated by Rap1GAP recruitment to the α-subunit, mediates the constitutively increased PDE4 activity detected in asthmatic HASM cells. These new findings support the notion that interventions targeted at suppressing Gβγ signaling may lead to novel approaches to treat asthma.

  3. Propionibacterium acnes and lipopolysaccharide induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in human sebocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, István; Pivarcsi, Andor; Kis, Kornélia; Koreck, Andrea; Bodai, László; McDowell, Andrew; Seltmann, Holger; Patrick, Sheila; Zouboulis, Christos C; Kemény, Lajos

    2006-07-01

    Acne is a common skin disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. In addition to genetic, hormonal and environmental factors, abnormal colonization by Propionibacterium acnes has been implicated in the occurrence of acne via the induction of inflammatory mediators. To gain more insight into the role that sebocytes play in the innate immune response of the skin, particularly in acne, we compared the antimicrobial peptide and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression at mRNA and protein levels, as well as the viability and differentiation of SZ95 sebocytes in response to co-culture with representative isolates of P. acnes type IA and type IB as well as Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that, in vitro, P. acnes type IA and IB isolates and LPS induced human beta-defensin-2 and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression, and influenced sebocyte viability and differentiation. Our results provide evidence that sebocytes are capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and antimicrobial peptides, which may have a role in acne pathogenesis. Furthermore, since P. acnes types IA and IB differentially affect both the differentiation and viability of sebocytes, our data demonstrate that different strains of P. acnes vary in their capacity to stimulate an inflammatory response within the pilosebaceous follicle.

  4. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 mediates direct and indirect fibrotic responses in human and murine cultured fibrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekert Jason E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibrocytes are a population of circulating bone-marrow-derived cells that express surface markers for leukocytes and mesenchymal cells, and are capable of differentiating into myofibroblasts. They have been observed at sites of active fibrosis and increased circulating numbers correlate with mortality in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Inhibition of chemokine (C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 during experimental models of lung fibrosis reduces lung collagen deposition, as well as reducing lung fibrocyte accumulation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether human and mouse fibrocytes express functional CCR2. Results Following optimized and identical human and murine fibrocyte isolation, both cell sources were shown to be positive for CCR2 by flow cytometry and this expression colocalized with collagen I and CD45. Human blood fibrocytes stimulated with the CCR2 ligand chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2, demonstrated increased proliferation (P P P Conclusions This study directly compares the functional responses of human and murine fibrocytes to CCR2 ligands, and following comparable isolation techniques. We have shown comparable biological effects, strengthening the translatability of the murine models to human disease with respect to targeting the CCR2 axis to ameliorate disease in IPF patients.

  5. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of a synthetic peptide derived from the C-terminal region of human chemokine CCL13 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Ayala, Mayte; Domínguez-López, Mariana; Mendez-Enriquez, Erika; Portillo-Téllez, María Del Carmen; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    Chemokines are important mediators of immunological responses during inflammation and under steady-state conditions. In addition to regulating cell migration, some chemotactic cytokines have direct effects on bacteria. Here, we characterized the antibacterial ability of the synthetic oligopeptide CCL1357-75, which corresponds to the carboxyl-terminal region of the human chemokine CCL13. In vitro measurements indicated that CCL1357-75 disrupts the cell membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through a mechanism coupled to an unordered-helicoidal conformational transition. In a murine pneumonic model, CCL1357-75 improved mouse survival and bacterial clearance and decreased neutrophil recruitment, proinflammatory cytokines and lung pathology compared with that observed in untreated infected animals. Overall, our study supports the ability of chemokines and/or chemokine-derived oligopeptides to act as direct defense agents against pathogenic bacteria and suggests their potential use as alternative antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemokine regulation in response to beryllium exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Pardington, Paige E; Cary, Robert B; Sauer, Nancy N; Gupta, Goutam

    2006-02-01

    Exposure to beryllium (Be) induces a delayed-type hypersensitivity immune reaction in the lungs of susceptible individuals, which leads to the onset of Be sensitivity and Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). Although some mechanistic aspects of CBD have begun to be characterized, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Be activates the host immune response. To gain insight into the cellular response to Be exposure, we have performed global microarray analysis using a mixture of peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells (PBMC/DCs) from a non-CBD source to identify genes that are specifically upregulated in response to BeSO(4) stimulation, compared to a control metal salt, Al(2)(SO(4))(3). We identified a number of upregulated immunomodulatory genes, including several chemokines in the MIP-1 and GRO families. Using PBMC/DCs from three different donors, we demonstrate that BeSO(4) stimulation generally exhibits an increased rate of both chemokine mRNA transcription and release compared to Al(2)(SO(4))(3) exposure, although variations among the individual donors do exist. We show that MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta neutralizing antibodies can partially inhibit the ability of BeSO(4) to stimulate cell migration of PBMC/DCs in vitro. Finally, incubation of PBMC/DCs with BeSO(4) altered the binding of the transcription factor RUNX to the MIP-1 alpha promoter consensus sequence, indicating that Be can regulate chemokine gene activation. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which Be stimulation of PBMC/DCs can modulate the expression and release of different chemokines, leading to the migration of lymphocytes to the lung and the formation of a localized environment for development of Be disease in susceptible individuals.

  7. The probiotic mixture VSL#3 dampens LPS-induced chemokine expression in human dendritic cells by inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Mariman

    Full Text Available VSL#3, a mixture of 8 different probiotic bacteria, has successfully been used in the clinic to treat Ulcerative Colitis. We previously identified the modulation of chemokines as a major mechanism in the protective effect of the VSL#3 in a mouse model of colitis. This was supported by in vitro studies that implicated a role for VSL#3 in the suppression of LPS-induced chemokine production by mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC. Herein, we validated these findings employing human monocyte-derived DC. Stimulation of human DC with LPS, VSL#3, or a combination of both resulted in their maturation, evident from enhanced expression of activation markers on the cell-surface, as well as the induction of various chemokines and cytokines. Interestingly, a set of LPS-induced chemokines was identified that were suppressed by VSL#3. These included CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL2, CCL7, and CCL8. In silico approaches identified STAT-1 as a dominant regulator of these chemokines, and this was confirmed by demonstrating that LPS-induced phosphorylation of this transcription factor was inhibited by VSL#3. This indicates that VSL#3 may contribute to the control of inflammation by selective suppression of STAT-1 induced chemokines.

  8. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  9. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bar-Shavit

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics.

  10. The hematopoietic chemokine CXCL12 promotes integration of human endothelial colony forming cell-derived cells into immature vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Sarah E; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Khoo, Cheen P; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Camicia, Rosalba; Zhang, Youyi; Grabowska, Rita; Harris, Adrian L; Roubelakis, Maria G; Watt, Suzanne M

    2014-11-15

    Proangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) prime endothelial cells to respond to "hematopoietic" chemokines and cytokines by inducing/upregulating expression of the respective chemokine/cytokine receptors. Coculture of human endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC)-derived cells with human stromal cells in the presence of VEGF and FGF-2 for 14 days resulted in upregulation of the "hematopoietic" chemokine CXCL12 and its CXCR4 receptor by day 3 of coculture. Chronic exposure to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in this vasculo/angiogenesis assay significantly reduced vascular tubule formation, an observation recapitulated by delayed AMD3100 addition. While AMD3100 did not affect ECFC-derived cell proliferation, it did demonstrate a dual action. First, over the later stages of the 14-day cocultures, AMD3100 delayed tubule organization into maturing vessel networks, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell retraction and loss of complexity as defined by live cell imaging. Second, at earlier stages of cocultures, we observed that AMD3100 significantly inhibited the integration of exogenous ECFC-derived cells into established, but immature, vascular networks. Comparative proteome profiler array analyses of ECFC-derived cells treated with AMD3100 identified changes in expression of potential candidate molecules involved in adhesion and/or migration. Blocking antibodies to CD31, but not CD146 or CD166, reduced the ECFC-derived cell integration into these extant vascular networks. Thus, CXCL12 plays a key role not only in endothelial cell sensing and guidance, but also in promoting the integration of ECFC-derived cells into developing vascular networks.

  11. Chemokine Systems Link Obesity to Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuguhito Ota

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. This chronic inflammation is deeply involved in insulin resistance, which is the underlying condition of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. A significant advance in our understanding of obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance has been recognition of the critical role of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs. Chemokines are small proteins that direct the trafficking of immune cells to sites of inflammation. In addition, chemokines activate the production and secretion of inflammatory cytokines through specific G protein-coupled receptors. ATM accumulation through C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 and its ligand monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is considered pivotal in the development of insulin resistance. However, chemokine systems appear to exhibit a high degree of functional redundancy. Currently, more than 50 chemokines and 18 chemokine receptors exhibiting various physiological and pathological properties have been discovered. Therefore, additional, unidentified chemokine/chemokine receptor pathways that may play significant roles in ATM recruitment and insulin sensitivity remain to be fully identified. This review focuses on some of the latest findings on chemokine systems linking obesity to inflammation and subsequent development of insulin resistance.

  12. Breast Cancer Migration and Invasion Depend on Proteasome Degradation of Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 4

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yan; Wolff, Dennis W.; Wei, Taotao; Wang, Bo; Deng, Caishu; Kirui, Joseph K.; Jiang, Haihong; Qin, Jianbing; Abel, Peter W.; Tu, Yaping

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant signaling through G-protein coupled receptors promotes metastasis, the major cause of breast cancer death. We identified regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) as a novel suppressor of breast cancer migration and invasion, important steps of metastatic cascades. By blocking signals initiated through Gi-coupled receptors, such as protease-activated receptor 1 and CXC chemokine receptor 4, RGS4 disrupted Rac1-dependent lamellipodia formation, a key step involved in cancer migration ...

  13. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand bin...

  14. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing both chemotactic cytokines IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their receptors,and their selective migration to these chemokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To characterize the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine IL-8, CC chemokine monocyte chemothractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated on activation,normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and a newly defined DC chemokine DC- CK1 as well as the expression of IL-8 receptor, MCP-1 receptor and RANTES receptor in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDCs).The migratory responsiveness of MoDC to IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES was alsso studied. Methods In vitro generated MoDCs were obtained by differentiating monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 5 days. The time course of RNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and migratoly ability was assessed by a micromultiwell chemotaxis chamber assay. Results IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their corres ponding receptors were consistently expressed in MoDCs. DC-CK-1 expression was detectable efter 48 hours of differentiation. MoDC selectively migrated in response to MCP-1 and RANTES but not to IL-8 though transcripts of IL-8 receptor were present. Conclusion Because the capacity of dendritic cells to initiate immune responses depends on their specialized migratory and tissue homing properties, the expression of chemokines and their receptors along with the migratory responsiveness to chemokines of MoDC in our study suggests a potential role of chemokines in the interaction between dendritic cells and T cells and the induction of immune responses.

  15. Inhibition by rebamipide of cytokine-induced or lipopolysaccharide-induced chemokine synthesis in human corneal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ken; Ishida, Waka; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Harada, Yosuke; Fukushima, Atsuki

    2014-12-01

    The dry-eye drug rebamipide has mucin secretagogue activity in and anti-inflammatory effects on corneal epithelial cells. Corneal stromal fibroblasts (transdifferentiated keratocytes) function as immune modulators in the pathogenesis of chronic ocular allergic inflammation and in innate immune responses at the ocular surface. The possible anti-inflammatory effects of rebamipide on human corneal stromal fibroblasts were examined. Serum-deprived cells were incubated for 1 h with rebamipide and then for various times in the additional absence or presence of cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The release of chemokines into culture supernatants was determined with ELISAs. The intracellular abundance of chemokine mRNAs was quantitated by reverse transcription and real-time PCR analysis. Degradation of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) inhibitor IκBα was detected by immunoblot analysis. Rebamipide suppressed the release of interleukin (IL)-8 and the upregulation of IL-8 mRNA induced by tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or LPS in corneal fibroblasts. It also inhibited eotaxin-1 (CCL-11) expression at the protein and mRNA levels induced by the combination of TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, rebamipide attenuated the degradation of IκBα induced by TNF-α or LPS. Rebamipide inhibited the synthesis of chemokines by corneal fibroblasts in association with suppression of NFκB signalling. Rebamipide may therefore prove effective for the treatment of corneal stromal inflammation associated with allergy or bacterial infection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  17. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Rosero, Rebecca A.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors ...

  18. Membrane androgen receptor characteristics of human ZIP9 (SLC39A) zinc transporter in prostate cancer cells: Androgen-specific activation and involvement of an inhibitory G protein in zinc and MAP kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei; Dong, Jing

    2017-05-15

    Characteristics of novel human membrane androgen receptor (mAR), ZIP9 (SLC39A9), were investigated in ZIP9-transfected PC-3 cells (PC3-ZIP9). Ligand blot analysis showed plasma membrane [(3)H]-T binding corresponds to the position of ZIP9 on Western blots which suggests ZIP9 can bind [(3)H]-T alone, without a protein partner. Progesterone antagonized testosterone actions, blocking increases in zinc, Erk phosphorylation and apoptosis, further evidence that ZIP9 is specifically activated by androgens. Pre-treatment with GTPγS and pertussis toxin decreased plasma membrane [(3)H]-T binding and blocked testosterone-induced increases in Erk phosphorylation and intracellular zinc, indicating ZIP9 is coupled to an inhibitory G protein (Gi) that mediates both MAP kinase and zinc signaling. Testosterone treatment of nuclei and mitochondria which express ZIP9 decreased their zinc contents, suggesting ZIP9 also regulates free zinc through releasing it from these intracellular organelles. The results show ZIP9 is a specific Gi coupled-mAR mediating testosterone-induced MAP kinase and zinc signaling in PC3-ZIP9 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Lymph Node-Derived Fibroblastic and Double-Negative Reticular Cells Alter Their Chemokines and Cytokines Expression Profile Following Inflammatory Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Patricia; Palomino, Diana Torres; Alvarenga, Heliene; Almeida, Camila Bononi; Pasqualim, Denise Cunha; Cury, Adriano; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério; De Vasconcelos Macedo, Antonio Luiz; Andrade, Maria Claudina; Aloia, Thiago; Bromberg, Silvio; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Rocha, Fernanda Agostini; Marti, Luciana C.

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) is a secondary lymphoid organ with highly organized and compartmentalized structure. LNs harbor B, T, and other cells among fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs). FRCs are characterized by both podoplanin (PDPN/gp38) expression and by the lack of CD31 expression. FRCs are involved in several immune response processes but mechanisms underlying their function are still under investigation. Double-negative cells (DNCs), another cell population within LNs, are even less understood. They do not express PDPN or CD31, their localization within the LN is unknown, and their phenotype and function remain to be elucidated. This study evaluates the gene expression and cytokines and chemokines profile of human LN-derived FRCs and DNCs during homeostasis and following inflammatory stimuli. Cytokines and chemokines secreted by human FRCs and DNCs partially diverged from those identified in murine models that used similar stimulation. Cytokine and chemokine secretion and their receptors expression levels differed between stimulated DNCs and FRCs, with FRCs expressing a broader range of chemokines. Additionally, dendritic cells demonstrated increased migration toward FRCs, possibly due to chemokine-induced chemotaxis since migration was significantly decreased upon neutralization of secreted CCL2 and CCL20. Our study contributes to the understanding of the biology and functions of FRCs and DNCs and, accordingly, of the mechanisms involving them in immune cells activation and migration. PMID:28261205

  20. Revisiting the Roco G-protein cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terheyden, Susanne; Ho, Franz Y.; Gilsbach, Bernd K.; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Kortholt, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich-repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most frequent cause of late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 belongs to the Roco family of proteins which share a conserved Ras-like G-domain (Roc) and a C-terminal of Roc (COR) domain tandem. The nucleotide state of small G-proteins is

  1. Comparative expression study of the endo-G protein coupled receptor (GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells, U87-MG cells and non malignant cells of neural origin unveils new potential therapeutic targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Fève

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBMs are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs, U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs. The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs. Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets.

  2. The amino-terminal domain of the CCR2 chemokine receptor acts as coreceptor for HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The chemokines are a homologous serum protein family characterized by their ability to induce activation of integrin adhesion molecules and leukocyte migration. Chemokines interact with their receptors, which are composed of a single-chain, seven-helix, membrane-spanning protein coupled to G proteins. Two CC chemokine receptors, CCR3 and CCR5, as well as the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, have been shown necessary for infection by several HIV-1 virus isolates. We studied the effect of the chemokin...

  3. Down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by activation of chemotactic formyl peptide receptor in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W; Li, B; Wetzel, M A; Rogers, T J; Henderson, E E; Su, S B; Gong, W; Le, Y; Sargeant, R; Dimitrov, D S; Oppenheim, J J; Wang, J M

    2000-10-15

    Interactions between cell surface receptors are important regulatory elements in the complex host responses to infections. In this study, it is shown that a classic chemotactic factor, the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenyl-alanine (fMLF), rapidly induced a protein-kinase-C-mediated serine phosphorylation and down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5, which serves as a major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor. The fMLF binding to its receptor, formyl peptide receptor (FPR), resulted in significant attenuation of cell responses to CCR5 ligands and in inhibition of HIV-1-envelope-glycoprotein-mediated fusion and infection of cells expressing CD4, CCR5, and FPR. The finding that the expression and function of CCR5 can be regulated by peptides that use an unrelated receptor may provide a novel approach to the design of anti-inflamatory and antiretroviral agents. (Blood. 2000;96:2887-2894)

  4. Identification of chemokines associated with the recruitment of decidual leukocytes in human labour: potential novel targets for preterm labour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Hamilton

    Full Text Available Current therapies for preterm labour (PTL focus on arresting myometrial contractions but are largely ineffective, thus alternative therapeutic targets need to be identified. Leukocytes infiltrate the uterus around the time of labour, and are in particularly abundant in decidua (maternal-fetal interface. Moreover, decidual inflammation precedes labour in rat pregnancies and thus may contribute to initiation of labour. We hypothesized that chemokines mediate decidual leukocyte trafficking during preterm labour (PTL and term labour (TL, thus representing potential targets for preventing PTL. Women were recruited into 4 groups: TL, term not in labour (TNL, idiopathic PTL and PTL with infection (PTLI. Choriodecidual RNA was subjected to a pathway-specific PCR array for chemokines. Differential expression of 12 candidate chemokines was validated by real time RT-PCR and Bioplex assay, with immunohistochemistry to confirm cellular origin. 25 chemokines were upregulated in choriodecidua from TL compared to TNL. A similar pattern was detected in PTL, however a distinct profile was observed in PTLI consistent with differences in leukocyte infiltration. Upregulation of CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein was confirmed in TL, with CCL8 upregulated in PTL. Significant correlations were detected between these chemokines and decidual leukocyte abundance previously assessed by immunohistochemical and image analysis. Chemokines were primarily expressed by decidual stromal cells. In addition, CXCL8 and CCL5 were significantly elevated in maternal plasma during labour, suggesting chemokines contribute to peripheral inflammatory events during labour. Differences in chemokine expression patterns between TL and idiopathic PTL may be attributable to suppression of chemokine expression by betamethasone administered to women in PTL; this was supported by in vitro evidence of chemokine downregulation by clinically relevant concentrations of the steroid

  5. Applications of molecular replacement to G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Kobilka, Brian K., E-mail: kobilka@stanford.edu [Stanford University, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Weis, William I., E-mail: kobilka@stanford.edu [Stanford University, 279 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Fairchild Building, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The use of molecular replacement in solving the structures of G protein-coupled receptors is discussed, with specific examples being described in detail. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large class of integral membrane proteins involved in regulating virtually every aspect of human physiology. Despite their profound importance in human health and disease, structural information regarding GPCRs has been extremely limited until recently. With the advent of a variety of new biochemical and crystallographic techniques, the structural biology of GPCRs has advanced rapidly, offering key molecular insights into GPCR activation and signal transduction. To date, almost all GPCR structures have been solved using molecular-replacement techniques. Here, the unique aspects of molecular replacement as applied to individual GPCRs and to signaling complexes of these important proteins are discussed.

  6. A modeling strategy for G-protein coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell responses can be triggered via G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs that interact with small molecules, peptides or proteins and transmit the signal over the membrane via structural changes to activate intracellular pathways. GPCRs are characterized by a rather low sequence similarity and exhibit structural differences even for functionally closely related GPCRs. An accurate structure prediction for GPCRs is therefore not straightforward. We propose a computational approach that relies on the generation of several independent models based on different template structures, which are subsequently refined by molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of their conformational stability and the agreement with GPCR-typical structural features is then used to select a favorable model. This strategy was applied to predict the structure of the herpesviral chemokine receptor US28 by generating three independent models based on the known structures of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR4, and CCR5. Model refinement and evaluation suggested that the model based on CCR5 exhibits the most favorable structural properties. In particular, the GPCR-typical structural features, such as a conserved water cluster or conserved non-covalent contacts, are present to a larger extent in the model based on CCR5 compared to the other models. A final model validation based on the recently published US28 crystal structure confirms that the CCR5-based model is the most accurate and exhibits 80.8% correctly modeled residues within the transmembrane helices. The structural agreement between the selected model and the crystal structure suggests that our modeling strategy may also be more generally applicable to other GPCRs of unknown structure.

  7. Continuous human metastin 45-54 infusion desensitizes G protein-coupled receptor 54-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone release monitored indirectly in the juvenile male Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta): a finding with therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminara, Stephanie B; Dipietro, Meloni J; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Crowley, William F; Plant, Tony M

    2006-05-01

    The effect of continuous administration of the C-terminal fragment of metastin, the ligand for the G protein-coupled receptor, GPR54, on GnRH-induced LH secretion was examined in three agonadal, juvenile male monkeys whose responsiveness to GnRH was heightened by pretreatment with a chronic pulsatile iv infusion of synthetic GnRH. After bolus injection of 10 microg human (hu) metastin 45-54 (equivalent to kisspeptin 112-121), the GPR54 agonist was infused continuously at a dose of 100 microg/h and elicited a brisk LH response for approximately 3 h. This rise was then followed by a precipitous drop in LH despite continuous exposure of GPR54 to metastin 45-54. On d 4, during the final 3 h of the infusion, single boluses of hu metastin 45-54 (10 microg), N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid (NMDA) (10 mg/kg) and GnRH (0.3 microg) were administered to interrogate each element of the metastin-GPR54-GnRH-GnRH receptor cascade. Although the NMDA and GnRH boluses were able to elicit LH pulses, that of hu metastin 45-54 was not, demonstrating functional integrity of GnRH neurons (NMDA) and GnRH receptors (NMDA and GnRH) but desensitization of GPR54. The desensitization of GPR54 by continuous hu metastin 45-54 administration has therapeutic implications for a variety of conditions currently being treated by GnRH and its analogs, including restoration of fertility in patients with abnormal GnRH secretion (i.e. idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and hypothalamic amenorrhea) and selective, reversible suppression of the pituitary-gonadal axis to achieve suppression of gonadal steroids (i.e. precocious puberty, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and prostate cancer).

  8. Orexin-stimulated MAP kinase cascades are activated through multiple G-protein signalling pathways in human H295R adrenocortical cells: diverse roles for orexins A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Conner, Alex C; Chen, Jing; Kumar, Prashanth; Brown, James E P; Jöhren, Olaf; Lehnert, Hendrik; Stanfield, Peter R; Randeva, Harpal S

    2009-08-01

    Orexins A and B (ORA and ORB) are neuropeptide hormones found throughout the central nervous system and periphery. They are required for a host of physiological processes including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulation, steroidogenesis, appetite control and energy regulation. While some signalling mechanisms have been proposed for individual recombinant orexin receptors in generic mammalian cell types, it is clear that the peripheral effects of orexin are spatially and temporally complex. This study dissects the different G-protein signalling and MAPK pathways activated in a pluripotent human adrenal H295R cell line capable of all the physiological steps involved in steroidogenesis. Both extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 were phosphorylated rapidly with a subsequent decline, in a time- and dose-dependent manner, in response to both ORA and ORB. Conversely, there was little or no direct activation of the ERK5 or JNK pathway. Analysis using signalling and MAPK inhibitors as well as receptor-specific antagonists determined the precise mediators of the orexin response in these cells. Both ERK1/2 and p38 activation were predominantly G(q)- and to a lesser extent G(s)-mediated; p38 activation even had a small G(i)-component. Effects were broadly comparable for both orexin sub-types ORA and ORB and although most of the effects were transmitted through the orexin receptor-1 subtype, we did observe a role for orexin receptor-2-mediated activation of both ERK1/2 and p38. Cortisol secretion also differed in response to ORA and ORB. These data suggest multiple roles for orexin-mediated MAPK activation in an adrenal cell-line, this complexity may help to explain the diverse biological actions of orexins with wide-ranging consequences for our understanding of the mechanisms initiated by these steroidogenic molecules.

  9. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan José; Masood, Asna; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I; Rohrer, Daniel K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural information. We describe the generation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the third intracellular loop (IL3) of the native human beta(2) adrenergic (beta(2)AR) receptor; this antibody was critical for acquiring diffraction-quality crystals.

  10. Critical analysis of the successes and failures of homology models of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Lam, Alfonso Ramon; Li, Hubert; Balaraman, Gouthaman; Niesen, Michiel Jacobus Maria; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    We present a critical assessment of the performance of our homology model refinement method for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), called LITICon that led to top ranking structures in a recent structure prediction assessment GPCRDOCK2010. GPCRs form the largest class of drug targets for which only a few crystal structures are currently available. Therefore, accurate homology models are essential for drug design in these receptors. We submitted five models each for human chemokine CXCR4 (bound to small molecule IT1t and peptide CVX15) and dopamine D3DR (bound to small molecule eticlopride) before the crystal structures were published. Our models in both CXCR4/IT1t and D3/eticlopride assessments were ranked first and second, respectively, by ligand RMSD to the crystal structures. For both receptors, we developed two types of protein models: homology models based on known GPCR crystal structures, and ab initio models based on the prediction method MembStruk. The homology-based models compared better to the crystal structures than the ab initio models. However, a robust refinement procedure for obtaining high accuracy structures is needed. We demonstrate that optimization of the helical tilt, rotation, and translation is vital for GPCR homology model refinement. As a proof of concept, our in-house refinement program LITiCon captured the distinct orientation of TM2 in CXCR4, which differs from that of adrenoreceptors. These findings would be critical for refining GPCR homology models in future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne Petrosiute

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants.

  12. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Bar-Shavit; Myriam Maoz; Arun Kancharla; Jeetendra Kumar Nag; Daniel Agranovich; Sorina Grisaru-Granovsky; Beatrice Uziely

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances ...

  13. G Proteins and Regulation of Effector Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Dehpour

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors use a variety of membrane signalling mechanisms to translate information encoded in neurotransmitters, hormones, and growth factors into cellular responses.Collectively these mechanisms are refered to as transmembrane signalling or signal transduction. In the simplest example,the process involves a receptor protein-encompassed ion channel whose conductance is regulated by receptor activation.A second type of transmembrane signalling system involves the coupling of at least three separate components, a receptor protein, a guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein , and an effector mechanism. In some receptor" effector systems the signal transduction pathways is entirely confined to the membrane, in which no intracellular messenger is involved.Alternatively, the activity of an enzyme may be changed to generate a specific intracellular signal molecule or second messenger. Receptors in this latter category may regulate the activity of adenylyl cyclase in a positive manner through a stimulatory G protein( G or in a negative manner through an inhibitory G protein( G. thereby controlling the intracellular level of cAMP. Another membrane- associated enzyme, similar to adenylate cyclase, is phospholipase C which catalizes the hydrolysis of PIP2into IP3and DAG. Phospholipase C coupled receptors are physiologically very important because both products of the reaction act as a second messenger; diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C and IP3 stimulates calcium release from Intracellular stores.

  14. Modeling structure of G protein-coupled receptors in huan genome

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (or GPCRs) are integral transmembrane proteins responsible to various cellular signal transductions. Human GPCR proteins are encoded by 5% of human genes but account for the targets of 40% of the FDA approved drugs. Due to difficulties in crystallization, experimental structure determination remains extremely difficult for human GPCRs, which have been a major barrier in modern structure-based drug discovery. We proposed a new hybrid protocol, GPCR-I-TASSER, to construct GPCR structure models by integrating experimental mutagenesis data with ab initio transmembrane-helix assembly simulations, assisted by the predicted transmembrane-helix interaction networks. The method was tested in recent community-wide GPCRDock experiments and constructed models with a root mean square deviation 1.26 Å for Dopamine-3 and 2.08 Å for Chemokine-4 receptors in the transmembrane domain regions, which were significantly closer to the native than the best templates available in the PDB. GPCR-I-TASSER has been applied to model all 1,026 putative GPCRs in the human genome, where 923 are found to have correct folds based on the confidence score analysis and mutagenesis data comparison. The successfully modeled GPCRs contain many pharmaceutically important families that do not have previously solved structures, including Trace amine, Prostanoids, Releasing hormones, Melanocortins, Vasopressin and Neuropeptide Y receptors. All the human GPCR models have been made publicly available through the GPCR-HGmod database at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/GPCR-HGmod/ The results demonstrate new progress on genome-wide structure modeling of transmembrane proteins which should bring useful impact on the effort of GPCR-targeted drug discovery.

  15. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Castro de Moura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II. This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  16. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Castro de Moura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II. This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  17. Role of G protein-coupled receptors in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SUN; Richard DYE

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important roles in inflammation.Inflammatory cells such as polymorphonuclear leuko-cytes (PMN),monocytes and macrophages express a large number of GPCRs for classic chemoattractants and chemokines.These receptors are critical to the migration of phagocytes and their accumulation at sites of inflammation,where these cells can exacer-bate inflammation but also contribute to its resolution.Besides chemoattractant GPCRs,protease activated receptors (PARs) such as PAR1 are involved in the regulation of vascular endothelial permeability.Prostaglandin receptors play different roles in inflam-matory cell activation,and can mediate both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions.Many GPCRs present in inflammatory cells also mediate transcription factor activation,resulting in the synthesis and secretion of inflammatory factors and,in some cases,molecules that suppress inflammation.An understanding of the signaling paradigms of GPCRs in inflammatory cells is likely to facilitate translational research and development of improved anti-inflammatory therapies.

  18. The G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P;

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor, that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L...

  19. Dissecting signaling and functions of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araç, Demet; Aust, Gabriela; Calebiro, Davide;

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise an expanded superfamily of receptors in the human genome. Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs) form the second largest class of GPCRs. Despite the abundance, size, molecular structure, and functions in facilitating cell and matrix...

  20. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly......The human chemokine system comprises 19 seven-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors and 45 endogenous chemokines that often interact with each other in a promiscuous manner. Due to the chemokine system's primary function in leukocyte migration, it has a central role in immune homeostasis...... and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity...

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States); Clouse, Kathleen A. [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wahl, Larry M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Development Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Viral Immunology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  2. Ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory chemokine ligand 2 gene in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor in the respiratory chain and serves in its reduced form, ubiquinol, as a potent antioxidant. Studies in vitro and in vivo provide evidence that ubiquinol reduces inflammatory processes via gene expression. Here we investigate the putative link between expression and DNA methylation of ubiquinol sensitive genes in monocytes obtained from human volunteers supplemented with 150 mg/ day ubiquinol for 14 days. Findings Ubiquinol decreases the expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 2 gene (CXCL2 more than 10-fold. Bisulfite-/ MALDI-TOF-based analysis of regulatory regions of the CXCL2 gene identified six adjacent CpG islands which showed a 3.4-fold decrease of methylation status after ubiquinol supplementation. This effect seems to be rather gene specific, because ubiquinol reduced the expression of two other pro-inflammatory genes (PMAIP1, MMD without changing the methylation pattern of the respective gene. Conclusion In conclusion, ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory CXCL2 gene in humans. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN26780329.

  3. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  4. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasse Antje

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11 in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II. AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response.

  5. Up-Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokine Production in Avian Influenza H9N2 Virus-Infected Human Lung Epithelial Cell Line (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Hamidreza; Toroghi, Reza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Influenza H9N2 virus mostly infects avian species but poses a potential health risk to humans. Little is known about the mammalian host immune responses to H9N2 virus. To obtain insight into the innate immune responses of human lung epithelial cells to the avian H9N2 virus, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in the human airway epithelial cells infected with avian H9N2 virus were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). H9N2 virus was able to cultivate in the human lung epithelial cell line (A549) and stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). Expressions of cytokine genes were up-regulated to a significantly higher level for IL-1β (p cytokines and chemokine. The findings in this study will broaden our understanding of host innate immune mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium.

  6. Computational Modeling for the Activation Cycle of G-proteins by G-protein-coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Bao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we survey five different computational modeling methods. For comparison, we use the activation cycle of G-proteins that regulate cellular signaling events downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as a driving example. Starting from an existing Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs model, we implement the G-protein cycle in the stochastic Pi-calculus using SPiM, as Petri-nets using Cell Illustrator, in the Kappa Language using Cellucidate, and in Bio-PEPA using the Bio-PEPA eclipse plug in. We also provide a high-level notation to abstract away from communication primitives that may be unfamiliar to the average biologist, and we show how to translate high-level programs into stochastic Pi-calculus processes and chemical reactions.

  7. Serial femtosecond crystallography datasets from G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Zhang, Haitao; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Basu, Shibom; Oberthür, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Yoon, Chun Hong; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Messerschmidt, Marc; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Weierstall, Uwe; Cherezov, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    We describe the deposition of four datasets consisting of X-ray diffraction images acquired using serial femtosecond crystallography experiments on microcrystals of human G protein-coupled receptors, grown and delivered in lipidic cubic phase, at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The receptors are: the human serotonin receptor 2B in complex with an agonist ergotamine, the human δ-opioid receptor in complex with a bi-functional peptide ligand DIPP-NH2, the human smoothened receptor in complex with an antagonist cyclopamine, and finally the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in complex with the selective antagonist ZD7155. All four datasets have been deposited, with minimal processing, in an HDF5-based file format, which can be used directly for crystallographic processing with CrystFEL or other software. We have provided processing scripts and supporting files for recent versions of CrystFEL, which can be used to validate the data.

  8. [Chemokine CC receptors in the nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzik, Tomasz Łukasz; Głabiński, Andrzej; Żylińska, Ludmiła

    2015-01-01

    Chemoattractant cytokines (chemokines) are traditionally known as the important mediators of inflammatory processes, however, recently, is also given to their other functions in the body. Acting through specific receptors belonging to the G proteins they regulate immune processes in the body. About 20 chemokine receptors have been identified so far, and 10 of them bind chemokines CC, i.e. having in amino-terminal domain 2 adjacent molecules of cysteins. An increasing number of data indicates that chemokines and their receptors play an important role in the nervous system by acting as trophic factors, increasing the neurons survival, neural migration and synaptic transmission. Special role chemokine receptors play primarily in the diseases of the nervous system, because due to damage of the blood-brain barrier and the blood cerebrospinal fluid barrier, infiltration of leukocytes results in development of inflammation. Chemokine CC receptors has been shown to participate in Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia associated with HIV infection, stroke or some type of cancers.

  9. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising...

  10. Chemokine Receptors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goda G. Muralidhar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy with very poor rate of survival, and it is characterized by the presence of vast incurable peritoneal metastasis. Studies of the role of chemokine receptors, a family of proteins belonging to the group of G protein-coupled receptors, in ovarian carcinoma strongly placed this family of membrane receptors as major regulators of progression of this malignancy. In this review, we will discuss the roles that chemokine-receptor interactions play to support angiogenesis, cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, invasion, metastasis, and immune evasion in progression of ovarian carcinoma. Data regarding the role that the chemokine receptors play in the disease progression accumulated insofar strongly suggest that this family of proteins could be good therapeutic targets against ovarian carcinoma.

  11. Expression and purification of recombinant human chemokine SDF-1βin E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hong; Stephen C PEIPER; ZHU Xi-hua

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To obtain recombinant human SDF-1β expressed in E. coli and purify SDF-1β with biological activity from the bacterium. Methods: A thioredoxin-SDF-1β fusion protein (26 × 103) composed of230 amino acid residues was expressed in E. coli AD494 (DE3)pLysS under the induction of IPTG when pET32a(+)-SDF-1β was used as an expression vector. Purified SDF-1β was produced through following procedures: Bacteria lysis, metal-chelated affinity chromatography (MAC), enterokinase digestion to separate SDF-1β from fusion protein, cation exchange chromatography (CEC) and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Western blot with anti-SDF-1β monoclonal antibody (mAb), N-terminal amino acid sequencing, ligand-binding assay and cytosensor/microphysiometry were used to investigate the biochemical characters and biological activities of the purified SDF-1β. Results: From 10% to 15% of total bacterium protein was expressed as fusion protein. Approximately 400μg purified SDF-1β (7. 8 × 103) consisting of 71 amino acid residues were produced from 1 L of fermented bacteria. Western blot showed that anti-SDF-1β mAb bound with the purified SDF-1β specifically. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that N-terminus of purified SDF-1β possessed as the same amino acid sequence as nature one. Purified SDF-1β not only had the binding activity with CXCR4 expressing cells [Kd = ( 12.20± 2. 99) nmol/L ], but also activated CXCR4 expressing cell signaling specifically in a dose-dependence manner. Conclusion: The purified recombinant human SDF-1β produced with this method possesses biochemical characters and biological activities as same as those nature human SDF-1β.

  12. Simple Plex(™) : A Novel Multi-Analyte, Automated Microfluidic Immunoassay Platform for the Detection of Human and Mouse Cytokines and Chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldo, Paulomi; Marusov, Gregory; Svancara, Danielle; David, James; Mor, Gil

    2016-06-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins in bodily fluids or cellular preparations is critical for the evaluation of biomarkers or the study of complex cellular processes. While immunoassays are the most common quantitative approach used so far, they are not practical for the evaluation of multiple proteins. Microfluidic technology allows a fine spatial control in immobilizing proteins and biomolecules inside microchannels, eliminating cross-reactivity between competing analytes, and allowing rapid and sensitive detection of targeted antigens for multiple applications. We report the characterization and validation of the Simple Plex(™) platform for the detection and quantification of cytokines and chemokines from human and mouse samples. Cytokine and chemokine expression levels were determined using Simple Plex cartridges from ProteinSimple. Serum samples were obtained from the Yale Biorepository. Our data demonstrate an excellent correlation between the results obtained with Simple Plex and conventional immunoassays such as ELISA and Luminex. We describe the characterization and validation of Simple Plex, a novel multi-analyte, automated microfluidic platform that allows the evaluation of cytokines and chemokines from human and mice biological samples. Simple Plex showed significant advantages over traditional approaches in terms of low sample volume requirements, sensitivity and dynamic range, coefficient of variation, and reproducibility. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. RNA sensors enable human mast cell anti-viral chemokine production and IFN-mediated protection in response to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Brown

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of

  14. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  15. Elucidation of binding sites of dual antagonists in the human chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Spencer E; Mao, Allen; Nicolaidou, Vicky; Finelli, Mattea; Wise, Emma L; Nedjai, Belinda; Kanjanapangka, Julie; Harirchian, Paymann; Chen, Deborah; Selchau, Victor; Ribeiro, Sofia; Schyler, Sabine; Pease, James E; Horuk, Richard; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2009-06-01

    Design of dual antagonists for the chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 will be greatly facilitated by knowledge of the structural differences of their binding sites. Thus, we computationally predicted the binding site of the dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist N-dimethyl-N-[4-[[[2-(4-methylphenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzohepten-8-yl] carbonyl]amino]benzyl]tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-aminium (TAK-779), and a CCR2-specific antagonist N-(carbamoylmethyl)-3-trifluoromethyl benzamido-parachlorobenzyl 3-aminopyrrolidine (Teijin compound 1) in an ensemble of predicted structures of human CCR2 and CCR5. Based on our predictions of the protein-ligand interactions, we examined the activity of the antagonists for cells expressing thirteen mutants of CCR2 and five mutants of CCR5. The results show that residues Trp98(2.60) and Thr292(7.40) contribute significantly to the efficacy of both TAK-779 and Teijin compound 1, whereas His121(3.33) and Ile263(6.55) contribute significantly only to the antagonistic effect of Teijin compound 1 at CCR2. Mutation of residues Trp86(2.60) and Tyr108(3.32) adversely affected the efficacy of TAK-779 in antagonizing CCR5-mediated chemotaxis. Y49A(1.39) and E291A(7.39) mutants of CCR2 showed a complete loss of CCL2 binding and chemotaxis, despite robust cell surface expression, suggesting that these residues are critical in maintaining the correct receptor architecture. Modeling studies support the hypothesis that the residues Tyr49(1.39), Trp98(2.60), Tyr120(3.32), and Glu291(7.39) of CCR2 form a tight network of aromatic cluster and polar contacts between transmembrane helices 1, 2, 3, and 7.

  16. The chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 are implicated in human seminoma metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, S C; Loveland, K L; Roman, S D; Nixon, B; Kitazawa, R; McLaughlin, E A

    2013-05-01

    Seminoma and non-seminoma tumours increasingly occur within the western population. These tumours originate from carcinoma in situ (CIS) cells, which arise from dysfunctional gonocytes. CXCL12 and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, have been implicated in migration, proliferation and survival of gonocytes and their precursors and progeny, primordial germ cells and spermatogonial stem cells respectively. We previously found evidence that several miRNA molecules predicted to modulate CXCR4 signalling are differentially expressed during the differentiation of gonocytes into spermatogonia in mice. Bioinformatic analysis predicted these miRNA to modulate CXCR4 signalling, leading us to hypothesize that CXCL12-mediated CXCR4 signalling is involved in the disrupted differentiation of gonocytes that underpins CIS formation. Indeed, we detected CXCL12 in Sertoli cells of normal human testis, and relatively high expression in tumour stroma with concomitant weak staining in dispersed tumour cells. In contrast, CXCR4 was expressed in spermatogonial and meiotic germ cells of normal testis and in the majority of tumour cells. Quantitative RT-PCR identified elevated CXCR4 transcript levels in seminoma compared with normal testis and to non-seminoma, potentially reflecting the higher proportion of dysfunctional germ cells within seminomas. In the normal testis, expression of CXCR4 downstream signalling molecules phospho-MEK1/2 and phospho-ERK1/2 correlated with CXCR4/CXCL12 expression. Strikingly, this correlation was absent in seminoma and non-seminoma samples, suggesting that CXCL12 signalling is disrupted. Proliferation rate and cell survival were not altered by CXCL12 in either seminoma (TCam-2) or non-seminoma (833ke) cell lines. However, CXCL12 exposure induced TCam-2 cell invasion though simulated basement membrane, while in contrast, we provide the novel evidence that CXCR4-expressing non-seminoma cell lines 833ke and NTera2/D1 do not invade in response to CXCL12. These

  17. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Dileepan

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle (ASM cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma.

  18. G protein signaling in plants: minus times minus equals plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stateczny, Dave; Oppenheimer, Jara; Bommert, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are key regulators in the transduction of extracellular signals both in animals and plants. In plants, heterotrimeric G protein signaling plays essential roles in development and in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, over the last decade it has become clear that plants have unique mechanisms of G protein signaling. Although plants share most of the core components of heterotrimeric G proteins, some of them exhibit unusual properties compared to their animal counterparts. In addition, plants do not share functional GPCRs. Therefore the well-established paradigm of the animal G protein signaling cycle is not applicable in plants. In this review, we summarize recent insights into these unique mechanisms of G protein signaling in plants with special focus on the evident potential of G protein signaling as a target to modify developmental and physiological parameters important for yield increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A surface membrane protein of Entamoeba histolytica functions as a receptor for human chemokine IL-8: its role in the attraction of trophozoites to inflammation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Valencia, J Daniel; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy Andrés; Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge Tonatiuh; Franco, Elizabeth; Meza, Isaura

    2015-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites respond to the presence of IL-8, moving by chemotaxis towards the source of the chemokine. IL-8 binds to the trophozoite membrane and triggers a response that activates signaling pathways that in turn regulate actin/myosin cytoskeleton organisation to initiate migration towards the chemokine, suggesting the presence of a receptor for IL-8 in the parasite. Antibodies directed to the human IL-8 receptor (CXCR1) specifically recognised a 29 kDa protein in trophozoite membrane fractions. The same protein was immunoprecipitated by this antibody from total amebic extracts. Peptide analysis of the immunoprecipitated protein revealed a sequence with high homology to a previously identified amebic outer membrane peroxiredoxin and a motif within the third loop of human CXCR1, which is an important site for IL-8 binding and activation of signaling processes. Immunodetection assays demonstrated that the anti-human CXCR1 antibody binds to the 29 kDa protein in a different but close site to where IL-8 binds to the trophozoite surface membrane, suggesting that human and amebic receptors for this chemokine share common epitopes. In the context of the human intestinal environment, a receptor for IL-8 could be a great advantage for E. histolytica trophozoite survival, as they could reach an inflammatory milieu containing abundant nutrients. In addition, it has been suggested that the high content of accessible thiol groups of the protein and its peroxidase activity could provide protection in the oxygen rich milieu of colonic lesions, allowing trophozoite invasion of other tissues and escape from the host immune response.

  20. G Protein - Coupled Receptors [Receptores Acoplados à Proteína G

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas V. B. Hoelz; Guilherme B. L. de Freitas; Pedro Henrique M. Torres; Tácio Vinício A. Fernandes; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Joaquim Fernando M. da Silva; Pedro G Pascutti; Ricardo B. de Alencastro

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest superfamily of proteins encoded by the human genome. These receptors are membrane proteins which share a common structure of seven transmembrane helices and are involved in the cellular signal transduction through activation of heterotrimeric protein (G protein) in intracellular environment. This activation signal, mediated by the agonist binding to the extracellular domain of the receptor, is transmitted into the cell and activat...

  1. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; de Jong, EK; van Weering, HRJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today th

  2. Chemokines and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  3. Regulation, Signaling, and Physiological Functions of G-Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Alegre, Kamela O; Dey, Raja; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2016-09-25

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) mainly relay the information from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the plasma membrane to the inside of cells to regulate various biochemical functions. Depending on the targeted cell types, tissues, and organs, these signals modulate diverse physiological functions. The basic schemes of heterotrimeric G-proteins have been outlined. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about the regulation, signaling, and physiological functions of G-proteins. We then focus on a few less explored areas such as the regulation of G-proteins by non-GPCRs and the physiological functions of G-proteins that cannot be easily explained by the known G-protein signaling pathways. There are new signaling pathways and physiological functions for G-proteins to be discovered and further interrogated. With the advancements in structural and computational biological techniques, we are closer to having a better understanding of how G-proteins are regulated and of the specificity of G-protein interactions with their regulators.

  4. Human herpesvirus 6A infection in CD46 transgenic mice: viral persistence in the brain and increased production of proinflammatory chemokines via Toll-like receptor 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Joséphine M; Jégou, Jean-François; Welsch, Jérémy C; Horvat, Branka

    2014-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is widely spread in the human population and has been associated with several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis. To develop a small-animal model of HHV-6 infection, we analyzed the susceptibility of several lines of transgenic mice expressing human CD46, identified as a receptor for HHV-6. We showed that HHV-6A (GS) infection results in the expression of viral transcripts in primary brain glial cultures from CD46-expressing mice, while HHV-6B (Z29) infection was inefficient. HHV-6A DNA persisted for up to 9 months in the brain of CD46-expressing mice but not in the nontransgenic littermates, whereas HHV-6B DNA levels decreased rapidly after infection in all mice. Persistence in the brain was observed with infectious but not heat-inactivated HHV-6A. Immunohistological studies revealed the presence of infiltrating lymphocytes in periventricular areas of the brain of HHV-6A-infected mice. Furthermore, HHV-6A stimulated the production of a panel of proinflammatory chemokines in primary brain glial cultures, including CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL10, and induced the expression of CCL5 in the brains of HHV-6A-infected mice. HHV-6A-induced production of chemokines in the primary glial cultures was dependent on the stimulation of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Finally, HHV-6A induced signaling through human TLR9 as well, extending observations from the murine model to human infection. Altogether, this study presents a first murine model for HHV-6A-induced brain infection and suggests a role for TLR9 in the HHV-6A-initiated production of proinflammatory chemokines in the brain, opening novel perspectives for the study of virus-associated neuropathology. HHV-6 infection has been related to neuroinflammatory diseases; however, the lack of a suitable small-animal infection model has considerably hampered further studies of HHV-6-induced neuropathogenesis. In this study, we have characterized a new model for HHV-6 infection in mice

  5. A G protein-coupled receptor for UDP-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J K; Macdonald, L E; Sarau, H M; Ames, R S; Freeman, K; Foley, J J; Zhu, Y; McLaughlin, M M; Murdock, P; McMillan, L; Trill, J; Swift, A; Aiyar, N; Taylor, P; Vawter, L; Naheed, S; Szekeres, P; Hervieu, G; Scott, C; Watson, J M; Murphy, A J; Duzic, E; Klein, C; Bergsma, D J; Wilson, S; Livi, G P

    2000-04-14

    Uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose) has a well established biochemical role as a glycosyl donor in the enzymatic biosynthesis of carbohydrates. It is less well known that UDP-glucose may possess pharmacological activity, suggesting that a receptor for this molecule may exist. Here, we show that UDP-glucose, and some closely related molecules, potently activate the orphan G protein-coupled receptor KIAA0001 heterologously expressed in yeast or mammalian cells. Nucleotides known to activate P2Y receptors were inactive, indicating the distinctly novel pharmacology of this receptor. The receptor is expressed in a wide variety of human tissues, including many regions of the brain. These data suggest that some sugar-nucleotides may serve important physiological roles as extracellular signaling molecules in addition to their familiar role in intermediary metabolism.

  6. A Polymorphism in the Regulatory Region of the CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 Gene Influences Perinatal Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 to African-American Infants

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    There are natural mutations in the coding and noncoding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CC-chemokine coreceptor 5 (CCR5) and in the related CCR2 protein (the CCR2-64I mutation). Individuals homozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 allele, which prevents CCR5 expression, strongly resist HIV-1 infection. Several genetic polymorphisms have been identified within the CCR5 5′ regulatory region, some of which influence the rate of disease progression in adult AIDS study cohorts. We ge...

  7. Expression of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus G protein-coupled receptor monocistronic and bicistronic transcripts in primary effusion lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, R G; Milligan, L L; Flore, O; Wang, X; Arvanitakis, L; Knowles, D M; Cesarman, E

    2001-08-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) encodes a G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) in open reading frame (ORF) 74, which is homologous to human chemokine receptors. KSHV vGPCR is constitutively active and induces VEGF-mediated angiogenesis. Previous studies have shown that ORF 74 is transcribed as part of a bicistronic message containing ORF K14 upstream of ORF 74, with an early lytic pattern of expression. We have now extended these studies by analyzing three different KSHV-positive primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines and three PEL clinical samples. In addition, we have identified another less abundant monocistronic transcript containing only ORF 74. Both transcripts were identified at low but similar levels in two PEL clinical samples. We evaluated the degree of sequence and functional conservation of ORF74 in three additional PELs and two KS clinical specimens, demonstrating complete identity at the amino acid level among all isolates. While it is expressed as an early lytic transcript in PEL cell lines, in primary clinical PEL samples transcription of KSHV vGPCR can be readily detected.

  8. Expression of the Chemokine Receptors CCR4, CCR5, and CXCR3 by Human Tissue-Infiltrating Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Differential expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors has been useful for identification of peripheral blood memory lymphocyte subsets with distinct tissue and microenvironmental tropisms. Expression of CCR4 by circulating memory CD4+ lymphocytes is associated with cutaneous and other systemic populations while expression of CCR9 is associated with a small intestine-homing subset. CCR5 and CXCR3 are also expressed by discrete memory CD4+ populations in blood, as well as by tis...

  9. Genomic organization, complete sequence, and chromosomal location of the gene for human eotaxin (SCYA11), an eosinophil-specific CC chemokine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zepeda, E.A.; Sarafi, M.N.; Luster, A.D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States)]|[Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine that is a specific chemoattractant for eosinophils and is implicated in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma. We describe the genomic organization, complete sequence, including 1354 bp 5{prime} of the RNA initiation site, and chromosomal localization of the human eotaxin gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis localized eotaxin to human chromosome 17, in the region q21.1-q21.2, and the human gene name SCYA11 was assigned. We also present the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the mouse eotaxin gene and have identified several regulatory elements that are conserved between the murine and the human promoters. In particular, the presence of elements such as NF-{Kappa}B, interferon-{gamma} response element, and glucocorticoid response element may explain the observed regulation of the eotaxin gene by cytokines and glucocorticoids. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Apoptosis in human germinal centre B cells by means of CC chemokine receptor 3 expression induced by interleukin-2 and interleukin-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiu-ping; XIE Luo-kun; ZHANG Li-jun; TAN Jin-quan

    2005-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), expressed on some inflammatory cells, is a member of the chemokine receptor family. Its ligand is eotaxin/CCL11. In this research, we studied the expression and function of CCR3 induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) on human germinal centre (GC) B cells.Methods Cells isolated from human tonsils were stimulated with IL-2 or/and IL-4 followed by bonding with eotaxin/CCL11. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CCR3 on GC B cells and apoptosis of GC B cells. Real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot assays were used to analyse the CCR3 mRNA expressed in the GC B cells. Chemotaxis and adhesion assays were used to determine the effect of eotaxin/CCL11 ligand bonded to CCR3 on GC B cells.Results There was no CCR3 expression on human freshly isolated GC B cells. The combination IL-2 and IL-4 could upregulate CCR3 mRNA and protein expression on GC B cells. Eotaxin could not induce GC B cell chemotaxis and adhesion but triggered apoptosis of GC B cells.Conclusion IL-2 and IL-4 together induced expression of CCR3 on GC B cells, and the receptor acted as a death receptor.

  11. Expression, Purification and Crystallisation of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Bound to an Engineered Mini G Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2017-04-20

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) promote cytoplasmic signalling by activating heterotrimeric G proteins in response to extracellular stimuli such as light, hormones and nucleosides. Structure determination of GPCR-G protein complexes is central to understanding the precise mechanism of signal transduction. However, these complexes are challenging targets for structural studies due to their conformationally dynamic and inherently transient nature. We recently developed an engineered G protein, mini-Gs, which addressed these problems and allowed the formation of a stable GPCR-G protein complex. Mini-Gs facilitated the structure determination of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) in its G protein-bound conformation at 3.4 Å resolution. Here, we describe a step by step protocol for the expression and purification of A2AR, and crystallisation of the A2AR-mini-Gs complex.

  12. CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 suppresses replication of CCR5-tropic HIV-1 in human lymphoid tissue by selective induction of CC-chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshinori; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen, Silvia; Kiselyeva, Yana; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Margolis, Leonid

    2004-02-01

    In infected individuals, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exist as a "swarm" of quasi species compartmentalized in tissues where individual viral variants may interact locally. We have used human lymphoid tissue, where the critical events of HIV disease occur, to study local interactions in model HIV-1 binary swarms ex vivo. We infected tissue blocks with binary mixtures consisting either of CCR5-dependent and CXCR4-dependent variants or of 2 dual-tropic HIV-1 variants, of which one is skewed to utilization of CXCR4 and the other of CCR5. HIV-1 variants that use CXCR4 suppress replication of CCR5-dependent HIV-1 variants, whereas CCR5-dependent HIV-1 variants do not affect replication of CXCR4-dependent HIV-1. CC-chemokines that inhibit replication of CCR5-dependent HIV-1 variants were up-regulated by CXCR4-dependent HIV-1, thus possibly contributing to this suppression. Tissue-specific chemokine/cytokine network modulations triggered by individual HIV-1 variants may be an important mechanism of local interactions among HIV-1 quasi species in infected tissue.

  13. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S. (Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter (Oakland, CA); Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Meijer, Laurent (Roscoff, FR)

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  14. Selectivity determinants of GPCR-G-protein binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flock, Tilman; Hauser, Alexander S; Lund, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The selective coupling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to specific G proteins is critical to trigger the appropriate physiological response. However, the determinants of selective binding have remained elusive. Here we reveal the existence of a selectivity barcode (that is, patterns of ami...

  15. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannetier, Delphine; Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome.

  16. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Pannetier

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF, a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC, including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP, induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome.

  17. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D;

    2001-01-01

    ORF74 (or KSHV-vGPCR) is a highly constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor encoded by HHV8 that is regulated both positively and negatively by endogenous chemokines. When expressed in transgenic mice, this chemokine receptor induces an angioproliferative disease closely resembling Kaposi...... sarcoma (KS). Here we demonstrate that several lines of mice carrying mutated receptors deficient in either constitutive activity or chemokine regulation fail to develop KS-like disease. In addition, animals expressing a receptor that preserves chemokine binding and constitutive activity but that does...

  18. Cloning and characterization of exodus, a novel beta-chemokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, R; Gray, P W; Chantry, D; Godiska, R; Krathwohl, M; Fife, K; Bell, G I; Takeda, J; Aronica, S; Gordon, M; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E; Klemsz, M J

    1997-05-01

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue. Some chemokines such as MIP-1 alpha also inhibit hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation. Recently, three chemokines, MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, and RANTES, have been found to significantly decrease human immunodeficiency virus production from infected T cells. We report here the cloning and characterization of a novel human chemokine termed Exodus for its chemotactic properties. This novel chemokine is distantly related to other chemokines (28% homology with MIP-1 alpha) and shares several biological activities. Exodus is expressed preferentially in lymphocytes and monocytes, and its expression is markedly upregulated by mediators of inflammation such as tumor necrosis factor or lipopolysaccharide. Purified synthetic Exodus was found to inhibit proliferation of myeloid progenitors in colony formation assays. Exodus also stimulated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The sequence homology, expression, and biological activity indicate that Exodus represents a novel divergent beta-chemokine.

  19. In vitro characterization and inhibition of the CXCR4/CXCL12 chemokine axis in human uveal melanoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antecka Emilia

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The CXCR4/CXCL12 chemokine axis may play a critical role in guiding CXCR4+ circulating malignant cells to organ specific locations that actively secrete its ligand CXCL12 (SDF-1 such as bone, brain, liver, and lungs. We sought to characterize the presence of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in five uveal melanoma (UM cell lines in vitro. The ability of TN14003, a synthetic peptide inhibitor that targets the CXCR4 receptor complex, to inhibit this axis was also assessed. Methods Immunocytochemistry was performed against CXCR4 to confirm expression of this chemokine receptor in all five UM cell lines. Flow cytometry was preformed to evaluate CXCR4 cell surface expression on all five UM cell lines. A proliferation assay was also used to test effects TN14003 would have on cellular proliferation. Inhibition of cellular migration by specifically inhibiting the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis with TN14003 was also investigated. The binding efficacy of TN14003 to the CXCR4 receptor was assessed through flow cytometric methods. Results The CXCR4 receptor was present on all five UM cell lines. All five cell lines expressed different relative levels of surface CXCR4. TN14003 did not affect the proliferation of the five cell lines (p > 0.05. All cell lines migrated towards the chemokine CXCL12 at a level greater than the negative control (p Conclusion Interfering with the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, using TN14003 was shown to effectively down regulate UM cell migration in vitro. Knowing that UM expresses the CXCR4 receptor, these CXCR4+ cells may be less likely to colonize distant organs that secrete the CXCL12 ligand, if treated with an inhibitor that binds CXCR4. Further studies should be pursued in order to test TN14003 efficacy in vivo.

  20. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Qun Kuang

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  1. Dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 acts as a molecular chaperone for CCR5 chemokine receptor signaling complex organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yi-Qun; Charette, Nicholle; Frazer, Jennifer; Holland, Patrick J; Attwood, Kathleen M; Dellaire, Graham; Dupré, Denis J

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. CCR5 and CXCR4 act as co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and several efforts have been made to develop ligands to inhibit HIV infection by blocking those receptors. Removal of chemokine receptors from the cell surface using polymorphisms or other means confers some levels of immunity against HIV infection. Up to now, very limited success has been obtained using ligand therapies so we explored potential avenues to regulate chemokine receptor expression at the plasma membrane. We identified a molecular chaperone, DRiP78, that interacts with both CXCR4 and CCR5, but not the heterodimer formed by these receptors. We further characterized the effects of DRiP78 on CCR5 function. We show that the molecular chaperone inhibits CCR5 localization to the plasma membrane. We identified the interaction region on the receptor, the F(x)6LL motif, and show that upon mutation of this motif the chaperone cannot interact with the receptor. We also show that DRiP78 is involved in the assembly of CCR5 chemokine signaling complex as a homodimer, as well as with the Gαi protein. Finally, modulation of DRiP78 levels will affect receptor functions, such as cell migration in cells that endogenously express CCR5. Our results demonstrate that modulation of the functions of a chaperone can affect signal transduction at the cell surface.

  2. Making Sense of G Proteins: Genetic analysis of sensory G protein signaling in the nematode C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAmong the key molecules involved in sensory perception are G proteins, which act in every cell to activate a cascade of signaling molecules in response to certain environmental cues. In this thesis, several studies on the role of G proteins in the sensory system of C. elegans are describ

  3. Making Sense of G Proteins: Genetic analysis of sensory G protein signaling in the nematode C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAmong the key molecules involved in sensory perception are G proteins, which act in every cell to activate a cascade of signaling molecules in response to certain environmental cues. In this thesis, several studies on the role of G proteins in the sensory system of C. elegans are describ

  4. RNase P-Associated External Guide Sequence Effectively Reduces the Expression of Human CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 and Inhibits the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available External guide sequences (EGSs represent a new class of RNA-based gene-targeting agents, consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA, and render the target RNA susceptible to degradation by ribonuclease P (RNase P. In this study, EGSs were constructed to target the mRNA encoding human CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, one of the primary coreceptors for HIV. An EGS RNA, C1, efficiently directed human RNase P to cleave the CCR5 mRNA sequence in vitro. A reduction of about 70% in the expression level of both CCR5 mRNA and protein and an inhibition of more than 50-fold in HIV (R5 strain Ba-L p24 production were observed in cells that expressed C1. In comparison, a reduction of about 10% in the expression of CCR5 and viral growth was found in cells that either did not express the EGS or produced a “disabled” EGS which carried nucleotide mutations that precluded RNase P recognition. Furthermore, the same C1-expressing cells that were protected from R5 strain Ba-L retained susceptibility to X4 strain IIIB, which uses CXCR4 as the coreceptor instead of CCR5, suggesting that the RNase P-mediated cleavage induced by the EGS is specific for the target CCR5 but not the closely related CXCR4. Our results provide direct evidence that EGS RNAs against CCR5 are effective and specific in blocking HIV infection and growth. These results also demonstrate the feasibility to develop highly effective EGSs for anti-HIV therapy.

  5. Production of cytokine and chemokines by human mononuclear cells and whole blood cells after infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Rezende-Oliveira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The innate immune response is the first mechanism of protection against Trypanosoma cruzi, and the interaction of inflammatory cells with parasite molecules may activate this response and modulate the adaptive immune system. This study aimed to analyze the levels of cytokines and chemokines synthesized by the whole blood cells (WBC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of individuals seronegative for Chagas disease after interaction with live T. cruzi trypomastigotes. METHODS: IL-12, IL-10, TNF-α, TGF-β, CCL-5, CCL-2, CCL-3, and CXCL-9 were measured by ELISA. Nitrite was determined by the Griess method. RESULTS: IL-10 was produced at high levels by WBC compared with PBMC, even after incubation with live trypomastigotes. Production of TNF-α by both PBMC and WBC was significantly higher after stimulation with trypomastigotes. Only PBMC produced significantly higher levels of IL-12 after parasite stimulation. Stimulation of cultures with trypomastigotes induced an increase of CXCL-9 levels produced by WBC. Nitrite levels produced by PBMC increased after the addition of parasites to the culture. CONCLUSIONS: Surface molecules of T. cruzi may induce the production of cytokines and chemokines by cells of the innate immune system through the activation of specific receptors not evaluated in this experiment. The ability to induce IL-12 and TNF-α contributes to shift the adaptive response towards a Th1 profile.

  6. THE REGULATORY EFFECT OF NUCLEOSIDE DIPHOSPHATE KINASE ON G-PROTEIN AND G-PROTEIN MEDIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德昌; 张宽仁

    1995-01-01

    The effect of nueleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) on the activity of guanine nueleotide regulatory protein (G-protein) mediated phospholipase C (PLC) and on the [35S ] GTPTτS binding of G-protein was investigated in this work in order to demonstrate the mechanism behind the regulation of G-protein and its effector PLC by NDPK. The stimulation of PLC in turkey erythrocyte membrane by both GTP and GTPτS indicated that the PLC stimulation was msdiated by G-protein, NDPK alone stimulated PLC activity, as well as the stimulation in the presence of GTP and GDP, in a dose-dependent manner. However, NDPK inhibited GTPτS-stimulated PLC, Furthermore, NDPK inhibited [35S] GTPτS binding of purified Gi-protein in a non-competitive manner. A hypothesis implying an important role of direct interaction of G-protein and NDPK in the regulation of their functions is suggested and discussed.

  7. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet...... the organization of the signaling complex between GPCRs and G proteins is poorly understood. The observations that some GPCRs are obligate heterodimers, and that many GPCRs form both homo- and heterodimers, has led to speculation that GPCR dimers may be required for efficient activation of G proteins. However......, technical limitations have precluded a definitive analysis of G protein coupling to monomeric GPCRs in a biochemically defined and membrane-bound system. Here we demonstrate that a prototypical GPCR, the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), can be incorporated into a reconstituted high-density lipoprotein...

  8. Chemokine receptor expression in the human ectocervix: implications for infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Asin, Susana; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; Gonzalez, Jorge L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W; Howell, Alexandra L

    2004-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that can infect cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT). The mechanism of viral transmission within the FRT and the mode of viral spread to the periphery are not well understood. To characterize the frequency of potential targets of HIV infection within the FRT, we performed a systematic study of the expression of HIV receptors (CD4, galactosyl ceramide (GalCer)) and coreceptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) on epithelial cells and leucocytes from the ectocervix. The ectocervix is a likely first site of contact with HIV-1 following heterosexual transmission, and expression of these receptors is likely to correlate with susceptibility to viral infection. We obtained ectocervical tissue specimens from women undergoing hysterectomy, and compared expression of these receptors among patients who were classified as being in the proliferative or secretory phases of their menstrual cycle at the time of hysterectomy, as well as from postmenopausal tissues. Epithelial cells from tissues at early and mid-proliferative stages of the menstrual cycle express CD4, although by late proliferative and secretory phases, CD4 expression was absent or weak. In contrast, GalCer expression was uniform in all stages of the menstrual cycle. CXCR4 expression was not detected on ectocervical epithelial cells and positive staining was only evident on individual leucocytes. In contrast, CCR5 expression was detected on ectocervical epithelial cells from tissues at all stages of the menstrual cycle. Overall, our results suggest that HIV infection of cells in the ectocervix could most likely occur through GalCer and CCR5. These findings are important to define potential targets of HIV-1 infection within the FRT, and for the future design of approaches to reduce the susceptibility of women to infection by HIV-1.

  9. The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a marker of, but not essential for the development of human Th1 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Bregenholt, S; Eriksen, K W

    1999-01-01

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has recently been described as a surface marker of human T cells producing type 1 (Th1) cytokines. Here we confirm that CCR5 is expressed on human Th1 but not on Th2 T-cell clones. Using intracellular cytokine staining, we show that alloantigen specific CD4+ T......-cell lines derived from a CCR5-deficient individual (delta32 allele homozygote) contain high numbers of both interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-2 producing cells, low numbers of IL-10 producing cells and no IL4 or IL-5 producing cells when stimulated with phorbol ester and ionomycin in vitro...

  10. Heterotrimeric G protein-coupled signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Daisuke; Jones, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    Investigators studying G protein-coupled signaling--often called the best-understood pathway in the world owing to intense research in medical fields--have adopted plants as a new model to explore the plasticity and evolution of G signaling. Much research on plant G signaling has not disappointed. Although plant cells have most of the core elements found in animal G signaling, differences in network architecture and intrinsic properties of plant G protein elements make G signaling in plant cells distinct from the animal paradigm. In contrast to animal G proteins, plant G proteins are self-activating, and therefore regulation of G activation in plants occurs at the deactivation step. The self-activating property also means that plant G proteins do not need and therefore do not have typical animal G protein-coupled receptors. Targets of activated plant G proteins, also known as effectors, are unlike effectors in animal cells. The simpler repertoire of G signal elements in Arabidopsis makes G signaling easier to manipulate in a multicellular context.

  11. Regulation of heartbeat by G protein-coupled ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M

    1990-12-01

    The coupling of ion channels to receptors by G proteins is the subject of this American Physiological Society Walter B. Cannon Memorial "Physiology in Perspective" Lecture. This subject is particularly appropriate because it includes a molecular explanation of a homeostatic mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system and the latter subject preoccupied Dr. Cannon during most of his career. With the use of reconstitution methods, we and others have shown that heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins couple receptors to ion channels by both membrane-delimited, direct pathways and cytoplasmic second messenger pathways. Furthermore, one set of receptors may be coupled to as many as three different sets of ion channels to form networks. Dual G protein pathways lead to the prediction of biphasic ion current responses in cell signaling, and this prediction was confirmed. In sinoatrial pacemaker cells, the pacemaking hyperpolarization-activated inward current (If) is directly regulated by the G proteins Gs and Go, and the two can act simultaneously. This could explain the classical observation that vagal inhibition of heart rate is greater during sympathetic stimulation. Because deactivation of the muscarinic response occurs much faster than the G protein alpha-subunit hydrolyzes guanosine 5'-triphosphate, we looked for accessory cellular factors. A surprising result was that the small monomeric ras G protein blocked the muscarinic pathway. The significance of this observation is unknown, but it appears that small and large G proteins may interact in ion channel signaling pathways.

  12. The natural flavonoid apigenin suppresses Th1- and Th2-related chemokine production by human monocyte THP-1 cells through mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Hua; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chang, Tai-Tsung; Tseng, Hsing-I; Chu, Yu-Te; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Chen, Huan-Nan; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2010-04-01

    Dietary flavonoids have various biological functions, and there is increasing evidence that reduced prevalence and severity of allergic reactions are associated with the intake of flavonoids. Among natural flavonoids, apigenin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, the mechanisms of apigenin's effect remain uncertain. Monocyte-derived chemokine (MDC) plays a pivotal role in recruiting T-helper (Th) 2 cells in the allergic inflammation process. In the late phase of allergic inflammation, the Th1 chemokine interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) has also been found in elevated levels in the bronchial alveolar fluid of asthmatic children. We used human THP-1 monocyte cells, pretreated with or without apigenin, prior to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. By means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that apigenin inhibited production of both MDC and IP-10 by THP-1 cells and that the suppressive effect of apigenin was not reversed by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182780. The p65 phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappaB remained unaffected, but the phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were all blocked. We found that inhibition of c-raf phosphorylation might be the target of apigenin's anti-inflammation property.

  13. G protein-membrane interactions II: Effect of G protein-linked lipids on membrane structure and G protein-membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Jesús; Ibarguren, Maitane; Álvarez, Rafael; Terés, Silvia; Lladó, Victoria; Piotto, Stefano P; Concilio, Simona; Busquets, Xavier; López, David J; Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    G proteins often bear myristoyl, palmitoyl and isoprenyl moieties, which favor their association with the membrane and their accumulation in G Protein Coupled Receptor-rich microdomains. These lipids influence the biophysical properties of membranes and thereby modulate G protein binding to bilayers. In this context, we showed here that geranylgeraniol, but neither myristate nor palmitate, increased the inverted hexagonal (HII) phase propensity of phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes. While myristate and palmitate preferentially associated with phosphatidylcholine membranes, geranylgeraniol favored nonlamellar-prone membranes. In addition, Gαi1 monomers had a higher affinity for lamellar phases, while Gβγ and Gαβγ showed a marked preference for nonlamellar prone membranes. Moreover, geranylgeraniol enhanced the binding of G protein dimers and trimers to phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes, yet it decreased that of monomers. By contrast, both myristate and palmitate increased the Gαi1 preference for lamellar membranes. Palmitoylation reinforced the binding of the monomer to PC membranes and myristoylation decreased its binding to PE-enriched bilayer. Finally, binding of dimers and trimers to lamellar-prone membranes was decreased by palmitate and myristate, but it was increased in nonlamellar-prone bilayers. These results demonstrate that co/post-translational G protein lipid modifications regulate the membrane lipid structure and that they influence the physico-chemical properties of membranes, which in part explains why G protein subunits sort to different plasma membrane domains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. CXCL12 chemokine and its receptors as major players in the interactions between immune and nervous systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eGuyon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine CXCL12/SDF1a has first been described in the immune system where it functions include chemotaxis for lymphocytes and macrophages, migration of hematopoietic cells from fetal liver to bone marrow and the formation of large blood vessels. Among other chemokines, CXCL12 has recently attracted much attention in the brain as it has been shown that it can be produced not only by glial cells but also by neurons. In addition, its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, which are belonging to the G-protein coupled receptors family, are abundantly expressed in diverse brain area, CXCR4 being a major co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 entry. This chemokine system has been shown to play important roles in brain plasticity processes occurring during development but also in the physiology of the brain in normal and pathological conditions. For example, in neurons, CXCR4 stimulation has been shown regulate the synaptic release of glutamate and GABA. It can also act post-synaptically by activating a G-protein Inward Rectifier K+ (GIRK, a voltage-gated K channel Kv2.1 associated to neuronal survival, and by increasing high voltage activated (HVA Ca2+ currents. In addition, it has been recently evidenced that there are several crosstalks between the CXCL12/CXCR4-7 system and other neurotransmitter systems in the brain (such as GABA, glutamate, opioids ans cannabinoids. Overall, this chemokine system could be one of the key players of the neuro-immune interface that participates in shaping the brain in response to changes in the environment.

  15. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  16. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    OpenAIRE

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G pro...

  17. Rap G protein signal in normal and disordered lymphohematopoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minato, Nagahiro, E-mail: minato@imm.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    Rap proteins (Rap1, Rap2a, b, c) are small molecular weight GTPases of the Ras family. Rap G proteins mediate diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and gene activation through various signaling pathways. Activation of Rap signal is regulated tightly by several specific regulatory proteins including guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins. Beyond cell biological studies, increasing attempts have been made in the past decade to define the roles of Rap signal in specific functions of normal tissue systems as well as in cancer. In the immune and hematopoietic systems, Rap signal plays crucial roles in the development and function of essentially all lineages of lymphocytes and hematopoietic cells, and importantly, deregulated Rap signal may lead to unique pathological conditions depending on the affected cell types, including various types of leukemia and autoimmunity. The phenotypical studies have unveiled novel, even unexpected functional aspects of Rap signal in cells from a variety of tissues, providing potentially important clues for controlling human diseases, including malignancy.

  18. Rap G protein signal in normal and disordered lymphohematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Nagahiro

    2013-09-10

    Rap proteins (Rap1, Rap2a, b, c) are small molecular weight GTPases of the Ras family. Rap G proteins mediate diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and gene activation through various signaling pathways. Activation of Rap signal is regulated tightly by several specific regulatory proteins including guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins. Beyond cell biological studies, increasing attempts have been made in the past decade to define the roles of Rap signal in specific functions of normal tissue systems as well as in cancer. In the immune and hematopoietic systems, Rap signal plays crucial roles in the development and function of essentially all lineages of lymphocytes and hematopoietic cells, and importantly, deregulated Rap signal may lead to unique pathological conditions depending on the affected cell types, including various types of leukemia and autoimmunity. The phenotypical studies have unveiled novel, even unexpected functional aspects of Rap signal in cells from a variety of tissues, providing potentially important clues for controlling human diseases, including malignancy. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tre1, a G protein-coupled receptor, directs transepithelial migration of Drosophila germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat S Kunwar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  20. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), which is known to be expressed predominately on memory and activated T lymphocytes, is a receptor for both interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible protein 10 (gamma IP-10) and monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig). We report the novel finding that CXCR3 is also...... expressed on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood stimulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) but not on freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors. Freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors expressed low levels of CXCR3 messenger RNA, but this expression was highly up...... for the physiologic and pathophysiologic events of differentiation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors into lymphoid and myeloid stem cells, subsequently immune and inflammatory cells. These processes include transmigration, relocation, differentiation, and maturation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. (Blood...

  1. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region...

  2. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...

  3. CCR5 conformations are dynamic and modulated by localization, trafficking and G protein association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayanna J Flegler

    Full Text Available CCR5 acts as the principal coreceptor during HIV-1 transmission and early stages of infection. Efficient HIV-1 entry requires a series of processes, many dependent on the conformational state of both viral envelope protein and cellular receptor. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs are able to identify different CCR5 conformations, allowing for their use as probes to distinguish CCR5 populations. Not all CCR5 MAbs are able to reduce HIV-1 infection, suggesting the use of select CCR5 populations for entry. In the U87.CD4.CCR5-GFP cell line, we used such HIV-1-restricting MAbs to probe the relation between localization, trafficking and G protein association for individual CCR5 conformations. We find that CCR5 conformations not only exhibit different localization and abundance patterns throughout the cell, but that they also display distinct sensitivities to endocytosis inhibition. Using chemokine analogs that vary in their HIV-1 inhibitory mechanisms, we also illustrate that responses to ligand engagement are conformation-specific. Additionally, we provide supporting evidence for the select sensitivity of conformations to G protein association. Characterizing the link between the function and dynamics of CCR5 populations has implications for understanding their selective targeting by HIV-1 and for the development of inhibitors that will block CCR5 utilization by the virus.

  4. CCR5 conformations are dynamic and modulated by localization, trafficking and G protein association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegler, Ayanna J; Cianci, Gianguido C; Hope, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 acts as the principal coreceptor during HIV-1 transmission and early stages of infection. Efficient HIV-1 entry requires a series of processes, many dependent on the conformational state of both viral envelope protein and cellular receptor. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are able to identify different CCR5 conformations, allowing for their use as probes to distinguish CCR5 populations. Not all CCR5 MAbs are able to reduce HIV-1 infection, suggesting the use of select CCR5 populations for entry. In the U87.CD4.CCR5-GFP cell line, we used such HIV-1-restricting MAbs to probe the relation between localization, trafficking and G protein association for individual CCR5 conformations. We find that CCR5 conformations not only exhibit different localization and abundance patterns throughout the cell, but that they also display distinct sensitivities to endocytosis inhibition. Using chemokine analogs that vary in their HIV-1 inhibitory mechanisms, we also illustrate that responses to ligand engagement are conformation-specific. Additionally, we provide supporting evidence for the select sensitivity of conformations to G protein association. Characterizing the link between the function and dynamics of CCR5 populations has implications for understanding their selective targeting by HIV-1 and for the development of inhibitors that will block CCR5 utilization by the virus.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R G; Bocking, Alan D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4, IL-9, and IL-10); chemokines (IL-8, eotaxin, IFN-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β], and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]); and growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] 3, CSF-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA]). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1SN alone significantly increased CSF-3, MIP-1α MIP-1β, and RANTES but decreased IL-15 and IP-10 output. The GR-1SN also significantly or partially reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2 IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17, and IP-10; partially reduced LPS-induced anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1RN, IL-4 and IL-10, and LPS-induced VEGFA output but did not affect CSF-3, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-9. Our results demonstrate that GR-1SN attenuates the inflammatory responses to LPS by human decidual cells, suggesting its potential role in ameliorating intrauterine infection.

  6. Engineering a minimal G protein to facilitate crystallisation of G protein-coupled receptors in their active conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2016-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate cytoplasmic signalling in response to extracellular stimuli, and are important therapeutic targets in a wide range of diseases. Structure determination of GPCRs in all activation states is important to elucidate the precise mechanism of signal transduction and to facilitate optimal drug design. However, due to their inherent instability, crystallisation of GPCRs in complex with cytoplasmic signalling proteins, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins, has proved challenging. Here, we describe the design of a minimal G protein, mini-Gs, which is composed solely of the GTPase domain from the adenylate cyclase stimulating G protein Gs Mini-Gs is a small, soluble protein, which efficiently couples GPCRs in the absence of Gβγ subunits. We engineered mini-Gs, using rational design mutagenesis, to form a stable complex with detergent-solubilised β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Mini G proteins induce similar pharmacological and structural changes in GPCRs as heterotrimeric G proteins, but eliminate many of the problems associated with crystallisation of these complexes, specifically their large size, conformational dynamics and instability in detergent. They are therefore novel tools, which will facilitate the biochemical and structural characterisation of GPCRs in their active conformation.

  7. Heterotrimeric G protein signaling in polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Taketsugu; Park, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a signalopathy of renal tubular epithelial cells caused by naturally occurring mutations in two distinct genes, polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) and 2 (PKD2). Genetic variants in PKD1, which encodes the polycystin-1 (PC-1) protein, remain the predominant factor associated with the pathogenesis of nearly two-thirds of all patients diagnosed with PKD. Although the relationship between defective PC-1 with renal cystic disease initiation and progression remains to be fully elucidated, there are numerous clinical studies that have focused upon the control of effector systems involving heterotrimeric G protein regulation. A major regulator in the activation state of heterotrimeric G proteins are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are defined by their seven transmembrane-spanning regions. PC-1 has been considered to function as an unconventional GPCR, but the mechanisms by which PC-1 controls signal processing, magnitude, or trafficking through heterotrimeric G proteins remains to be fully known. The diversity of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in PKD is further complicated by the presence of non-GPCR proteins in the membrane or cytoplasm that also modulate the functional state of heterotrimeric G proteins within the cell. Moreover, PC-1 abnormalities promote changes in hormonal systems that ultimately interact with distinct GPCRs in the kidney to potentially amplify or antagonize signaling output from PC-1. This review will focus upon the canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways that have been described in PKD with specific emphasis on which heterotrimeric G proteins are involved in the pathological reorganization of the tubular epithelial cell architecture to exacerbate renal cystogenic pathways.

  8. Multiple functions of G protein-coupled receptor kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Kenji; Nakaya, Michio; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2014-03-06

    Desensitization is a physiological feedback mechanism that blocks detrimental effects of persistent stimulation. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was originally identified as the kinase that mediates G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) desensitization. Subsequent studies revealed that GRK is a family composed of seven isoforms (GRK1-GRK7). Each GRK shows a differential expression pattern. GRK1, GRK4, and GRK7 are expressed in limited tissues. In contrast, GRK2, GRK3, GRK5, and GRK6 are ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. The roles of GRKs in GPCR desensitization are well established. When GPCRs are activated by their agonists, GRKs phosphorylate serine/threonine residues in the intracellular loops and the carboxyl-termini of GPCRs. Phosphorylation promotes translocation of β-arrestins to the receptors and inhibits further G protein activation by interrupting receptor-G protein coupling. The binding of β-arrestins to the receptors also helps to promote receptor internalization by clathrin-coated pits. Thus, the GRK-catalyzed phosphorylation and subsequent binding of β-arrestin to GPCRs are believed to be the common mechanism of GPCR desensitization and internalization. Recent studies have revealed that GRKs are also involved in the β-arrestin-mediated signaling pathway. The GRK-mediated phosphorylation of the receptors plays opposite roles in conventional G protein- and β-arrestin-mediated signaling. The GRK-catalyzed phosphorylation of the receptors results in decreased G protein-mediated signaling, but it is necessary for β-arrestin-mediated signaling. Agonists that selectively activate GRK/β-arrestin-dependent signaling without affecting G protein signaling are known as β-arrestin-biased agonists. Biased agonists are expected to have potential therapeutic benefits for various diseases due to their selective activation of favorable physiological responses or avoidance of the side effects of drugs. Furthermore, GRKs are recognized as

  9. A novel MEK-ERK-AMPK signaling axis controls chemokine receptor CCR7-dependent survival in human mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cotarelo, Pilar; Escribano-Díaz, Cristina; González-Bethencourt, Ivan Luis; Gómez-Moreira, Carolina; Deguiz, María Laura; Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Gómez-Cabañas, Laura; Fernández-Barrera, Jaime; Delgado-Martín, Cristina; Mellado, Mario; Regueiro, José Ramón; Miranda-Carús, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2015-01-09

    Chemokine receptor CCR7 directs mature dendritic cells (mDCs) to secondary lymph nodes where these cells regulate the activation of T cells. CCR7 also promotes survival in mDCs, which is believed to take place largely through Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms. We have analyzed the involvement of the AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) in the control of CCR7-dependent survival. A pro-apoptotic role for AMPK is suggested by the finding that pharmacological activators induce apoptosis, whereas knocking down of AMPK with siRNA extends mDC survival. Pharmacological activation of AMPK also induces apoptosis of mDCs in the lymph nodes. Stimulation of CCR7 leads to inhibition of AMPK, through phosphorylation of Ser-485, which was mediated by G(i)/Gβγ, but not by Akt or S6K, two kinases that control the phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 in other settings. Using selective pharmacological inhibitors, we show that CCR7-induced phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 is mediated by MEK and ERK. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis and proximity ligation assays indicate that AMPK associates with ERK, but not with MEK. These results suggest that in addition to Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms, CCR7 can also promote survival of mDCs through a novel MEK1/2-ERK1/2-AMPK signaling axis. The data also suggest that AMPK may be a potential target to modulate mDC lifespan and the immune response.

  10. G protein signaling in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Dustin E; Siderovski, David P

    2013-01-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic colitis and systemic amebiasis. Among the known amebic factors contributing to pathogenesis are signaling pathways involving heterotrimeric and Ras superfamily G proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge of the roles of heterotrimeric G protein subunits, Ras, Rho and Rab GTPase families in E. histolytica pathogenesis, as well as of their downstream signaling effectors and nucleotide cycle regulators. Heterotrimeric G protein signaling likely modulates amebic motility and attachment to and killing of host cells, in part through activation of an RGS-RhoGEF (regulator of G protein signaling–Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor) effector. Rho family GTPases, as well as RhoGEFs and Rho effectors (formins and p21-activated kinases) regulate the dynamic actin cytoskeleton of E. histolytica and associated pathogenesis-related cellular processes, such as migration, invasion, phagocytosis and evasion of the host immune response by surface receptor capping. A remarkably large family of 91 Rab GTPases has multiple roles in a complex amebic vesicular trafficking system required for phagocytosis and pinocytosis and secretion of known virulence factors, such as amebapores and cysteine proteases. Although much remains to be discovered, recent studies of G protein signaling in E. histolytica have enhanced our understanding of parasitic pathogenesis and have also highlighted possible targets for pharmacological manipulation. PMID:23519208

  11. Recombinant human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2 Tax proteins induce high levels of CC-chemokines and downregulate CCR5 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Christy S; Abuerreish, Muna; Lairmore, Michael D; Castillo, Laura; Giam, Chou-Zen; Beilke, Mark A

    2011-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia viruses types 1 (HTLV-1) and 2 (HTLV-2) produce key transcriptional regulatory gene products, known as Tax1 and Tax2, respectively. Tax1 and Tax2 transactivate multiple host genes involved in cellular immune responses within the cellular microenvironment, including induction of genes encoding expression of CC-chemokines. It is speculated that HTLV Tax proteins may act as immune modulators. In this study, recombinant Tax1 and Tax2 proteins were tested for their effects on the viability of cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and their ability to induce expression of CC-chemokines and to downregulate the level of CCR5 expression in PBMCs. PBMCs obtained from uninfected donors were cultured in a range of Tax1 and Tax2 concentrations (10-100 pM), and supernatant fluids were harvested at multiple time points for quantitative determinations of MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. Treatment of PBMCs with Tax1 and Tax2 proteins (100 pM) resulted in a significant increase in viability over a 7-d period compared to controls (pCCR5-positive cells compared to those of uninfected donors and from mock-treated lymphocytes, respectively (p<0.05). These results suggest that Tax1 and Tax2 could promote innate immunity in the extracellular environment during HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections via CC-chemokine ligands and receptors.

  12. Human p38{delta} MAP kinase mediates UV irradiation induced up-regulation of the gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Shigeyuki [Oral Health Science Research Center (Japan); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kanagawa Dental College, 82 Inaoka-cho, Yokosuka 238-8580 (Japan); Ito, Shin; Kato, Yasumasa [Oral Health Science Research Center (Japan); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Japan); Kubota, Eiro [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kanagawa Dental College, 82 Inaoka-cho, Yokosuka 238-8580 (Japan); Hata, Ryu-Ichiro, E-mail: ryuhata@gmail.com [Oral Health Science Research Center (Japan); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Japan)

    2010-06-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family comprises ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5 (big-MAPK, BMK1). UV irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma cells induced up-regulation of gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14, stimulated p38 phosphorylation, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK. Human p38 MAPKs exist in 4 isoforms: p38{alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} and {delta}. The UV stimulation of p38 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the presence of SB203580 or PD169316, inhibitors of p38{alpha} and {beta}, suggesting p38 phosphorylation was not dependent on these 2 isoforms and that p38{gamma} and/or {delta} was responsible for the phosphorylation. In fact, inhibition of each of these 4 p38 isoforms by the introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNAs for respective isoforms revealed that only shRNA for p38{delta} attenuated the UV-induced up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. In addition, over-expression of p38 isoforms in the cells showed the association of p38{delta} with ERK1 and 2, concomitant with down-regulation of ERK phosphorylation. The usage of p38{delta} isoform by UV irradiation is not merely due to the abundance of this p38 isoform in the cells. Because serum deprivation of the cells also induced an increase in BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression, and in this case p38{alpha} and/or {beta} isoform is responsible for up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. Taken together, the data indicate that the respective stress-dependent action of p38 isoforms is responsible for the up-regulation of the gene expression of the chemokine BRAK/CXCL14.

  13. Emerging Concepts and Approaches for Chemokine-Receptor Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Hamel, Damon J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemokine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) most noted for their role in cell migration. However, inappropriate utilization or regulation of these receptors is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, cancer and HIV, making them important drug targets. Areas covered in this review Allostery, oligomerization, and ligand bias are presented as they pertain to chemokine receptors and their associated pathologies. Specific examples of each are described from the recent literature and their implications are discussed in terms of drug discovery efforts targeting chemokine receptors. What the reader will gain Insight into the expanding view of the multitude of pharmacological variables that need to be considered or that may be exploited in chemokine receptor drug discovery. Take home message Since 2007, two drugs targeting chemokine receptors have been approved by the FDA, Maraviroc for preventing HIV infection and Mozobil™ for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. While these successes permit optimism for chemokine receptors as drug targets, only recently has the complexity of this system begun to be appreciated. The concepts of allosteric inhibitors, biased ligands and functional selectivity raise the possibility that drugs with precisely-defined properties can be developed. Other complexities such as receptor oligomerization and tissue-specific functional states of receptors also offer opportunities for increased target and response specificity, although it will be more challenging to translate these ideas into approved therapeutics compared to traditional approaches. PMID:21132095

  14. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G protein-independent effectors upon ligand binding suggesting the existence of multiple ligand-specific active states. These active-state conformations are unstable in the absence of specific cytosolic signaling partners representing new challenges for structural biology. Camelid single chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) show promise for stabilizing active GPCR conformations and as chaperones for crystallogenesis. PMID:21782416

  15. Heterotrimeric G protein signalling in the plant kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Daisuke; Chen, Jin-Gui; Botella, José Ramón; Jones, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising α-, β-and γ-subunits, perceive extracellular stimuli through cell surface receptors, and transmit signals to ion channels, enzymes and other effector proteins to affect numerous cellular behaviours. In plants, G proteins have structural similarities to the corresponding molecules in animals but transmit signals by atypical mechanisms and effector proteins to control growth, cell proliferation, defence, stomate movements, channel regulation, sugar sensing and some hormonal responses. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular regulation of plant G proteins, their effectors and the physiological functions studied mainly in two model organisms: Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also look at recent progress on structural analyses, systems biology and evolutionary studies. PMID:23536550

  16. Heterotrimeric G protein signalling in the plant kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Daisuke; Chen, Jin-Gui; Botella, José Ramón; Jones, Alan M

    2013-03-27

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising α-, β-and γ-subunits, perceive extracellular stimuli through cell surface receptors, and transmit signals to ion channels, enzymes and other effector proteins to affect numerous cellular behaviours. In plants, G proteins have structural similarities to the corresponding molecules in animals but transmit signals by atypical mechanisms and effector proteins to control growth, cell proliferation, defence, stomate movements, channel regulation, sugar sensing and some hormonal responses. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular regulation of plant G proteins, their effectors and the physiological functions studied mainly in two model organisms: Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also look at recent progress on structural analyses, systems biology and evolutionary studies.

  17. G protein-coupled receptor regulation: The role of protein interactions and receptor trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Sandén, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) is the largest gene family in the human genome. GPCR-mediated signaling operates in every human cell, and about 50% of existing clinically useful drugs act through GPCR. Kinins are proinflammatory peptides that are rapidly produced extracellularly following pathological insults and tissue damage. These peptides act through two GPCR subtypes, B1 (B1R) and B2 (B2R), to elicit numerous inflammatory responses including vasodilatiation, increas...

  18. Molecular pharmacology of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R J

    2016-10-01

    This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology stems from the eighth in the series of meetings on the Molecular Pharmacology of G protein coupled receptors (MPGPCR) held as part of a joint meeting with the Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists (ASCEPT) in Melbourne Australia from 7 to 11 December 2014. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc.

  19. Signaling via G proteins mediates tumorigenic effects of GPR87

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arfelt, Kristine Niss; Fares, Suzan; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H.;

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large protein family of seven transmembrane (7TM) spanning proteins that regulate multiple physiological functions. GPR87 is overexpressed in several cancers and plays a role in tumor cell survival. Here, the basal activity of GPR87 was investigated...... in transiently transfected HEK293 cells, revealing ligand-independent coupling to Gαi, Gαq and Gα12/13. Furthermore, GPR87 showed a ligand-independent G protein-dependent activation of the downstream transcription factors CREB, NFκB, NFAT and SRE. In tetracycline-induced Flp-In T-Rex-293 cells, GPR87 induced...

  20. G protein-coupled receptor modulation with pepducins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimond, Patricia; Carlson, Kenneth; Bouvier, Michel;

    2011-01-01

    At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4-5, 2010, investigators working in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge of the stru......At the 2nd Pepducin Science Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on November 4-5, 2010, investigators working in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research convened to discuss progress since last year's inaugural conference. This year's symposium focused on increasing knowledge...

  1. Evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Mustafa, Arshi; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Williams, Michael J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins perform a crucial role as molecular switches controlling various cellular responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Recent data have shown that the vertebrate-like G protein families are found across metazoans and their closest unicellular relatives. However, an overall evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like G proteins, including gene family annotations and in particular mapping individual gene gain/loss events across diverse holozoan lineages is still incomplete. Here, with more expanded invertebrate taxon sampling, we have reconstructed phylogenetic trees for each of the G protein classes/families and provide a robust classification and hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G proteins. Our results further extend the evidence that the common ancestor (CA) of holozoans had at least five ancestral Gα genes corresponding to all major vertebrate Gα classes and contain a total of eight genes including two Gβ and one Gγ. Our results also indicate that the GNAI/O-like gene likely duplicated in the last CA of metazoans to give rise to GNAI- and GNAO-like genes, which are conserved across invertebrates. Moreover, homologs of GNB1-4 paralogon- and GNB5 family-like genes are found in most metazoans and that the unicellular holozoans encode two ancestral Gβ genes. Similarly, most bilaterian invertebrates encode two Gγ genes which include a representative of the GNG gene cluster and a putative homolog of GNG13. Interestingly, our results also revealed key evolutionary events such as the Drosophila melanogaster eye specific Gβ subunit that is found conserved in most arthropods and several previously unidentified species specific expansions within Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gα12/13 classes and the GNB1-4 paralogon. Also, we provide an overall proposed evolutionary scenario on the expansions of all G protein families in vertebrate tetraploidizations. Our robust classification/hierarchy is essential to further

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced CXCR4 and chemokine expression leads to preferential X4 HIV-1 replication in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Tse, Doris B; Rochford, Gemma; Prabhakar, Savita; Hoshino, Satomi; Chitkara, Nishay; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Ching, Elbert; Raju, Bindu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Borkowsky, William; Rom, William N; Pine, Richard; Weiden, Michael

    2004-05-15

    Opportunistic infections such as pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) increase local HIV-1 replication and mutation. As AIDS progresses, alteration of the HIV-1 gp120 V3 sequence is associated with a shift in viral coreceptor use from CCR5 (CD195) to CXCR4 (CD184). To better understand the effect of HIV/TB coinfection, we screened transcripts from bronchoalveolar lavage cells with high density cDNA arrays and found that CXCR4 mRNA is increased in patients with TB. Surprisingly, CXCR4 was predominately expressed on alveolar macrophages (AM). Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of macrophages in vitro increased CXCR4 surface expression, whereas amelioration of disease reduced CXCR4 expression in vivo. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from TB patients had elevated levels of CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta), CCL5 (RANTES), and CX3CL1 (fractalkine), but not CXCL12 (stromal-derived factor-1alpha). We found that M. tuberculosis infection of macrophages in vitro increased viral entry and RT of CXCR4-using [corrected] HIV-1, but not of CCR5-using [corrected] HIV-1. Lastly, HIV-1 derived from the lung contains CD14, suggesting that they were produced in AM. Our results demonstrate that TB produces a permissive environment for replication of CXCR4-using virus by increasing CXCR4 expression in AM and for suppression of CCR5-using HIV-1 by increasing CC chemokine expression. These changes explain in part why TB accelerates the course of AIDS. CXCR4 inhibitors are a rational therapeutic approach in HIV/TB coinfection.

  3. Expression of the Chemokine Receptors CCR4, CCR5, and CXCR3 by Human Tissue-Infiltrating Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Eric J.; Boisvert, Judie; Murphy, Kristine; Vierra, Mark A.; Genovese, Mark C.; Wardlaw, Andrew J.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Hodge, Martin R.; Wu, Lijun; Butcher, Eugene C.; Campbell, James J.

    2002-01-01

    Differential expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors has been useful for identification of peripheral blood memory lymphocyte subsets with distinct tissue and microenvironmental tropisms. Expression of CCR4 by circulating memory CD4+ lymphocytes is associated with cutaneous and other systemic populations while expression of CCR9 is associated with a small intestine-homing subset. CCR5 and CXCR3 are also expressed by discrete memory CD4+ populations in blood, as well as by tissue-infiltrating lymphocytes from a number of sites. To characterize the similarities and differences among tissue-infiltrating lymphocytes, and to shed light on the specialization of lymphocyte subsets that mediate inflammation and immune surveillance in particular tissues, we have examined the expression of CCR4, CXCR3, and CCR5 on CD4+ lymphocytes directly isolated from a wide variety of normal and inflamed tissues. Extra-lymphoid tissues contained only memory lymphocytes, many of which were activated (CD69+). As predicted by classical studies, skin lymphocytes were enriched in CLA expression whereas intestinal lymphocytes were enriched in α4β7 expression. CCR4 was expressed at high levels by skin-infiltrating lymphocytes, at lower levels by lung and synovial fluid lymphocytes, but never by intestinal lymphocytes. Only the high CCR4 levels characteristic of skin lymphocytes were associated with robust chemotactic and adhesive responses to TARC, consistent with a selective role for CCR4 in skin lymphocyte homing. In contrast, CXCR3 and CCR5 were present on the majority of lymphocytes from each non-lymphoid tissue examined, suggesting that these receptors are unlikely to determine tissue specificity, but rather, may play a wider role in tissue inflammation. PMID:11786428

  4. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, Knut; de Jong, Eiko K; van Weering, Hilmar R J; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today that chemokine signaling orchestrates the immune system and is widely involved in both physiological and pathophysiological processes. Since the chemokine system offers various targets through which pathology could be influenced, most pharmaceutical companies have chosen this system as a therapeutic target for a variety of diseases. Here recent developments concerning the role of chemokines in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as their possible therapeutic relevance are discussed.

  5. Predicting the Coupling Specificity of G-protein Coupled Receptors to G-proteins by Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-Ping Guan; Zhen-Ran Jiang; Yan-Hong Zhou

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important classes of drug targets for pharmaceutical industry and play important roles in cellular signal transduction. Predicting the coupling specificity of GPCRs to G-proteins is vital for further understanding the mechanism of signal transduction and the function of the receptors within a cell, which can provide new clues for pharmaceutical research and development. In this study, the features of amino acid compositions and physiochemical properties of the full-length GPCR sequences have been analyzed and extracted. Based on these features, classifiers have been developed to predict the coupling specificity of GPCRs to G-proteins using support vector machines. The testing results show that this method could obtain better prediction accuracy.

  6. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  7. Stabilizing effects of G protein on the active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor differ depending on G protein type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-05

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger various cellular and physiological responses upon the ligand binding. The ligand binding induces conformational change in GPCRs which allows G protein to interact with the receptor. The interaction of G protein also affects the active conformation of GPCRs. In this study, we have investigated the effects of Gαi1, Gαo and chimeric Gαqi5 on the active conformation of the adenosine A1 receptor, as each Gα showed difference in the interaction with adenosine A1 receptor. The conformational changes in the adenosine A1 receptor were detected as the agonist-induced decreases in efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused at the two intracellular domains of the adenosine A1 receptor. Amplitudes of the agonist-induced FRET decreases were subtle when the FP-tagged adenosine A1 receptor was expressed alone, whereas they were significantly enhanced when co-expressed with Gαi1Gβ1Gγ22 (Gi1) or Gαqi5Gβ1Gγ22 (Gqi5) but not with GαοGβ1Gγ22 (Go). The enhancement of the agonist-induced FRET decrease in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly larger than that of Gi1. Furthermore, the FRET recovery upon the agonist removal in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly slower than that of Gi1. From these results it was revealed that the agonist-bound active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor is unstable without the binding of G protein and that the stabilizing effects of G protein differ depending on the types of G protein.

  8. Dynamic phospholipid signaling by G protein-coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; Han, Li; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control a variety of fundamental cellular processes by regulating phospholipid signaling pathways. Essential for signaling by a large number of receptors is the hydrolysis of the membrane phosphoinositide PIP2 by phospholipase C (PLC) into the second messengers IP

  9. Allosteric modulation of G-protein coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Spalding, Tracy A

    2004-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has more than 1000 members and is the largest family of proteins in the body. GPCRs mediate signalling of stimuli as diverse as light, ions, small molecules, peptides and proteins and are the targets for many pharmaceuticals. Most GPCR ligands...

  10. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Parnot, Charles

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural...

  11. Alpha-Bulges in G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob van der Kant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agonist binding is related to a series of motions in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that result in the separation of transmembrane helices III and VI at their cytosolic ends and subsequent G protein binding. A large number of smaller motions also seem to be associated with activation. Most helices in GPCRs are highly irregular and often contain kinks, with extensive literature already available about the role of prolines in kink formation and the precise function of these kinks. GPCR transmembrane helices also contain many α-bulges. In this article we aim to draw attention to the role of these α-bulges in ligand and G-protein binding, as well as their role in several aspects of the mobility associated with GPCR activation. This mobility includes regularization and translation of helix III in the extracellular direction, a rotation of the entire helix VI, an inward movement of the helices near the extracellular side, and a concerted motion of the cytosolic ends of the helices that makes their orientation appear more circular and that opens up space for the G protein to bind. In several cases, α-bulges either appear or disappear as part of the activation process.

  12. G-protein-coupled receptors for free fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond; Murdoch, Hannah;

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming evident that nutrients and metabolic intermediates derived from such nutrients regulate cellular function by activating a number of cell-surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Until now, members of the GPCR family have largely been considered as the molecular targets that com...

  13. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits are located on rat liver endosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyke Rebecca W

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rat liver endosomes contain activated insulin receptors and downstream signal transduction molecules. We undertook these studies to determine whether endosomes also contain heterotrimeric G proteins that may be involved in signal transduction from G protein-coupled receptors. Results By Western blotting Gsα, Giα1,2, Giα3 and Gβ were enriched in both canalicular (CM and basolateral (BLM membranes but also readily detectable on three types of purified rat liver endosomes in the order recycling receptor compartment (RRC > compartment for uncoupling of receptor and ligand (CURL > multivesicular bodies (MVB >> purified secondary lysosomes. Western blotting with antibodies to Na, K-ATPase and to other proteins associated with plasma membranes and intracellular organelles indicated this was not due to contamination of endosome preparations by CM or BLM. Adenylate cyclase (AC was also identified on purified CM, BLM, RRC, CURL and MVB. Percoll gradient fractionation of liver postnuclear supernatants demonstrated co-occurrence of endosomes and heterotrimeric G protein subunits in fractions with little plasma membrane markers. By confocal microscopy, punctate staining for Gsα, Giα3 and Gβ corresponded to punctate areas of endocytosed Texas red-dextran in hepatocytes from control and cholera toxin-treated livers. Conclusion We conclude that heterotrimeric G protein subunits as well as AC likely traffic into hepatocytes on endosome membranes, possibly generating downstream signals spatially separate from signalling generated at the plasma membrane, analogous to the role(s of internalized insulin receptors.

  14. Serum amyloid A1α induces paracrine IL-8/CXCL8 via TLR2 and directly synergizes with this chemokine via CXCR2 and formyl peptide receptor 2 to recruit neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Mieke; Berghmans, Nele; Pörtner, Noëmie; Vanbrabant, Lotte; Cockx, Maaike; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo; Gouwy, Mieke

    2015-12-01

    Cell migration depends on the ability of leukocytes to sense an external gradient of chemotactic proteins produced during inflammation. These proteins include chemokines, complement factors, and some acute phase proteins, such as serum amyloid A. Serum amyloid A chemoattracts neutrophils, monocytes, and T lymphocytes via its G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor 2. We demonstrate that serum amyloid A1α more potently chemoattracts neutrophils in vivo than in vitro. In contrast to CD14(+) monocytes, no rapid (within 2 h) induction of interleukin-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 or macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α/CC chemokine ligand 3 was observed in purified human neutrophils after stimulation of the cells with serum amyloid A1α or lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, interleukin-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 induction in monocytes by serum amyloid A1α was mediated by toll-like receptor 2 and was inhibited by association of serum amyloid A1α with high density lipoprotein. This indicates that the potent chemotactic response of neutrophils toward intraperitoneally injected serum amyloid A1α is indirectly enhanced by rapid induction of chemokines in peritoneal cells, synergizing in a paracrine manner with serum amyloid A1α. We observed direct synergy between IL-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 and serum amyloid A1α, but not lipopolysaccharide, in chemotaxis and shape change assays with neutrophils. Furthermore, the selective CXC chemokine receptor 2 and formyl peptide receptor 2 antagonists, SB225002 and WRW4, respectively, blocked the synergy between IL-8/CXC chemokine ligand 8 and serum amyloid A1α in neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro, indicating that for synergy their corresponding G protein-coupled receptors are required. Additionally, SB225002 significantly inhibited serum amyloid A1α-mediated peritoneal neutrophil influx. Taken together, endogenous (e.g., IL-1β) and exogenous (e.g., lipopolysaccharide) inflammatory mediators induce primary chemoattractants such as

  15. Daucane esters from laserwort (Laserpitium latifolium L.) inhibit cytokine and chemokine production in human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Višnja; Goeman, Jan; Thommis, Jonathan; Heyerick, Arne; Caroen, Jurgen; Van der Eycken, Johan; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2017-03-15

    Laserwort, Laserpitium latifolium L. (Apiaceae), is a European medicinal plant. Its roots and rhizomes were traditionally used as a general tonic and to treat inflammatory and infective diseases. The anti-inflammatory potential of daucane esters, isolated from underground parts extract of L. latifolium and specific structural features that contribute to their activity were investigated. In addition, we studied their interference with the transactivation capacity of the Glucocorticoid Receptor when added together with a classic glucocorticoid (GC), dexamethasone (DEX). This particular property may be relevant in combination strategies, attempting to circumvent diabetogenic side effects of glucocorticoids upon long-term anti-inflammatory treatments. Nine L. latifolium daucane esters were isolated and elucidated as derivatives of desoxodehydrolaserpitin, laserpitin and a novel 2β-esterified laserpitinol analogue. Of all compounds effects on NF-κB- and AP-1-driven pro-inflammatory pathways were assessed using TNF- or PMA-induced reporter gene analysis in A549 cells. Daucanes with a strong and concentration-dependent inhibition of both NF-κB and AP-1, were tested for a potential effect on DEX-stimulated GR-driven Glucocorticoid Response Element (GRE) reporter gene activity. In addition, GRE-driven anti-inflammatory mRNA expression was determined (GILZ and DUSP1). Also anti-inflammatory properties were validated by monitoring effects on CCL-2, IL-6, IL-1β mRNA expression levels (qPCR) and on CCL-2 chemokine production (ELISA). Daucanes featuring an ester moiety and/or a hydroxy group at positions 2β, 6α and 10α and especially the novel 2β-esterified laserpitinol derivative that, in comparison to other isolated compounds, features an additional 9α-hydroxy group, demonstrated suppression of both NF-κB- and AP-1-dependent pro-inflammatory pathways. Remarkably, those entities competitively and concentration-dependently repressed GR-driven GRE-dependent reporter

  16. Acupuncture upregulates G protein coupled activity in SAMP8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Benhua; Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Xuezhu; Kan, Bohong; Liu, Yunhe; Jia, Yujie; Han, Jingxian; Yu, Jianchun

    2017-08-01

    Transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction of G protein is closely related to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To explore the effects of Sanjiao acupuncture on G protein signal transduction pathways in the pathogenesis of AD. 36 senescence-accelerated (SAM) prone 8 mice were divided into three groups that remained untreated (SAMP8, n=12) or received Sanjiao acupuncture (SAMP8+SA, n=12) or control acupuncture (SAMP8+CA, n=12). An additional control group of SAM resistant 1 mice was included (SAMR1 group, n=12). Morris water maze tests were used to investigate learning and memory abilities. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to study expression of G protein subunits and their activities in the cortex/hippocampus. Behavioural analysis showed that acupuncture attenuated the severe cognitive deficits observed in untreated/CA-treated SAMP8 mice. The findings of the G protein activation assays via immunoprecipitation and Western blots were that the physiologically coupled activation rate (PCAR) and maximal coupled activation rate (MCAR) of Gαs and Gαi were decreased in the cortex of SAMP8 vs SAMR1 mice. Sanjiao acupuncture induced an upregulation in the PCAR of Gαs and Gαi. In the hippocampus of untreated SAMP8 mice, the PCAR of Gαs and MCAR of both Gαs and Gαi declined, and Sanjiao acupuncture was associated with an upregulation in the MCAR of Gαs and Gαi. There were no significant differences in Gαs and Gαi expression between the groups. Sanjiao acupuncture attenuates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of AD via upregulation of G protein activity and stabilisation of the cellular signal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaofeng Liao; Tharshikha Pirapakaran; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potentia...

  18. Chemokine Receptors and Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinquan Tan; Gang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A complex process including both the innate and acquired immune responses results in allograft rejection. Some chemokine receptors and their ligands play essential roles not only for leukocyte migration into the graft but also in facilitating dendritic and T cell trafficking between lymph nodes and the transplant in the early and late stage of the allogeneic response. This review focuses on the impact of these chemoattractant proteins on transplant outcome and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for antirejection therapy based on targeting of chemokine receptors and/or their ligands. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  19. [Chemokine Receptor-5 and Graft-versus-Host Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Liu, Wei; Ren, Han-Yun

    2015-06-01

    Chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5) belongs to a G-protein coupled receptors superfamily. It is mainly expressed on a wide variety of immune cells. CCR5 can bind with its specific ligands, which plays very important roles in inflammatory cell growth, differentiation, activation, adhesion and migration. CCR5 was identified as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) to infect CD4+ T cells. In addition, CCR5 not only participates in the pathogenic mechanisms of many inflammation disease such as AIDS, auto-immune disease, and atherosclerosis, but also plays important roles in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent studies using murine models have demonstrated the critical role of CCR5 and its ligands which direct T-cell infiltration and recruitment into target tissues during acute GVHD. CCR5 has become the focus of intense interest and discussion, and this review will attempt to describe what is understood about the structure and function, internalization, signal transduction of CCR5, in order to investigate the relationship between CCR5 and acute GVHD.

  20. C-terminal engineering of CXCL12 and CCL5 chemokines: functional characterization by electrophysiological recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Picciocchi

    Full Text Available Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines comprised of 70-100 amino acids. The chemokines CXCL12 and CCL5 are the endogenous ligands of the CXCR4 and CCR5 G protein-coupled receptors that are also HIV co-receptors. Biochemical, structural and functional studies of receptors are ligand-consuming and the cost of commercial chemokines hinders their use in such studies. Here, we describe methods for the expression, refolding, purification, and functional characterization of CXCL12 and CCL5 constructs incorporating C-terminal epitope tags. The model tags used were hexahistidines and Strep-Tag for affinity purification, and the double lanthanoid binding tag for fluorescence imaging and crystal structure resolution. The ability of modified and purified chemokines to bind and activate CXCR4 and CCR5 receptors was tested in Xenopus oocytes expressing the receptors, together with a Kir3 G-protein activated K(+ channel that served as a reporter of receptor activation. Results demonstrate that tags greatly influence the biochemical properties of the recombinant chemokines. Besides, despite the absence of any evidence for CXCL12 or CCL5 C-terminus involvement in receptor binding and activation, we demonstrated unpredictable effects of tag insertion on the ligand apparent affinity and efficacy or on the ligand dissociation. These tagged chemokines should constitute useful tools for the selective purification of properly-folded chemokines receptors and the study of their native quaternary structures.

  1. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G;

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...

  2. Regulation of Chemokine Function: The Roles of GAG-Binding and Post-Translational Nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah; Martínez-Burgo, Beatriz; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Kirby, John A; Sheerin, Neil S; Ali, Simi

    2017-08-03

    The primary function of chemokines is to direct the migration of leukocytes to the site of injury during inflammation. The effects of chemokines are modulated by several means, including binding to G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and through post-translational modifications (PTMs). GAGs, present on cell surfaces, bind chemokines released in response to injury. Chemokines bind leukocytes via their GPCRs, which directs migration and contributes to local inflammation. Studies have shown that GAGs or GAG-binding peptides can be used to interfere with chemokine binding and reduce leukocyte recruitment. Post-translational modifications of chemokines, such as nitration, which occurs due to the production of reactive species during oxidative stress, can also alter their biological activity. This review describes the regulation of chemokine function by GAG-binding ability and by post-translational nitration. These are both aspects of chemokine biology that could be targeted if the therapeutic potential of chemokines, like CXCL8, to modulate inflammation is to be realised.

  3. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders.

  4. Differential response of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes to burn wound exudates: potential role of skin-specific chemokine CCL27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Lenie J; Kroeze, Kim L; Waaijman, Taco; Breetveld, Melanie; Sampat-Sardjoepersad, Shakun C; Niessen, Frank B; Middelkoop, Esther; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Many cell-based regenerative medicine strategies toward tissue-engineered constructs are currently being explored. Cell-cell interactions and interactions with different biomaterials are extensively investigated, whereas very few studies address how cultured cells will interact with soluble wound-healing mediators that are present within the wound bed after transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine how adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC), dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes will react when they come in contact with the deep cutaneous burn wound bed. Burn wound exudates isolated from deep burn wounds were found to contain many cytokines, including chemokines and growth factors related to inflammation and wound healing. Seventeen mediators were identified by ELISA (concentration range 0.0006-9 ng/mg total protein), including the skin-specific chemokine CCL27. Burn wound exudates activated both ASC and dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocytes, to increase secretion of CXCL1, CXCL8, CCL2, and CCL20. Notably, ASC but not fibroblasts or keratinocytes showed significant increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (5-fold) and interleukin-6 (253-fold), although when the cells were incorporated in bi-layered skin substitute (SS) these differences were less pronounced. A similar discrepancy between ASC and dermal fibroblast mono-cultures was observed when recombinant human-CCL27 was used instead of burn wound exudates. Although CCL27 did not stimulate the secretion of any of the wound-healing mediators by keratinocytes, these cells, in contrast to ASC or dermal fibroblasts, showed increased proliferation and migration. Taken together, these results indicate that on transplantation, keratinocytes are primarily activated to promote wound closure. In contrast, dermal fibroblasts and, in particular, ASC respond vigorously to factors present in the wound bed, leading to increased secretion of angiogenesis/granulation tissue formation

  5. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN.

  6. Detection and quantitation of twenty-seven cytokines, chemokines and growth factors pre- and post-high abundance protein depletion in human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Beom Ahn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines, chemokines and growth factors (CCGFs in human plasma are analyzed for identification of biomarkers. However concentrations of CCGFs are very low; it is difficult to identify and quantify low abundance proteins in the presence of the high abundance proteins (HAPs unless HAPs are removed prior to analysis. However, there is a concern that the low abundance proteins such as CCGFs may also be removed during the HAP depletion process. In this study, we have examined whether or not depletion of the HAPs enhances detection of the CCGFs by immuno-assays. Top 14 HAPs were depleted from 10 healthy volunteers’ plasma using MARS-14 immuno-depletion column and a total of 27 CCGFs were analyzed by bead-based multiplexed immuno-assay. All 27 CCGFs were detected in neat plasma (NP, 25 were detected in flow through fraction (FT and 21 were detected in bound protein (BP fraction. Concentrations of 22 CCGFs were significantly higher in NP compared to FT and BP. Only one CCGF had higher concentration in FT compared to NP. The remaining 2 CCGFs were not different between NP and FT. It was counter-productive for the detection of 24 CCGFs after HAP removal, primarily due to post-depletion protein precipitation and/or re-suspension of pellets.

  7. Induction of CXC chemokines in human mesenchymal stemcells by stimulation with secreted frizzled-related proteinsthrough non-canonical Wnt signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of secreted frizzledrelatedproteins (sFRPs) on CXC chemokine expressionin human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs).METHODS: CXC chemokines such as CXCL5 andCXCL8 are induced in hMSCs during differentiation withosteogenic differentiation medium (OGM) and may beinvolved in angiogenic stimulation during bone repair.hMSCs were treated with conditioned medium (CM) fromL-cells expressing non-canonical Wnt5a protein, or withcontrol CM from wild type L-cells, or directly with sFRPsfor up to 10 d in culture. mRNA expression levels of bothCXCL5 and CXCL8 were quantitated by real-time reversetranscriptase-polymerase chain reaction and secretedprotein levels of these proteins determined by ELISA.Dose- (0-500 ng/mL) and time-response curves weregenerated for treatment with sFRP1. Signal transductionpathways were explored by western blot analysis withpan- or phosphorylation-specific antibodies, through useof specific pathway inhibitors, and through use of siRNAstargeting specific frizzled receptors (Fzd)-2 and 5 or the receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-2 (RoR2)prior to treatment with sFRPs.RESULTS: CM from L-cells expressing Wnt5a, a noncanonicalWnt, stimulated an increase in CXCL5 mRNAexpression and protein secretion in comparison to controlL-cell CM. sFRP1, which should inhibit both canonicaland non-canonical Wnt signaling, surprisingly enhancedthe expression of CXCL5 at 7 and 10 d. Dickkopf1, aninhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling prevented the sFRPstimulatedinduction of CXCL5 and actually inhibitedbasal levels of CXCL5 expression at 7 but not at 10 d posttreatment. In addition, all four sFRPs isoforms inducedCXCL8 expression in a dose- and time-dependent mannerwith maximum expression at 7 d with treatment at 150ng/mL. The largest increases in CXCL5 expression wereseen from stimulation with sFRP1 or sFRP2. Analysis ofmitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathwaysin the presence of OGM showed sFRP1

  8. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, T; Haga, K; Kameyama, K; Nakata, H

    1994-09-01

    Recent progress on the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinases is reviewed. beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK) is activated by G protein beta gamma -subunits, which interact with the carboxyl terminal portion of beta ARK. Muscarinic receptor m2-subtypes are phosphorylated by beta ARK1 in the central part of the third intracellular loop (I3). Phosphorylation of I3-GST fusion protein by beta ARK1 is synergistically stimulated by the beta gamma -subunits and mastoparan or a peptide corresponding to portions adjacent to the transmembrane segments of m2-receptors or by beta gamma -subunits and the agonist-bound I3-deleted m2 variant. These results indicate that agonist-bound receptors serve as both substrates and activators of beta ARK.

  9. Multiple switches in G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Shivani; Smith, Steven O

    2009-09-01

    The activation mechanism of G protein-coupled receptors has presented a puzzle that finally may be close to solution. These receptors have a relatively simple architecture consisting of seven transmembrane helices that contain just a handful of highly conserved amino acids, yet they respond to light and a range of chemically diverse ligands. Recent NMR structural studies on the active metarhodopsin II intermediate of the visual receptor rhodopsin, along with the recent crystal structure of the apoprotein opsin, have revealed multiple structural elements or 'switches' that must be simultaneously triggered to achieve full activation. The confluence of several required structural changes is an example of "coincidence counting", which is often used by nature to regulate biological processes. In ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors, the presence of multiple switches may provide an explanation for the differences between full, partial and inverse agonists.

  10. Membrane Recruitment of the Non-receptor Protein GIV/Girdin (Gα-interacting, Vesicle-associated Protein/Girdin) Is Sufficient for Activating Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; Leyme, Anthony; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Marivin, Arthur; Broselid, Stefan; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-12-30

    GIV (aka Girdin) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates heterotrimeric G protein signaling downstream of RTKs and integrins, thereby serving as a platform for signaling cascade cross-talk. GIV is recruited to the cytoplasmic tail of receptors upon stimulation, but the mechanism of activation of its G protein regulatory function is not well understood. Here we used assays in humanized yeast models and G protein activity biosensors in mammalian cells to investigate the role of GIV subcellular compartmentalization in regulating its ability to promote G protein signaling. We found that in unstimulated cells GIV does not co-fractionate with its substrate G protein Gαi3 on cell membranes and that constitutive membrane anchoring of GIV in yeast cells or rapid membrane translocation in mammalian cells via chemically induced dimerization leads to robust G protein activation. We show that membrane recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif alone is sufficient for G protein activation and that it does not require phosphomodification. Furthermore, we engineered a synthetic protein to show that recruitment of the GIV "Gα binding and activating" motif to membranes via association with active RTKs, instead of via chemically induced dimerization, is also sufficient for G protein activation. These results reveal that recruitment of GIV to membranes in close proximity to its substrate G protein is a major mechanism responsible for the activation of its G protein regulatory function.

  11. Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR7 in CXCR4-expressing human 143B osteosarcoma cells enhances lung metastasis of intratibial xenografts in SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecke, Patrick; Arlt, Matthias J E; Muff, Roman; Campanile, Carmen; Gvozdenovic, Ana; Husmann, Knut; Holzwarth, Nathalie; Cameroni, Elisabetta; Ehrensperger, Felix; Thelen, Marcus; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    More effective treatment of metastasizing osteosarcoma with a current mean 5-year survival rate of less than 20% requires more detailed knowledge on mechanisms and key regulatory molecules of the complex metastatic process. CXCR4, the receptor of the chemokine CXCL12, has been reported to promote tumor progression and metastasis in osteosarcoma. CXCR7 is a recently deorphanized CXCL12-scavenging receptor with so far not well-defined functions in tumor biology. The present study focused on a potential malignancy enhancing function of CXCR7 in interaction with CXCR4 in osteosarcoma, which was investigated in an intratibial osteosarcoma model in SCID mice, making use of the human 143B osteosarcoma cell line that spontaneously metastasizes to the lung and expresses endogenous CXCR4. 143B osteosarcoma cells stably expressing LacZ (143B-LacZ cells) were retrovirally transduced with a gene encoding HA-tagged CXCR7 (143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells). 143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells co-expressing CXCR7 and CXCR4 exhibited CXCL12 scavenging and enhanced adhesion to IL-1β-activated HUVEC cells compared to 143B-LacZ cells expressing CXCR4 alone. SCID mice intratibially injected with 143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells had significantly (plung metastases than mice injected with 143B-LacZ cells. Unexpectedly, 143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells, unlike 143B-LacZ cells, also metastasized with high incidence to the auriculum cordis. In conclusion, expression of the CXCL12 scavenging receptor CXCR7 in the CXCR4-expressing human 143B osteosarcoma cell line enhances its metastatic activity in intratibial primary tumors in SCID mice that predominantly metastasize to the lung and thereby closely mimic the human disease. These findings point to CXCR7 as a target, complementary to previously proposed CXCR4, for more effective metastasis-suppressive treatment in osteosarcoma.

  12. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly be divi...

  13. Chromosomal distribution of PcG proteins during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Nègre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins are able to maintain the memory of silent transcriptional states of homeotic genes throughout development. In Drosophila, they form multimeric complexes that bind to specific DNA regulatory elements named PcG response elements (PREs. To date, few PREs have been identified and the chromosomal distribution of PcG proteins during development is unknown. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP with genomic tiling path microarrays to analyze the binding profile of the PcG proteins Polycomb (PC and Polyhomeotic (PH across 10 Mb of euchromatin. We also analyzed the distribution of GAGA factor (GAF, a sequence-specific DNA binding protein that is found at most previously identified PREs. Our data show that PC and PH often bind to clustered regions within large loci that encode transcription factors which play multiple roles in developmental patterning and in the regulation of cell proliferation. GAF co-localizes with PC and PH to a limited extent, suggesting that GAF is not a necessary component of chromatin at PREs. Finally, the chromosome-association profile of PC and PH changes during development, suggesting that the function of these proteins in the regulation of some of their target genes might be more dynamic than previously anticipated.

  14. Molecular piracy of chemokine receptors by herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P M

    1994-01-01

    To succeed as a biological entity, viruses must exploit normal cellular functions and elude the host immune system; they often do so by molecular mimicry. One way that mimicry may occur is when viruses copy and modify host genes. The best studied examples of this are the oncogenes of RNA retroviruses, but a growing number of examples are also known for DNA viruses. So far they all come from just two groups of DNA viruses, the herpesviruses and poxviruses, and the majority of examples are for genes whose products regulate immune responses, such as cytokines, cytokine receptors, and complement control proteins. This review will focus on human and herpesvirus receptors for chemokines, a family of leukocyte chemoattractant and activating factors that are thought to be important mediators of inflammation. Although the biological roles of the viral chemokine receptor homologues are currently unknown, their connection to specific sets of chemokines has suggested a number of possible functions.

  15. Adhering maternal platelets can contribute to the cytokine and chemokine cocktail released by human first trimester villous placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschitz, A; Siwetz, M; Schlenke, P; Gauster, M

    2015-11-01

    Placental villous explant culture has been increasingly recognized as suitable model to study secretion of inflammatory and immune modulating factors by human placenta. Most of these factors likely derive from the syncytiotrophoblast, whereas extraplacental sources such as maternal peripheral blood cells are rarely considered. Due to their small size and absence of a nucleus, platelets adhering to perivillous fibrinoid of normal placenta are frequently ignored in routine immunohistochemistry. Here we demonstrate adhering maternal platelets on first trimester placental villi after explant culture and point out that platelet-derived factors must be considered when analyzing the inflammatory secretion profile of human placenta.

  16. Genetic variants in the chemokines and chemokine receptors in Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Oscar; Martín, Javier; González, Clara Isabel

    2012-08-01

    Clinical symptoms of Chagas' disease occur in 30% of the individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and are characterised by heart inflammation and dysfunction. Chemokines and chemokine receptors control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are involved in the modulation of Th1 or Th2 responses. To determine their influence, we investigated the possible role of CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 chemokines, and CCR2 and CCR5 chemokines receptors cluster gene polymorphisms with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Our study included 260 Chagas seropositive individuals (asymptomatic, n=130; cardiomyopathic, n=130) from an endemic area of Colombia. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. We found statistically significant differences in the distribution of the CCR5 human haplogroup (HH)-A (p=0.027; OR=3.78, 95% CI=1.04-13.72). Moreover, we found that the CCR5-2733 G and CCR5-2554 T alleles are associated, respectively, with a reduced risk of susceptibility and severity to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy. No other associations were found to be significant for the other polymorphisms analysed in the CCR5, CCR2, CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 genes. Our data suggest that the analysed chemokines and chemokine receptor genetic variants have a weak but important association with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy in the population under study.

  17. Directed migration of human neural progenitor cells to interleukin-1β is promoted by chemokines stromal cell-derived factor-1 and monocyte chemotactic factor-1 in mouse brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yumei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis, including the proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs, is impaired in HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected macrophages (HIV-MDM regulate stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1 production in astrocytes through Interleukin-1β (IL-1β. Chemokines are known to induce NPC migration; however, it remains unclear how chemokines produced in inflammation regulate NPC migration. Methods The secretion of SDF-1 and Monocyte chemotactic preotein-1 (MCP-1 in astrocytes upon IL-1β stimulation was measured by ELISA assay. Human NPCs were injected parallel along with IL-1β, SDF-1 or MCP-1 intracranially into basal ganglion 1 mm apart in SCID mice, and immunofluorescent staining was used to study the survival and migration of injected human NPCs. Results SDF-1 and MCP-1 are secreted by astrocytes upon IL-1β stimulation in a time-dependent manner. Injected human NPCs survived in SCID mice and migrated towards sites of IL-1β, SDF-1 and MCP-1 injection. Conclusions In conclusion, chemokines SDF-1 or MCP-1 secreted by astrocytes in the presence of IL-1β injection are attractive to NPCs injected into SCID mouse brains, suggesting that SDF-1 and MCP-1 play important roles in NPC migration during neuroinflammation.

  18. The unconventional G-protein cycle of LRRK2 and Roco proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terheyden, Susanne; Nederveen-Schippers, Laura M; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-12-15

    Mutations in the human leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most frequent cause of hereditary Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 belongs to the Roco family of proteins, which are characterized by the presence of a Ras of complex proteins domain (Roc), a C-terminal of Roc domain (COR) and a kinase domain. Despite intensive research, much remains unknown about activity and the effect of PD-associated mutations. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that LRRK2 and Roco proteins are noncanonical G-proteins that do not depend on guanine nucleotide exchange factors or GTPase-activating proteins for activation. In this review, we will discuss the unusual G-protein cycle of LRRK2 in the context of the complex intramolecular LRRK2 activation mechanism.

  19. Expression of Human CD4 and chemokine receptors in cotton rat cells confers permissiveness for productive HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broder Christopher C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current small animal models for studying HIV-1 infection are very limited, and this continues to be a major obstacle for studying HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis, as well as for the urgent development and evaluation of effective anti-HIV-1 therapies and vaccines. Previously, it was shown that HIV-1 can infect cotton rats as indicated by development of antibodies against all major proteins of the virus, the detection of viral cDNA in spleen and brain of challenged animals, the transmission of infectious virus, albeit with low efficiency, from animal to animal by blood, and an additional increase in the mortality in the infected groups. Results Using in vitro experiments, we now show that cotton rat cell lines engineered to express human receptor complexes for HIV-1 (hCD4 along with hCXCR4 or hCCR5 support virus entry, viral cDNA integration, and the production of infectious virus. Conclusion These results further suggest that the development of transgenic cotton rats expressing human HIV-1 receptors may prove to be useful small animal model for HIV infection.

  20. The Retinoic Acid Receptor-α mediates human T-cell activation and Th2 cytokine and chemokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Key Michael

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently demonstrated that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis RA promote IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis, while decreasing IFN-γ and TNF-α expression by activated human T cells and reduces the synthesis of IL-12p70 from accessory cells. Here, we have demonstrated that the observed effects using ATRA and 9-cis RA are shared with the clinically useful RAR ligand, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA, and the retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 but not with the RAR-β/γ ligand, 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide (4-HPR. Results The increase in type 2 cytokine production by these retinoids correlated with the expression of the T cell activation markers, CD69 and CD38. The RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 recapitulated all of the T cell activation and type 2 cytokine-inducing effects of ATRA and 9-cis-RA, while the RAR-α-selective antagonist, RO 41–5253, inhibited these effects. Conclusion These results strongly support a role for RAR-α engagement in the regulation of genes and proteins involved with human T cell activation and type 2 cytokine production.

  1. Role of APP Interactions with Heterotrimeric G Proteins: Physiological Functions and Pathological Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Philip F; Kögel, Donat

    2017-01-01

    Following the discovery that the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the source of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD), structural analyses suggested that the holoprotein resembles a transmembrane receptor. Initial studies using reconstituted membranes demonstrated that APP can directly interact with the heterotrimeric G protein Gαo (but not other G proteins) via an evolutionarily G protein-binding motif in its cytoplasmic domain. Subsequent investigations in cell culture showed that antibodies against the extracellular domain of APP could stimulate Gαo activity, presumably mimicking endogenous APP ligands. In addition, chronically activating wild type APP or overexpressing mutant APP isoforms linked with familial AD could provoke Go-dependent neurotoxic responses, while biochemical assays using human brain samples suggested that the endogenous APP-Go interactions are perturbed in AD patients. More recently, several G protein-dependent pathways have been implicated in the physiological roles of APP, coupled with evidence that APP interacts both physically and functionally with Gαo in a variety of contexts. Work in insect models has demonstrated that the APP ortholog APPL directly interacts with Gαo in motile neurons, whereby APPL-Gαo signaling regulates the response of migratory neurons to ligands encountered in the developing nervous system. Concurrent studies using cultured mammalian neurons and organotypic hippocampal slice preparations have shown that APP signaling transduces the neuroprotective effects of soluble sAPPα fragments via modulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, providing a mechanism for integrating the stress and survival responses regulated by APP. Notably, this effect was also inhibited by pertussis toxin, indicating an essential role for Gαo/i proteins. Unexpectedly, C-terminal fragments (CTFs) derived from APP have also been found to interact with Gαs, whereby CTF-Gαs signaling can promote neurite outgrowth

  2. The repertoire of trace amine G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Yan, Yi-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Trace amines, such as tyramine, beta-phenylethylamine, tryptamine, and octopamine, are present in trace levels in nervous systems and bind a specific family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), but the function or origin of this system is not well understood. We searched the genomes of several...... ancestor of vertebrate TA-receptors arose before the split of the ray-finned and lobe-finned fishes. The evolutionary history of the TA-receptors is more complex than for most other GPCR families and here we suggest a mechanism by which they may have arisen....

  3. Regulating Rap small G-proteins in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloerich, Martijn; Bos, Johannes L

    2011-10-01

    Signaling by the small G-protein Rap is under tight regulation by its GEFs and GAPs. These are multi-domain proteins that are themselves controlled by distinct upstream pathways, and thus couple different extra- and intracellular cues to Rap. The individual RapGEFs and RapGAPs are, in addition, targeted to specific cellular locations by numerous anchoring mechanisms and, consequently, may control different pools of Rap. Here, we review the various activating signals and targeting mechanisms of these proteins and discuss their contribution to the spatiotemporal regulation and biological functions of the Rap proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Conformational changes in the G protein Gs induced by the β2 adrenergic receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Ka Young; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Liu, Tong

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors represent the largest family of membrane receptors that instigate signalling through nucleotide exchange on heterotrimeric G proteins. Nucleotide exchange, or more precisely, GDP dissociation from the G protein α-subunit, is the key step towards G protein activation...

  5. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  6. Erythrocyte Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC):diagnostic and therapeutic implications in atherosclerotic Cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stavros APOSTOLAKIS; Georgios K CHALIKIAS; Dimitrios N TZIAKAS; Stavros KONSTANTINIDES

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease.The last three decades efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that are implicated in the process of atherogenesis and plaque development.Chemokines are crucial mediators in every step of this process.Additionally.cellular components of the peripheral blood have been proved important mediators in the formation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions.However,until recently data were mostly focusing on leukocytes and platelets.Erythrocytes were considered unreceptive bystanders and limited data supported their importance in the progression and destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque.Recently erythrocytes, through their Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines(DARC),have been proposed as appealing regulators of chemokine-induced pathways.Dissimilar to every other chemokine receptor DARC possesses high affinity for severalligands from both CC and CXC chemokine sub-families.Moreover,DARC is not coupled to a G-protein or any other intracellular signalling system;thus it is incapable of generating second messages.The exact biochemical role of erythrocyte DARC remains to be determined.It is however challenging the fact that DARC is a regulator of almost every CC and CXC chemokine ligand and therefore DARC antagonism could efiectively block the complex pre-inflammatory chemokine network.In the present review we intent to provid recent evidence supporting the role of erythrocytes in atherosclerosis focusing on the erythrocyte-chemokine interaction through the Duffy antigen system.

  7. Natural killer cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are an important source of CC-chemokines and suppress HIV-1 entry and replication in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), which are the natural ligands of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5, inhibit replication of MT-2- negative strains of HIV-1 by interfering with the ability of these strains to utilize CCR5 as a coreceptor for entry in CD4(+) cells. The present study investigates the capacity of natural killer (NK) cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals to produce CC-chemokines...

  8. CC-Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) Suppresses High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Internalization and Cholesterol Efflux via CC-Chemokine Receptor 2 (CCR2) Induction and p42/44 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activation in Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Run-Lu; Huang, Can-Xia; Bao, Jin-Lan; Jiang, Jie-Yu; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Shu-Xian; Cai, Wei-Bin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Ling

    2016-09-09

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to be internalized and to promote reverse cholesterol transport in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanism underlying these processes has not been studied. In this study, we aim to characterize HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux in ECs and regulatory mechanisms. We found mature HDL particles were reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), which was associated with an increase in CC-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). In cultured primary human coronary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, we determined that CCL2 suppressed the binding (4 °C) and association (37 °C) of HDL to/with ECs and HDL cellular internalization. Furthermore, CCL2 inhibited [(3)H]cholesterol efflux to HDL/apoA1 in ECs. We further found that CCL2 induced CC-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression and siRNA-CCR2 reversed CCL2 suppression on HDL binding, association, internalization, and on cholesterol efflux in ECs. Moreover, CCL2 induced p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation via CCR2, and p42/44 MAPK inhibition reversed the suppression of CCL2 on HDL metabolism in ECs. Our study suggests that CCL2 was elevated in CAD patients. CCL2 suppressed HDL internalization and cholesterol efflux via CCR2 induction and p42/44 MAPK activation in ECs. CCL2 induction may contribute to impair HDL function and form atherosclerosis in CAD.

  9. Endogenous circadian regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shadab A; Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Scheer, Frank A J L; Shea, Steven A; Czeisler, Charles A; Davidson, Alec J; Lockley, Steven W

    2015-07-01

    Various aspects of immune response exhibit 24-h variations suggesting that infection susceptibility and treatment efficacy may vary by time of day. Whether these 24-h variations are endogenous or evoked by changes in environmental or behavioral conditions is not known. We assessed the endogenous circadian control and environmental and behavioral influences on ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide stimulation of whole blood in thirteen healthy participants under 48h of baseline conditions with standard sleep-wake schedules and 40-50h of constant environmental and behavioral (constant routine; CR) conditions. Significant 24-h rhythms were observed under baseline conditions in Monocyte Chemotactic Protein, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and Interleukin 8 but not Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha whereas significant 24-h rhythms were observed in all four immune factors under CR conditions. The rhythm amplitudes, expressed as a percentage of mean, were comparable between immune factors and across conditions. In contrast, the acrophase time (time of the fitted peak) was different between immune factors, and included daytime and nighttime peaks and changes across behavioral conditions. These results suggest that the endogenous circadian system underpins the temporal organization of immune responses in humans with additional effects of external environmental and behavioral cycles. These findings have implications for understanding the adverse effects of recurrent circadian disruption and sleep curtailment on immune function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational methods for studying G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Bartuzi, Damian; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The functioning of GPCRs is classically described by the ternary complex model as the interplay of three basic components: a receptor, an agonist, and a G protein. According to this model, receptor activation results from an interaction with an agonist, which translates into the activation of a particular G protein in the intracellular compartment that, in turn, is able to initiate particular signaling cascades. Extensive studies on GPCRs have led to new findings which open unexplored and exciting possibilities for drug design and safer and more effective treatments with GPCR targeting drugs. These include discovery of novel signaling mechanisms such as ligand promiscuity resulting in multitarget ligands and signaling cross-talks, allosteric modulation, biased agonism, and formation of receptor homo- and heterodimers and oligomers which can be efficiently studied with computational methods. Computer-aided drug design techniques can reduce the cost of drug development by up to 50%. In particular structure- and ligand-based virtual screening techniques are a valuable tool for identifying new leads and have been shown to be especially efficient for GPCRs in comparison to water-soluble proteins. Modern computer-aided approaches can be helpful for the discovery of compounds with designed affinity profiles. Furthermore, homology modeling facilitated by a growing number of available templates as well as molecular docking supported by sophisticated techniques of molecular dynamics and quantitative structure-activity relationship models are an excellent source of information about drug-receptor interactions at the molecular level.

  11. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5 is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc and smoothened (Smo. Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP, we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases.

  12. Natural Products Induce a G Protein-Mediated Calcium Pathway Activating p53 in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Paul R.; Yan, Michael B.; Bhattacharya, Saswati; Polans, Arthur S.; Kenealey, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin are examples of natural products being used as chemotherapeutics but with adverse side effects that limit their therapeutic window. Natural products derived from plants and having low toxicity, such as quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and piceatannol, have been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth both in vitro and in pre-clinical models of cancer, but their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, thus restricting their use as prototypes for developing synthetic analogs with improved anti-cancer properties. We and others have demonstrated that one of the earliest and consistent events upon exposure of tumor cells to these less toxic natural products is a rise in cytoplasmic calcium, activating several pro-apoptotic pathways. We describe here a G protein/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway (InsP3) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that mediates between these less toxic natural products and the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Further, we demonstrate that this elevation of intracellular calcium modulates p53 activity and the subsequent transcription of several pro-apoptotic genes encoding PIG8, CD95, PIDD, TP53INP, RRM2B, Noxa, p21 and PUMA. We conclude from our findings that less toxic natural products likely bind to a G protein coupled receptor that activates a G protein-mediated and calcium-dependent pathway resulting selectively in tumor cell death. PMID:26341291

  13. Natural products induce a G protein-mediated calcium pathway activating p53 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Paul R; Yan, Michael B; Bhattacharya, Saswati; Polans, Arthur S; Kenealey, Jason D

    2015-11-01

    Paclitaxel, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin are examples of natural products being used as chemotherapeutics but with adverse side effects that limit their therapeutic window. Natural products derived from plants and having low toxicity, such as quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and piceatannol, have been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth both in vitro and in pre-clinical models of cancer, but their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, thus restricting their use as prototypes for developing synthetic analogs with improved anti-cancer properties. We and others have demonstrated that one of the earliest and consistent events upon exposure of tumor cells to these less toxic natural products is a rise in cytoplasmic calcium, activating several pro-apoptotic pathways. We describe here a G protein/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway (InsP3) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that mediates between these less toxic natural products and the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Further, we demonstrate that this elevation of intracellular calcium modulates p53 activity and the subsequent transcription of several pro-apoptotic genes encoding PIG8, CD95, PIDD, TP53INP, RRM2B, Noxa, p21 and PUMA. We conclude from our findings that less toxic natural products likely bind to a G protein coupled receptor that activates a G protein-mediated and calcium-dependent pathway resulting selectively in tumor cell death.

  14. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Jennifer R.; Jenny Yingzi Wang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in ...

  15. Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR7 in CXCR4-expressing human 143B osteosarcoma cells enhances lung metastasis of intratibial xenografts in SCID mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Brennecke

    Full Text Available More effective treatment of metastasizing osteosarcoma with a current mean 5-year survival rate of less than 20% requires more detailed knowledge on mechanisms and key regulatory molecules of the complex metastatic process. CXCR4, the receptor of the chemokine CXCL12, has been reported to promote tumor progression and metastasis in osteosarcoma. CXCR7 is a recently deorphanized CXCL12-scavenging receptor with so far not well-defined functions in tumor biology. The present study focused on a potential malignancy enhancing function of CXCR7 in interaction with CXCR4 in osteosarcoma, which was investigated in an intratibial osteosarcoma model in SCID mice, making use of the human 143B osteosarcoma cell line that spontaneously metastasizes to the lung and expresses endogenous CXCR4. 143B osteosarcoma cells stably expressing LacZ (143B-LacZ cells were retrovirally transduced with a gene encoding HA-tagged CXCR7 (143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells. 143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells co-expressing CXCR7 and CXCR4 exhibited CXCL12 scavenging and enhanced adhesion to IL-1β-activated HUVEC cells compared to 143B-LacZ cells expressing CXCR4 alone. SCID mice intratibially injected with 143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells had significantly (p<0.05 smaller primary tumors, but significantly (p<0.05 higher numbers of lung metastases than mice injected with 143B-LacZ cells. Unexpectedly, 143B-LacZ-X7-HA cells, unlike 143B-LacZ cells, also metastasized with high incidence to the auriculum cordis. In conclusion, expression of the CXCL12 scavenging receptor CXCR7 in the CXCR4-expressing human 143B osteosarcoma cell line enhances its metastatic activity in intratibial primary tumors in SCID mice that predominantly metastasize to the lung and thereby closely mimic the human disease. These findings point to CXCR7 as a target, complementary to previously proposed CXCR4, for more effective metastasis-suppressive treatment in osteosarcoma.

  16. The G protein Gi1 exhibits basal coupling but not preassembly with G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Alexey; Lazar, Josef

    2017-06-09

    The Gi/o protein family transduces signals from a diverse group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The observed specificity of Gi/o-GPCR coupling and the high rate of Gi/o signal transduction have been hypothesized to be enabled by the existence of stable associates between Gi/o proteins and their cognate GPCRs in the inactive state (Gi/o-GPCR preassembly). To test this hypothesis, we applied the recently developed technique of two-photon polarization microscopy (2PPM) to Gαi1 subunits labeled with fluorescent proteins and four GPCRs: the α2A-adrenergic receptor, GABAB, cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R), and dopamine receptor type 2. Our experiments with non-dissociating mutants of fluorescently labeled Gαi1 subunits (exhibiting impaired dissociation from activated GPCRs) showed that 2PPM is capable of detecting GPCR-G protein interactions. 2PPM experiments with non-mutated fluorescently labeled Gαi1 subunits and α2A-adrenergic receptor, GABAB, or dopamine receptor type 2 receptors did not reveal any interaction between the Gi1 protein and the non-stimulated GPCRs. In contrast, non-stimulated CB1R exhibited an interaction with the Gi1 protein. Further experiments revealed that this interaction is caused solely by CB1R basal activity; no preassembly between CB1R and the Gi1 protein could be observed. Our results demonstrate that four diverse GPCRs do not preassemble with non-active Gi1 However, we also show that basal GPCR activity allows interactions between non-stimulated GPCRs and Gi1 (basal coupling). These findings suggest that Gi1 interacts only with active GPCRs and that the well known high speed of GPCR signal transduction does not require preassembly between G proteins and GPCRs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Splice Isoforms of Phosducin-like Protein Control the Expression of Heterotrimeric G Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xueli; Sinha, Satyabrata; Belcastro, Marycharmain; Woodard, Catherine; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Stoilov, Peter; Sokolov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play an essential role in cellular signaling; however, the mechanism regulating their synthesis and assembly remains poorly understood. A line of evidence indicates that the posttranslational processing of G protein β subunits begins inside the protein-folding chamber of the chaperonin containing t-complex protein 1. This process is facilitated by the ubiquitously expressed phosducin-like protein (PhLP), which is thought to act as a CCT co-factor. Here we demonstrate that alternative splicing of the PhLP gene gives rise to a transcript encoding a truncated, short protein (PhLPs) that is broadly expressed in human tissues but absent in mice. Seeking to elucidate the function of PhLPs, we expressed this protein in the rod photoreceptors of mice and found that this manipulation caused a dramatic translational and posttranslational suppression of rod heterotrimeric G proteins. The investigation of the underlying mechanism revealed that PhLPs disrupts the folding of Gβ and the assembly of Gβ and Gγ subunits, events normally assisted by PhLP, by forming a stable and apparently inactive tertiary complex with CCT preloaded with nascent Gβ. As a result, the cellular levels of Gβ and Gγ, which depends on Gβ for stability, decline. In addition, PhLPs evokes a profound and rather specific down-regulation of the Gα transcript, leading to a complete disappearance of the protein. This study provides the first evidence of a generic mechanism, whereby the splicing of the PhLP gene could potentially and efficiently regulate the cellular levels of heterotrimeric G proteins. PMID:23888055

  18. The Probiotic Mixture VSL#3 Dampens LPS-Induced Chemokine Expression in Human Dendritic Cells by Inhibition of STAT-1 Phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariman, R.; Tielen, F.; Koning, F.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2014-01-01

    VSL#3, a mixture of 8 different probiotic bacteria, has successfully been used in the clinic to treat Ulcerative Colitis. We previously identified the modulation of chemokines as a major mechanism in the protective effect of the VSL#3 in a mouse model of colitis. This was supported by in vitro studi

  19. Priming by Chemokines Restricts Lateral Mobility of the Adhesion Receptor LFA-1 and Restores Adhesion to ICAM-1 Nano-Aggregates on Human Mature Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgman, K.J.; Zanten, T.S. van; Manzo, C.; Cabezon, R.; Cambi, A.; Benitez-Ribas, D.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific beta2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into

  20. Priming by Chemokines Restricts Lateral Mobility of the Adhesion Receptor LFA-1 and Restores Adhesion to ICAM-1 Nano-Aggregates on Human Mature Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgman, K.J.; Zanten, van T.S.; Manzo, C.; Cabezon, R.; Cambi, A.; Benitez-Ribas, D.; Garcia Parajo, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the

  1. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.mantovani@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan (Italy)

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  2. submitter Emerging importance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands in cardiovascular diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Altara, R; Brandao, R D; Zeidan, A; Booz, G W; Zouein, F A

    2016-01-01

    The CXC chemokines, CXCL4, -9, -10, -11, CXCL4L1, and the CC chemokine CCL21, activate CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), a cell-surface G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly by Th1 cells, cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and NK cells that have a key role in immunity and inflammation. However, CXCR3 is also expressed by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and appears to be important in controlling physiological vascular function. In the last decade, evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies has revealed the participation of CXCR3 and its ligands in multiple cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) of different aetiologies including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and transplant coronary artery disease (CAD). CXCR3 ligands have also proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the deve...

  3. [G-protein-coupled receptors targeting: the allosteric approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, Julien A; Pantel, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are a major family of drug targets. Essentially all drugs targeting these receptors on the market compete with the endogenous ligand (agonists or antagonists) for binding the receptor. Recently, non-competitive compounds binding to distinct sites from the cognate ligand were documented in various classes of these receptors. These compounds, called allosteric modulators, generally endowed of a better selectivity are able to modulate specifically the endogenous signaling of the receptor. To better understand the promising potential of this class of GPCRs targeting compounds, this review highlights the properties of allosteric modulators, the strategies used to identify them and the challenges associated with the development of these compounds.

  4. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Albasanz, José L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, Ismael; Pastor, Manuel; Sanz, Ferran; Martí-Solano, Maria; Manna, Moutusi; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Martín, Mairena; Selent, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is a key component of cell membranes with a proven modulatory role on the function and ligand-binding properties of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Crystal structures of prototypical GPCRs such as the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) have confirmed that cholesterol finds stable binding sites at the receptor surface suggesting an allosteric role of this lipid. Here we combine experimental and computational approaches to show that cholesterol can spontaneously enter the A2AR-binding pocket from the membrane milieu using the same portal gate previously suggested for opsin ligands. We confirm the presence of cholesterol inside the receptor by chemical modification of the A2AR interior in a biotinylation assay. Overall, we show that cholesterol's impact on A2AR-binding affinity goes beyond pure allosteric modulation and unveils a new interaction mode between cholesterol and the A2AR that could potentially apply to other GPCRs.

  5. Molecular dynamics techniques for modeling G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobb, Fiona M; Negri, Ana; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody

    2016-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a major class of drug targets and modulating their signaling can produce a wide range of pharmacological outcomes. With the growing number of high-resolution GPCR crystal structures, we have the unprecedented opportunity to leverage structure-based drug design techniques. Here, we discuss a number of advanced molecular dynamics (MD) techniques that have been applied to GPCRs, including long time scale simulations, enhanced sampling techniques, water network analyses, and free energy approaches to determine relative binding free energies. On the basis of the many success stories, including those highlighted here, we expect that MD techniques will be increasingly applied to aid in structure-based drug design and lead optimization for GPCRs.

  6. Engineering therapeutic antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Migyeong; Jung, Sang Taek

    2016-02-05

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most attractive therapeutic target classes because of their critical roles in intracellular signaling and their clinical relevance to a variety of diseases, including cancer, infection and inflammation. However, high conformational variability, the small exposed area of extracellular epitopes and difficulty in the preparation of GPCR antigens have delayed both the isolation of therapeutic anti-GPCR antibodies as well as studies on the structure, function and biochemical mechanisms of GPCRs. To overcome the challenges in generating highly specific anti-GPCR antibodies with enhanced efficacy and safety, various forms of antigens have been successfully designed and employed for screening with newly emerged systems based on laboratory animal immunization and high-throughput-directed evolution.

  7. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Albasanz, José L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, Ismael; Pastor, Manuel; Sanz, Ferran; Martí-Solano, Maria; Manna, Moutusi; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Martín, Mairena; Selent, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is a key component of cell membranes with a proven modulatory role on the function and ligand-binding properties of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Crystal structures of prototypical GPCRs such as the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) have confirmed that cholesterol finds stable binding sites at the receptor surface suggesting an allosteric role of this lipid. Here we combine experimental and computational approaches to show that cholesterol can spontaneously enter the A2AR-binding pocket from the membrane milieu using the same portal gate previously suggested for opsin ligands. We confirm the presence of cholesterol inside the receptor by chemical modification of the A2AR interior in a biotinylation assay. Overall, we show that cholesterol's impact on A2AR-binding affinity goes beyond pure allosteric modulation and unveils a new interaction mode between cholesterol and the A2AR that could potentially apply to other GPCRs. PMID:28220900

  8. Isolation and characterization of a new chemokine receptor gene, the putative chicken CXCR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q J; Lu, S; Ye, R D; Martins-Green, M

    2000-10-31

    This study delineates the isolation and characterization of a novel chemokine receptor gene, the putative chicken CXC receptor 1 (cCXCR1). Using a human CXCR1 probe, we isolated several positive clones from a chicken genomic library. One of the clones contained a fragment of approximately 5000bp that hybridized strongly with the hCXCR1 probe. This fragment was sequenced and subjected to a variety of computer analyses. The open reading frame for this gene predicts a seven transmembrane domain protein with all the characteristics of a chemokine receptor and with 67% sequence homology to hCXCR1, 65% to hCXCR2 and also with considerable sequence homology to other human chemokine receptors such as hCXCR4 (50%), hCCR2 (49%) and hCCR1 (49%). However, the homology to a previously isolated potential G-protein-coupled receptor for chickens (AvCRL1) is only 47%. Using 5' RACE, two transcription initiation sites were identified suggesting the potential for the expression of two protein isoforms (I and II) in vivo. The promoter for the putative cCXCR1 contains a variety of consensus transcription factor binding elements that can potentially be involved in the expression of this chicken receptor upon stimulation by stress-inducing agents. RT-PCR analysis was used to determine the pattern of expression of the larger isoform (I) of this receptor in a variety of tissues. This form of the receptor is expressed primarily in the organs of the gastrointestinal tract, tissues that are frequently exposed to stress-inducing agents, but not in the central nervous system, tissues that are protected from insult by the blood barrier. Using the same RT-PCR approach we show that stress-inducing agents, such as 'first-hand' and 'second-hand' cigarette smoke components, tumor promoters and thrombin, differentially stimulate the expression of the isoform I in primary fibroblasts. Thrombin is an enzyme that plays many important roles in thrombosis, angiogenesis and wound healing and exposure to

  9. Diversity of heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trusov Yuri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of three subunits Gα, Gβ and Gγ are present in most eukaryotes and mediate signaling in numerous biological processes. In plants, Gγ subunits were shown to provide functional selectivity to G-proteins. Three unconventional Gγ subunits were recently reported in Arabidopsis, rice and soybean but no structural analysis has been reported so far. Their relationship with conventional Gγ subunits and taxonomical distribution has not been yet demonstrated. Results After an extensive similarity search through plant genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes we assembled over 200 non-redundant proteins related to the known Gγ subunits. Structural analysis of these sequences revealed that most of them lack the obligatory C-terminal prenylation motif (CaaX. According to their C-terminal structures we classified the plant Gγ subunits into three distinct types. Type A consists of Gγ subunits with a putative prenylation motif. Type B subunits lack a prenylation motif and do not have any cysteine residues in the C-terminal region, while type C subunits contain an extended C-terminal domain highly enriched with cysteines. Comparative analysis of C-terminal domains of the proteins, intron-exon arrangement of the corresponding genes and phylogenetic studies suggested a common origin of all plant Gγ subunits. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses suggest that types C and B most probably originated independently from type A ancestors. We speculate on a potential mechanism used by those Gγ subunits lacking isoprenylation motifs to anchor the Gβγ dimer to the plasma membrane and propose a new flexible nomenclature for plant Gγ subunits. Finally, in the light of our new classification, we give a word of caution about the interpretation of Gγ research in Arabidopsis and its generalization to other plant species.

  10. An IgM-kappa rat monoclonal antibody specific for the type 1 sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptor with antagonist and agonist activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzl, Edward J; Dembrow, Dale; Van Brocklyn, James R; Gráler, Markus; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2004-04-30

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) type 1G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1 GPCRs) are specific high-affinity transducers for this lipid growth factor and cellular mediator. S1P1 GPCRs are widely-expressed and physiologically critical in the cardiovascular and immune systems. Functional rat monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been generated against human S1P1 GPCRs expressed in rat null-cell transductants to provide bioavailable agents capable of stimulating or suppressing the S1P-S1P1 GPCR axis. The rat IgM-kappa anti-S1P1 GPCR MoAb designated 4B5.2 binds specifically to native human or mouse S1P1 GPCRs in cell membranes, but not to solubilized and denatured S1P1 GPCRs. Specific binding of 32P-S1P to cellular S1P1 GPCRs is not blocked by 4B5.2. T cell chemotactic responses to S1P and S1P suppression of T cell chemotaxis to chemokines both are inhibited selectively by 4B5.2. In contrast, generation of gamma-interferon by stimulated T cells is diminished by 4B5.2 as by S1P. T cell S1P1 GPCR-selective antagonist and agonist effects of 4B5.2 in vivo may alter immune responses as distinctively as the available poly-S1P GPCR-directed pharmacological agents, without the undesirable side-effects attributable to actions of these agents on other S1P GPCRs.

  11. Understanding the Added Value of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Franco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute the most populated family of proteins within the human genome. Since the early sixties work on GPCRs and on GPCR-mediated signaling has led to a number of awards, the most recent being the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2012. The future of GPCRs research is surely based on their capacity for heteromerization. Receptor heteromers offer a series of challenges that will help in providing success in academic/basic research and translation into more effective and safer drugs.

  12. Shuttling of G protein subunits between the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisari, Mariangela; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2007-08-17

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (alphabetagamma) mediate the majority of signaling pathways in mammalian cells. It is long held that G protein function is localized to the plasma membrane. Here we examined the spatiotemporal dynamics of G protein localization using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence loss in photobleaching, and a photoswitchable fluorescent protein, Dronpa. Unexpectedly, G protein subunits shuttle rapidly (t1/2 bromopalmitate. Thus, contrary to present thought, G proteins do not reside permanently on the plasma membrane but are constantly testing the cytoplasmic surfaces of the plasma membrane and endomembranes to maintain G protein pools in intracellular membranes to establish direct communication between receptors and endomembranes.

  13. Upregulation of CC Chemokine Receptor 7 (CCR7) Enables Migration of Xenogeneic Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Rat Secondary Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Luan, Shao-Liang; Huang, Hong; Sun, Xing-Kun; Yang, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Hui; Han, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong; Han, Yan

    2016-12-30

    BACKGROUND CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression is vital for cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). Our previous work showed that inducing CCR7 expression enabled syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to migrate into SLOs, resulting in enhanced immunosuppressive performance in mice. Given that human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) are widely used in clinical therapy, we further investigated whether upregulation of CCR7 enables xenogeneic hASCs to migrate to rat SLOs. MATERIAL AND METHODS hASCs rarely express CCR7; therefore, hASCs were transfected with lentivirus encoding rat CCR7 (rCCR7) plus green fluorescence protein (GFP) or GFP alone. CCR7 mRNA and cell surface expression of rCCR7-hASCs and GFP-hASCs were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry (FCM), respectively. The phenotype, differentiation, and proliferation capacity of each cell type was also determined. To examine migration, rCCR7-hASCs and GFP-hASCs were injected intravenously into Lewis rats, and the proportion of GFP-positive cells in the spleen and lymph nodes was determined with FCM. RESULTS mRNA and cell surface protein expression of CCR7 was essentially undetectable in hASCs and GFP-ASCs; however, CCR7 was highly expressed in rCCR7-ASCs. rCCR7-hASCs, GFP-hASCs, and hASCs shared a similar immunophenotype, and maintained the ability of multilineage differentiation and proliferation. In addition, the average proportion of GFP-positive cells was significantly higher following transplantation of rCCR7-hASCs compared with GFP-hASCs (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that upregulation of rat CCR7 expression does not change the phenotype, differentiation, or proliferation capacity of hASCs, but does enable efficient migration of hASCs to rat SLOs.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase and G protein coupled receptors: co-conspirators in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Sarah M; Blackburn, Jessica S; Schmucker, Adam C; Burrage, Peter S; Brinckerhoff, Constance E

    2009-01-01

    Similarities in the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer have been noted for at least 30 years. Inflammatory cytokines and growth factors mediate cell proliferation, and proteinases, especially the collagenase, Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), contribute to disease progression by remodeling the extracellular matrix and modulating the microenvironment. This review focuses on two cancers (melanoma and breast) and on the autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and discusses the activated stromal cells found in these diseases. MMP-1 was originally thought to function only to degrade interstitial collagens, but recent studies have revealed novel roles for MMP-1 involving the G protein-coupled receptors: the chemokine receptor, CXCR-4, and Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1). Cooperativity between MMP-1 and CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling influences the behavior of activated fibroblasts in both RA and cancer. Further, MMP-1 is a vital part of an autocrine/paracrine MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis, a function that amplifies its potential to remodel the matrix and to modify cell behavior. Finally, new therapeutic agents directed at MMP-1 and G protein-coupled receptors are emerging. Even though these agents are more specific in their targets than past therapies, these targets are often shared between RA and cancer, underscoring fundamental similarities between autoimmune disorders and some cancers.

  15. A new monoclonal antibody (5D3-F7) which recognizes human monocyte-chemotactic protein-1 but not related chemokines. Development of a sandwich ELISA and in situ detection of producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, G; Milanese, C; Matteucci, C; Ruco, L; Zhou, D; Sozzani, S; Coletta, I; Mantovani, A

    1994-09-14

    Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally related cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment in normal and neoplastic tissues. The availability of non-cross-reacting reagents specific for each member of the C-C and C-X-C family is important for careful characterization of their in vitro and in vivo production and relevance. Here we describe a novel, highly specific, mAb against monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). The 5D3-F7 mAb (IgG1,kappa) recognizes human recombinant and natural MCP-1 in ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis. As a source of natural MCP-1 we used the 8387 human sarcoma line which produces spontaneously MCP-1 and responds to TNF with increased expression and release. The 5D3-F7 mAb inhibited the chemotactic activity of MCP-1 for monocytes. Using the 5D3-F7 mAb and a polyclonal rabbit anti-MCP-1 serum, a sandwich ELISA was developed. In both the direct and the sandwich ELISA, the 5D3-F7 mAb recognized human MCP-1, but not the closely related C-C chemokines MCP-1, MCP-2, MCP-3, MIP-1 alpha, and RANTES and the C-X-C chemokines IL-8, gro alpha and NAP-2. In culture supernatants the sensitivity of the sandwich ELISA was approximately equal to 30 pg/ml. The sandwich ELISA permitted detection of MCP-1 in resting or cytokine-stimulated endothelial, mesothelial and Kaposi's sarcoma cells. Preliminary immunohistochemical analysis revealed production of MCP-1 by macrophage-like cells at sites of inflammation. The 5D3-F7 mAb provides a novel, highly specific reagent with which to investigate the in vitro and in vivo production and role of MCP-1.

  16. T cell homeostasis requires G protein-coupled receptor-mediated access to trophic signals that promote growth and inhibit chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Cinalli, Ryan M.; Herman, Catherine E.; Lew, Brian O.; Wieman, Heather L.; Thompson, Craig B.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2005-01-01

    Signals that regulate T cell homeostasis are not fully understood. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), such as the chemokine receptors, may affect homeostasis by direct signaling or by guiding T cell migration to distinct location-restricted signals. Here, we show that blockade of Gαi-associated GPCR signaling by treatment with pertussis toxin led to T cell atrophy and shortened life-span in T cell-replete hosts and prevented T cell homeostatic growth and proliferation in T cell-deficient hos...

  17. Characterization of Structurally Novel G Protein Biased CB1 Agonists: Implications for Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Benjamin M; Franks, Lirit N; Tai, Sherrica; Fantegrossi, William E; Stahl, Edward L; Berquist, Michael D; Cabanlong, Christian V; Wilson, Catheryn D; Penthala, Narsimha R; Crooks, Peter A; Prather, Paul L

    2017-08-21

    The human cannabinoid subtype 1 receptor (hCB1R) is highly expressed in the CNS and serves as a therapeutic target for endogenous ligands as well as plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoids. Unfortunately, acute use of hCB1R agonists produces unwanted psychotropic effects and chronic administration results in development of tolerance and dependence, limiting the potential clinical use of these ligands. Studies in β-arrestin knockout mice suggest that interaction of certain GPCRs, including μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and hCB1Rs, with β-arrestins might be responsible for several adverse effects produced by agonists acting at these receptors. Indeed, agonists that bias opioid receptor activation toward G-protein, relative to β-arrestin signaling, produce less severe adverse effects. These observations indicate that therapeutic utility of agonists acting at hCB1Rs might be improved by development of G-protein biased hCB1R agonists. Our laboratory recently reported a novel class of indole quinulidinone (IQD) compounds that bind cannabinoid receptors with relatively high affinity and act with varying efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether agonists in this novel cannabinoid class exhibit ligand bias at hCB1 receptors. Our studies found that a novel IQD-derived hCB1 receptor agonist PNR-4-20 elicits robust G protein-dependent signaling, with transduction ratios similar to the non-biased hCB1R agonist CP-55,940. In marked contrast to CP-55,940, PNR-4-20 produces little to no β-arrestin 2 recruitment. Quantitative calculation of bias factors indicates that PNR-4-20 exhibits from 5.4-fold to 29.5-fold bias for G protein, relative to β-arrestin 2 signaling (when compared to G protein activation or inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, respectively). Importantly, as expected due to reduced β-arrestin 2 recruitment, chronic exposure of cells to PNR-4-20 results in significantly less desensitization and down-regulation of hCB1Rs compared to

  18. Multiplex detection of homo- and heterodimerization of g protein-coupled receptors by proximity biotinylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Steel

    Full Text Available Dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs represents a potential mechanism by which GPCR functions are regulated. Several resonance energy transfer (RET-based methods have revealed GPCR homo- and heterodimerization. However, interpretation of an increase in FRET efficiency could be attributed to either dimerization/oligomerization events or conformational changes within an already dimerized/oligomerized receptor complex. Furthermore, RET-based methods can only measure pairwise dimerization, and cannot easily achieve multiplex detection. In this study, we applied proximity-based biotinylation for detecting receptor dimerization by utilizing a specific enzyme-substrate pair that are fused to GPCRs. The biotin ligase BirA is fused to CXCR4 and site-specifically biotinylates an acceptor peptide (AP in the presence of biotin. As a test case for our newly developed assay, we have characterized the homo-dimerization of chemokine receptor CXCR4 and heterodimerization of CXCR4 with CCR2 or CCR5. The degree of biotinylation varies with the amount of GPCR-AP as well as biotinylation time. Using enzyme/substrate receptor pairs and measuring receptor biotinylation, we demonstrate that CXCR4 can homo-dimerize and hetero-dimerize with CCR2 and CCR5. The effect of CXCL12, agonist for CXCR4, was found to decrease surface biotinylation of CXCR4-AP. This effect is due to a combination of CXCR4 endocytosis and stabilization of CXCR4 homodimers. Finally, when CXCR4-AP, CCR2-AP, and CCR5-AP were expressed together, we observed CXCR4-CXCR4 homodimers and CXCR4-CCR2 and CXCR4-CCR5 heterodimers. The newly developed assay opens new opportunity for multiplex detection for GPCR homo- and heterodimerization within the same cellular context.

  19. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  20. Stabilization of G protein-coupled receptors by point mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eHeydenreich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are flexible integral membrane proteins involved in transmembrane signaling. Their involvement in many physiological processes makes them interesting targets for drug development. Determination of the structure of these receptors will help to design more specific drugs, however, their structural characterization has so far been hampered by the low expression and their inherent instability in detergents which made protein engineering indispensable for structural and biophysical characterization.Several approaches to stabilize the receptors in a particular conformation have led to breakthroughs in GPCR structure determination. These include truncations of the flexible regions, stabilization by antibodies and nanobodies, fusion partners, high affinity and covalently bound ligands as well as conformational stabilization by mutagenesis. In this review we focus on stabilization of GPCRs by insertion of point mutations, which lead to increased conformational and thermal stability as well as improved expression levels. We summarize existing mutagenesis strategies with different coverage of GPCR sequence space and depth of information, design and transferability of mutations and the molecular basis for stabilization. We also discuss whether mutations alter the structure and pharmacological properties of GPCRs.

  1. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Ubiquitination

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    Kamila Skieterska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs comprise the largest family of membrane receptors that control many cellular processes and consequently often serve as drug targets. These receptors undergo a strict regulation by mechanisms such as internalization and desensitization, which are strongly influenced by posttranslational modifications. Ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification with a broad range of functions that is currently gaining increased appreciation as a regulator of GPCR activity. The role of ubiquitination in directing GPCRs for lysosomal degradation has already been well-established. Furthermore, this modification can also play a role in targeting membrane and endoplasmic reticulum-associated receptors to the proteasome. Most recently, ubiquitination was also shown to be involved in GPCR signaling. In this review, we present current knowledge on the molecular basis of GPCR regulation by ubiquitination, and highlight the importance of E3 ubiquitin ligases, deubiquitinating enzymes and β-arrestins. Finally, we discuss classical and newly-discovered functions of ubiquitination in controlling GPCR activity.

  2. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

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    Xin Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5 enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis.

  3. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Klopffleisch, K.; Phan, N.; Augustin, K.; Bayne, R; Booker, K.; Botella, J.; Carpita, N.; Carr, T.; J. Chen; Cooke, T.; Arwen, F.; E. Friedman; Fulk, B.; Hahn, M.; K. Jiang

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio p...

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis infection results in a modest pro-inflammatory cytokine response and a decrease in T cell chemokine secretion in human polarized endocervical epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Lyndsey R; Lewis, Maria E; Greene, Sheila J; Foster, Timothy P; Quayle, Alison J

    2013-08-01

    The endocervical epithelium is a major reservoir for Chlamydia trachomatis in women, and genital infections are extended in their duration. Epithelial cells act as mucosal sentinels by secreting cytokines and chemokines in response to pathogen challenge and infection. We therefore determined the signature cytokine and chemokine response of primary-like endocervix-derived epithelial cells in response to a common genital serovar (D) of C. trachomatis. For these studies, we used a recently-established polarized, immortalized, endocervical epithelial cell model (polA2EN) that maintains, in vitro, the architectural and functional characteristics of endocervical epithelial cells in vivo including the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PolA2EN cells were susceptible to C. trachomatis infection, and chlamydiae in these cells underwent a normal developmental cycle as determined by a one-step growth curve. IL1α protein levels were increased in both apical and basolateral secretions of C. trachomatis infected polA2EN cells, but this response did not occur until 72h after infection. Furthermore, protein levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines IL6, TNFα and CXCL8 were not significantly different between C. trachomatis infected polA2EN cells and mock infected cells at any time during the chlamydial developmental cycle up to 120h post-infection. Intriguingly, C. trachomatis infection resulted in a significant decrease in the constitutive secretion of T cell chemokines IP10 and RANTES, and this required a productive C. trachomatis infection. Examination of anti-inflammatory cytokines revealed a high constitutive apical secretion of IL1ra from polA2EN cells that was not significantly modulated by C. trachomatis infection. IL-11 was induced by C. trachomatis, although only from the basolateral membrane. These results suggest that C. trachomatis can use evasion strategies to circumvent a robust pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine response. These evasion

  5. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24517644

  6. Heterologous expression of functional G-protein-coupled receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-02-01

    New strategies for expression, purification, functional characterization, and structural determination of membrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are constantly being developed because of their importance to human health. Here, we report a Caenorhabditis elegans heterologous expression system able to produce milligram amounts of functional native and engineered GPCRs. Both bovine opsin [(b)opsin] and human adenosine A(2A) subtype receptor [(h)A(2A)R] expressed in neurons or muscles of C. elegans were localized to cell membranes. Worms expressing these GPCRs manifested changes in motor behavior in response to light and ligands, respectively. With a newly devised protocol, 0.6-1 mg of purified homogenous 9-cis-retinal-bound bovine isorhodopsin [(b)isoRho] and ligand-bound (h)A(2A)R were obtained from C. elegans from one 10-L fermentation at low cost. Purified recombinant (b)isoRho exhibited its signature absorbance spectrum and activated its cognate G-protein transducin in vitro at a rate similar to native rhodopsin (Rho) obtained from bovine retina. Generally high expression levels of 11 native and mutant GPCRs demonstrated the potential of this C. elegans system to produce milligram quantities of high-quality GPCRs and possibly other membrane proteins suitable for detailed characterization.

  7. Differential expression of G protein alpha and ß subunit genes during development of Phytophthora infestans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laxalt, A.M.; Latijnhouwers, M.; Hulten, van M.; Govers, F.

    2002-01-01

    A G protein subunit gene (pigpa1) and a G protein subunit gene (pigpb1) were isolated from the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight. Heterotrimeric G proteins are evolutionary conserved GTP-binding proteins that are composed of ,, and subunits and participate in di

  8. Commercially available antibodies directed against α-adrenergic receptor subtypes and other G protein-coupled receptors with acceptable selectivity in flow cytometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Abhishek; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Several previous reports suggested that many commercially available antibodies directed against G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) lack sufficient selectivity. Accordingly, it has been proposed that receptor antibodies should be validated by at least one of several criteria, such as testing tissues or cells after knockout or silencing of the corresponding gene. Here, we tested whether 12 commercially available antibodies directed against α-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes (α1A/B/D, α2A/B/C), atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3), and vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) suffice these criteria. We detected in flow cytometry experiments with human vascular smooth muscle cells that the fluorescence signals from each of these antibodies were reduced by 46 ± 10 %-91 ± 2 % in cells treated with commercially available small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for each receptor, as compared with cells that were incubated with non-targeting siRNA. The tested antibodies included anti-ACKR3 (R&D Systems, mab42273), for which specificity has previously been demonstrated. Staining with this antibody resulted in 72 ± 5 % reduction of the fluorescence signal after ACKR3 siRNA treatment. Furthermore, staining with anti-α1A-AR (Santa Cruz, sc1477) and anti-ACKR3 (Abcam, ab38089), which have previously been reported to be non-specific, resulted in 70 ± 19 % and 80 ± 4 % loss of the fluorescence signal after α1A-AR and ACKR3 siRNA treatment, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that the tested antibodies show reasonable selectivity for their receptor target under our experimental conditions. Furthermore, our observations suggest that the selectivity of GPCR antibodies depends on the method for which the antibody is employed, the species from which cells/tissues are obtained, and on the type of specimens (cell, tissue/cell homogenate, or section) tested.

  9. Small-molecule inhibitors targeting G-protein-coupled Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xun; Marchioni, Fillipo; Evelyn, Chris R; Sipes, Nisha; Zhou, Xuan; Seibel, William; Wortman, Matthew; Zheng, Yi

    2013-02-19

    The G-protein-mediated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)-Rho GTPase signaling axis has been implicated in human pathophysiology and is a potential therapeutic target. By virtual screening of chemicals that fit into a surface groove of the DH-PH domain of LARG, a G-protein-regulated Rho GEF involved in RhoA activation, and subsequent validations in biochemical assays, we have identified a class of chemical inhibitors represented by Y16 that are active in specifically inhibiting LARG binding to RhoA. Y16 binds to the junction site of the DH-PH domains of LARG with a ∼80 nM K(d) and suppresses LARG catalyzed RhoA activation dose dependently. It is active in blocking the interaction of LARG and related G-protein-coupled Rho GEFs with RhoA without a detectable effect on other DBL family Rho GEFs, Rho effectors, or a RhoGAP. In cells, Y16 selectively inhibits serum-induced RhoA activity and RhoA-mediated signaling, effects that can be rescued by a constitutively active RhoA or ROCK mutant. By suppressing RhoA activity, Y16 inhibits mammary sphere formation of MCF7 breast cancer cells but does not affect the nontransforming MCF10A cells. Significantly, Y16 works synergistically with Rhosin/G04, a Rho GTPase activation site inhibitor, in inhibiting LARG-RhoA interaction, RhoA activation, and RhoA-mediated signaling functions. Thus, our studies show that Rho GEFs can serve as selective targets of small chemicals and present a strategy of dual inhibition of the enzyme-substrate pair of GEF-RhoA at their binding interface that leads to enhanced efficacy and specificity.

  10. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  11. The GHS-R Blocker D-[Lys3] GHRP-6 Serves as CCR5 Chemokine Receptor Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpesh Patel, Vishwa Deep Dixit, Jun Ho Lee, Jie Wan Kim, Eric M. Schaffer, Dzung Nguyen, Dennis D. Taub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available [D-Lys3]-Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6 (DLS is widely utilized in vivo and in vitro as a selective ghrelin receptor (GHS-R antagonist. This antagonist is one of the most common antagonists utilized in vivo to block GHS-R function and activity. Here, we found that DLS also has the ability to modestly block chemokine function and ligand binding to the chemokine receptor CCR5. The DLS effects on RANTES binding and Erk signaling as well as calcium mobilization appears to be much stronger than its effects on MIP-1α and MIP-1β. CCR5 have been shown to act as major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the CD4 positive host cells. To this end, we also found that DLS blocks M-tropic HIV-1 propagation in activated human PBMCs. These data demonstrate that DLS may not be a highly selective GHS-R1a inhibitor and may also effects on other G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family members. Moreover, DLS may have some potential clinical applications in blocking HIV infectivity and CCR5-mediated migration and function in various inflammatory disease states.

  12. SMM-chemokines: a class of unnatural synthetic molecules as chemical probes of chemokine receptor biology and leads for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Choi, Won-Tak; Dong, Chang-Zhi; Madani, Navid; Tian, Shaomin; Liu, Dongxiang; Wang, Youli; Pesavento, James; Wang, Jun; Fan, Xuejun; Yuan, Jian; Fritzsche, Wayne R; An, Jing; Sodroski, Joseph G; Richman, Douglas D; Huang, Ziwei

    2006-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. To develop natural chemokines into receptor probes and inhibitors of pathological processes, the lack of chemokine-receptor selectivity must be overcome. Here, we apply chemical synthesis and the concept of modular modifications to generate unnatural synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokines that have high receptor selectivity and affinity, and reduced toxicity. A proof of the concept was shown by transforming the nonselective viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II into new analogs with enhanced selectivity and potency for CXCR4 or CCR5, two principal coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 entry. These new analogs provided insights into receptor binding and signaling mechanisms and acted as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. These results support the concept of SMM-chemokines for studying and controlling the function of other chemokine receptors.

  13. Implications of chemokines, chemokine receptors, and inflammatory lipids in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Johannes; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines are a diverse group of molecules with important implications for the development of solid tissues and normal function of the immune system. However, change of the conditions for such a complex system can have important and dangerous consequences leading to diseases. The specific implications of the various chemokines in diseases have been elucidated in the last few years, prompting hope of manipulating this system for therapy or prevention of diseases. On the other hand, inflammatory lipids are biologically active molecules with crucial impacts on the function of various cell types, including immune cells in health and disease. Here, we describe how these lipids affect the chemokine system and how they interact with chemokines to shape chronic inflammation in the case of atherosclerosis.

  14. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs.

  15. Carnosol inhibits cell adhesion molecules and chemokine expression by tumor necrosis factor-α in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through the nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hui; Chen, Yufeng; Zhang, Longjuan; He, Xiaosheng; He, Xiaowen; Lian, Lei; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are gastrointestinal disorders associated with chronic inflammatory processes. Carnosol has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory properties. This study examined the suppressive effect of carnosol on the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and chemokines in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the possible underlying mechanism. The effect of carnosol on CAM and chemokine expression in HUVECs was identified by western blotting and ELISA, respectively. nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation of HUVECs was analyzed using the TransAM NF-κB Family kit. The effect of carnosol on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced activation of the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and was subsequently analyzed using western blotting. Carnosol not only inhibited TNF-α-induced protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and E-selectin in HUVECs, but also suppressed interleukin (IL)-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 expression. In addition, carnosol inhibited the TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of p-65 and IκB-α, as well as the activation of NF-κB. The same result was observed in TNF-α-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p-38. It was demonstrated that carnosol inhibited TNF-α-induced CAM and chemokine expression in HUVECs. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the blocking of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. These results indicate that carnosol may be a novel therapeutic agent for targeting endothelial cells in IBDs.

  16. Priming by chemokines restricts lateral mobility of the adhesion receptor LFA-1 and restores adhesion to ICAM-1 nano-aggregates on human mature dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra J E Borgman

    Full Text Available LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the lymph nodes, by transiently switching its molecular conformational state. However, the role of LFA-1 mobility in this process is not yet known, despite that the importance of lateral organization and dynamics for LFA-1-mediated adhesion regulation is broadly recognized. Using single particle tracking approaches we here show that LFA-1 exhibits higher mobility on resting mDCs compared to monocytes. Lymphoid chemokine CCL21 stimulation of the LFA-1 high affinity state on mDCs, led to a significant reduction of mobility and an increase on the fraction of stationary receptors, consistent with re-activation of the receptor. Addition of soluble monomeric ICAM-1 in the presence of CCL21 did not alter the diffusion profile of LFA-1 while soluble ICAM-1 nano-aggregates in the presence of CCL21 further reduced LFA-1 mobility and readily bound to the receptor. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LFA-1 lateral mobility across the membrane on the regulation of integrin activation and its function as adhesion receptor. Importantly, our data show that chemokines alone are not sufficient to trigger the high affinity state of the integrin based on the strict definition that affinity refers to the adhesion capacity of a single receptor to its ligand in solution. Instead our data indicate that nanoclustering of the receptor, induced by multi-ligand binding, is required to maintain stable cell adhesion once LFA-1 high affinity state is transiently triggered by inside-out signals.

  17. Priming by chemokines restricts lateral mobility of the adhesion receptor LFA-1 and restores adhesion to ICAM-1 nano-aggregates on human mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgman, Kyra J E; van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Cabezón, Raquel; Cambi, Alessandra; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the lymph nodes, by transiently switching its molecular conformational state. However, the role of LFA-1 mobility in this process is not yet known, despite that the importance of lateral organization and dynamics for LFA-1-mediated adhesion regulation is broadly recognized. Using single particle tracking approaches we here show that LFA-1 exhibits higher mobility on resting mDCs compared to monocytes. Lymphoid chemokine CCL21 stimulation of the LFA-1 high affinity state on mDCs, led to a significant reduction of mobility and an increase on the fraction of stationary receptors, consistent with re-activation of the receptor. Addition of soluble monomeric ICAM-1 in the presence of CCL21 did not alter the diffusion profile of LFA-1 while soluble ICAM-1 nano-aggregates in the presence of CCL21 further reduced LFA-1 mobility and readily bound to the receptor. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LFA-1 lateral mobility across the membrane on the regulation of integrin activation and its function as adhesion receptor. Importantly, our data show that chemokines alone are not sufficient to trigger the high affinity state of the integrin based on the strict definition that affinity refers to the adhesion capacity of a single receptor to its ligand in solution. Instead our data indicate that nanoclustering of the receptor, induced by multi-ligand binding, is required to maintain stable cell adhesion once LFA-1 high affinity state is transiently triggered by inside-out signals.

  18. Identification of common mechanisms by which human and mouse cytomegalovirus seven-transmembrane receptor homologues contribute to in vivo phenotypes in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Helen E; Abraham, Alexander M; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2013-01-01

    The mouse cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologue (CKR) M33 is required for salivary gland tropism and efficient reactivation from latency, phenotypes partially rescued by the human cytomegalovirus CKR US28. Herein, we demonstrate that complementation of salivary gland tropism is mediated...... predominantly by G protein-dependent signaling conserved with that of M33; in contrast, both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways contribute to the latency phenotypes. A novel M33-dependent replication phenotype in cultured bone marrow macrophages is also described....

  19. Constitutively active CCR5 chemokine receptors differ in mediating HIV envelope-dependent fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Voux, Alex; Chan, Mei-Chi; Folefoc, Asongna T; Madziva, Michael T; Flanagan, Colleen A

    2013-01-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is a rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that mediates the effects of pro-inflammatory β-chemokines. CCR5 is also the major co-receptor for entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into human cells. G protein-coupled receptors exist in ensembles of active and inactive conformations. Active receptor conformations can be stabilized by mutations. Although binding of the HIV envelope protein to CCR5 stimulates cellular signaling, the CCR5 conformation that induces fusion of the viral membrane with cellular membranes is not known. We mutated conserved amino acids to generate constitutively active CCR5 receptors, which are stabilized in active conformations, and tested the ability of constitutively active CCR5 receptors to mediate HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion. Mutation of the Asp³·⁴⁹(¹²⁵) and Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵) residues of CCR5 did not cause constitutive activity, but Lys or Pro substitutions for Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²), in the TxP motif, caused high basal inositol phosphate signaling. Signaling did not increase in response to MIP-1β, suggesting that the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²) mutants were fully stabilized in active conformations. The Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²)Lys mutation severely decreased cell surface CCR5 expression. Combining the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²)Lys mutation with an Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵)Gln mutation partially reversed the decrease in expression. Mutants with Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²)Lys substitutions were poor mediators of HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion, but mutants with the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²)Pro substitution exhibited full co-receptor function. Our results suggest that the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²)Lys and Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²)Pro mutations stabilize distinct constitutively active CCR5 conformations. Lys in position 2.65(82) stabilizes activated receptor conformations that appear to be constitutively internalized and do not induce envelope-dependent membrane fusion, whereas Pro stabilizes activated conformations

  20. Constitutively active CCR5 chemokine receptors differ in mediating HIV envelope-dependent fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex de Voux

    Full Text Available The CCR5 chemokine receptor is a rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that mediates the effects of pro-inflammatory β-chemokines. CCR5 is also the major co-receptor for entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV into human cells. G protein-coupled receptors exist in ensembles of active and inactive conformations. Active receptor conformations can be stabilized by mutations. Although binding of the HIV envelope protein to CCR5 stimulates cellular signaling, the CCR5 conformation that induces fusion of the viral membrane with cellular membranes is not known. We mutated conserved amino acids to generate constitutively active CCR5 receptors, which are stabilized in active conformations, and tested the ability of constitutively active CCR5 receptors to mediate HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion. Mutation of the Asp³·⁴⁹(¹²⁵ and Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵ residues of CCR5 did not cause constitutive activity, but Lys or Pro substitutions for Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸², in the TxP motif, caused high basal inositol phosphate signaling. Signaling did not increase in response to MIP-1β, suggesting that the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸² mutants were fully stabilized in active conformations. The Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²Lys mutation severely decreased cell surface CCR5 expression. Combining the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²Lys mutation with an Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵Gln mutation partially reversed the decrease in expression. Mutants with Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²Lys substitutions were poor mediators of HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion, but mutants with the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²Pro substitution exhibited full co-receptor function. Our results suggest that the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²Lys and Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²Pro mutations stabilize distinct constitutively active CCR5 conformations. Lys in position 2.65(82 stabilizes activated receptor conformations that appear to be constitutively internalized and do not induce envelope-dependent membrane fusion, whereas Pro stabilizes activated

  1. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    for the physiologic and pathophysiologic events of differentiation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors into lymphoid and myeloid stem cells, subsequently immune and inflammatory cells. These processes include transmigration, relocation, differentiation, and maturation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. (Blood......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...

  2. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  3. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Hildebrand

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7, and B (between TM5 and 6, respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all

  4. Ubiquitylation of the chemokine receptor CCR7 enables efficient receptor recycling and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Schäuble, Karin; Hauser, Mark A.; Rippl, Alexandra; Bruderer, Roland; Otero, Carolina; Gröttrup, Marcus; Legler, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for lymphocyte and dendritic cell homing to secondary lymphoid organs. Owing to the ability to induce directional migration, CCR7 and its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 are pivotal for the regulation of the immune system. Here, we identify a novel function for receptor ubiquitylation in the regulation of the trafficking process of this G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. We discovered that CCR7 is ubiquitylated in a constitutive, ligand-independen...

  5. Crystal Structure of the Mammalian GIRK2 KplusChannel and Gating Regulation by G Proteins PIP2 and Sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Whorton; R MacKinnon

    2011-12-31

    G protein-gated K{sup +} channels (Kir3.1--Kir3.4) control electrical excitability in many different cells. Among their functions relevant to human physiology and disease, they regulate the heart rate and govern a wide range of neuronal activities. Here, we present the first crystal structures of a G protein-gated K{sup +} channel. By comparing the wild-type structure to that of a constitutively active mutant, we identify a global conformational change through which G proteins could open a G loop gate in the cytoplasmic domain. The structures of both channels in the absence and presence of PIP{sub 2} suggest that G proteins open only the G loop gate in the absence of PIP{sub 2}, but in the presence of PIP{sub 2} the G loop gate and a second inner helix gate become coupled, so that both gates open. We also identify a strategically located Na{sup +} ion-binding site, which would allow intracellular Na{sup +} to modulate GIRK channel activity. These data provide a structural basis for understanding multiligand regulation of GIRK channel gating.

  6. In Vitro Effects of the Reduced Form of Coenzyme Q(10) on Secretion Levels of TNF-alpha and Chemokines in Response to LPS in the Human Monocytic Cell Line THP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Constance; Lorenz, Gerti; Rimbach, Gerald; Döring, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquinol-10 (QH(2)), the reduced form of Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) serves as a potent antioxidant of lipid membranes. Because many antioxidants reveal potent anti-inflammatory effects, the influence of QH(2) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined in the human monocytic cell line THP-1. Stimulation of cells with LPS resulted in a distinct release of Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), Regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and Monocyte chemotattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). The LPS-induced responses were significantly decreased by pre-incubation of cells with QH(2) to 60.27 +/- 9.3% (p = 0.0009), 48.13 +/- 6.93% (p = 0.0007) and 74.36 +/- 7.25% (p = 0.008) for TNF-alpha, MIP-1alpha and RANTES, respectively. In conclusion, our results indicate anti-inflammatory effects of the reduced form of CoQ(10) on various proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in vitro.

  7. The local cytokine and chemokine milieu within malignant effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanackovic, Djordje; Cao, Yanran; Kim, Ji-Won; Brandl, Stephan; Thom, Ina; Faltz, Christiane; Hildebrandt, York; Bartels, Katrin; de Weerth, Andreas; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna; Hossfeld, Dieter Kurt; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Malignant effusions offer a unique opportunity for the study of interactions between the human immune system and cancer. We have recently demonstrated that malignant effusions are characterized by an accumulation of T cells expressing chemokine receptors such as CCR4, which is commonly found on Th2 cells. In contrast, effector T cells expressing chemokine receptors typical for Th1 cells, such as CCR5, showed a diminished homing into malignant effusions. We analyzed concentrations of 12 different cytokines and 9 chemokines within malignant and nonmalignant effusions and investigated cytokine expression by effusion-infiltrating leukocytes. We observed that concentrations of the immunoregulatory cytokine TGF-beta(1) and of angiogenic factors VEGF and IL-8 were markedly increased within effusions caused by malignancies. However, we did not observe signs of a typical Th1 or Th2 milieu. Analyzing concentrations of 9 different chemokines, we found elevated concentrations of the chemokines MDC, eotaxin, I-TAC, and MCP-1 in malignant effusions. Interestingly, tumor-infiltrating leukocytes themselves seemed to contribute strongly to the creation of a distinct cytokine/chemokine pattern within cancer-related effusions. Additional analyses suggested that this cytokine/chemokine milieu might support an enrichment of immunosuppressive leukocytes. The local cytokine and chemokine milieu within malignant effusions seems to promote angiogenesis and to block an efficient immune-mediated antitumor response. An elimination of such tumor-promoting influences will be necessary in order to transform local immunotolerance into clinically relevant immune recognition of tumors causing malignant effusions. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. G protein coupled receptors as targets for next generation pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Neil; Down, Rachel E

    2015-12-01

    There is an on-going need for the discovery and development of new pesticides due to the loss of existing products through the continuing development of resistance, the desire for products with more favourable environmental and toxicological profiles and the need to implement the principles of integrated pest management. Insect G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in modulating biology, physiology and behaviour, including reproduction, osmoregulation, growth and development. Modifying normal receptor function by blocking or over stimulating its actions may either result in the death of a pest or disrupt its normal fitness or reproductive capacity to reduce pest populations. Hence GPCRs offer potential targets for the development of next generation pesticides providing opportunities to discover new chemistries for invertebrate pest control. Such receptors are important targets for pharmaceutical drugs, but are under-exploited by the agro-chemical industry. The octopamine receptor agonists are the only pesticides with a recognized mode of action, as described in the classification scheme developed by the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee, that act via a GPCR. The availability of sequenced insect genomes has facilitated the characterization of insect GPCRs, but the development and utilization of screening assays to identify lead compounds has been slow. Various studies using knock-down technologies or applying the native ligands and/or neuropeptide analogues to pest insects in vivo, have however demonstrated that modifying normal receptor function can have an insecticidal effect. This review presents examples of potential insect neuropeptide receptors that are potential targets for lead compound development, using case studies from three representative pest species, Tribolium castaneum, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and Drosophila suzukii. Functional analysis studies on T. castaneum suggest that GPCRs involved in growth and development (eclosion

  9. Analysis of Arrestin Recruitment to Chemokine Receptors by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneterre, J; Montpas, N; Boularan, C; Galés, C; Heveker, N

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors recruit the multifunctional scaffolding protein beta arrestin in response to binding of their chemokine ligands. Given that arrestin recruitment represents a signaling axis that is in part independent from G-protein signaling, it has become a hallmark of G protein-coupled receptor functional selectivity. Therefore, quantification of arrestin recruitment has become a requirement for the delineation of chemokine and drug candidate activity along different signaling axes. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) techniques provide methodology for such quantification that can reveal differences between nonredundant chemokines binding the same receptor, and that can be upscaled for high-throughput testing. We here provide protocols for the careful setup of BRET-based arrestin recruitment assays, and examples for the application of such systems in dose-response or time-course experiments. Suggestions are given for troubleshooting, optimizing test systems, and the interpretation of results obtained with BRET-based assays, which indeed yield an intricate blend of quantitative and qualitative information.

  10. Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Spinal Nociception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliu, Elena; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    in spinal nociceptive processing. Intrathecal challenging of mice with the GPER agonist G-1 results in pain-related behaviors. GPER antagonism with G15 reduces the G-1-induced response. Electrophysiological recordings from superficial dorsal horn neurons indicate neuronal membrane depolarization with G-1......Human and animal studies suggest that estrogens are involved in the processing of nociceptive sensory information and analgesic responses in the central nervous system. Rapid pronociceptive estrogenic effects have been reported, some of which likely involve G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER......) activation. Membrane depolarization and increases in cytosolic calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are markers of neuronal activation, underlying pain sensitization in the spinal cord. Using behavioral, electrophysiological, and fluorescent imaging studies, we evaluated GPER involvement...

  11. Denatured G-protein coupled receptors as immunogens to generate highly specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmont, Franck; Moulédous, Lionel; Boué, Jérôme; Mollereau, Catherine; Dietrich, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a major role in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, GPCRs have become the most frequent targets for development of new therapeutic drugs. In this context, the availability of highly specific antibodies may be decisive to obtain reliable findings on localization, function and medical relevance of GPCRs. However, the rapid and easy generation of highly selective anti-GPCR antibodies is still a challenge. Herein, we report that highly specific antibodies suitable for detection of GPCRs in native and unfolded forms can be elicited by immunizing animals against purified full length denatured recombinant GPCRs. Contrasting with the currently admitted postulate, our study shows that an active and well-folded GPCR is not required for the production of specific anti-GPCR antibodies. This new immunizing strategy validated with three different human GPCR (μ-opioid, κ-opioid, neuropeptide FF2 receptors) might be generalized to other members of the GPCR family.

  12. Regulation of chemokine activity – a focus on the role of dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Metzemaekers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small, chemotactic proteins that play a crucial role in leukocyte migration and are therefore essential for proper functioning of the immune system. Chemokines exert their chemotactic effect by activation of chemokine receptors, which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, and interaction with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Furthermore, the exact chemokine function is modulated at the level of posttranslational modifications. Among the different types of posttranslational modifications that were found to occur in vitro and in vivo, i.e. proteolysis, citrullination, glycosylation and nitration, NH2-terminal proteolysis of chemokines has been described most intensively. Since the NH2-terminal chemokine domain mediates receptor interaction, NH2-terminal modification by limited proteolysis or amino acid side chain modification can drastically affect their biological activity. An enzyme that has been shown to provoke NH2-terminal proteolysis of various chemokines is dipeptidyl peptidase IV or CD26. This multifunctional protein is a serine protease that preferably cleaves dipeptides from the NH2-terminal region of peptides and proteins with a proline or alanine residue in the penultimate position. Various chemokines possess such a proline or alanine residue and CD26-truncated forms of these chemokines have been identified in cell culture supernatant as well as in body fluids. The effects of CD26-mediated proteolysis in the context of chemokines turned out to be highly complex. Depending on the chemokine ligand, loss of these two NH2-terminal amino acids can result in either an increased or a decreased biological activity, enhanced receptor specificity, inactivation of the chemokine ligand or generation of receptor antagonists. Since chemokines direct leukocyte migration in homeostatic as well as pathophysiologic conditions, CD26-mediated proteolytic processing of these chemotactic proteins may have significant consequences for appropriate

  13. Prediction of GPCR-G Protein Coupling Specificity Using Features of Sequences and Biological Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihide Ono; Haretsugu Hishigaki

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the coupling specificity between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and specific classes of G proteins is important for further elucidation of receptor functions within a cell. Increasing information on GPCR sequences and the G protein family would facilitate prediction of the coupling properties of GPCRs. In this study, we describe a novel approach for predicting the coupling specificity between GPCRs and G proteins. This method uses not only GPCR sequences but also the functional knowledge generated by natural language processing, and can achieve 92.2% prediction accuracy by using the C4.5 algorithm.Furthermore, rules related to GPCR-G protein coupling are generated. The combination of sequence analysis and text mining improves the prediction accuracy for GPCR-G protein coupling specificity, and also provides clues for understanding GPCR signaling.

  14. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Lynch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84 and G protein subunit Gαq in the maintenance of cancer stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia. This review will discuss how GPCRs and G proteins regulate stem cells with a focus on cancer stem cells, as well as their implications for the development of novel targeted cancer therapies.

  15. Heterotrimeric G protein participated in modulation of cytoplasmic calcium concentration in pollen cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Zhonglin; MA Ligeng; WANG Xuechen; SUN Daye

    2003-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium concentration([Ca2+]c) in pollen cells of Lilium daviddi is measured with confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate the effect of heterotrimeric G protein (G protein) on [Ca2+]c and the possible signal transduction pathway of G protein triggering cellular calcium signal. After application, cholera toxin (CTX), an agonist of G protein, triggers a transient increase of [Ca2+]c in pollen cells, and evokes a spatial-temporal characteristic calcium dynamics; while pertussis toxin (PTX), a G protein antagonist, leads to the decrease of [Ca2+]c. Both L-type Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil and inhibitor of IP3 receptor heparin inhibit CTX-induced [Ca2+]c increase. The results show that G protein may play a role in the modulation of [Ca2+]c through enhancing the extracellular Ca2+ influx and releasing of Ca2+ from intracellular stores.

  16. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in stem cell circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Peled, Amnon

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells are rare, pluripotent, self-renewing cells that give rise to all mature cells during development and adult life. Due to their proliferative capabilities and their ability to home and contribute to the regeneration of damage tissue, stem cells can be transformed into established tumors. Stem cells can function as a double-edged sword--they have the ability to circulate and migrate throughout the developing and mature adult organism, which is essential for their normal function; however, transformed stem cells are also endowed with the machinery to metastasize into various organs. Chemokine and chemokine receptors play a critical role in directing the trafficking of these cells. It is therefore evident that understanding the role of chemokines and their receptors in stem cell circulation is critical for the successful use of these cells in therapy for a wide variety of pathological conditions.

  17. Expression and its significance of stem cells marker leucine-rich repeat containing G protein coupled receptor 5 gene in human colorectal cancer%人结直肠癌干细胞标志物富含亮氨酸重复单位的G蛋白耦联受体5基因的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙艳; 盛春华; 文大成; 李玉林; 迟宝荣

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨人结直肠癌组织及外周血中干细胞标志物富含亮氨酸重复单位的G蛋白耦联受体5(lgr5)基因的表达及其与临床病理特征间的关系.方法 采用SYBR Green实时定量PCR方法检测27份结直肠癌组织及配对的正常组织中、1 7例患者及8名健康对照者外周血中lgr5mRNA的表达.应用Wilcoxon秩和检验分析lgr5 mRNA在不同组织间、临床病理参数之间的表达差异.结果 结直肠癌组织中lgr5 mRNA表达水平为1.000(0.012,496.353),高于配对正常组织的0.147(0.004,73.002),差异有统计学意义(Z=8.029,P<0.01).结直肠癌患者外周血中lgr5mRNA表达水平为0.742(0.077,456.566),高于健康对照组的0.104(0.034,0.274),差异有统计学意义(Z=2.048,P<0.05).结直肠癌组织lgr5 mRNA在不同性别、年龄、肿瘤原发部位、肿瘤大小、组织学类型组间表达差异均无统计学意义(P均>0.05),但有淋巴结转移组lgr5 mRNA表达高于无淋巴结转移组,差异有统计学意义(Z=2.066,P<0.05).结论 lgr5在结直肠癌组织及外周血中的表达上调可能参与了结直肠癌的生长及转移.%Objective To investigate the expression of stem cell marker leucine-rich repeat containing G protein coupled receptor 5 (lgr5) gene in human colorectal cancer tissues and peripheral blood and its correlation with clinical pathological characteristics.Methods The expression of lgr5 at mRNA level was detected by SYBR Green quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 27 human colorectal cancer tissues and corresponding non-cancerous tissues as well as in peripheral blood of 17 patients and eight healthy controls.The differences of lgr5 mRNA expression in different tissues and clinical pathology parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon test.Results The expression of lgr5 at mRNA level in colorectal cancer tissues was 1.000 (0.012,496.353),which was higher than that of corresponding non-cancerous tissues 0.147 (0.004,73.002),the

  18. Inflammatory mediators alter the astrocyte transcriptome and calcium signaling elicited by multiple G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, Mary E; Coppola, Giovanni; Ao, Yan; Geschwind, Daniel H; Khakh, Baljit S; Sofroniew, Michael V

    2012-10-17

    Inflammation features in CNS disorders such as stroke, trauma, neurodegeneration, infection, and autoimmunity in which astrocytes play critical roles. To elucidate how inflammatory mediators alter astrocyte functions, we examined effects of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and interferon-gamma (IFNγ), alone and in combination, on purified, mouse primary cortical astrocyte cultures. We used microarrays to conduct whole-genome expression profiling, and measured calcium signaling, which is implicated in mediating dynamic astrocyte functions. Combinatorial exposure to TGF-β1, LPS, and IFNγ significantly modulated astrocyte expression of >6800 gene probes, including >380 synergistic changes not predicted by summing individual treatment effects. Bioinformatic analyses revealed significantly and markedly upregulated molecular networks and pathways associated in particular with immune signaling and regulation of cell injury, death, growth, and proliferation. Highly regulated genes included chemokines, growth factors, enzymes, channels, transporters, and intercellular and intracellular signal transducers. Notably, numerous genes for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and G-protein effectors involved in calcium signaling were significantly regulated, mostly down (for example, Cxcr4, Adra2a, Ednra, P2ry1, Gnao1, Gng7), but some up (for example, P2ry14, P2ry6, Ccrl2, Gnb4). We tested selected cases and found that changes in GPCR gene expression were accompanied by significant, parallel changes in astrocyte calcium signaling evoked by corresponding GPCR-specific ligands. These findings identify pronounced changes in the astrocyte transcriptome induced by TGF-β1, LPS, and IFNγ, and show that these inflammatory stimuli upregulate astrocyte molecular networks associated with immune- and injury-related functions and significantly alter astrocyte calcium signaling stimulated by multiple GPCRs.

  19. Viral leads for chemokine-modulatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    of years of experience in manipulating this system. For example, virally encoded "biopharmaceuticals"--chemokines and chemokine binding proteins--demonstrate the effectiveness of blocking a carefully selected group of chemokine receptors and how the local immune response can be changed from one dominated...... by Th1 cells to one dominated by Th2 cells by targeting specific chemokine receptors. The crucial importance of the binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans to produce their effects is also highlighted by viruses that produce binding proteins to disrupt the gradient of chemokines, which guides...

  20. Genome Diversification Mechanism of Rodent and Lagomorpha Chemokine Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Shibata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines that are involved in host defence and body homeostasis through recruitment of cells expressing their receptors. Their genes are known to undergo rapid evolution. Therefore, the number and content of chemokine genes can be quite diverse among the different species, making the orthologous relationships often ambiguous even between closely related species. Given that rodents and rabbit are useful experimental models in medicine and drug development, we have deduced the chemokine genes from the genome sequences of several rodent species and rabbit and compared them with those of human and mouse to determine the orthologous relationships. The interspecies differences should be taken into consideration when experimental results from animal models are extrapolated into humans. The chemokine gene lists and their orthologous relationships presented here will be useful for studies using these animal models. Our analysis also enables us to reconstruct possible gene duplication processes that generated the different sets of chemokine genes in these species.

  1. Acidic pH stimulates the production of the angiogenic CXC chemokine, CXCL8 (interleukin-8), in human adult mesenchymal stem cells via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-kappaB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2008-07-01

    Blood vessel injury results in limited oxygen tension and diffusion leading to hypoxia, increased anaerobic metabolism, and elevated production of acidic metabolites that cannot be easily removed due to the reduced blood flow. Therefore, an acidic extracellular pH occurs in the local microenvironment of disrupted bone. The potential role of acidic pH and glu-leu-arg (ELR(+)) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) treated with medium of decreasing pH (7.4, 7.0, 6.7, and 6.4). The cells showed a reciprocal increase in CXCL8 (interleukin-8, IL-8) mRNA levels as extracellular pH decreased. At pH 6.4, CXCL8 mRNA was induced >60x in comparison to levels at pH 7.4. hMSCs treated with osteogenic medium (OGM) also showed an increase in CXCL8 mRNA with decreasing pH; although, at a lower level than that seen in cells grown in non-OGM. CXCL8 protein was secreted into the medium at all pHs with maximal induction at pH 6.7. Inhibition of the G-protein-coupled receptor alpha, G(alphai), suppressed CXCL8 levels in response to acidic pH; whereas phospholipase C inhibition had no effect on CXCL8. The use of specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction inhibitors indicated that the pH-dependent increase in CXCL8 mRNA is due to activation of ERK and p38 pathways. The JNK pathway was not involved. NF-kappaB inhibition resulted in a decrease in CXCL8 levels in hMSCs grown in non-OGM. However, OGM-differentiated hMSCs showed an increase in CXCL8 levels when treated with the NF-kappaB inhibitor PDTC, a pyrrolidine derivative of dithiocarbamate.

  2. Differential CCR7 targeting in dendritic cells by three naturally occurring CC-chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrud Malene Hjortø

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The CCR7 ligands CCL19 and CCL21 are increasingly recognized as functionally different (biased. Using mature human dendritic cells (DCs, we show that CCL19 is more potent than CCL21 in inducing 3D chemotaxis. Intriguingly, CCL21 induces prolonged and more efficient ERK1/2 activation compared to CCL19 and to a C-terminal truncated (tailless CCL21 in DCs. In contrast, tailless-CCL21 displays increased potency in DC chemotaxis compared to native CCL21. Using a CCL21-specific antibody, we show that CCL21, but not tailless-CCL21, accumulates at the cell surface. In addition removal of sialic acid from the cell surface by neuraminidase treatment impairs ERK1/2 activation by CCL21, but not of CCL19 or tailless-CCL21. Using standard laboratory cell-lines, we observe low potency of both CCL21 and tailless-CCL21 in G protein activation and -arrestin recruitment compared to CCL19, indicating that the tail itself does not improve receptor interaction. Chemokines interact with their receptors in a stepwise manner with ultimate docking of their N-terminus into the main binding pocket. Employing site-directed mutagenesis we identify residues in this pocket of selective CCL21 importance. We also identify a molecular switch in the top of TM7 important for keeping CCR7 in an inactive conformation (Tyr312, as introduction of the chemokine receptor-conserved Glu (or Ala induces high constitutive activity. Summarized, we show that the interaction of the tail of CCL21 with polysialic acid is needed for strong ERK-signaling, whereas it impairs CCL21-mediated chemotaxis and has no impact on receptor docking consistent with the current model of chemokine:receptor interaction. This indicates that future selective pharmacological targeting of CCL19 versus CCL21 should focus on a differential targeting of the main receptor pocket, while selective targeting of tailless-CCL21 versus CCL21 and CCL19 requires targeting of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG interaction.

  3. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-08-24

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5.

  4. The Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor 9 Internalization Triggered by Interleukin 2 and Interleukin 4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Tong; Lijun Zhang; Li Zhang; Meng Hu; Jun Leng; Beibei Yu; Beibei Zhou; Yi Hu; Qiuping Zhang

    2009-01-01

    In previous study, we found that the chemokine receptor 9 (CCR9) was highly expressed on CD4+ T cells from patients with T-cell lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) and mediated leukemia cell infiltration and metastasis. Combined use of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-4 promoted the internalization of CCR9 and therefore attenuated leukemia cell infiltration and metastasis. In this study, we preliminarily investigated the mechanism of internalization of CCR9 on MOLT4 cell model (a human leukemia T-cell line, naturally expresses CCR9) and found that IL-2 upregulated the cell surface expression of IL-4Rα (CD124) greatly, whereas IL-4 had no significant influence on α (CD25) and β subunits (CD122) of IL-2R. Moreover, specific inhibitors, such as staurosporine, H89 and heparin, inhibited internalization of CCR9, which indicated a role of protein kinase C (PKC) and G protein-coupled kinase 2 (GRK2), respectively. Furthermore, GRK2 was upregulated and translocated to cell membrane in IL-2 and IL-4 treated cells which indicated that PKC could be a prerequisite for GRK2 activity.Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(3):181-189.

  5. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...

  6. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bychkov

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  7. Chemokines in the brain : neuroimmunology and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; Zuurman, MW; Dijkstra, IM; Boddeke, HWGM

    2002-01-01

    Chemokines in the brain have been recognised as essential elements in neurodegenerative diseases and related neuroinflammation. Recent studies suggest that in addition to the orchestration of chemotaxis of immune cells, chemokines are also involved in neurodevelopment and neurophysiological signalli

  8. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium current contributes to ventricular repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Bo; Nissen, Jakob D; Laursen, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional role of G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels in the cardiac ventricle.......The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional role of G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels in the cardiac ventricle....

  9. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy R Botella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  10. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Jimmy; Trusov, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 positively regulates epithelial cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penela, Petronila; Ribas, Catalina; Aymerich, Ivette; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Barreiro, Olga; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Mayor, Federico

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration requires integration of signals arising from both the extracellular matrix and messengers acting through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We find that increased levels of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), a key player in GPCR regulation, poteniate migration of epithelial

  12. Heterotrimeric G-protein shuttling via Gip1 extends the dynamic range of eukaryotic chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Yoichiro; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro

    2016-04-19

    Chemotactic eukaryote cells can sense chemical gradients over a wide range of concentrations via heterotrimeric G-protein signaling; however, the underlying wide-range sensing mechanisms are only partially understood. Here we report that a novel regulator of G proteins, G protein-interacting protein 1 (Gip1), is essential for extending the chemotactic range ofDictyosteliumcells. Genetic disruption of Gip1 caused severe defects in gradient sensing and directed cell migration at high but not low concentrations of chemoattractant. Also, Gip1 was found to bind and sequester G proteins in cytosolic pools. Receptor activation induced G-protein translocation to the plasma membrane from the cytosol in a Gip1-dependent manner, causing a biased redistribution of G protein on the membrane along a chemoattractant gradient. These findings suggest that Gip1 regulates G-protein shuttling between the cytosol and the membrane to ensure the availability and biased redistribution of G protein on the membrane for receptor-mediated chemotactic signaling. This mechanism offers an explanation for the wide-range sensing seen in eukaryotic chemotaxis.

  13. The interaction of acetylcholine receptors in porcine atrial membranes with three kinds of G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, T; Ikegaya, T; Haga, K

    1990-09-01

    We developed a simple procedure to detect the interaction of muscarinic receptors in atrial membranes with exogenous GTP-binding proteins (G proteins). The procedure consists of mixing atrial membranes with G proteins in the presence of sodium cholate, diluting the mixture with a salt buffer and then measuring the ligand binding activity. The displacement by carbachol of [3H] QNB binding to muscarinic receptors in the atrial membranes was not affected by guanine nucleotides when the membranes had been treated at 60 degrees C for 30 min or with N-ethylmeleimide (NEM) and became affected by them after mixing the heat- or NEM-treated membranes with G proteins. The displacement curves in the presence of GTP were essentially the same irrespective of the presence or absence of G proteins. Those in the absence of GTP shifted to a lower concentration of carbachol with addition of a higher concentration of G proteins, indicating an increase in GTP-sensitive high affinity agonist binding sites. The highest affinity for carbachol was detected with membranes treated with NEM and then mixed with G proteins. The GTP-sensitive high affinity agonist binding could be detected with any one of three kinds of G proteins (Gi, Go, Gn) which were purified from porcine cerebrum, indicating that the muscarinic receptor m2 subtype may interact with and possibly activate these three kinds of G proteins.

  14. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopffleisch, Karsten [University of Cologne; Phan, Nguyen [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Panstruga, Ralph [Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research; Uhrig, Joachim [University of Cologne; Jones, Alan M [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of G{alpha}, G{beta}, and G{gamma} subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification.

  15. Biophysical and structural investigation of bacterially expressed and engineered CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Maciej; Morin, Sébastien; Sass, Hans-Jürgen; Kebbel, Fabian; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 belongs to the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Besides its role in leukocyte trafficking, it is also the major HIV-1 coreceptor and hence a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Here, we report Escherichia coli expression and a broad range of biophysical studies on E. coli-produced CCR5. After systematic screening and optimization, we obtained 10 mg of purified, detergent-solubilized, folded CCR5 from 1L culture in a triply isotope-labeled ((2)H/(15)N/(13)C) minimal medium. Thus the material is suitable for NMR spectroscopic studies. The expected α-helical secondary structure content is confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The solubilized CCR5 is monodisperse and homogeneous as judged by transmission electron microscopy. Interactions of CCR5 with its ligands, RANTES and MIP-1β were assessed by surface plasmon resonance yielding K(D) values in the nanomolar range. Using size exclusion chromatography, stable monomeric CCR5 could be isolated. We show that cysteine residues affect both the yield and oligomer distribution of CCR5. HSQC spectra suggest that the transmembrane domains of CCR5 are in equilibrium between several conformations. In addition we present a model of CCR5 based on the crystal structure of CXCR4 as a starting point for protein engineering.

  16. Biophysical and structural investigation of bacterially expressed and engineered CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiktor, Maciej; Morin, Sebastien; Sass, Hans-Juergen [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland); Kebbel, Fabian [University of Basel, Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum (Switzerland); Grzesiek, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.grzesiek@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Focal Area Structural Biology and Biophysics, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 belongs to the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Besides its role in leukocyte trafficking, it is also the major HIV-1 coreceptor and hence a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Here, we report Escherichia coli expression and a broad range of biophysical studies on E. coli-produced CCR5. After systematic screening and optimization, we obtained 10 mg of purified, detergent-solubilized, folded CCR5 from 1L culture in a triply isotope-labeled ({sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C) minimal medium. Thus the material is suitable for NMR spectroscopic studies. The expected {alpha}-helical secondary structure content is confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The solubilized CCR5 is monodisperse and homogeneous as judged by transmission electron microscopy. Interactions of CCR5 with its ligands, RANTES and MIP-1{beta} were assessed by surface plasmon resonance yielding K{sub D} values in the nanomolar range. Using size exclusion chromatography, stable monomeric CCR5 could be isolated. We show that cysteine residues affect both the yield and oligomer distribution of CCR5. HSQC spectra suggest that the transmembrane domains of CCR5 are in equilibrium between several conformations. In addition we present a model of CCR5 based on the crystal structure of CXCR4 as a starting point for protein engineering.

  17. Integration of G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways for Activation of a Transcription Factor (EGR-3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehai Tan; Pam Sanders; Jack Bolado Jr.; Mike Whitney

    2003-01-01

    We recently reported the use of a gene-trapping approach to isolate cell clones in which a reporter gene had integrated into genes modulated by T-cell activation. We have now tested a panel of clones from that report and identified the one that responds to a variety of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The βlactamase tagged EGR-3 Jurkat cell was used to dissect specific GPCR signaling in vivo. Three GPCRs were studied, including the chemokine receptor CXCR4 (Gicoupled) that was endogenously expressed, the platelet activation factor (PAF) receptor (Gq-coupled), andβ2 adrenergic receptor (Gs-coupled) that was both stably transfected. Agonists for each receptor activated transcription of theβ-lactamase tagged EGR-3 gene. Induction of EGR-3 through CXCR4 was blocked by pertussis toxin and PD58059, a specific inhibitor of MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase). Neither of these inhibitors blocked isoproterenol or PAF-mediated activation of EGR-3. Conversely, β2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation was blocked by the p38, specific inhibitor SB580. In addition, bothβ2- and PAF-mediated EGR-3 activation could be synergistically activated by CXCR4 activation. This combined result indicates that EGR-3 can be activated through distinct signal transduction pathways by different GPCRs and that signals can be integrated and amplified to efficiently tune the level of activation.

  18. The bovine chemokine receptors and their mRNA abundance in mononuclear phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley George

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemokine and chemokine receptor families play critical roles in both the healthy and diseased organism mediating the migration of cells. The chemokine system is complex in that multiple chemokines can bind to one chemokine receptor and vice versa. Although chemokine receptors have been well characterised in humans, the chemokine receptor repertoire of cattle is not well characterised and many sequences are yet to be experimentally validated. Results We have identified and sequenced bovine homologs to all identified functional human chemokine receptors. The bovine chemokine receptors show high levels of similarity to their human counterparts and similar genome arrangements. We have also characterised an additional bovine chemokine receptor, not present in the available genome sequence of humans or the more closely related pigs or horses. This receptor shows the highest level of similarity to CCR1 but shows significant differences in regions of the protein that are likely to be involved in ligand binding and signalling. We have also examined the mRNA abundance levels of all identified bovine chemokine receptors in mononuclear phagocytic cells. Considerable differences were observed in the mRNA abundance levels of the receptors, and interestingly the identified novel chemokine receptor showed differing levels of mRNA abundance to its closest homolog CCR1. The chemokine receptor repertoire was shown to differ between monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. This may reflect the differing roles of these cells in the immune response and may have functional consequences for the trafficking of these cells in vivo. Conclusions In summary, we have provided the first characterisation of the complete bovine chemokine receptor gene repertoire including a gene that is potentially unique to cattle. Further study of this receptor and its ligands may reveal a specific role of this receptor in cattle. The availability of the bovine

  19. Development of surface-based assays for transmembrane proteins: selective immobilization of functional CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, Vitalii I; Karlik, Evan A; Ridge, Kevin D; Vanderah, David J

    2006-02-15

    A general method to develop surface-based assays for transmembrane (TM) receptor function(s) without the need to isolate, purify, and reconstitute the proteins is presented. Based on the formation of an active surface that selectively immobilizes membrane vesicles, the method is illustrated using the chemokine receptor CCR5, a member of the largest family of cell surface eukaryotic TM proteins, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The method begins with a protein-resistant surface containing a low percentage (1-5%) of surface-bound biotin on gold as the initial template. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data show specific immobilization of functional CCR5 after the initial template is activated by immobilization of rho 1D4 antibody, an anti-rhodopsin monoclonal antibody specific for the carboxyl terminal nine amino acids on bovine rhodopsin that had been engineered into the carboxyl terminus of CCR5, and exposure to vesicles obtained from mammalian cells transfected with a synthetic human CCR5 gene. Activation of the initial template is effected by sequential immobilization of avidin, which binds to the biotin in the initial template, a biotinylated goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G (Bt-IgG), which binds to the avidin binding sites distal to the surface and the F(c) portion of the rho 1D4 antibody through its F(ab) region(s) and finally rho 1D4. This approach establishes a broad outline for the development and application of various assays for CCR5 functions. SPR data also showed that vesicle immobilization could be achieved through an integrin-integrin antibody interaction after activation of the initial template with a goat anti-human integrin beta1 antibody. These results suggest that the generic nature of the initial platform and flexibility of the subsequent surface activation for specific immobilization of membrane vesicles can be applied to the development of assays for other GPCRs or TM receptors for which antibodies are available or can be engineered to

  20. Systematic generation of in vivo G protein-coupled receptor mutants in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, R; Vroling, B; Toonen, P; Nijman, I J; van Roekel, H; Verheul, M; Baakman, C; Guryev, V; Vriend, G; Cuppen, E

    2011-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of cell surface receptors that are involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, and are targets for many therapeutic interventions. However, genetic models in the rat, one of the most widely used model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, are largely lacking. Here, we applied N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis to generate an in vivo GPCR mutant collection in the rat. A pre-selected panel of 250 human GPCR homologs was screened for mutations in 813 rats, resulting in the identification of 131 non-synonymous mutations. From these, seven novel potential rat gene knockouts were established as well as 45 lines carrying missense mutations in various genes associated with or involved in human diseases. We provide extensive in silico modeling results of the missense mutations and show experimental data, suggesting loss-of-function phenotypes for several models, including Mc4r and Lpar1. Taken together, the approach used resulted not only in a set of novel gene knockouts, but also in allelic series of more subtle amino acid variants, similar as commonly observed in human disease. The mutants presented here may greatly benefit studies to understand specific GPCR function and support the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. The G-protein-coupled receptor GPR103 regulates bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baribault, Helene; Danao, Jean; Gupte, Jamila; Yang, Li; Sun, Banghua; Richards, William; Tian, Hui

    2006-01-01

    GPR103 is a G-protein-coupled receptor with reported expression in brain, heart, kidney, adrenal gland, retina, and testis. It encodes a 455-amino-acid protein homologous to neuropeptide FF2, neuropeptide Y2, and galanin GalR1 receptors. Its natural ligand was recently identified as 26RFa, a novel human RF-amide-related peptide with orexigenic activity. To identify the function of GPR103, we generated GPR103-deficient mice. Homozygous mutant mice were viable and fertile. Their body weight was undistinguishable from that of their wild-type littermates. Histological analysis revealed that GPR103-/- mice exhibited a thinned osteochondral growth plate, a thickening of trabecular branches, and a reduction in osteoclast number, suggestive of an early arrest of osteochondral bone formation. Microcomputed tomography confirmed the reduction in trabecular bone and connective tissue densities in GPR103 knockout animals. Whole-body radiography followed by morphometric analysis revealed a kyphosis in mutant animals. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that GPR103 was expressed in human skull, mouse spine, and several osteoblast cell lines. Dexamethasone, a known inhibitor of osteoblast growth and inducer of osteoblast differentiation, inhibited GPR103 expression in human osteoblast primary cultures. Altogether, these results suggest that osteopenia in GPR103-/- mice may be mediated directly by the loss of GPR103 expression in bone.

  2. Conformational flexibility and structural dynamics in GPCR-mediated G protein activation: a perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preininger, Anita M.; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of G proteins and their cognate receptors, both alone and in complex, are becoming increasingly accessible to experimental techniques. Understanding the conformational changes and timelines which govern these changes can lead to new insights into the processes of ligand binding and associated G protein activation. Experimental systems may involve the use of, or otherwise stabilize, non-native environments. This can complicate our understanding of structural and dynamical features of processes such as the ionic lock, Tryptophan toggle, and G protein flexibility. While elements in the receptor’s transmembrane helices and the C-terminal α5 helix of Gα undergo well defined structural changes, regions subject to conformational flexibility may be important in fine-tuning the interactions between activated receptors and G proteins. The pairing of computational and experimental approaches will continue to provide powerful tools to probe the conformation and dynamics of receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:23602809

  3. Specific subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins play important roles during nodulation in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling.

  4. Mapping physiological G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways reveals a role for receptor phosphorylation in airway contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sophie J; Wiegman, Coen H; Iglesias, Max Maza; Kong, Kok Choi; Butcher, Adrian J; Plouffe, Bianca; Goupil, Eugénie; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; LeGouill, Christian; Russell, Kirsty; Laporte, Stéphane A; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Bouvier, Michel; Chung, Kian Fan; Amrani, Yassine; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-19

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to initiate a plethora of signaling pathways in vitro. However, it is unclear which of these pathways are engaged to mediate physiological responses. Here, we examine the distinct roles of Gq/11-dependent signaling and receptor phosphorylation-dependent signaling in bronchial airway contraction and lung function regulated through the M3-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR). By using a genetically engineered mouse expressing a G protein-biased M3-mAChR mutant, we reveal the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a role for M3-mAChR phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle contraction in health and in a disease state with relevance to human asthma. Furthermore, this mouse model can be used to distinguish the physiological responses that are regulated by M3-mAChR phosphorylation (which include control of lung function) from those responses that are downstream of G protein signaling. In this way, we present an approach by which to predict the physiological/therapeutic outcome of M3-mAChR-biased ligands with important implications for drug discovery.

  5. Regulation of EGF-induced ERK/MAPK Activation and EGFR Internalization by G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingxia GAO; Jiali LI; Lan MA

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) mediate agonist-induced phosphorylation and desensitization of various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We investigate the role of GRK2 on epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling, including EGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) activation and EGFR internalization. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments show that EGF stimulates GRK2 binding to EGFR complex and GRK2 translocating from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Western blotting assay shows that EGF-induced ERK/MAPK phosphorylation increases 1.9-fold, 1.1-fold and 1.5-fold (P<0.05) at time point 30, 60 and 120 min, respectively when the cells were transfected with GRK2,suggesting the regulatory role of GRK2 on EGF-induced ERK/MAPK activation. Flow cytometry experiments show that GRK2 overexpression has no effect on EGF-induced EGFR internalization, however, it increases agonist-induced G protein-coupled δ opioid receptor internalization by approximately 40% (P<0.01). Overall,these data suggest that GRK2 has a regulatory role in EGF-induced ERK/MAPK activation, and that the mechanisms underlying the modulatory role of GRK2 in EGFR and GPCR signaling pathways are somewhat different at least in receptor internalization.

  6. Effects of sustained sleep restriction on mitogen-stimulated cytokines, chemokines and T helper 1/ T helper 2 balance in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Axelsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that acute sleep deprivation disrupts cellular immune responses by shifting T helper (Th cell activity towards a Th2 cytokine profile. Since little is known about more long-term effects, we investigated how five days of sleep restriction would affect pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, Th1- and Th2 cytokine secretion. METHODS: Nine healthy males participated in an experimental sleep protocol with two baseline sleep-wake cycles (sleep 23.00-07.00 h followed by 5 days with restricted sleep (03.00-07.00 h. On the second baseline day and on the fifth day with restricted sleep, samples were drawn every third hour for determination of cytokines/chemokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin (IL -1β, IL-2, IL-4 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 after in vitro stimulation of whole blood samples with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA. Also leukocyte numbers, mononuclear cells and cortisol were analysed. RESULTS: 5-days of sleep restriction affected PHA-induced immune responses in several ways. There was a general decrease of IL-2 production (p<.05. A shift in Th1/Th2 cytokine balance was also evident, as determined by a decrease in IL2/IL4 ratio. No other main effects of restricted sleep were shown. Two significant interactions showed that restricted sleep resulted in increased TNF-α and MCP-1 in the late evening and early night hours (p's<.05. In addition, all variables varied across the 24 h day. CONCLUSIONS: 5-days of sleep restriction is characterized by a shift towards Th2 activity (i.e. lower 1L-2/IL-4 ratio which is similar to the effects of acute sleep deprivation and psychological stress. This may have implications for people suffering from conditions characterized by excessive Th2 activity like in allergic disease, such as asthma, for whom restricted sleep could have negative consequences.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel GABAB-related G-protein coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Michalovich, D; Testa, T T; Robbins, M J; Jaillard, C; Hill, J; Szekeres, P G; Charles, K J; Jourdain, S; Holbrook, J D; Boyfield, I; Patel, N; Medhurst, A D; Pangalos, M N

    2003-02-20

    Using a homology-based bioinformatics approach we have analysed human genomic sequence and identified the human and rodent orthologues of a novel putative seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, termed GABA(BL). The amino acid sequence homology of these cDNAs compared to GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) led us to postulate that GABA(BL) was a putative novel GABA(B) receptor subunit. The C-terminal sequence of GABA(BL) contained a putative coiled-coil domain, di-leucine and several RXR(R) ER retention motifs, all of which have been shown to be critical in GABA(B) receptor subunit function. In addition, the distribution of GABA(BL) in the central nervous system was reminiscent of that of the other known GABA(B) subunits. However, we were unable to detect receptor function in response to any GABA(B) ligands when GABA(BL) was expressed in isolation or in the presence of either GABA(B1) or GABA(B2). Therefore, if GABA(BL) is indeed a GABA(B) receptor subunit, its partner is a potentially novel receptor subunit or chaperone protein which has yet to be identified.

  8. The G protein-coupled bile acid receptor, TGR5, stimulates gallbladder filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Holmstrom, Sam R; Kir, Serkan; Umetani, Michihisa; Schmidt, Daniel R; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2011-06-01

    TGR5 is a G protein-coupled bile acid receptor present in brown adipose tissue and intestine, where its agonism increases energy expenditure and lowers blood glucose. Thus, it is an attractive drug target for treating human metabolic disease. However, TGR5 is also highly expressed in gallbladder, where its functions are less well characterized. Here, we demonstrate that TGR5 stimulates the filling of the gallbladder with bile. Gallbladder volume was increased in wild-type but not Tgr5(-/-) mice by administration of either the naturally occurring TGR5 agonist, lithocholic acid, or the synthetic TGR5 agonist, INT-777. These effects were independent of fibroblast growth factor 15, an enteric hormone previously shown to stimulate gallbladder filling. Ex vivo analyses using gallbladder tissue showed that TGR5 activation increased cAMP concentrations and caused smooth muscle relaxation in a TGR5-dependent manner. These data reveal a novel, gallbladder-intrinsic mechanism for regulating gallbladder contractility. They further suggest that TGR5 agonists should be assessed for effects on human gallbladder as they are developed for treating metabolic disease.

  9. Association between regulator of G protein signaling 9-2 and body weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L Waugh

    Full Text Available Regulator of G protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2 is a protein that is highly enriched in the striatum, a brain region that mediates motivation, movement and reward responses. We identified a naturally occurring 5 nucleotide deletion polymorphism in the human RGS9 gene and found that the mean body mass index (BMI of individuals with the deletion was significantly higher than those without. A splicing reporter minigene assay demonstrated that the deletion had the potential to significantly decrease the levels of correctly spliced RGS9 gene product. We measured the weights of rats after virally transduced overexpression of RGS9-2 or the structurally related RGS proteins, RGS7, or RGS11, in the nucleus accumbens (NAc and observed a reduction in body weight after overexpression of RGS9-2 but not RGS7 or 11. Conversely, we found that the RGS9 knockout mice were heavier than their wild-type littermates and had significantly higher percentages of abdominal fat. The constituent adipocytes were found to have a mean cross-sectional area that was more than double that of corresponding cells from wild-type mice. However, food intake and locomotion were not significantly different between the two strains. These studies with humans, rats and mice implicate RGS9-2 as a factor in regulating body weight.

  10. Identification of four evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four evolutio......The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four...... evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from this mosquito and expressed them in Chinese hamster ovary cells. After screening of a library of thirty-three insect or other invertebrate neuropeptides and eight biogenic amines, we could identify (de-orphanize) three of these GPCRs as...... relationship to the A. gambiae and other insect AKH receptors suggested that it is a receptor for an AKH-like peptide. This is the first published report on evolutionarily related AKH, corazonin, and CCAP receptors in mosquitoes....

  11. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor and estrogen receptor ligands regulate colonic motility and visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, M; Fichna, J; Bashashati, M; Habibi, S; Sibaev, A; Timmermans, J-P; Storr, M

    2017-07-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, which occurs more frequently in women than men. The aim of our study was to determine the role of activation of classical estrogen receptors (ER) and novel membrane receptor, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in human and mouse tissue and to assess the possible cross talk between these receptors in the GI tract. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of GPER in human and mouse intestines. The effect of G-1, a GPER selective agonist, and estradiol, a non-selective ER agonist, on muscle contractility was characterized in isolated preparations of the human and mouse colon. To characterize the effect of G-1 and estradiol in vivo, colonic bead expulsion test was performed. G-1 and estradiol activity on the visceral pain signaling was assessed in the mustard oil-induced abdominal pain model. GPER is expressed in the human colon and in the mouse colon and ileum. G-1 and estradiol inhibited muscle contractility in vitro in human and mouse colon. G-1 or estradiol administered intravenously at the dose of 20 mg/kg significantly prolonged the time to bead expulsion in females. Moreover, G-1 prolonged the time to bead expulsion and inhibited GI hypermotility in both genders. The injection of G-1 or estradiol resulted in a significant reduction in the number of pain-induced behaviors in mice. GPER and ER receptors are involved in the regulation of GI motility and visceral pain. Both may thus constitute an important pharmacological target in the IBS-D therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Priming GPCR signaling through the synergistic effect of two G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupte, Tejas M; Malik, Rabia U; Sommese, Ruth F; Ritt, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2017-04-04

    Although individual G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to activate one or more G proteins, the GPCR-G-protein interaction is viewed as a bimolecular event involving the formation of a ternary ligand-GPCR-G-protein complex. Here, we present evidence that individual GPCR-G-protein interactions can reinforce each other to enhance signaling through canonical downstream second messengers, a phenomenon we term "GPCR priming." Specifically, we find that the presence of noncognate Gq protein enhances cAMP stimulated by two Gs-coupled receptors, β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) and D1 dopamine receptor (D1-R). Reciprocally, Gs enhances IP1 through vasopressin receptor (V1A-R) but not α1 adrenergic receptor (α1-AR), suggesting that GPCR priming is a receptor-specific phenomenon. The C terminus of either the Gαs or Gαq subunit is sufficient to enhance Gα subunit activation and cAMP levels. Interaction of Gαs or Gαq C termini with the GPCR increases signaling potency, suggesting an altered GPCR conformation as the underlying basis for GPCR priming. We propose three parallel mechanisms involving (i) sequential G-protein interactions at the cognate site, (ii) G-protein interactions at distinct allosteric and cognate sites on the GPCR, and (iii) asymmetric GPCR dimers. GPCR priming suggests another layer of regulation in the classic GPCR ternary-complex model, with broad implications for the multiplicity inherent in signaling networks.

  13. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions.

  14. Ligand-Dependent Modulation of G Protein Conformation Alters Drug Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, Sebastian George Barton; Liang, Yi-Lynn; Nowell, Cameron James; Halls, Michelle Louise; Wookey, Peter John; Dal Maso, Emma; Inoue, Asuka; Christopoulos, Arthur; Wootten, Denise; Sexton, Patrick Michael

    2016-10-20

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, mediated by hetero-trimeric G proteins, can be differentially controlled by agonists. At a molecular level, this is thought to occur principally via stabilization of distinct receptor conformations by individual ligands. These distinct conformations control subsequent recruitment of transducer and effector proteins. Here, we report that ligand efficacy at the calcitonin GPCR (CTR) is also correlated with ligand-dependent alterations to G protein conformation. We observe ligand-dependent differences in the sensitivity of the G protein ternary complex to disruption by GTP, due to conformational differences in the receptor-bound G protein hetero-trimer. This results in divergent agonist-dependent receptor-residency times for the hetero-trimeric G protein and different accumulation rates for downstream second messengers. This study demonstrates that factors influencing efficacy extend beyond receptor conformation(s) and expands understanding of the molecular basis for how G proteins control/influence efficacy. This has important implications for the mechanisms that underlie ligand-mediated biased agonism. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  15. Connecting G protein signaling to chemoattractant-mediated cell polarity and cytoskeletal reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youtao; Lacal, Jesus; Firtel, Richard A; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-10-07

    The directional movement towards extracellular chemical gradients, a process called chemotaxis, is an important property of cells. Central to eukaryotic chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which chemoattractant-mediated activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) induces symmetry breaking in the activated downstream signaling pathways. Studies with mainly Dictyostelium and mammalian neutrophils as experimental systems have shown that chemotaxis is mediated by a complex network of signaling pathways. Recently, several labs have used extensive and efficient proteomic approaches to further unravel this dynamic signaling network. Together these studies showed the critical role of the interplay between heterotrimeric G-protein subunits and monomeric G proteins in regulating cytoskeletal rearrangements during chemotaxis. Here we highlight how these proteomic studies have provided greater insight into the mechanisms by which the heterotrimeric G protein cycle is regulated, how heterotrimeric G proteins-induced symmetry breaking is mediated through small G protein signaling, and how symmetry breaking in G protein signaling subsequently induces cytoskeleton rearrangements and cell migration.

  16. Melanopsin Variants as Intrinsic Optogenetic On and Off Switches for Transient versus Sustained Activation of G Protein Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoida, Katharina; Eickelbeck, Dennis; Karapinar, Raziye; Eckhardt, Tobias; Mark, Melanie D; Jancke, Dirk; Ehinger, Benedikt Valerian; König, Peter; Dalkara, Deniz; Herlitze, Stefan; Masseck, Olivia A

    2016-05-09

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the major protein family for cellular modulation in mammals. Therefore, various strategies have been developed to analyze the function of GPCRs involving pharmaco- and optogenetic approaches [1, 2]. However, a tool that combines precise control of the activation and deactivation of GPCR pathways and/or neuronal firing with limited phototoxicity is still missing. We compared the biophysical properties and optogenetic application of a human and a mouse melanopsin variant (hOpn4L and mOpn4L) on the control of Gi/o and Gq pathways in heterologous expression systems and mouse brain. We found that GPCR pathways can be switched on/off by blue/yellow light. The proteins differ in their kinetics and wavelength dependence to activate and deactivate G protein pathways. Whereas mOpn4L is maximally activated by very short light pulses, leading to sustained G protein activation, G protein responses of hOpn4L need longer light pulses to be activated and decline in amplitude. Based on the different biophysical properties, brief light activation of mOpn4L is sufficient to induce sustained neuronal firing in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC), whereas brief light activation of hOpn4L induces AP firing, which declines in frequency over time. Most importantly, mOpn4L-induced sustained firing can be switched off by yellow light. Based on the biophysical properties, hOpn4L and mOpn4L represent the first GPCR optogenetic tools, which can be used to switch GPCR pathways/neuronal firing on an off with temporal precision and limited phototoxicity. We suggest to name these tools moMo and huMo for future optogenetic applications.

  17. Receptor conformation and constitutive activity in CCR5 chemokine receptor function and HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Colleen A

    2014-01-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor mediates the effects of proinflammatory β-chemokines that stimulate chemotaxis, activation, and proliferation of macrophages and T cells. CCR5 is also the major coreceptor that mediates HIV infection in combination with CD4. Chemokine agonists of CCR5 stimulate the activation of cellular calcium and protein kinase signaling pathways that depend on the activation of Gαi and probably also Gαq in some cells. Chemokines also stimulate the recruitment of β-arrestin, which is required for clathrin-dependent receptor internalization and acts as a scaffold protein for the chemotaxis signaling complex that mobilizes the actin cytoskeleton. CCR5 is partially constitutively active for the activation of Gαi, but the physiological significance has not been studied. HIV binding to CCR5 also activates G protein and protein kinase signaling but, in addition, stimulates the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, and mobilizes the actin cytoskeleton to form the fusion pore that allows viral entry and subsequently supports viral replication in the cell. The CCR5 conformation that mediates the fusion of the viral and cell membranes is unknown, but it is probably distinct from the conformation that mediates G protein signaling. Nonpeptide CCR5 blockers are allosteric inverse agonists that increase dissociation of both chemokines and HIV envelope proteins, but this does not correlate with their ability to inhibit HIV infection. Nevertheless, the inverse agonist activity may ameliorate the immune activation that exacerbates AIDS pathogenesis. Inverse agonists of CCR5 have established efficacy for the treatment of AIDS, but may also be useful in preventing HIV infection.

  18. The G Protein α Chaperone Ric-8 as a Potential Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasergi, Makaía M.; Patel, Bharti R.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase (Ric-8)A and Ric-8B are essential genes that encode positive regulators of heterotrimeric G protein α subunits. Controversy persists surrounding the precise way(s) that Ric-8 proteins affect G protein biology and signaling. Ric-8 proteins chaperone nucleotide-free Gα-subunit states during biosynthetic protein folding prior to G protein heterotrimer assembly. In organisms spanning the evolutionary window of Ric-8 expression, experimental perturbation of Ric-8 genes results in reduced functional abundances of G proteins because G protein α subunits are misfolded and degraded rapidly. Ric-8 proteins also act as Gα-subunit guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) in vitro. However, Ric-8 GEF activity could strictly be an in vitro phenomenon stemming from the ability of Ric-8 to induce partial Gα unfolding, thereby enhancing GDP release. Ric-8 GEF activity clearly differs from the GEF activity of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). G protein βγ is inhibitory to Ric-8 action but obligate for receptors. It remains an open question whether Ric-8 has dual functions in cells and regulates G proteins as both a molecular chaperone and GEF. Clearly, Ric-8 has a profound influence on heterotrimeric G protein function. For this reason, we propose that Ric-8 proteins are as yet untested therapeutic targets in which pharmacological inhibition of the Ric-8/Gα protein–protein interface could serve to attenuate the effects of disease-causing G proteins (constitutively active mutants) and/or GPCR signaling. This minireview will chronicle the understanding of Ric-8 function, provide a comparative discussion of the Ric-8 molecular chaperoning and GEF activities, and support the case for why Ric-8 proteins should be considered potential targets for development of new therapies. PMID:25319541

  19. Baclofen and other GABAB receptor agents are allosteric modulators of the CXCL12 chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, Alice; Kussrow, Amanda; Olmsted, Ian Roys; Sandoz, Guillaume; Bornhop, Darryl J; Nahon, Jean-Louis

    2013-07-10

    CXCR4, a receptor for the chemokine CXCL12 (stromal-cell derived factor-1α), is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), expressed in the immune and CNS and integrally involved in various neurological disorders. The GABAB receptor is also a GPCR that mediates metabotropic action of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and is located on neurons and immune cells as well. Using diverse approaches, we report novel interaction between GABAB receptor agents and CXCR4 and demonstrate allosteric binding of these agents to CXCR4. First, both GABAB antagonists and agonists block CXCL12-elicited chemotaxis in human breast cancer cells. Second, a GABAB antagonist blocks the potentiation by CXCL12 of high-threshold Ca(2+) channels in rat neurons. Third, electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney cell line 293 cells in which we coexpressed rat CXCR4 and the G-protein inward rectifier K(+) (GIRK) channel showed that GABAB antagonist and agonist modified CXCL12-evoked activation of GIRK channels. To investigate whether GABAB ligands bind to CXCR4, we expressed this receptor in heterologous systems lacking GABAB receptors and performed competition binding experiments. Our fluorescent resonance energy transfer experiments suggest that GABAB ligands do not bind CXCR4 at the CXCL12 binding pocket suggesting allosteric modulation, in accordance with our electrophysiology experiments. Finally, using backscattering interferometry and lipoparticles containing only the CXCR4 receptor, we quantified the binding affinity for the GABAB ligands, confirming a direct interaction with the CXCR4 receptor. The effect of GABAergic agents on CXCR4 suggests new therapeutic potentials for neurological and immune diseases.

  20. Isolation of a novel member of small G protein superfamily and its expression in colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yan; Wen-Liang Wang; Feng Zhu; Sheng-Quan Chen; Qing-Long Li; Li Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: APMCF1 is a novel human gene whose transcripts are up-regulated in apoptotic MCF-7 cells. In order to learn more about this gene′s function in other tumors, we cloned its full length cDNA and prepared its polyclonal antibody to investigate its expression in colon cancers with immunohistochemistry.METHODS: With the method of 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) and EST assembled in GenBank, we extended the length of APMCF1 at 5′ end. Then the sequence encoding the APMCF1 protein was amplified by RT-PCR from the total RNA of apoptotic MCF-7 cells and cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-KG to construct recombinant expression vector pGEX-APMCF1. The GSTAPMCF1 fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and used to immunize rabbits to get the rabbit anti-APMCF1 serum. The specificity of polyclonal anti-APMCF1 antibody was determined by Western blot. Then we investigated the expression of Apmcf1 in colon cancers and normal colonic mucosa with immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: A cDNA fragment with a length of 1 745 bp was obtained. APMCF1 was mapped to chromosome 3q22.2and spanned at least 14.8 kb of genomic DNA with seven exons and six introns contained. Bioinformatic analysis showed the protein encoded by APMCF1 contained a small GTP-binding protein (G proteins) domain and was homologous to mouse signal recognition particle receptor β(SRβ). A coding region covering 816 bp was cloned and polyclonal anti-APMCF1 antibody was prepared successfully.The immunohistochemistry study showed that APMCF1 had a strong expression in colon cancer.CONCLUSION: APMCF1 may be the gene coding human signal recognition particle receptor β and belongs to the small-G protein superfamily. Its strong expression pattern in colon cancer suggests it may play a role in colon cancer development.

  1. Simultaneous Activation of Induced Heterodimerization between CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Reveals a Mechanism for Regulation of Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Christopher J; Scarlett, Kisha A; Chetram, Mahandranauth A; Jones, Kia J; Sandifer, Brittney J; Davis, Ahriea S; Marcus, Adam I; Hinton, Cimona V

    2016-05-06

    The G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4 generates signals that lead to cell migration, cell proliferation, and other survival mechanisms that result in the metastatic spread of primary tumor cells to distal organs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 can form homodimers or can heterodimerize with other G-protein-coupled receptors to form receptor complexes that can amplify or decrease the signaling capacity of each individual receptor. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we found that CXCR4 can form an induced heterodimer with cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Simultaneous, agonist-dependent activation of CXCR4 and CB2 resulted in reduced CXCR4-mediated expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and ultimately reduced cancer cell functions such as calcium mobilization and cellular chemotaxis. Given that treatment with cannabinoids has been shown to reduce invasiveness of cancer cells as well as CXCR4-mediated migration of immune cells, it is plausible that CXCR4 signaling can be silenced through a physical heterodimeric association with CB2, thereby inhibiting subsequent functions of CXCR4. Taken together, the data illustrate a mechanism by which the cannabinoid system can negatively modulate CXCR4 receptor function and perhaps tumor progression.

  2. Effects of transient oxygen-glucose deprivation on G-proteins and G-protein-coupled receptors in rat CA3 pyramidal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, M; Gähwiler, B H; Gerber, U

    1998-06-01

    The role of guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins (G-proteins) in the generation of the outward current during transient oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) was investigated in CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures using the single-electrode voltage-clamp technique with KMeSO4-filled microelectrodes. To simulate ischaemia, brief chemical OGD (2 mM 2-deoxyglucose and 3 mM NaN3 for 4-9 min) was used, which induced an outward K+ current associated with an increase in input conductance. OGD failed to induce the outward current under conditions where G-protein function was disrupted by loading cells with guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) [GDPbetaS] or after prolonged injection of guanosine 5'-O(3-thiotdphosphate) [GTPgammaS]. However, in slices treated with pertussis toxin (PTX), OGD still elicited the outward current, indicating that PTX-insensitive G-proteins are involved. Consistent with this insensitivity to PTX, neither adenosine receptors nor GABA(B) (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptors, which operate via PTX-sensitive G-proteins, mediate the OGD-induced outward current. When adenosine receptors or GABA(B) receptors were blocked with 1,3-dipropyl-8-psulphophenylxanthine (DPSPX, 5 microM) or CGP 52 432 (10 microM), respectively, the OGD-induced response was not modified. The response also persisted following pretreatment of slice cultures with tetanus toxin to prevent vesicular release of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators from presynaptic terminals. Both PTX-sensitive and PTX-insensitive G-protein-mediated responses were suppressed during OGD. The inward current induced by the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 1 S, 3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate (1S,3R-ACPD) and the outward current elicited by adenosine or baclofen were strongly or completely attenuated. In contrast, the ionotropic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) response was not affected. These findings suggest that during OGD there is

  3. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    modified forms of these proteins may serve as potential autoantigens in RA. References: 1. Yoshida Y, Korchynskyi O, Tak PP, Isozaki T, Ruth JH, Campbell ...recruiting chemokine. Arthritis Rheumatol. 66:2716-27, 2014. 2. Edhayan G, Ha CM, Isozaki T, Amin MA, Ohara RA, Morgan R, Campbell PL, Haines GK III, Arbab S...of RA. 6. Publications, Abstracts and Presentations Peer-reviewed manuscripts: 1. Yoshida Y, Korchynskyi O, Tak PP, Isozaki T, Ruth JH, Campbell PL

  4. Angiotensin-(1-7) Is an Endogenous Ligand for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Mas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robson A. S. Santos; Ana C. Simoes e Silva; Christine Maric; Denise M. R. Silva; Raquel Pillar Machado; Insa de Buhr; Silvia Heringer-Walther; Sergio Veloso B. Pinheiro; Myriam Teresa Lopes; Michael Bader; Elizabeth P. Mendes; Virgina Soares Lemos; Maria Jose Campagnole-Santos; Heinz-Peter Schultheiss; Robert Speth; Thomas Walther

    2003-01-01

    ...) antagonist indicated the existence of a distinct Ang-(1-7) receptor. We demonstrate that genetic deletion of the G protein-coupled receptor encoded by the Mas protooncogene abolishes the binding of Ang-(1-7) to mouse kidneys...

  5. Chronic regulation of colonic epithelial secretory function by activation of G protein-coupled receptors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toumi, F

    2011-02-01

    Enteric neurotransmitters that act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well known to acutely promote epithelial Cl(-) and fluid secretion. Here we examined if acute GPCR activation might have more long-term consequences for epithelial secretory function.

  6. How a Mycoparasite Employs G-Protein Signaling: Using the Example of Trichoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Omann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoparasitic Trichoderma spp. act as potent biocontrol agents against a number of plant pathogenic fungi, whereupon the mycoparasitic attack includes host recognition followed by infection structure formation and secretion of lytic enzymes and antifungal metabolites leading to the host's death. Host-derived signals are suggested to be recognized by receptors located on the mycoparasite's cell surface eliciting an internal signal transduction cascade which results in the transcription of mycoparasitism-relevant genes. Heterotrimeric G proteins of fungi transmit signals originating from G-protein-coupled receptors mainly to the cAMP and the MAP kinase pathways resulting in regulation of downstream effectors. Components of the G-protein signaling machinery such as G subunits and G-protein-coupled receptors were recently shown to play crucial roles in Trichoderma mycoparasitism as they govern processes such as the production of extracellular cell wall lytic enzymes, the secretion of antifungal metabolites, and the formation of infection structures.

  7. G Protein-induced Trafficking of Voltage-dependent Calcium Channels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eugene Tombler; Nory Jun Cabanilla; Paul Carman; Natasha Permaul; John J. Hall; Ryan W. Richman; Jessica Lee; Jennifer Rodriguez; Dan P. Felsenfeld; Robert F. Hennigan; María A. Diversé-Pierluissi

    2006-01-01

    .... Here we report a novel mechanism for G protein-mediated modulation of neuronal voltage-dependent calcium channels that involves the destabilization and subsequent removal of calcium channels from the plasma membrane...

  8. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  9. Homologous and unique G protein alpha subunits in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochrie, M A; Mendel, J E; Sternberg, P W; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a known G protein alpha subunit, the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha), was isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence of C. elegans Go alpha is 80-87% identical to other Go alpha sequences. An mRNA that hybridizes to the C. elegans Go alpha cDNA can be detected on Northern blots. A C. elegans protein that crossreacts with antibovine Go alpha antibody can be detected on immunoblots. A cosmid clone containing the C. elegans Go alpha gene (goa-1) was isolated and mapped to chromosome I. The genomic fragments of three other C. elegans G protein alpha subunit genes (gpa-1, gpa-2, and gpa-3) have been isolated using the polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding cosmid clones were isolated and mapped to disperse locations on chromosome V. The sequences of two of the genes, gpa-1 and gpa-3, were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences of gpa-1 and gpa-3 are only 48% identical to each other. Therefore, they are likely to have distinct functions. In addition they are not homologous enough to G protein alpha subunits in other organisms to be classified. Thus C. elegans has G proteins that are identifiable homologues of mammalian G proteins as well as G proteins that appear to be unique to C. elegans. Study of identifiable G proteins in C. elegans may result in a further understanding of their function in other organisms, whereas study of the novel G proteins may provide an understanding of unique aspects of nematode physiology. Images PMID:1907494

  10. G protein signaling governing cell fate decisions involves opposing Gα subunits in Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Xue, Chaoyang; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Communication between cells and their environments is often mediated by G protein-coupled receptors and cognate G proteins. In fungi, one such signaling cascade is the mating pathway triggered by pheromone/pheromone receptor recognition. Unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which expresses two Gα subunits, most filamentous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes have three Gα subunits. Previous studies have defined the Gα subunit acting upstream of the cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, but it has been unclea...

  11. Regulation of G protein-coupled receptors by palmitoylation and cholesterol

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Due to their membrane location, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are subject to regulation by soluble and integral membrane proteins as well as membrane components, including lipids and sterols. GPCRs also undergo a variety of post-translational modifications, including palmitoylation. A recent article by Zheng et al. in BMC Cell Biology demonstrates cooperative roles for receptor palmitoylation and cholesterol binding in GPCR dimerization and G protein coupling, underlining the c...

  12. Mechanisms of regulation and function of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Yang; Shi-Hai Xia

    2006-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) interact with the agonist-activated form of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) to affect receptor phosphorylation and to initiate profound impairment of receptor signaling,or desensitization. GPCR forms the largest family of cell surface receptors, and defects in GRK function have the potential consequence to affect GPCR-stimulated biological responses in many pathological situations.

  13. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging Reveals that Chemokine-Binding Modulates Heterodimers of CXCR4 and CCR5 Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dimerization has emerged as an important feature of chemokine G-protein-coupled receptors. CXCR4 and CCR5 regulate leukocyte chemotaxis and also serve as a co-receptor for HIV entry. Both receptors are recruited to the immunological synapse during T-cell activation. However, it is not clear whether they form heterodimers and whether ligand binding modulates the dimer formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a sensitive Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) imaging ...

  14. Identification and Characterization of Amlexanox as a G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 Inhibitor

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    Kristoff T. Homan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs have been implicated in human diseases ranging from heart failure to diabetes. Previous studies have identified several compounds that selectively inhibit GRK2, such as paroxetine and balanol. Far fewer selective inhibitors have been reported for GRK5, a target for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy, and the mechanism of action of reported compounds is unknown. To identify novel scaffolds that selectively inhibit GRK5, a differential scanning fluorometry screen was used to probe a library of 4480 compounds. The best hit was amlexanox, an FDA-approved anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic immunomodulator. The crystal structure of amlexanox in complex with GRK1 demonstrates that its tricyclic aromatic ring system forms ATP-like interactions with the hinge of the kinase domain, which is likely similar to how this drug binds to IκB kinase ε (IKKε, another kinase known to be inhibited by this compound. Amlexanox was also able to inhibit myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcriptional activity in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes in a manner consistent with GRK5 inhibition. The GRK1 amlexanox structure thus serves as a springboard for the rational design of inhibitors with improved potency and selectivity for GRK5 and IKKε.

  15. The G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heterodimer Network (GPCR-HetNet and Its Hub Components

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    Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs oligomerization has emerged as a vital characteristic of receptor structure. Substantial experimental evidence supports the existence of GPCR-GPCR interactions in a coordinated and cooperative manner. However, despite the current development of experimental techniques for large-scale detection of GPCR heteromers, in order to understand their connectivity it is necessary to develop novel tools to study the global heteroreceptor networks. To provide insight into the overall topology of the GPCR heteromers and identify key players, a collective interaction network was constructed. Experimental interaction data for each of the individual human GPCR protomers was obtained manually from the STRING and SCOPUS databases. The interaction data were used to build and analyze the network using Cytoscape software. The network was treated as undirected throughout the study. It is comprised of 156 nodes, 260 edges and has a scale-free topology. Connectivity analysis reveals a significant dominance of intrafamily versus interfamily connections. Most of the receptors within the network are linked to each other by a small number of edges. DRD2, OPRM, ADRB2, AA2AR, AA1R, OPRK, OPRD and GHSR are identified as hubs. In a network representation 10 modules/clusters also appear as a highly interconnected group of nodes. Information on this GPCR network can improve our understanding of molecular integration. GPCR-HetNet has been implemented in Java and is freely available at http://www.iiia.csic.es/~ismel/GPCR-Nets/index.html.

  16. The G protein-coupled receptor heterodimer network (GPCR-HetNet) and its hub components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Brito, Ismel; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Di Palma, Michael; Oflijan, Julia; Skieterska, Kamila; Duchou, Jolien; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Suárez-Boomgaard, Diana; Rivera, Alicia; Guidolin, Diego; Agnati, Luigi F; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-05-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization has emerged as a vital characteristic of receptor structure. Substantial experimental evidence supports the existence of GPCR-GPCR interactions in a coordinated and cooperative manner. However, despite the current development of experimental techniques for large-scale detection of GPCR heteromers, in order to understand their connectivity it is necessary to develop novel tools to study the global heteroreceptor networks. To provide insight into the overall topology of the GPCR heteromers and identify key players, a collective interaction network was constructed. Experimental interaction data for each of the individual human GPCR protomers was obtained manually from the STRING and SCOPUS databases. The interaction data were used to build and analyze the network using Cytoscape software. The network was treated as undirected throughout the study. It is comprised of 156 nodes, 260 edges and has a scale-free topology. Connectivity analysis reveals a significant dominance of intrafamily versus interfamily connections. Most of the receptors within the network are linked to each other by a small number of edges. DRD2, OPRM, ADRB2, AA2AR, AA1R, OPRK, OPRD and GHSR are identified as hubs. In a network representation 10 modules/clusters also appear as a highly interconnected group of nodes. Information on this GPCR network can improve our understanding of molecular integration. GPCR-HetNet has been implemented in Java and is freely available at http://www.iiia.csic.es/~ismel/GPCR-Nets/index.html.

  17. Advances in G-protein coupled receptor research and related bioinformatics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) is one of the most important protein families for drug target. GPCR agonists and antagonists occupy approximately one third of the world small molecule drug market. Much effort has been invested in GPCR study by both academic institutions and pharmaceutical industries. With seven-transmembrane domains, GPCR plays significant roles in intercellular signal transduction and is involved in a variety of biological pathways. With the availability of sequence data of human and other mammalian genomes, as well as their expressed sequence tag (EST) data, the bioinformatics and genomics approaches can be applied to identifying novel GPCR in the post genomic era. Deorphanizing GPCR or matching ligands with GPCR greatly facilitates target validation process and automatically provides a possible compound screening assay. Similarly, bioinformatics data mining approach could also be applied to the identification of GPCR peptide or protein ligands. Here we give a general review of recent advances in the study of GPCR structure, function, as well as GPCR and ligand identification with the emphasis on the bioinformatics database mining of GPCR and their peptide or protein ligands.

  18. The repertoire of G-protein-coupled receptors in Xenopus tropicalis

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    Hu Yinghe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily represents the largest protein family in the human genome. These proteins have a variety of physiological functions that give them well recognized roles in clinical medicine. In Xenopus tropicalis, a widely used animal model for physiology research, the repertoire of GPCRs may help link the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates from teleost fish to mammals. Results We have identified 1452 GPCRs in the X. tropicalis genome. Phylogenetic analyses classified these receptors into the following seven families: Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled, Secretin, Taste 2 and Vomeronasal 1. Nearly 70% of X. tropicalis GPCRs are represented by the following three types of receptors thought to receive chemosensory information from the outside world: olfactory, vomeronasal 1 and vomeronasal 2 receptors. Conclusion X. tropicalis shares a more similar repertoire of GPCRs with mammals than it does with fish. An examination of the three major groups of receptors related to olfactory/pheromone detection shows that in X. tropicalis, these groups have undergone lineage specific expansion. A comparison of GPCRs in X. tropicalis, teleost fish and mammals reveals the GPCR evolutionary history in vertebrates.

  19. Nicotinic Acid Increases Adiponectin Secretion from Differentiated Bovine Preadipocytes through G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling

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    Christina Kopp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The transition period in dairy cows (3 weeks prepartum until 3 weeks postpartum is associated with substantial mobilization of energy stores, which is often associated with metabolic diseases. Nicotinic acid (NA is an antilipolytic and lipid-lowering compound used to treat dyslipidaemia in humans, and it also reduces non-esterified fatty acids in cattle. In mice the G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A ligand NA positively affects the secretion of adiponectin, an important modulator of glucose and fat metabolism. In cattle, the corresponding data linking NA to adiponectin are missing. Our objective was to examine the effects of NA on adiponectin and AMPK protein abundance and the expression of mRNAs of related genes such as chemerin, an adipokine that enhances adiponectin secretion in vitro. Differentiated bovine adipocytes were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX to verify the involvement of GPR signaling, and treated with 10 or 15 µM NA for 12 or 24 h. NA increased adiponectin concentrations (p ≤ 0.001 and the mRNA abundances of GPR109A (p ≤ 0.05 and chemerin (p ≤ 0.01. Pre-incubation with PTX reduced the adiponectin response to NA (p ≤ 0.001. The NA-stimulated secretion of adiponectin and the mRNA expression of chemerin in the bovine adipocytes were suggestive of GPR signaling-dependent improved insulin sensitivity and/or adipocyte metabolism in dairy cows.

  20. Disruption of G-protein γ5 subtype causes embryonic lethality in mice.

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    Anne M Moon

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins modulate many processes essential for embryonic development including cellular proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Although most research has focused on identifying the roles of the various αsubtypes, there is growing recognition that similarly divergent βγ dimers also regulate these processes. In this paper, we show that targeted disruption of the mouse Gng5 gene encoding the γ5 subtype produces embryonic lethality associated with severe head and heart defects. Collectively, these results add to a growing body of data that identify critical roles for the γ subunits in directing the assembly of functionally distinct G-αβγ trimers that are responsible for regulating diverse biological processes. Specifically, the finding that loss of the G-γ5 subtype is associated with a reduced number of cardiac precursor cells not only provides a causal basis for the mouse phenotype but also raises the possibility that G-βγ5 dependent signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of human congenital heart problems.

  1. Structural modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: An overview on automatic web-servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busato, Mirko; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Despite the significant efforts and discoveries during the last few years in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expression and crystallization, the receptors with known structures to date are limited only to a small fraction of human GPCRs. The lack of experimental three-dimensional structures of the receptors represents a strong limitation that hampers a deep understanding of their function. Computational techniques are thus a valid alternative strategy to model three-dimensional structures. Indeed, recent advances in the field, together with extraordinary developments in crystallography, in particular due to its ability to capture GPCRs in different activation states, have led to encouraging results in the generation of accurate models. This, prompted the community of modelers to render their methods publicly available through dedicated databases and web-servers. Here, we present an extensive overview on these services, focusing on their advantages, drawbacks and their role in successful applications. Future challenges in the field of GPCR modeling, such as the predictions of long loop regions and the modeling of receptor activation states are presented as well.

  2. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 promotes flaviviridae entry and replication.

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    Caroline Le Sommer

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses cause a wide range of severe diseases ranging from encephalitis to hemorrhagic fever. Discovery of host factors that regulate the fate of flaviviruses in infected cells could provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of infection and therefore facilitate the development of anti-flaviviral drugs. We performed genome-scale siRNA screens to discover human host factors required for yellow fever virus (YFV propagation. Using a 2 × 2 siRNA pool screening format and a duplicate of the screen, we identified a high confidence list of YFV host factors. To find commonalities between flaviviruses, these candidates were compared to host factors previously identified for West Nile virus (WNV and dengue virus (DENV. This comparison highlighted a potential requirement for the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family, GRKs, for flaviviral infection. The YFV host candidate GRK2 (also known as ADRBK1 was validated both in siRNA-mediated knockdown HuH-7 cells and in GRK(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Additionally, we showed that GRK2 was required for efficient propagation of DENV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV indicating that GRK2 requirement is conserved throughout the Flaviviridae. Finally, we found that GRK2 participates in multiple distinct steps of the flavivirus life cycle by promoting both entry and RNA synthesis. Together, our findings identified GRK2 as a novel regulator of flavivirus infection and suggest that inhibition of GRK2 function may constitute a new approach for treatment of flavivirus associated diseases.

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 promotes flaviviridae entry and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Sommer, Caroline; Barrows, Nicholas J; Bradrick, Shelton S; Pearson, James L; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses cause a wide range of severe diseases ranging from encephalitis to hemorrhagic fever. Discovery of host factors that regulate the fate of flaviviruses in infected cells could provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of infection and therefore facilitate the development of anti-flaviviral drugs. We performed genome-scale siRNA screens to discover human host factors required for yellow fever virus (YFV) propagation. Using a 2 × 2 siRNA pool screening format and a duplicate of the screen, we identified a high confidence list of YFV host factors. To find commonalities between flaviviruses, these candidates were compared to host factors previously identified for West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV). This comparison highlighted a potential requirement for the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family, GRKs, for flaviviral infection. The YFV host candidate GRK2 (also known as ADRBK1) was validated both in siRNA-mediated knockdown HuH-7 cells and in GRK(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Additionally, we showed that GRK2 was required for efficient propagation of DENV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) indicating that GRK2 requirement is conserved throughout the Flaviviridae. Finally, we found that GRK2 participates in multiple distinct steps of the flavivirus life cycle by promoting both entry and RNA synthesis. Together, our findings identified GRK2 as a novel regulator of flavivirus infection and suggest that inhibition of GRK2 function may constitute a new approach for treatment of flavivirus associated diseases.

  4. Novel antigen design for the generation of antibodies to G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, K; Hofström, C; Lindskog, C; Hansson, M; Angelidou, P; Hökfelt, T; Uhlén, M; Wernérus, H; Gräslund, T; Hober, S

    2011-07-29

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors, key proteins in cellular signaling. Due to their large hydrophobic membrane spanning regions and often very short loops exposed on the surface of the cells, generation of antibodies able to recognize the receptors in the endogenous environment has been difficult. Here, we describe an antigen-design method where the extracellular loops and N-terminus are combined to a single antigen for generation of antibodies specific to three selected GPCRs: NPY5R, B2ARN and GLP1R. The design strategy enabled straightforward antigen production and antibody generation. Binding of the antibodies to intact receptors was analyzed using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence based confocal microscopy on A-431 cells overexpressing the respective GPCR. The antibody-antigen interactions were characterized using epitope mapping, and the antibodies were applied in immunohistochemical staining of human tissues. Most of the antibodies showed specific binding to their respective overexpressing cell line but not to the non-transfected cells, thus indicating binding to their respective target receptor. The epitope mapping showed that sub-populations within the purified antibody pool recognized different regions of the antigen. Hence, the genetic combination of several different epitopes enables efficient generation of specific antibodies with potential use in several applications for the study of endogenous receptors.

  5. Heteromerization of ciliary G protein-coupled receptors in the mouse brain.

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    Jill A Green

    Full Text Available Nearly every cell type in the mammalian body projects from its cell surface a primary cilium that provides important sensory and signaling functions. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human developmental disorders and diseases, collectively termed ciliopathies. Most neurons in the brain possess cilia that are enriched for signaling proteins such as G protein-coupled receptors and adenylyl cyclase type 3, suggesting neuronal cilia sense neuromodulators in the brain and contribute to non-synaptic signaling. Indeed, disruption of neuronal cilia or loss of neuronal ciliary signaling proteins is associated with obesity and learning and memory deficits. As the functions of primary cilia are defined by the signaling proteins that localize to the ciliary compartment, identifying the complement of signaling proteins in cilia can provide important insights into their physiological roles. Here we report for the first time that different GPCRs can colocalize within the same cilium. Specifically, we found the ciliary GPCRs, melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (Mchr1 and somatostatin receptor 3 (Sstr3 colocalizing within cilia in multiple mouse brain regions. In addition, we have evidence suggesting Mchr1 and Sstr3 form heteromers. As GPCR heteromerization can affect ligand binding properties as well as downstream signaling, our findings add an additional layer of complexity to neuronal ciliary signaling.

  6. Identifying G-protein Coupled Receptors Using Weighted Levenshtein Distance and Nearest Neighbor Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Xu

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of seven-helix transmembrane proteins that have been used in bioinformatics as the targets to facilitate drug discovery for human diseases. Although thousands of GPCR sequences have been collected, the ligand specificity of many GPCRs is still unknown and only one crystal structure of the rhodopsin-like family has been solved. Therefore, identifying GPCR types only from sequence data has become an important research issue. In this study, a novel technique for identifying GPCR types based on the weighted Levenshtein distance between two receptor sequences and the nearest neighbor method (NNM) is introduced, which can deal with receptor sequences with different lengths directly. In our experiments for classifying four classes(acetylcholine, adrenoceptor, dopamine, and serotonin) of the rhodopsin-like family of GPCRs, the error rates from the leave-one-out procedure and the leave-half-out procedure were 0.62% and 1.24%, respectively. These results are prior to those of the covariant discriminant algorithm, the support vector machine method, and the NNM with Euclidean distance.

  7. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ligand Binding to a Muscarinic G-protein Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Kalli; Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the detailed process of ligand binding to a receptor is pharmaceutically important for identifying druggable binding sites. With the ability to provide atomistic detail, computational methods are well poised to study these processes. Here, accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is proposed to simulate processes of ligand binding to a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), in this case the M3 muscarinic receptor, which is a target for treating many human diseases, including cancer, diabetes and obesity. Long-timescale aMD simulations were performed to observe the binding of three chemically diverse ligand molecules: antagonist tiotropium (TTP), partial agonist arecoline (ARc), and full agonist acetylcholine (ACh). In comparison with earlier microsecond-timescale conventional MD simulations, aMD greatly accelerated the binding of ACh to the receptor orthosteric ligand-binding site and the binding of TTP to an extracellular vestibule. Further aMD simulations also captured binding of ARc to the receptor orthosteric site. Additionally, all three ligands were observed to bind in the extracellular vestibule during their binding pathways, suggesting that it is a metastable binding site. This study demonstrates the applicability of aMD to protein-ligand binding, especially the drug recognition of GPCRs. PMID:26537408

  8. G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and neural tube closure defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Issei S; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2016-10-12

    Disruption of the normal mechanisms that mediate neural tube closure can result in neural tube defects (NTDs) with devastating consequences in affected patients. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, we are increasingly detecting mutations in multiple genes in NTD cases. However, our ability to determine which of these genes contribute to the malformation is limited by our understanding of the pathways controlling neural tube closure. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane receptors in humans and have been historically favored as drug targets. Recent studies implicate several GPCRs and downstream signaling pathways in neural tube development and closure. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of GPCR signaling pathways in pathogenesis of NTDs. Notable examples include the orphan primary cilia-localized GPCR, Gpr161 that regulates the basal suppression machinery of sonic hedgehog pathway by means of activation of cAMP-protein kinase A signaling in the neural tube, and protease-activated receptors that are activated by a local network of membrane-tethered proteases during neural tube closure involving the surface ectoderm. Understanding the role of these GPCR-regulated pathways in neural tube development and closure is essential toward identification of underlying genetic causes to prevent NTDs. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Regulator of G protein signaling 20 enhances cancer cell aggregation, migration, invasion and adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Lee, Maggie M K; Leung, Manton M H; Wong, Yung H

    2016-11-01

    Several RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) proteins are known to be upregulated in a variety of tumors but their roles in modulating tumorigenesis remain undefined. Since the expression of RGS20 is elevated in metastatic melanoma and breast tumors, we examined the effects of RGS20 overexpression and knockdown on the cell mobility and adhesive properties of different human cancer cell lines, including cervical cancer HeLa, breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231, and non-small cell lung carcinoma H1299 and A549 cells. Expression of RGS20 enhanced cell aggregation, migration, invasion and adhesion as determined by hanging drop aggregation, wound healing, transwell chamber migration and invasion assays. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous RGS20 impaired these responses. In addition, RGS20 elevated the expression of vimentin (a mesenchymal cell marker) but down-regulated the expression of E-cadherin, two indicators commonly associated with metastasis. These results suggest that the expression of RGS20 may promote metastasis of tumor cells.

  10. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor 56 regulates mechanical overload-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James P; Wrann, Christiane D; Rao, Rajesh R; Nair, Sreekumaran K; Jedrychowski, Mark P; You, Jae-Sung; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Gygi, Steven P; Ruas, Jorge L; Hornberger, Troy A; Wu, Zhidan; Glass, David J; Piao, Xianhua; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2014-11-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha 4 (PGC-1α4) is a protein isoform derived by alternative splicing of the PGC1α mRNA and has been shown to promote muscle hypertrophy. We show here that G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) is a transcriptional target of PGC-1α4 and is induced in humans by resistance exercise. Furthermore, the anabolic effects of PGC-1α4 in cultured murine muscle cells are dependent on GPR56 signaling, because knockdown of GPR56 attenuates PGC-1α4-induced muscle hypertrophy in vitro. Forced expression of GPR56 results in myotube hypertrophy through the expression of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is dependent on Gα12/13 signaling. A murine model of overload-induced muscle hypertrophy is associated with increased expression of both GPR56 and its ligand collagen type III, whereas genetic ablation of GPR56 expression attenuates overload-induced muscle hypertrophy and associated anabolic signaling. These data illustrate a signaling pathway through GPR56 which regulates muscle hypertrophy associated with resistance/loading-type exercise.

  12. Citric acid cycle intermediates as ligands for orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weihai; Miao, Frederick J-P; Lin, Daniel C-H; Schwandner, Ralf T; Wang, Zhulun; Gao, Jinhai; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Ling, Lei

    2004-05-13

    The citric acid cycle is central to the regulation of energy homeostasis and cell metabolism. Mutations in enzymes that catalyse steps in the citric acid cycle result in human diseases with various clinical presentations. The intermediates of the citric acid cycle are present at micromolar concentration in blood and are regulated by respiration, metabolism and renal reabsorption/extrusion. Here we show that GPR91 (ref. 3), a previously orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), functions as a receptor for the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate. We also report that GPR99 (ref. 4), a close relative of GPR91, responds to alpha-ketoglutarate, another intermediate in the citric acid cycle. Thus by acting as ligands for GPCRs, succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate are found to have unexpected signalling functions beyond their traditional roles. Furthermore, we show that succinate increases blood pressure in animals. The succinate-induced hypertensive effect involves the renin-angiotensin system and is abolished in GPR91-deficient mice. Our results indicate a possible role for GPR91 in renovascular hypertension, a disease closely linked to atherosclerosis, diabetes and renal failure.

  13. The role of G protein gene GNB3 C825T Polymorphism in HIV-1 acquisition, progression and immune activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juno Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GNB3 C825T polymorphism is associated with increased G protein-mediated signal transduction, SDF-1α-mediated lymphocyte chemotaxis, accelerated HIV-1 progression, and altered responses to antiretroviral therapy among Caucasian subjects. The GNB3 825T allele is highly prevalent in African populations, and as such any impact on HIV-1 acquisition or progression rates could have a dramatic impact. This study examines the association of the 825T polymorphism with HIV-1 acquisition, disease progression and immune activation in two African cohorts. GNB3 825 genotyping was performed for enrolees in both a commercial sex worker cohort and a perinatal HIV transmission (PHT cohort in Nairobi, Kenya. Ex vivo immune activation was quantified by flow cytometry, and plasma chemokine levels were assessed by cytokine bead array. Results GNB3 genotype was not associated with sexual or vertical HIV-1 acquisition within these cohorts. Within the Pumwani cohort, GNB3 genotype did not affect HIV-1 disease progression among seroconverters or among HIV-1-positive individuals after adjustment for baseline CD4 count. Maternal CD4 decline and viral load increase in the PHT cohort did not differ between genotypes. Multi-parametric flow cytometry assessment of T cell activation (CD69, HLA-DR, CD38 and Treg frequency (CD25+FOXP3+ found no differences between genotype groups. Plasma SDF-1α, MIP-1β and TRAIL levels quantified by cytokine bead array were also similar between groups. Conclusions In contrast to previous reports, we were unable to provide evidence to suggest that the GNB3 C825T polymorphism affects HIV-1 acquisition or disease progression within African populations. Ex vivo immune activation and plasma chemokine levels were similarly unaffected by GNB3 genotype in both HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive individuals. The paucity of studies investigating the impact of GNB3 polymorphism among African populations and the lack of mechanistic

  14. X-ray structure of the mammalian GIRK2-βγ G-protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Matthew R; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2013-06-13

    G-protein-gated inward rectifier K(+) (GIRK) channels allow neurotransmitters, through G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, to control cellular electrical excitability. In cardiac and neuronal cells this control regulates heart rate and neural circuit activity, respectively. Here we present the 3.5 Å resolution crystal structure of the mammalian GIRK2 channel in complex with βγ G-protein subunits, the central signalling complex that links G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation to K(+) channel activity. Short-range atomic and long-range electrostatic interactions stabilize four βγ G-protein subunits at the interfaces between four K(+) channel subunits, inducing a pre-open state of the channel. The pre-open state exhibits a conformation that is intermediate between the closed conformation and the open conformation of the constitutively active mutant. The resultant structural picture is compatible with 'membrane delimited' activation of GIRK channels by G proteins and the characteristic burst kinetics of channel gating. The structures also permit a conceptual understanding of how the signalling lipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and intracellular Na(+) ions participate in multi-ligand regulation of GIRK channels.

  15. X-ray structure of the mammalian GIRK2-βγ G-protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whorton, Matthew R.; MacKinnon, Roderick [Rockefeller

    2013-07-30

    G-protein-gated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels allow neurotransmitters, through G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, to control cellular electrical excitability. In cardiac and neuronal cells this control regulates heart rate and neural circuit activity, respectively. Here we present the 3.5Å resolution crystal structure of the mammalian GIRK2 channel in complex with βγ G-protein subunits, the central signalling complex that links G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation to K+ channel activity. Short-range atomic and long-range electrostatic interactions stabilize four βγ G-protein subunits at the interfaces between four K+ channel subunits, inducing a pre-open state of the channel. The pre-open state exhibits a conformation that is intermediate between the closed conformation and the open conformation of the constitutively active mutant. The resultant structural picture is compatible with ‘membrane delimited’ activation of GIRK channels by G proteins and the characteristic burst kinetics of channel gating. The structures also permit a conceptual understanding of how the signalling lipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and intracellular Na+ ions participate in multi-ligand regulation of GIRK channels.

  16. Mechanistic pathways and biological roles for receptor-independent activators of G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Joe B; Smrcka, Alan V; Lanier, Stephen M

    2007-03-01

    Signal processing via heterotrimeric G-proteins in response to cell surface receptors is a central and much investigated aspect of how cells integrate cellular stimuli to produce coordinated biological responses. The system is a target of numerous therapeutic agents and plays an important role in adaptive processes of organs; aberrant processing of signals through these transducing systems is a component of various disease states. In addition to G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated activation of G-protein signaling, nature has evolved creative ways to manipulate and utilize the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer or Galpha and Gbetagamma subunits independent of the cell surface receptor stimuli. In such situations, the G-protein subunits (Galpha and Gbetagamma) may actually be complexed with alternative binding partners independent of the typical heterotrimeric Galphabetagamma. Such regulatory accessory proteins include the family of regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins that accelerate the GTPase activity of Galpha and various entities that influence nucleotide binding properties and/or subunit interaction. The latter group of proteins includes receptor-independent activators of G-protein signaling (AGS) proteins that play surprising roles in signal processing. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge regarding AGS proteins. AGS proteins are indicative of a growing number of accessory proteins that influence signal propagation, facilitate cross talk between various types of signaling pathways, and provide a platform for diverse functions of both the heterotrimeric Galphabetagamma and the individual Galpha and Gbetagamma subunits.

  17. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 is a novel suppressor of breast tumor initiation and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; O'Malley, Yunxia; Askeland, Ryan W; Sugg, Sonia L; Fisher, Rory A

    2013-08-01

    Breast cancer is a large global health burden and the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women worldwide. Here, we utilize RGS6(-/-) mice to interrogate the role of regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6), localized to the ductal epithelium in mouse and human breast, as a novel tumor suppressor in vivo. RGS6(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenza[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor initiation and progression, as well as decreased overall survival. Analysis of carcinogenic aberrations in the mammary glands of DMBA-treated mice revealed a failure of the DNA damage response concurrent with augmented oncogenesis in RGS6(-/-) animals. Furthermore, RGS6 suppressed cell growth induced by either human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or estrogen receptor activation in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and mammary epithelial cells (MECs). MECs isolated from RGS6(-/-) mice also showed a deficit in DMBA-induced ATM/p53 activation, reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis confirming that RGS6 is required for effective activation of the DNA damage response in these cells, a critical countermeasure against carcinogen-mediated genotoxic stress. The ability of RGS6 to simultaneously enhance DNA-damage-induced apoptotic signaling and suppress oncogenic cell growth likely underlie the accelerated tumorigenesis and cellular transformation observed in DMBA-treated RGS6(-/-) mice and isolated MECs, respectively. Unsurprisingly, spontaneous tumor formation was also seen in old female RGS6(-/-) but not in wild-type mice. Our finding that RGS6 is downregulated in all human breast cancer subtypes independent of their molecular classification indicates that obtaining a means to restore the growth suppressive and pro-apoptotic actions of RGS6 in breast might be a viable means to treat a large spectrum of breast tumors.

  18. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 in lung cancer

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    Jala Venkatakrishna Rao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30 was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2, tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ, the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in lung cancer. Methods The expression patterns of GPER in various lung cancer lines and lung tumors were investigated using standard quantitative real time PCR (at mRNA levels, Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC methods (at protein levels. The expression of GPER was scored and the pairwise comparisons (cancer vs adjacent tissues as well as cancer vs normal lung tissues were performed. Results Analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed a significantly higher expression of GPER at both mRNA and protein levels in human non small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC lines relative to immortalized normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs. The virally immortalized human small airway epithelial cell line HPL1D showed higher expression than HBECs and similar expression to NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections of murine lung adenomas as well as human lung adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung carcinomas showed consistently higher expression of GPER in the tumor relative to the surrounding non-tumor tissue. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrate increased GPER expression in lung cancer cells and tumors compared to normal lung. Further evaluation of the function and regulation of GPER will be necessary to determine if GPER is a marker of lung cancer progression.

  19. The exodus subfamily of CC chemokines inhibits the proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia progenitors.

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    Hromas, R; Cripe, L; Hangoc, G; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E

    2000-02-15

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue and play important roles in disease processes. Among the biologic activities of chemokines is inhibition of proliferation of normal hematopoietic progenitors. However, chemokines that inhibit normal progenitors rarely inhibit proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We and others recently cloned a subfamily of CC chemokines that share similar amino-terminal peptide sequences and a remarkable ability to chemoattract T cells. These chemokines, Exodus-1/LARC/MIP-3alpha, Exodus-2/SLC/6Ckine/TCA4, and Exodus-3/CKbeta11/MIP-3beta, were found to inhibit proliferation of normal human marrow progenitors. The study described here found that these chemokines also inhibited the proliferation of progenitors in every sample of marrow from patients with CML that was tested. This demonstration of consistent inhibition of CML progenitor proliferation makes the 3 Exodus chemokines unique among chemokines. (Blood. 2000;95:1506-1508)

  20. Proton-sensing ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 on dendritic cells is required for airway responses in a murine asthma model.

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    Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro; Hisada, Takeshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Kamide, Yosuke; Ichimonji, Isao; Tomura, Hideaki; Tobo, Masayuki; Sato, Koichi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Dobashi, Kunio; Mori, Tetsuya; Harada, Akihiro; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) stimulation by extracellular protons causes the activation of G proteins and subsequent cellular functions. However, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of OGR1 in airway responses remain largely unknown. In the present study, we show that OGR1-deficient mice are resistant to the cardinal features of asthma, including airway eosinophilia, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and goblet cell metaplasia, in association with a remarkable inhibition of Th2 cytokine and IgE production, in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Intratracheal transfer to wild-type mice of OVA-primed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) from OGR1-deficient mice developed lower AHR and eosinophilia after OVA inhalation compared with the transfer of those from wild-type mice. Migration of OVA-pulsed DCs to peribronchial lymph nodes was also inhibited by OGR1 deficiency in the adoption experiments. The presence of functional OGR1 in DCs was confirmed by the expression of OGR1 mRNA and the OGR1-sensitive Ca(2+) response. OVA-induced expression of CCR7, a mature DC chemokine receptor, and migration response to CCR7 ligands in an in vitro Transwell assay were attenuated by OGR1 deficiency. We conclude that OGR1 on DCs is critical for migration to draining lymph nodes, which, in turn, stimulates Th2 phenotype change and subsequent induction of airway inflammation and AHR.

  1. Varicella zoster virus glycoprotein C increases chemokine-mediated leukocyte migration.

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    González-Motos, Víctor; Jürgens, Carina; Ritter, Birgit; Kropp, Kai A; Durán, Verónica; Larsen, Olav; Binz, Anne; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Lenac Rovis, Tihana; Jonjic, Stipan; Verjans, Georges M G M; Sodeik, Beate; Krey, Thomas; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Schulz, Thomas F; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Kalinke, Ulrich; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel

    2017-05-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a highly prevalent human pathogen that establishes latency in neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Primary infection causes varicella whereas reactivation results in zoster, which is often followed by chronic pain in adults. Following infection of epithelial cells in the respiratory tract, VZV spreads within the host by hijacking leukocytes, including T cells, in the tonsils and other regional lymph nodes, and modifying their activity. In spite of its importance in pathogenesis, the mechanism of dissemination remains poorly understood. Here we addressed the influence of VZV on leukocyte migration and found that the purified recombinant soluble ectodomain of VZV glycoprotein C (rSgC) binds chemokines with high affinity. Functional experiments show that VZV rSgC potentiates chemokine activity, enhancing the migration of monocyte and T cell lines and, most importantly, human tonsillar leukocytes at low chemokine concentrations. Binding and potentiation of chemokine activity occurs through the C-terminal part of gC ectodomain, containing predicted immunoglobulin-like domains. The mechanism of action of VZV rSgC requires interaction with the chemokine and signalling through the chemokine receptor. Finally, we show that VZV viral particles enhance chemokine-dependent T cell migration and that gC is partially required for this activity. We propose that VZV gC activity facilitates the recruitment and subsequent infection of leukocytes and thereby enhances VZV systemic dissemination in humans.

  2. Varicella zoster virus glycoprotein C increases chemokine-mediated leukocyte migration.

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    Víctor González-Motos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV is a highly prevalent human pathogen that establishes latency in neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Primary infection causes varicella whereas reactivation results in zoster, which is often followed by chronic pain in adults. Following infection of epithelial cells in the respiratory tract, VZV spreads within the host by hijacking leukocytes, including T cells, in the tonsils and other regional lymph nodes, and modifying their activity. In spite of its importance in pathogenesis, the mechanism of dissemination remains poorly understood. Here we addressed the influence of VZV on leukocyte migration and found that the purified recombinant soluble ectodomain of VZV glycoprotein C (rSgC binds chemokines with high affinity. Functional experiments show that VZV rSgC potentiates chemokine activity, enhancing the migration of monocyte and T cell lines and, most importantly, human tonsillar leukocytes at low chemokine concentrations. Binding and potentiation of chemokine activity occurs through the C-terminal part of gC ectodomain, containing predicted immunoglobulin-like domains. The mechanism of action of VZV rSgC requires interaction with the chemokine and signalling through the chemokine receptor. Finally, we show that VZV viral particles enhance chemokine-dependent T cell migration and that gC is partially required for this activity. We propose that VZV gC activity facilitates the recruitment and subsequent infection of leukocytes and thereby enhances VZV systemic dissemination in humans.

  3. Pertussis toxin non-sensitive G protein mediates cholinergic stimulation for secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells.

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    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Kono, A

    1992-01-02

    To clarify the possible role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) in the signal transducing system activated by carbachol, actions of carbachol on human pancreastatin producing cell line (QGP-1N) were compared with those of fluoride, a well-known activator of stimulatory (Gs) or inhibitory (Gi) G protein. 10(-5) M of carbachol as well as 20 mM of NaF stimulated secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. These secretion and Ca2+ mobilization were not modified by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gi protein. These results suggest that pancreastatin and somatostatin secretions from QGP-1N are regulated by acetylcholine through a muscarinic receptor coupled to the activation of polyphosphoinositide breakdown by a G protein, which appears to be fluoride sensitive but is other than a Gi-like protein.

  4. Targeted Elimination of G Proteins and Arrestins Defines Their Specific Contributions to Both Intensity and Duration of G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling.

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    Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Inoue, Asuka; Jenkins, Laura; Raihan, Sheikh Zahir; Prihandoko, Rudi; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-12-30

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can initiate intracellular signaling cascades by coupling to an array of heterotrimeric G proteins and arrestin adaptor proteins. Understanding the contribution of each of these coupling options to GPCR signaling has been hampered by a paucity of tools to selectively perturb receptor function. Here we employ CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to eliminate selected G proteins (Gαq and Gα11) or arrestin2 and arrestin3 from HEK293 cells together with the elimination of receptor phosphorylation sites to define the relative contribution of G proteins, arrestins, and receptor phosphorylation to the signaling outcomes of the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4). A lack of FFA4-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) in Gαq/Gα11-null cells and agonist-mediated receptor internalization in arrestin2/3-null cells confirmed previously reported canonical signaling features of this receptor, thereby validating the genome-edited HEK293 cells. FFA4-mediated ERK1/2 activation was totally dependent on Gq/11 but intriguingly was substantially enhanced for FFA4 receptors lacking sites of regulated phosphorylation. This was not due to a simple lack of desensitization of Gq/11 signaling because the Gq/11-dependent calcium response was desensitized by both receptor phosphorylation and arrestin-dependent mechanisms, whereas a substantially enhanced ERK1/2 response was only observed for receptors lacking phosphorylation sites and not in arrestin2/3-null cells. In conclusion, we validate CRISPR/Cas9 engineered HEK293 cells lacking Gq/11 or arrestin2/3 as systems for GPCR signaling research and employ these cells to reveal a previously unappreciated interplay of signaling pathways where receptor phosphorylation can impact on ERK1/2 signaling through a mechanism that is likely independent of arrestins.

  5. Structure based energy calculation to determine the regulation of G protein signalling by RGS and RGS-G protein interaction specificity.

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    Gulati, Gavish; Gaonkar, Krutika Satish; Kamraj, Balu; Kumar, Ambuj; Purohit, Rituraj

    2012-09-01

    The RGS proteins act as GTPase activating proteins and therefore regulate the lifespan of the active G alpha-GTP by accelerating the GTP hydrolysis. Modulatory residues in the RGS protein are present at the periphery of the RGS domain-G protein interface which is essential to fine-tune the G protein recognition and interaction. The docking energies of the mutant complex and the native complex were compared to see the effects of the mutations in the Modulatory regions. Mutations of Modulatory residues in high-activity RGS proteins lead to loss of function, whereas multiple mutations in the low-activity RGS proteins in critical Modulatory positions lead to complete gain of function. In the RGS proteins the Significant and Conserved core residues with peripheral Modulatory residues selectively optimize G protein recognition and inactivation. The flexibility of the structures of the mutant complexes were seen to be higher and the accessible surface area for the complexes increased after the mutations in the Modulatory residues. Through this approach we analyzed the interaction specificity among the RGS and the G alpha protein, the approach can also be applied to other protein families to find the residues which along with the core binding domain, fine tune the protein recognition and are crucial in the loss or gain of function.

  6. S-Nitrosothiols modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling in a reversible and highly receptor-specific manner

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    Mönkkönen Kati S

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling machinery can serve as a direct target of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide (NO and S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs. To gain a broader view into the way that receptor-dependent G protein activation – an early step in signal transduction – might be affected by RSNOs, we have studied several receptors coupling to the Gi family of G proteins in their native cellular environment using the powerful functional approach of [35S]GTPγS autoradiography with brain cryostat sections in combination with classical G protein activation assays. Results We demonstrate that RSNOs, like S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO and S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO, can modulate GPCR signaling via reversible, thiol-sensitive mechanisms probably involving S-nitrosylation. RSNOs are capable of very targeted regulation, as they potentiate the signaling of some receptors (exemplified by the M2/M4 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, inhibit others (P2Y12 purinergic, LPA1lysophosphatidic acid, and cannabinoid CB1 receptors, but may only marginally affect signaling of others, such as adenosine A1, μ-opioid, and opiate related receptors. Amplification of M2/M4 muscarinic responses is explained by an accelerated rate of guanine nucleotide exchange, as well as an increased number of high-affinity [35S]GTPγS binding sites available for the agonist-activated receptor. GSNO amplified human M4 receptor signaling also under heterologous expression in CHO cells, but the effect diminished with increasing constitutive receptor activity. RSNOs markedly inhibited P2Y12 receptor signaling in native tissues (rat brain and human platelets, but failed to affect human P2Y12 receptor signaling under heterologous expression in CHO cells, indicating that the native cellular signaling partners, rather than the P2Y12 receptor protein, act as a molecular target for this action. Conclusion These in vitro studies

  7. Differential conformational requirements for activation of G proteins and the regulatory proteins arrestin and G protein-coupled receptor kinase in the G protein-coupled receptor for parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related protein.

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    Vilardaga, J P; Frank, M; Krasel, C; Dees, C; Nissenson, R A; Lohse, M J

    2001-09-07

    After stimulation with agonist, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activate G proteins and become phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), and most of them translocate cytosolic arrestin proteins to the cytoplasmic membrane. Agonist-activated GPCRs are specifically phosphorylated by GRKs and are targeted for endocytosis by arrestin proteins, suggesting a connection between GPCR conformational changes and interaction with GRKs and arrestins. Previously, we showed that by substitution of histidine for residues at the cytoplasmic side of helix 3 (H3) and helix 6 (H6) of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor (PTHR), a zinc metal ion-binding site is engineered that prevents PTH-stimulated G(s) activation (Sheikh, S. P., Vilardaga, J.-P., Baranski, T. J., Lichtarge, O., Iiri, T., Meng, E. C., Nissenson, R. A., and Bourne, H. R. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 17033-17041). These data suggest that relative movements between H3 and H6 are critical for G(s) activation. Does this molecular event play a similar role in activation of GRK and arrestin and in PTHR-mediated G(q) activation? To answer this question, we utilized the two previously described mutant forms of PTHR, H401 and H402, which contain a naturally present histidine residue at position 301 in H3 and a second substituted histidine residue at positions 401 and 402 in H6, respectively. Both mutant receptors showed inhibition of PTH-stimulated inositol phosphate and cAMP generation in the presence of increasing concentrations of Zn(II). However, the mutants showed no Zn(II)-dependent impairment of phosphorylation by GRK-2. Likewise, the mutants were indistinguishable from wild-type PTHR in the ability to translocate beta-arrestins/green fluorescent protein to the cell membrane and were also not affected by sensitivity to Zn(II). These results suggest that agonist-mediated phosphorylation and internalization of PTHR require conformational switches of the receptor distinct from the cAMP and inositol

  8. Expression of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in irritable bowel syndrome and its clinical significance.

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    Qin, Bin; Dong, Lei; Guo, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Jiong; He, Yangxin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Lu; Zhao, Juhui

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen is suggested to participate in pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but expression of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in the colon of IBS patients has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of GPER and classical estrogen receptors in the colon of IBS patients and healthy controls. Colonic biopsies were obtained by endoscopy from patients with IBS (n=46) and healthy subjects (n=13). Expression of GPER, estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in mast cells were measured by double-labelling immunofluorescence. Quantification of mRNA expression was performed for GPER, ERα and ERβ by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Differential distribution of GPER, ERα and ERβ were detected in human colonic mucosa. The expression of GPER in the cytoplasm of mast cells and GPER-positive cells was significantly higher in diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) patients than that in constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS, Pcolonic mucosa and no difference of immunostaining results for ERα and ERβ was found among these three groups. A positive correlation (r=0.451, P=0.011) between GPER-positive cell counts and abdominal pain severity was observed in D-IBS group. Relative mRNA expression of GPER in D-IBS was also higher than that in C-IBS (P=0.018) and healthy subjects (P=0.011). The present study, for the first time, demonstrated the expression of GPER in human colonic mucosa and its correlation with abdominal pain severity.

  9. Untangling the evolution of Rab G proteins: implications of a comprehensive genomic analysis

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    Klöpper Tobias H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane-bound organelles are a defining feature of eukaryotic cells, and play a central role in most of their fundamental processes. The Rab G proteins are the single largest family of proteins that participate in the traffic between organelles, with 66 Rabs encoded in the human genome. Rabs direct the organelle-specific recruitment of vesicle tethering factors, motor proteins, and regulators of membrane traffic. Each organelle or vesicle class is typically associated with one or more Rab, with the Rabs present in a particular cell reflecting that cell's complement of organelles and trafficking routes. Results Through iterative use of hidden Markov models and tree building, we classified Rabs across the eukaryotic kingdom to provide the most comprehensive view of Rab evolution obtained to date. A strikingly large repertoire of at least 20 Rabs appears to have been present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA, consistent with the 'complexity early' view of eukaryotic evolution. We were able to place these Rabs into six supergroups, giving a deep view into eukaryotic prehistory. Conclusions Tracing the fate of the LECA Rabs revealed extensive losses with many extant eukaryotes having fewer Rabs, and none having the full complement. We found that other Rabs have expanded and diversified, including a large expansion at the dawn of metazoans, which could be followed to provide an account of the evolutionary history of all human Rabs. Some Rab changes could be correlated with differences in cellular organization, and the relative lack of variation in other families of membrane-traffic proteins suggests that it is the changes in Rabs that primarily underlies the variation in organelles between species and cell types.

  10. Identification of novel splice variants of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

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    Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Geirardsdóttir, Kristín; Ingemansson, Malena; Mirza, Majd A I; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2007-01-31

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism to generate proteome diversity in higher eukaryotic organisms. We searched for splice variants of the human Adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using mRNA sequences and expressed sequence tags. The results presented here describe 53 human splice variants among the 33 Adhesion GPCRs. Many of these variants appear to be coding for "functional" proteins (29) while the others are seemingly "non-functional" (24). Novel functional splice variants were found for: CD97, CELR3, EMR2, EMR3, GPR56, GPR110, GPR112-GPR114, GPR116, GPR123-GPR126, GPR133, HE6, and LEC1-LEC3. Splice variants for GPR116, GPR125, GPR126, and HE6 were found conserved in other species. Several of the functional splice variants lack one or more of the functional domains that are found in the N-termini of these receptors. These functional domains are likely to affect ligand binding or interaction with other proteins and these novel splice variants may have important roles for the specificity of interactions between these receptors and extracellular molecules. Another type of splice variants found here lacks a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS). The GPS domain has been shown to be essential for the proteolytic cleavage of the receptors N-termini and for cellular surface expression. We suggest that these alternative splice variants may be crucial for the function of the receptors while the seemingly non-functional splice variants may be a part of a regulative mechanism.

  11. G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30: a novel regulator of endothelial inflammation.

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    Subhadeep Chakrabarti

    Full Text Available Estrogen, the female sex hormone, is known to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic effects. Traditionally, estrogen effects were believed to be largely mediated through the classical estrogen receptors (ERs. However, there is increasing evidence that G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30, a novel estrogen receptor, can mediate many estrogenic effects on the vasculature. Despite this, the localization and functional significance of GPR30 in the human vascular endothelium remains poorly understood. Given this background, we examined the subcellular location and potential anti-inflammatory roles of GPR30 using human umbilical vein endothelial cells as a model system. Inflammatory changes were induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF, a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in atherogenesis and many other inflammatory conditions. We found that GPR30 was located predominantly in the endothelial cell nuclei. Treatment with the selective GPR30 agonist G-1 partially attenuated the TNF induced upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins such as intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1. This effect was completely abolished by the selective GPR30 antagonist G-15, suggesting that it was indeed mediated in a GPR30 dependent manner. Interestingly, estrogen alone had no effects on TNF-treated endothelium. Concomitant activation of the classical ERs blocked the anti-inflammatory effects of G-1, indicating opposing effects of GPR30 and the classical ERs. Our findings demonstrate that endothelial GPR30 is a novel regulator of the inflammatory response which could be a potential therapeutic target against atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  12. G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids suppresses colon cancer.

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    Tang, Yong; Chen, Yakun; Jiang, Hongmei; Robbins, Gregory T; Nie, Daotai

    2011-02-15

    GPR43 is a G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Expression of GPR43 is detected in hematopoietic tissues and the large intestine. SCFAs are derived from bacterial fermentation and metabolism of undigested dietary fibers and have been recognized for their cancer prevention activities in the colon. The role of SCFAs, particularly butyrate, in colon cancer therapy has been extensively studied, and its tumor suppressive functions are believed to be due to their intracellular actions, notably inhibition of histone deacetylase. In our study, we show that SCFAs also exert their antitumor effects via receptor GPR43 and that GPR43 is frequently lost in colon cancer cells. Immunohistostaining revealed that GPR43 immunoreactivity was high in normal colon tissues (N = 31) but was markedly reduced or completely lost in most colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues (N = 70) and their corresponding lymph node metastatic adenocarcinomas (N = 38). RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of full length GPR43 mRNA in only one (HT-29) of nine established human colon cancer cell lines. Restoration of GPR43 expression in HCT8 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and activated caspases, leading to increased apoptotic cell death after propionate/butyrate treatment. Restored GPR43 expression, coupled with propionate treatment, induced an upregulation of p21 and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 1 and 2, while the CDK4 and CDK6 levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest that GPR43 functions as a tumor suppressor by mediating SCFA-induced cell proliferation inhibition and apoptotic cell death in colon cancer.

  13. Prediction and identification of the effectors of heterotrimeric G proteins in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

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    Li, Kuan; Xu, Chaoqun; Huang, Jian; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Lina; Wan, Weifeng; Tao, Huan; Li, Ling; Lin, Shoukai; Harrison, Andrew; He, Huaqin

    2017-03-01

    Heterotrimeric G protein signaling cascades are one of the primary metazoan sensing mechanisms linking a cell to environment. However, the number of experimentally identified effectors of G protein in plant is limited. We have therefore studied which tools are best suited for predicting G protein effectors in rice. Here, we compared the predicting performance of four classifiers with eight different encoding schemes on the effectors of G proteins by using 10-fold cross-validation. Four methods were evaluated: random forest, naive Bayes, K-nearest neighbors and support vector machine. We applied these methods to experimentally identified effectors of G proteins and randomly selected non-effector proteins, and tested their sensitivity and specificity. The result showed that random forest classifier with composition of K-spaced amino acid pairs and composition of motif or domain (CKSAAP_PROSITE_200) combination method yielded the best performance, with accuracy and the Mathew's correlation coefficient reaching 74.62% and 0.49, respectively. We have developed G-Effector, an online predictor, which outperforms BLAST, PSI-BLAST and HMMER on predicting the effectors of G