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Sample records for human forniceal region

  1. Forniceal deep brain stimulation rescues hippocampal memory in Rett syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Ure, Kerstin; Sun, Yaling; Tao, Huifang; Gao, Yan; Patel, Akash J; Curry, Daniel J; Samaco, Rodney C; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Tang, Jianrong

    2015-10-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has improved the prospects for many individuals with diseases affecting motor control, and recently it has shown promise for improving cognitive function as well. Several studies in individuals with Alzheimer disease and in amnesic rats have demonstrated that DBS targeted to the fimbria-fornix, the region that appears to regulate hippocampal activity, can mitigate defects in hippocampus-dependent memory. Despite these promising results, DBS has not been tested for its ability to improve cognition in any childhood intellectual disability disorder. Such disorders are a pressing concern: they affect as much as 3% of the population and involve hundreds of different genes. We proposed that stimulating the neural circuits that underlie learning and memory might provide a more promising route to treating these otherwise intractable disorders than seeking to adjust levels of one molecule at a time. We therefore studied the effects of forniceal DBS in a well-characterized mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT), which is a leading cause of intellectual disability in females. Caused by mutations that impair the function of MeCP2 (ref. 6), RTT appears by the second year of life in humans, causing profound impairment in cognitive, motor and social skills, along with an array of neurological features. RTT mice, which reproduce the broad phenotype of this disorder, also show clear deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here we show that forniceal DBS in RTT mice rescues contextual fear memory as well as spatial learning and memory. In parallel, forniceal DBS restores in vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation and hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that forniceal DBS might mitigate cognitive dysfunction in RTT.

  2. Thinking regionally: narrative, the medical humanities and region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Keir

    2015-06-01

    Drawing on multiple literatures from history, geography, anthropology, sociology and literature, this essay asks questions about what we mean by region and why narratives of region should matter to the medical humanities. The essay surveys how region can be used as a lens of analysis, exploring the various academic approaches to region and their limitations. It argues that regions are dynamic but also unstable as a category of analysis and are often used uncritically by scholars. In encouraging scholars working in the medical humanities to be aware that regions are not simple objective or analytical boxes, the essay shows how an awareness of region helps challenge metropolitan whiggism and ideas of core and periphery to give a more prominent place to hinterlands, market towns and rural environments. Furthermore, the essay considers how incorporating region into our understanding of illness can offer new insights. It demonstrates the need for scholars to be attuned to the narratives constructed around regions, suggesting that regions can be viewed as discursive formations that provide a frame for understanding both collective and personal ideas of, and responses to, health and illness, disease and healing, to create what Megan Davies calls a more nuanced 'intellectual cartography'.

  3. Many human accelerated regions are developmental enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, John A; Erwin, Genevieve D; McKinsey, Gabriel; Rubenstein, John L R; Pollard, Katherine S

    2013-12-19

    The genetic changes underlying the dramatic differences in form and function between humans and other primates are largely unknown, although it is clear that gene regulatory changes play an important role. To identify regulatory sequences with potentially human-specific functions, we and others used comparative genomics to find non-coding regions conserved across mammals that have acquired many sequence changes in humans since divergence from chimpanzees. These regions are good candidates for performing human-specific regulatory functions. Here, we analysed the DNA sequence, evolutionary history, histone modifications, chromatin state and transcription factor (TF) binding sites of a combined set of 2649 non-coding human accelerated regions (ncHARs) and predicted that at least 30% of them function as developmental enhancers. We prioritized the predicted ncHAR enhancers using analysis of TF binding site gain and loss, along with the functional annotations and expression patterns of nearby genes. We then tested both the human and chimpanzee sequence for 29 ncHARs in transgenic mice, and found 24 novel developmental enhancers active in both species, 17 of which had very consistent patterns of activity in specific embryonic tissues. Of these ncHAR enhancers, five drove expression patterns suggestive of different activity for the human and chimpanzee sequence at embryonic day 11.5. The changes to human non-coding DNA in these ncHAR enhancers may modify the complex patterns of gene expression necessary for proper development in a human-specific manner and are thus promising candidates for understanding the genetic basis of human-specific biology.

  4. Scientists Spot 15 Regions of Human DNA Linked to Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spot 15 Regions of Human DNA Linked to Depression Many are located near genes involved in brain ... identified 15 regions of human DNA associated with depression. These regions may contain genes that increase the ...

  5. Human body region enhancement method based on Kinect infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Fan, Yubo; Song, Xiaowei; Cai, Wenjing

    2016-10-01

    To effectively improve the low contrast of human body region in the infrared images, a combing method of several enhancement methods is utilized to enhance the human body region. Firstly, for the infrared images acquired by Kinect, in order to improve the overall contrast of the infrared images, an Optimal Contrast-Tone Mapping (OCTM) method with multi-iterations is applied to balance the contrast of low-luminosity infrared images. Secondly, to enhance the human body region better, a Level Set algorithm is employed to improve the contour edges of human body region. Finally, to further improve the human body region in infrared images, Laplacian Pyramid decomposition is adopted to enhance the contour-improved human body region. Meanwhile, the background area without human body region is processed by bilateral filtering to improve the overall effect. With theoretical analysis and experimental verification, the results show that the proposed method could effectively enhance the human body region of such infrared images.

  6. The age pattern of human capital and regional productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Hirte, Georg; Brunow, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    We explore the impact of the age structure of human capital on average regional productivity by applying a spatial econometric analysis based on an augmented Lucas-type production function. We also apply a new definition of regional human capital focusing on its availability. The estimates provide evidence that there are age specific human capital effects in Germany and that a temporary increase in regional productivity could occur during the demographic transition. Furthermore, it becomes cl...

  7. ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES FOR REGIONAL INNOVATION ACTIVITY

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    R. R. Lukyanova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issues of human resource development regarding an innovation activity. Concepts of labor and human resources have been surveyed. An integral index for assessment of human resources for regional innovation activity has been developed and assessment of the Russian regions has been made on the basis of it. Development tendencies of modern human resources for innovation activity in Russia have been revealed.

  8. REGIONAL COMPETITIVENESS DEVELOPMENT BASED ON HUMAN RESOURCES

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Into the actual social and economic context, characterised by the challenges of the globalisation process, the need of redefining the state role in the economy, the switch to the knowledge based economy, the problem of increasing the national and regional

  9. Predicting human age using regional morphometry and inter-regional morphological similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun-Heng; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study is predicting human age using neuro-metrics derived from structural MRI, as well as investigating the relationships between age and predictive neuro-metrics. To this end, a cohort of healthy subjects were recruited from 1000 Functional Connectomes Project. The ages of the participations were ranging from 7 to 83 (36.17+/-20.46). The structural MRI for each subject was preprocessed using FreeSurfer, resulting in regional cortical thickness, mean curvature, regional volume and regional surface area for 148 anatomical parcellations. The individual age was predicted from the combination of regional and inter-regional neuro-metrics. The prediction accuracy is r = 0.835, p ages and actual ages. Moreover, the LASSO linear regression also found certain predictive features, most of which were inter-regional features. The turning-point of the developmental trajectories in human brain was around 40 years old based on regional cortical thickness. In conclusion, structural MRI could be potential biomarkers for the aging in human brain. The human age could be successfully predicted from the combination of regional morphometry and inter-regional morphological similarity. The inter-regional measures could be beneficial to investigating human brain connectome.

  10. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    During the current report experimental studies of upper respiratory deposition of radon progeny aerosols and stimulant aerosols were carried out in replicate casts of nasal and oral passages of adults and children. Additionally, preliminary studies of nasal passage deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles was carried out in four human subjects. Data on nasal inspiratory deposition in replicate models of adults and infants from three collaborating laboratories were compared and a best-fit curve of deposition efficiency for both attached and unattached particles was obtained, showing excellent inter-laboratory agreement. This curve demonstrates that nasal inspiratory deposition of radon progeny is weakly dependent upon flow rate over physiologically realistic ranges of flow, does not show a significant age effect, and is relatively independent of nasal passage dimensions for a given age range. Improved replicate models of the human adult oral passage extending to the mid-trachea were constructed for medium and higher flow mouth breathing states; these models were used to assess the deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles during oronasal breathing in the oral passage and demonstrated lower deposition efficiency than the nasal passage. Measurements of both Po{sup 218} particle and attached fraction particle size deposition were performed in replicate nasal passage of a four week old infant. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Automated regional behavioral analysis for human brain images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lancaster, Jack L; Laird, Angela R; Eickhoff, Simon B; Martinez, Michael J; Fox, P Mickle; Fox, Peter T

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral categories of functional imaging experiments along with standardized brain coordinates of associated activations were used to develop a method to automate regional behavioral analysis of human brain images...

  12. Assessing sustainable biophysical human-nature connectedness at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, Christian; Abson, David J.; Fischer, Joern; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2017-05-01

    Humans are biophysically connected to the biosphere through the flows of materials and energy appropriated from ecosystems. While this connection is fundamental for human well-being, many modern societies have—for better or worse—disconnected themselves from the natural productivity of their immediate regional environment. In this paper, we conceptualize the biophysical human-nature connectedness of land use systems at regional scales. We distinguish two mechanisms by which primordial connectedness of people to regional ecosystems has been circumvented via the use of external inputs. First, ‘biospheric disconnection’ refers to people drawing on non-renewable minerals from outside the biosphere (e.g. fossils, metals and other minerals). Second, ‘spatial disconnection’ arises from the imports and exports of biomass products and imported mineral resources used to extract and process ecological goods. Both mechanisms allow for greater regional resource use than would be possible otherwise, but both pose challenges for sustainability, for example, through waste generation, depletion of non-renewable resources and environmental burden shifting to distant regions. In contrast, biophysically reconnected land use systems may provide renewed opportunities for inhabitants to develop an awareness of their impacts and fundamental reliance on ecosystems. To better understand the causes, consequences, and possible remedies related to biophysical disconnectedness, new quantitative methods to assess the extent of regional biophysical human-nature connectedness are needed. To this end, we propose a new methodological framework that can be applied to assess biophysical human-nature connectedness in any region of the world.

  13. A HYBRID APPROACH TO HUMAN SKIN REGION DETECTION

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    R. Vijayanandh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is important in research areas like machine vision and complex security systems. Skin region detection is a vital factor for processing in such systems. Hence the proposed paper focuses on isolating the regions of an image corresponding to human skin region through the hybrid method. This paper intends to combine the skin region detected from RGB and YCbCr color spaces image by the explicit skin color conditions and the skin label cluster identified from CIEL*a*b color space image, which is clustered by Hillclimbing segmentation with K-Means clustering algorithm. Then the resultant image is dilated by arbitrary shape and filtered by the median filter, in order to enhance the skin region and to avoid the noise respectively. The proposed method has been tested on various real images, which contain one or more human beings and the performance of skin region detection is found to be quite satisfactory.

  14. [Regionalization and human development: a typology of health regions in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Cristina Maria Rabelais; Pedroso, Marcel de Moraes; Bellido, Jaime Gregório; Moreira, Rodrigo da Silva; Viacava, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    This article aimed to present a proposal for characterizing health regions in Brazil based on human development, contributing to the identification of comparable geographic areas for observation, analysis, and monitoring of performance in regionalized health systems. The dimensions of the Municipal Human Development Index were calculated for the health regions by aggregating data from municipalities, weighted by population size. The grouping of health regions in 5 groups, based on combinations of life expectancy, income, and schooling, was determined by the K-Means method. Approximately half of Brazil's health regions were classified as type 1 and the other half as types 3 to 5. The typology provides a clustering model for homogeneous health regions, consistent with the theoretical assumptions of PROADESS. The choice of well-established indicators and aggregation methods tends to facilitate their comprehension and use by the actors involved in the administration of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS).

  15. Interactive 3D computer model of the human corneolimbal region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molvaer, Rikke Kongshaug; Andreasen, Arne; Heegaard, Steffen;

    2013-01-01

    in the superior limbal region and one LEC, six LCs and 12 FSPs in the inferior limbal region. Only few LECs, LCs and FSPs were localized nasally and temporally. CONCLUSION: Interactive 3D models are a powerful tool that may help to shed more light on the existence and spatial localization of the different stem......PURPOSE: This study aims to clarify the existence of and to map the localization of different proposed stem cell niches in the corneal limbal region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One human eye was cut into 2200 consecutive sections. Every other section was stained with haematoxylin and eosin, digitized...... in the limbal region: limbal epithelial crypts (LECs), limbal crypts (LCs) and focal stromal projections (FSPs). In all, eight LECs, 25 LCs and 105 FSPs were identified in the limbal region. The LECs, LCs and FSPs were predominantly located in the superior limbal region with seven LECs, 19 LCs and 93 FSPs...

  16. Linkage disequilibrium of evolutionarily conserved regions in the human genome

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    Johnson Todd A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strong linkage disequilibrium (LD recently found in genic or exonic regions of the human genome demonstrated that LD can be increased by evolutionary mechanisms that select for functionally important loci. This suggests that LD might be stronger in regions conserved among species than in non-conserved regions, since regions exposed to natural selection tend to be conserved. To assess this hypothesis, we used genome-wide polymorphism data from the HapMap project and investigated LD within DNA sequences conserved between the human and mouse genomes. Results Unexpectedly, we observed that LD was significantly weaker in conserved regions than in non-conserved regions. To investigate why, we examined sequence features that may distort the relationship between LD and conserved regions. We found that interspersed repeats, and not other sequence features, were associated with the weak LD tendency in conserved regions. To appropriately understand the relationship between LD and conserved regions, we removed the effect of repetitive elements and found that the high degree of sequence conservation was strongly associated with strong LD in coding regions but not with that in non-coding regions. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that the degree of sequence conservation does not simply increase LD as predicted by the hypothesis. Rather, it implies that purifying selection changes the polymorphic patterns of coding sequences but has little influence on the patterns of functional units such as regulatory elements present in non-coding regions, since the former are generally restricted by the constraint of maintaining a functional protein product across multiple exons while the latter may exist more as individually isolated units.

  17. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  18. Mechanosensitive promoter region in the human HB-GAM gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liedert, Astrid; Kassem, Moustapha; Claes, Lutz;

    2009-01-01

    expression through specific transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of mechanosensitive genes. In the present study, we demonstrate that the expression of HB-GAM, which is known to have stimulating effects on osteogenic differentiation, is rapidly induced by mechanical loading in hMSC-TERT4...... cells. Analysis of the human HB-GAM gene upstream regulatory region with luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the upregulation of HB-GAM expression occurred at the transcriptional level and was mainly dependent on the HB-GAM promoter region most upstream containing three potential AP-1 binding...

  19. On Expression Patterns and Developmental Origin of Human Brain Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Lior; Chechik, Gal

    2016-08-01

    Anatomical substructures of the human brain have characteristic cell-types, connectivity and local circuitry, which are reflected in area-specific transcriptome signatures, but the principles governing area-specific transcription and their relation to brain development are still being studied. In adult rodents, areal transcriptome patterns agree with the embryonic origin of brain regions, but the processes and genes that preserve an embryonic signature in regional expression profiles were not quantified. Furthermore, it is not clear how embryonic-origin signatures of adult-brain expression interplay with changes in expression patterns during development. Here we first quantify which genes have regional expression-patterns related to the developmental origin of brain regions, using genome-wide mRNA expression from post-mortem adult human brains. We find that almost all human genes (92%) exhibit an expression pattern that agrees with developmental brain-region ontology, but that this agreement changes at multiple phases during development. Agreement is particularly strong in neuron-specific genes, but also in genes that are not spatially correlated with neuron-specific or glia-specific markers. Surprisingly, agreement is also stronger in early-evolved genes. We further find that pairs of similar genes having high agreement to developmental region ontology tend to be more strongly correlated or anti-correlated, and that the strength of spatial correlation changes more strongly in gene pairs with stronger embryonic signatures. These results suggest that transcription regulation of most genes in the adult human brain is spatially tuned in a way that changes through life, but in agreement with development-determined brain regions.

  20. Regional distribution of serotonin transporter protein in postmortem human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, Stephen J. [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)]. E-mail: Stephen_Kish@CAMH.net; Furukawa, Yoshiaki [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Chang Lijan [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Tong Junchao [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Ginovart, Nathalie [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Wilson, Alan [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Houle, Sylvain [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Meyer, Jeffrey H. [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    Introduction: The primary approach in assessing the status of brain serotonin neurons in human conditions such as major depression and exposure to the illicit drug ecstasy has been the use of neuroimaging procedures involving radiotracers that bind to the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, there has been no consistency in the selection of a 'SERT-free' reference region for the estimation of free and nonspecific binding, as occipital cortex, cerebellum and white matter have all been employed. Objective and Methods: To identify areas of human brain that might have very low SERT levels, we measured, by a semiquantitative Western blotting procedure, SERT protein immunoreactivity throughout the postmortem brain of seven normal adult subjects. Results: Serotonin transporter could be quantitated in all examined brain areas. However, the SERT concentration in cerebellar cortex and white matter were only at trace values, being approximately 20% of average cerebral cortex and 5% of average striatum values. Conclusion: Although none of the examined brain areas are completely free of SERT, human cerebellar cortex has low SERT binding as compared to other examined brain regions, with the exception of white matter. Since the cerebellar cortical SERT binding is not zero, this region will not be a suitable reference region for SERT radioligands with very low free and nonspecific binding. For SERT radioligands with reasonably high free and nonspecific binding, the cerebellar cortex should be a useful reference region, provided other necessary radioligand assumptions are met.

  1. Canine and Human Dirofilariosis in the Rostov Region (Southern Russia

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    Vladimir Kartashev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data on canine and human dirofilariosis in the Rostov Region (Southern Russia are presented. Prevalence of Dirofilaria spp. infections in 795 autochthonous dogs, assessed by the Knott test, was 20.25%. The highest prevalence was found in Novocherkassk (38.3% and Rostov-on-Don (18.5%, while prevalences were lower in other points of the region. Prevalence of D. repens was 44.7%, prevalence of D. immitis was 30.3%, and coinfections were observed in 25.0% of the dog population. A case finding study carried out during 9 years (2000–2009 revealed 131 cases of human dirofilariosis in the Rostov Region, 129 of subcutaneous dirofilariosis and 2 of pulmonary dirofilariosis. Seroprevalence among 317 healthy blood donors from the Rostov Region was 10.4%, while seroprevalence in policemen living in Rostov city and working in training dogs was 19%. These data show high infection rates of Dirofilaria spp. in both human and dog populations of Rostov, probably because of the existence of favorable conditions for the transmission in this region.

  2. The distribution of SNPs in human gene regulatory regions

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    Guo Yongjian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of high-throughput genotyping methods, millions of human genetic variants have been reported in recent years. To efficiently identify those with significant biological functions, a practical strategy is to concentrate on variants located in important sequence regions such as gene regulatory regions. Results Analysis of the most common type of variant, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, shows that in gene promoter regions more SNPs occur in close proximity to transcriptional start sites than in regions further upstream, and a disproportionate number of those SNPs represent nucleotide transversions. Additionally, the number of SNPs found in the predicted transcription factor binding sites is higher than in non-binding site sequences. Conclusion Current information about transcription factor binding site sequence patterns may not be exhaustive, and SNPs may be actively involved in influencing gene expression by affecting the transcription factor binding sites.

  3. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome.

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    Katherine S Pollard

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 genomic elements that are highly conserved in vertebrates but show evidence of significantly accelerated substitution rates in human. These are mostly in non-coding DNA, often near genes associated with transcription and DNA binding. Resequencing confirmed that the five most accelerated elements are dramatically changed in human but not in other primates, with seven times more substitutions in human than in chimp. The accelerated elements, and in particular the top five, show a strong bias for adenine and thymine to guanine and cytosine nucleotide changes and are disproportionately located in high recombination and high guanine and cytosine content environments near telomeres, suggesting either biased gene conversion or isochore selection. In addition, there is some evidence of directional selection in the regions containing the two most accelerated regions. A combination of evolutionary forces has contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.

  4. Synchronization of regional contractions of human labor; direct effects of region size and tissue excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Roger C

    2015-06-25

    The mechanisms used to coordinate organ-level contractions of human labor are not universally accepted. We previously proposed a dual mechanism, where electrical activity coordinates cellular contractions into tissue-level regional contractions, and mechanotransduction synchronizes the regional contractions into organ-level contractions. The simulation of this model successfully recapitulates the phasic pressure rises typical of human labor. In this work we extend the simulation to probe the effects of three critical parameters: electrical coupling (which defines functional regions within the uterine wall), enhancement of contractile responses during action potential bursts (action potential multiplier), and the threshold for mechanical recruitment of regional myometrial contractions (threshold). We test how changing the values of these parameters modulates the ability of the uterus to generate synchronized organ-level contractions. Simulations are performed using Mathematica and a non-classical cellular automaton program we recently published. At least 15 regions are necessary to generate physiologically relevant, synchronized contractions. Organ-level synchronization was improved using higher values for the action potential multiplier. At lower values of the action potential multiplier, synchronized contractions were inhibited when the number of regions was between 32 and 44, suggesting a critical level of electrical coupling is necessary at the onset of labor. Large numbers of low threshold regions resulted in contraction patterns suggestive of hyperstimulation. This work furthers support for the electrical-mechanotransduction mechanism for organ-level synchronization of uterine contractions. The mathematical simulation provides insight regarding how cellular- and tissue-level physiology converge to express synchronized contractions of human labor.

  5. Regional boreal biodiversity peaks at intermediate human disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, S J; Cahill, J F; He, F; Sólymos, P; Boutin, S

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide biodiversity crisis has intensified the need to better understand how biodiversity and human disturbance are related. The 'intermediate disturbance hypothesis' suggests that disturbance regimes generate predictable non-linear patterns in species richness. Evidence often contradicts intermediate disturbance hypothesis at small scales, and is generally lacking at large regional scales. Here, we present the largest extent study of human impacts on boreal plant biodiversity to date. Disturbance extent ranged from 0 to 100% disturbed in vascular plant communities, varying from intact forest to agricultural fields, forestry cut blocks and oil sands. We show for the first time that across a broad region species richness peaked in communities with intermediate anthropogenic disturbance, as predicted by intermediate disturbance hypothesis, even when accounting for many environmental covariates. Intermediate disturbance hypothesis was consistently supported across trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses, with temporary and perpetual disturbances. However, only native species fit this pattern; exotic species richness increased linearly with disturbance.

  6. Human papillomavirus infection in women in four regions of Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, El Hadji Seydou; Gheit, Tarik; Dem, Ahmadou; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Toure-Kane, Ndeye Coumba; Mboup, Souleymane; Tommasino, Massimo; Sylla, Bakary S; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women in Senegal. However, there are few data concerning the human papillomavirus (HPV) types inducing neoplasia and cervical cancers and their prevalence in the general population of Senegal. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of HPV infection in Senegalese women aged 18 years and older in Dakar Region and three other regions. Cervical samples were collected from 498 women aged 18-80 years (mean, 42.1 years) in Dakar Region. Also, 438 samples were collected from three other regions: Thiès, Saint-Louis, and Louga. The samples were screened for 21 HPV genotypes using an HPV type-specific E7 PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping assay (TS-MPG). The prevalence of high risk (HR)-HPV in Dakar Region was 17.4%. HPV 52 (3.2%) was the most prevalent HPV type, followed by HPV 31 (3.0%) and HPV 16, 45, and 53 (all 2.8%). In the Thiès, Saint-Louis, and Louga Regions, the prevalence of HR-HPV was 23.2%, 13.1%, and 19.4%, respectively. The study revealed the specificity of HPV prevalence in Dakar Region and other regions of Senegal. The observed patterns show some differences compared with other regions of the world. These findings raise the possibility that, in addition to HPV 16 and HPV 18, other HPV types should be considered for a vaccination program in Senegal. However, additional studies to determine the HPV type distribution in cervical cancer specimens in Senegal are required to further corroborate this hypothesis.

  7. Population-specific recombination sites within the human MHC region

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Genetic rearrangement by recombination is one of the major driving forces for genome evolution, and recombination is known to occur in non-random, discreet recombination sites within the genome. Mapping of recombination sites has proved to be difficult, particularly, in the human MHC region that is complicated by both population variation and highly polymorphic HLA genes. To overcome these problems, HLA-typed individuals from three representative populations: Asian, European an...

  8. Health indicators and human development in the Arab region.

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    Boutayeb, Abdesslam; Serghini, Mansour

    2006-12-28

    The present paper deals with the relationship between health indicators and human development in the Arab region. Beyond descriptive analysis showing geographic similarities and disparities inter countries, the main purpose is to point out health deficiencies and to propose pragmatic strategies susceptible to improve health conditions and consequently enhance human development in the Arab world. Data analysis using Principal Components Analysis is used to compare the achievements of the Arab countries in terms of direct and indirect health indicators. The variables (indicators) are seen to be well represented on the circle of correlation, allowing for interesting interpretation and analysis. The 19 countries are projected on the first and second plane respectively. The results given by the present analysis give a good panorama of the Arab countries with their geographic similarities and disparities. The high correlation between health indicators and human development is well illustrated and consequently, countries are classified by groups having similar human development. The analysis shows clearly how health deficits are impeding human development in the majority of Arab countries and allows us to formulate suggestions to improve health conditions and enhance human development in the Arab World. The discussion is based on the link between different direct and indirect health indicators and the relationship between these indicators and human development index. Without including the GDP indicator, our analysis has shown that the 19 Arab countries may be classified, independently of their geographic proximity, in three different groups according to their global human development level (Low, Medium and High). Consequently, while identifying health deficiencies in each group, the focus was made on the countries presenting a high potential of improvement in health indicators. In particular, maternal mortality and infant mortality which are really challenging health

  9. Health indicators and human development in the Arab region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghini Mansour

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present paper deals with the relationship between health indicators and human development in the Arab region. Beyond descriptive analysis showing geographic similarities and disparities inter countries, the main purpose is to point out health deficiencies and to propose pragmatic strategies susceptible to improve health conditions and consequently enhance human development in the Arab world. Methods Data analysis using Principal Components Analysis is used to compare the achievements of the Arab countries in terms of direct and indirect health indicators. The variables (indicators are seen to be well represented on the circle of correlation, allowing for interesting interpretation and analysis. The 19 countries are projected on the first and second plane respectively. Results The results given by the present analysis give a good panorama of the Arab countries with their geographic similarities and disparities. The high correlation between health indicators and human development is well illustrated and consequently, countries are classified by groups having similar human development. The analysis shows clearly how health deficits are impeding human development in the majority of Arab countries and allows us to formulate suggestions to improve health conditions and enhance human development in the Arab World. Discussion The discussion is based on the link between different direct and indirect health indicators and the relationship between these indicators and human development index. Without including the GDP indicator, our analysis has shown that the 19 Arab countries may be classified, independently of their geographic proximity, in three different groups according to their global human development level (Low, Medium and High. Consequently, while identifying health deficiencies in each group, the focus was made on the countries presenting a high potential of improvement in health indicators. In particular, maternal

  10. Regional material properties of the human hip joint capsule ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, J; Guilak, F; Glisson, R; Vail, T P

    2001-05-01

    The hip joint capsule functions to constrain translation between the femur and acetabulum while allowing rotational and planar movements. Despite the crucial role it plays in the pathogenesis of hip instability, little is known about its biomechanical properties. The goal of this study was to determine the regional material properties of the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments of the capsule. Ten human cadaveric specimens of each ligament were tested to failure in tension. The stress at failure, strain at failure, strain energy density at failure, toe- and linear-region elastic moduli, and the Poisson's ratio were measured for each ligament. The strain to failure was greatest in the ischiofemoral ligament, while no significant difference was noted in failure stress by region or ligament. The Young's moduli of elasticity ranged from 76.1 to 285.8 MPa among the different ligaments, and were generally consistent with properties previously reported for the shoulder capsule. The elastic moduli and strain energy density at failure differed by region. No significant differences in Poisson's ratio were found by region or ligament. The average Poisson's ratio was approximately 1.4, consistent with anisotropic behavior of ligamentous tissues. Understanding the material properties of the hip capsule may help the orthopaedic surgeon better understand normal ligament function, and thereby choose a surgical approach or strategy of repair. Furthermore, knowledge of the normal mechanical function of the hip capsule ligaments could assist in the evaluation of the success of a repair.

  11. Flavin nucleotides in human lens: regional distribution in brunescent cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, K S; Nayak, S

    1998-12-01

    The biochemical mechanism(s) underlying brunescent cataracts remain unclear. Oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species may have a role in the pigmentation process in eye lens. We have analysed human cataractous lenses for flavins by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), since flavins are light sensitive and act as endogenous sensitizers generating reactive oxygen species in the eye. The most significant observation in this study is that higher levels of flavin nucleotides occur in brown lens compared to yellow lens. The concentration of flavin nucleotides (flavin monouncleotide, FMN + flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD) was highest in the nuclear region of the lens followed by the cortical and capsule-epithelial regions. However, the ratio of FAD/FMN was lowest in the nuclear region of the lens followed by other regions. On the other hand, riboflavin was not detected in any of the lens (cataractous) regions. These results suggest that the observed increase in flavin nucleotides in the ocular tissue could contribute towards deepening of lens pigmentation.

  12. Genetic Effects on Fine-Grained Human Cortical Regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Liu, Bing; Zhou, Yuan; Fan, Lingzhong; Li, Jin; Zhang, Yun; Wu, Huawang; Hou, Bing; Wang, Chao; Zheng, Fanfan; Qiu, Chengxiang; Rao, Li-Lin; Ning, Yuping; Li, Shu; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-09-01

    Various brain structural and functional features such as cytoarchitecture, topographic mapping, gyral/sulcal anatomy, and anatomical and functional connectivity have been used in human brain parcellation. However, the fine-grained intrinsic genetic architecture of the cortex remains unknown. In the present study, we parcellated specific regions of the cortex into subregions based on genetic correlations (i.e., shared genetic influences) between the surface area of each pair of cortical locations within the seed region. The genetic correlations were estimated by comparing the correlations of the surface area between monozygotic and dizygotic twins using bivariate twin models. Our genetic subdivisions of diverse brain regions were reproducible across 2 independent datasets and corresponded closely to fine-grained functional specializations. Furthermore, subregional genetic correlation profiles were generally consistent with functional connectivity patterns. Our findings indicate that the magnitude of the genetic covariance in brain anatomy could be used to delineate the boundaries of functional subregions of the brain and may be of value in the next generation human brain atlas.

  13. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Identification of fibrillogenic regions in human triosephosphate isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson N. Carcamo-Noriega

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Amyloid secondary structure relies on the intermolecular assembly of polypeptide chains through main-chain interaction. According to this, all proteins have the potential to form amyloid structure, nevertheless, in nature only few proteins aggregate into toxic or functional amyloids. Structural characteristics differ greatly among amyloid proteins reported, so it has been difficult to link the fibrillogenic propensity with structural topology. However, there are ubiquitous topologies not represented in the amyloidome that could be considered as amyloid-resistant attributable to structural features, such is the case of TIM barrel topology. Methods. This work was aimed to study the fibrillogenic propensity of human triosephosphate isomerase (HsTPI as a model of TIM barrels. In order to do so, aggregation of HsTPI was evaluated under native-like and destabilizing conditions. Fibrillogenic regions were identified by bioinformatics approaches, protein fragmentation and peptide aggregation. Results. We identified four fibrillogenic regions in the HsTPI corresponding to the β3, β6, β7 y α8 of the TIM barrel. From these, the β3-strand region (residues 59–66 was highly fibrillogenic. In aggregation assays, HsTPI under native-like conditions led to amorphous assemblies while under partially denaturing conditions (urea 3.2 M formed more structured aggregates. This slightly structured aggregates exhibited residual cross-β structure, as demonstrated by the recognition of the WO1 antibody and ATR-FTIR analysis. Discussion. Despite the fibrillogenic regions present in HsTPI, the enzyme maintained under native-favoring conditions displayed low fibrillogenic propensity. This amyloid-resistance can be attributed to the three-dimensional arrangement of the protein, where β-strands, susceptible to aggregation, are protected in the core of the molecule. Destabilization of the protein structure may expose inner regions promoting

  15. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  16. Regional deposition of radon decay products in human airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, R.; Moere, H.; Nyblom, L.; Oestergren, I. (Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of the uptake and deposition pattern in the human airways of inhaled radon decay products have been carried out using two different techniques. The deposition in the nasal, bronchial and lung regions was assessed by external gamma measurements on the subject. The exposure of the subject was performed in a 'walk-in' radon chamber with controlled conditions. Results from exposure with high and low aerosol concentrations show that no rapid clearance occurred for the deposited decay products. About 20% of the attached inhaled decay products are retained and deposited in the lungs when mouth breathing during resting conditions, while nasal breathing gave about 26% retention, of which 5% was deposited in the nasal region and about 21% in the lungs. Exposure at low aerosol concentration with unattached fraction of about 80% shows a total retention of about 90% indicating a 100% retention of the unattached fraction. Only about 20% of the unattached fraction is found to penetrate the nasal cavity and it seems to be deposited in the bronchial region. (author).

  17. Impact of regional climate change on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Jonathan A.; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid; Holloway, Tracey; Foley, Jonathan A.

    2005-11-01

    The World Health Organisation estimates that the warming and precipitation trends due to anthropogenic climate change of the past 30years already claim over 150,000 lives annually. Many prevalent human diseases are linked to climate fluctuations, from cardiovascular mortality and respiratory illnesses due to heatwaves, to altered transmission of infectious diseases and malnutrition from crop failures. Uncertainty remains in attributing the expansion or resurgence of diseases to climate change, owing to lack of long-term, high-quality data sets as well as the large influence of socio-economic factors and changes in immunity and drug resistance. Here we review the growing evidence that climate-health relationships pose increasing health risks under future projections of climate change and that the warming trend over recent decades has already contributed to increased morbidity and mortality in many regions of the world. Potentially vulnerable regions include the temperate latitudes, which are projected to warm disproportionately, the regions around the Pacific and Indian oceans that are currently subjected to large rainfall variability due to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation sub-Saharan Africa and sprawling cities where the urban heat island effect could intensify extreme climatic events.

  18. Estimation of human heat loss in five Mediterranean regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, M; Simsek, E; Sahin, B; Yasar, A; Ozbek, A

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the effects of seasonal weather differences on the human body's heat losses in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. The provinces of Adana, Antakya, Osmaniye, Mersin and Antalya were chosen for the research, and monthly atmospheric temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed and atmospheric pressure data from 2007 were used. In all these provinces, radiative, convective and evaporative heat losses from the human body based on skin surface and respiration were analyzed from meteorological data by using the heat balance equation. According to the results, the rate of radiative, convective and evaporative heat losses from the human body varies considerably from season to season. In all the provinces, 90% of heat loss was caused by heat transfer from the skin, with the remaining 10% taking place through respiration. Furthermore, radiative and convective heat loss through the skin reached the highest values in the winter months at approximately between 110 and 140W/m(2), with the lowest values coming in the summer months at roughly 30-50W/m(2).

  19. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J. [INSERM, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. How Changing Human Lifestyles are Shaping Europe's Regional Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, L. D.; Lowe, C. D.; Langmead, O.; McQuatters-Gollop, A.; Attrill, M.; Cooper, P.; Gilbert, A.; Knudsen, S.; Garnacho, E.

    2007-05-01

    European society is experiencing unprecedented changes triggered by expansion of the European Union, the fall of Communism, economic growth and the onset of globalisation. Europe's regional seas, the Baltic, Black Sea, Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic (including the North Sea), provide key goods and services to the human population but have suffered from severe degradation in past decades. Their integrity as coupled social and ecological systems depends on how humanity will anticipate potential problems and deal with its ecological footprint in the future. We report the outcome of an EU-funded 15-country, 28 institution project entitled European Lifestyles and Marine Ecosystems (ELME). Our studies were designed to inform new EU policy and legislation that incorporates Ecosystem-Based Management. ELME has modelled the key relationships between economic and social drivers (D), environmental pressures (P) and changes in the state of the environment (S) in Europe's regional seas. We examined four key issues in each sea: habitat change, eutrophication, chemical pollution and fisheries. We developed conceptual models for each regional sea and employed a novel stochastic modelling technique to examine the interrelationship between key components of the conceptual models. We used the models to examine 2-3 decade projections of current trends in D, P and S and how a number of alternative development scenarios might modify these trends. These simulations demonstrate the vulnerability of Europe's seas to human pressure. As affluence increases in countries acceding to the EU, so does the demand for marine goods and services. There are `winners' and `losers' amongst marine species; the winners are often species that are opportunistic invaders or those with low economic value. In the case of eutrophication, semi-enclosed seas such as the Baltic or Black Sea are already affected by the `legacy of the past'; nutrients that have accumulated in soils, ground waters and

  1. HUMAN RESOURCE PRACTICES IN THE EURO-MEDITERRANEAN REGION: TYPOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline SCOUARNEC

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the project “Agora RH”, we would like to propose a framework for theanalysis of Human Resource practices in the Euro-Mediterranean region.This article is theoretical; it is a reflection of the state of the art and thoughtswhich led to the construction of a framework for analysis, used for anempirical investigation currently being carried out in the eight countriesinvolved in this project (France, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Morocco, Algeria,Tunisia, and Slovenia. In this article, we will attempt to define key conceptsabout the evolution of the HR function. We propose in a forthcoming article toexpand on our work, presenting the theoretical foundations with particularemphasis on the possible cultural variables.

  2. Regional neuromuscular regulation within human rectus femoris muscle during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kohei; Kouzaki, Motoki; Moritani, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution pattern of neuromuscular activation within the human rectus femoris (RF) muscle was investigated during gait by multi-channel surface electromyography (surface EMG). Eleven healthy men walked on a treadmill with three gait speeds (4, 5, and 6 km/h) and gradients (0°, 12.5°, and 25°). The spatial distribution of surface EMG was tested by central locus activation (CLA), which is calculated from 2-D multi-channel surface EMG with 46 surface electrodes. For all conditions, CLA was around the middle regions during the swing-to-stance transition and moved in a proximal direction during the stance phase and stance-to-swing transition (pphase significantly moved to proximal site with increasing gait speed (pphases, with increasing grade, CLA significantly moved distally (pgait cycle and is non-uniformly regulated longitudinally.

  3. Identification of reliable sulcal patterns of the human rolandic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mellerio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A major feature of the human cortex is its huge morphological variability. Although a comprehensive literature about the sulco-gyral pattern of the central region is available from post-mortem data, a reliable and reproducible characterization from in vivo data is still lacking. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of morphological criteria of the central region sulci used in post-mortem data, when applied to in vivo MRI data.Thirty right-handed healthy individuals were included in the study. Automated segmentation and three-dimensional surface-based rendering were obtained from clinical 3D T1-weighted MRI. Two senior radiologists labelled the three sulci composing the central region (precentral [PreCS], central [CS] and postcentral [PostCS] and analyzed their morphological variations using 47 standard criteria derived from Ono’s atlas based on post-mortem data. For each criterion, inter-rater concordance and comparison with the occurrence frequency provided in Ono’s atlas were estimated. Overall, the sulcal pattern criteria derived from MRI data were highly reproducible between the raters with a high mean inter-rater concordance in the three sulci (CS: =0.92 in left hemisphere / =0.91 in right hemisphere; PreCS: =0.91/ =0.93; PostCS: = 0.84 / 0.79. Only a very limited number of sulcal criteria significantly differed between the in vivo and the post-mortem data (CS: 2 criteria in the left hemisphere / 3 criteria in the right hemisphere; PreCS: 3 in the left and right hemispheres; PostCS: 3 in the left hemisphere and 5 in the right hemisphere. Our study provides a comprehensive description of qualitative sulcal patterns in the central region from in vivo clinical MRI with high agreement with previous post-mortem data. Such identification of reliable sulcal patterns of the central region visible with standard clinical MRI data paves the way for the detection of subtle variations of the central sulcation associated

  4. THIRD TROCANTER OF HUMAN FEMORA IN NORTH KARNATAKA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Sylvia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthopaedic surgery, trochanteric region is an important as it’s an entry point, usually lateral side of the great trochanter, although anterior and posterior approaches have variable interest. For implants such as plates and DHS (dynamic hip screw, lateral approach is standard. After skin, fat tissue and fascia lata, vastuslateralis muscle is reached and elevated to approach lateral surface of subtrochanteric area. For implants as intra-medullar nail, minimally invasive approach is in routine use. Despite abundant research of general femoral morphology, especially its specific morphological parts (femoral head, neck, shaft, and its distal part involved in knee joint. Materials and methods: Study on 158 dry adult human femur of unknown age & sex collected from the department of anatomy and phase I students of KBNIMS, Kalaburagi, Karnataka. The broken or non-dried specimens were excluded from the study. Results: The third trochanter was present in 4.43% of the femora. Although the incidence was higher on the right side it was not statistically significant. Discussion: Another study which reported the side variations in Whites and Negroes, documented higher incidence on right side in White and on left side in Negro population; it also reported the trait to be more common in females in both Whites and Negroes. Conclusion: The presence of third trochanter at the proximal part of the femur has been found to alter the break lines in the pertrochanteric fracture patients. This study dealt with the incidence of third trochanter in north Karnataka region.

  5. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    During the award period, a number of studies have been carried out related to the overall objective of the project which is to elucidate important factors which influence the upper airway deposition and dose of particles in the size range 0.5 nm - 10 {mu}m, such as particle size, breathing conditions, age, airway geometry, and mode of breathing. These studies are listed below. (1) A high voltage electrospray system was constructed to generate polydispersed 1-10 {mu}m diameter di-ethylhexyl sebacate aerosol for particle deposition studies in nasal casts and in human subjects. (2) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage geometry, and nasal resistance on particle deposition efficiency in forty healthy, nonsmoking adults at a constant flowrate were studied. (3) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage dimensions and nasal resistance on the percentage of particle deposition in the anterior 3 cm of the nasal passage of spontaneously breathing humans were studied. (4) The region of deposition of monodispersed aerosols were studied using replicate casts. (5) Ultrafine aerosol deposition using simulated breath holding path and natural path was compared. (6) An experimental technique was proposed and tested to measure the oral deposition of inhaled ultrafine particles. (7) We have calculated the total deposition fraction of ultrafine aerosols from 5 to 200 n in the extrathoracic airways and in the lung. (8) The deposition fraction of radon progeny in the head airways was studied using several head airway models.

  6. Automated regional behavioral analysis for human brain images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jack L; Laird, Angela R; Eickhoff, Simon B; Martinez, Michael J; Fox, P Mickle; Fox, Peter T

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral categories of functional imaging experiments along with standardized brain coordinates of associated activations were used to develop a method to automate regional behavioral analysis of human brain images. Behavioral and coordinate data were taken from the BrainMap database (http://www.brainmap.org/), which documents over 20 years of published functional brain imaging studies. A brain region of interest (ROI) for behavioral analysis can be defined in functional images, anatomical images or brain atlases, if images are spatially normalized to MNI or Talairach standards. Results of behavioral analysis are presented for each of BrainMap's 51 behavioral sub-domains spanning five behavioral domains (Action, Cognition, Emotion, Interoception, and Perception). For each behavioral sub-domain the fraction of coordinates falling within the ROI was computed and compared with the fraction expected if coordinates for the behavior were not clustered, i.e., uniformly distributed. When the difference between these fractions is large behavioral association is indicated. A z-score ≥ 3.0 was used to designate statistically significant behavioral association. The left-right symmetry of ~100K activation foci was evaluated by hemisphere, lobe, and by behavioral sub-domain. Results highlighted the classic left-side dominance for language while asymmetry for most sub-domains (~75%) was not statistically significant. Use scenarios were presented for anatomical ROIs from the Harvard-Oxford cortical (HOC) brain atlas, functional ROIs from statistical parametric maps in a TMS-PET study, a task-based fMRI study, and ROIs from the ten "major representative" functional networks in a previously published resting state fMRI study. Statistically significant behavioral findings for these use scenarios were consistent with published behaviors for associated anatomical and functional regions.

  7. Geomagnetic Variations of Near-polar Regions and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchistova, Z. B.; Kutinov, Y. G.

    In polar region geomagnetic variations play active role to non-linear tectonic processes. This analysis is based on spatial-time spectral representation of geomagnetic variation and wave migration transformation. Many perturbations in electromagnetic fields may because by external factors (e.g. magnetic storms, ionosphere anomalies and other phenomena related to solar activity) "trigging" tectonic processes but having no direct relation to the processes of their preparation. Geophysical processes are responsible for perturbations in Earth's rotation and orientation on wide range of time-scale, from less than a day of millions of years. The geological structure of some sites of Earth's crust promotes occurrence of wave guides a number of geophysical fields (acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic), usually of transportation of acoustic, seismic, electromagnetic energy in Earth's crust are coincide spatially. During last 250 mln years Arctic Segment has been developing as an autonomous region with circumpolar zonality of geomagnetic fields, and mass - and-energy transfer in its bowlers as well as shitting of lithospheric plates and expansion of ocean are caused by rotation forces under of expanding planet. The dynamic structure of the geomagnetic variations may be characteriz ed by the variations of the order-chaos state. The order manifest itself in the rhythmic change of the medium state. Analysis of amplitude and phase of geomagnetic variations can be information on ecological state of regions. Geomagnetic variations is intrincically a multiscale process in time and space. One of the most important features of geomagnetic variations is multicyclic character, whish predetermined both extent and character of geomagnetic show, and specific features. Recently, there are collected many facts, show dependence between the processes in the Earth's biosphere, the elements of it, gelio- geo- physical and meteorological factors. The recent experimental data gives us opportunity

  8. Real Time Detection and Tracking of Human Face using Skin Color Segmentation and Region Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar G.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Real time faces detection and face tracking is one of the challenging problems in application like computer human interaction, video surveillance, biometrics etc. In this paper we are presenting an algorithm for real time face detection and tracking using skin color segmentation and region properties. First segmentation of skin regions from an image is done by using different color models. Skin regions are separated from the image by using thresholding. Then to decide whether these regions contain human face or not we used face features. Our procedure is based on skin color segmentation and human face features (knowledge-based approach. We have used RGB, YCbCr, and HSV color models for skin color segmentation. These color models with thresholds, help to remove non skin like pixel from an image. Each segmented skin regions are tested to know whether region is human face or not, by using human face features based on knowledge of geometrical properties of human face.

  9. Effects of regional phentolamine on hypoxic vasodilatation in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, C J; Minson, C T; Joyner, M J; Halliwill, J R

    2001-12-01

    1. Limb vascular beds exhibit a graded dilatation in response to hypoxia despite increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. We investigated the extent to which sympathetic vasoconstriction can mask hypoxic vasodilatation and assessed the relative contributions of beta-adrenergic and nitric oxide (NO) pathways to hypoxic vasodilatation. 2. We measured forearm blood flow responses (plethysmography) to isocapnic hypoxia (arterial saturation approximately 85%) in eight healthy men and women (18-26 years) after selective alpha-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine) of one forearm. Subsequently, we measured hypoxic responses after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine and propranolol) and after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade coupled with NO synthase inhibition (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, L-NMMA). 3. Hypoxia increased forearm vascular conductance by 49.0 +/- 13.5% after phentolamine (compared to +16.8 +/- 7.0% in the control arm without phentolamine, P < 0.05). After addition of propranolol, the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia was reduced by approximately 50%, but dilatation was still present (+24.7 +/- 7.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). When L-NMMA was added, there was no further reduction in the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia (+28.2 +/- 4.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). 4. Thus, selective regional alpha-adrenergic blockade unmasked a greater hypoxic vasodilatation than occurs in the presence of functional sympathetic nervous system responses to hypoxia. Furthermore, approximately half of the hypoxic vasodilatation in the forearm appears to be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated pathways. Finally, since considerable dilatation persists in the presence of both beta-adrenergic blockade and NO synthase inhibition, it is likely that an additional vasodilator mechanism is activated by hypoxia in humans.

  10. Report: EPA’s Distribution of Superfund Human Resources Does Not Support Current Regional Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #17-P-0397, September 19, 2017. Due to insufficient human resources to cover all Superfund site work, some regions have had to slow down or discontinue their efforts to protect human health and the environment.

  11. Species pool, human population, and global versus regional invasion patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Basil V. Iannone III; Gabriela C. Nunez-Mir; Kevin M. Potter; Christopher M. Oswalt; Songlin Fei

    2017-01-01

    Context Biological invasions are among the greatest global and regional threats to biomes in the Anthropocene. Islands, in particular, have been perceived to have higher vulnerability to invasions. Because of the dynamic nature of ongoing invasions, distinguishing regional patterns from global patterns and their underlying determinants remains a challenge. Objectives...

  12. Chimeric antibody with human constant regions and mouse variable regions directed against carcinoma-associated antigen 17-1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, L.K.; Curtis, P.; Rakowicz-Szulczynska, E.; Ghrayeb, J.; Chang, N.; Morrison, S.L.; Koprowski, H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have cloned the genomic DNA fragments encoding the heavy and light chain variable regions of monoclonal antibody 17-1A, and they have inserted them into mammalian expression vectors containing genomic DNA segments encoding human ..gamma..3 and kappa constant regions. The transfer of these expression vectors containing mouse-human chimeric immunoglobulin genes into Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells resulted in the production of functional IgG that retained the specific binding to the surface antigen 17-1A expressed on colorectal carcinoma cells.

  13. Construction of a consistent YAC contig for human chromosome region 3p14.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardenheuer, W; Michaelis, S; Lux, A; Vieten, L; Brocker, F; Julicher, K; Willers, C; Siebert, R; Smith, DI; vanderHout, AH; Buys, C; Schutte, J; Opalka, B

    1996-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions and translocations of human chromosome region 3p14 are observed in various human malignancies and suggest the existence of a tumor suppressor gene locus within this region. Tumors most frequently affected by these aberrations are small-cell lung cancer and renal-cell carcinoma.

  14. Region-specific mechanical properties of the human patella tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, B T; Aagaard, P; Krogsgaard, M

    2004-01-01

    . A stereoscopic microscope equipped with a digital camera recorded elongation. The fascicles were preconditioned five cycles before the failure test based on pilot data on rat tendon fascicle. Human fascicle length increased with repeated cycles (P

  15. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Katherine S; Salama, Sofie R; King, Bryan;

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 gen...... contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.......Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202...... genomic elements that are highly conserved in vertebrates but show evidence of significantly accelerated substitution rates in human. These are mostly in non-coding DNA, often near genes associated with transcription and DNA binding. Resequencing confirmed that the five most accelerated elements...

  16. Regional variability in the permeability of human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, D H; Andringa, H J; Derkson, G D; Derkson, M E; Kalathoor, S R

    1987-01-01

    This was measured qualitatively by using dyes and quantitatively by hydraulic conductance in dentine discs and crown segments in vitro. Both types of preparation demonstrated large regional differences in permeability, with the highest values at the periphery and the lowest in the centre of the disc or crown. As dentine permeability may vary 3-10-fold across a few millimetres, investigators should use as large a surface area as possible to compensate for these regional differences.

  17. Regional quantitative histological variations in human oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciano, Joseph; Beatty, Brian Lee

    2015-03-01

    Oral mucosa demonstrates regional variations that reflect contact with food during mastication. Though known qualitatively, our aim was to quantitatively assess regions to establish a measurable baseline from which one could compare in pathological and comparative studies, in which the abrasiveness of diets may differ. We assessed variations in the epithelial-connective tissue junction (rete ridges counts), collagen organization within the lamina propria, and elastin composition of the lamina propria of 15 regions of the labial (buccal) gingiva, lingual gingiva, vestibule, and palate. All characteristics varied more between regions within the same individual than between individuals. Lingual gingiva had high rete ridges counts, high level of collagen organization, and moderate elastin composition compared to other regions. The labial gingiva had few rete ridges, high collagen organization, and low elastin. The vestibule had the fewest average of rete ridges, least organized collagen, and high elastin. The hard palate had the highest average of rete ridges, high collagen organization, and the lowest elastin content. The soft palate conversely had the smallest average of rete ridges, moderate collagen organization, and the highest elastin composition. Our results indicate that comparison of these quantitative histological differences is warranted only for collagen organization and elastin composition. Differences in rete ridges counts were not statistically significant. Most histological characteristics observed were not significantly different between dentulous and edentulous cadavers, and the group containing all individuals. An exception was the level of collagen fiber organization within the lamina propria, which was higher in most regions when teeth were present.

  18. Impact of Rural Basic Human Capital Investment on Regional Development Ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    From the perspective of human resources development and regional economic cooperation,this paper expounds the basic conditions for socio-economic transformation and development in underdeveloped rural areas,and the ways to acquire basic human capital.On the basis of this,this paper further analyses the regional competitiveness difference arising from human capital difference,and proposes that we should solve this problem through sufficient supply of rural compulsory education.

  19. Regional Slow Waves and Spindles in Human Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yuval; Staba, Richard J.; Andrillon, Thomas; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Fried, Itzhak; Tononi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The most prominent EEG events in sleep are slow waves, reflecting a slow (waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states occur locally. Thus, especially in late sleep, some regions can be active while others are silent. We also find that slow waves can propagate, usually from medial prefrontal cortex to the medial temporal lobe and hippocampus. Sleep spindles, the other hallmark of NREM sleep EEG, are likewise predominantly local. Thus, intracerebral communication during sleep is constrained because slow and spindle oscillations often occur out-of-phase in different brain regions. PMID:21482364

  20. DNA sequence comparative analysis of the 3pter-p26 region of human genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO; Chunqing; LI; Yan; ZHANG; Xiaowei; ZHANG; Yilin; ZHAN

    2005-01-01

    Most proterminal regions of human chromosomes are GC-rich and gene-rich. Chromosome 3p is an exception. Its proterminal region is GC-poor, and likely to lose heterozygosity, thus causing a number of fatal diseases. Except one gap left in the telomeric position, the proterminal region of human chromosome 3p has been completely sequenced. The detailed sequence analysis showed: (i) the GC content of this region was 38.5%, being the lowest among all the human proterminal regions; (ii) this region contained 20 known genes and 22 predicted genes, with an average gene size of 97.5 kb. The previously mapped gene Cntn3 was not found in this region, but instead located in the 74 Mb position of human chromosome 3p; (iii) the interspersed repeats of this region were more active than the average level of the whole human genome, especially (TA)n, the content of which was twice the genome average; (iv) this region had a conserved synteny extending from 104.1 Mb to 112.4 Mb on the mouse chromosome 6, which was 8% larger in size, not in accordance with the whole genome comparison, probably because the 3pter-p26 region was more likely to lose neocleitides and its mouse synteny had more active interspersed repeats.

  1. Human Resource Education in the Middle East Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, Khalil M.; Hamie, Christine Silva

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of human resource development (HRD) education in Middle Eastern countries. In particular, the authors discuss the current state of HRD education, country readiness and challenges that hinder HRD progress in Middle Eastern countries. They argue that HRD programs need to prepare young…

  2. Human Resource Education in the Middle East Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, Khalil M.; Hamie, Christine Silva

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of human resource development (HRD) education in Middle Eastern countries. In particular, the authors discuss the current state of HRD education, country readiness and challenges that hinder HRD progress in Middle Eastern countries. They argue that HRD programs need to prepare young…

  3. Region specific patella tendon hypertrophy in humans following resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Reitelseder, S; Pedersen, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine if cross-sectional area (CSA) differs along the length of the human patellar tendon (PT), and if there is PT hypertrophy in response to resistance training. METHODS: Twelve healthy young men underwent baseline and post-training assessments. Maximal isometric knee extension strength...... (MVC) was determined unilaterally in both legs. PT CSA was measured at the proximal-, mid- and distal PT level and quadriceps muscle CSA was measured at mid-thigh level using magnetic resonance imaging. Mechanical properties of the patellar tendons were determined using ultrasonography. Subsequently....... CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to report tendon hypertrophy following resistance training. Further, the data show that the human PT CSA varies along the length of the tendon....

  4. Regional growth and atlasing of the developing human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makropoulos, Antonios; Aljabar, Paul; Wright, Robert; Hüning, Britta; Merchant, Nazakat; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Hajnal, Joseph V; Edwards, A David; Counsell, Serena J; Rueckert, Daniel

    2016-01-15

    Detailed morphometric analysis of the neonatal brain is required to characterise brain development and define neuroimaging biomarkers related to impaired brain growth. Accurate automatic segmentation of neonatal brain MRI is a prerequisite to analyse large datasets. We have previously presented an accurate and robust automatic segmentation technique for parcellating the neonatal brain into multiple cortical and subcortical regions. In this study, we further extend our segmentation method to detect cortical sulci and provide a detailed delineation of the cortical ribbon. These detailed segmentations are used to build a 4-dimensional spatio-temporal structural atlas of the brain for 82 cortical and subcortical structures throughout this developmental period. We employ the algorithm to segment an extensive database of 420 MR images of the developing brain, from 27 to 45weeks post-menstrual age at imaging. Regional volumetric and cortical surface measurements are derived and used to investigate brain growth and development during this critical period and to assess the impact of immaturity at birth. Whole brain volume, the absolute volume of all structures studied, cortical curvature and cortical surface area increased with increasing age at scan. Relative volumes of cortical grey matter, cerebellum and cerebrospinal fluid increased with age at scan, while relative volumes of white matter, ventricles, brainstem and basal ganglia and thalami decreased. Preterm infants at term had smaller whole brain volumes, reduced regional white matter and cortical and subcortical grey matter volumes, and reduced cortical surface area compared with term born controls, while ventricular volume was greater in the preterm group. Increasing prematurity at birth was associated with a reduction in total and regional white matter, cortical and subcortical grey matter volume, an increase in ventricular volume, and reduced cortical surface area.

  5. Tourism development and Human Resources challenges (Gjirokastra Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Qiqi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The economic development of many countries in general, depends on a large extent on the development of the tertiary sector and tourism is one of the most important components of this sector. Tourism significantly affects GDP growth, export growth, environmental protection and also employs many people. As a result, many developing countries promote tourism as a tool for economic and social development. In our country tourism development tends to be one of the main ways to alleviate the problem of high unemployment.Human resources play a vital role as an important element in the organization's performance for achieving its economic objectives. This role is increased even more in the case of organizations that provide services. This means that it is necessary to ensure high standards of quality and efficiency of HR. Intendedobjectives can only be achieved by defining the specific needs of human resources development in various segments of the sector.Keyword: Human Resources, Tourism, Training, Education system, Gjirokastra1. The Importance of Tourism DevelopmentTourism is an important economic activity worldwide. There is a direct and anindirect impact of this sector in the economic development and in the number ofemployees. This paper is mainly based on the national and international institution’s databut we must mention that the revenues of this sector are higher than statistic data shows.There are practical difficulties in the right collection of this sector’s data because of thediverse structure of its services and it’s all inclusive nature. However, based on the reportmade by WTTC (World Travel & Tourism Council, we can mention that in Albania thetotal contribution of Tourism & Travel in GDP for 2013 was 68.1 bn ALL or 4,8% ofGDP and it is predicted to grow by 5.5% up to 71.9 bn ALL in 2014. The forecast for2024 shows a growth up to 123.6 bn ALL or 6.1% of GDP.1An element with great importance in the sector of tourism is the number of

  6. Human Constraints to Sustainable Agriculture in the Arid Regions of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, G. H.; Botha, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 79 South African farmers in arid regions showed that their conservation practices were influenced by such human factors as needs, perceptions, and knowledge. Direct influence on adoption behaviors was recommended to encourage sustainable agriculture practices. (SK)

  7. [Mechanism of heat transfer in various regions of human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchakov, Iu I; Nozdrachev, A D

    2009-01-01

    The processes of heat transfer in a human body were studied with the use of a mathematical model. It has been shown that only conductive or only convective heat transfer may occur in different body areas. The rate of blood-mediated heat transfer in the presence of blood circulation is many times higher than heat transfer due to temperature gradient; therefore, the convective process prevails over the conductive process. The body core contains a variety of blood vessels, and the bulk of blood concentrates there in the norm. Hence, heat transfer in it is mainly convective. In surface tissues, where the rate of blood circulation is lower and the vasculature has certain specific features, heat transfer is mainly conductive. Hence, the core and surface tissues are absolutely different body zones in terms of heat transfer.

  8. Regional distribution of lead in human milk from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M A; Ragab, A A; Kamel, A; Jones, J; el-Sebae, A K

    1996-05-01

    Bioaccumulation of lead during chronic exposure and its mobilization and secretion with mother's milk constitute a serious health hazard to the newly born children. Lead levels in human breast milk of 120 Egyptian women representing 20 different governorates throughout Egypt were determined using a graphite furnace Atomic Absorption spectrometer. According to the daily permissible intake (DPI) value established by the WHO of 5.0 micrograms/kg/d in mother's milk, the mean values of lead were around the permissible level in most of the Egyptian governorates. However, lead levels in mother's milk from Alexandria, Assiut and Cairo were significantly higher than the permissible value. Higher lead levels in mother's milk from these governorates may be attributed to heavy automobile traffic using leaded gasoline in addition to the use of lead water pipelines in these areas.

  9. High resolution regional elasticity mapping of the human prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Yoshinobu; Omata, Sadao; Yajima, Toshikuni; Peng, Qiyu; Shishido, Keiichi; Peehl, Donna M; Constantinou, Christos E

    2007-01-01

    What is it that the clinician "feels" during a digital rectal examination? To answer this question, it is necessary to measure the elastic properties of the prostate and verify the stiffness values with histological examination. Therefore, we devised an Elasticity Mapping System to evaluate the elastic properties of various histopathological grades of prostate cancer in relation to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissue. The system consists of a micro tactile sensor, a three-axis (XYZ) with one (fine Z) micromanipulation stage, a stereoscope camera and a measurement chamber. Using this methodology we mapped the elasticity of human prostate cancer (CaP) and it was obviously observed that the node was significantly harder than surrounding normal tissues and had some textures.

  10. RADIOLOGICAL STUDY OF HUMAN LUMBAR VERTEBRAL CANAL IN VIDHARBHA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increase in number of patients suffering from backache all over world needs changing health polices and cost benefit analysis, it is important to look at diseases causing low back pain and for this study of radiological structure of lumbar vertebral canal is undertaken. AIMS : To reveal the radiological feature of Human lumbar vert ebral canal. METHOD AND MATERIAL : 50 - xray of lumbar canal was collected from orthopedic department of government medical college, Nagpur. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : Data is presented in mean ± standard deviation and categorical variable are presented in percen tage. Comparison with previous study is done. RESULT : M aximum measurement as greater in male than female of same age group. CONCLUSION : T he present study and previous studies are compared and the non - significant result is found.

  11. Problems of Development of Human Capital in the Regions of North Caucasian Federal District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminat Ruslanovna Kappusheva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article specifies types of investments in human capital: spending on education, health and mobility. The author highlights the key actors invest in human capital development: the state, the corporate sector, households; emphasizes the low activity of the corporate sector and households in the process of investing in human capital. During the analysis of the problems of development of the human capital of the North Caucasian Federal District the author highlighted the interdependence of development of the productive sector of the economy and human capital: the low level of industrialization determines the gap in terms of gross regional product, high unemployment and low incomes, lack of investment in human capital of households. The article also deals with the problems of health and education in the North Caucasian Federal District: the shortage of qualified personnel, insufficient capacity of institutions. The analysis of the structure of regional budget expenditures on human capital development are pointed out. They include the spheres of health, education and culture. There is a direct and close relationship between the amount of budget spending on health, education, culture and the level of development of human capital in the country and the region. In the regions of the North Caucasian Federal District the lower level of educated population engaged in the sphere of economics was revealed. Particular attention is paid to analysis of the quality of human capital state and municipal employees of the North Caucasian Federal District, whose activities in the conditions of underdevelopment of large business, significantly affects the prospects for regional economic growth. The necessity of developing and implementing regional policies to promote health, education and culture, determines the quality of human capital in the economy.

  12. The early noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 16 is regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Kristiansen, Karen; Durand, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    All human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) early mRNAs are polyadenylated at the poly(A) signal within the early 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). The 3'end of the early E5 open reading frame and the 3'UTR of HPV-16 is very AU-rich, with five regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (...

  13. Total regional and global number of synapses in the human brain neocortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Y.; Nyengaard, J.R.; Groot, D.M.G. de; Jorgen, H.; Gundersen, G.

    2001-01-01

    An estimator of the total number of synapses in neocortex of human autopsy brains based on unbiased stereological principles is described. Each randomly chosen cerebral hemisphere was stratified into the four major neocortical regions. Uniform sampling with a varying sampling fraction in each region

  14. Human capital accumulation and migration in a peripheral EU region : the case of Basilicata

    OpenAIRE

    Coniglio, Nicola D.; Prota, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    The importance of human capital as a key source of value added, innovation and economic growth is widely acknowledged by both economists and policy-makers. Local governments can directly affect individuals’ decision making by subsidising human capital formation. The ability of a regional system to generate human capital is crucial but it is not a sufficient condition leading to economic success. In this work we emphasise the importance of maintaining and attracting high-skilled individuals, a...

  15. The Pan American Health Organization and the mainstreaming of human rights in regional health governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Ayala, Ana S

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of centralized human rights leadership in an increasingly fragmented global health policy landscape, regional health offices have stepped forward to advance the rights-based approach to health. Reviewing the efforts of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), this article explores the evolution of human rights in PAHO policy, assesses efforts to mainstream human rights in the Pan American Sanitary Bureau (PASB), and analyzes the future of the rights-based approach through regional health governance, providing lessons for other regional health offices and global health institutions. This article explores PAHO's 15-year effort to mainstream human rights through PASB technical units, national capacity-building, the Inter-American human rights system, and the PAHO Directing Council. Through documentary analysis of PAHO policies and semi-structured interviews with key PASB stakeholders, the authors analyze the understandings and actions of policymakers and technical officers in implementing human rights through PAHO governance. Analyzing the themes arising from this narrative, the authors examine the structural role of secretariat leadership, state support, legal expertise, and technical unit commitment in facilitating a rights-based approach to the health in the Americas. Human rights are increasingly framing PAHO efforts, and this analysis of the structures underlying PAHO's approach provides an understanding of the institutional determinants of the rights-based approach to health, highlighting generalizable themes for the mainstreaming of human rights through regional health governance. With this regional-level understanding of health governance, future national-level research can begin to understand the causal forces linking regional human rights work with national policy reforms and public health outcomes. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  16. Human-driven topographic effects on the distribution of forest in a flat, lowland agricultural region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Mette Vestergaard; Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    on cultural-historical factors and thus be human-driven (anthropogenic) rather than natural, except in regions where the general climate or extreme soils limit the occurrence of forests. We used spatial regression modeling to assess the extent to which topographic factors explain forest distribution (presence......Complex topography buffers forests against deforestation in mountainous regions. However, it is unknown if terrain also shapes forest distribution in lowlands where human impacts are likely to be less constrained by terrain. In such regions, if important at all, topographic effects will depend...

  17. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2006-01-01

    overlapped by transfrags than regions that are not overlapped by transfrags. To verify the coexpression between predicted candidates in human and mouse, we conducted expression studies by RT-PCR and Northern blotting on mouse candidates, which overlap with transfrags on human chromosome 20. RT-PCR results...... confirmed expression of 32 out of 36 candidates, whereas Northern blots confirmed four out of 12 candidates. Furthermore, many RT-PCR results indicate differential expression in different tissues. Hence, our findings suggest that there are corresponding regions between human and mouse, which contain...

  18. Human Vision System’s Region of Interest Based Video Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Asha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available While watching a video human visual system gives more attention on the foreground objects than background objects. That is to say, human vision system pays more attention to region of interest, such as the human faces in the video content. Most of the video encoders compress video by considering every part of the video frames with equal importance. So the video size could not be reduced to maintain quality. The proposed system can detect the foreground and it can allocate different bit rates for different regions. By doing this the video quality can be maintained and the size can be reduced up to 40%.

  19. INFLUENCE OF WELFARE ON THE LEVEL OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN CAPITAL OF RUSSIAN REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И. А. Гурбан

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a methodological approach for mea-suring the level of human capital development in the regions of Russian Federation. The approach suggested enables to determine the qualitative state of human capital in each region, to find out the reasons underpinning the current situation, to asses regions’ contribution to the overall national human ca-pital, to develop some individual approach to forming another quality human capital and its managing for each territory. The methodology afforded the instrument ware based on the qualimetric analysis which uses the natural estimates (indi-cators of an object. A system of indicators simulating the human capital state puts forward the following modules: demographic, educational, labor, research and sociocultural. The tool offered allows differentiation of the Russian regions into the levels of human capital state. 2000 and 2011 rating of Russian regions according to the human capital state and his dynamics over 2000-2011 is given.Purchase on Elibrary.ru > Buy now

  20. Infectious Agents As Markers of Human Migration toward the Amazon Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ishak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Infectious agents are common companions of humans and since ancient times they follow human migration on their search for a better place to live. The study of paleomicrobiology was significantly improved in its accuracy of measurement with the constant development of better methods to detect and analyze nucleic acids. Human tissues are constantly used to trace ancient infections and the association of anthropological evidences are important to confirm the microbiological information. Infectious agents which establish human persistent infections are particularly useful to trace human migrations. In the present article, the evidence of infection by viral agents such as human T-lymphotropic virus 1, human T-lymphotropic virus 2, human herpes virus-8, JC virus, and a bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, was described using different methodologies for their detection. Their presence was further used as biomarkers associated with anthropological and other relevant information to trace human migration into the Amazon region of Brazil. The approach also evidenced their microbiological origin, emergence, evolution, and spreading. The information obtained confirms much of the archeological information available tracing ancient and more recent human migration into this particular geographical region. In this article, the paleomicrobiological information on the subject was summarized and reviewed.

  1. Mitochondrial Genome Analyses Suggest Multiple Trichuris Species in Humans, Baboons, and Pigs from Different Geographical Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed B F Hawash

    Full Text Available The whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis are two parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs, respectively. Although whipworms in human and non-human primates historically have been referred to as T. trichiura, recent reports suggest that several Trichuris spp. are found in primates.We sequenced and annotated complete mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human in Uganda, an olive baboon in the US, a hamadryas baboon in Denmark, and two pigs from Denmark and Uganda. Comparative analyses using other published mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human and a porcine host in China and from a françois' leaf-monkey (China were performed, including phylogenetic analyses and pairwise genetic and amino acid distances. Genetic and protein distances between human Trichuris in Uganda and China were high (~19% and 15%, respectively suggesting that they represented different species. Trichuris from the olive baboon in US was genetically related to human Trichuris in China, while the other from the hamadryas baboon in Denmark was nearly identical to human Trichuris from Uganda. Baboon-derived Trichuris was genetically distinct from Trichuris from françois' leaf monkey, suggesting multiple whipworm species circulating among non-human primates. The genetic and protein distances between pig Trichuris from Denmark and other regions were roughly 9% and 6%, respectively, while Chinese and Ugandan whipworms were more closely related.Our results indicate that Trichuris species infecting humans and pigs are phylogenetically distinct across geographical regions, which might have important implications for the implementation of suitable and effective control strategies in different regions. Moreover, we provide support for the hypothesis that Trichuris infecting primates represents a complex of cryptic species with some species being able to infect both humans and non-human primates.

  2. Managing the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium: Management and Operation of the Pacific Region Junior Science & Humanities Symposium, 2001-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This publication provides administrative, management, supervisory guidance, and other information necessary for successful conduct and support of grades 7-12 science symposia. Originally the text was developed as the operations manual for the Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (PJSHS). It contains information necessary to…

  3. Human Security: A Thematic Guidance Note for Regional and National Human Development Report Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Gómez (Oscar); D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Many important aspects of human development relate also to people’s security: loosely defined as people’s freedom from fear and freedom from want in a broad sense. Applying a human security approach offers an opportunity to analyse many issues in an informative way.

  4. Human Security: A Thematic Guidance Note for Regional and National Human Development Report Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Gómez (Oscar); D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Many important aspects of human development relate also to people’s security: loosely defined as people’s freedom from fear and freedom from want in a broad sense. Applying a human security approach offers an opportunity to analyse many issues in an informative way. This note

  5. miR-148 targets human DNMT3b protein coding region

    OpenAIRE

    Duursma, Anja M.; Kedde, Martijn; Schrier, Mariette; le Sage, Carlos; Agami, Reuven

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules of 20–24 nucleotides that regulate gene expression. In animals, miRNAs form imperfect interactions with sequences in the 3′ Untranslated region (3′UTR) of mRNAs, causing translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In contrast, plant miRNAs mostly associate with protein coding regions. Here we show that human miR-148 represses DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b) gene expression through a region in its coding sequence. This region is evolutionary ...

  6. Social Media Interactions and Online Games - Building up New Human Relationships in Danube Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag K Nikolić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are trying to explore possibilities of using online environment, multiplayer gaming culture and social media networks to engage people in the Danube Region around social, multi-cultural and environment initiatives. The Danube Region online community could become a new cultural phenomena, technology mediated, built on human interactions, common interests and cultural heritage which open space for future humancentered social and infrastructural design initiatives. We believe that such social media environment could also be a research playground where people form Danube Region may express their needs and desires as well as to leave the trace of their behavior, significant for further Danube Region development.

  7. Simian virus 40 regulatory region structural diversity and the association of viral archetypal regulatory regions with human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednicky, J A; Butel, J S

    2001-02-01

    The regulatory region (RR) of simian virus 40 (SV40) contains enhancer/promoter elements and an origin of DNA replication. Natural SV40 isolates from simian brain or kidney tissues typically have an archetypal RR arrangement with a single 72-basepair enhancer element. A rare simpler, shorter SV40 RR exists that lacks a duplicated sequence in the G/C-rich region and is termed protoarchetypal. Occasionally, SV40 strain variants arise de novo that have complex RRs, which typically contain sequence reiterations, rearrangements, and/or deletions. These variants replicate faster and to higher titers in tissue culture; we speculate that such faster-growing variants were selected when laboratory strains of SV40 were initially recovered. SV40 strains with archetypal RRs have been found in some human brain tumors. The possible implications of these findings and a brief review of the SV40 RR structure are presented.

  8. Research on the human resource development of the Three Gorges Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yinzhen; Sun Dalin

    2008-01-01

    The Three Gorges Region (TGR) is an economic region of China, and lies in the western part of Yangtze economic belt. It takes the Three Gorges Project as leading, Chongqing and Yichang City as main body, the Three Gorges Reservoir as ligament. It covers about 700 km of the Yangtze River valley from Chongqing to Yichang, in- cluding Chongqing City, Yichang City and Enshi District of Hubei Province. Since the construction of Three Gorges Project and establishment of Chongqing as municipality directly under the Central Government, the regional econ-omy, culture, education, technology, etc., all developed harmoniously and rapidly, and the diathesis of the regional human resources also got an exaltation. While compared with the eastern region of China, the economy, science and technology in this region still fall behind, and the current situation is of no optimism. Based on the theory of human resources development, this paper analyzes current situation and problems in the human resources development of the TGR, and puts forward the countermeasures, such as planning human resources development program based on"anaphase support "policy, developing education and training business, reasonably organizing labor export, etc.

  9. Human Rabies in the WHO Southeast Asia Region: Forward Steps for Elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra Gongal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are eleven Member States in the WHO southeast Asia region (Bangladesh, Bhutan, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste of which eight are endemic for rabies. More than 1.4 billion people in the Region are at risk of rabies infection, and approximately 45% of worldwide rabies deaths occur in Asia. Dog bites account for 96% of human rabies cases. Progress in preventing human rabies through control of the disease in dogs has been slow due to various factors. Innovative control tools and techniques have been developed and standardized in recent years. The introduction of cost-effective intradermal rabies vaccination regimens in Asian countries has increased the availability and affordability of postexposure prophylaxis. Elimination of rabies is not possible without regional and intersectoral cooperation. Considering the importance of consolidating achievements in rabies control in Member countries, the WHO Regional Office for southeast Asia has developed a regional strategy for elimination of human rabies transmitted by dogs in the Region. They have committed to provide technical leadership, to advocate national health authorities to develop major stakeholder consensus for a comprehensive rabies elimination programme, and to implement national strategies for elimination of human rabies.

  10. Job Matching Efficiency in Skilled Regions: Evidence on the Microeconomic Foundations of Human Capital Externalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Heuermann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the literature on the role of local career networks for the quality of labour market matches we investigate whether human capital externalities arise from a higher job matching efficiency in skilled regions. Using two samples of workers in Germany we find that an increase in the regional share of highly qualified workers by one standard deviation is associated with between-job wage growth of about five per cent and with an increase in the annual probability of a job change of about sixty per cent. Wage gains are incurred only by workers changing jobs within industries. We find highly qualified workers in skilled regions to respond to these wage differentials by changing jobs more often within rather than between industries. Taken together, these findings suggest that human capital externalities partly arise because workers in skilled regions have better access to labour market information, which allows them to capitalize on their industry-specific knowledge when changing jobs.

  11. The human SOX18 gene: Expression analysis and characterization of its 5’ flanking region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Isidora

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish an adequate in vitro model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human SOX18 gene. The paper presents an analysis of expression of this gene in cultured cell lines and characterization of its 5' flanking region. Using RT-PCR, Northern and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated SOX18 expression in HeLa cells, indicating that this cell line provides a suitable model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the given gene. We also cloned, sequenced and for the first time characterized the human SOX18 5’ flanking region. It is shown that the region 892 bp in size immediately upstream from the start codone harbors regulatory elements sufficient for transcription and represents an SOX18 promoter region.

  12. Comparison of regional gene expression differences in the brains of the domestic dog and human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennerly Erin

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comparison of the expression profiles of 2,721 genes in the cerebellum, cortex and pituitary gland of three American Staffordshire terriers, one beagle and one fox hound revealed regional expression differences in the brain but failed to reveal marked differences among breeds, or even individual dogs. Approximately 85 per cent (42 of 49 orthologue comparisons of the regional differences in the dog are similar to those that differentiate the analogous human brain regions. A smaller percentage of human differences were replicated in the dog, particularly in the cortex, which may generally be evolving more rapidly than other brain regions in mammals. This study lays the foundation for detailed analysis of the population structure of transcriptional variation as it relates to cognitive and neurological phenotypes in the domestic dog.

  13. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mia E.; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S. V.; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog’s human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders. PMID:27685260

  14. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mia E; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S V; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-09-29

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog's human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders.

  15. Social Media Interactions and Online Games - Building up New Human Relationships in Danube Region

    OpenAIRE

    Predrag K Nikolić

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we are trying to explore possibilities of using online environment, multiplayer gaming culture and social media networks to engage people in the Danube Region around social, multi-cultural and environment initiatives. The Danube Region online community could become a new cultural phenomena, technology mediated, built on human interactions, common interests and cultural heritage which open space for future humancentered social and infrastructural design initiatives...

  16. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Paniagua-Torija; Angel Arevalo-Martin; Isidro Ferrer; Eduardo Molina-Holgado; Daniel Garcia-Ovejero

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqma...

  17. Regional and cellular gene expression changes in human Huntington's disease brain

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) pathology is well understood at a histological level but a comprehensive molecular analysis of the effect of the disease in the human brain has not previously been available. To elucidate the molecular phenotype of HD on a genome-wide scale, we compared mRNA profiles from 44 human HD brains with those from 36 unaffected controls using microarray analysis. Four brain regions were analyzed: caudate nucleus, cerebellum, prefrontal association cortex [Brodmann's area 9 (...

  18. Computational Comparison of Human Genomic Sequence Assemblies for a Region of Chromosome 4

    OpenAIRE

    Semple, Colin; Stewart W. Morris; Porteous, David J.; Evans, Kathryn L.

    2002-01-01

    Much of the available human genomic sequence data exist in a fragmentary draft state following the completion of the initial high-volume sequencing performed by the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) and Celera Genomics (CG). We compared six draft genome assemblies over a region of chromosome 4p (D4S394–D4S403), two consecutive releases by the IHGSC at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), two consecutive releases from the National Centre for Biotechnology Informa...

  19. High-expanding cortical regions in human development and evolution are related to higher intellectual abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Anders M; Westlye, Lars T; Amlien, Inge; Tamnes, Christian K; Grydeland, Håkon; Engvig, Andreas; Espeseth, Thomas; Reinvang, Ivar; Lundervold, Astri J; Lundervold, Arvid; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2015-01-01

    Cortical surface area has tremendously expanded during human evolution, and similar patterns of cortical expansion have been observed during childhood development. An intriguing hypothesis is that the high-expanding cortical regions also show the strongest correlations with intellectual function in humans. However, we do not know how the regional distribution of correlations between intellectual function and cortical area maps onto expansion in development and evolution. Here, in a sample of 1048 participants, we show that regions in which cortical area correlates with visuospatial reasoning abilities are generally high expanding in both development and evolution. Several regions in the frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate, showed high expansion in both development and evolution. The area of these regions was related to intellectual functions in humans. Low-expanding areas were not related to cognitive scores. These findings suggest that cortical regions involved in higher intellectual functions have expanded the most during development and evolution. The radial unit hypothesis provides a common framework for interpretation of the findings in the context of evolution and prenatal development, while additional cellular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, dendritic arborization, and intracortical myelination, likely impact area expansion in later childhood.

  20. DDX11L: a novel transcript family emerging from human subtelomeric regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Urso Michele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes exhibit an extraordinary plasticity. To date, due to the high GC content and to the presence of telomeric repeats, the subtelomeric sequences are underrepresented in the genomic libraries and consequently their sequences are incomplete in the finished human genome sequence, and still much remains to be learned about subtelomere organization, evolution and function. Indeed, only in recent years, several studies have disclosed, within human subtelomeres, novel gene family members. Results During a project aimed to analyze genes located in the telomeric region of the long arm of the human X chromosome, we have identified a novel transcript family, DDX11L, members of which map to 1pter, 2q13/14.1, 2qter, 3qter, 6pter, 9pter/9qter, 11pter, 12pter, 15qter, 16pter, 17pter, 19pter, 20pter/20qter, Xpter/Xqter and Yqter. Furthermore, we partially sequenced the underrepresented subtelomeres of human chromosomes showing a common evolutionary origin. Conclusion Our data indicate that an ancestral gene, originated as a rearranged portion of the primate DDX11 gene, and propagated along many subtelomeric locations, is emerging within subtelomeres of human chromosomes, defining a novel gene family. These findings support the possibility that the high plasticity of these regions, sites of DNA exchange among different chromosomes, could trigger the emergence of new genes.

  1. HUMAN CAPITAL: A DETERMINANT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT? AN EMPIRICAL STUDY ON THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIMPIA NEAGU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to investigate if human capital is a determinant of regional development accross EU countries. We used a regression model to show that economic growth in the EU countries is influenced by the tertiary educational level of population. Data from EUROSTAT, as tertiary educational attainement of population and GDP per capita in PPS at regional level (NUTS 2, over the period of 2002-2011, were used. We found a moderate validated statistical dependence between the variance of GDP per inhabitant and that of tertiary educational attainment of population accross European regions and a stronger link between them when we used time series of data.

  2. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2006-01-01

    been investigated. Owing to the limitations in computational methods, comparative genomics has been lacking the ability to compare such nonconserved sequence regions for conserved structural RNA elements. We have investigated the presence of structural RNA elements by conducting a local structural...... alignment, using FOLDALIGN, on a subset of these 100,000 corresponding regions and estimate that 1800 contain common RNA structures. Comparing our results with the recent mapping of transcribed fragments (transfrags) in human, we find that high-scoring candidates are twice as likely to be found in regions...... expressed non-coding RNA sequences not alignable in primary sequence....

  3. Morphological characterization of the nasopalatine region in human fetuses and its association to pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Gabriel Moreira FALCI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The nasopalatine region is composed of structures such as the vomeronasal organ and nasopalatine duct. The nasopalatine duct may provide the communication of the mouth to the nasal cavity in human fetuses and can be obliterated in an adult human. Knowledge on the development of the nasopalatine region and nasopalatine duct in humans is necessary for understanding the morphology and etiopathogenesis of lesions that occur in this region. Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the morphological aspects of the nasopalatine region in human fetuses and correlate these aspects with the development of pathologies in this region. Material and Methods Five human fetuses with no facial or palatine abnormalities were used for the acquisition of specimens from the nasopalatine region. After demineralization, the specimens were histologically processed. Histological cuts were stained with methylene blue to orient the cutting plane and hematoxylin-eosin for the descriptive histological analysis. Results The age of the fetuses was 8.00, 8.25, 9.00 and 9.25 weeks, and it was not possible to determine the age in the last one. The incisive canal was observed in all specimens as an opening delimited laterally by the periosteum and connecting oral and nasal cavity. The nasopalatine duct is an epithelial structure with the greatest morphological variation, with either unilateral or bilateral occurrence and total patent, partial patent and islet forms. The vomeronasal organ is a bilateral epithelized structure located alongside the nasal septum above the incisive canal in all the fetuses. Conclusions The incisive canal, nasopalatine duct and vomeronasal organ are distinct anatomic structures. The development of nasopalatine duct cysts may occur in all forms of the nasopalatine duct.

  4. Human bite injuries in the oro-facial region at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Elison NM

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bites in the maxillofacial region compromise function and aesthetics, resulting in social and psychological effects. There is paucity of information regarding human bite injuries in Tanzania. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence, treatment modalities and prognosis of human bite injuries in the oro-facial region at the Muhimbili National Hospital Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods In a prospective study the details of patients with human bite injuries in the oro-facial region who attended at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Muhimbili National Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005 were recorded. Data included information on age, sex, site, duration of the injury at the time of reporting to hospital, reasons, details of treatment offered and outcome after treatment. Results A total of 33 patients, 13 males and 20 females aged between 12 and 49 years with human bite injuries in the oro-facial region were treated. Thirty patients presented with clean uninfected wounds while 3 had infected wounds. The most (45.5% frequently affected site was the lower lip. Treatment offered included thorough surgical cleansing with adequate surgical debridement and primary suturing. Tetanus prophylaxis and a course of broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to all the patients. In 90% of the 30 patients who were treated by suturing, the healing was uneventful with only 10% experiencing wound infection or necrosis. Three patients who presented with wounds that had signs of infection were treated by surgical cleansing with debridement, antibiotics and daily dressing followed by delayed primary suturing. Conclusion Most of the human bite injuries in the oro-facial region were due to social conflicts. Although generally considered to be dirty or contaminated they could be successfully treated by surgical cleansing and primary suture with a favourable outcome. Management of such injuries often need

  5. Identification and analysis of genomic regions with large between-population differentiation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, S; Tang, K; Somel, M; Green, R E; Kelso, J; Stoneking, M

    2008-01-01

    The primary aim of genetic association and linkage studies is to identify genetic variants that contribute to phenotypic variation within human populations. Since the overwhelming majority of human genetic variation is found within populations, these methods are expected to be effective and can likely be extrapolated from one human population to another. However, they may lack power in detecting the genetic variants that contribute to phenotypes that differ greatly between human populations. Phenotypes that show large differences between populations are expected to be associated with genomic regions exhibiting large allele frequency differences between populations. Thus, from genome-wide polymorphism data genomic regions with large allele frequency differences between populations can be identified, and evaluated as candidates for large between-population phenotypic differences. Here we use allele frequency data from approximately 1.5 million SNPs from three human populations, and present an algorithm that identifies genomic regions containing SNPs with extreme Fst. We demonstrate that our candidate regions have reduced heterozygosity in Europeans and Chinese relative to African-Americans, and are likely enriched with genes that have experienced positive natural selection. We identify genes that are likely responsible for phenotypes known to differ dramatically between human populations and present several candidates worthy of future investigation. Our list of high Fst genomic regions is a first step in identifying the genetic variants that contribute to large phenotypic differences between populations, many of which have likely experienced positive natural selection. Our approach based on between population differences can compliment traditional within population linkage and association studies to uncover novel genotype-phenotype relationships.

  6. Significant Differences in Physicochemical Properties of Human Immunoglobulin Kappa and Lambda CDR3 Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Catherine L; Laffy, Julie M J; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Silva O'Hare, Joselli; Martin, Victoria; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain, and in humans, there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains and probed the Protein Data Bank to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda, and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors but can differ between donors. This indicates that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase may work with differing efficiencies between different people but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response.

  7. Deciphering the cause of evolutionary variance within intrinsically disordered regions in human proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sanghita; Chakraborty, Sandip; De, Rajat K

    2017-02-01

    Why the intrinsically disordered regions evolve within human proteome has became an interesting question for a decade. Till date, it remains an unsolved yet an intriguing issue to investigate why some of the disordered regions evolve rapidly while the rest are highly conserved across mammalian species. Identifying the key biological factors, responsible for the variation in the conservation rate of different disordered regions within the human proteome, may revisit the above issue. We emphasized that among the other biological features (multifunctionality, gene essentiality, protein connectivity, number of unique domains, gene expression level and expression breadth) considered in our study, the number of unique protein domains acts as a strong determinant that negatively influences the conservation of disordered regions. In this context, we justified that proteins having a fewer types of domains preferably need to conserve their disordered regions to enhance their structural flexibility which in turn will facilitate their molecular interactions. In contrast, the selection pressure acting on the stretches of disordered regions is not so strong in the case of multi-domains proteins. Therefore, we reasoned that the presence of conserved disordered stretches may compensate the functions of multiple domains within a single domain protein. Interestingly, we noticed that the influence of the unique domain number and expression level acts differently on the evolution of disordered regions from that of well-structured ones.

  8. The Changes of the Human Development on Micro-Regional and Settlement Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Lipták

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to define and estimate the human potential of the settlements in South-Cserehát,, Hungary. The human development index in the classical view can be estimated atmicroregional level with only hard distortions, to which the list of starting indicators differ from the usual indicators, such as GDP and GNI, the life expectancy at birth and the portion of taking part in education. However, the estimating calculations made for defining the human potential in a settlement level should be handled with hard restrictions , at the same time it perfectly shows the formation of the human factor in the region. As a research question the following was defined: In what range has the human potential changed on the basis of the census data and what kind of configuration changes have happened in the South-Cserehát? The aim of the study to attempt to estimate the HDI on settlement level.

  9. Human imprinted chromosomal regions are historical hot-spots of recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Sandovici

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Human recombination rates vary along the chromosomes as well as between the two sexes. There is growing evidence that epigenetic factors may have an important influence on recombination rates, as well as on crossover position. Using both public database analysis and wet-bench approaches, we revisited the relationship between increased rates of meiotic recombination and genome imprinting. We constructed metric linkage disequilibrium (LD maps for all human chromosomal regions known to contain one or more imprinted genes. We show that imprinted regions contain significantly more LD units (LDU and have significantly more haplotype blocks of smaller sizes than flanking nonimprinted regions. There is also an excess of hot-spots of recombination at imprinted regions, and this is likely to do with the presence of imprinted genes, per se. These findings indicate that imprinted chromosomal regions are historical "hot-spots" of recombination. We also demonstrate, by direct segregation analysis at the 11p15.5 imprinted region, that there is remarkable agreement between sites of meiotic recombination and steps in LD maps. Although the increase in LDU/Megabase at imprinted regions is not associated with any significant enrichment for any particular sequence class, major sequence determinants of recombination rates seem to differ between imprinted and control regions. Interestingly, fine-mapping of recombination events within the most male meiosis-specific recombination hot-spot of Chromosome 11p15.5 indicates that many events may occur within or directly adjacent to regions that are differentially methylated in somatic cells. Taken together, these findings support the involvement of a combination of specific DNA sequences and epigenetic factors as major determinants of hot-spots of recombination at imprinted chromosomal regions.

  10. Potential transcriptional regulatory regions exist upstream of the human ezrin gene promoter in esophageal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuying Gao; Yanpeng Dai; Meijun Yin; Jing Ye; Gang Li; Jie Yu

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the region -87/+ 134 of the human ezrin gene (VIL2) exhibited promoter activity in human esophageal carcinoma EC109 cells, and a further upstream region -1324/-890 positively regulated transcription.In this study, to identify the transcriptional regulatory regions upstream of the VIL2 promoter, we cloned VIL2 - 1541/- 706 segment containing the -1324/-890, and investigated its transcriptional regulatory properties via luciferase assays in transiently transfected cells.In EC109 cells, it was found that VIL2 -1541/-706 possessed promoter and enhancer activities.We also localized transcriptional regulatory regions by fusing 5′- or 3′-deletion segments of VIL2 -1541/-706 to a luciferase reporter.We found that there were three positive and one negative transcriptional regulatory regions ithin VIL2 -1541/-706 in EC109 cells.When these regions were separately located upstream of the luciferase gene without promoter, or located upstream of the VIL2 promoter or SV40 promoter directing the luciferase gene, only VIL2 -1297/-1186 exhibited considerable promoter and enhancer activities, which were lower than those of -1541/-706.In addition, transient expression of Sp1 increased ezrin expression and the transcriptional activation of VIL2 -1297/-1186.Other three regions,although exhibiting significantly positive or negative transcriptional regulation in deletion experiments, showed a weaker or absent regulation.These data suggested that more than one region upstream of the VIL2 promoter participated in VIL2 transcription, and the VIL2 -1297/-1186, probably as a key transcriptional regulatory region, regulated VIL2 transcription in company with other potential regulatory regions.

  11. [Human Resource Development for Tohoku Region after Great East Japan Earthquake: Remarks of the Chairperson].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    In order to promote further advances of medical systems in the Tohoku region where the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant occurred, the requirement of human resources in clinical laboratory medicine has increased. Therefore, the symposium entitled "Human resource development for Tohoku region after Great East Japan Earthquake" was held in The 47th Tohoku Regional Congress of Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine. In Fukushima Prefecture, the Thyroid Ultrasound Examination program has been conducted since Oct. 2011. Educational courses and certification programs for thyroid ultrasound examiners were established for medical doctors and technologists in Fukushima. The need for certified sonographers has also increased because deep venous thrombosis is also one of the health problems in the earthquake-hit area. Human resource development of sonographers was discussed in this symposium. In addition, further advances in clinical laboratory medicine are dependent on the development of specified medical technologists and certified physicians. Projects of human resource development currently performed in the Tohoku region were introduced and future actions were discussed.

  12. LANDSCAPE, PLACE AND REGION: THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES FOR ONE HUMAN GEOGRAPHY OF LIVED SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Serpa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It intends to discuss the different theoretical and methodological perspectives for human Geography starting from the work with landscape, place and region concepts pointing to the constitution/consolidation of one human Geography of lived spaces. There will be presented, so preliminary, the different approaches for the concepts of landscape, place and region in human Geography with the priority of the discussion about the possibility of the work with these concepts on also dialectic and phenomenological bases. Landscape, place and region will be presented as epistemological and methodological ways for a geographical approach focused on spatial practices, on spaces of representation and on the representations of space (LEFEBVRE, 2000, what points for the importance of space representations as intrinsic element of space production processes in contemporarily times. It will also search to present the bases of a human Geography of lived spaces presenting it as a cognitive Geography of social and spatial representations that contemplates the complex structures of society representation connecting this discussion with the work with the presented concepts (landscape, place and region.

  13. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  14. Competencies for Port and Logistics Personnel: An Application of Regional Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-sik; McLean, Gary N.

    2008-01-01

    Human resource development for regional strategic industries is an emerging emphasis for the development of industries that have growth potential. This article identifies competencies and expertise levels needed by port and logistics industry personnel, a sector that has growth potential in Busan, South Korea. The research consisted of expert…

  15. Simplified human model and pedestrian simulation in the millimeter-wave region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junghwan; Kim, Seok; Lee, Tae-Yun; Ka, Min-Ho

    2016-02-01

    The 24 GHz and 77 GHz radar sensors have been studied as a strong candidate for advanced driver assistance systems(ADAS) because of their all-weather capability and accurate range and radial velocity measuring scheme. However, developing a reliable pedestrian recognition system hasmany obstacles due to the inaccurate and non-trivial radar responses at these high frequencies and the many combinations of clothes and accessories. To overcome these obstacles, many researchers used electromagnetic (EM) simulation to characterize the radar scattering response of a human. However, human simulation takes so long time because of the electrically huge size of a human in the millimeter-wave region. To reduce simulation time, some researchers assumed the skin of a human is the perfect electric conductor (PEC) and have simulated the PEC human model using physical optics (PO) algorithm without a specific explanation about how the human body could be modeled with PEC. In this study, the validity of the assumption that the surface of the human body is considered PEC in the EM simulation is verified, and the simulation result of the dry skin human model is compared with that of the PEC human model.

  16. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Light Variable Region Gene of Anti-human Retinoblastoma Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufeng Zhong; Yongping Li; Shuqi Huang; Bo Ning; Chunyan Zhang; Jianliang Zheng; Guanguang Feng

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To clone the variable region gene of light chain of monoclonal antibody against human retinoblastoma and to analyze the characterization of its nucleotide sequence as well as amino acid sequence.Methods: Total RNA was extracted from 3C6 hybridoma cells secreting specific monoclonal antibody(McAb)against human retinoblastoma(RB), then transcripted reversely into cDNA with olig-dT primers.The variable region of the light chain (VL) gene fragments was amplified using polymeerase chain reaction(PCR) and further cloned into pGEM(R) -T Easy vector. Then, 3C6 VL cDNA was sequenced by Sanger's method.Homologous analysis was done by NCBI BLAST.Results: The complete nucleotide sequence of 3C6 VL cDNA consisted of 321 bp encoding 107 amino acid residues, containing four workframe regions(FRs)and three complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) as well as the typical structure of two cys residues. The sequence is most homological to a member of the Vk9 gene family, and its chain utilizes the Jkl gene segment.Conclusion: The light chain variable region gene of the McAb against human RB was amplified successfully , which belongs to the Vk9 gene family and utilizes Vk-Jk1 gene rearrangement. This study lays a good basis for constructing a recombinant antibody and for making a new targeted therapeutic agents against retinoblastoma.

  17. Application of research and information to human resources policies: regional goals for the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Marcos; Rigoli, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Objective Report experiences involving the use of research and information systems to support national human resources policies through benchmarking between different countries, with comparisons over time and between similar countries or regions. Method In 2007, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) promoted a set of goals for all the countries in the Americas to improve the situation of health human resources, using a uniform methodology and research process carried out by Observatories of Human Resources. Results The analysis focused on the progress made in relation to the main challenges in the Southern Cone countries, with a special emphasis on Brazil, noting improvements in the distribution of professionals in the regions. Conclusion These experiences showed how research and the use of information systems can stimulate the expansion of good practices in the training, retention and development of the health workforce in the Americas.

  18. The coding region of the human c-mos pseudogene contains Alu repeat insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarovsky, E R; Chumakov, I M; Prassolov, V S; Kisselev, L L

    1984-10-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of an 841-bp fragment derived from a segment of the human genome previously cloned by Chumakov et al. [Gene 17 (1982) 19-26] and Zabarovsky et al. [Gene 23 (1983) 379-384] and containing regions homologous to the viral mos gene probe. This sequence displays homology with part of the coding region of the human and murine c-mos genes, contains several termination codons, and is interrupted by two Alu-family elements flanked by short direct repeats. Probably, the progenitor of the human c-mos gene was duplicated approximately at the time of mammalian divergence, was converted to a pseudogene, and acquired insertions of two Alu elements.

  19. Significant differences in physicochemical properties of human immunoglobulin kappa and lambda CDR3 regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Townsend

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain and in humans there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain CDR-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 - light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains, and probed the Protein Data Bank (PDB to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors, but can differ between donors. This indicates that TdT may work with differing efficiencies between different people, but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response.

  20. Natural and human impacts on ecosystem services in Guanzhong - Tianshui economic region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Z X

    2016-04-01

    Due to the accelerated growth of society, the gaps between the capacity of ecosystems to provide services and human needs are steadily widening. Natural, semi-natural, or managed ecosystems had been able to provide ecosystem services to meet the needs of social development. Four agricultural ecosystem services (net primary production (NPP), carbon sequestration and oxygen production (CSOP), water interception, soil conservation and agriculture production) were quantified in Guanzhong-Tianshui economic region. Estimates of ecosystem services were obtained from the analysis of satellite imagery and the use of well-known models. Based on the ecological services in Guanzhong-Tianshui economic region, this study mainly analysed the driving mechanism of the changes from the two aspects of natural drivers and human drivers. Natural drivers (climate, soil, elevation, land cover) had incentive to the ecological services. Human activity was quantified by an integrated human activity index (HAI) based on population density, farmland ratio, and the influence of road networks and residential areas. We found relationships between ecosystem services, human activities and many natural factors, however these varied according to the service studied. Human activities were mostly negatively related to each ecosystem services, while population and residential land ware positively related to agricultural production. Land use change had made a contribution to ecosystem services. Based on the selected ecosystem services and HAI, we provided sustainable ecosystem management suggestions.

  1. Short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) are excluded from imprinted regions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greally, John M

    2002-01-08

    To test whether regions undergoing genomic imprinting have unique genomic characteristics, imprinted and nonimprinted human loci were compared for nucleotide and retroelement composition. Maternally and paternally expressed subgroups of imprinted genes were found to differ in terms of guanine and cytosine, CpG, and retroelement content, indicating a segregation into distinct genomic compartments. Imprinted regions have been normally permissive to L1 long interspersed transposable element retroposition during mammalian evolution but universally and significantly lack short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs). The primate-specific Alu SINEs, as well as the more ancient mammalian-wide interspersed repeat SINEs, are found at significantly low densities in imprinted regions. The latter paleogenomic signature indicates that the sequence characteristics of currently imprinted regions existed before the mammalian radiation. Transitions from imprinted to nonimprinted genomic regions in cis are characterized by a sharp inflection in SINE content, demonstrating that this genomic characteristic can help predict the presence and extent of regions undergoing imprinting. During primate evolution, SINE accumulation in imprinted regions occurred at a decreased rate compared with control loci. The constraint on SINE accumulation in imprinted regions may be mediated by an active selection process. This selection could be because of SINEs attracting and spreading methylation, as has been found at other loci. Methylation-induced silencing could lead to deleterious consequences at imprinted loci, where inactivation of one allele is already established, and expression is often essential for embryonic growth and survival.

  2. Deletion of the App-Runx1 region in mice models human partial monosomy 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Arbogast

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Partial monosomy 21 (PM21 is a rare chromosomal abnormality that is characterized by the loss of a variable segment along human chromosome 21 (Hsa21. The clinical phenotypes of this loss are heterogeneous and range from mild alterations to lethal consequences, depending on the affected region of Hsa21. The most common features include intellectual disabilities, craniofacial dysmorphology, short stature, and muscular and cardiac defects. As a complement to human genetic approaches, our team has developed new monosomic mouse models that carry deletions on Hsa21 syntenic regions in order to identify the dosage-sensitive genes that are responsible for the symptoms. We focus here on the Ms5Yah mouse model, in which a 7.7-Mb region has been deleted from the App to Runx1 genes. Ms5Yah mice display high postnatal lethality, with a few surviving individuals showing growth retardation, motor coordination deficits, and spatial learning and memory impairments. Further studies confirmed a gene dosage effect in the Ms5Yah hippocampus, and pinpointed disruptions of pathways related to cell adhesion (involving App, Cntnap5b, Lgals3bp, Mag, Mcam, Npnt, Pcdhb2, Pcdhb3, Pcdhb4, Pcdhb6, Pcdhb7, Pcdhb8, Pcdhb16 and Vwf. Our PM21 mouse model is the first to display morphological abnormalities and behavioural phenotypes similar to those found in affected humans, and it therefore demonstrates the major contribution that the App-Runx1 region has in the pathophysiology of PM21.

  3. Identification of the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yue-Sheng; Deng, Guang-Fei; Sun, Xun-Sha; Yi, Yong-Hong; Su, Tao; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2011-08-01

    To identify the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA (miRNA) genes, we analyzed the 5' flanking regions of intergenic miRNAs and intronic miRNAs. With the TSSG program prediction, we found that the ratio of intronic-s miRNA genes with a least one promoter was significantly lower than those of intergenic miRNA genes and intronic-a miRNA genes. More than half of the miRNA genes have only one promoter and less than 20% of the miRNA genes have more than three promoters in the 5-kb upstream regions. All potential promoters are randomly distributed within these regions. Approximately 60% of the miRNA promoters have a TATA-like box, being significantly higher than that of all human promoters. Luciferase reporter assays showed that 22 of the 30 promoters drove gene expression in HEK-293 cells, indicating a high accuracy of the promoter prediction. This study lays a foundation for future investigation into the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of human miRNA genes.

  4. Transcriptional analysis of the 5'-noncoding region of the human involucrin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Bayghen, E; Vega, A; Cadena, A; Granados, S E; Jave, L F; Gariglio, P; Alvarez-Salas, L M

    1996-01-01

    Human involucrin whose gene transcription is directed by a 2456-nucleotide (nt) 5'-noncoding region is a structural component of the epithelial cornified layer. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that this region is transcriptionally active in multiplying keratinocytes and is enhanced by 2 mM CaCl2 treatment. Calcium-independent transcriptional activity and the interaction with the AP-1 transcriptional factor was located on the proximal part (nt -159 to -1) of the 5'-noncoding region. However, CaCl2 responsiveness was mapped to a distal 1185-nt fragment (nt -2456 to -1272). Moreover, this fragment potentiated the Herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter in normal keratinocytes and is responsive to calcium treatment in a cell type-specific manner. Interestingly, the absence of a 491-nt fragment located between the two enhancer domains (nt -651 to -160) resulted in transcriptional activation in multiplying keratinocytes. This fragment interacts with AP-1 and the YY1 transcriptional silencer. It is concluded that human involucrin 5'-noncoding region contains at least three regulatory domains, a distal CaCl2-responsive enhancer, a putative transcriptional silencer (that interacts with AP-1 and YY1), and a proximal enhancer/promoter (that interacts with AP-1). Thus, this study demonstrates the presence of particular transcriptional factors can potentially regulate the human involucrin expression.

  5. Identification of the human chromosomal region containing the iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly locus by genomic-mismatch scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, F; Mears, A J; Guo, S W; Pearce, W G; Walter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Genome-mismatch scanning (GMS) is a new method of linkage analysis that rapidly isolates regions of identity between two genomes. DNA molecules from regions of identity by descent from two relatives are isolated based on their ability to form extended mismatch-free heteroduplexes. We have applied this rapid technology to identify the chromosomal region shared by two fifth-degree cousins with autosomal dominant iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly (IGDA), a rare ocular neurocristopathy. Markers on the short arm of human chromosome 6p were recovered, consistent with the results of conventional linkage analysis conducted in parallel, indicating linkage of IGDA to 6p25. Control markers tested on a second human chromosome were not recovered. A GMS error rate of approximately 11% was observed, well within an acceptable range for a rapid, first screening approach, especially since GMS results would be confirmed by family analysis with selected markers from the putative region of identity by descent. These results demonstrate not only the value of this technique in the rapid mapping of human genetic traits, but the first application of GMS to a multicellular organism. Images Figure 2 PMID:9245991

  6. Regional paleofire regimes affected by non-uniform climate, vegetation and human drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blarquez, Olivier; Ali, Adam A.; Girardin, Martin P.; Grondin, Pierre; Fréchette, Bianca; Bergeron, Yves; Hély, Christelle

    2015-09-01

    Climate, vegetation and humans act on biomass burning at different spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we used a dense network of sedimentary charcoal records from eastern Canada to reconstruct regional biomass burning history over the last 7000 years at the scale of four potential vegetation types: open coniferous forest/tundra, boreal coniferous forest, boreal mixedwood forest and temperate forest. The biomass burning trajectories were compared with regional climate trends reconstructed from general circulation models, tree biomass reconstructed from pollen series, and human population densities. We found that non-uniform climate, vegetation and human drivers acted on regional biomass burning history. In the open coniferous forest/tundra and dense coniferous forest, the regional biomass burning was primarily shaped by gradual establishment of less climate-conducive burning conditions over 5000 years. In the mixed boreal forest an increasing relative proportion of flammable conifers in landscapes since 2000 BP contributed to maintaining biomass burning constant despite climatic conditions less favourable to fires. In the temperate forest, biomass burning was uncoupled with climatic conditions and the main driver was seemingly vegetation until European colonization, i.e. 300 BP. Tree biomass and thus fuel accumulation modulated fire activity, an indication that biomass burning is fuel-dependent and notably upon long-term co-dominance shifts between conifers and broadleaf trees.

  7. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  8. P-gp activity and inhibition in the different regions of human intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2017-03-01

    Although intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been extensively studied in vitro and in animals, its activity and the consequences of P-gp inhibition for drug disposition and toxicity in humans are still difficult to accurately extrapolate from these studies. Moreover, existing in vitro models do not take into consideration that the intestine is heterogeneous with respect to P-gp expression. Recently, we reported rat precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) as a physiological ex vivo model to study the regional gradient of P-gp activity and inhibition. Here we extended the application of PCIS to the human intestine. For this purpose rhodamine 123 (R123) accumulation in the presence or absence of the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, cyclosporine A, quinidine, ketoconazole, PSC833 and CP100356 was measured in PCIS of human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. R123 accumulation in the presence of the P-gp inhibitors appeared to be most enhanced in the ileum compared to the other regions. Moreover, the regional differences in accumulation are in line with published differences in abundance of P-gp. The rank order of the potency of the P-gp inhibitors, reflected by their IC50 , was comparable to that in rat PCIS. However, the increase in accumulation of the P-gp substrate R123 by the inhibitors was larger in human ileum PCIS than in rat PCIS, indicating species difference in P-gp abundance. These data show that human PCIS are an appropriate ex vivo model to study the activity of intestinal P-gp and predict the inhibitory effect of drugs and of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in the human intestine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Sustainable Human Resource Management in Religiously Diverse Regions: The Podlasie Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mazur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sustainability seems fundamental for companies operating worldwide. Human resources are acknowledged to be among the most valuable assets for them. Even though literature shows that Sustainable Human Resource Management is an upcoming topic there is still limited research on the concept due to its initial state. Prior literature reveals a lack in the consideration of systematic links between sustainability and HRM. The purpose of the study is to present the sociological approach to Sustainable Human Resource Management. The paper contributes to the literature linking sustainability to the issues researched in HRM literature. In the introduction it discusses how the notion of sustainability has emerged and developed. Then the sociological approach to Sustainable Human Resource Management is briefly depicted. Next, Diversity Management is presented as the manifestation of the social approach to Sustainable Human Resource Management. To illustrate this approach, the empirical research is presented. It has been conducted among 32 companies operating in Podlasie region (northeastern part of Poland. The research tried to uncover the companies’ knowledge and consciousness of cultural (religious diversity. It also aimed at finding out whether this diversity was seen as an advantage and taken opportunity of or rather neglected in the companies. The results show the reception of diversity among larger and smaller enterprises in the Podlasie region. In general, smaller companies tend to know the religion of the worker more often, and therefore are able to take advantage of it. The larger companies tend to treat faith as a personal matter.

  10. A high-resolution interval map of the q21 region of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, C.; Monaco, A.P. [ICRF Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others; Arnould, C. [Laboratoire de Genetique Humaine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [and others

    1995-06-10

    In a previous study, we have developed a panel of chromosomal rearrangements for the physical mapping of the q13-q21 region of the human X chromosome. Here, we report the physical localization of 36 additional polymorphic markers by polymerase chain reaction analysis. The high density of chromosomal breakpoints in Xq21 allows us to map 58 DNA loci in 22 intervals. As a result, this segment of the X chromosome is saturated with approximately three sequence tagged sites per megabase of DNA, which will facilitate the construction of a YAC contig of this region. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Trans-foramen magnum examination of the sella turcica region in the macerated human skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzat, Janusz; Kozerska, Magdalena; Chmielewski, Przemyslaw; Goncerz, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a method of quick and accurate imaging of the sellar region by means of the laryngological mirror equipped with a light pipe and followed by taking digital photograph as the mirror image visible through the foramen magnum. A technique of the intracranial imaging of the osseous structures was tested on the macerated human skulls. Images of the sellar region were presented as the example of quality of the employed technique, which can be regarded as a simplified version of the endoscopic examination.

  12. Interferon gamma response region in the promoter of the human DPA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) response region of the human class II major histocompatibility complex gene, DPA, has been localized to a 52-base-pair (bp) DNA fragment in the proximal promotor at -107 to -55 bp after transfection into HeLa cells of a series of 5', 3', and gap deletion mutants linked to a reporter gene, human growth hormone, as well as of synthetic oligonucleotides fused to the heterologous promoter thymidine kinase. The 52-mer sequence contains the X and Y box elements cons...

  13. Variation in the sequence and modification state of the human insulin gene flanking regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, A; Dull, T J; Gray, A; Philips, J A; Peter, S

    1982-04-10

    The nucleotide sequence of a highly repetitive sequence region upstream from the human insulin gene is reported. The length of this region varies between alleles in the population, and appears to be stably transmitted to the next generation in a Mendelian fashion. There is no significant correlation between the length of this sequence and two types of diabetes mellitus. We observe variation in the cleavability of a BglI recognition site downstream from the human insulin gene, which is probably due to variable nucleotide modification. This presumed modification state appears not to be inherited, and varies between tissues within an individual and between individuals for a given tissue. Both alleles in a given tissue DNA sample are modified to the same extent.

  14. A hybrid neural network system for prediction and recognition of promoter regions in human genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-bo; LI Tao

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a high specificity and sensitivity algorithm called PromPredictor for recognizing promoter regions in the human genome. PromPredictor extracts compositional features and CpG islands information from genomic sequence,feeding these features as input for a hybrid neural network system (HNN) and then applies the HNN for prediction. It combines a novel promoter recognition model, coding theory, feature selection and dimensionality reduction with machine learning algorithm.Evaluation on Human chromosome 22 was ~66% in sensitivity and ~48% in specificity. Comparison with two other systems revealed that our method had superior sensitivity and specificity in predicting promoter regions. PromPredictor is written in MATLAB and requires Matlab to run. PromPredictor is freely available at http://www.whtelecom.com/Prompredictor.htm.

  15. Learning to predict where human gaze is using quaternion DCT based regional saliency detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Chongyang

    2014-09-01

    Many current visual attention approaches used semantic features to accurately capture human gaze. However, these approaches demand high computational cost and can hardly be applied to daily use. Recently, some quaternion-based saliency detection models, such as PQFT (phase spectrum of Quaternion Fourier Transform), QDCT (Quaternion Discrete Cosine Transform), have been proposed to meet real-time requirement of human gaze tracking tasks. However, current saliency detection methods used global PQFT and QDCT to locate jump edges of the input, which can hardly detect the object boundaries accurately. To address the problem, we improved QDCT-based saliency detection model by introducing superpixel-wised regional saliency detection mechanism. The local smoothness of saliency value distribution is emphasized to distinguish noises of background from salient regions. Our algorithm called saliency confidence can distinguish the patches belonging to the salient object and those of the background. It decides whether the image patches belong to the same region. When an image patch belongs to a region consisting of other salient patches, this patch should be salient as well. Therefore, we use saliency confidence map to get background weight and foreground weight to do the optimization on saliency map obtained by QDCT. The optimization is accomplished by least square method. The optimization approach we proposed unifies local and global saliency by combination of QDCT and measuring the similarity between each image superpixel. We evaluate our model on four commonly-used datasets (Toronto, MIT, OSIE and ASD) using standard precision-recall curves (PR curves), the mean absolute error (MAE) and area under curve (AUC) measures. In comparison with most state-of-art models, our approach can achieve higher consistency with human perception without training. It can get accurate human gaze even in cluttered background. Furthermore, it achieves better compromise between speed and accuracy.

  16. Structure-infectivity analysis of the human rhinovirus genomic RNA 3' non-coding region.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The specific recognition of genomic positive strand RNAS as templates for the synthesis of intermediate negative strands by the picornavirus replication machinery is presumably mediated by cis-acting sequences within the genomic RNA 3' non-coding region (NCR). A structure-infectivity analysis was conducted on the 44 nt human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) 3' NCR to identify the primary sequence and/or secondary structure determinants required for viral replication. Using biochemical RNA secondary stru...

  17. [Recent occurrence of human infection by Rocio arbovirus in the Valley of Ribeira region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversson, L B; Travassos da Rosa, A P; Rosa, M D

    1989-01-01

    The presence of IgM antibodies to Rocio in sera of two children from rural area of Ribeira Valley, Brazil, was detected by MAC-ELISA. This new arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family was responsible for an extensive encephalitis epidemic that occurred in the region in 1975-1977. Since 1980 no human disease caused by this virus has been diagnosed. An improvement on surveillance of Rocio infections and on the researches for virus identification in suspected vectors and reservoirs is necessary.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus complex from animals and humans in three remote African regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Pauly, Maude; Anoh, Etile; Mossoun, Arsene; Wiersma, Lidewij; Schubert, Grit; Flammen, Arnaud; Alabi, Abraham S; Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Grobusch, Martin P; Karhemere, Stomy; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Kremsner, Peter G; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Leendertz, Fabian H; Peters, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus schweitzeri has been recently considered to be a highly divergent Staphylococcus aureus clade and usually colonises nonhuman primates and bats in sub-Saharan Africa. Its transmissibility to humans remains unclear. We therefore investigated the transmission of S. aureus and S. schweitzeri among humans, domestic animals, and wildlife in three remote African regions. A cross-sectional study on nasal and pharyngeal colonisation in humans (n = 1288) and animals (n = 698) was performed in Côte d'Ivoire, Gabon, and Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo). Isolates were subjected to spa typing and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility and selected virulence factors were tested. S. schweitzeri was found in monkeys from all study sites but no transmission to humans was evident, despite frequent contact of humans with wildlife. In contrast, human-associated S. aureus sequence types (ST1, ST6, ST15) were detected in domestic animals and nonhuman primates, pointing toward a human-to-monkey transmission in the wild. The proportion of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) among all S. aureus was 0% (Gabon), 1.7% (DR Congo), and 5.3% (Côte d'Ivoire). The majority of MRSA isolates belonged to the African clone ST88. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence for a transmission of S. schweitzeri from animals to humans. However, such a transmission might remain possible due to the close phylogenetic relation of humans and nonhuman primates. The ST88-MRSA clone was widespread in Côte d'Ivoire but not in Gabon and DR Congo.

  19. DNA indels in coding regions reveal selective constraints on protein evolution in the human lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messer Philipp W

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insertions and deletions of DNA segments (indels are together with substitutions the major mutational processes that generate genetic variation. Here we focus on recent DNA insertions and deletions in protein coding regions of the human genome to investigate selective constraints on indels in protein evolution. Results Frequencies of inserted and deleted amino acids differ from background amino acid frequencies in the human proteome. Small amino acids are overrepresented, while hydrophobic, aliphatic and aromatic amino acids are strongly suppressed. Indels are found to be preferentially located in protein regions that do not form important structural domains. Amino acid insertion and deletion rates in genes associated with elementary biochemical reactions (e. g. catalytic activity, ligase activity, electron transport, or catabolic process are lower compared to those in other genes and are therefore subject to stronger purifying selection. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that indels in human protein coding regions are subject to distinct levels of selective pressure with regard to their structural impact on the amino acid sequence, as well as to general properties of the genes they are located in. These findings confirm that many commonly accepted characteristics of selective constraints for substitutions are also valid for amino acid insertions and deletions.

  20. CpG islands undermethylation in human genomic regions under selective pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cocozza

    Full Text Available DNA methylation at CpG islands (CGIs is one of the most intensively studied epigenetic mechanisms. It is fundamental for cellular differentiation and control of transcriptional potential. DNA methylation is involved also in several processes that are central to evolutionary biology, including phenotypic plasticity and evolvability. In this study, we explored the relationship between CpG islands methylation and signatures of selective pressure in Homo Sapiens, using a computational biology approach. By analyzing methylation data of 25 cell lines from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE Consortium, we compared the DNA methylation of CpG islands in genomic regions under selective pressure with the methylation of CpG islands in the remaining part of the genome. To define genomic regions under selective pressure, we used three different methods, each oriented to provide distinct information about selective events. Independently of the method and of the cell type used, we found evidences of undermethylation of CGIs in human genomic regions under selective pressure. Additionally, by analyzing SNP frequency in CpG islands, we demonstrated that CpG islands in regions under selective pressure show lower genetic variation. Our findings suggest that the CpG islands in regions under selective pressure seem to be somehow more "protected" from methylation when compared with other regions of the genome.

  1. Region-specific maturation of cerebral cortex in human fetal brain: diffusion tensor imaging and histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Saksena, Sona [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow, UP (India); Husain, Nuzhat; Srivastava, Savita [CSM Medical University, Department of Pathology, Lucknow (India); Rathore, Ram K.S.; Sarma, Manoj K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Kanpur (India); Malik, Gyanendra K. [CSM Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Lucknow (India); Das, Vinita [CSM Medical University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lucknow (India); Pradhan, Mandakini [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Genetics, Lucknow (India); Pandey, Chandra M. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Biostatistics, Lucknow (India); Narayana, Ponnada A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-09-15

    In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemical analysis in different cortical regions in fetal brains at different gestational age (GA) were performed. DTI was performed on 50 freshly aborted fetal brains with GA ranging from 12 to 42 weeks to compare age-related fractional anisotropy (FA) changes in different cerebral cortical regions that include frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes at the level of thalami. GFAP immunostaining was performed and the percentage of GFAP-positive areas was quantified. The cortical FA values in the frontal lobe peaked at around 26 weeks of GA, occipital and temporal lobes at around 20 weeks, and parietal lobe at around 23 weeks. A significant, but modest, positive correlation (r=0.31, p=0.02) was observed between cortical FA values and percentage area of GFAP expression in cortical region around the time period during which the migrational events are at its peak, i.e., GA {<=} 28 weeks for frontal cortical region and GA{<=}22 weeks for rest of the lobes. The DTI-derived FA quantification with its GFAP immunohistologic correlation in cortical regions of the various lobes of the cerebral hemispheres supports region-specific migrational and maturational events in human fetal brain. (orig.)

  2. Regional distribution of potassium, calcium, and six trace elements in normal human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duflou, H.; Maenhaut, W.; De Reuck, J. (Institute for Nuclear Sciences, Gent (Belgium))

    1989-11-01

    Eight elements (i.e. K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Rb) were measured in 50 different regions of 12 normal human brains by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The dry weight concentrations of K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Rb were consistently higher for gray than for white matter areas. The K, Zn and Se concentrations for the regions of mixed composition and, to some extent, also the Rb concentrations, were intermediate between the gray and white matter values, and they tended to decrease with decreasing neuron density. The mean dry weight concentrations of K, Ca, Zn, Se, and Rb in the various brain regions were highly correlated with the mean wet-to-dry weight ratios of these regions. For Mn, Fe, and Cu, however, such a correlation was not observed, and these elements exhibited elevated levels in several structures of the basal ganglia. For K, Fe, and Se the concentrations seemed to change with age. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that the structures clustered into two large groups, one comprising gray and mixed matter regions, the other white and mixed matter areas. Brain structures involved in the same physiological function or morphologically similar regions often conglomerated in a single subcluster.

  3. Characterization of immunoglobulin variable regions of two human pathogenic monoclonal cryocrystalglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazza, Valentina; Gabba, Silvia; Alfieri, Andrea; Giorgetti, Sofia; Marchese, Loredana; Palladini, Giovanni; Mattevi, Andrea; Ascari, Edoardo; Caporali, Roberto; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Merlini, Giampaolo; Perfetti, Vittorio

    2008-03-01

    Cold-precipitating monoclonal immunoglobulins can rarely aggregate in form of crystals (cryocrystalglobulins) and cause serious clinical manifestations. The structural basis underlying this phenomenon remains to be defined. This study was undertaken to provide the first characterization of the heavy (VH) and light chain (VL) variable regions of two human pathogenic cryocrystalglobulins. The immunoglobulins used different heavy and light chain constant regions and germline gene fragments, underwent high degrees of somatic hypermutation, and showed distributions of replacement and silent nucleotide changes suggestive of antigenic selection. Primary sequences analyses and computer-generated modeling identified a positive charge and the introduction of unusual hydrophobic residues in exposed areas of VH and VL. In particular, a rare replacement of a polar residue with proline is shared at the beginning of the VH complementarity-determining region 2, and this residue might be involved in intermolecular contacts.

  4. On the Regional Coordinated Development Between Tourism Human Resource and Tourism Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jun

    2012-01-01

    Tourism is one of the typical labor intensive industries and tourism human resource (HR) is the main factor for regional discrepancy of tourism industry. The paper takes China as research region and evaluates the level of tourism HR and the level of tour- ism industry of 31 provinces respectively. First, the paper con- structs evaluation index of regional tourism industry and tourism HR. Then, the paper gets the evaluation scores of every province by applying the principal components analysis and statistical pack- age for the social sciences processing. Second, the paper builds the tourism development-tourism HR matrix and divides the matrix into four quadrants. Finally, the paper points out the problems of tourism HR that exist in the 31 provinces and puts forward devel- opment strategy.

  5. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  6. Mutational Analysis of Region-cytotoxicity Relationship in Human Transmembrane Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGFang; GONGFeili; LIZhuoya; JIANGXiaodan; XIONGPing; FENGWei; XUYong

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To determine the region of human transmembrane tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TM-TNFa), essential for cytotoxic activity a-gainst human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Methods:Single amino-acid-substituted TM-TNFα mutant proteins (muteins) were produced by in vitro transcription linked translation techniques. The cDNA of TM-TNFα was site-directed mutagenized by recombinant PCR. Results:13 single amino-acid substituted TM-TNFα muteins were generated and assayed for cytotoxic activity. The cytotoxic activities of TM-TNFα muteins, eg, TM-TNFα-71/Lys, -28/Phe and 117/Leu were significantly decreased (P<0.01) compared to that of parent TM-TNFα, 143/Tyr decreased 4-folds, and-17/Thr,-39/Ser,ll9/His,35/Gly,95/Cys and 147/Phe decreased 1.5-2.5-folds, respectively. However, the cytotoxic activities of TM-TNFα-8/Arg, 31/Gly and 87/Phe showed no significant change. Conclusion:These results indicate that the regions associated with cytotoxic-activity of TM-TNFα are different with that of secretory TNF-lpha (S-TNFα). The inner cell region and transmembrane region of TM-TNFα are related to the cytotoxic activity of TM-TNFα.

  7. Major Shifts in Glial Regional Identity Are a Transcriptional Hallmark of Human Brain Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach Soreq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies suggest that aging of the human brain is determined by a complex interplay of molecular events, although both its region- and cell-type-specific consequences remain poorly understood. Here, we extensively characterized aging-altered gene expression changes across ten human brain regions from 480 individuals ranging in age from 16 to 106 years. We show that astrocyte- and oligodendrocyte-specific genes, but not neuron-specific genes, shift their regional expression patterns upon aging, particularly in the hippocampus and substantia nigra, while the expression of microglia- and endothelial-specific genes increase in all brain regions. In line with these changes, high-resolution immunohistochemistry demonstrated decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes and of neuronal subpopulations in the aging brain cortex. Finally, glial-specific genes predict age with greater precision than neuron-specific genes, thus highlighting the need for greater mechanistic understanding of neuron-glia interactions in aging and late-life diseases.

  8. Capacity building in human resources for health: The experience of the region of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godue, Charles; Cameron, Rick; Borrell, Rosa Maria

    2016-12-27

    Since the year 2003, most countries of the Region of the Americas have experienced sustained economic growth and inclusive development policies. In the health sector, achieving universal access became the overarching goal. However, the structural limitations of the health workforce represented a formidable obstacle to change. National Health Authorities were confronted with the challenge of developing critical capacities to redress entrenched inequalities in access to qualified health personnel. Under the auspices of the Pan American Health Organization, the Ministers of Health of the Region adopted, in September 2007, twenty regional goals for Human Resources for Health 2007-2015, aligned with the renewed strategy of Primary Health Care. Subsequently, a set of indicators and a methodology were developed to assess the goals and to monitor progress at the country level. Fifteen countries carried out a baseline assessment in 2009 or 2010 and conducted a second assessment in 2013. Although differences were noted across goals and between countries, the results suggested improvements in all twenty goals overall. The goals linked to the distribution of personnel, the management of migration, and the cooperation with education institutions appeared to be more resilient to change. The twenty Regional Goals for Human Resources for Health provided a common vision for action and a framework for cooperation within and among countries, and was a catalyst for change. Faced with evolving challenges, the countries should consider adopting a new shared agenda that builds on progress made and further supports intergovernmental policy alignment and capacity building in health workforce development, governance and management.

  9. Rarity of DNA sequence alterations in the promoter region of the human androgen receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Cabral

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The human androgen receptor (AR gene promoter lies in a GC-rich region containing two principal sites of transcription initiation and a putative Sp1 protein-binding site, without typical "TATA" and "CAAT" boxes. It has been suggested that mutations within the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR may contribute to the development of prostate cancer by changing the rates of gene transcription and/or translation. In order to investigate this question, the aim of the present study was to search for the presence of mutations or polymorphisms at the AR-5'UTR in 92 prostate cancer patients, where histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was established in specimens obtained from transurethral resection or after prostatectomy. The AR-5'UTR was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA samples of the patients and of 100 healthy male blood donors, included as controls. Conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was used for DNA sequence alteration screening. Only one band shift was detected in one individual from the blood donor group. Sequencing revealed a new single nucleotide deletion (T in the most conserved portion of the promoter region at position +36 downstream from the transcription initiation site I. Although the effect of this specific mutation remains unknown, its rarity reveals the high degree of sequence conservation of the human androgen promoter region. Moreover, the absence of detectable variation within the critical 5'UTR in prostate cancer patients indicates a low probability of its involvement in prostate cancer etiology.

  10. HUMAN RESOURCES, SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PAWN IN SOUTH-WEST OLTENIA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia, Marin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a strategy by which people seek ways to economic development, benefiting also from the local environment or to benefit quality of life. Aim of this paper is to highlight that each county has different sustainable development opportunities, according to demographic and economic potential. These opportunities exist for each urban area in part due to each Region.Starting from the idea accepted worldwide through sustainable development that seeks interaction and compatibility of four systems: human (social economic, environmental (for environmental or ecological and technology, we considered an analysis of human resources in the South-West Oltenia Region. Rresearch methods used consist of systemic analysis, comparative and comprehensive approach to the topic investigated, depending on the target. This research is based on different databases, and uses various methods in an attempt to provide an explanation of the issues that are, theoretically speaking, persuasive. Research results are to highlight the employment rate in the South region West Oltenia, the programs used by authorities to reduce unemployment and to identify any tracks to revive the labor market in this region.

  11. Dyeing regions of oxidative hair dyes in human hair investigated by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Toru; Yamada, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Toshihiko; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuhiko

    2013-06-01

    To develop more effective oxidative hair coloring products, it is important to understand the localization of colored chromophores, which are formed from oxidative dyes, in the fine structure of hair. However, the dyeing regions of oxidative hair dyes in the fine structure of hair have not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the distribution and localization of colored chromophores formed by an oxidative hair coloring product in the fine structure of human hair by using a stable isotope-labeled oxidative dye with nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). First, formation of the colored chromophore from a deuterium-labeled oxidative dye was examined by visible spectra similarly to a study of its formation using nonlabeled oxidative dye. Furthermore, the formation of binuclear indo dye containing deuterium in its chemical structure was confirmed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) analysis. As a result of the NanoSIMS image on a cross-sectional dyed hair, although deuterium ions were detected in whole hair cross-section, quite a few of them were detected at particulate regions. These particulate regions of the dyed black hair in which deuterium ions were intensely detected were identified as melanin granules, by comparing the dyeing behaviors of black and white hair. NanoSIMS analysis revealed that melanin granules of black human hair are important dyeing regions in oxidative hair coloring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Read clouds uncover variation in complex regions of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Alex; Liu, Yuling; Weng, Ziming; Kashef-Haghighi, Dorna; Newburger, Daniel E; West, Robert; Sidow, Arend; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2015-10-01

    Although an increasing amount of human genetic variation is being identified and recorded, determining variants within repeated sequences of the human genome remains a challenge. Most population and genome-wide association studies have therefore been unable to consider variation in these regions. Core to the problem is the lack of a sequencing technology that produces reads with sufficient length and accuracy to enable unique mapping. Here, we present a novel methodology of using read clouds, obtained by accurate short-read sequencing of DNA derived from long fragment libraries, to confidently align short reads within repeat regions and enable accurate variant discovery. Our novel algorithm, Random Field Aligner (RFA), captures the relationships among the short reads governed by the long read process via a Markov Random Field. We utilized a modified version of the Illumina TruSeq synthetic long-read protocol, which yielded shallow-sequenced read clouds. We test RFA through extensive simulations and apply it to discover variants on the NA12878 human sample, for which shallow TruSeq read cloud sequencing data are available, and on an invasive breast carcinoma genome that we sequenced using the same method. We demonstrate that RFA facilitates accurate recovery of variation in 155 Mb of the human genome, including 94% of 67 Mb of segmental duplication sequence and 96% of 11 Mb of transcribed sequence, that are currently hidden from short-read technologies.

  13. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Bassi, M.T. [Univ. of Siena (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional ne

  15. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional ne

  16. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional

  17. Lead (Pb) Isotope Baselines for Studies of Ancient Human Migration and Trade in the Maya Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Ashley E; Kamenov, George D; Gilli, Adrian; Hodell, David A; Emery, Kitty F; Brenner, Mark; Krigbaum, John

    2016-01-01

    We examined the potential use of lead (Pb) isotopes to source archaeological materials from the Maya region of Mesoamerica. The main objectives were to determine if: 1) geologic terrains throughout the Maya area exhibit distinct lead isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb), and 2) a combination of lead and strontium ratios can enhance sourcing procedures in the Mesoamerica region. We analyzed 60 rock samples for lead isotope ratios and a representative subset of samples for lead, uranium, and thorium concentrations across the Maya region, including the Northern Lowlands of the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula, the Southern Lowlands of Guatemala and Belize, the Volcanic Highlands, the Belizean Maya Mountains, and the Metamorphic Province/Motagua Valley. Although there is some overlap within certain sub-regions, particularly the geologically diverse Metamorphic Province, lead isotopes can be used to distinguish between the Northern Lowlands, the Southern Lowlands, and the Volcanic Highlands. The distinct lead isotope ratios in the sub-regions are related to the geology of the Maya area, exhibiting a general trend in the lowlands of geologically younger rocks in the north to older rocks in the south, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the southern highlands. Combined with other sourcing techniques such as strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and oxygen (δ18O), a regional baseline for lead isotope ratios can contribute to the development of lead isoscapes in the Maya area, and may help to distinguish among geographic sub-regions at a finer scale than has been previously possible. These isotope baselines will provide archaeologists with an additional tool to track the origin and movement of ancient humans and artifacts across this important region.

  18. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: quantitation using site-specific drug absorption data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Erik; Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Lennernäs, Hans

    2015-06-01

    Application of information on regional intestinal permeability has been identified as a key aspect of successful pharmaceutical product development. This study presents the results and evaluation of an approach for the indirect estimation of site-specific in vivo intestinal effective permeability (Peff) in humans. Plasma concentration-time profiles from 15 clinical studies that administered drug solutions to specific intestinal regions were collected and analyzed. The intestinal absorption rate for each drug was acquired by deconvolution, using historical intravenous data as reference, and used with the intestinal surface area and the dose remaining in the lumen to estimate the Peff. Forty-three new Peff values were estimated (15 from the proximal small intestine, 11 from the distal small intestine, and 17 from the large intestine) for 14 active pharmaceutical ingredients representing a wide range of biopharmaceutical properties. A good correlation (r(2) = 0.96, slope = 1.24, intercept = 0.030) was established between these indirect jejunal Peff estimates and jejunal Peff measurements determined directly using the single-pass perfusion double balloon technique. On average, Peff estimates from the distal small intestine and large intestine were 90% and 40%, respectively, of those from the proximal small intestine. These results support the use of the evaluated deconvolution method for indirectly estimating regional intestinal Peff in humans. This study presents the first comprehensive data set of estimated human regional intestinal permeability values for a range of drugs. These biopharmaceutical data can be used to improve the accuracy of gastrointestinal absorption predictions used in drug development decision-making.

  19. Strategic relationship between innovation development and management of human resources potential in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Nikolaevna Kozitsina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The modern concept for modernization of Russia’s economy, put forward by the federal executive authorities, provides for an innovation development model. It is believed that only innovation is able to solve many problems that the Russian economy faces, and first of all, the enhancement of its competitiveness. One of the problems of Russia’s innovation system consists in the lack of resources and in their inefficient use in certain directions of development of innovation activity: outdated production capacities and facilities and equipment at research organizations; ageing of staff; limited access to financial resources. The availability and condition of these resources, the opportunities for their usage – in other words, the choice of innovation development strategy, all these factors determine the effectiveness of innovation activity in the region. The article provides a classification of the region’s innovation strategies. Due to the fact that the most important factor in achieving innovation economic development is the improvement of the quality of human resources, the authors highlight the issue of strategic compliance between the innovation development of the region and human resources management. The authors define the strategy for innovative development of Krasnoyarsk Krai on the basis of the proposed methodology according to the methodology of strategic compliance; they also give recommendations on human resources management in the region. The authors use analytical and statistical methods of research, and they take into consideration relevant scientific publications of domestic and foreign scientists. The research findings can be applied in the implementation of the concept for innovation development of the region

  20. Cloning,sequencing and analyzing of the heavy chain V region genes of human polyreactive antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJINSONG; MINGYEH

    1994-01-01

    The heavy chain variable region genes of 5 human polyreactive mAbs generated in our laboratory have been cloned and sequenced using polymerase chain reaction(PCR) technique.We found that 2 and 3 mAbs utilized genes of the VHIV and VHⅢ families,respectively.The former 2 VH segments were in germline configuration.A common VH segment,with the best similarity of 90.1% to the published VHⅢ germline genes,was utilized by 2 different rearranged genes encoding the V regions of other 3 mAbs.This strongly suggests that the common VH segment is a unmutated copy of an unidentified germline VHⅢ gene.All these polyreactive mAbs displayed a large NDN region(VH-D-JH junction).The entire H chain V regions of these polyreactive mAbs are unusually basic.The analysis of the charge properties of these mAbs as well as those of other poly-and mono-reactive mAbs from literatures prompts us to propose that the charged amino acids with a particular distribution along the H chain V region,especially the binding sites(CDRs),may be an important structural feature involved in antibody polyreactivity.

  1. Comparative analysis of chromatin landscape in regulatory regions of human housekeeping and tissue specific genes

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    Dasgupta Dipayan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global regulatory mechanisms involving chromatin assembly and remodelling in the promoter regions of genes is implicated in eukaryotic transcription control especially for genes subjected to spatial and temporal regulation. The potential to utilise global regulatory mechanisms for controlling gene expression might depend upon the architecture of the chromatin in and around the gene. In-silico analysis can yield important insights into this aspect, facilitating comparison of two or more classes of genes comprising of a large number of genes within each group. Results In the present study, we carried out a comparative analysis of chromatin characteristics in terms of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions, nucleosome formation potential and the occurrence of repetitive sequences, in the upstream regulatory regions of housekeeping and tissue specific genes. Our data show that putative scaffold/matrix attachment regions are more abundant and nucleosome formation potential is higher in the 5' regions of tissue specific genes as compared to the housekeeping genes. Conclusion The differences in the chromatin features between the two groups of genes indicate the involvement of chromatin organisation in the control of gene expression. The presence of global regulatory mechanisms mediated through chromatin organisation can decrease the burden of invoking gene specific regulators for maintenance of the active/silenced state of gene expression. This could partially explain the lower number of genes estimated in the human genome.

  2. Human albumin use at hospitals in the Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Guacira Corrêa de; Rozenfeld, Suely; Martins, Monica

    2010-05-01

    The study analyzes the use of human albumin in hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, using inpatient data from the information system of Brazil's health system between 1999 and 2001. Death was the main outcome as patients died in 32% of admissions in which human albumin was used as compared with 4% of all admissions in the same period and region. The Charlson Comorbidity Index was included for risk adjustment. Human albumin was used in 10,111 in-patients more than 1 year old. 87,774 50-ml bottles of 20% human albumin were consumed at a cost of US$ 1,755. The main diagnoses were neoplasms (29.1%), diseases of the digestive system (17.5%) and circulatory system (16%). Death rate increased with age, public ownership of the hospital, clinical services (as opposed to surgical services), length of stay and use of intensive care. Death was associated with use of more than four bottles of human albumin (PR: 1.30; 99%CI: 1.23-1.37), adjusted for severity and speciality. The results are cause for concern as they may be related to poor compliance with guidelines, excess of risk to patients and unnecessary expenses for the public health system.

  3. High-resolution recombination patterns in a region of human chromosome 21 measured by sperm typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Tiemann-Boege

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available For decades, classical crossover studies and linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis of genomic regions suggested that human meiotic crossovers may not be randomly distributed along chromosomes but are focused instead in "hot spots." Recent sperm typing studies provided data at very high resolution and accuracy that defined the physical limits of a number of hot spots. The data were also used to test whether patterns of LD can predict hot spot locations. These sperm typing studies focused on several small regions of the genome already known or suspected of containing a hot spot based on the presence of LD breakdown or previous experimental evidence of hot spot activity. Comparable data on target regions not specifically chosen using these two criteria is lacking but is needed to make an unbiased test of whether LD data alone can accurately predict active hot spots. We used sperm typing to estimate recombination in 17 almost contiguous ~5 kb intervals spanning 103 kb of human Chromosome 21. We found two intervals that contained new hot spots. The comparison of our data with recombination rates predicted by statistical analyses of LD showed that, overall, the two datasets corresponded well, except for one predicted hot spot that showed little crossing over. This study doubles the experimental data on recombination in men at the highest resolution and accuracy and supports the emerging genome-wide picture that recombination is localized in small regions separated by cold areas. Detailed study of one of the new hot spots revealed a sperm donor with a decrease in recombination intensity at the canonical recombination site but an increase in crossover activity nearby. This unique finding suggests that the position and intensity of hot spots may evolve by means of a concerted mechanism that maintains the overall recombination intensity in the region.

  4. miR-148 targets human DNMT3b protein coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duursma, Anja M; Kedde, Martijn; Schrier, Mariette; le Sage, Carlos; Agami, Reuven

    2008-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules of 20-24 nucleotides that regulate gene expression. In animals, miRNAs form imperfect interactions with sequences in the 3' Untranslated region (3'UTR) of mRNAs, causing translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In contrast, plant miRNAs mostly associate with protein coding regions. Here we show that human miR-148 represses DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b) gene expression through a region in its coding sequence. This region is evolutionary conserved and present in the Dnmt3b splice variants Dnmt3b1, Dnmt3b2, and Dnmt3b4, but not in the abundantly expressed Dnmt3b3. Whereas overexpression of miR-148 results in decreased DNMT3b1 expression, short-hairpin RNA-mediated miR-148 repression leads to an increase in DNMT3b1 expression. Interestingly, mutating the putative miR-148 target site in Dnmt3b1 abolishes regulation by miR-148. Moreover, endogenous Dnmt3b3 mRNA, which lacks the putative miR-148 target site, is resistant to miR-148-mediated regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that the coding sequence of Dnmt3b mediates regulation by the miR-148 family. More generally, we provide evidence that coding regions of human genes can be targeted by miRNAs, and that such a mechanism might play a role in determining the relative abundance of different splice variants.

  5. Human papillomavirus in oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas in the central region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Petito

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Molecular studies about carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx demonstrate the presence of human papilomavirus genome in these tumors, reinforcing the participation of human papilomavirus in oral carcinogenesis. Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of human papilomavirus and genotype distribution of HPV16 and HPV18 in oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas, as well as their association with clinical characteristics of the tumors. Methods This is a retrospective study, with clinical data collected from 82 patients. Human papilomavirus detection was conducted on specimens of oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas included in paraffin blocks. Patients were assisted in a cancer reference center, in the central region of Brazil, between 2005 and 2007. Polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection and genotyping of human papilomavirus. Results Among the patients evaluated, 78% were male. The average age of the group was about 58 years. Risk factors, such as smoking (78% and alcohol consumption (70.8% were recorded for the group. HPV DNA was detected in 21 cases (25.6%; 95% confidence interval 16.9–36.6 of which 33.3% were HPV16 and 14.3% were HPV18. The presence of lymph node metastases and registered deaths were less frequent in human papilomavirus positive tumors, suggesting a better prognosis for these cases; however, the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion The results obtained in the present study, with respect to the presence of the high-risk HPV16 and HPV18 genotypes, highlight the importance of human papilomavirus vaccination in the control of oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas.

  6. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers.

  7. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction in humans detected noninvasively using I-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, M.S.; Tuli, M.M.; Radtke, N.L.; Heger, J.J.; Miles, W.M.; Mock, B.H.; Burt, R.W.; Wellman, H.N.; Zipes, D.P. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, IN (USA))

    1989-11-15

    Transmural myocardial infarction in dogs produces denervation of sympathetic nerves in viable myocardium apical to the infarct that may be arrhythmogenic. It is unknown whether sympathetic denervation occurs in humans. The purpose of this study was to use iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiolabeled guanethidine analog that is actively taken up by sympathetic nerve terminals, to image noninvasively the cardiac sympathetic nerves in patients with and without ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction. Results showed that 10 of 12 patients with spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias after myocardial infarction exhibited regions of thallium-201 uptake indicating viable perfused myocardium, with no MIBG uptake. Such a finding is consistent with sympathetic denervation. One patient had frequent episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia induced at exercise testing that was eliminated by beta-adrenoceptor blockade. Eleven of the 12 patients had ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study and metoprolol never prevented induction. Sympathetic denervation was also detected in two of seven postinfarction patients without ventricular arrhythmias. Normal control subjects had no regions lacking MIBG uptake. This study provides evidence that regional sympathetic denervation occurs in humans after myocardial infarction and can be detected noninvasively by comparing MIBG and thallium-201 images. Although the presence of sympathetic denervation may be related to the onset of spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias in some patients, it does not appear to be related to sustained ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study.

  8. Common vampire bat attacks on humans in a village of the Amazon region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Maria Cristina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people in Amazonian communities have reported bat bites in the last decade. Bites by vampire bats can potentially transmit rabies to humans. The objective of this study was to analyze factors associated with bat biting in one of these communities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a village of gold miners in the Amazonian region of Brazil (160 inhabitants. Bats were captured near people's houses and sent to a lab. Of 129 people interviewed, 41% had been attacked by a bat at least once, with 92% of the bites located on the lower limbs. A logistic regression found that adults were bitten around four times more often than children (OR = 3.75, CI 95%: 1.46-9.62, p = 0.036. Males were bitten more frequently than females (OR = 2.08, CI 95%: 0.90-4.76, p = 0.067. Nine Desmodus rotundus and three frugivorous bats were captured and tested negative for rabies. The study suggests that, in an area of gold miners, common vampire bats are more likely to attack adults and males. The control strategy for human rabies developed in this region should therefore place special emphasis on adult males. There should also be more research on how the search for gold in the Amazonian region places people and the environment at risk.

  9. The Northern Bolivian Altiplano: a region highly endemic for human fascioliasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Coma, S; Anglés, R; Esteban, J G; Bargues, M D; Buchon, P; Franken, M; Strauss, W

    1999-06-01

    The worldwide importance of human infection by Fasciola hepatica has been recognized in recent years. The endemic region between Lake Titicaca and the valley of La Paz, Bolivia, at 3800-4100 m altitude, presents the highest prevalences and intensities recorded. Large geographical studies involving Lymnaea truncatula snails (malacological, physico-chemical, and botanic studies of 59, 28 and 30 water bodies, respectively, inhabited by lymnaeids; environmental mean temperature studies covering a 40-year period), livestock (5491 cattle) and human coprological surveys (2723 subjects, 2521 of whom were school children) were conducted during 1991-97 to establish the boundaries and distributional characteristics of this endemic Northern Altiplano region. The endemic area covers part of the Los Andes, Ingavi, Omasuyos and Murillo provinces of the La Paz Department. The human endemic zone is stable, isolated and apparently fixed in its present outline, the boundaries being marked by geographical, climatic and soil-water chemical characteristics. The parasite distribution is irregular in the endemic area, the transmission foci being patchily distributed and linked to the presence of appropriate water bodies. Prevalences in school children are related to snail population distribution and extent. Altiplanic lymnaeids mainly inhabit permanent water bodies, which enables parasite transmission during the whole year. A confluence of several factors mitigates the negative effects of the high altitude.

  10. A Compendium of Chromatin Contact Maps Reveals Spatially Active Regions in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anthony D; Hu, Ming; Jung, Inkyung; Xu, Zheng; Qiu, Yunjiang; Tan, Catherine L; Li, Yun; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Barr, Cathy L; Ren, Bing

    2016-11-15

    The three-dimensional configuration of DNA is integral to all nuclear processes in eukaryotes, yet our knowledge of the chromosome architecture is still limited. Genome-wide chromosome conformation capture studies have uncovered features of chromatin organization in cultured cells, but genome architecture in human tissues has yet to be explored. Here, we report the most comprehensive survey to date of chromatin organization in human tissues. Through integrative analysis of chromatin contact maps in 21 primary human tissues and cell types, we find topologically associating domains highly conserved in different tissues. We also discover genomic regions that exhibit unusually high levels of local chromatin interactions. These frequently interacting regions (FIREs) are enriched for super-enhancers and are near tissue-specifically expressed genes. They display strong tissue-specificity in local chromatin interactions. Additionally, FIRE formation is partially dependent on CTCF and the Cohesin complex. We further show that FIREs can help annotate the function of non-coding sequence variants. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HUMAN CAPITAL OF THE REGIONS-DRIVEN FACTOR FOR GROWTH AND EMPLOYMENT.THE CASE OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Neagu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The world is entering a new era - a time when economic wealth is created by knowledgeand skills and the human capital of nations, regions and cities will determine the winnersfrom the loosers. The paper is focused on the human capital’s performance of the romanianregions, measured by economic growth and employment, analysing statistical data fromeuropean sources. There are differences between regions regarding the human capitalendowment, employment and economic growth. The assumption of a positive correlationbetween these variables is partially confirmed. Further researches are needed to measure theimpact of other factors such as: human migration or attractivity of regions. Designing anddeveloping regional human capital strategies would be a good starting point for a positiveperspective of the Europe 2020 strategy implementation.

  12. Structured RNAs in the ENCODE selected regions of the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Washietl, Stefan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Korbel, Jan O

    2007-01-01

    characteristic signals in primary sequence, comparative approaches evaluating evolutionary conservation of structures are most promising. We have used three recently introduced programs based on either phylogenetic-stochastic context-free grammar (EvoFold) or energy directed folding (RNAz and AlifoldZ), yielding......Functional RNA structures play an important role both in the context of noncoding RNA transcripts as well as regulatory elements in mRNAs. Here we present a computational study to detect functional RNA structures within the ENCODE regions of the human genome. Since structural RNAs in general lack...... and EvoFold, and an additional 239 RNAz or EvoFold predictions are supported by the (more stringent) AlifoldZ algorithm. Five hundred seventy RNAz structure predictions fall into regions that show signs of selection pressure also on the sequence level (i.e., conserved elements). More than 700 predictions...

  13. Characterization of a gene from the EDM1-PSACH region of human chromosome 19p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, G.G.; Giorgi, D.; Martin, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage mapping has indicated that both multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a skeletal disorder associated with dwarfism, map to a 2-3 Mb region of human chromosome 19p. We have isolated a partial cDNA from this region using hybrid selection, and report on progress towards the characterization of the genomic structure and transcription of the corresponding gene. Sequence analysis of the cDNA to date indicates that this gene is likely to be expressed within extracellular matrix tissues. Defects in this gene or neighboring gene family members may therefore lead to EDM1, PSACH, or other connective tissue and skeletal disorders.

  14. Stem cells expanded from the human embryonic hindbrain stably retain regional specification and high neurogenic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Jignesh; Kittappa, Raja; Leto, Ketty; Gates, Monte; Borel, Melodie; Paulsen, Ole; Spitzer, Sonia; Karadottir, Ragnhildur Thora; Rossi, Ferdinando; Falk, Anna; Smith, Austin

    2013-07-24

    Stem cell lines that faithfully maintain the regional identity and developmental potency of progenitors in the human brain would create new opportunities in developmental neurobiology and provide a resource for generating specialized human neurons. However, to date, neural progenitor cultures derived from the human brain have either been short-lived or exhibit restricted, predominantly glial, differentiation capacity. Pluripotent stem cells are an alternative source, but to ascertain definitively the identity and fidelity of cell types generated solely in vitro is problematic. Here, we show that hindbrain neuroepithelial stem (hbNES) cells can be derived and massively expanded from early human embryos (week 5-7, Carnegie stage 15-17). These cell lines are propagated in adherent culture in the presence of EGF and FGF2 and retain progenitor characteristics, including SOX1 expression, formation of rosette-like structures, and high neurogenic capacity. They generate GABAergic, glutamatergic and, at lower frequency, serotonergic neurons. Importantly, hbNES cells stably maintain hindbrain specification and generate upper rhombic lip derivatives on exposure to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). When grafted into neonatal rat brain, they show potential for integration into cerebellar development and produce cerebellar granule-like cells, albeit at low frequency. hbNES cells offer a new system to study human cerebellar specification and development and to model diseases of the hindbrain. They also provide a benchmark for the production of similar long-term neuroepithelial-like stem cells (lt-NES) from pluripotent cell lines. To our knowledge, hbNES cells are the first demonstration of highly expandable neuroepithelial stem cells derived from the human embryo without genetic immortalization.

  15. Stoichiometry and heterogeneity of the pro-region chain in tetrameric human cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigić, B; Krizaj, I; Kralj, B; Turk, V; Pain, R H

    1998-01-15

    The subunit structure and composition of mature human cathepsin C, an oligomeric cysteine proteinase, has been characterised in detail. The heavy chain, light chain and pro-region peptides are shown to be held together solely by non-covalent interactions, and to be present in equimolar ratio, suggesting an important structural role for the residual pro-region chain which is strongly bound to the enzyme. The mass of the light chain, as determined by mass spectrometry, combined with its N-terminal sequence, determines the position of cleavage from the heavy chain. Amino-acid sequencing has led to definition of the 13.5 kDa N-terminal part of the pro-region which remains in the mature enzyme, the C-terminal moiety of 10 kDa being cleaved out and lost from the pro-peptide on activation. The residual pro-region is heterogeneous, a proportion being intact and the remainder being cleaved at alternative positions 58 or 61, yielding two smaller peptides joined by disulphide bond. The proportion of cleaved form was found to vary with tissue and enzyme preparation but did not affect enzyme activity. The molecular masses of the constituent chains after deglycosylation lead to a protein mass of 158 kDa. All four potential glycosylation sites are glycosylated.

  16. 4DCT-based assessment of regional airflow distribution in healthy human lungs during tidal breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Jahani, Nariman; Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of regional airflow distribution in healthy human lungs are studied with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) quantitative imaging of four subjects. During the scanning session, subjects continuously breathed with tidal volumes controlled by the dual piston system. For each subject, 10 instantaneous volumetric image data sets (5 inspiratory and 5 expiratory phases) were reconstructed. A mass-preserving image registration was then applied to pairs of these image data to construct a breathing lung model. Regional distributions of local flow rate fractions are computed from time-varying local air volumes. The 4DCT registration-based method provides the link between local and global air volumes of the lung, allowing derivation of time-varying regional flow rates during the tidal breathing for computational fluid dynamics analysis. The local flow rate fraction remains greater in the lower lobes than in the upper lobes, being qualitatively consistent with those derived from three static CT (3SCT) images (Yin et al. JCP 2013). However, unlike 3SCT, the 4DCT data exhibit lung hysteresis between inspiration and expiration, providing more sensitive measures of regional ventilation and lung mechanics. NIH Grants U01-HL114494, R01-HL094315 and S10-RR022421.

  17. Expanding the spectrum of human ganglionic eminence region anomalies on fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Righini, Andrea; Parazzini, Cecilia; Izzo, Giana [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Cesaretti, Claudia [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Medical Genetics Unit, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Conte, Giorgio [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); Frassoni, Carolina; Inverardi, Francesca [Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Istituto Neurologico ' ' C. Besta' ' , Clinical Epileptology and Experimental Neurophysiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Bulfamante, Gaetano; Avagliano, Laura [San Paolo Hospital, Division of Human Pathology, Milan (Italy); Rustico, Mariangela [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Prenatal Diagnosis, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Ganglionic eminence (GE) is a transient fetal brain structure that harvests a significant amount of precursors of cortical GABA-ergic interneurons. Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of GE anomalies (i.e., cavitations) have already been reported associated with severe micro-lissencephaly. The purpose of this report was to illustrate the MR imaging features of GE anomalies in conditions other than severe micro-lissencephalies. Among all the fetuses submitted to prenatal MR imaging at our center from 2005 to 2014, we collected eight cases with GE anomalies and only limited associated brain anomalies. The median gestational age at the time of MR imaging was 21 weeks ranging from 19 to 29 weeks. Two senior pediatric neuroradiologists categorized the anomalies of the GE region in two groups: group one showing cavitation in the GE region and group two showing enlarged GE region. For each fetal case, associated cranial anomalies were also reported. Five out of the eight cases were included in group one and three in group two. Besides the GE region abnormality, all eight cases had additional intracranial anomalies, such as mild partial callosal agenesis, vermian hypoplasia and rotation, cerebellar hypoplasia, ventriculomegaly, enlarged subarachnoid spaces, molar tooth malformation. Ultrasound generally detected most of the associated intracranial anomalies, prompting the MR investigation; on the contrary in none of the cases, GE anomalies had been detected by ultrasound. Our observation expands the spectrum of human GE anomalies, demonstrating that these may take place also without associated severe micro-lissencephalies. (orig.)

  18. Mapping and characterization of non-HLA multigene assemblages in the human MHC class I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venditti, C.P.; Harris, J.M.; Geraghty, D.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I region has been shown to be associated with a variety of immune and nonimmune disorders. In an effort to initiate steps designed to identify the idiopathic hemochromatosis disease gene (HFE), the authors have cloned and mapped two expressed messages using probes from the HLA-H subregion that lie immediately distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint. Although the cDNA clones identify distinct multifragment families that are dispersed throughout the MHC, the gene sequences from which the two cDNA clones derive map centromeric to the HLA-B locus and are absent from the genomes of higher nonhuman primates. This suggests that a syntenic coding segment arose within a highly polymorphic region (TNF to HLA-B interval) as the result of an insertion event following the emergence of Homo sapiens. An additional syntenic cluster exists within a peak of linkage disequilibrium with the HFE gene and may define coding sequences that underlie the defect in genetic iron overload. These data generally support the concept that the class I region is potentially gene-rich and further highlight the possibility that these new coding sequences may play a role in the development of a variety of HLA-linked diseases. The observations presented suggest that interlocus exchanges have played a structural role in the genesis of the human class I region. 46 refs., 6 refs.

  19. Regional differences in gene expression and promoter usage in aged human brains

    KAUST Repository

    Pardo, Luba M.

    2013-02-19

    To characterize the promoterome of caudate and putamen regions (striatum), frontal and temporal cortices, and hippocampi from aged human brains, we used high-throughput cap analysis of gene expression to profile the transcription start sites and to quantify the differences in gene expression across the 5 brain regions. We also analyzed the extent to which methylation influenced the observed expression profiles. We sequenced more than 71 million cap analysis of gene expression tags corresponding to 70,202 promoter regions and 16,888 genes. More than 7000 transcripts were differentially expressed, mainly because of differential alternative promoter usage. Unexpectedly, 7% of differentially expressed genes were neurodevelopmental transcription factors. Functional pathway analysis on the differentially expressed genes revealed an overrepresentation of several signaling pathways (e.g., fibroblast growth factor and wnt signaling) in hippocampus and striatum. We also found that although 73% of methylation signals mapped within genes, the influence of methylation on the expression profile was small. Our study underscores alternative promoter usage as an important mechanism for determining the regional differences in gene expression at old age.

  20. Characterization of intracellular regions in the human serotonin transporter for phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    /dephosphorylation during transporter regulation by multiple pathways. In particular, activation and/or inhibition of kinases including PKC, PKG, p38MAPK, and CaMKII modulate SERT function and trafficking. The molecular mechanisms by which kinase activity is linked to SERT regulation are poorly understood, including...... the identity of specific phosphorylated residues. To elucidate SERT phosphorylation sites, we have generated peptides corresponding to the entire intracellular region of human SERT and performed in vitro phosphorylation assays with a panel of kinases suggested to be involved in SERT regulation or for which...

  1. Stable RNA hairpins in 88 coding regions of human mRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Min; WANG Chuanming; LIU Ciquan

    2004-01-01

    RNA hairpins containing UNCG, GNRA, CUUG (N=A, U, C or G, R=G or A) loops are unusually thermodynamic stable and conserved structures. The structural features of these hairpin loops are very special, and they play very important roles in vivo. They are prevalent in rRNA, catalytic RNA and non-coding mRNA. However, the 5′ C(UUCG)G 3′ hairpin is not found in the folding structure of 88 human mRNA coding regions. It is also different from rRNA in that there is no preference for certain sequences among tetraloops in these 88 mRNA folding structures.

  2. IMPACT OF ECONOMIC GLOBALIZATION ON THE HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN THE GREATER MEKONG SUB-REGION COUNTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Peerapeng, Suk-Rutai; Chaitip, Prasert; Chaiboonsri, Chukiat; Kovacs, Sandor; Balogh, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of economic globalization on the human trafficking inflows into the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) countries. The paper empirically tests for a cross-section of six countries, including Cambodia, the Yunnan Province of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PRD), Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam. Employing the Pooled OLS estimator, as the theory predicts, the economic globalization increases trafficking inflow into the GMS...

  3. Human regional cerebral glucose metabolism during non-rapid eye movement sleep in relation to waking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Miewald, Jean M; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Sembrat, Robert C; Ombao, Hernando; Reynolds, Charles F; Monk, Timothy H; Hall, Martica; Kupfer, David J; Moore, Robert Y

    2002-05-01

    Sleep is an essential human function. Although the function of sleep has generally been regarded to be restorative, recent data indicate that it also plays an important role in cognition. The neurobiology of human sleep is most effectively analysed with functional imaging, and PET studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. In this study, PET was used to determine patterns of regional glucose metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking. We hypothesized that brain structures related to waking cognitive function would show a persistence of function into the NREM sleep state. Fourteen healthy subjects (age range 21-49 years; 10 women, 4 men) underwent concurrent EEG sleep studies and [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET scans during waking and NREM sleep. Whole-brain glucose metabolism declined significantly from waking to NREM sleep. Relative decreases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM sleep occurred in wide areas of frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital association cortex, primary visual cortex, and in anterior/dorsomedial thalamus. After controlling for the whole-brain declines in absolute metabolism, relative increases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM were found bilaterally in the dorsal pontine tegmentum, hypothalamus, basal forebrain, ventral striatum, anterior cingulate cortex and extensive regions of the mesial temporal lobe, including the amygdala and hippocampus, and in the right dorsal parietal association cortex and primary somatosensory and motor cortices. The reductions in relative metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking are consistent with prior findings from blood flow studies. The relative increases in glucose utilization in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, ventral striatum, amygdala, hippocampus and pontine reticular formation are new observations that are in accordance with the view that NREM sleep is important to brain

  4. Brain regions involved in human movement perception: a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Beaton, Susan; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-02-01

    Face, hands, and body movements are powerful signals essential for social interactions. In the last 2 decades, a large number of brain imaging studies have explored the neural correlates of the perception of these signals. Formal synthesis is crucially needed, however, to extract the key circuits involved in human motion perception across the variety of paradigms and stimuli that have been used. Here, we used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis approach with random effect analysis. We performed meta-analyses on three classes of biological motion: movement of the whole body, hands, and face. Additional analyses of studies of static faces or body stimuli and sub-analyses grouping experiments as a function of their control stimuli or task employed allowed us to identify main effects of movements and forms perception, as well as effects of task demand. In addition to specific features, all conditions showed convergence in occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal regions, but with different peak location and extent. The conjunction of the three ALE maps revealed convergence in all categories in a region of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus as well as in a bilateral region at the junction between middle temporal and lateral occipital gyri. Activation in these regions was not a function of attentional demand and was significant also when controlling for non-specific motion perception. This quantitative synthesis points towards a special role for posterior superior temporal sulcus for integrating human movement percept, and supports a specific representation for body parts in middle temporal, fusiform, precentral, and parietal areas.

  5. Humanized Tau Mice with Regionalized Amyloid Exhibit Behavioral Deficits but No Pathological Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetman, Michael J.; Fowler, Stephanie W.; Jankowsky, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) researchers have struggled for decades to draw a causal link between extracellular Aβ aggregation and intraneuronal accumulation of microtubule-associated protein tau. The amyloid cascade hypothesis posits that Aβ deposition promotes tau hyperphosphorylation, tangle formation, cell loss, vascular damage, and dementia. While the genetics of familial AD and the pathological staging of sporadic disease support this sequence of events, attempts to examine the molecular mechanism in transgenic animal models have largely relied on models of other inherited tauopathies as the basis for testing the interaction with Aβ. In an effort to more accurately model the relationship between Aβ and wild-type tau in AD, we intercrossed mice that overproduce human Aβ with a tau substitution model in which all 6 isoforms of the human protein are expressed in animals lacking murine tau. We selected an amyloid model in which pathology was biased towards the entorhinal region so that we could further examine whether the anticipated changes in tau phosphorylation occurred at the site of Aβ deposition or in synaptically connected regions. We found that Aβ and tau had independent effects on locomotion, learning, and memory, but found no behavioral evidence for an interaction between the two transgenes. Moreover, we saw no indication of amyloid-induced changes in the phosphorylation or aggregation of human tau either within the entorhinal area or elsewhere. These findings suggest that robust amyloid pathology within the medial temporal lobe has little effect on the metabolism of wild type human tau in this model. PMID:27070146

  6. A map of nuclear matrix attachment regions within the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey A.; Akopov, Sergey B.; Chernov, Igor P.

    2007-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that the DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized into loop domains that represent basic structural and functional units of chromatin packaging. To explore the DNA domain organization of the breast cancer loss-of-heterozygosity region on human chromosome 16q22.1, we have...... identified a significant portion of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) within this region. Forty independent putative S/MAR elements were assigned within the 16q22.1 locus. More than 90% of these S/MARs are AT rich, with GC contents as low as 27% in 2 cases. Thirty-nine (98%) of the S...

  7. Regional differentiation of retinoic acid-induced human pluripotent embryonic carcinoma stem cell neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis E Coyle

    Full Text Available The NTERA2 cl D1 (NT2 cell line, derived from human teratocarcinoma, exhibits similar properties as embryonic stem (ES cells or very early neuroepithelial progenitors. NT2 cells can be induced to become postmitotic central nervous system neurons (NT2N with retinoic acid. Although neurons derived from pluripotent cells, such as NT2N, have been characterized for their neurotransmitter phenotypes, their potential suitability as a donor source for neural transplantation also depends on their ability to respond to localized environmental cues from a specific region of the CNS. Therefore, our study aimed to characterize the regional transcription factors that define the rostocaudal and dorsoventral identity of NT2N derived from a monolayer differentiation paradigm using quantitative PCR (qPCR. Purified NT2N mainly expressed both GABAergic and glutamatergic phenotypes and were electrically active but did not form functional synapses. The presence of immature astrocytes and possible radial glial cells was noted. The NT2N expressed a regional transcription factor code consistent with forebrain, hindbrain and spinal cord neural progenitors but showed minimal expression of midbrain phenotypes. In the dorsoventral plane NT2N expressed both dorsal and ventral neural progenitors. Of major interest was that even under the influence of retinoic acid, a known caudalization factor, the NT2N population maintained a rostral phenotype subpopulation which expressed cortical regional transcription factors. It is proposed that understanding the regional differentiation bias of neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells will facilitate their successful integration into existing neuronal networks within the CNS.

  8. Regional mechanical properties of human brain tissue for computational models of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, John D; Sundaresh, Sowmya N; Elkin, Benjamin S; McKhann, Guy M; Morrison, Barclay

    2017-06-01

    To determine viscoelastic shear moduli, stress relaxation indentation tests were performed on samples of human brain tissue resected in the course of epilepsy surgery. Through the use of a 500µm diameter indenter, regional mechanical properties were measured in cortical grey and white matter and subregions of the hippocampus. All regions were highly viscoelastic. Cortical grey matter was significantly more compliant than the white matter or hippocampus which were similar in modulus. Although shear modulus was not correlated with the age of the donor, cortex from male donors was significantly stiffer than from female donors. The presented material properties will help to populate finite element models of the brain as they become more anatomically detailed. We present the first mechanical characterization of fresh, post-operative human brain tissue using an indentation loading mode. Indentation generates highly localized data, allowing structure-specific mechanical properties to be determined from small tissue samples resected during surgery. It also avoids pitfalls of cadaveric tissue and allows data to be collected before degenerative processes alter mechanical properties. To correctly predict traumatic brain injury, finite element models must calculate intracranial deformation during head impact. The functional consequences of injury depend on the anatomical structures injured. Therefore, morbidity depends on the distribution of deformation across structures. Accurate prediction of structure-specific deformation requires structure-specific mechanical properties. This data will facilitate deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms that lead to traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bone dosimetry using synthetic images to represent trabecular bones of five regions of the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, Jose de M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W. [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (POLI). Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Vanildo J. de M., E-mail: vjr@ufpe.br [Departamento de Anatomia. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Lindeval F., E-mail: lindeval@dmat.ufrr.br [Departamento de Matematica (DMAT). Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/NE-CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wagner E. de [Departamento de Energia Nuclear (DEN). Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    One of the greatest challenges in numerical dosimetry of ionizing radiation is to estimate the absorbed dose by bone tissue in the human body. The bone tissues of greater radiosensitivity are the red bone marrow (RBM), that consist of the hematopoietic cells, located within the trabecular bones, and the bone surface cells (BSC), called osteogenic cells. The report 70 of the ICRP lists five spongiosa regions with their respective volume percent of trabecular bone: ribs (also contemplating the clavicles and sternum), spine, long bones, pelvis and skull (also contemplating mandible). The Grupo de Pesquisa em Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq) has been built exposure computational models (ECMs) based on voxel phantoms and EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. To estimate the energy deposited in the RBM and in the BSC of a phantom, the GDN/CNPq has used a method based on micro-CT images of the five trabecular regions mentioned above. These images were provided by other research institutes and were obtained from scan of bone samples of adult. Here is the greatest difficulty in reproducing this method: besides the need for bone images of real people with micrometer resolution, the distribution of bone marrow in the human body, according to ICRP 70, varies with age. This article presents some proposals of the GDN/CNPQ for replacing in the ECMs the micro-CT images by images synthesized by the computer, based on Monte Carlo sampling. (author)

  10. No increase in female recombination frequency in the distal part of the human pseudoautosomal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergnaud, G. [Institut de Biologie, Nantes (France)

    1994-12-01

    In human, the genetic map is larger in female than in male. However, for unknown reasons, a reversed situation is observed toward at least some telomeres, where recombination in males can be 10-fold that observed in females. Henke et al. report that male and female recombination rates are equal in the very distal part of the human pseudoautosomal region (PAR), thus suggesting that the telomeric excess of male recombination, when observed, may not exist right to the tip of chromosomes. Such an observation is of importance for the genetic mapping of chromosome ends, for both practical and biological reasons. Thus, I have examined in detail our own data for this region and failed to confirm the previous report. I will explain here the origin of the discrepancy, in the CEPH family K1333 presented in detail in the Henke et al. report, which accounts for half (3/6) of the maternal recombination events detected in the most distal interval of the PAR. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Human Papillomavirus Cervical Infection and Associated Risk Factors in a Region of Argentina With a High Incidence of Cervical Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Tonon

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence and potential risk factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV cervical infection among women residing in a region of northeastern Argentina with a high incidence of cervical cancer.

  12. Regional differences in islet distribution in the human pancreas--preferential beta-cell loss in the head region in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Wang

    Full Text Available While regional heterogeneity in islet distribution has been well studied in rodents, less is known about human pancreatic histology. To fill gaps in our understanding, regional differences in the adult human pancreas were quantitatively analyzed including the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Cadaveric pancreas specimens were collected from the head, body and tail regions of each donor, including subjects with no history of diabetes or pancreatic diseases (n = 23 as well as patients with T2D (n = 12. The study further included individuals from whom islets were isolated (n = 7 to study islet yield and function in a clinical setting of islet transplantation. The whole pancreatic sections were examined using an innovative large-scale image capture and unbiased detailed quantitative analyses of the characteristics of islets from each individual (architecture, size, shape and distribution. Islet distribution/density is similar between the head and body regions, but is >2-fold higher in the tail region. In contrast to rodents, islet cellular composition and architecture were similar throughout the pancreas and there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islets isolated from different regions of the pancreas. Further studies revealed preferential loss of large islets in the head region in patients with T2D. The present study has demonstrated distinct characteristics of the human pancreas, which should provide a baseline for the future studies integrating existing research in the field and helping to advance bi-directional research between humans and preclinical models.

  13. Echinococcus granulosus infection in humans and livestock in the Coquimbo region, north-central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Cleaveland, Sarah; Cunningham, Andrew A; Bronsvoort, Barend M deC; Craig, Philip S

    2010-04-19

    Cyst echinococcosis (CE) is one of the most important zoonosis in Chile, where studies have focussed mainly in moist southern regions. The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in livestock and humans in the semiarid Coquimbo region in north-central Chile. A review of all surgical cases of CE in humans reported in the Elqui, Limarí and Choapa provinces in Coquimbo region for the period comprising 1995-2006 was obtained. In addition, a retrospective study of CE covering condemnation records from slaughterhouses of these provinces from the same period was carried out. The surgical incidence of CE in humans ranged between 2.3 and 8.5 cases per 10(5) people, with more cases reported in provinces with a higher percentage of rural inhabitants (Limarí and Choapa). A total of 174,034 cattle, 22,208 goats, 35,404 sheep, 25,355 swine and 9391 equines were examined during the period. Higher prevalence of CE was detected in cattle (24%), followed by swine (14%), sheep (11%), goats (6%), and equines (9%). More cases of CE in livestock were also found in provinces with higher rural population. The overall trend of the prevalence of CE for each livestock species across years was a significant downward one, except for swine in Elqui and sheep and swine in Choapa. Cattle showed higher prevalence of CE in liver in Elqui, in kidney in Limarí and in lungs in Choapa. Swine showed similar prevalence by organs in all provinces. Sheep showed higher prevalence of CE in liver in Elqui and Limarí and lower prevalence in Choapa. Goats presented higher prevalence of CE in kidney in all provinces, and equines had higher prevalence of CE in liver in the provinces where animals were slaughtered. Further studied are needed to assess whether these differences are due to different strains affecting these species or due to ecological factors. When analyzing the CE prevalence of each species within each province, a negative correlation between

  14. Assessing the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Climate change and human activities are driving forces of sandy desertification and the relative role of them in sandy desertification is the hot point in related researches. A study was carried to assess the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region in China. Potential NPP and the difference between potential and actual NPP were selected as indicators to assess the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification, respectively. Assessing methods were built based on some scenarios for the reversion and expansion of sandy desertification and the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region were assessed from 1981 to 2000. The results showed that although some local places experienced an expansion of sandy desertification, the change of sandy desertification of Ordos region from 1981 to 2000 showed a stably reversing trend. The relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region varied at different temporal and spatial scales in the reversion and expansion processes. In the reversion of sandy desertification, climate change was the dominant factor in the period of 1981 to 1990 and the reversed areas mainly induced by climate change including Mu Us sandy land and the transition zone between temperate steppe and temperate deciduous scrubs in north east of Ordos region; however, human activities controlled the reversed process during the period from 1991 to 2000 and the areas mainly induced by human activities distributed in all banners of Ordos region. In the expansion of sandy desertification, human activities were the dominant factor in the period of 1981 to 1990 and the expanded areas mainly included the regions around common boundary of Hanggin, Dalad Banners and Dongsheng City; however, climate change dominated the expansion of sandy desertification from 1991 to 2000, the expanded areas equably

  15. Hinge-Region O-Glycosylation of Human Immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, Rosina; Dekkers, Gillian; Rombouts, Yoann; Visser, Remco; Koeleman, Carolien A.M.; Kammeijer, Guinevere S.M.; Jansen, Bas C.; Rispens, Theo; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Vidarsson, Gestur; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is one of the most abundant proteins present in human serum and a fundamental component of the immune system. IgG3 represents ∼8% of the total amount of IgG in human serum and stands out from the other IgG subclasses because of its elongated hinge region and enhanced effector functions. This study reports partial O-glycosylation of the IgG3 hinge region, observed with nanoLC-ESI-IT-MS(/MS) analysis after proteolytic digestion. The repeat regions within the IgG3 hinge were found to be in part O-glycosylated at the threonine in the triple repeat motif. Non-, mono- and disialylated core 1-type O-glycans were detected in various IgG3 samples, both poly- and monoclonal. NanoLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS with electron transfer dissociation fragmentation and CE-MS/MS with CID fragmentation were used to determine the site of IgG3 O-glycosylation. The O-glycosylation site was further confirmed by the recombinant production of mutant IgG3 in which potential O-glycosylation sites had been knocked out. For IgG3 samples from six donors we found similar O-glycan structures and site occupancies, whereas for the same samples the conserved N-glycosylation of the Fc CH2 domain showed considerable interindividual variation. The occupancy of each of the three O-glycosylation sites was found to be ∼10% in six serum-derived IgG3 samples and ∼13% in two monoclonal IgG3 allotypes. PMID:25759508

  16. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: importance for pharmaceutical drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Both the development and regulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms have undergone significant improvements and development over the past 25 years, due primarily to the extensive application of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System, which was published in 2005, has also been a useful resource for predicting the influence of transporters in several pharmacokinetic processes. However, there remains a need for the pharmaceutical industry to develop reliable in vitro/in vivo correlations and in silico methods for predicting the rate and extent of complex gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, the bioavailability, and the plasma concentration-time curves for orally administered drug products. Accordingly, a more rational approach is required, one in which high quality in vitro or in silico characterizations of active pharmaceutical ingredients and formulations are integrated into physiologically based in silico biopharmaceutics models to capture the full complexity of GI drug absorption. The need for better understanding of the in vivo GI process has recently become evident after an unsuccessful attempt to predict the GI absorption of BCS class II and IV drugs. Reliable data on the in vivo permeability of the human intestine (Peff) from various intestinal regions is recognized as one of the key biopharmaceutical requirements when developing in silico GI biopharmaceutics models with improved predictive accuracy. The Peff values for human jejunum and ileum, based on historical open, single-pass, perfusion studies are presented in this review. The main objective of this review is to summarize and discuss the relevance and current status of these human in vivo regional intestinal permeability values.

  17. Background field removal using a region adaptive kernel for quantitative susceptibility mapping of human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jinsheng; Bao, Lijun; Li, Xu; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Chen, Zhong

    2017-08-01

    Background field removal is an important MR phase preprocessing step for quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). It separates the local field induced by tissue magnetic susceptibility sources from the background field generated by sources outside a region of interest, e.g. brain, such as air-tissue interface. In the vicinity of air-tissue boundary, e.g. skull and paranasal sinuses, where large susceptibility variations exist, present background field removal methods are usually insufficient and these regions often need to be excluded by brain mask erosion at the expense of losing information of local field and thus susceptibility measures in these regions. In this paper, we propose an extension to the variable-kernel sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data (V-SHARP) background field removal method using a region adaptive kernel (R-SHARP), in which a scalable spherical Gaussian kernel (SGK) is employed with its kernel radius and weights adjustable according to an energy ;functional; reflecting the magnitude of field variation. Such an energy functional is defined in terms of a contour and two fitting functions incorporating regularization terms, from which a curve evolution model in level set formation is derived for energy minimization. We utilize it to detect regions of with a large field gradient caused by strong susceptibility variation. In such regions, the SGK will have a small radius and high weight at the sphere center in a manner adaptive to the voxel energy of the field perturbation. Using the proposed method, the background field generated from external sources can be effectively removed to get a more accurate estimation of the local field and thus of the QSM dipole inversion to map local tissue susceptibility sources. Numerical simulation, phantom and in vivo human brain data demonstrate improved performance of R-SHARP compared to V-SHARP and RESHARP (regularization enabled SHARP) methods, even when the whole paranasal sinus regions

  18. Physical Characterization of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Larionov, Ph D

    2007-06-05

    A special interest in the organization of human centromeric DNA was stimulated a few years ago when two independent groups succeeded in reconstituting a functional human centromere, using constructs carrying centromere-specific alphoid DNA arrays. This work demonstrated the importance of DNA components in mammalian centromeres and opened a way for studying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation and for construction of human artificial chromosomes (HACs) with therapeutic potential. To elucidate the structural requirements for formation of HACs with a functional kinetochore, we developed a new method for cloning of large DNA fragments for human centromeric regions that can be used as a substrate for HAC formation. This method exploits in vivo recombination in yeast (TAR cloning). In addition, a new strategy for the construction of alphoid DNA arrays was developed in our lab. The strategy involves the construction of uniform or hybrid synthetic alphoid DNA arrays by the RCA-TAR technique. This technique comprises two steps: rolling circle amplification of an alphoid DNA dimer and subsequent assembling of the amplified fragments by in vivo homologous recombination in yeast (Figure 1). Using this system, we constructed a set of different synthetic alphoid DNA arrays with a predetermined sequence varying in size from 30 to 140 kb and demonstrated that some of the arrays are competent in HAC formation. Because any nucleotide can be changed in a dimer before its amplification, this new technique is optimal for identifying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation in HACs. Moreover, the technique makes possible to introduce into alphoid DNA arrays recognition sites for DNA-binding proteins. We have made the following progress on the studying of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology: i) minimal size of alphoid DNA array required for de novo kinetochore formation was estimated; ii

  19. Distinct representations of configural and part information across multiple face- selective regions of the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golijeh eGolarai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Several regions of the human brain respond more strongly to faces than to other visual stimuli, such as regions in the amygdala (AMG, superior temporal sulcus (STS, and the fusiform face area (FFA. It is unclear if these brain regions are similar in representing the configuration or natural appearance of face parts. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of healthy adults who viewed natural or schematic faces with internal parts that were either normally configured or randomly rearranged. Response amplitudes were reduced in the AMG and STS when subjects viewed stimuli whose configuration of parts were digitally rearranged, suggesting representation of the 1st order configuration of face parts. In contrast, response amplitudes in the FFA showed little modulation whether face parts were rearranged or if the natural face parts were replaced with lines. Instead, FFA responses were reduced only when both configural and part information were reduced, revealing an interaction between these factors, suggesting distinct representation of 1st order face configuration and parts in the AMG and STS vs. the FFA.

  20. Recognition by human sera of a variable region of the surface glycoprotein of HTLV-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edouard, E; Londos-Gagliardi, D; Busetta, B; Geoffre, S; Dalbon, P; Moreau, J P; Guillemain, B

    1994-04-01

    The region comprised between the amino acids 175 and 199 of the HTLV-I envelope surface glycoprotein is one of the immunodominant domains of this molecule. In this region, which is well recognized by sera from HTLV-I infected patients, a substitution of the proline at position 192 by a serine has been described in some isolates. Because this mutation could modify the secondary structure of the glycoprotein molecule, we studied the inference of the presence of proline or serine on the recognition of the region 175-199 by human sera. For this, three peptides have been synthetized (a 25-mer 175-199 corresponding to the sequence of the ATK prototype, and two internal 10-mer 190-Pro-199 and 190-Ser-199 having a proline or a serine at position 192) and tested by immunosorbent assay. While most sera reacted with 190-Pro-199 and with 190-Ser-199 synthetic peptides, a differential recognition was observed according to the pathology associated to HTLV-I infection. Moreover sera corresponding to patients infected with a virus harboring a serine at position 192 were found to recognize only the 10-mer with a serine. These data indicates that HTLV-I is subject to antigenic variability.

  1. Biomass burning in the Amazon region causes DNA damage and cell death in human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Alves, Nilmara; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Quinet, Annabel; Fortunato, Rodrigo Soares; Kajitani, Gustavo Satoru; Peixoto, Milena Simões; Hacon, Sandra de Souza; Artaxo, Paulo; Saldiva, Paulo; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia Regina

    2017-09-07

    Most of the studies on air pollution focus on emissions from fossil fuel burning in urban centers. However, approximately half of the world's population is exposed to air pollution caused by biomass burning emissions. In the Brazilian Amazon population, over 10 million people are directly exposed to high levels of pollutants resulting from deforestation and agricultural fires. This work is the first study to present an integrated view of the effects of inhalable particles present in emissions of biomass burning. Exposing human lung cells to particulate matter smaller than 10 µm (PM10), significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammatory cytokines, autophagy, and DNA damage. Continued PM10 exposure activated apoptosis and necrosis. Interestingly, retene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon present in PM10, is a potential compound for the effects of PM10, causing DNA damage and cell death. The PM10 concentrations observed during Amazon biomass burning were sufficient to induce severe adverse effects in human lung cells. Our study provides new data that will help elucidate the mechanism of PM10-mediated lung cancer development. In addition, the results of this study support the establishment of new guidelines for human health protection in regions strongly impacted by biomass burning.

  2. Regional characterization of freshwater Use in LCA: modeling direct impacts on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Anne-Marie; Bulle, Cécile; Bayart, Jean-Baptiste; Deschênes, Louise; Margni, Manuele

    2011-10-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodology that quantifies potential environmental impacts for comparative purposes in a decision-making context. While potential environmental impacts from pollutant emissions into water are characterized in LCA, impacts from water unavailability are not yet fully quantified. Water use can make the resource unavailable to other users by displacement or quality degradation. A reduction in water availability to human users can potentially affect human health. If financial resources are available, there can be adaptations that may, in turn, shift the environmental burdens to other life cycle stages and impact categories. This paper proposes a model to evaluate these potential impacts in an LCA context. It considers the water that is withdrawn and released, its quality and scarcity in order to evaluate the loss of functionality associated with water uses. Regionalized results are presented for impacts on human health for two modeling approaches regarding affected users, including or not domestic uses, and expressed in disability-adjusted life years (DALY). A consumption and quality based scarcity indicator is also proposed as a midpoint. An illustrative example is presented for the production of corrugated board with different effluents, demonstrating the importance of considering quality, process effluents and the difference between the modeling approaches.

  3. Regional livestock grazing, human demography and fire incidence in the Portuguese landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Torres-Manso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study:Wildfire incidence in Portugal is high in comparison with other Mediterranean Europe countries. Wildfire problems have been worsened by complex interactions between land use, livestock grazing and human population during the 20th century. In this study we try to understand these interactions and relationships.Area of study: Portugal country. Material and Methods: For the mainland Portuguese territory we present a statistical temporal analysis (1930-2001 based on the densities of livestock grazing and human inhabitants at the smallest administrative unit level, the parish. We compare these data with fire incidence descriptors (average area burned and average fire density between 1990 and 2007. Research highlights: We have identified clusters of parishes sharing common trends in the evolution of livestock and human inhabitant densities. A cause-effect relationship was not detected between livestock grazing density and fire incidence. However, the results point out clusters of parishes where conflicts between forest, fire and livestock grazing are important in the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal.Key Words: Livestock grazing; inhabitants; forest; fire; vegetation.

  4. A GENE FROM HUMAN-CHROMOSOME REGION-3P21 WITH REDUCED EXPRESSION IN SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CARRITT, B; KOK, K; van den Berg, Anke; OSINGA, J; PILZ, A; HOFSTRA, RMW; DAVIS, MB; VANDERVEEN, AY; RABBITTS, PH; GULATI, K; BUYS, CHCM

    1992-01-01

    A combination of cytogenetic and molecular studies has implicated the p21 region of human chromosome 3 as the probable site of a gene the loss of which contributes to the development of small cell lung cancer. We report here the isolation of a gene from this region which is expressed in normal lung

  5. Localization of the human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) gene to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkin, D.J.; Jones, C. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (United States)); Kimbro, K.S.; Taylor, M.W. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Barr, B.L.; Gupta, S.L. (Hipple Cancer Research Center, Dayton, OH (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first enzyme in the catabolic pathway for tryptophan. This extrahepatic enzyme differs from the hepatic enzyme, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), in molecular as well as enzymatic characteristics, although both enzymes catalyze the same reaction: cleavage of tryptophan into N-formylkynurenine. The induction of IDO by IFN-[gamma] plays a role in the antigrowth effect of IFN-[gamma] in cell cultures and in the inhibition of intracellular pathogens, e.g., Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci. Tryptophan is also the precursor for the synthesis of serotonin, and reduced levels of tryptophan and serotonin found in AIDS patients have been correlated with the presence of IFN-[gamma] and consequent elevation of IDO activity. The IDO enzyme has been purified and characterized, and its cDNA and genomic DNA clones have been isolated and analyzed. DNA from hybrid cells containing fragments of human chromosome 8 was used to determine the regional localization of the IDO gene on chromosome 8. The hybrids R30-5B and R30-2A contain 8p11 [yields] qter and 8q13 [yields] qter, respectively. Hybrid 229-3A contains the 8pter [yields] q11. The hybrid R30-2A was negative for the IDO gene, whereas R30-5B and 229-3A were positive as analyzed by PCR and verified by Southern blotting. Only the region close to the centromere is shared by R30-5B and 229-3A hybrids. The results indicate that the IDO gene is located on chromosome 8p11 [yields] q11.

  6. Landscape and regional environmental analysis of the spatial distribution of hantavirus human cases in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Brigitte Zeimes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Europe, the most prevalent hantavirus, Puumala virus, is transmitted by bank voles and causes nephropathia epidemica in human. The European spatial distribution of nephropathia epidemica is investigated here for the first time with a rich set of environmental variables. Methods: The influence of variables at the landscape and regional level is studied through multilevel logistic regression and further information on their effects across the different European ecoregions is obtained by comparing an overall niche model (boosted regression trees with regressions by ecoregion. Results: The presence of nephropathia epidemica is likely in populated regions with well-connected forests, more intense vegetation activity, low soil water content, mild summers and cold winters. In these regions, landscapes with a higher proportion of built-up areas in forest ecotones and lower minimum temperature in winter are expected to be more at risk. Climate and forest connectivity have a stronger effect at the regional level. If variables are staying at their current values, the models predict that nephropathia epidemica may know intensification but should not spread (although Southern Sweden, the Norwegian coast and the Netherlands should be kept under watch.Conclusions: Models indicate that large-scale modeling can lead to a very high predictive power. At large scale, the effect of one variable on disease may follow three response scenarios: the effect may be the same across the entire study area; the effect can change according to the variable value, and the effect can change depending on local specificities. Each of these scenarios impacts large-scale modeling differently.

  7. Distinct representations of configural and part information across multiple face-selective regions of the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Golijeh eGolarai; Dara eGhahremani; Eberhardt, Jennifer L.; John D E Gabrieli

    2015-01-01

    Several regions of the human brain respond more strongly to faces than to other visual stimuli, such as regions in the amygdala (AMG), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the fusiform face area (FFA). It is unclear if these brain regions are similar in representing the configuration or natural appearance of face parts. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of healthy adults who viewed natural or schematic faces with internal parts that were either normally configured or randomly rearr...

  8. Human lambda light-chain constant region gene CMor lambda: the primary structure of lambda VI Bence Jones protein Mor.

    OpenAIRE

    Frangione, B.; Moloshok, T; Prelli, F; Solomon, A

    1985-01-01

    Serologic, structural, and genetic analyses have shown that the constant (C) region of human kappa light chains is encoded by a single gene, whereas that of lambda chains is encoded by multiple genes. We have determined the complete C region amino acid sequence of two monoclonal lambda VI light chains, Bence Jones proteins Sut and Mor. The C region of lambda chains Sut and Mor consists of 105 residues, as is characteristic for human lambda light chains, of which 102 are identical in sequence....

  9. Seasonality of Campylobacter jejuni isolates associated with human campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu region, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, A; Marshall, J C; Biggs, P J; Midwinter, A C; French, N P

    2016-03-01

    A 9-year time-series of genotyped human campylobacteriosis cases from the Manawatu region of New Zealand was used to investigate strain-type seasonality. The data were collected from 2005 to 2013 and the samples were multi-locus sequence-typed (MLST). The four most prevalent clonal complexes (CCs), consisting of 1215 isolates, were CC48, CC21, CC45 and CC61. Seasonal decomposition and Poisson regression with autocorrelated errors, were used to display and test for seasonality of the most prevalent CCs. Of the four examined CCs, only CC45 showed a marked seasonal (summer) peak. The association of CC45 with summer peaks has been observed in other temperate countries, but has previously not been identified in New Zealand. This is the first in-depth study over a long time period employing MLST data to examine strain-type-associated seasonal patterns of C. jejuni infection in New Zealand.

  10. Regional differences in expression of specific markers for human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steen B; Møllgård, Kjeld; Olesen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines derived from the inner cell masses of blastocysts generally includes expression analysis of markers such as OCT4, NANOG, SSEA3, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Expression is usually detected by immunocytochemical staining of entire colonies...... staining to weak or absent NANOG staining, and vice versa. SSEA4 staining was only observed in small clusters or single cells and not confined to the TRA territory. Co-expression of all markers was only detected in small areas. SSEA1 expression was found exclusively outside the TRA territory. In conclusion......, pronounced regional differences in the expression of markers considered specific for undifferentiated hESC may suggest the existence of different cell populations....

  11. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwanodi, Oroma

    2017-09-08

    This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV) and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness.

  12. Attitudes towards Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination in the Latin American Andean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oroma Nwanodi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary explores the distribution of human papilloma virus (HPV and HPV-related diseases, and factors affecting attitudes towards HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination in the Latin American Andean region. Lack of knowledge of HPV, known negative attitudes or incorrect assumptions about HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination provide a basis upon which to develop targeted HPV awareness and preventive health media campaigns. For maximal effect, media campaigns should use the internet, radio, and television to address health care providers, parents, and students. Additional programming can be developed for clinics to use in-house with their clients. Ministries of Education, Finance, and Health all have roles to play to increase national HPV, HPV-related diseases, and HPV vaccination awareness.

  13. Human biomonitoring for metals in Italian urban adolescents: data from Latium Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Anna; Amato, Antonio; Alimonti, Alessandro; Mattei, Daniela; Bocca, Beatrice

    2012-02-01

    As a part of the activities of the first Italian human biomonitoring survey (PROBE - PROgramme for Biomonitoring general population Exposure), a reference population of adolescents, aged 13-15 years, was examined for their exposure to metals. The study included 252 adolescents living in urban areas, representative of Latium Region (Italy) and blood specimens were analyzed for metals (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Ir, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rh, Sb, Sn, Tl, U, V and W) by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results obtained will improve the knowledge about the body burden in adolescents and are tentative reference values for Italian young people as a basis for risk evaluation deriving from urban/environmental exposure to metals.

  14. Climate Change and Mortality in Vienna—A Human Biometeorological Analysis Based on Regional Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthers, Stefan; Matzarakis, Andreas; Koch, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    The potential development of heat-related mortality in the 21th century for Vienna (Austria) was assessed by the use of two regional climate models based on the IPCC emissions scenarios A1B and B1. Heat stress was described with the human-biometeorological index PET (Physiologically Equivalent Temperature). Based on the relation between heat stress and mortality in 1970–2007, we developed two approaches to estimate the increases with and without long-term adaptation. Until 2011–2040 no significant changes will take place compared to 1970–2000, but in the following decades heat-related mortality could increase up to 129% until the end of the century, if no adaptation takes place. The strongest increase occurred due to extreme heat stress (PET ≥ 41 °C). With long-term adaptation the increase is less pronounced, but still notable. This encourages the requirement for additional adaptation measurements. PMID:20717552

  15. The execution of decision of international human rights jurisdictions: towards a harmonization of regional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Lambert - Abdelgawad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article, which compares the legal monitoring procedures of the judgments of the European and Inter-American Court of Human Rights, states that these regimes were initially thought of in very diverse terms. Indeed the political approach at the European level is opposed to the judicial approach adopted by the Inter-American system. This study demonstrates how through evolution, which has already occurred in Europe but is still in preparation in America, both regional systems are moving closer together towards a mixed system (judicial and political involving several organs, at the international and national levels. Facing similar cases of noncompliance (for either technical or political reasons, both systems try to reply through non punitive measures.

  16. A paradigm for human body finite element model integration from a set of regional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A B; Gayzik, F S; Moreno, D P; Rhyne, A C; Vavalle, N A; Stitzel, J D

    2012-01-01

    Computational modeling offers versatility, scalability, and cost advantages to researchers in the trauma and injury biomechanics communities. The Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) is a group of government, industry, and academic researchers developing human body models (HBMs) that aim to become the standard tool to meet this growing research need. The objective of this study is to present the methods used to develop the average seated male occupant model (M50, weight = 78 kg, height = 175 cm) from five separately validated body region models (BRMs). BRMs include the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and a combined pelvis and lower extremity model. Modeling domains were split at the atlanto-occipital joint, C7-T1 boundary, diaphragm, abdominal cavity (peritoneum/retroperitoneum), and the acetabulum respectively. BRM meshes are based on a custom CAD model of the seated male built from a multi-modality imaging protocol of a volunteer subject found in literature.[1] Various meshing techniques were used to integrate the full body model (FBM) including 1-D beam and discrete element connections (e.g. ligamentous structures), 2D shell nodal connections (e.g. inferior vena cava to right atrium), 3D hexahedral nodal connections (e.g. soft tissue envelope connections between regions), and contact definitions varying from tied (muscle insertions) to sliding (liver and diaphragm contact). The model was developed in a general-purpose finite element code, LS-Dyna (LTSC, Livermore, CA) R4.2.1., and consists of 1.95 million elements and 1.3 million nodes. The element breakdown by type is 41% hexahedral, 33.7% tetrahedral, 19.5% quad shells and 5% tria shell. The integration methodology presented highlights the viability of using a collaborative development paradigm for the construction of HBMs, and will be used as template for expanding the suite of GHBMC models.

  17. Dimensions of the human sclera: Thickness measurement and regional changes with axial length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Richard E; Flanagan, John G; Rausch, Sophie M K; Sigal, Ian A; Tertinegg, Inka; Eilaghi, Armin; Portnoy, Sharon; Sled, John G; Ethier, C Ross

    2010-02-01

    Scleral thickness, especially near the region of the optic nerve head (ONH), is a potential factor of interest in the development of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Our goal was to characterize the scleral thickness distribution and other geometric features of human eyes. Eleven enucleated human globes (7 normal and 4 ostensibly glaucomatous) were imaged using high-field microMRI, providing 80 microm isotropic resolution over the whole eye. The MRI scans were segmented to produce 3-D corneoscleral shells. Each shell was divided into 15 slices along the anterior-posterior axis of the eye, and each slice was further subdivided into the anatomical quadrants. Average thickness was measured in each region, producing 60 thickness measurements per eye. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify trends in the thickness distribution, and scleral geometric features were correlated with globe axial length. Thickness over the whole sclera was 670 +/- 80 microm (mean +/- SD; range: 564 microm-832 microm) over the 11 eyes. Maximum thickness occurred at the posterior pole of the eye, with mean thickness of 996 +/- 181 microm. Thickness decreased to a minimum at the equator, where a mean thickness of 491 +/- 91 microm was measured. Eyes with a reported history of glaucoma were found to have longer axial length, smaller ONH canal dimensions and thinner posterior sclera. Several geometrical parameters of the eye, including posterior scleral thickness, axial length, and ONH canal diameter, appear linked. Significant intra-individual and inter-individual variation in scleral thickness was evident. This may be indicative of inter-individual differences in ocular biomechanics. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diurnal variation in baseline human regional cerebral blood flow demonstrated by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, D.J.; Mintun, M.A.; Moore, R.Y. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    We have previously described the diurnal variation in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) response to bright light in human subjects as demonstrated by the positron emission tomography (PET) activation method. In this abstract, we report the differences in rCBF (an indicator of differences in regional neuronal activity) between the evening and midday dim light baseline scans which served as the control states in the above bright light activation study. Five right-handed, healthy volunteers underwent both an evening (8pm) and a midday (12N) O-15 water PET scanning session. Each scanning session was preceded by one hour of dim light adaptation (50 lux) and consisted of six rCBF scans at three different light intensities in an AABBCC sequence (A=50 lux, B=2500 lux, C=7000lux). Significant differences in rCBF between the evening and midday 50 lux states were identified using the statistical parametric mapping method developed by Friston et al (p<.001). The evening scans demonstrated areas of greater relative blood flow in the pineal gland, the lateral temporal cortex bilaterally, the right lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior aspect of the anterior cingulate, and the left thalamus. The midday scans showed areas of greater relative blood flow in the visual cortex, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. the inferior aspect of the anterior cingulate, the left parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Our results demonstrate an extensive diurnal variation in baseline human rCBF. This indicates that time of day may be an important variable in conducting and interpreting functional brain imaging studies. Furthermore, these results suggest possible neuroanatomical substrates through which the circadian system may regulate the various physiologic and behavioral processes that manifest circadian rhythms.

  19. Probabilistic map of critical functional regions of the human cerebral cortex: Broca's area revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Matthew C; Herbet, Guillaume; Moritz-Gasser, Sylvie; Tate, Joseph E; Duffau, Hugues

    2014-10-01

    The organization of basic functions of the human brain, particularly in the right hemisphere, remains poorly understood. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have improved our understanding of cortical organization but do not allow for direct interrogation or determination of essential (versus participatory) cortical regions. Direct cortical stimulation represents a unique opportunity to provide novel insights into the functional distribution of critical epicentres. Direct cortical stimulation (bipolar, 60 Hz, 1-ms pulse) was performed in 165 consecutive patients undergoing awake mapping for resection of low-grade gliomas. Tasks included motor, sensory, counting, and picture naming. Stimulation sites eliciting positive (sensory/motor) or negative (speech arrest, dysarthria, anomia, phonological and semantic paraphasias) findings were recorded and mapped onto a standard Montreal Neurological Institute brain atlas. Montreal Neurological Institute-space functional data were subjected to cluster analysis algorithms (K-means, partition around medioids, hierarchical Ward) to elucidate crucial network epicentres. Sensorimotor function was observed in the pre/post-central gyri as expected. Articulation epicentres were also found within the pre/post-central gyri. However, speech arrest localized to ventral premotor cortex, not the classical Broca's area. Anomia/paraphasia data demonstrated foci not only within classical Wernicke's area but also within the middle and inferior frontal gyri. We report the first bilateral probabilistic map for crucial cortical epicentres of human brain functions in the right and left hemispheres, including sensory, motor, and language (speech, articulation, phonology and semantics). These data challenge classical theories of brain organization (e.g. Broca's area as speech output region) and provide a distributed framework for future studies of neural networks.

  20. Identification by functional MRI of human cerebral region activated by taste stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, Naoya [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was the examination of possible imaging of the primary taste region of human cerebral cortex by functional MRI (fMRI). Subjects were 19-36 years old, healthy adult male and female volunteers given information concerning the purpose, significance and method of the study. MRI equipment was 1.5 T Signa Horizon (GE) with Head Coil. Images were processed by the software FuncTool on the Advantage Windows Workstation (GE). Taste stimulation was done by swab bearing the solution of 4% quinine hydrochloride, 20% sodium chloride or distilled water (control) or by dripping from the syringe of the solutions, 8% tartaric acid or 80% sugar. Preliminary examinations with the swab suggested the possibility of the identification. Further, with use of dripping apparatus, the taste active region was shown to be identified by fMRI and of which area tended to be larger in male than in female: a significant difference was seen for the quinine hydrochloride. As above, the method was suggested to be a diagnostic mean for the taste perception. (K.H.)

  1. A comprehensive resource of interacting protein regions for refining human transcription factor networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuko Miyamoto-Sato

    Full Text Available Large-scale data sets of protein-protein interactions (PPIs are a valuable resource for mapping and analysis of the topological and dynamic features of interactome networks. The currently available large-scale PPI data sets only contain information on interaction partners. The data presented in this study also include the sequences involved in the interactions (i.e., the interacting regions, IRs suggested to correspond to functional and structural domains. Here we present the first large-scale IR data set obtained using mRNA display for 50 human transcription factors (TFs, including 12 transcription-related proteins. The core data set (966 IRs; 943 PPIs displays a verification rate of 70%. Analysis of the IR data set revealed the existence of IRs that interact with multiple partners. Furthermore, these IRs were preferentially associated with intrinsic disorder. This finding supports the hypothesis that intrinsically disordered regions play a major role in the dynamics and diversity of TF networks through their ability to structurally adapt to and bind with multiple partners. Accordingly, this domain-based interaction resource represents an important step in refining protein interactions and networks at the domain level and in associating network analysis with biological structure and function.

  2. The negative impacts of human activities in the eastern African region: an international waters perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payet, Rolph; Obura, David

    2004-02-01

    The complex interactions between human activities and the environment at the interface of land and water is analyzed with a focus on the Somali Current (East Africa), and Indian Ocean Island States, subregions of the Global International Waters Assessment (GIWA). These 2 subregions contain some of the world's richest ecosystems, including the high biodiversity forests of Madagascar and the diverse coastal habitats of the eastern African coast. These ecosystems support local communities and national and regional economies. Current and future degradation of these systems, from water basins to continental shelves, affects the livelihoods and sustainability of the countries in the region, and long-term efforts to reduce poverty. The assessments determined that pollution and climate change are the primary environmental and social concerns in the Islands of the Indian Ocean, while freshwater shortage and unsustainable exploitation of fisheries and other living resources are the primary environmental and social concerns in East Africa. The GIWA approach, through assessing root causes of environmental concerns, enables the development of policy approaches for mitigating environmental degradation. This paper explores policy frameworks for mitigating the impacts, and reducing the drivers, of 3 environmental concerns--freshwater shortage; solid waste pollution; and climate change--addressing social and institutional causes and effects, and linking the subregions to broad international frameworks. The common theme in all 3 case studies is the need to develop integrated ecosystem and international waters policies, and mechanisms to manage conflicting interests and to limit threats to natural processes.

  3. Sequence polymorphism of human mitochondrial DNA control region in Chinese Dongxiang unrelated individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-she; CHEN Teng; LI Sheng-bin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphism in Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group and to provide basic data used in ethnic origin investigation and forensic purpose. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from the whole blood of 100 unrelated individuals of Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group by standard Chelex-100 method.The sequence polymorphism was determined by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Results: Eighty-two polymorphic sites were identified in mtDNA D-loop region 16 091 - 16 418 np, and 88 haplotypes were found. The genetic diversity was calculated to be 0.996 9, and the genetic identity was 0.013 2. Conclusion: There are some particular polymorphic sites in Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group, and these sites provide an important basis to investigate the origin of Dongxiang and the relationship between Dongxiang and other ethnic groups. The result also suggested that sequence polymorphism from 16 091 -16 418 np in human mitochondrial DNA control region can be an useful tool for forensic identity.

  4. Human leukocyte antigens in indigenous (mapuche) people in a regional renal transplantation program in chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droguett, M A; Oyarzún, M J; Alruiz, P; Jerez, V; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2005-10-01

    An active regional transplantation program established in the southern region of Chile has allowed the incorporation of ethnic minorities particularly Mapuche living in this geographic area in the development of a histocompatibility database. To identify possible differences in the human leukocyte (HLA) antigen distribution in Chilean Mapuche compared with non-Mapuche, we reviewed 442 HLA tissue-typing studies. Seventy-eight of 309 recipients (25%) and 18 of 133 donors (13%) were Mapuche. Among recipients, Mapuche people showed a significantly higher frequency of the HLA antigens, A28, B16, DR4, and DR8, and a lower one for A19, B15, and DR1 (P Mapuche individuals. A particularly higher frequency of the haplotype A28, -B16, -DR4 was also evidenced in Mapuche. Besides, these recipients showed a higher frequency of the allele -DR4 when compared with Mapuche donors. A greater frequency of some histocompatibility antigens in patients with chronic renal disease might be attributed to allelic concentration due to a high index of endogamy, but a possible association with the development of progressive renal disease cannot be ignored, especially when a higher prevalence of DR4 was observed among Mapuche recipients.

  5. Differential DNA Methylation Regions in Adult Human Sperm following Adolescent Chemotherapy: Potential for Epigenetic Inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Stansfeld, Barbara; Sadler-Riggleman, Ingrid; Beck, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background The potential that adolescent chemotherapy can impact the epigenetic programming of the germ line to influence later life adult fertility and promote epigenetic inheritance was investigated. Previous studies have demonstrated a number of environmental exposures such as abnormal nutrition and toxicants can promote sperm epigenetic changes that impact offspring. Methods Adult males approximately ten years after pubertal exposure to chemotherapy were compared to adult males with no previous exposure. Sperm were collected to examine differential DNA methylation regions (DMRs) between the exposed and control populations. Gene associations and correlations to genetic mutations (copy number variation) were also investigated. Methods and Findings A signature of statistically significant DMRs was identified in the chemotherapy exposed male sperm. The DMRs, termed epimutations, were found in CpG desert regions of primarily 1 kilobase size. Observations indicate adolescent chemotherapy exposure can promote epigenetic alterations that persist in later life. Conclusions This is the first observation in humans that an early life chemical exposure can permanently reprogram the spermatogenic stem cell epigenome. The germline (i.e., sperm) epimutations identified suggest chemotherapy has the potential to promote epigenetic inheritance to the next generation. PMID:28146567

  6. Italian network for human biomonitoring of metals: preliminary results from two regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Bocca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Italian program for human biomonitoring (HBM of chemical elements, PROgram for Biomonitoring of the Exposure (PROBE, started in 2008 with the aim to provide the knowledge about risk assessment of the Italian population following the environmental exposure to metals. The project is implemented through a HBM campaign for the production of data on 19 metals in the blood and serum of subjects living in different Italian Regions. The metals studied are: antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, iridium, lead, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, palladium, platinum, rhodium, thallium, tin, tungsten, uranium and vanadium. The first phase of the project has included the development and validation of laboratory protocols for the collection of fluids and quantification of metals. The second phase provides the HBM data expressed as the reference values (RVs for the Italian population, i.e., as the level of metals in the general population not occupationally exposed. In this paper, the experimental protocols used for the maintenance of high standards of analysis and the RVs for metals in serum of inhabitants of two Italian Regions (Calabria and Umbria are described.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of the vaccine against human papillomavirus in the Brazilian Amazon region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Allex Jardim da; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Neto, Giacomo Balbinotto

    2013-01-01

    To assess the cost-utility of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on the prevention of cervical cancer in the Brazilian Amazon region. A Markov cohort model was developed to simulate the natural evolution of HPV and its progress to cervical cancer, considering the current preventive programs and treatment costs. The one-year transition probabilities were mainly based on empirical data of local and national studies. The model evaluated the addition of the vaccine to three cervical cancer-screening scenarios (0, 3 or 10 exams throughout life). The scenario of three Pap tests resulted in satisfactory calibration (base case). The addition of HPV vaccination would reduce by 35% the incidence of cervical cancer (70% vaccination coverage). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was US$ 825 for each quality-adjusted life year gained. The sensitivity analysis confirms the robustness of this result, and duration of immunity was the parameter with greater variation in incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Vaccination has a favorable profile in terms of cost-utility, and its inclusion in the immunization schedule would result in a substantial reduction in incidence and mortality of invasive cervical cancer in the Brazilian Amazon region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Fine mapping of the human pentraxin gene region on chromosome 1q23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, M.T.; Whitehead, A.S. [Univ. of Dublin (Ireland); Divane, A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    The 1q21 to 25 region of human chromosome 1 contains genes which encode proteins with immune- and inflammation-associated functions. These include the pentraxin genes, for C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid P(SAP) protein (APCS), and a CRP pseudogene (CRPP1). The region of chromosome 1 containing this cluster is syntenic with distal mouse chromosome 1. We constructed an approximately 1.4 megabase yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig with the pentraxin genes at its core. This four-YAC contig includes other genes with immune functions including the FCER1A gene, which encodes the {alpha}-subunit of the IgE high-affinity Fc receptor and the 1F1-16 gene, an interferon-{gamma}-induced gene. In addition, it contains the histone H3F2 and H4F2 genes and the gene for erythroid {alpha}-spectrin (SPTA1). The gene order is cen.-SPTA1-H4F2-H3F2-1F1-16-CRP-CRPP1-APCS-FCERIA-tel. The contig thus consists of a cluster of genes whose products either have immunological importance, bind DNA, or both. 68 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Genomic and network patterns of schizophrenia genetic variation in human evolutionary accelerated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E; Pollard, Katherine S; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-05-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia.

  10. Wet phases in the Sahara/Sahel region and human migration patterns in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Isla S; Mulitza, Stefan; Schefuss, Enno; Lopes dos Santos, Raquel A; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Schouten, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual plant leaf waxes (a proxy for C(3) vs. C(4) vegetation) in a marine sediment core collected from beneath the plume of Sahara-derived dust in northwest Africa reveals three periods during the past 192,000 years when the central Sahara/Sahel contained C(3) plants (likely trees), indicating substantially wetter conditions than at present. Our data suggest that variability in the strength of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a main control on vegetation distribution in central North Africa, and we note expansions of C(3) vegetation during the African Humid Period (early Holocene) and within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 ( approximately 50-45 ka) and MIS 5 ( approximately 120-110 ka). The wet periods within MIS 3 and 5 coincide with major human migration events out of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results thus suggest that changes in AMOC influenced North African climate and, at times, contributed to amenable conditions in the central Sahara/Sahel, allowing humans to cross this otherwise inhospitable region.

  11. Expression of human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand extracellular region in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐蓓; HE; Fengtian; 等

    2002-01-01

    This study is conducted to clone the cDNA encoding human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand(hTRAIL)extracellular region(amino acids 41-281,hTRAIL41-281)and to express it in E.coli.The hTRAIL41-281 cDNA is amplified by reverse transcription(RT)PCR from total RNA derived from human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60.After sequenced,the cDNA is cloned into the vector pQE-80L and transformed into E.coli DH5α to express the recombinant hTRAIL41-281(rhTRAIL41-281)induced by IPTG.The recombinant protein is analyzed by SDS-PAGE.The cloned cDNA is consistent with the cDNA sequence encoding hTRAIL41-281 reported in GenBankTM.After inducing.the hTRAIL41-281 protein is expressed,and the mass of the recombinant protein is about 30% of total bacteria protein,which demonstrates that the cDNA encoding hTRAIL41-281 is successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli.

  12. Regional deposition of thoron progeny in models of the human tracheobronchial tree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.M.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Yeh, Hsu-Chi

    1995-12-01

    Models of the human tracheobronchial tree have been used to determine total and regional aerosol deposition of inhaled particles. Particle sizes measured in these studies have all been > 40 nm in diameter. The deposition of aerosols < 40 nm in diameter has not been measured. Particles in the ultrafine aerosol size range include some combustion aerosols and indoor radon progeny. Also, the influence of reduced lung size and airflow rates on particle deposition in young children has not been determined. With their smaller lung size and smaller minute volumes, children may be at increased risk from ultrafine pollutants. In order to accurately determine dose of inhaled aerosols, the effects of particle size, minute volume, and age at exposure must be quantified. The purpose of this study was to determine the deposition efficiency of ultrafine aerosols smaller than 40 nm in diameter in models of the human tracheobronchia tree. This study demonstrates that the deposition efficiency of aerosols in the model of the child`s tracheobronchial tree may be slightly higher than in the adult models.

  13. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT IN INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: EVIDENCE FROM THE CEE REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneš Slavić

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance management (PM is a very important process of human resource management (HRM, in general. It implies an assessment of current or previous results or performance of the employee, team or the whole organization. It is a base for many business practices related to HRM: the need for staff training, new recruitment, career development, rewarding, etc. A wide literature sources emphasized that PM is a complex process, especially when the global market is in the scope of the research. This paper examined the performance management from the aspect of international human resource management (IHRM. The main objective of this paper was to explore the area of performance management in context of IHRM and relations between the existence of formal appraisal systems (FAS for performance management and organizational performances. The research was carried out trough literature and empirical research based on CRANET data base. Methodology used in the research included statistical techniques of descriptive statistics and independent t-test, performed with SPSS program. Authors explored data from organizations from 7 countries from the Central and Eastern Europe (CEE region.

  14. Specification of Region-Specific Neurons Including Forebrain Glutamatergic Neurons from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Zheng; Park, Jung Woo; Zhan, Shuning; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Lichtler, Alexander; Liu, Hui-Xia; Chen, Fang-Ping; Yue, Lixia; Li, Xue-Jun; Xu, Ren-He

    2010-01-01

    Background Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE) cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders. PMID:20686615

  15. Investigation Into the Humaneness of Slaughter Methods for Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcelus) in the Andean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Georgina; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy A; Gibson, Troy J

    2016-01-01

    Guinea pigs (Cavia porcelus) are an important source of nonhuman animal protein in the Andean region of South America. Specific guidelines regarding the welfare of guinea pigs before and during slaughter have yet to be developed. This study critically assessed the humaneness of 4 different stunning/slaughter methods for guinea pigs: cervical neck dislocation (n = 60), electrical head-only stunning (n = 83), carbon dioxide (CO2) stunning (n = 21), and penetrating captive bolt (n = 10). Following cervical neck dislocation, 97% of guinea pigs had at least 1 behavioral or cranial/spinal response. Six percent of guinea pigs were classified as mis-stunned after electrical stunning, and 1% were classified as mis-stunned after captive bolt. Increased respiratory effort was observed during CO2 stunning. Apart from this finding, there were no other obvious behavioral responses that could be associated with suffering. Of the methods assessed, captive bolt was deemed the most humane, effective, and practical method of stunning guinea pigs. Cervical neck dislocation should not be recommended as a slaughter method for guinea pigs.

  16. Expression of Bcl-2 in adult human brain regions with special reference to neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, S; Javoy-Agid, F; Herrero, M T; Strada, O; Boissiere, F; Hibner, U; Agid, Y

    1997-07-01

    The expression of the protooncogene bcl-2, an inhibitor of apoptosis in various cells, was examined in the adult human brain. Several experimental criteria were used to verify its presence; mRNA was analyzed by northern blot with parallel experiments in mouse tissues, by RNase protection, and by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Bcl-2 protein was detected by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Two bcl-2 mRNA species were identified in the human brain. The pattern of distribution of bcl-2 mRNA at the cellular level showed labeling in neurons but not glia. The in situ hybridization signal was stronger in the pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex and in the cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert than in the Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. Both melanized and nonmelanized neurons were labeled in the substantia nigra. In the striatum, bcl-2 mRNA was detected in some but not all neurons. In the regions examined for Bcl-2 protein, the expression pattern correlated with the mRNA results. In patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, quantification of bcl-2 mRNA in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and substantia nigra, respectively, showed that the expression was unaltered compared with controls, raising the possibility that the expression of other components of apoptosis is modulated.

  17. Specification of region-specific neurons including forebrain glutamatergic neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders.

  18. Human antibody expression in transgenic rats: comparison of chimeric IgH loci with human VH, D and JH but bearing different rat C-gene regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Osborn, Michael J; Avis, Suzanne; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Ménoret, Séverine; Anegon, Ignacio; Buelow, Roland; Brüggemann, Marianne

    2013-12-31

    Expression of human antibody repertoires in transgenic animals has been accomplished by introducing large human Ig loci into mice and, more recently, a chimeric IgH locus into rats. With human VH, D and JH genes linked to the rat C-region antibody expression was significantly increased, similar to wild-type levels not found with fully human constructs. Here we compare four rat-lines containing the same human VH-region (comprising 22 VHs, all Ds and all JHs in natural configuration) but linked to different rat CH-genes and regulatory sequences. The endogenous IgH locus was silenced by zinc-finger nucleases. After breeding, all lines produced exclusively chimeric human H-chain with near normal IgM levels. However, in two lines poor IgG expression and inefficient immune responses were observed, implying that high expression, class-switching and hypermutation are linked to optimal enhancer function provided by the large regulatory region at the 3' end of the IgH locus. Furthermore, exclusion of Cδ and its downstream interval region may assist recombination. Highly diverse IgG and immune responses similar to normal rats were identified in two strains carrying diverse and differently spaced C-genes.

  19. Untangling human and environmental effects on geographical gradients of mammal species richness: a global and regional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Romero, Erik Joaquín; Olalla-Tárraga, Miguel Á

    2015-05-01

    Different hypotheses (geographical, ecological, evolutionary or a combination of them) have been suggested to account for the spatial variation in species richness. However, the relative importance of environment and human impacts in explaining these patterns, either globally or at the biogeographical region level, remains largely unexplored. Here, we jointly evaluate how current environmental conditions and human impacts shape global and regional gradients of species richness in terrestrial mammals. We processed IUCN global distributional data for 3939 mammal species and a set of seven environmental and two human impact variables at a spatial resolution of 96.5 × 96.5 km. We used simple, multiple and partial regression techniques to evaluate environmental and human effects on species richness. Actual evapotranspiration (AET) is the main driver of mammal species richness globally. Together with our results at the biogeographical realm level, this lends strong support for the water-energy hypothesis (i.e. global diversity gradients are best explained by the interaction of water and energy, with a latitudinal shift in the relative importance of ambient energy vs. water availability as we move from the poles to the equator). While human effects on species richness are not easily detected at a global scale due to the large proportion of shared variance with the environment, these effects significantly emerge at the regional level. In the Nearctic, Palearctic and Oriental regions, the independent contribution of human impacts is almost as important as current environmental conditions in explaining richness patterns. The intersection of human impacts with climate drives the geographical variation in mammal species richness in the Palearctic, Nearctic and Oriental regions. Using a human accessibility variable, we show, for the first time, that the zones most accessible to humans are often those where we find lower mammal species richness. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of

  20. The use of formulation technology to assess regional gastrointestinal drug absorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Abdul W; Podczeck, Fridrun; Newton, J Michael; Waddington, Wendy A; Ell, Peter J; Lacey, Larry F

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using oral modified-release formulations for the purposes of site-specific targeting and regional drug absorption assessment in man. An immediate release pellet formulation containing ranitidine as the model drug of choice for the study was fabricated by extrusion-spheronisation, and then film coated with either the enteric polymer polyvinyl acetate phthalate or the bacteria-degradable polymer amylose, in combination with ethylcellulose, to effect drug release within the small intestine and colon, respectively. Optimised formulations were evaluated in vivo in ten healthy volunteers, who each received, on four separate occasions, the immediate release, small intestinal release and colonic release formulations (each equivalent to 150mg ranitidine), and an intravenous injection of ranitidine (equivalent to 50mg ranitidine). Blood samples were collected and assessed for ranitidine concentration, and radiolabelled placebo pellets were co-administered with the coated ranitidine pellets to monitor their gastrointestinal transit using a gamma camera. Ranitidine was rapidly released and absorbed from the immediate release formulation, whereas the enteric formulation (10% coat weight gain) delayed drug release until some or all of the pellets had emptied into the small intestine. The amylose-ethylcellulose coated formulation (coat ratio 1:3, coat weight gain 25%) retarded ranitidine release until the pellets had reached the colon. The mean absolute bioavailability of ranitidine from the immediate release, small intestinal release and colonic release formulations were 50.6, 46.1 and 5.5%, respectively. These data are in general agreement to those obtained from a previous regional intubation study. The present study therefore demonstrates the practical potential of utilising a non-invasive, formulation-based approach to assess drug absorption from different regions of the human gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Differentially methylated regions of imprinted genes in prenatal, perinatal and postnatal human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Murphy

    Full Text Available Epigenetic plasticity in relation to in utero exposures may mechanistically explain observed differences in the likelihood of developing common complex diseases including hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease through the cumulative effects of subtle alterations in gene expression. Imprinted genes are essential mediators of growth and development and are characterized by differentially methylated regulatory regions (DMRs that carry parental allele-specific methylation profiles. This theoretical 50% level of methylation provides a baseline from which endogenously- or exogenously-induced deviations in methylation can be detected. We quantified DNA methylation at imprinted gene DMRs in a large panel of human conceptal tissues, in matched buccal cell specimens collected at birth and at one year of age, and in the major cell fractions of umbilical cord blood to assess the stability of methylation at these regions. DNA methylation was measured using validated pyrosequencing assays at seven DMRs regulating the IGF2/H19, DLK1/MEG3, MEST, NNAT and SGCE/PEG10 imprinted domains. DMR methylation did not significantly differ for the H19, MEST and SGCE/PEG10 DMRs across all conceptal tissues analyzed (ANOVA p>0.10. Methylation differences at several DMRs were observed in tissues from brain (IGF2 and MEG3-IG DMRs, liver (IGF2 and MEG3 DMRs and placenta (both DLK1/MEG3 DMRs and NNAT DMR. In most infants, methylation profiles in buccal cells at birth and at one year of age were comparable, as was methylation in the major cell fractions of umbilical cord blood. Several infants showed temporal deviations in methylation at multiple DMRs. Similarity of inter-individual and intra-individual methylation at some, but not all of the DMRs analyzed supports the possibility that methylation of these regions can serve as useful biosensors of exposure.

  2. Solution and crystallographic structures of the central region of the phosphoprotein from human metapneumovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Leyrat

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV of the family Paramyxoviridae is a major cause of respiratory illness worldwide. Phosphoproteins (P from Paramyxoviridae are essential co-factors of the viral RNA polymerase that form tetramers and possess long intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs. We located the central region of HMPV P (P(ced which is involved in tetramerization using disorder analysis and modeled its 3D structure ab initio using Rosetta fold-and-dock. We characterized the solution-structure of P(ced using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and carried out direct fitting to the scattering data to filter out incorrect models. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS and ensemble optimization were employed to select correct models and capture the dynamic character of P(ced. Our analysis revealed that oligomerization involves a compact central core located between residues 169-194 (P(core, that is surrounded by flexible regions with α-helical propensity. We crystallized this fragment and solved its structure at 3.1 Å resolution by molecular replacement, using the folded core from our SAXS-validated ab initio model. The RMSD between modeled and experimental tetramers is as low as 0.9 Å, demonstrating the accuracy of the approach. A comparison of the structure of HMPV P to existing mononegavirales P(ced structures suggests that P(ced evolved under weak selective pressure. Finally, we discuss the advantages of using SAXS in combination with ab initio modeling and MDS to solve the structure of small, homo-oligomeric protein complexes.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of human prion protein is mediated by its N-terminal region.

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    Mukesh Pasupuleti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular prion-related protein (PrP(c is a cell-surface protein that is ubiquitously expressed in the human body. The multifunctionality of PrP(c, and presence of an exposed cationic and heparin-binding N-terminus, a feature characterizing many antimicrobial peptides, made us hypothesize that PrP(c could exert antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intact recombinant PrP exerted antibacterial and antifungal effects at normal and low pH. Studies employing recombinant PrP and N- and C-terminally truncated variants, as well as overlapping peptide 20mers, demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity is mediated by the unstructured N-terminal part of the protein. Synthetic peptides of the N-terminus of PrP killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida parapsilosis. Fluorescence studies of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen after treatment with the "classical" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, however, no marked helix induction was detected for the PrP-derived peptides in presence of negatively charged (bacteria-mimicking liposomes. PrP furthermore showed an inducible expression during wounding of human skin ex vivo and in vivo, as well as stimulation of keratinocytes with TGF-alpha in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The demonstration of an antimicrobial activity of PrP, localisation of its activity to the N-terminal and heparin-binding region, combined with results showing an increased expression of PrP during wounding, indicate that PrPs could have a previously undisclosed role in host defense.

  4. Specific circular organization of the neurons of human interthalamic adhesion and of periventricular thalamic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslo, Puskas; Slobodan, Malobabić; Nela, Puskas; Milos, Malis; Rade, Popović; Tatjana, Ille

    2005-05-01

    Interthalamic adhesion between the medial surfaces of the left and right thalamus is a variable structure and contains the midline thalamic nuclei, which are not much developed in humans. The research has been done on 6 human brains obtained during routine autopsy (age 45 to 65; 4 male and 2 female). Every tenth 10 microm thick frontal section was stained according to Klüver-Barrera method. In all cases the authors found a specific organization of certain groups of neurons within the interthalamic adhesion (IA) in form of circles on frontal sections. These circular groups were present on all sections but only 1-2 in each. The larger mean diameter of these circular arrangements was R = 229.4 microm, and smaller was r = 203.1 microm. These circular groups within the human IA were formed in average by 7.29 neurons. In periventricular region (PVR) of thalamus similar circular groups of neurons also were present in all cases as in IA. These neuronal groups in PVR were of smaller size than in the IA, with larger mean diameter R = 201.4, smaller mean diameter r = 181.2 microm and they contained fewer neurons, 6.69 on average. All three values (both diameters of circular arrangements, and number of neurons forming them) were significantly smaller in PVR (p < .01). Morphological types and sizes of neurons in both investigated structures (IA and PV) were not different. The circular neuronal groups in IA were formed in 61% of fusiform neurons and in PVR in 48% of fusiform neurons. According to their subependymal localization, size and form, these circular groups can represent in vivo correlates of neurospheres.

  5. Genetic variation of the RASGRF1 regulatory region affects human hippocampus-dependent memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eBarman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The guanine nucleotide exchange factor RASGRF1 is an important regulator of intracellular signaling and neural plasticity in the brain. RASGRF1-deficient mice exhibit a complex phenotype with learning deficits and ocular abnormalities. Also in humans, a genome-wide association study has identified the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs8027411 in the putative transcription regulatory region of RASGRF1 as a risk variant of myopia. Here we aimed to assess whether, in line with the RASGRF1 knockout mouse phenotype, rs8027411 might also be associated with human memory function. We performed computer-based neuropsychological learning experiments in two independent cohorts of young, healthy participants. Tests included the Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT and the logical memory section of the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS. Two sub-cohorts additionally participated in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies of hippocampus function. 119 participants performed a novelty encoding task that had previously been shown to engage the hippocampus, and 63 subjects participated in a reward-related memory encoding study. RASGRF1 rs8027411 genotype was indeed associated with memory performance in an allele dosage-dependent manner, with carriers of the T allele (i.e. the myopia risk allele showing better memory performance in the early encoding phase of the VLMT and in the recall phase of the WMS logical memory section. In fMRI, T allele carriers exhibited increased hippocampal activation during presentation of novel images and during encoding of pictures associated with monetary reward. Taken together, our results provide evidence for a role of the RASGRF1 gene locus in hippocampus-dependent memory and, along with the previous association with myopia, point towards pleitropic effects of RASGRF1 genetic variations on complex neural function in humans.

  6. Alkali metals levels in the human brain tissue: Anatomical region differences and age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Patrícia; Santos, Agostinho; Pinto, Edgar; Pinto, Nair Rosas; Mendes, Ricardo; Magalhães, Teresa; Almeida, Agostinho

    2016-12-01

    The link between trace elements imbalances (both "toxic" and "essential") in the human brain and neurodegenerative disease has been subject of extensive research. More recently, some studies have highlighted the potential role of the homeostasis deregulation of alkali metals in specific brain regions as key factor in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Using flame atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples, alkali metals (Na, K, Li, Rb and Cs) were determined in 14 different areas of the human brain (frontal cortex, superior and middle temporal gyri, caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, cingulated gyrus, hippocampus, inferior parietal lobule, visual cortex of the occipital lobe, midbrain, pons, medulla and cerebellum) of adult individuals (n=42; 71±12, range: 50-101 years old) with no known history and evidence of neurodegenerative, neurological or psychiatric disorder. Potassium was found as the most abundant alkali metal, followed by Na, Rb, Cs and Li. Lithium, K and Cs distribution showed to be quite heterogeneous. On the contrary, Rb and Na appeared quite homogeneously distributed within the human brain tissue. The lowest levels of Na, K, Rb and Li were found in the brainstem (midbrain, medulla and pons) and cerebellum, while the lowest levels of Cs were found in the frontal cortex. The highest levels of K (mean±sd; range 15.5±2.5; 8.9-21.8mg/g) Rb (17.2±6.1; 3.9-32.4μg/g and Cs (83.4±48.6; 17.3-220.5ng/g) were found in putamen. The highest levels of Na and Li were found in the frontal cortex (11.6±2.4; 6.6-17.1mg/g) and caudate nucleus (7.6±4.6 2.2-21.3ng/g), respectively. Although K, Cs and Li levels appear to remain largely unchanged with age, some age-related changes were observed for Na and Rb levels in particular brain regions (namely in the hippocampus). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All

  7. "Beijing Region" (3pter-D3S3397) of the Human Genome: Complete sequence and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    The; Chinese; Human; Genome; Sequencing; Consortium

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is to determine a complete and high-quality sequence of the human genome. China, as one of the six member states, takes a region between 3pter and D3S3397 of the human chromosome 3 as its share of this historic project, referred as "Beijing Region". The complete sequence of this region comprises of 17.4 megabasepairs (Mb) with an average GC content of 42% and an average recombination rate of 2.14 cM/Mb. Within Beijing Region, 122 known and 20 novel genes are identified, as well as 42607 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Comprehensive analyses also reveal: (i) gene density and GC-content of Beijing Region are in agreement with human cytogenetic maps, i.e. G-minus bands are GC-rich and of a high gene density, whereas G-plus bands are GC-poor and of a relatively low gene density; (ii) the average recombination rate within Beijing Region is relatively high compared with other regions of chromosome 3, with the highest recombination rate of 6.06 cM/Mb in the subtelomeric area; (iii) it is most likely that a large gene, associated with the mammary gland, may reside in the 1.1 Mb gene-poor area near the telomere; (iv) many disease-related genes are genetically mapped to Beijing Region, including those associated with cancers and metabolic syndromes. All make Beijing Region an important target for in-depth molecular investigations with a purpose of medical applications.

  8. Human Coxiella burnetii infections in regions of Bosnia and Herzegovina, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukrija, Zvizdić; Hamzić, Sadeta; Cengić, Dzevad; Beslagić, Edina; Fejzić, Nihad; Cobanov, Darko; Maglajlić, Jasminka; Puvacić, Sandra; Puvacić, Zlatko

    2006-10-01

    Acute infections in humans and animals caused by Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii) are becoming an important medical problem for Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H). From a clinical and epidemiological aspect, Q fever represents a complex medical problem, considering that one of the highest incidence rates of Q fever in Europe has been recorded during the last few years in B&H. The first case of this disease in B&H was described in 1950, by Muray et al., and the first epidemic, with 16 infected individuals, was recorded the same year. Confirmed animal infections by C. burnetii in B&H were first reported in 1985 when, of all tested sheep, positive results were found in 12.4%. During 2001, 2.11% of tested sheep and goats were found to have a positive result, which was also confirmed by studies from the following years in particular regions of B&H. These studies suggest that endemic loci of infected animals are established in particular geographic regions in B&H, which is important to emphasize for better understanding of the sources and routes of C. burnetii transmission to the human population. This conclusion is based on the studies from 2000, when 2.17% of positive cattle, 1.85% of positive sheep, and 0.27% of positive goats were registered. During the same period, in B&H, in 6 different regions, 156 individuals with Q fever were registered as were 3 separate epidemics with 115 infected individuals. Official data on the number of detected animal C. burnetii infections during 2002 suggest that 10 positive cattle and 88 positive sheep or goats were registered. During 2003, 24 positive cattle, 29 positive goats, and 167 positive sheep were detected, while in 2004, 71 positive cattle, 4 positive goats, 37 positive sheep, and 72 positive animals from the sheep-goat group were registered. According to official reports from 2001, 19 individuals with Q fever were registered in B&H, while in 2002, the number of infected individuals increased to 250. In five cantons in B&H, 43

  9. No role for human papillomavirus infection in oral cancers in a region in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprise, Claudie; Madathil, Sreenath A; Allison, Paul; Abraham, Priya; Raghavendran, Anantharam; Shahul, Hameed P; ThekkePurakkal, Akhil-Soman; Castonguay, Geneviève; Coutlée, François; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Franco, Eduardo L; Nicolau, Belinda

    2016-02-15

    Oral cancer is a major public health issue in India with ∼ 77,000 new cases and 52,000 deaths yearly. Paan chewing, tobacco and alcohol use are strong risk factors for this cancer in India. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are also related to a subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs). We examined the association between oral HPV and oral cancer in a sample of Indian subjects participating in a hospital-based case-control study. We recruited incident oral cancer cases (N = 350) and controls frequency-matched by age and sex (N = 371) from two main referral hospitals in Kerala, South India. Sociodemographic and behavioral data were collected by interviews. Epithelial cells were sampled using Oral CDx® brushes from the oral cancer site and the normal mucosa. Detection and genotyping of 36 HPV genotypes were done using a polymerase chain reaction protocol. Data collection procedures were performed by qualified dentists via a detailed protocol with strict quality control, including independent HPV testing in India and Canada. HPV DNA was detected in none of the cases or controls. Associations between oral cancer and risk factors usually associated with HPV infection, such as oral sex and number of lifetime sexual partners, were examined by logistic regression and were not associated with oral cancer. Lack of a role for HPV infection in this study may reflect cultural or religious characteristics specific to this region in India that are not conducive to oral HPV transmission. A nationwide representative prevalence study is needed to investigate HPV prevalence variability among Indian regions.

  10. Modeling Regional Dynamics of Human-Rangifer Systems: a Framework for Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Berman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical models of interaction between wild and domestic reindeer (Rangifer tarandus; caribou in North America can help explain observed social-ecological dynamics of arctic hunting and husbandry systems. Different modes of hunting and husbandry incorporate strategies to mitigate effects of differing patterns of environmental uncertainty. Simulations of simple models of harvested wild and domestic herds with density-dependent recruitment show that random environmental variation produces cycles and crashes in populations that would quickly stabilize at a steady state with nonrandom parameters. Different husbandry goals lead to radically different long-term domestic herd sizes. Wild and domestic herds are typically ecological competitors but social complements. Hypothesized differences in ecological competition and diverse human livelihoods are explored in dynamic social-ecological models in which domestic herds competitively interact with wild herds. These models generate a framework for considering issues in the evolution of Human-Rangifer Systems, such as state-subsidized herding and the use of domestic herds for transportation support in hunting systems. Issues considered include the role of geographic factors, markets for Rangifer products, state-subsidized herding, effects of changes in husbandry goals on fate of wild herds, and how environmental shocks, herd population cycles, and policy shifts might lead to system state changes. The models also suggest speculation on the role of geographic factors in the failure of reindeer husbandry to take hold in the North American Arctic. The analysis concludes with suggested empirical strategies for estimating parameters of the model for use in comparative studies across regions of the Arctic.

  11. Assessing the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU DuanYang; KANG XiangWu; LIU ZhiLi; ZHUANG DaFang; PAN JianJun

    2009-01-01

    Climate change and human activities are driving forces of sandy desertification and the relative role of them in sandy desertification is the hot point in related researches.A study was carried to assess the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region in China.Potential NPP and the difference between potential and actual NPP were selected as indicators to as-sess the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification,respectively.Assessing methods were built based on some scenarios for the reversion and expansion of sandy desertification and the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region were assessed from 1981 to 2000.The results showed that although some local places experienced an expansion of sandy desertification,the change of sandy desertification of Ordos region from 1981 to 2000 showed a stably reversing trend.The relative role of climate change and human ac-tivities in sandy desertification of Ordos region varied at different temporal and spatial scales in the reversion and expansion processes.In the reversion of sandy desertification,climate change was the dominant factor in the period of 1981 to 1990 and the reversed areas mainly induced by climate change including Mu Us sandy land and the transition zone between temperate steppe and temperate decidu-ous scrubs in north east of Ordos region; however,human activities controlled the reversed process during the period from 1991 to 2000 and the areas mainly induced by human activities distributed in all banners of Ordos region.In the expansion of sandy desertificallon,human activities were the dominant factor in the period of 1981 to 1990 and the expanded areas mainly included the regions around com-mon boundary of Hanggin,Dalad Banners and Dongsheng City; however,climate change dominated the expansion of sandy desertification from 1991 to 2000,the expanded areas equably distributed

  12. Human health risk assessment for potentially toxic metals (PTEs) in Acerra' s area (Campanian Region, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezza, Carmela; Sorvari, Jaana; Albanese, Stefano; Matar, Thiombane; Lima, Annamaria; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-04-01

    Acerra's territory is situated in the Agro Aversano area. It is characterized by considerable anthropogenic pollution, caused by the illegal dumping and burning of waste since the 1990s. This area has also become highly urbanized and it is undergoing continuous changes in land-use patterns. Altogether 60 % of the total area is dedicated to agriculture, cereals, potato, tobacco and vegetables being the main crops, while 20 % of the area is urban and peri-urban. The remaining part is devoted to industrial use. The waste treatment plant, which incinerates mixed municipal solid waste from most of the municipalities around the city of Naples since 2009, is a potential major source of industrial pollution in the area. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of environmental contamination in Acerra and assess the consequential health risks. 178 topsoil samples and 10 food samples (corn and Chicorium endive) were taken within the whole study area. All samples were analysed for 15 elements (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V and Zn) at Bureau Veritas Analytical Laboratories (Vancouver, Canada) by ICP-MS and ICP-ES after an aqua-regia digestion. We calculated enrichment factors and pollution indexes of the PTEs in soil and vegetables by comparing their concentrations with the regional background level and trigger and action values for residential/recreational and industrial/commercial land use set in the Italian Environmental Law (152/06). We also calculated the soil-to-plant bio-concentration factor for critical PTEs. In the human health risk assessment, we focused on Be, Cu, Pb, and Zn since they were identified as the most critical elements based on the pollution indexes. We drew up a conceptual model to describe the formation of human health risks in the study area and divided it into agricultural, urban and industrial subareas. Considering the land use and environmental conditions, the following exposure routes are relevant in the formation

  13. PCR analysis of the upstream regulatory region of human papillomavirus genomes in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Y K; Arends, M. J.; Duvall, E.; Bird, C C

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To test whether human papillomavirus (HPV) variants with large scale sequence alterations to the upstream regulatory region are present in cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) and cervical carcinomas. METHODS--New PCR based assays were designed specifically to detect large scale insertion/deletion alterations in the upstream regulatory region of HPV 16 and 18. The assays were applied to 24 cases of CIN and 34 cases of cervical carcinoma previously shown to contain these two high ri...

  14. ANALYSIS OF THE RESULTS IN IMPLEMENTING THE OPERATIONAL PROGRAM FOR HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT 2007-2013 FOR CENTER REGION, ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ionela Gavrila-Paven; Iulian Bogdan Dobra; Lucian Docea

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to highlight the results achieved through the implementation ofprojects financed by the European Social Fund through the Operational Program for HumanResources Development 2007-2013 at regional level. It was considered Center Region for thepresentation and analysis of data from the point of view of absorption and especially from the pointof view of the results obtained by analyzing outcome indicators reported by the recipients for 2007-2012. Although the degree of absorption i...

  15. Climate Predictors of the Spatial Distribution of Human Plague Cases in the West Nile Region of Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    MacMillan, Katherine; Andrew J Monaghan; Apangu, Titus; Griffith, Kevin S.; Mead, Paul S.; Acayo, Sarah; Acidri, Rogers; Moore, Sean M.; MPANGA, JOSEPH TENDO; Enscore, Russel E.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Eisen, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    East Africa has been identified as a region where vector-borne and zoonotic diseases are most likely to emerge or re-emerge and where morbidity and mortality from these diseases is significant. Understanding when and where humans are most likely to be exposed to vector-borne and zoonotic disease agents in this region can aid in targeting limited prevention and control resources. Often, spatial and temporal distributions of vectors and vector-borne disease agents are predictable based on clima...

  16. Dissecting the transcriptional regulatory properties of human chromosome 16 highly conserved non-coding regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Royo

    Full Text Available Non-coding DNA conservation across species has been often used as a predictor for transcriptional enhancer activity. However, only a few systematic analyses of the function of these highly conserved non-coding regions (HCNRs have been performed. Here we use zebrafish transgenic assays to perform a systematic study of 113 HCNRs from human chromosome 16. By comparing transient and stable transgenesis, we show that the first method is highly inefficient, leading to 40% of false positives and 20% of false negatives. When analyzed in stable transgenic lines, a great majority of HCNRs were active in the central nervous system, although some of them drove expression in other organs such as the eye and the excretory system. Finally, by testing a fraction of the HCNRs lacking enhancer activity for in vivo insulator activity, we find that 20% of them may contain enhancer-blocking function. Altogether our data indicate that HCNRs may contain different types of cis-regulatory activity, including enhancer, insulators as well as other not yet discovered functions.

  17. [Effects of human disturbance on soil aggregates content and their organic C stability in Karst regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ya-wei; Su, Yi-rong; Chen, Xiang-bi; He, Xun-yang; Qin, Wen-geng; Wei, Guo-fu

    2011-04-01

    Taking the primary forest land (PF), natural restoration land (NR), grazing grassland burned annually in winter (GB), and maize-sweet potato cropland (MS) in Karst regions of Northwest Guangxi as test objects, this paper studied the soil aggregates content and their organic C stability in the four ecosystems under different human disturbance patterns. The soil water-stable aggregates (>0.25 mm) content in PF, NR, and GB accounted for more than 70%, while that in MS was only 37%. The destruction rate of soil aggregates structure in the four ecosystems decreased in the sequence of MS (54.9%) > GB (23.2%) > NR (9.8%) and PF (9.6%), with significant differences among them (Psoil aggregate organic C decreased after an initial increase and kept stable after 20 days, and increased with decreasing aggregate size. In the same size aggregates, the mineralization rate of organic C in the four ecosystems increased in the sequence of MS soil organic C was 1.7% - 3.8%, being significantly higher than that in NR, GB, and MS. The cumulative mineralization amount of soil organic C had the same change trend with the mineralization rate. The contents of soil organic C and aggregate organic C were significantly positively correlated with the mineralization rate and cumulative mineralization amount of organic C, respectively, and significantly negatively correlated with the mineralization ratio of organic C.

  18. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Copy-number variations (CNV, loss of heterozygosity (LOH, and uniparental disomy (UPD are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS, is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs. In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  19. Role of human premotor dorsal region in learning a conditional visuomotor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Pranav J; Santello, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Conditional learning is an important component of our everyday activities (e.g., handling a phone or sorting work files) and requires identification of the arbitrary stimulus, accurate selection of the motor response, monitoring of the response, and storing in memory of the stimulus-response association for future recall. Learning this type of conditional visuomotor task appears to engage the premotor dorsal region (PMd). However, the extent to which PMd might be involved in specific or all processes of conditional learning is not well understood. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we demonstrate the role of human PMd in specific stages of learning of a novel conditional visuomotor task that required subjects to identify object center of mass using a color cue and to apply appropriate torque on the object at lift onset to minimize tilt. TMS over PMd, but not vertex, increased error in torque exerted on the object during the learning trials. Analyses of digit position and forces further revealed that the slowing in conditional visuomotor learning resulted from impaired monitoring of the object orientation during lift, rather than stimulus identification, thus compromising the ability to accurately reduce performance error across trials. Importantly, TMS over PMd did not alter production of torque based on the recall of learned color-torque associations. We conclude that the role of PMd for conditional learning is highly sensitive to the stage of learning visuomotor associations.

  20. Genetic network properties of the human cortex based on regional thickness and surface area measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R. Docherty

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined network properties of genetic covariance between average cortical thickness (CT and surface area (SA within genetically-identified cortical parcellations that we previously derived from human cortical genetic maps using vertex-wise fuzzy clustering analysis with high spatial resolution. There were 24 hierarchical parcellations based on vertex-wise CT and 24 based on vertex-wise SA expansion/contraction; in both cases the 12 parcellations per hemisphere were largely symmetrical. We utilized three techniques—biometrical genetic modeling, cluster analysis, and graph theory—to examine genetic relationships and network properties within and between the 48 parcellation measures. Biometrical modeling indicated significant shared genetic covariance between size of several of the genetic parcellations. Cluster analysis suggested small distinct groupings of genetic covariance; networks highlighted several significant negative and positive genetic correlations between bilateral parcellations. Graph theoretical analysis suggested that small world, but not rich club, network properties may characterize the genetic relationships between these regional size measures. These findings suggest that cortical genetic parcellations exhibit short characteristic path lengths across a broad network of connections. This property may be protective against network failure. In contrast, previous research with structural data has observed strong rich club properties with tightly interconnected hub networks. Future studies of these genetic networks might provide powerful phenotypes for genetic studies of normal and pathological brain development, aging, and function.

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human milk samples from two regions in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinčić, D; Herceg Romanić, S; Matek Sarić, M; Grzunov, J; Dukić, B

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and seven organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in milk samples collected during 2009-2011 from primiparae living in two different regions in Croatia. p,p'-DDE is the dominant organochlorine pesticide. α-HCH/γ-HCH and p,p'-DDE/p,p'-DDT ratios indicate that there is fresh input of γ-HCH in investigated population on both locations, while this is not applicable to p,p'-DDT. The PCB profile was dominated by higher chlorinated congeners. Non-ortho PCB congeners which have the highest TEF values were not detected in any of individual samples. Toxic equivalents for mono-ortho substituted PCB congeners indicated higher exposure to toxic PCBs in Zadar, but estimated daily intakes for both locations indicate that infants consuming mother's milk are not at risk of adverse effects caused by PCBs and OCPs. Our study builds on the previous research of human milk samples collected in Zagreb and reveals that over 10-year period, levels of investigated organochlorine compounds decreased significantly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  3. Human papilloma virus (HPV genotypes prevalence in a region of South Italy (Apulia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Franca Coscia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Since human papillomavirus (HPV is the central casual factor in cervical cancer, understanding the epidemiology and geographical area distribution of the most prevalent HPV genotypes constitutes an important step towards development of strategies of prevention. AIM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and to determine HPV types distribution among 822 HPV positive women and some sexual male partners in Apulia (Italy. METHODS. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed by nested-PCR for the L1 region and reverse line blot hybridization allowing the specific detection of 24 HPV genotyping both high risk (HR and low risk (LR. RESULTS. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (35%, HPV 31 (16% HPV 6 (9%, HPV 58 and 66 (7%, followed by HPV 33 (6%, HPV 18 and 56 (4%, HPV 70 and 45 (3%, HPV 53 and 11 (2%. Currently 1.5% of tested specimens remained unclassified. Multiple infections with at last two different high-risk HPV genotypes were observed in 10% of specimens. CONCLUSIONS. This finding adds knowledge to HPV epidemiological investigation, and addresses further studies aimed to consider public health for identifying groups at risk for cervical cancer.

  4. Distribution of Non-Persistent Endocrine Disruptors in Two Different Regions of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Thomas P; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Swaab, Dick F; Struik, Dicky; Makris, Konstantinos C; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Frederiksen, Hanne; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V

    2017-09-13

    Non-persistent endocrine disrupting chemicals (npEDCs) can affect multiple organs and systems in the body. Whether npEDCs can accumulate in the human brain is largely unknown. The major aim of this pilot study was to examine the presence of environmental phenols and parabens in two distinct brain regions: the hypothalamus and white-matter tissue. In addition, a potential association between these npEDCs concentrations and obesity was investigated. Post-mortem brain material was obtained from 24 individuals, made up of 12 obese and 12 normal-weight subjects (defined as body mass index (BMI) > 30 and BMI < 25 kg/m², respectively). Nine phenols and seven parabens were measured by isotope dilution TurboFlow-LC-MS/MS. In the hypothalamus, seven suspect npEDCs (bisphenol A, triclosan, triclocarban and methyl-, ethyl-, n-propyl-, and benzyl paraben) were detected, while five npEDCs (bisphenol A, benzophenone-3, triclocarban, methyl-, and n-propyl paraben) were found in the white-matter brain tissue. We observed higher levels of methylparaben (MeP) in the hypothalamic tissue of obese subjects as compared to controls (p = 0.008). Our findings indicate that some suspected npEDCs are able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Whether the presence of npEDCs can adversely affect brain function and to which extent the detected concentrations are physiologically relevant needs to be further investigated.

  5. Spatial econometric model of natural disaster impacts on human migration in vulnerable regions of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña-Zorrilla, Sergio O; Sandberg, Krister

    2009-10-01

    Mexico's vast human and environmental diversity offers an initial framework for comprehending some of the prevailing great disparities between rich and poor. Its socio-economic constructed vulnerability to climatic events serves to expand this understanding. Based on a spatial econometric model, this paper tests the contribution of natural disasters to stimulating the emigration process in vulnerable regions of Mexico. Besides coping and adaptive capacity, it assesses the effects of economic losses due to disasters as well as the adverse production and trade conditions of the 1990s on emigration rates in 2000 at the municipality level. Weather-related disasters were responsible for approximately 80 per cent of economic losses in Mexico between 1980 and 2005, mostly in the agricultural sector, which continues to dominate many parts of the country. It is dramatic that this sector generates around only four per cent of gross domestic product but provides a livelihood to about one-quarter of the national population. It is no wonder, therefore, that most emigration from this country arises in vulnerable rural areas.

  6. Immunochip analysis identifies association of the RAD50/IL13 region with human longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Ellinghaus, David; Gentschew, Liljana;

    2016-01-01

    Human longevity is characterized by a remarkable lack of confirmed genetic associations. Here, we report on the identification of a novel locus for longevity in the RAD50/IL13 region on chromosome 5q31.1 using a combined European sample of 3208 long-lived individuals (LLI) and 8919 younger controls....... First, we performed a large-scale association study on 1458 German LLI (mean age 99.0 years) and 6368 controls (mean age 57.2 years) by targeting known immune-associated loci covered by the Immunochip. The analysis of 142 136 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed an Immunochip...... (1257 LLI, mean age 102.4 years; 1811 controls, mean age 49.1 years) and Denmark (493 LLI, mean age 96.2 years; 740 controls, mean age 63.1 years). The association at SNP rs2706372 replicated in the French study collection and showed a similar trend in the Danish participants and was also significant...

  7. Effects of cortisol on lipolysis and regional interstitial glycerol levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurhuus, C B; Gravholt, C H; Nielsen, S; Mengel, A; Christiansen, J S; Schmitz, O E; Møller, N

    2002-07-01

    Cortisol's effects on lipid metabolism are controversial and may involve stimulation of both lipolysis and lipogenesis. This study was undertaken to define the role of physiological hypercortisolemia on systemic and regional lipolysis in humans. We investigated seven healthy young male volunteers after an overnight fast on two occasions by means of microdialysis and palmitate turnover in a placebo-controlled manner with a pancreatic pituitary clamp involving inhibition with somatostatin and substitution of growth hormone, glucagon, and insulin at basal levels. Hydrocortisone infusion increased circulating concentrations of cortisol (888 +/- 12 vs. 245 +/- 7 nmol/l). Interstitial glycerol concentrations rose in parallel in abdominal (327 +/- 35 vs. 156 +/- 30 micromol/l; P = 0.05) and femoral (178 +/- 28 vs. 91 +/- 22 micromol/l; P = 0.02) adipose tissue. Systemic [(3)H]palmitate turnover increased (165 +/- 17 vs. 92 +/- 24 micromol/min; P = 0.01). Levels of insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone were comparable. In conclusion, the present study unmistakably shows that cortisol in physiological concentrations is a potent stimulus of lipolysis and that this effect prevails equally in both femoral and abdominal adipose tissue.

  8. Screening of a Novel Peptide Targeting the Proteoglycan-Like Region of Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Rana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX is extended by a proteoglycan-like region (PGLR. The aim of the present study was the development of novel molecules with specificity for PGLR, which may be used for tumor targeting and imaging. PGLR was chemically synthesized, and phage display biopanning was performed. The identified ligand PGLR-P1 was labeled with 125I and characterized for target binding and metabolic stability. In vitro characterization included kinetic, competition, and internalization studies on CA IX–positive renal cell carcinoma SKRC 52 cells. The CA IX–negative cell lines HEK293 wt and BxPC3 were used as negative controls. In vitro binding experiments revealed an increasing affinity of 125I-PGLR-P1 to SKRC 52 cells but not to negative control HEK293 wt and BxPC3 cells. Internalization studies indicated an exclusive cell membrane binding. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in most normal tissues after perfusion. In vivo blocking led to a significant decrease in tumor uptake. Our findings indicate that PGLR-P1 is a promising lead structure for the development of new peptide-based ligands targeting the PGLR of CA IX and reveal challenges that need to be considered for peptide-related molecular imaging.

  9. Screening of a novel peptide targeting the proteoglycan-like region of human carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Shoaib; Nissen, Felix; Lindner, Thomas; Altmann, Annette; Mier, Walter; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Askoxylakis, Vasileios

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is extended by a proteoglycan-like region (PGLR). The aim of the present study was the development of novel molecules with specificity for PGLR, which may be used for tumor targeting and imaging. PGLR was chemically synthesized, and phage display biopanning was performed. The identified ligand PGLR-P1 was labeled with 125I and characterized for target binding and metabolic stability. In vitro characterization included kinetic, competition, and internalization studies on CA IX-positive renal cell carcinoma SKRC 52 cells. The CA IX-negative cell lines HEK293 wt and BxPC3 were used as negative controls. In vitro binding experiments revealed an increasing affinity of 125I-PGLR-P1 to SKRC 52 cells but not to negative control HEK293 wt and BxPC3 cells. Internalization studies indicated an exclusive cell membrane binding. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in most normal tissues after perfusion. In vivo blocking led to a significant decrease in tumor uptake. Our findings indicate that PGLR-P1 is a promising lead structure for the development of new peptide-based ligands targeting the PGLR of CA IX and reveal challenges that need to be considered for peptide-related molecular imaging.

  10. An antisense transcript in the human cytomegalovirus UL87 gene region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yanping

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid advances in research on antisense transcripts are gradually changing our comprehension of genomic and gene expression aspects of the Herpesviridae. One such herpesvirus is the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. Although transcription of the HCMV UL87 gene has not been specifically investigated, cDNA clones of UL87 antisense transcripts were found in HCMV cDNA libraries previously. In this study, the transcription of the UL87 antisense strand was investigated in three clinically isolated HCMV strains. Results First, an 800 nucleotides transcript having an antisense orientation to the UL87 gene was found in a late HCMV cDNA library. Then, the UL87 antisense transcript was confirmed by Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and Northern blot in three HCMV clinical strains. Two ORFs were predicted in the antisense transcript. The putative protein of ORF 1 showed a high degree of conservation among HCMV and other CMV strains. Conclusion An 800nt antisense transcript in the UL87 gene region exists in HCMV clinical strains.

  11. Irregular G-quadruplexes Found in the Untranslated Regions of Human mRNAs Influence Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, François; Garant, Jean-Michel; Allard, Félix; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-07

    G-quadruplex structures are composed of coplanar guanines and are found in both DNA and RNA. They are formed by the stacking of two or more G-quartets that are linked together by three loops. The current belief is that RNA G-quadruplexes include loops of l to 7 nucleotides in length, although recent evidence indicates that the central loop (loop 2) can be longer if loops 1 and 3 are limited to a single nucleotide each. With the objective of broadening the definition of irregular RNA G-quadruplexes, a bioinformatic search was performed to find potential G-quadruplexes located in the untranslated regions of human mRNAs (i.e. in the 5' and 3'-UTRs) that contain either a long loop 1 or 3 of up to 40 nucleotides in length. RNA molecules including the potential sequences were then synthesized and examined in vitro by in-line probing for the formation of G-quadruplex structures. The sequences that adopted a G-quadruplex structure were cloned into a luciferase dual vector and examined for their ability to modulate translation in cellulo Some irregular G-quadruplexes were observed to either promote or repress translation regardless of the position or the size of the long loop they possessed. Even if the composition of a RNA G-quadruplex is not quite completely understood, the results presented in this report clearly demonstrate that what defines a RNA G-quadruplex is much broader than what we previously believed.

  12. Genetic network properties of the human cortex based on regional thickness and surface area measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Anna R.; Sawyers, Chelsea K.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Neale, Michael C.; Eyler, Lisa T.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Franz, Carol E.; Chen, Chi-Hua; McEvoy, Linda K.; Verhulst, Brad; Tsuang, Ming T.; Kremen, William S.

    2015-01-01

    We examined network properties of genetic covariance between average cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) within genetically-identified cortical parcellations that we previously derived from human cortical genetic maps using vertex-wise fuzzy clustering analysis with high spatial resolution. There were 24 hierarchical parcellations based on vertex-wise CT and 24 based on vertex-wise SA expansion/contraction; in both cases the 12 parcellations per hemisphere were largely symmetrical. We utilized three techniques—biometrical genetic modeling, cluster analysis, and graph theory—to examine genetic relationships and network properties within and between the 48 parcellation measures. Biometrical modeling indicated significant shared genetic covariance between size of several of the genetic parcellations. Cluster analysis suggested small distinct groupings of genetic covariance; networks highlighted several significant negative and positive genetic correlations between bilateral parcellations. Graph theoretical analysis suggested that small world, but not rich club, network properties may characterize the genetic relationships between these regional size measures. These findings suggest that cortical genetic parcellations exhibit short characteristic path lengths across a broad network of connections. This property may be protective against network failure. In contrast, previous research with structural data has observed strong rich club properties with tightly interconnected hub networks. Future studies of these genetic networks might provide powerful phenotypes for genetic studies of normal and pathological brain development, aging, and function. PMID:26347632

  13. Transcription-factor occupancy at HOT regions quantitatively predicts RNA polymerase recruitment in five human cell lines.

    KAUST Repository

    Foley, Joseph W

    2013-10-20

    BACKGROUND: High-occupancy target (HOT) regions are compact genome loci occupied by many different transcription factors (TFs). HOT regions were initially defined in invertebrate model organisms, and we here show that they are a ubiquitous feature of the human gene-regulation landscape. RESULTS: We identified HOT regions by a comprehensive analysis of ChIP-seq data from 96 DNA-associated proteins in 5 human cell lines. Most HOT regions co-localize with RNA polymerase II binding sites, but many are not near the promoters of annotated genes. At HOT promoters, TF occupancy is strongly predictive of transcription preinitiation complex recruitment and moderately predictive of initiating Pol II recruitment, but only weakly predictive of elongating Pol II and RNA transcript abundance. TF occupancy varies quantitatively within human HOT regions; we used this variation to discover novel associations between TFs. The sequence motif associated with any given TF\\'s direct DNA binding is somewhat predictive of its empirical occupancy, but a great deal of occupancy occurs at sites without the TF\\'s motif, implying indirect recruitment by another TF whose motif is present. CONCLUSIONS: Mammalian HOT regions are regulatory hubs that integrate the signals from diverse regulatory pathways to quantitatively tune the promoter for RNA polymerase II recruitment.

  14. Subanesthetic concentration of sevoflurane increases regional cerebral blood flow more, but regional cerebral blood volume less, than subanesthetic concentration of isoflurane in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, I H; Kolbitsch, C; Hörmann, C; Schocke, M; Felber, S; Zschiegner, F; Hinteregger, M; Kremser, C; Pfeiffer, K P; Benzer, A

    2001-10-01

    Both sevoflurane and isoflurane are used in moderate concentrations in neuroanesthesia practice. The limiting factors for using higher concentrations of inhalational anesthetics in patients undergoing neurosurgery are the agents' effects on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). In particular, an increase in CBV, which is a key determinant of intracranial pressure, may add to the neurosurgical patient's perioperative risk. To compare the effects of a subanesthetic concentration (0.4 minimum alveolar concentration) of sevoflurane or isoflurane on regional CBF (rCBF), regional CBV (rCBV) and regional mean transit time (rMTT), contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging perfusion measurements were made in spontaneously breathing human volunteers. Absolute changes in rCBF, regional CBV, and rMTT during administration of either drug in regions of interest outlined bilaterally in white and grey matter were nonparametrically (Mann-Whitney test) analyzed. Sevoflurane increased rCBF in practically all regions (absolute change, 4.44 +/- 2.87 to 61.54 +/- 2.39 mL/100g per minute) more than isoflurane did (absolute change, 12.91 +/- 2.52 to 52.67 +/- 3.32 mL/100g per minute), which decreased frontal, parietal, and white matter rCBF (absolute change, -1.12 +/- 0.59 to -14.69 +/- 3.03 mL/100g per minute). Regional CBV was higher in most regions during isoflurane administration (absolute change, 0.75 +/- 0.03 to 4.92 +/- 0.16 mL/100g) than during sevoflurane administration (absolute change, 0.05 +/- 0.14 to 3.57 +/- 0.14 mL/100g). Regional mean transit time was decreased by sevoflurane (absolute change, -0.18 +/- 0.05 to -0.60 +/- 0.04 s) but increased by isoflurane (absolute change, 0.19 +/- 0.03 to 0.69 +/- 0.04 s). In summary, regional CBV was significantly lower during sevoflurane than during isoflurane administration, although sevoflurane increased rCBF more than isoflurane, which even decreased rCBF in some regions. For sevoflurane and, even more

  15. Getting the Dimensions Right - Human Nutrition as Key for the Control of Regional Nitrogen Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zessner, M.; Thaler, S.; Ruzicka, K.; Natho, S.

    2009-04-01

    The western society is rested upon a strong animal-based (meat, eggs, milk) nutrition, which is far of a healthy balanced diet. Furthermore, the production of animal based food consumes five to six times more resources (e.g.: area, fertilizer) compared to plant-based food and is closely connected to environmental pollution (e.g.: emission of greenhouse gases, water pollution). Especially the regional nitrogen turnover is highly driven by the request from human nutrition on agricultural production. While the efficiency of the transfer of applied nitrogen into the product is 60 - 70 % for vegetarian food, it is 15 - 25 % for animal based food. This contribution is going to demonstrate the most important nitrogen fluxes on national scale in Austria calculated using a national material flow analysis. The national nitrogen balance is driven by the production of nitrogen fertiliser and import of fooder. The airborne transport of reactive nitrogen (NOX and NHX) plays a decisive role within this balance. The main losses into the environment occur during the agricultural production process. Losses to the atmosphere exceed losses to groundwater and surface waters. After introduction of nitrogen removal at treatment plants, emissions to surface waters are dominated by land use driven fluxes via groundwater. The influence of nitrogen depositions on land (agricultural area, forest and mountain regions) on nitrogen emissions to the water system is in the same order of magnitude as the direct emissions due to fertiliser application - especially in a country as Austria with high shares of mountainous and silvicultural areas. Sources for depositions of reactive nitrogen are mainly NH3 emissions to the air from animal husbandry and NOX emissions to the air from traffic. Both substance are matter of transboundary transport and thus are highly influenced by activities outside a specific country or river catchment. Management of nitrogen on a national or catchment scale has therefore

  16. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical neoplasia attributed to 12 high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes by region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Ault, Kevin A; Bosch, F Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background: We estimated the proportion of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) cases attributed to 14 HPV types, including quadrivalent (qHPV) (6/11/16/18) and 9-valent (9vHPV) (6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccine types, by region. Methods: Women ages 15-26 and 24-45 years from 5 regions were...

  17. Genome-wide DNA methylation analyses in the brain reveal four differentially methylated regions between humans and non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jinkai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly improved cognitive function is the most significant change in human evolutionary history. Recently, several large-scale studies reported the evolutionary roles of DNA methylation; however, the role of DNA methylation on brain evolution is largely unknown. Results To test if DNA methylation has contributed to the evolution of human brain, with the use of MeDIP-Chip and SEQUENOM MassARRAY, we conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs in the brain between humans and rhesus macaques. We first identified a total of 150 candidate DMRs by the MeDIP-Chip method, among which 4 DMRs were confirmed by the MassARRAY analysis. All 4 DMRs are within or close to the CpG islands, and a MIR3 repeat element was identified in one DMR, but no repeat sequence was observed in the other 3 DMRs. For the 4 DMR genes, their proteins tend to be conserved and two genes have neural related functions. Bisulfite sequencing and phylogenetic comparison among human, chimpanzee, rhesus macaque and rat suggested several regions of lineage specific DNA methylation, including a human specific hypomethylated region in the promoter of K6IRS2 gene. Conclusions Our study provides a new angle of studying human brain evolution and understanding the evolutionary role of DNA methylation in the central nervous system. The results suggest that the patterns of DNA methylation in the brain are in general similar between humans and non-human primates, and only a few DMRs were identified.

  18. Isolation and functional analysis of the human glioblastoma-specific promoter region of the human GD3 synthase (hST8Sia I) gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-Mi Dae; Haw-Young Kwon; Nam-Young Kang; Na-Ree Song; Kyoung-Sook Kim; Cheorl-Ho Kim; Jai-Heon Lee; Young-Choon Lee

    2009-01-01

    We identified the promoter region of the human GD3 synthase (hST8Sia I) gene to elucidate the mechanism underlying the regulation of hST8Sia I expression in human glioblastoma cells. The 5-rapid amplification of cDNA end using mRNA prepared from U-87MG cells revealed the presence of transcription start site of hST8Sia I gene, and the 5'-terminal analysis of its product showed that transcription started from 648 nucleotides upstream of the translational initiation site. Functional analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the hST8Sia I gene by transient expression method revealed that the region from 638 to 498 is important for transcriptional activity of the hST8Sia I gene in U-87MG and T98G cells. This region lacks apparent TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains putative binding sites for transcription factors AREB6 and Elk-1. Site-directed mutagenesis and transient transfection assays demonstrated that both AREB6 and Elk-1 elements in this region were required for the promoter activity in U-87MG and T98G cells. These results indicated that both AREB6 and Elk-1 might play an essential role in the transcriptional activity of hST8Sia I gene essential for GD3 synthesis in human glioblastoma cells.

  19. Age- and sex-related regional compressive strength characteristics of human lumbar vertebrae in osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márta Kurutz

    2008-12-01

    about 25% larger in men, yield and ultimate strains were quasi equal for sexes, break strains were 10% higher in women. Ultimate energy absorption capacity was 10%–20% higher in men; the final ductile energy absorption capacity was quasi equal for sexes in all levels. Age-dependence was stronger for men, mainly in central regions (ultimate load, male: r = −0.66, p < 0.01, female: r = −0.52, p < 0.005; ultimate stress, male: r = −0.69, p < 0.01, female: r = −0.50, p < 0.005; Young’s modulus, male: r = −0.55, p < 0.05, female: r = −0.52, p < 0.005, ultimate stiffness, male: r = −0.58, p < 0.05, female: r = −0.35, p < 0.03, central ultimate absorbed energy density, male: r = −0.59, p < 0.015, female: r = −0.29, p < 0.08.Conclusions: For the strongly osteoporotic population (BMD < 0.4 g/cm2, T-score < −4 the statical variables (loads, stresses showed significant correlation; mixed variables (stiffness, Young’s modulus, energy showed moderate correlation; kinematical variables (displacements, strains showed no correlation with age. The strong correlation of men between BMD and aging (r = −0.82, p < 0.001 and betwen BMD and strength parameters (r = 0.8–0.9, p < 0.001 indicated linear trends in age-related strength loss for men; however, the moderate correlation of women between BMD and aging (r = −0.47, p < 0.005 and between BMD and strength parameters (r = 0.4–0.5, p < 0.005 suggested the need of nonlinear (quadratic approximation that provided the better fit in age-related strength functions of females modelling postmenopausal disproportionalities.Keywords: osteoporosis, human lumbar vertebral body, regional compressive strength, load, stress, strain, young’s modulus, energy absorption capacity, age- and sex-dependence

  20. [Occurrence of Giardia species and genotypes in humans and animals in Wielkopolska region, Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarczyk, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Giardia is the most common intestinal protozoan parasite found in humans and animals worldwide. Although it has been known for three hundred years, the nomenclature, taxonomy, host specificity, and pathogenicity of Giardia still arouse numerous controversies and ambiguities. Giardia is classified into six species, that are characterised by various ranges of hosts. The most dubious species is G. intestinalis, which includes a dozen or so genotypes, and only two of them (genotype A and B) have wide ranges of hosts, including humans. Moreover, in some genotype assemblages of G. intestinalis certain subgenotypes were distinguished and it was proven that in the same host species various subgenotypes of this parasite may occur. Bearing in mind the significant genetic heterogeneity of G. intestinalis and the fact that various genotypes and subgenotypes of this parasite are characterised by the broad or narrow host specificity, the data concerning the frequency of giardiosis occurrence are insufficient. It is necessary to use molecular biology techniques in order to define the genotype and/or the subgenotype of G. intestinalis that are found in humans and in certain animal species. Furthermore, since more and more pieces of evidence connected with a possibility of the sexual recombination of Giardia are gathered, it is unknown if genotypes and subgenotypes of this parasite are stable in time. The aim of this thesis was to define the frequency of Giardia occurrence in humans and animals in Wielkopolska region, to identify species and genotypes of Giardia that occur in humans and animals, as well as to obtain an axenic culture of the chosen isolates of Giardia from animals and to compare the sequence of the beta-giardin gene fragment obtained from the DNA isolated from cysts and trophozoites in order to check if the axenisation of G. intestinalis leads to the selection of genotypes or if Giardia genotypes are stable in time. Altogether, 2183 faecal samples were examined for

  1. The ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord differs from other species and shows ependymoma-like features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Florensa-Vila, José; Ferrer, Isidro; Grassner, Lukas; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    Several laboratories have described the existence of undifferentiated precursor cells that may act like stem cells in the ependyma of the rodent spinal cord. However, there are reports showing that this region is occluded and disassembled in humans after the second decade of life, although this has been largely ignored or interpreted as a post-mortem artefact. To gain insight into the patency, actual structure, and molecular properties of the adult human spinal cord ependymal region, we followed three approaches: (i) with MRI, we estimated the central canal patency in 59 control subjects, 99 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and 26 patients with non-traumatic spinal cord injuries. We observed that the central canal is absent from the vast majority of individuals beyond the age of 18 years, gender-independently, throughout the entire length of the spinal cord, both in healthy controls and after injury; (ii) with histology and immunohistochemistry, we describe morphological properties of the non-lesioned ependymal region, which showed the presence of perivascular pseudorosettes, a common feature of ependymoma; and (iii) with laser capture microdissection, followed by TaqMan® low density arrays, we studied the gene expression profile of the ependymal region and found that it is mainly enriched in genes compatible with a low grade or quiescent ependymoma (53 genes); this region is enriched only in 14 genes related to neurogenic niches. In summary, we demonstrate here that the central canal is mainly absent in the adult human spinal cord and is replaced by a structure morphologically and molecularly different from that described for rodents and other primates. The presented data suggest that the ependymal region is more likely to be reminiscent of a low-grade ependymoma. Therefore, a direct translation to adult human patients of an eventual therapeutic potential of this region based on animal models should be approached with caution.

  2. Characterization of promoter region and genomic structure of the murine and human genes encoding Src like adapter protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratchmarova, I; Sosinowski, T; Weiss, A; Witter, K; Vincenz, C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-10

    Src-like adapter protein (SLAP) was identified as a signaling molecule in a yeast two-hybrid system using the cytoplasmic domain of EphA2, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase (Pandey et al., 1995. Characterization of a novel Src-like adapter protein that associates with the Eck receptor tyrosine kinase. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19201-19204). It is very similar to members of the Src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in that it contains very homologous SH3 and SH2 domains (Abram and Courtneidge, 2000. Src family tyrosine kinases and growth factor signaling. Exp. Cell. Res. 254, 1-13.). However, instead of a kinase domain at the C-terminus, it contains a unique C-terminal region. In order to exclude the possibility that an alternative form exists, we have isolated genomic clones containing the murine Slap gene as well as the human SLA gene. The coding regions of murine Slap and human SLA genes contain seven exons and six introns. Absence of any kinase domain in the genomic region confirm its designation as an adapter protein. Additionally, we have cloned and sequenced approximately 2.6 kb of the region 5' to the initiator methionine of the murine Slap gene. When subcloned upstream of a luciferase gene, this fragment increased the transcriptional activity about 6-fold in a human Jurkat T cell line and approximately 52-fold in a murine T cell line indicating that this region contains promoter elements that dictate SLAP expression. We have also cloned the promoter region of the human SLA gene. Since SLAP is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid and by activation of B cells, the cloning of its promoter region will permit a detailed analysis of the elements required for its transcriptional regulation.

  3. Advancing the sexual and reproductive health and human rights of women living with HIV: a review of UN, regional and national human rights norms and standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Rajat; Van Belle, Nuna; Temmerman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    The right to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) is an essential part of the right to health and is dependent upon substantive equality, including freedom from multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination that result in exclusion in both law and practice. Nonetheless, general and specific SRH needs of women living with HIV are often not adequately addressed. For example, services that women living with HIV need may not be available or may have multiple barriers, in particular stigma and discrimination. This study was conducted to review United Nations Human Rights Council, Treaty Monitoring Bodies and Special Rapporteur reports and regional and national mechanisms regarding SRH issues of women living with HIV. The objective is to assess areas of progress, as well as gaps, in relation to health and human rights considerations in the work of these normative bodies on health and human rights. The review was done using keywords of international, regional and national jurisprudence on findings covering the 2000 to 2014 period for documents in English; searches for the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and national judgments were also conducted in Spanish. Jurisprudence of UN Treaty Monitoring Bodies, regional mechanisms and national bodies was considered in this regard. In total, 236 findings were identified using the search strategy, and of these 129 were selected for review based on the inclusion criteria. The results highlight that while jurisprudence from international, regional and national bodies reflects consideration of some health and human rights issues related to women living with HIV and SRH, the approach of these bodies has been largely ad hoc and lacks a systematic integration of human rights concerns of women living with HIV in relation to SRH. Most findings relate to non-discrimination, accessibility, informed decision-making and accountability. There are critical gaps on normative standards regarding the human rights of women living with

  4. Extending human perception of electromagnetic radiation to the UV region through biologically inspired photochromic fuzzy logic (BIPFUL) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Rightler, Amanda L; Heron, B Mark; Gabbutt, Christopher D

    2016-01-25

    Photochromic fuzzy logic systems have been designed that extend human visual perception into the UV region. The systems are founded on a detailed knowledge of the activation wavelengths and quantum yields of a series of thermally reversible photochromic compounds. By appropriate matching of the photochromic behaviour unique colour signatures are generated in response differing UV activation frequencies.

  5. Weather and human impacts on forest fires: 100 years of fire history in two climatic regions of Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zumbrunnen, T.; Pezzatti, B.; Menendez, P.; Bugmann, H.; Brgi, M.; Conedera, M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the factors driving past fire regimes is crucial in the context of global change as a basis for predicting future changes. In this study, we aimed to identify the impact of climate and human activities on fire occurrence in the most fire-prone regions of Switzerland. We considered fore

  6. Probing region-specific microstructure of human cortical areas using high angular and spatial resolution diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Nauen, David W; Troncoso, Juan C; Mori, Susumu

    2015-01-15

    Regional heterogeneity in cortical cyto- and myeloarchitecture forms the structural basis of mapping of cortical areas in the human brain. In this study, we investigate the potential of diffusion MRI to probe the microstructure of cortical gray matter and its region-specific heterogeneity across cortical areas in the fixed human brain. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data at an isotropic resolution of 92-μm and 30 diffusion-encoding directions were acquired using a 3D diffusion-weighted gradient-and-spin-echo sequence, from prefrontal (Brodmann area 9), primary motor (area 4), primary somatosensory (area 3b), and primary visual (area 17) cortical specimens (n=3 each) from three human subjects. Further, the diffusion MR findings in these cortical areas were compared with histological silver impregnation of the same specimens, in order to investigate the underlying architectonic features that constitute the microstructural basis of diffusion-driven contrasts in cortical gray matter. Our data reveal distinct and region-specific diffusion MR contrasts across the studied areas, allowing delineation of intracortical bands of tangential fibers in specific layers-layer I, layer VI, and the inner and outer bands of Baillarger. The findings of this work demonstrate unique sensitivity of diffusion MRI to differentiate region-specific cortical microstructure in the human brain, and will be useful for myeloarchitectonic mapping of cortical areas as well as to achieve an understanding of the basis of diffusion NMR contrasts in cortical gray matter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A dominant chromatin opening activity in 5' hypersensitive site 3 of the human β-globin locus control region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); K.C. Tan-Un; A. Harper; D. Michalovich (David); P.J. Fraser (Peter); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractSingle-copy human beta-globin transgenes are very susceptible to suppression by position effects of surrounding closed chromatin. However, these position effects are overcome by a 20 kbp DNA fragment containing the locus control region (LCR). Here we show that the 6.5 kbp microlocus LCR

  8. Weather and human impacts on forest fires: 100 years of fire history in two climatic regions of Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zumbrunnen, T.; Pezzatti, B.; Menendez, P.; Bugmann, H.; Brgi, M.; Conedera, M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the factors driving past fire regimes is crucial in the context of global change as a basis for predicting future changes. In this study, we aimed to identify the impact of climate and human activities on fire occurrence in the most fire-prone regions of Switzerland. We considered

  9. The Upstream Regulatory Region of Human Papillomavirus Type 31 Is Insensitive to Glucocorticoid Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg-White, Jennifer L.; Meyers, Craig

    2002-01-01

    The upstream regulatory region (URR) of various types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has been shown to contain functional glucocorticoid response elements (GREs), including HPV type 11 (HPV11), HPV16, and HPV18. Glucocorticoids have been demonstrated to induce the transcriptional activity of the early promoters of these HPV types. Although it has been assumed that the URR of HPV31 contains at least one GRE, no functionality has been demonstrated. We attempt to show here inducibility of the URR of HPV31 by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex). By sequence analysis we identified three potential GREs in the URR of HPV31. Gel shift analysis indicated that each of these three sites has the potential to be a functional GRE. However, constructs containing the full-length URR, 5′ deletions of the URR, and an internal fragment of the URR containing all three putative GREs were only weakly inducible by dex. Linker scanning mutants, whereby each potential GRE was replaced individually, in double combination, or in triple combination by a unique polylinker, had no effect on dex inducibility. Replacement of each of the three HPV31 GREs with the GRE of HPV18 failed to induce a response to dex. Placement of the HPV18 GRE into the URR of HPV31 in a region similar to its location in the HPV18 URR was also unable to result in a strong dex induction of the HPV31 URR. These data suggest that the lack of dex inducibility is due to the overall context of the HPV31 URR and may be dependent on the requirements of the major early promoter for transcriptional activation. Finally, replacement of the HPV18 GRE with each of the HPV31 GREs in HPV18 only showed weak inducibility, indicating that the three GREs of HPV31 are in fact only weak inducers of dex. Overall, these data suggest that dex responsiveness, along with oncogenic potential, may provide a possible explanation for the classification of HPV31 as an intermediate-risk virus and demonstrate the complexity of

  10. Epidemiologic characterization of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in various regions of Yunnan Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Zulqarnain; Li, Yuanyue; Yuan, Tao; Feng, Yue; Liu, Yanqing; Tai, Wenlin; Liu, Li; Wang, Binghui; Zhang, A-Mei; Wu, Xiaomei; Xia, Xueshan

    2016-05-26

    This study was designed to determine the Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and its distribution of genotypes in various regions of Yunnan Province, China. In this study, participants were recruited during routine gynecologic examination between Oct 2013 and Feb 2015. A total of 17,898 women were recruited. Polymerase chain reaction was used for detecting the HPV positive samples and HPV geno-array test was used for genotyping. The overall HPV infection rate (19.9 %) among the south-western women was significantly higher (P = 0.001) than that among the north-western (18.0 %), south-eastern (13.3 %), north-eastern (11.1 %) and central women (12.9 %). The high-risk (HR) (18.1 %, P = 0.001) and single genotype (16.7 %, P = 0.001) infection rates among the South-western women were also significantly higher than those of among the north-western (13.9 %, 11.3 %), south-eastern (11.6 %, 10.5 %), north-eastern (9.6 %, 9.1 %) and central women (10.5 %, 10.0 %), respectively. While, the infections with multiple HPV (4.2 %) genotypes were significantly more common (P = 0.001) among women in north-western Yunnan than women in the south-western (1.3 %, 3.1 %), south-eastern (1.7 %, 2.7 %), north-eastern (1.5 %, 2.0 %) and central Yunnan (2.4 %, 2.9 %). A total of 30 HPV genotypes were detected; among them 13 were HR-HPV, 3 were PHR-HPV (Potential High risk), 8 were LR-HPV (Low risk) and six were unclassified. The most common HPV genotypes were HPV-52, 16, 58, 53 in control group, HPV-16, 52, 58, 39 and 53 in CINI (Cervical intraepithelial Neoplasia), HPV-52, 16, 58, 33, 53 and 81 in CINII, HPV16, 58, 18, 52, 81 in CINIII and HPV-16 18, 58, 52 in cervical cancer (CC), respectively. Such variation has also been observed about distribution of HPV genotypes distribution among single and multiple infections. This study gives an epidemiological estimate of HPV prevalence and different genotype distribution in various region of Yunnan

  11. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors associated with human Taenia solium infections in Mbozi District, Mbeya Region, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Mwanjali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Taenia solium cysticercosis/taeniosis is emerging as a serious public health and economic problem in many developing countries. This study was conducted to determine prevalence and risk factors of human T. solium infections in Mbeya Region, Tanzania. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 13 villages of Mbozi district in 2009. Sera of 830 people (mean 37.9±11.3 years (SD; 43% females were tested for circulating cysticerci antigen (Ag-ELISA and antibody (Ab-ELISA. A subset of persons found seropositive by Ag-ELISA underwent computed tomography (CT scan of the brain for evidence of neurocysticercosis. Stool samples from 820 of the same participants were tested for taeniosis by copro-antigens (copro-Ag-ELISA and formol-ether concentration technique. Cases of T. solium taeniosis were confirmed serologically by EITB assay (rES38. A questionnaire was used for identification of risk factors. Active cysticercosis by positive Ag-ELISA was found in 139 (16.7% persons while anti-cysticercal antibodies were detected in 376 (45.3% persons by Ab-ELISA. Among 55 persons positive for Ag-ELISA undergoing CT scan, 30 (54.6% were found to have structures in the brain suggestive of neurocysticercosis. Using faecal analysis, 43 (5.2% stool samples tested positive for taeniosis by copro-Ag-ELISA while Taenia eggs were detected in 9 (1.1% stool samples by routine coprology. Antibodies specifically against adult T. solium were detected in 34 copro-Ag-ELISA positive participants by EITB (rES38 indicating T. solium taeniosis prevalence of 4.1%. Increasing age and hand washing by dipping in contrast to using running water, were found associated with Ag-ELISA seropositivity by logistic regression. Gender (higher risk in females and water source were risk factors associated with Ab-ELISA seropositivity. Reported symptoms of chronic severe headaches and history of epileptic seizures were found associated with positive Ag-ELISA (p≤0

  13. Landscape, demographic and climatic associations with human West Nile virus occurrence regionally in 2012 in the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. DeGroote

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After several years of low West Nile virus (WNV occurrence in the United States of America (USA, 2012 wit- nessed large outbreaks in several parts of the country. In order to understand the outbreak dynamics, spatial clustering and landscape, demographic and climatic associations with WNV occurrence were investigated at a regional level in the USA. Previous research has demonstrated that there are a handful of prominent WNV mosquito vectors with varying ecological requirements responsible for WNV transmission in the USA. Published range maps of these important vectors were georef- erenced and used to define eight functional ecological regions in the coterminous USA. The number of human WNV cases and human populations by county were attained in order to calculate a WNV rate for each county in 2012. Additionally, a binary value (high/low was calculated for each county based on whether the county WNV rate was above or below the rate for the region it fell in. Global Moran’s I and Anselin Local Moran’s I statistics of spatial association were used per region to examine and visualize clustering of the WNV rate and the high/low rating. Spatial data on landscape, demographic and climatic variables were compiled and derived from a variety of sources and then investigated in relation to human WNV using both Spearman rho correlation coefficients and Poisson regression models. Findings demonstrated significant spatial clustering of WNV and substantial inter-regional differences in relationships between WNV occurrence and landscape, demographic and climatically related variables. The regional associations were consistent with the ecologies of the dominant vectors for those regions. The large outbreak in the Southeast region was preceded by higher than normal winter and spring precipitation followed by dry and hot conditions in the summer.

  14. Landscape, demographic and climatic associations with human West Nile virus occurrence regionally in 2012 in the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroote, John P; Sugumaran, Ramanathan; Ecker, Mark

    2014-11-01

    After several years of low West Nile virus (WNV) occurrence in the United States of America (USA), 2012 witnessed large outbreaks in several parts of the country. In order to understand the outbreak dynamics, spatial clustering and landscape, demographic and climatic associations with WNV occurrence were investigated at a regional level in the USA. Previous research has demonstrated that there are a handful of prominent WNV mosquito vectors with varying ecological requirements responsible for WNV transmission in the USA. Published range maps of these important vectors were georeferenced and used to define eight functional ecological regions in the coterminous USA. The number of human WNV cases and human populations by county were attained in order to calculate a WNV rate for each county in 2012. Additionally, a binary value (high/low) was calculated for each county based on whether the county WNV rate was above or below the rate for the region it fell in. Global Moran's I and Anselin Local Moran's I statistics of spatial association were used per region to examine and visualize clustering of the WNV rate and the high/low rating. Spatial data on landscape, demographic and climatic variables were compiled and derived from a variety of sources and then investigated in relation to human WNV using both Spearman rho correlation coefficients and Poisson regression models. Findings demonstrated significant spatial clustering of WNV and substantial inter-regional differences in relationships between WNV occurrence and landscape, demographic and climatically related variables. The regional associations were consistent with the ecologies of the dominant vectors for those regions. The large outbreak in the Southeast region was preceded by higher than normal winter and spring precipitation followed by dry and hot conditions in the summer.

  15. Segmental Duplications in Euchromatic Regions of Human Chromosome 5: A Source of Evolutionary Instability and Transcriptional Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courseaux, Anouk; Richard, Florence; Grosgeorge, Josiane; Ortola, Christine; Viale, Agnes; Turc-Carel, Claude; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Gaudray, Patrick; Nahon, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Recent analyses of the structure of pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions have revealed that these particular regions of human chromosomes are often composed of blocks of duplicated genomic segments that have been associated with rapid evolutionary turnover among the genomes of closely related primates. In the present study, we show that euchromatic regions of human chromosome 5—5p14, 5p13, 5q13, 5q15–5q21—also display such an accumulation of segmental duplications. The structure, organization and evolution of those primate-specific sequences were studied in detail by combining in silico and comparative FISH analyses on human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutang, macaca, and capuchin chromosomes. Our results lend support to a two-step model of transposition duplication in the euchromatic regions, with a founder insertional event at the time of divergence between Platyrrhini and Catarrhini (25–35 million years ago) and an apparent burst of inter- and intrachromosomal duplications in the Hominidae lineage. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the chronology and, likely, molecular mechanisms, differ regarding the region of primary insertion—euchromatic versus pericentromeric regions. Lastly, we show that as their counterparts located near the heterochromatic region, the euchromatic segmental duplications have consistently reshaped their region of insertion during primate evolution, creating putative mosaic genes, and they are obvious candidates for causing ectopic rearrangements that have contributed to evolutionary/genomic instability. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: D. Le Paslier, A. McKenzie, J. Melki, C. Sargent, J. Scharf and S. Selig.] PMID:12618367

  16. Substance P immunoreactivity exhibits frequent colocalization with kisspeptin and neurokinin B in the human infundibular region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hrabovszky

    Full Text Available Neurons synthesizing neurokinin B (NKB and kisspeptin (KP in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus represent important upstream regulators of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurosecretion. In search of neuropeptides co-expressed in analogous neurons of the human infundibular nucleus (Inf, we have carried out immunohistochemical studies of the tachykinin peptide Substance P (SP in autopsy samples from men (21-78 years and postmenopausal (53-83 years women. Significantly higher numbers of SP-immunoreactive (IR neurons and darker labeling were observed in the Inf of postmenopausal women than in age-matched men. Triple-immunofluorescent studies localized SP immunoreactivity to considerable subsets of KP-IR and NKB-IR axons and perikarya in the infundibular region. In postmenopausal women, 25.1% of NKB-IR and 30.6% of KP-IR perikarya contained SP and 16.5% of all immunolabeled cell bodies were triple-labeled. Triple-, double- and single-labeled SP-IR axons innervated densely the portal capillaries of the infundibular stalk. In quadruple-labeled sections, these axons formed occasional contacts with GnRH-IR axons. Presence of SP in NKB and KP neurons increases the functional complexity of the putative pulse generator network. First, it is possible that SP modulates the effects of KP and NKB in axo-somatic and axo-dendritic afferents to GnRH neurons. Intrinsic SP may also affect the activity and/or neuropeptide release of NKB and KP neurons via autocrine/paracrine actions. In the infundibular stalk, SP may influence the KP and NKB secretory output via additional autocrine/paracrine mechanisms or regulate GnRH neurosecretion directly. Finally, possible co-release of SP with KP and NKB into the portal circulation could underlie further actions on adenohypophysial gonadotrophs.

  17. The 2nd IALE Asia-Pacific Region Conference Landscape Change and Human Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Lanzhou, China, Sept. 22-25th, 2001 ( First circular announcement) Jointly organized by: IALE-China; IALE-Australia Cold and Arid Regions Environmental & Engineering Research Institute, CAS Programme Committee: Richard Hobbs (Australia), Xiao Duning (China) Nobukazu Nakagoshi (Japan), Sun-Kee Hong (Korea), Parida Kuneepong (Thailand), Elena Klimina (Russia), Kalpana Bhakuni, (India), Zhan Zhiyong (Hong Kong, China), Chun-Yen Chang (Taibei, China)Objectives and Topics: A Theoretical aspects and quantitative approaches (Landscape pattern and processes, Landscape modeling, GIS and Remote sensing). B Landscape change and driving forces (Monitoring of landscape changes, Human activity and land use, Culture and landscape). C Landscape management and reconstruction (Ecological restoration of natural areas, Landscape planning in rural areas, Ecological risk and security assessment for catchments, Ecological engineering in agricultural landscapes). D Environment protection and ecological development in western China (Management of oasis landscape, desert landscape and desertification control, Biodiversity conservation, landscape Resources and tourism). E Urban landscape ecology Preliminary conference program: September 22, arrival in Lanzhou, Registration. September 23, plenary sessions; September 24, in-conference excursion (Lanzhou city) September 25, parallel sessions Working language: English Post conference excursions: September 26-29, 2001 No.1 Silk Road and Arid Region Landscape: Desert, Oasis, and Dunhuang. No.2 Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Plateau, Meadow, Salt Lake and Qinghai Lake, Cool Desert No.3 World Natural Heritege: Jiuzhaigou, Sichuan Province (Forest and Waterfall)Call for papers: Participants intending to present a paper or a poster during the conference are requested to send an abstract (no longer than 500 words) as email or TXT format attachment to the conference secretary (Landscape2001@sina.com). Or, you can send the hard copy to: Dr. CAO Yu, Institute of

  18. The influence of gravity on regional lung blood flow in humans: SPECT in the upright and head-down posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ax, M; Sanchez-Crespo, A; Lindahl, S G E; Mure, M; Petersson, J

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that gravity has little influence on the distribution of lung blood flow while changing posture from supine to prone. This study aimed to evaluate the maximal influence of posture by comparison of regional lung blood flow in the upright and head-down posture in 8 healthy volunteers, using a tilt table. Regional lung blood flow was marked by intravenous injection of macroaggregates of human albumin labeled with (99m)Tc or (113m)In, in the upright and head-down posture, respectively, during tidal breathing. Both radiotracers remain fixed in the lung after administration. The distribution of radioactivity was mapped using quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) corrected for attenuation and scatter. All images were obtained supine during tidal breathing. A shift from upright to the head-down posture caused a clear redistribution of blood flow from basal to apical regions. We conclude that posture plays a role for the distribution of lung blood flow in upright humans, and that the influence of posture, and thereby gravity, is much greater in the upright and head-down posture than in horizontal postures. However, the results of the study demonstrate that lung structure is the main determinant of regional blood flow and gravity is a secondary contributor to the distribution of lung blood flow in the upright and head-down positions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using a dual-isotope quantitative SPECT method, we demonstrated that although a shift in posture redistributes blood flow in the direction of gravity, the results are also consistent with lung structure being a greater determinant of regional blood flow than gravity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use modern imaging methods to quantify the shift in regional lung blood flow in humans at a change between the upright and head-down postures. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Nodule worm infection in humans and wild primates in Uganda: cryptic species in a newly identified region of human transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria R Ghai

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs are a major health concern in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Oesophagostomum infection is considered endemic to West Africa but has also been identified in Uganda, East Africa, among primates (including humans. However, the taxonomy and ecology of Oesophagostomum in Uganda have not been studied, except for in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, which are infected by both O. bifurcum and O. stephanostomum. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied Oesophagostomum in Uganda in a community of non-human primates that live in close proximity to humans. Prevalence estimates based on microscopy were lower than those based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR, indicating greater sensitivity of PCR. Prevalence varied among host species, with humans and red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus infected at lowest prevalence (25% and 41% by PCR, respectively, and chimpanzees, olive baboons (Papio anubis, and l'hoest monkeys (Cercopithecus lhoesti infected at highest prevalence (100% by PCR in all three species. Phylogenetic regression showed that primates travelling further and in smaller groups are at greatest risk of infection. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed three cryptic clades of Oesophagostomum that were not distinguishable based on morphological characteristics of their eggs. Of these, the clade with the greatest host range had not previously been described genetically. This novel clade infects humans, as well as five other species of primates. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple cryptic forms of Oesophagostomum circulate in the people and primates of western Uganda, and parasite clades differ in host range and cross-species transmission potential. Our results expand knowledge about human Oesophagostomum infection beyond the West African countries of Togo and Ghana, where the parasite is a known public health concern. Oesophagostomum infection in humans may be common throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and the transmission of

  20. Evolutionary processes acting on candidate cis-regulatory regions in humans inferred from patterns of polymorphism and divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara G Torgerson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of polymorphism and divergence in the non-coding portion of the human genome yields crucial information about factors driving the evolution of gene regulation. Candidate cis-regulatory regions spanning more than 15,000 genes in 15 African Americans and 20 European Americans were re-sequenced and aligned to the chimpanzee genome in order to identify potentially functional polymorphism and to characterize and quantify departures from neutral evolution. Distortions of the site frequency spectra suggest a general pattern of selective constraint on conserved non-coding sites in the flanking regions of genes (CNCs. Moreover, there is an excess of fixed differences that cannot be explained by a Gamma model of deleterious fitness effects, suggesting the presence of positive selection on CNCs. Extensions of the McDonald-Kreitman test identified candidate cis-regulatory regions with high probabilities of positive and negative selection near many known human genes, the biological characteristics of which exhibit genome-wide trends that differ from patterns observed in protein-coding regions. Notably, there is a higher probability of positive selection in candidate cis-regulatory regions near genes expressed in the fetal brain, suggesting that a larger portion of adaptive regulatory changes has occurred in genes expressed during brain development. Overall we find that natural selection has played an important role in the evolution of candidate cis-regulatory regions throughout hominid evolution.

  1. Identification and regional localization of a human IMP dehydrogenase-like locus (IMPHDL1) at 16p13. 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doggett, N.A.; Tesmer, J.G.; Duesing, L.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Callen, D.F.; Chen, Z.L.; Moore, S. (Adelaide Children' s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)); Stallings, R.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Sequence-tagged sites (STS)s are versatile chromosomal markers for a variety of genome mapping efforts. In this report, the authors describe a randomly generated STS (323F4) from human chromosome 16 genomic DNA that has 90.0% sequence identity to the type I human inosine-5[prime]-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH1) gene and 72% identity to the type II human inosine-5[prime]-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH2) gene. Additional sequencing by primer walking has provided a total of 1380 bp of the human chromosome 16 sequence. The IMPDH-like sequence 323F4 was regionally localized by PCR analysis of a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing different portions of human chromosome 16 to 16p13.3-13.12, between the breakpoints found in hybrids CY196/CY197 and CY198. This regional mapping assignment was further refined to subband 16p13.3 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization using cosmid 323F4 as a probe. The authors conclude that a third, previously undescribed IMPDH locus, termed IMPDHL1, exists at human chromosome 16p13.13. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Biological basis of miRNA action when their targets are located in human protein coding region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjun Gu

    Full Text Available Recent analyses have revealed many functional microRNA (miRNA targets in mammalian protein coding regions. But, the mechanisms that ensure miRNA function when their target sites are located in protein coding regions of mammalian mRNA transcripts are largely unknown. In this paper, we investigate some potential biological factors, such as target site accessibility and local translation efficiency. We computationally analyze these two factors using experimentally identified miRNA targets in human protein coding region. We find site accessibility is significantly increased in miRNA target region to facilitate miRNA binding. At the mean time, local translation efficiency is also selectively decreased near miRNA target region. GC-poor codons are preferred in the flank region of miRNA target sites to ease the access of miRNA targets. Within-genome analysis shows substantial variations of site accessibility and local translation efficiency among different miRNA targets in the genome. Further analyses suggest target gene's GC content and conservation level could explain some of the differences in site accessibility. On the other hand, target gene's functional importance and conservation level can affect local translation efficiency near miRNA target region. We hence propose both site accessibility and local translation efficiency are important in miRNA action when miRNA target sites are located in mammalian protein coding regions.

  3. Regional selection of the brain size regulating gene CASC5 provides new insight into human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Hu, Enzhi; Wang, Zhenbo; Liu, Jiewei; Li, Jin; Li, Ming; Chen, Hua; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi; Su, Bing

    2017-02-01

    Human evolution is marked by a continued enlargement of the brain. Previous studies on human brain evolution focused on identifying sequence divergences of brain size regulating genes between humans and nonhuman primates. However, the evolutionary pattern of the brain size regulating genes during recent human evolution is largely unknown. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the brain size regulating gene CASC5 and found that in recent human evolution, CASC5 has accumulated many modern human specific amino acid changes, including two fixed changes and six polymorphic changes. Among human populations, 4 of the 6 amino acid polymorphic sites have high frequencies of derived alleles in East Asians, but are rare in Europeans and Africans. We proved that this between-population allelic divergence was caused by regional Darwinian positive selection in East Asians. Further analysis of brain image data of Han Chinese showed significant associations of the amino acid polymorphic sites with gray matter volume. Hence, CASC5 may contribute to the morphological and structural changes of the human brain during recent evolution. The observed between-population divergence of CASC5 variants was driven by natural selection that tends to favor a larger gray matter volume in East Asians.

  4. Global dynamic analysis of a H7N9 avian-human influenza model in an outbreak region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongxue; Wen, Yongxian

    2015-02-21

    In 2013 in China a new type of avian influenza virus, H7N9, began to infect humans and had aroused severe fatality in the infected humans. We know that the spread is from poultry to humans, and the H7N9 avian influenza is low pathogenic in the poultry world but highly pathogenic in the human world, but the transmission mechanism is unclear. Since it has no signs of human-to-human transmission and outbreaks are isolated in some cities in China, in order to investigate the transmission mechanism of human infection with H7N9 avian influenza, an eco-epidemiological model in an outbreak region is proposed and analyzed dynamically. Researches and reports show that gene mutation makes the new virus be capable of infecting humans, therefore the mutation factor is taken into account in the model. The global dynamic analysis is conducted, different thresholds are identified, persistence and global qualitative behaviors are obtained. The impact of H7N9 avian influenza on the people population is concerned. Finally, the numerical simulations are carried out to support the theoretical analysis and to investigate the disease control measures. It seems that we may take people׳s hygiene and prevention awareness factor as a significant policy to achieve the aim of both the disease control and the economic returns.

  5. The Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Surveyor (ARES): New Mars Science to Reduce Human Risk and Prepare for the Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Croom, Mark A.; Wright, Henry S.; Killough, B. D.; Edwards, W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining critical measurements for eventual human Mars missions while expanding upon recent Mars scientific discoveries and deriving new scientific knowledge from a unique near surface vantage point is the focus of the Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Surveyor (ARES) exploration mission. The key element of ARES is an instrumented,rocket-powered, well-tested robotic airplane platform, that will fly between one to two kilometers above the surface while traversing hundreds of kilometers to collect and transmit previously unobtainable high spatial measurements relevant to the NASA Mars Exploration Program and the exploration of Mars by humans.

  6. A Two Dimensional Infinite Element Model to Study Temperature Distribution in Human Dermal Regions due to Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. pardasani

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a two dimensional infinite element model has been developed to study thermal effect in human dermal regions due to tumors. This model incorporates the effect of blood mass flow rate, metabolic heat generation and thermal conductivity of the tissues.The dermal region is divided into three natural layers, namely, epidermis, dermis and subdermal tissues. A uniformly perfused tumor is assumed to be present in the dermis. The domain is assumed to be finite along the depth and infinite along the breadth. The whole dermis region involving tumor is modelled with the help of triangular finite elements to incorporate the geometry of the region. These elements are surrounded by infinite domain elements along the breadth. Appropriate boundary conditions has been incorporated. A computer program has been developed to obtain the numerical results.

  7. Burden and trends of type-specific human papillomavirus infections and related diseases in the latin america and Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, D Maxwell; Almonte, Maribel; Bruni, Laia; Clifford, Gary; Curado, Maria-Paula; Piñeros, Marion

    2008-08-19

    We present the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers (cancers of the cervix, anogenital region, oral cavity and pharynx) in terms of incidence and mortality, for the countries of the Latin America and Caribbean region. The region is a high-risk area for cancer of the cervix and, although incidence has declined since the 1960s, projected demographic changes imply that the actual burden of new cases will increase by more than 75% in the next 20 years, while the average and at diagnosis will increase. Approximately 65% of cervical cancer cases and 50% of the high risk lesions are associated with HPV-16 and 18. Incidence rates of other HPV-related cancers are significantly lower. The paper also describes the estimated impact of genital warts and the limited data available on the occurrence of HPV infections of the upper aerodigestive tract in the region.

  8. Reducing maternal mortality in Senegal: using GIS to identify priority regions for the expansion of human resources for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, Senegal had an estimated maternal mortality ratio of 980 deaths per 100,000 live births, well above the global average of 400. The concentration of health workers has been shown to be associated with improved health outcomes, including maternal mortality. To explore this relationship, this paper uses geographic information systems (GIS) to examine the regional distribution of human resources for health and related maternal health indicators in Senegal. Results show that a regional imbalance in the distribution of health personnel and health indicators exists in Senegal. This disparity may contribute to the disproportionate burden of disease experienced in the eastern part of the country. Based on a spatial analysis, a priority index is used to identify regions to target for the recruitment and training of midwives. GIS is an appropriate and practical tool for governments and other agencies to use in identifying regional disparities and for priority setting.

  9. Capital Humano:Su Definicion y Alcances en el Desarrollo Local y Regional Human Capital: its definition and scope in the Local and Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Navarro Abarzúa

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El concepto Capital Humano es descrito y analizado en este trabajo como un auxiliar metodológico que, depurado de sus definiciones mecanicistas y neoliberales, ayuda a vincular la teoría, con la práctica en el análisis específico de una realidad territorial. Se trata de superar los modelos teóricos globales del análisis social, que generalmente subutilizan los datos empíricos que provee el territorio, cayendo en generalizaciones y abstracciones que poco ayudan. Sin embargo, este análisis tampoco se queda en la casuística, sino que culmina en propuestas que buscan contribuir al desarrollo de la teoría sobre Capital Humano y su impacto en el desarrollo regional y local. This article describes and analyzes the concept of Human Capital nor in a mechanical way nor using the neo-liberal definitions, but by linking the theory with practice in an specific territorial analysis. This is about superseding global theoretical models of social analysis, which generally sub-utilize the empirical data provided by territorial analysis, often falling into unhelpful generalizations and abstractions. Furthermore, this analysis is not centered in establishing causality, and it aims to be a contribution in the development of a theory of Human Capital and its impacts in the regional and local development.

  10. 120-150 ka human tooth and ivory engravings from Xinglongdong Cave, Three Gorges Region, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xing; HUANG Wanbo; XU Ziqiang; MA Zhibang; J. W. Olsen

    2004-01-01

    Rich paleoanthropological materials were unearthed in primary context from the Xinglongdong Cave in Fengjie County, Chongqing, South China, including a human tooth, numerous mammalian fossils, some stone artifacts and a Stegodon tusk exhibiting intentional engravings. Based on biostratigraphic data and uranium series dating, the cave was utilized as a human shelter about 120000-150000 years ago. It is the first time that an archaic Homo sapiens fossil has been unearthed from the Three Gorges Region. Engravings on the Stegodon tusk appear in groups, making up simple and abstract images. It is the earliest known engravings created by human beings; it exhibits great potential for the study of the origin of art and the development of ancient cultures in south China and bears important implications for the origin of modern humans in East Asia.

  11. Identifying selected regions from heterozygosity and divergence using a light-coverage genomic dataset from two human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras K Oleksyk

    Full Text Available When a selective sweep occurs in the chromosomal region around a target gene in two populations that have recently separated, it produces three dramatic genomic consequences: 1 decreased multi-locus heterozygosity in the region; 2 elevated or diminished genetic divergence (F(ST of multiple polymorphic variants adjacent to the selected locus between the divergent populations, due to the alternative fixation of alleles; and 3 a consequent regional increase in the variance of F(ST (S(2F(ST for the same clustered variants, due to the increased alternative fixation of alleles in the loci surrounding the selection target. In the first part of our study, to search for potential targets of directional selection, we developed and validated a resampling-based computational approach; we then scanned an array of 31 different-sized moving windows of SNP variants (5-65 SNPs across the human genome in a set of European and African American population samples with 183,997 SNP loci after correcting for the recombination rate variation. The analysis revealed 180 regions of recent selection with very strong evidence in either population or both. In the second part of our study, we compared the newly discovered putative regions to those sites previously postulated in the literature, using methods based on inspecting patterns of linkage disequilibrium, population divergence and other methodologies. The newly found regions were cross-validated with those found in nine other studies that have searched for selection signals. Our study was replicated especially well in those regions confirmed by three or more studies. These validated regions were independently verified, using a combination of different methods and different databases in other studies, and should include fewer false positives. The main strength of our analysis method compared to others is that it does not require dense genotyping and therefore can be used with data from population-based genome SNP scans

  12. Mitochondrial genome analyses suggest multiple Trichuris species in humans, baboons, and pigs from different geographical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawash, Mohamed B. F.; Andersen, Lee O.; Gasser, Robin B.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis are two parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs, respectively. Although whipworms in human and non-human primates historically have been referred to as T. trichiura, recent reports suggest that several Trichuris spp. are found...... in primates. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sequenced and annotated complete mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human in Uganda, an olive baboon in the US, a hamadryas baboon in Denmark, and two pigs from Denmark and Uganda. Comparative analyses using other published mitochondrial genomes...... of Trichuris recovered from a human and a porcine host in China and from a françois' leaf-monkey (China) were performed, including phylogenetic analyses and pairwise genetic and amino acid distances. Genetic and protein distances between human Trichuris in Uganda and China were high (~19% and 15%, respectively...

  13. Regional activation of the human medial temporal lobe during intentional encoding of objects and positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsøy, T.Z.; Liptrot, Matthew George; Skimminge, A.

    2009-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) consists of several regions thought to be involved in learning and memory. However, the degree of functional specialization among these regions remains unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated effects of both content and processing stage, but findings have been i....... These results provide additional evidence for functional specialization within the MTL, but were less clear regarding the specific nature of content specificity in these regions. © 2009 Elsevier Inc....

  14. Climate predictors of the spatial distribution of human plague cases in the West Nile region of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Katherine; Monaghan, Andrew J; Apangu, Titus; Griffith, Kevin S; Mead, Paul S; Acayo, Sarah; Acidri, Rogers; Moore, Sean M; Mpanga, Joseph Tendo; Enscore, Russel E; Gage, Kenneth L; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2012-03-01

    East Africa has been identified as a region where vector-borne and zoonotic diseases are most likely to emerge or re-emerge and where morbidity and mortality from these diseases is significant. Understanding when and where humans are most likely to be exposed to vector-borne and zoonotic disease agents in this region can aid in targeting limited prevention and control resources. Often, spatial and temporal distributions of vectors and vector-borne disease agents are predictable based on climatic variables. However, because of coarse meteorological observation networks, appropriately scaled and accurate climate data are often lacking for Africa. Here, we use a recently developed 10-year gridded meteorological dataset from the Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting Model to identify climatic variables predictive of the spatial distribution of human plague cases in the West Nile region of Uganda. Our logistic regression model revealed that within high elevation sites (above 1,300 m), plague risk was positively associated with rainfall during the months of February, October, and November and negatively associated with rainfall during the month of June. These findings suggest that areas that receive increased but not continuous rainfall provide ecologically conducive conditions for Yersinia pestis transmission in this region. This study serves as a foundation for similar modeling efforts of other vector-borne and zoonotic disease in regions with sparse observational meteorologic networks.

  15. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  16. An Agreement to Disagree: The ASEAN Human Rights Declaration and the Absence of Regional Identity in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Davies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ASEAN’s engagement with human rights culminated in the creation of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration in 2012. The Declaration is fascinating in three ways: Its institutional origins are surprising, it was agreed upon by states with very different positions on the role of human rights domestically, and it both contains commitments far in advance of some members and is at the same time dangerously regressive. The three leading frameworks that currently interrogate the Declaration fail to provide convincing insights into all three of those dimensions. To correct these shortcomings, this article applies the notion of an “incompletely theorized agreement” to the study of the Declaration, arguing that member states understand the Declaration in very different ways and agreed to it for similarly diverse reasons. Further, I argue that the Declaration neither articulates a shared regional identity relating to respect for human rights, nor can it be understood as marking an early point towards the creation of this identity. Instead, the current diversity of regional opinions on human rights and democracy is perceived as legitimate and will endure. The article concludes by considering whether this denudes the Declaration of value, arguing that its importance will vary: The more progressive the member state, the more important the Declaration will be in the future.

  17. Humanization of rabbit monoclonal antibodies via grafting combined Kabat/IMGT/Paratome complementarity-determining regions: Rationale and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ho, Mitchell

    2017-04-01

    Rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMAbs) can recognize diverse epitopes, including those poorly immunogenic in mice and humans. However, there have been only a few reports on RabMAb humanization, an important antibody engineering step usually done before clinical applications are investigated. To pursue a general method for humanization of RabMAbs, we analyzed the complex structures of 5 RabMAbs with their antigens currently available in the Protein Data Bank, and identified antigen-contacting residues on the rabbit Fv within the 6 Angstrom distance to its antigen. We also analyzed the supporting residues for antigen-contacting residues on the same heavy or light chain. We identified "HV4" and "LV4" in rabbit Fvs, non-complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops that are structurally close to the antigen and located in framework 3 of the heavy chain and light chain, respectively. Based on our structural and sequence analysis, we designed a humanization strategy by grafting the combined Kabat/IMGT/Paratome CDRs, which cover most antigen-contacting residues, into a human germline framework sequence. Using this strategy, we humanized 4 RabMAbs that recognize poorly immunogenic epitopes in the cancer target mesothelin. Three of the 4 humanized rabbit Fvs have similar or improved functional binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cells. Interestingly, 4 immunotoxins composed of the humanized scFvs fused to a clinically used fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE38) showed stronger cytotoxicity against tumor cells than the immunotoxins derived from their original rabbit scFvs. Our data suggest that grafting the combined Kabat/IMGT/Paratome CDRs to a stable human germline framework can be a general approach to humanize RabMAbs.

  18. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16.1 region of human chromosome 4.

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, H S; Padanilam, B J; Buetow, K; Murray, J.C.; Solursh, M

    1992-01-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4p16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3' untra...

  19. A region finding method to remove the noise from the images of the human hand gesture recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Jibran; Mahmood, Waqas

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems depends on the quality of the images presented to the system. Since these systems work in real time environment the images may be corrupted by some environmental noise. By removing the noise the performance of the system can be enhanced. So far different noise removal methods have been presented in many researches to eliminate the noise but all have its own limitations. We have presented a region finding method to deal with the environmental noise that gives better results and enhances the performance of the human hand gesture recognition systems so that the recognition rate of the system can be improved.

  20. hSmad5 gene, a human hSmad family member: its full length cDNA, genomic structure, promoter region and mutation analysis in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemma, A; Hagiwara, K; Vincent, F; Ke, Y; Hancock, A R; Nagashima, M; Bennett, W P; Harris, C C

    1998-02-19

    hSmad (mothers against decapentaplegic)-related proteins are important messengers within the Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) superfamily signal transduction pathways. To further characterize a member of this family, we obtained a full length cDNA of the human hSmad5 (hSmad5) gene by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and then determined the genomic structure of the gene. There are eight exons and two alternative transcripts; the shorter transcript lacks exon 2. We identified the hSmad5 promoter region from a human genomic YAC clone by obtaining the nucleotide sequence extending 1235 base pairs upstream of the 5' end of the cDNA. We found a CpG island consistent with a promoter region, and we demonstrated promoter activity in a 1232 bp fragment located upstream of the transcription initiation site. To investigate the frequency of somatic hSmad5 mutations in human cancers, we designed intron-based primers to examine coding regions by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis. Neither homozygous deletions or point mutations were found in 40 primary gastric tumors and 51 cell lines derived from diverse types of human cancer including 20 cell lines resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of TGF-beta1. These results suggest that the hSmad5 gene is not commonly mutated and that other genetic alterations mediate the loss of TGF-beta1 responsiveness in human cancers.

  1. The 3' region of Human Papillomavirus type 16 early mRNAs decrease expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, J.; Rosenstierne, M.W.; Kristiansen, Karen

    2005-01-01

    of the reporter mRNAs. The integrity of the reporter mRNAs were tested by northern blotting. Results: We show that the 3' region of the HPV-16 early mRNAs ( HPV-16 nucleotide (nt.) 2582 4214) act in cis to decrease both mRNA and protein levels. This region seems to affect transcription from the exogenous minimal...

  2. Synthetic Human β-Globin 5'HS2 Constructs Function as Partially Active Locus Control Regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); D. Talbot; N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTransgenes linked to the beta-globin locus control region (LCR) are transcribed in a copy-dependent manner that is independent of the integration site. It has previously been shown that the LCR 5'HS2 region does not require its NF-E2 dimer binding site for LCR activity. In this paper we

  3. Implementation of the international and regional human rights framework for the elimination of female genital mutilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, M.J.; Desiderio, Rene

    2014-01-01

    A human rights approach to FGM places the practice within a broader social justice agenda — one that emphasizes the responsibilities of governments to ensure realization of the full spectrum of women’s and girls’ rights. In order to place FGM within a human rights framework, it is critical to know m

  4. Do Colleges and Universities Increase Their Region's Human Capital? Staff Report No. 401

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Jaison R.; Deitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We investigate whether the degree production and research and development (R&D) activities of colleges and universities are related to the amount and types of human capital present in the metropolitan areas where the institutions are located. We find that degree production has only a small positive relationship with local stocks of human capital,…

  5. Dynamic of quality and inequity of human development on Mexico’s northeastern region, 1995-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Zamudio Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the dynamics of human development in the period 1995–2005 following the ideas of the United Nations (nu for the Northeast region of Mexico, composed of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas. In contrast to the usual, for the increments it is proposed an average exchange rate that is not affected by the law of diminishing returns, the indices used are invariant during the period, as opposed to the un, and we use two indices of development, one related to gender, one to inequity, and one more to quality. Both states have development conditions higher than the national average and gender equity markedly reduced inequality. However worldwide both states show significant lags. Nuevo Leon is the most developed but childhood education has declined. Tamaulipas shows superiority in resource use. The distribution of human development in the region is not fair.

  6. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16. 1 region of human chromosome 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, H.S.; Padanilam, B.J.; Solursh, M. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Buetow, K. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City (United States))

    1992-12-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4P16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3[prime] untranslated region of the H6 cDNA placed this homeobox gene more than 20 centimorgans proximal of the previously mapped HOX7 gene on chromosome 4. Identity comparisons of the H6 Homeodomain with previously reported homeodomains reveal the highest identities to be with the Nk class of homeobox genes in Drosophila melanogaster. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16.1 region of human chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, H S; Padanilam, B J; Buetow, K; Murray, J C; Solursh, M

    1992-12-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4p16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3' untranslated region of the H6 cDNA placed this homeobox gene more than 20 centimorgans proximal of the previously mapped HOX7 gene on chromosome 4. Identity comparisons of the H6 homeodomain with previously reported homeodomains reveal the highest identities to be with the Nk class of homeobox genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

  8. A conserved region in the 3' untranslated region of the human LIMK1 gene is critical for proper expression of LIMK1 at the post-transcriptional level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Fei Deng; Shu-Jing Liu; Xun-Sha Sun; Wei-Wen Sun; Qi-Hua Zhao; Wei-Ping Liao; Yong-Hong Yi

    2013-01-01

    LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1),a cytosolic serine/threonine kinase,regulates actin filament dynamics and reorganization and is involved in neuronal development and brain function.Abnormal expression of LIMK1 is associated with several neurological disorders.In this study,we performed a conservation analysis using Vector NTI (8.0) software.The dualluciferase reporter assay and real-time quantitative RT-PCR were used to assess the protein and mRNA levels of the reporter gene,respectively.We found that a region ranging from nt +884 to +966 in the human LIMK1 3' untranslated region (UTR) was highly conserved in the mouse Limk1 3' UTR and formed a structure containing several loops and stems.Luciferase assay showed that the relative luciferase activity of the mutated construct with the conserved region deleted,pGL4-hLIMK1-3U-M,in SH-SY5Y and HEK-293 cells was only ~60% of that of the wild-type construct pGL4-hLIMK1-3U,indicating that the conserved region is critical for the reporter gene expression.Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the relative Luc2 mRNA levels in SH-SY5Y and HEK293 cells transfected with pGL4-hLIMK1-3U-M decreased to ~50% of that in cells transfected with pGL4-hLIMK1-3U,suggesting an important role of the conserved region in maintaining Luc2 mRNA stability.Our study suggests that the conserved region in the LIMK1 3' UTR is involved in regulating LIMK1 expression at the post-transcriptional level,which may help reveal the mechanism underlying the regulation of LIMK1 expression in the central nervous system and explore the relationship between the 3'-UTR mutant and neurological disorders.

  9. Human regional cerebral blood flow during rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Holm, S; Vorstrup, S;

    1991-01-01

    Owing to the coupling between CBF and neuronal activity, regional CBF is a reflection of neural activity in different brain regions. In this study we measured regional CBF during polysomnographically well-defined rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep by the use of single photon emission computerized...... tomography and the new tracer 99mTc-dl-hexamethylpropyleneamine. Eleven healthy volunteers aged between 22 and 27 years were studied. CBF was measured on separate nights during REM sleep and during EEG-verified wakefulness. On awakening from REM sleep, all subjects reported visual dreams. During REM sleep...

  10. Evolution of naturally occurring 5'non-coding region variants of Hepatitis C virus in human populations of the South American region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aguirre Laura

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been the subject of intense research and clinical investigation as its major role in human disease has emerged. Previous and recent studies have suggested a diversification of type 1 HCV in the South American region. The degree of genetic variation among HCV strains circulating in Bolivia and Colombia is currently unknown. In order to get insight into these matters, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5' non-coding region (5'NCR sequences from strains isolated in Bolivia, Colombia and Uruguay, as well as available comparable sequences of HCV strains isolated in South America. Methods Phylogenetic tree analysis was performed using the neighbor-joining method under a matrix of genetic distances established under the Kimura-two parameter model. Signature pattern analysis, which identifies particular sites in nucleic acid alignments of variable sequences that are distinctly representative relative to a background set, was performed using the method of Korber & Myers, as implemented in the VESPA program. Prediction of RNA secondary structures was done by the method of Zuker & Turner, as implemented in the mfold program. Results Phylogenetic tree analysis of HCV strains isolated in the South American region revealed the presence of a distinct genetic lineage inside genotype 1. Signature pattern analysis revealed that the presence of this lineage is consistent with the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of HCV strains isolated in South America. Comparisons of these results with the ones found for Europe or North America revealed that this sequence signature is characteristic of the South American region. Conclusion Phylogentic analysis revealed the presence of a sequence signature in the 5'NCR of type 1 HCV strains isolated in South America. This signature is frequent enough in type 1 HCV populations circulating South America to be detected in a phylogenetic tree analysis as a distinct

  11. Backbone resonance assignments of the micro-RNA precursor binding region of human TRBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Matthieu P M H; Plevin, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP) is a multidomain human protein involved in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis. TRBP is a component of both the Dicer complex, which processes precursor miRNAs, and the RNA-induced silencing complex-loading complex. In addition, TRBP is implicated in the human immunodeficiency virus replication cycle and interferon-protein kinase R activity. TRBP contains 3 double-stranded RNA binding domains the first two of which have been shown to interact with miRNA precursors. Here we present the backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure of residues 19-228 of human TRBP2.

  12. Black tattoos entail substantial uptake of genotoxicpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in human skin and regional lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Karin; Santarelli, Francesco; Vasold, Rudolf; Penning, Randolph; Sidoroff, Alexis; König, Burkhard; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of millions of people worldwide have tattoos, which predominantly contain black inks consisting of soot products like Carbon Black or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). We recently found up to 200 μg/g of PAH in commercial black inks. After skin tattooing, a substantial part of the ink and PAH should be transported to other anatomical sites like the regional lymph nodes. To allow a first estimation of health risk, we aimed to extract and quantify the amount of PAH in black tattooed skin and the regional lymph nodes of pre-existing tattoos. Firstly, we established an extraction method by using HPLC-DAD technology that enables the quantification of PAH concentrations in human tissue. After that, 16 specimens of human tattooed skin and corresponding regional lymph nodes were included in the study. All skin specimen and lymph nodes appeared deep black. The specimens were digested and tested for 20 different PAH at the same time.PAH were found in twelve of the 16 tattooed skin specimens and in eleven regional lymph nodes. The PAH concentration ranged from 0.1-0.6 μg/cm2 in the tattooed skin and 0.1-11.8 μg/g in the lymph nodes. Two major conclusions can be drawn from the present results. Firstly, PAH in black inks stay partially in skin or can be found in the regional lymph nodes. Secondly, the major part of tattooed PAH had disappeared from skin or might be found in other organs than skin and lymph nodes. Thus, beside inhalation and ingestion, tattooing has proven to be an additional, direct and effective route of PAH uptake into the human body.

  13. Black Tattoos Entail Substantial Uptake of Genotoxicpolycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in Human Skin and Regional Lymph Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Karin; Santarelli, Francesco; Vasold, Rudolf; Penning, Randolph; Sidoroff, Alexis; König, Burkhard; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of millions of people worldwide have tattoos, which predominantly contain black inks consisting of soot products like Carbon Black or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). We recently found up to 200 μg/g of PAH in commercial black inks. After skin tattooing, a substantial part of the ink and PAH should be transported to other anatomical sites like the regional lymph nodes. To allow a first estimation of health risk, we aimed to extract and quantify the amount of PAH in black tattooed skin and the regional lymph nodes of pre-existing tattoos. Firstly, we established an extraction method by using HPLC – DAD technology that enables the quantification of PAH concentrations in human tissue. After that, 16 specimens of human tattooed skin and corresponding regional lymph nodes were included in the study. All skin specimen and lymph nodes appeared deep black. The specimens were digested and tested for 20 different PAH at the same time.PAH were found in twelve of the 16 tattooed skin specimens and in eleven regional lymph nodes. The PAH concentration ranged from 0.1–0.6 μg/cm2 in the tattooed skin and 0.1–11.8 μg/g in the lymph nodes. Two major conclusions can be drawn from the present results. Firstly, PAH in black inks stay partially in skin or can be found in the regional lymph nodes. Secondly, the major part of tattooed PAH had disappeared from skin or might be found in other organs than skin and lymph nodes. Thus, beside inhalation and ingestion, tattooing has proven to be an additional, direct and effective route of PAH uptake into the human body. PMID:24670978

  14. Black tattoos entail substantial uptake of genotoxicpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH in human skin and regional lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lehner

    Full Text Available Hundreds of millions of people worldwide have tattoos, which predominantly contain black inks consisting of soot products like Carbon Black or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. We recently found up to 200 μg/g of PAH in commercial black inks. After skin tattooing, a substantial part of the ink and PAH should be transported to other anatomical sites like the regional lymph nodes. To allow a first estimation of health risk, we aimed to extract and quantify the amount of PAH in black tattooed skin and the regional lymph nodes of pre-existing tattoos. Firstly, we established an extraction method by using HPLC-DAD technology that enables the quantification of PAH concentrations in human tissue. After that, 16 specimens of human tattooed skin and corresponding regional lymph nodes were included in the study. All skin specimen and lymph nodes appeared deep black. The specimens were digested and tested for 20 different PAH at the same time.PAH were found in twelve of the 16 tattooed skin specimens and in eleven regional lymph nodes. The PAH concentration ranged from 0.1-0.6 μg/cm2 in the tattooed skin and 0.1-11.8 μg/g in the lymph nodes. Two major conclusions can be drawn from the present results. Firstly, PAH in black inks stay partially in skin or can be found in the regional lymph nodes. Secondly, the major part of tattooed PAH had disappeared from skin or might be found in other organs than skin and lymph nodes. Thus, beside inhalation and ingestion, tattooing has proven to be an additional, direct and effective route of PAH uptake into the human body.

  15. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  16. Current salt reduction policies across gradients of inequality-adjusted human development in the WHO European region: minding the gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rodrigo; Siopa, Margarida; Simpson, Sarah J; Amiya, Rachel M; Breda, Joao; Cappuccio, Francesco P

    2014-08-01

    To assess current salt reduction policies in countries of the WHO European Region against the backdrop of varying levels of human development adjusted for income, education and health (longevity) inequalities. Population-based, cross-sectional study, with data gathered through systematic review of relevant databases and supplementary information provided by WHO Nutrition Counterparts. Member States of the WHO European Region. Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index scores were analysed against assessed levels of development and implementation of national nutrition policies and initiatives targeting population-level salt reduction. Within the WHO European Region, Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index values among countries with no existing salt reduction initiatives (mean 0·643 (se 0·022)) were significantly lower than among those with either partially implemented/planned salt initiatives (mean 0·766 (se 0·017), P < 0·001) or fully implemented salt initiatives (mean 0·780 (se 0·021), P < 0·001). Where salt reduction strategies are implemented as an integral part of national policy, outcomes have been promising. However, low- and middle-income countries may face severe resource constraints that keep them from emulating more comprehensive strategies pursued in high-income countries. Care must be taken to ensure that gaps are not inadvertently widened by monitoring differential policy impacts of salt policies, particularly regarding trade flows.

  17. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  18. Human defensins facilitate local unfolding of thermodynamically unstable regions of bacterial protein toxins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kudryashova, Elena; Quintyn, Royston; Seveau, Stephanie; Lu, Wuyuan; Wysocki, Vicki H; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we showed that binding of neutrophil ?-defensin HNP1 to affected bacterial toxins caused their local unfolding, potentiated their thermal melting and precipitation, exposed new regions for proteolysis, and increased susceptibility...

  19. Lead (Pb) Isotope Baselines for Studies of Ancient Human Migration and Trade in the Maya Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharpe, Ashley E; Kamenov, George D; Gilli, Adrian; Hodell, David A; Emery, Kitty F; Brenner, Mark; Krigbaum, John

    2016-01-01

    .... We analyzed 60 rock samples for lead isotope ratios and a representative subset of samples for lead, uranium, and thorium concentrations across the Maya region, including the Northern Lowlands...

  20. Incidence of human papilloma virus in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in patients from the Lublin region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej D(a)browski; Wojciech Kwa(s)niewski; Tomasz Skoczylas; Wieslawa Bednarek; Dorota Ku(z)ma; Anna Go(z)dzicka-Józefiak

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO assess the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in the south-eastern region of Poland.METHODS:The study population consisted of 56 ESCC patients and 35 controls.The controls were patients referred to our department due to other nonesophageal and non-oncological disorders with no gross or microscopic esophageal pathology as confirmed by endoscopy and histopathology.In the ESCC patients,samples were taken from normal mucosa (56 mucosa samples) and from the tumor (56 tumor samples).Tissue samples from the controls were taken from normal mucosa of the middle esophagus (35 control samples).Quantitative determination of DNA was carried out using a spectrophotometric method.Genomic DNA was isolated using the QIAamp DNA Midi Kit.HPV infection was identified following PCR amplification of the HPV gene sequence,using primers MY09 and MY11 complementary to the genome sequence of at least 33 types of HPV.The sequencing results were computationally analyzed using the basic local alignment search tool database.RESULTS:In tumor samples,HPV DNA was identified in 28 of 56 patients (50%).High risk HPV phenotypes (16 or/and 18) were found in 5 of 56 patients (8.9%),low risk in 19 of 56 patients (33.9%) and other types of HPV (37,81,97,CP6108) in 4 of 56 patients (7.1%).In mucosa samples,HPV DNA was isolated in 21 of 56 patients (37.5%).High risk HPV DNA was confirmed in 3 of 56 patients (5.3%),low risk HPV DNA in 12 of 56 patients (21.4%),and other types of HPV in 6 of 56 patients (10.7%).In control samples,HPV DNA was identified in 4 of 35 patients (11.4%) with no high risk HPV.The occurrence of HPV in ESCC patients was significantly higher than in the controls [28 of 56 (50%)vs 4 of 35 (11.4%),P < 0.001].In esophageal cancer patients,both in tumor and mucosa samples,the predominant HPV phenotypes were low risk HPV,isolated 4 times more frequently than high risk phenotypes [19 of 56 (33.9%) vs 5 of 56

  1. Regional Approaches to the Development of Human and Economic Resources: Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profeta, Lydia; Davie, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    This examination of human resource development in Asia focuses on the role of education in the development plans of the Philippines, and the contributions of Australia to the growth of developing countries in Southeast Asia. (SK)

  2. TRANSDERMAL PERMEABILITY OF ESTRADIOL THROUGH THE HUMAN SKIN OF DIFFERENT BODY REGIONS IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGuo-Shen; GONGSai-Jun; DUJie; MARun-Zhen; ZHOURong-Rong; LIULiang-Chu

    1989-01-01

    Transdermal permeability of estradiol was carried out by using Valia-Chien double compartment permeation cells for the following regions of intact skin and skin without stratum corncum: chest, abdomen, hip, upper arm, thigh and back. The estradiol permeation rates and accumulative amounts within 72h in vitro were examined by HPLC. The results showed that the permeation rates of intact skin from different regions of the body

  3. Dynamics of MBD2 deposition across methylated DNA regions during malignant transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devailly, Guillaume; Grandin, Mélodie; Perriaud, Laury; Mathot, Pauline; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bidet, Yannick; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Bignon, Jean-Yves; Puisieux, Alain; Mehlen, Patrick; Dante, Robert

    2015-07-13

    DNA methylation is thought to induce transcriptional silencing through the combination of two mechanisms: the repulsion of transcriptional activators unable to bind their target sites when methylated, and the recruitment of transcriptional repressors with specific affinity for methylated DNA. The Methyl CpG Binding Domain proteins MeCP2, MBD1 and MBD2 belong to the latter category. Here, we present MBD2 ChIPseq data obtained from the endogenous MBD2 in an isogenic cellular model of oncogenic transformation of human mammary cells. In immortalized (HMEC-hTERT) or transformed (HMLER) cells, MBD2 was found in a large proportion of methylated regions and associated with transcriptional silencing. A redistribution of MBD2 on methylated DNA occurred during oncogenic transformation, frequently independently of local DNA methylation changes. Genes downregulated during HMEC-hTERT transformation preferentially gained MBD2 on their promoter. Furthermore, depletion of MBD2 induced an upregulation of MBD2-bound genes methylated at their promoter regions, in HMLER cells. Among the 3,160 genes downregulated in transformed cells, 380 genes were methylated at their promoter regions in both cell lines, specifically associated by MBD2 in HMLER cells, and upregulated upon MBD2 depletion in HMLER. The transcriptional MBD2-dependent downregulation occurring during oncogenic transformation was also observed in two additional models of mammary cell transformation. Thus, the dynamics of MBD2 deposition across methylated DNA regions was associated with the oncogenic transformation of human mammary cells.

  4. Organization and Detailed Parcellation of Human Hippocampal Head and Body Regions Based on a Combined Analysis of Cyto- and Chemoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song-Lin; Van Hoesen, Gary W

    2015-10-15

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is one of the hottest regions in neuroscience because it is critical to learning, memory, and cognition, while being vulnerable to many neurological and mental disorders. With increasing high-resolution imaging techniques, many scientists have started to use distinct landmarks along the anterior-posterior axis of HF to allow segmentation into individual subfields in order to identify specific functions in both normal and diseased conditions. These studies urgently call for more reliable and accurate segmentation of the HF subfields DG, CA3, CA2, CA1, prosubiculum, subiculum, presubiculum, and parasubiculum. Unfortunately, very limited data are available on detailed parcellation of the HF subfields, especially in the complex, curved hippocampal head region. In this study we revealed detailed organization and parcellation of all subfields of the hippocampal head and body regions on the base of a combined analysis of multiple cyto- and chemoarchitectural stains and dense sequential section sampling. We also correlated these subfields to macro-anatomical landmarks, which are visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Furthermore, we created three versions of the detailed anatomic atlas for the hippocampal head region to account for brains with four, three, or two hippocampal digitations. These results will provide a fundamental basis for understanding the organization, parcellation, and anterior-posterior difference of human HF, facilitating accurate segmentation and measurement of HF subfields in the human brain on MRI scans.

  5. High resolution analysis of the chromatin landscape of the IgE switch region in human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Dayal

    Full Text Available Antibodies are assembled by a highly orchestrated series of recombination events during B cell development. One of these events, class switch recombination, is required to produce the IgG, IgE and IgA antibody isotypes characteristic of a secondary immune response. The action of the enzyme activation induced cytidine deaminase is now known to be essential for the initiation of this recombination event. Previous studies have demonstrated that the immunoglobulin switch regions acquire distinct histone modifications prior to recombination. We now present a high resolution analysis of these histone modifications across the IgE switch region prior to the initiation of class switch recombination in primary human B cells and the human CL-01 B cell line. These data show that upon stimulation with IL-4 and an anti-CD40 antibody that mimics T cell help, the nucleosomes of the switch regions are highly modified on histone H3, accumulating acetylation marks and tri-methylation of lysine 4. Distinct peaks of modified histones are found across the switch region, most notably at the 5' splice donor site of the germline (I exon, which also accumulates AID. These data suggest that acetylation and K4 tri-methylation of histone H3 may represent marks of recombinationally active chromatin and further implicates splicing in the regulation of AID action.

  6. Chimeric approach for narrowing a membrane-inserting region within human perforin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Amy E; Mandigo, Kimberly A; Robinson, Rebekah L; Ness, Traci L; Weiland, Mitch H

    2017-02-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming, immune protein that functions to deliver an apoptotic cocktail of proteins into a target pathogen. Recent studies of the bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) have provided a model for perforin's pore-forming mechanism. Both perforin and CDC family members share a conserved β-sheet flanked by two clusters of α-helices. Within the CDCs, these helices refold into two transmembrane β-hairpins, TMH1 and TMH2. Based upon structural conservation and electron microscopy imaging, the analogous helices within perforin are predicted to also be membrane inserting; however, these regions are approximately twice the length of the CDC TMHs. To test the membrane-insertion potential of one of these regions, chimeras were created using a well-characterized CDC, perfringolysin-O (PFO), as the backbone of these constructs. PFO's TMH2 region was replaced with perforin's corresponding helical region. Although hemolytic activity was observed, the chimera was poorly soluble. A second chimera contained the same region truncated to match the length of the PFO TMH2 region. The truncated chimera demonstrated improved solubility, significant hemolytic activity and the ability to form pores characteristic of those created by PFO. These results provide the first evidence that perforin's helices function as TMHs and more importantly narrows the residues responsible for membrane insertion. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Effects of human presence on chimpanzee nest location in the Lebialem-Mone forest landscape, Southwest Region, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Cadell; Muh, Bernice

    2013-01-01

    In several areas of Africa, great apes experience increasing predation pressure as a result of human activities. In this study, terrestrial and arboreal nest construction among chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti) populations was investigated in the Lebialem-Mone Forest Landscape (LMFL), Southwest Region, Cameroon, to examine the anthropogenic effects on nest location. Data on the height, distribution and approximate age of chimpanzee night nests were collected during two 4-week primate field surveys (July to August 2010; July 2011) at two field sites (Bechati and Andu) within the LMFL. Data were collected using the line transect method. Chimpanzee night nests were categorized by their location: arboreal versus terrestrial. During the two field surveys, arboreal night nests were the most frequently constructed nest type at both sites, and the only type of night nest constructed at Bechati. Terrestrial night nests were also constructed at Andu. The main difference between these two sites is the level of human predation and agricultural development. At Bechati chimpanzees inhabit forest regions around dense, expanding villages and are regularly hunted by humans. However, at Andu the chimpanzee populations are not under the same threat. Therefore, terrestrial night nest construction in the LMFL appears to be a behavior exhibited where there is less human presence.

  8. Quantitative variation in obesity-related traits and insulin precursors linked to the OB gene region on human chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggirala, R.; Stern, M.P.; Reinhart, L.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Despite the evidence that human obesity has strong genetic determinants, efforts at identifying specific genes that influence human obesity have largely been unsuccessful. Using the sibship data obtained from 32 low-income Mexican American pedigrees ascertained on a type II diabetic proband and a multipoint variance-components method, we tested for linkage between various obesity-related traits plus associated metabolic traits and 15 markers on human chromosome 7. We found evidence for linkage between markers in the OB gene region and various traits, as follows: D7S514 and extremity skinfolds (LOD = 3.1), human carboxypeptidase A1 (HCPA1) and 32,33-split proinsulin level (LOD = 4.2), and HCPA1 and proinsulin level (LOD = 3.2). A putative susceptibility locus linked to the marker D7S514 explained 56% of the total phenotypic variation in extremity skinfolds. Variation at the HCPA1 locus explained 64% of phenotypic variation in proinsulin level and {approximately}73% of phenotypic variation in split proinsulin concentration, respectively. Weaker evidence for linkage to several other obesity-related traits (e.g., waist circumference, body-mass index, fat mass by bioimpedance, etc.) was observed for a genetic location, which is {approximately}15 cM telomeric to OB. In conclusion, our study reveals that the OB region plays a significant role in determining the phenotypic variation of both insulin precursors and obesity-related traits, at least in Mexican Americans. 66 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Effects of W-CDMA 1950 MHz EMF emitted by mobile phones on regional cerebral blood flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yoko; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Hikage, Takashi; Terao, Yasuo; Ohnishi, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2009-10-01

    Use of the third generation mobile phone system is increasing worldwide. This is the first study to investigate the effects of the third generation system on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in humans. We compared effects of the electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted from the Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) cellular system versus sham control exposure on rCBF in humans. Nine healthy male volunteers participated in this study. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans were obtained before, during, and after unilateral 30 min EMF exposure. The subtraction analysis revealed no significant rCBF changes caused by the EMF conditions compared with the sham exposure, suggesting that EMF emitted by a third generation mobile phone does not affect rCBF in humans.

  10. Formulating a Historical and Demographic Model of Recent Human Evolution Based on Resequencing Data from Noncoding Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Guillaume; Patin, Etienne; Barreiro, Luis B.; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2010-01-01

    Background Estimating the historical and demographic parameters that characterize modern human populations is a fundamental part of reconstructing the recent history of our species. In addition, the development of a model of human evolution that can best explain neutral genetic diversity is required to identify confidently regions of the human genome that have been targeted by natural selection. Methodology/Principal Findings We have resequenced 20 independent noncoding autosomal regions dispersed throughout the genome in 213 individuals from different continental populations, corresponding to a total of ∼6 Mb of diploid resequencing data. We used these data to explore and co-estimate an extensive range of historical and demographic parameters with a statistical framework that combines the evaluation of multiple models of human evolution via a best-fit approach, followed by an Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) analysis. From a methodological standpoint, evaluating the accuracy of the parameter co-estimation allowed us to identify the most accurate set of statistics to be used for the estimation of each of the different historical and demographic parameters characterizing recent human evolution. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a model in which modern humans left Africa through a single major dispersal event occurring ∼60,000 years ago, corresponding to a drastic reduction of ∼5 times the effective population size of the ancestral African population of ∼13,800 individuals. Subsequently, the ancestors of modern Europeans and East Asians diverged much later, ∼22,500 years ago, from the population of ancestral migrants. This late diversification of Eurasians after the African exodus points to the occurrence of a long maturation phase in which the ancestral Eurasian population was not yet diversified. PMID:20421973

  11. Formulating a historical and demographic model of recent human evolution based on resequencing data from noncoding regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Laval

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Estimating the historical and demographic parameters that characterize modern human populations is a fundamental part of reconstructing the recent history of our species. In addition, the development of a model of human evolution that can best explain neutral genetic diversity is required to identify confidently regions of the human genome that have been targeted by natural selection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have resequenced 20 independent noncoding autosomal regions dispersed throughout the genome in 213 individuals from different continental populations, corresponding to a total of approximately 6 Mb of diploid resequencing data. We used these data to explore and co-estimate an extensive range of historical and demographic parameters with a statistical framework that combines the evaluation of multiple models of human evolution via a best-fit approach, followed by an Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC analysis. From a methodological standpoint, evaluating the accuracy of the parameter co-estimation allowed us to identify the most accurate set of statistics to be used for the estimation of each of the different historical and demographic parameters characterizing recent human evolution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support a model in which modern humans left Africa through a single major dispersal event occurring approximately 60,000 years ago, corresponding to a drastic reduction of approximately 5 times the effective population size of the ancestral African population of approximately 13,800 individuals. Subsequently, the ancestors of modern Europeans and East Asians diverged much later, approximately 22,500 years ago, from the population of ancestral migrants. This late diversification of Eurasians after the African exodus points to the occurrence of a long maturation phase in which the ancestral Eurasian population was not yet diversified.

  12. A Multiple-plane Approach to Measure the Structural Properties of Functionally Active Regions in the Human Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Garfinkel, Sarah N.; King, Anthony P.; Angstadt, Mike; Dennis, Michael J.; Xie, Hong; Welsh, Robert C.; Tamburrino, Marijo B.; Liberzon, Israel

    2009-01-01

    Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide the means of studying both the structural and the functional properties of various brain regions, allowing us to address the relationship between the structural changes in human brain regions and the activity of these regions. However, analytical approaches combining functional (fMRI) and structural (sMRI) information are still far from optimal. In order to improve the accuracy of measurement of structural properties in active regions, the current study tested a new analytical approach that repeated a surface-based analysis at multiple planes crossing different depths of cortex. Twelve subjects underwent a fear conditioning study. During these tasks, fMRI and sMRI scans were acquired. The fMRI images were carefully registered to the sMRI images with an additional correction for cortical borders. The fMRI images were then analyzed with the new multiple-plane surface-based approach as compared to the volume-based approach, and the cortical thickness and volume of an active region were measured. The results suggested (1) using an additional correction for cortical borders and an intermediate template image produced an acceptable registration of fMRI and sMRI images; (2) surface-based analysis at multiple depths of cortex revealed more activity than the same analysis at any single depth; (3) projection of active surface vertices in a ribbon fashion improved active volume estimates; and (4) correction with gray matter segmentation removed non-cortical regions from the volumetric measurement of active regions. In conclusion, the new multiple-plane surface-based analysis approaches produce improved measurement of cortical thickness and volume of active brain regions. These results support the use of novel approaches for combined analysis of functional and structural neuroimaging. PMID:19922802

  13. Overexpression of a splice variant of DNA methyltransferase 3b, DNMT3b4, associated with DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during human hepatocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Kanai, Yae; Sakamoto, Michiie; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ishii, Hiromasa; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2002-01-01

    DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions is an early and frequent event associated with heterochromatin instability during human hepatocarcinogenesis. A DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3b, is required for methylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during mouse development. To clarify the molecular mechanism underlying DNA hypomethylation on pericentromeric satellite regions during human hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined mutations of the DNMT3b gene and mRNA expression levels ...

  14. Structural insights into the human RyR2 N-terminal region involved in cardiac arrhythmias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borko, Ľubomír; Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Beck, Konrad [Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XY Wales (United Kingdom); Lai, F. Anthony [Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff CF14 4XN Wales (United Kingdom); Zahradníková, Alexandra, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Molecular Physiology and Genetics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 5, 833 34 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ševčík, Jozef, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-01

    X-ray and solution structures of the human RyR2 N-terminal region were obtained under near-physiological conditions. The structure exhibits a unique network of interactions between its three domains, revealing an important stabilizing role of the central helix. Human ryanodine receptor 2 (hRyR2) mediates calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, enabling cardiomyocyte contraction. The N-terminal region of hRyR2 (amino acids 1–606) is the target of >30 arrhythmogenic mutations and contains a binding site for phosphoprotein phosphatase 1. Here, the solution and crystal structures determined under near-physiological conditions, as well as a homology model of the hRyR2 N-terminal region, are presented. The N-terminus is held together by a unique network of interactions among its three domains, A, B and C, in which the central helix (amino acids 410–437) plays a prominent stabilizing role. Importantly, the anion-binding site reported for the mouse RyR2 N-terminal region is notably absent from the human RyR2. The structure concurs with the differential stability of arrhythmogenic mutations in the central helix (R420W, I419F and I419F/R420W) which are owing to disparities in the propensity of mutated residues to form energetically favourable or unfavourable contacts. In solution, the N-terminus adopts a globular shape with a prominent tail that is likely to involve residues 545–606, which are unresolved in the crystal structure. Docking the N-terminal domains into cryo-electron microscopy maps of the closed and open RyR1 conformations reveals C{sup α} atom movements of up to 8 Å upon channel gating, and predicts the location of the leucine–isoleucine zipper segment and the interaction site for spinophilin and phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 on the RyR surface.

  15. Isolation and Characterisation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Different Regions of the Human Umbilical Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Mennan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cords as a source of stem cells are of increasing interest for cell therapies as they present little ethical consideration and are reported to contain immune privileged cells which may be suitable for allogeneic based therapies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs sourced from several different cord regions, including artery, vein, cord lining, and Wharton’s jelly, are described in the literature. However, no one study has yet isolated and characterised MSCs from all regions of the same cord to determine the most suitable cells for cell based therapeutics.

  16. Isolation and Characterisation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Different Regions of the Human Umbilical Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Karina; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Balain, Birender; Richardson, James; Roberts, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cords as a source of stem cells are of increasing interest for cell therapies as they present little ethical consideration and are reported to contain immune privileged cells which may be suitable for allogeneic based therapies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) sourced from several different cord regions, including artery, vein, cord lining, and Wharton's jelly, are described in the literature. However, no one study has yet isolated and characterised MSCs from all regions of the same cord to determine the most suitable cells for cell based therapeutics. PMID:23984420

  17. Segmental duplication as one of the driving forces underlying the diversity of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Richeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplication and deletion were implicated for a region containing the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV gene segments, 1.9III/hv3005 (possible allelic variants of IGHV3-30 and hv3019b9 (a possible allelic variant of IGHV3-33. However, very little is known about the ranges of the duplication and the polymorphic region. This is mainly because of the difficulty associated with distinguishing between allelic and paralogous sequences in the IGHV region containing extensive repetitive sequences. Inability to separate the two parental haploid genomes in the subjects is another serious barrier. To address these issues, unique DNA sequence tags evenly distributed within and flanking the duplicated region implicated by the previous studies were selected. The selected tags in single sperm from six unrelated healthy donors were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by microarray detection. In this way, individual haplotypes of different parental origins in the sperm donors could be analyzed separately and precisely. The identified polymorphic region was further analyzed at the nucleotide sequence level using sequences from the three human genomic sequence assemblies in the database. Results A large polymorphic region was identified using the selected sequence tags. Four of the 12 haplotypes were shown to contain consecutively undetectable tags spanning in a variable range. Detailed analysis of sequences from the genomic sequence assemblies revealed two large duplicate sequence blocks of 24,696 bp and 24,387 bp, respectively, and an incomplete copy of 961 bp in this region. It contains up to 13 IGHV gene segments depending on haplotypes. A polymorphic region was found to be located within the duplicated blocks. The variants of this polymorphism unusually diverged at the nucleotide sequence level and in IGHV gene segment number, composition and organization, indicating a limited selection pressure in general. However

  18. Relative effects of mutability and selection on single nucleotide polymorphisms in transcribed regions of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Christopher I

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most common type of genetic variation in humans. However, the factors that affect SNP density are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to estimate the relative effects of mutability and selection on SNP density in transcribed regions of human genes. It is important for prediction of the regions that harbor functional polymorphisms. Results We used frequency-validated SNPs resulting from single-nucleotide substitutions. SNPs were subdivided into five functional categories: (i 5' untranslated region (UTR SNPs, (ii 3' UTR SNPs, (iii synonymous SNPs, (iv SNPs producing conservative missense mutations, and (v SNPs producing radical missense mutations. Each of these categories was further subdivided into nine mutational categories on the basis of the single-nucleotide substitution type. Thus, 45 functional/mutational categories were analyzed. The relative mutation rate in each mutational category was estimated on the basis of published data. The proportion of segregating sites (PSSs for each functional/mutational category was estimated by dividing the observed number of SNPs by the number of potential sites in the genome for a given functional/mutational category. By analyzing each functional group separately, we found significant positive correlations between PSSs and relative mutation rates (Spearman's correlation coefficient, at least r = 0.96, df = 9, P P = 0.001, suggesting that selection affects SNP density in transcribed regions of the genome. We used analyses of variance and covariance to estimate the relative effects of selection (functional category and mutability (relative mutation rate on the PSSs and found that approximately 87% of variation in PSS was due to variation in the mutation rate and approximately 13% was due to selection, suggesting that the probability that a site located in a transcribed region of a gene is polymorphic mostly depends on the mutability

  19. The Social and Economic Significance of Human Migration in the Western Region. Bulletin 859.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Edward, Comp.; And Others

    Because migration trends in the West and their consequences have sometimes served as indicators of what other regions can expect, it is important that such trends and effects be monitored and analyzed. This bulletin describes patterns of migration, assesses individual and family and social considerations in western migration, and discusses policy…

  20. Regional differences of physiological functions and cancer susceptibility in the human large intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, A; DeVries, EGE; Mulder, NH; Kleibeuker, JH

    1996-01-01

    Regional differences in function, metabolism and morphology between proximal colon, distal colon and rectum may be important in the pathogenesis and biologic behaviour of tumours originating from these segments. Thus, the effect of primary prevention of colorectal cancer may also differ from one lar

  1. Human capital in European peripheral regions: brain - drain and brain - gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Franciscus H.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Project goal - The overall goal of the project is to build a legitimate transnational network to transfer ideas and experiences and implement measures to reduce brain drain and foster brain gain while reinforcing the economical and spatial development of peripheral regions in NWE. This means a

  2. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...

  3. Distribution of Non-Persistent Endocrine Disruptors in Two Different Regions of the Human Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Thomas P van der; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Swaab, Dick F; Struik, Dicky; Makris, Konstantinos C; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Frederiksen, Hanne; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V van

    2017-01-01

    Non-persistent endocrine disrupting chemicals (npEDCs) can affect multiple organs and systems in the body. Whether npEDCs can accumulate in the human brain is largely unknown. The major aim of this pilot study was to examine the presence of environmental phenols and parabens in two distinct brain

  4. Distribution of Non-Persistent Endocrine Disruptors in Two Different Regions of the Human Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, Thomas P; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Swaab, Dick F

    2017-01-01

    Non-persistent endocrine disrupting chemicals (npEDCs) can affect multiple organs and systems in the body. Whether npEDCs can accumulate in the human brain is largely unknown. The major aim of this pilot study was to examine the presence of environmental phenols and parabens in two distinct brain...

  5. WHO Regional Office for Europe guidance for influenza surveillance in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, C.S.; Andraghetti, R.; Paget, J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent international mandates, and the emergent circulation of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in human populations, call for strengthening influenza surveillance to better target seasonal influenza control programmes and support pandemic preparedness. This document provides technical guidance to establi

  6. Methylation Status of H19/IGF2 Differentially Methylated Region in in vitro Human Blastocysts Donated by Healthy Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan-Horeh, Marzieh; Abolhassani, Farid; Jafarpour, Farnoosh; Moini, Ashraf; Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Ostadhosseini, Somayyeh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Background: Imprinted genes are a unique subset of few genes that have been differentially methylated region (DMR) in a parental origin-dependent manner during gametogenesis, and these genes are highly protected during pre-implantation epigenetic reprogramming. Several studies have shown that the particular vulnerability of imprinting genes during suboptimal pre- and peri-conception micro-environments often is occurred by assisted reproduction techniques (ART). This study investigated the methylation status of H19/IGF2 DMR at high-quality expanding/expanded human blastocysts donated by healthy individuals to evaluate the risks linked to ART. Method: Methylation levels of H19/IGF2 DMR were analyzed by bisulfite conversion and sequencing at 18 CpG sites (CpGs) located in this region. Result: The overall percentage of methylated CpGs and the proportion of hyper-methylated clones of H19/IGF2 DMR in analyzed blastocysts were 37.85±4.87% and 43.75±5.1%, respectively. For validation of our technique, the corresponding methylation levels of peripheral human lymphocytes were defined (49.52±1.86% and 50%, respectively). Conclusion: Considering the absence of in vivo- produced human embryos, it is not possible to conclude that the methylation found in H19/IGF2 DMR is actually normal or abnormal. Regarding the possible risks associated with ART, the procedures should be optimized in order to at least reduce some of the epigenetic risks. PMID:27432596

  7. Optimal humanization of 1B4, an anti-CD18 murine monoclonal antibody, is achieved by correct choice of human V-region framework sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, I I; Kawka, D W; DeMartino, J A; Daugherty, B L; Elliston, K O; Alves, K; Bush, B L; Cameron, P M; Cuca, G C; Davies, P

    1993-04-01

    The murine anti-CD18 mAb 1B4 has been humanized using CDR grafting. Three VH (Gal, Jon, and New) and two VL (Rei and Len) human frameworks, whose selection was based exclusively on their sequence identity with m1B4, were used to construct five human gamma 4/kappa recombinant antibodies: Gal/Rei, Gal/Len, Jon/Rei, and New/Rei, and a "hemichimeric" antibody pairing the VH of m1B4 with grafted Rei. Each of these h1B4 constructs completely inhibited the binding of m1B4 to activated human leukocytes with avidities (IC50) ranging from 1.5 to 8.0 nM, compared to 0.5 nM for m1B4. Replacement of three VH residues in the best VH framework, Gal, with the corresponding m1B4 "packing" (nonsolvent exposed) residues gave an h1B4 (mutant Gal/Rei) with the same avidity as m1B4. Avidity correlated with overall percent identity between the human and murine VH frameworks and, in particular, with conservation of "packing" residues. Rei and Len VL frameworks proved to be interchangeable. Further characterization showed that the Gal/Rei prototype was equipotent to m1B4 in blocking adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes to human vascular endothelium in vitro, and polymorphonuclear leukocyte extravasation into C5a-injected rabbit or monkey skin sites. Dual-label immunofluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cells with Gal/Rei h1B4 and m1B4 demonstrated that the fine specificity of the combining sites had not been altered by humanization. Reduced immunogenicity was demonstrated in rhesus monkeys that tolerated weekly treatment with h1B4 for 6 wk, whereas m1B4 induced profound anaphylaxis at 3 wk. Anti-1B4 titers in h1B4-treated rhesus were 50 to 66% lower and developed 1 wk later than in m1B4-treated monkeys. Crucially, the anti-h1B4 antibodies were anti-idiotypic while the anti-m1B4 antibodies were directed against constant and framework regions. We conclude that sequence identity searches are sufficient to identify suitable human frameworks for CDR-grafting of m1B4

  8. Transient impairment of the axolemma following regional anaesthesia by lidocaine in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    action of lidocaine could be accounted for solely by the block of VGSCs or whether other mechanisms are also relevant. We tested the recovery of motor axon conduction and multiple measures of excitability by 'threshold-tracking' after ultrasound-guided distal median nerve regional anaesthesia in 13......The local anaesthetic lidocaine is known to block voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs), although at high concentration it was also reported to block other ion channel currents as well as to alter lipid membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the clinical regional anaesthetic...... healthy volunteers. Lidocaine caused rapid complete motor axon conduction block localized at the wrist. Within 3 h, the force of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and median motor nerve conduction studies returned to normal. In contrast, the excitability of the motor axons at the wrist remained markedly...

  9. Transcriptional organization of a 450-kb region of the human X chromosome in Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bione, S.; Tamanini, F.; Maestrini, E.; Tribioli, C.; Rivella, S.; Toniolo, D. (Instituto di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica, Pavia (Italy)); Poustka, A. (German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1993-11-15

    In this paper, the authors report the transcriptional organization of a 450-kb gene cluster in Xq28, flanked by the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the color vision genes. CpG islands previously identified and mapped to distal Xq28 have helped in construction of a continuous contig of cosmids and in identification of cDNAs corresponding to eight transcripts. Thirteen to 16 small genes with CpG islands are clustered in a region of 250-300 kb. Many are highly expressed in muscle or brain and may be the genes responsible for muscle or neurological disorders mapped to distal Xq28. The analysis indicates that, in this region of the genome, genes not related in sequence are organized in transcriptional domains of 100 kb and that this organization may be important for establishing and regulating gene expression in relation to tissue distribution and X chromosome inactivation.

  10. Transcriptional organization of a 450-kb region of the human X chromosome in Xq28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bione, S; Tamanini, F; Maestrini, E; Tribioli, C; Poustka, A; Torri, G; Rivella, S; Toniolo, D

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, we report the transcriptional organization of a 450-kb gene cluster in Xq28, flanked by the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the color vision genes. CpG islands previously identified and mapped to distal Xq28 have helped in construction of a continuous contig of cosmids and in identification of cDNAs corresponding to eight transcripts. Thirteen to 16 small genes with CpG islands are clustered in a region of 250-300 kb. Many are highly expressed in muscle or brain and may be the genes responsible for muscle or neurological disorders mapped to distal Xq28. Our analysis indicates that, in this region of the genome, genes not related in sequence are organized in transcriptional domains of 100 kb and that this organization may be important for establishing and regulating gene expression in relation to tissue distribution and X chromosome inactivation.

  11. [ROLE OF ANIMALS AND HUMAN BEINGS IN THE SPREAD OF TRICHINOSIS IN THE KURSK REGION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagin, N A; Malysheva, N S; Samofalova, N A; Vlasov, E A

    2015-01-01

    Trichinosis is natural focal invasion in the Kursk Region. Porkworms (Trichinella) circulate in natural biocenoses among wild carnivorous mammals, wild boars, and rodents. Trichinosis cases are recorded in synanthropic animals. Carnivorous mammals form the basis for the parasitic system of trichinosis. The animals are infected with Trichinella through carnivorism, necrophagy, and cannibalism. The transport Trichinella vectors, necrophagous insects, naturally play an insignificant role-in the spread of trichinosis. Trichinella infection in animals occurs more commonly through necrophagia and cannibaism during winter months. Not only animals, but also man, play a great role in the spread of trichinosis. Infested wild and synanthropic aninals inhabiting the Kursk Region may carry the risk for Trichinella infection in the population.

  12. Climate Change, Extreme Weather Events, and Human Health Implications in the Asia Pacific Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Hashim, Zailina

    2016-03-01

    The Asia Pacific region is regarded as the most disaster-prone area of the world. Since 2000, 1.2 billion people have been exposed to hydrometeorological hazards alone through 1215 disaster events. The impacts of climate change on meteorological phenomena and environmental consequences are well documented. However, the impacts on health are more elusive. Nevertheless, climate change is believed to alter weather patterns on the regional scale, giving rise to extreme weather events. The impacts from extreme weather events are definitely more acute and traumatic in nature, leading to deaths and injuries, as well as debilitating and fatal communicable diseases. Extreme weather events include heat waves, cold waves, floods, droughts, hurricanes, tropical cyclones, heavy rain, and snowfalls. Globally, within the 20-year period from 1993 to 2012, more than 530 000 people died as a direct result of almost 15 000 extreme weather events, with losses of more than US$2.5 trillion in purchasing power parity.

  13. Region-based geometric modelling of human airways and arterial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Songlin; Ye, Yong; Tu, Jiyuan; Subic, Aleksandar

    2010-03-01

    Anatomically precise geometric models of human airways and arterial vessels play a critical role in the analysis of air and blood flows in human bodies. The established geometric modelling methods become invalid when the model consists of bronchioles or small vessels. This paper presents a new method for reconstructing the entire airway tree and carotid vessels from point clouds obtained from CT or MR images. A novel layer-by-layer searching algorithm has been developed to recognize branches of the airway tree and arterial vessels from the point clouds. Instead of applying uniform accuracy to all branches regardless of the number of available points, the surface patches on each branch are constructed adaptively based on the number of available elemental points, which leads to the elimination of distortions occurring at small bronchi and vessels.

  14. Identification of regions required for apical membrane localization of human multidrug resistance protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, Paul E; Westlake, Christopher J; Grant, Caroline E; Cole, Susan P C; Deeley, Roger G

    2008-07-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 transport a wide range of endo- and xenobiotics. However, with the exception of certain parts of the brain, MRP1 traffics to basolateral membranes of polarized cells, whereas MRP2 is apical in location and thus it is particularly important for systemic elimination of such compounds. Different regions of MRP1 and MRP2 seem to target them to their respective membrane locations. In addition to two "core" membrane spanning domains (MSDs) characteristic of ATP-binding cassette transporters, MRP1 and MRP2 have a third NH2-terminal MSD (MSD0), which is not required for basolateral targeting of MRP1, or for transport of at least some substrates. Here, we demonstrate that all elements necessary for apical targeting of MRP2 reside in MSD0 and the adjacent cytoplasmic loop (CL) 3. Furthermore, we show that this region of MRP2 can target the core of MRP1 to an exclusively apical location. Within MRP2 CL3, we identified a lysine-rich element that is essential for apical targeting. When introduced into MRP1, this element alone is sufficient to result in partial apical localization. However, exclusive targeting to the apical membrane seems to require the integrity of the entire region encompassing MSD0 and CL3 of MRP2. Because CL3 of MRP1 is critical for binding, transport, or both of several compounds, we also examined the function of hybrids containing all, or portions of MRP2 MSD0 and CL3. Our results indicate that CL3 is important for interaction with both the glutathione and glucuronide conjugates tested, but that different regions may be involved.

  15. Genomic and Network Patterns of Schizophrenia Genetic Variation in Human Evolutionary Accelerated Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Roussos, Panos; Joel T Dudley

    2015-01-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specifi...

  16. Viewing the motion of human body parts activates different regions of premotor, temporal, and parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Kylie J; Thompson, James C; Syngeniotis, Ari; Abbott, David F; Puce, Aina

    2004-05-01

    Activation of premotor and temporoparietal cortex occurs when we observe others movements, particularly relating to objects. Viewing the motion of different body parts without the context of an object has not been systematically evaluated. During a 3T fMRI study, 12 healthy subjects viewed human face, hand, and leg motion, which was not directed at or did not involve an object. Activation was identified relative to static images of the same human face, hand, and leg in both individual subject and group average data. Four clear activation foci emerged: (1) right MT/V5 activated to all forms of viewed motion; (2) right STS activated to face and leg motion; (3) ventral premotor cortex activated to face, hand, and leg motion in the right hemisphere and to leg motion in the left hemisphere; and (4) anterior intraparietal cortex (aIP) was active bilaterally to viewing hand motion and in the right hemisphere leg motion. In addition, in the group data, a somatotopic activation pattern for viewing face, hand, and leg motion occurred in right ventral premotor cortex. Activation patterns in STS and aIP were more complex--typically activation foci to viewing two types of human motion showed some overlap. Activation in individual subjects was similar; however, activation to hand motion also occurred in the STS with a variable location across subjects--explaining the lack of a clear activation focus in the group data. The data indicate that there are selective responses to viewing motion of different body parts in the human brain that are independent of object or tool use.

  17. Genomic and Network Patterns of Schizophrenia Genetic Variation in Human Evolutionary Accelerated Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-01-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specifi...

  18. Touristic specialization and returns on human capital in the hospitality sector of the Spanish regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro García Pozo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar la existencia y el grado de especialización en la industria turística de las principales regiones españolas desde la perspectiva del stock de capital humano y de los rendimientos de la educación, centrándose en el subsector de la hostelería. Para ello, se ha utilizado una versión extendida de la ecuación de salarios de Mincer (1974 y datos procedentes de la Encuesta de Estructura Salarial para el año 2006. Todas las regiones analizadas muestran rendimientos de la educa-ción más bajos en el sector de la hostelería que los que se presentan en otros servicios privados. Existen también diferencias signifi cativas en los rendimientos de la educación entre regiones, especialmente en Cataluña y en las Islas Canarias.

  19. Propofol Affects Different Human Brain Regions Depending on Depth of Sedation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Quan; Tie-hu Ye; Si-fang Lin; Liang Zou; Shou-yuan Tian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of propofol on brain regions at different sedation levels and the association between changes in brain region activity and loss of consciousness using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and bispectral index (BIS) monitoring. Methods Forty-eight participants were enrolled at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from October 2011 to March 2012 and randomly assigned to a mild or a deep sedation group using computer- generated random numbers. Preliminary tests were performed a week prior to scanning to determine target effect site concentrations based on BIS and concomitant Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scores while under propofol. Within one week of the preliminary tests where propofol dose-response was established, BOLD-fMRI was conducted to examine brain activation with the subject awake, and with propofol infusion at the sedation level. Results Mild propofol sedation inhibited left inferior parietal lobe activation. Deep sedation inhibited activation of the left insula, left superior temporal gyrus, and right middle temporal gyrus. Compared with mild sedation, deep propofol sedation inhibited activation of the left thalamus, precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, and right basal nuclei. Conclusion Mild and deep propofol sedation are associated with inhibition of different brain regions, possibly explaining differences in the respective loss of consciousness processes.

  20. Human traces in the bryophyte flora of the summit region of Karkonosze Mts (Polish side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Fudali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on results of the bryofloristic investigations carried out in 2006 along tourist roads and around mountain chalets the problem of bryophyte response to the tourist utilization of the summit region of Karkonosze Mts is discussed here. The hypothesis that introduction of cement as building material might have caused the income and spread of subneutral or basiphilous ruderal species in that naturally acidic region was formulated and tested. In result 45 species were found, of which the majority do not occur in natural sites in the Karkonosze Mts. Among them 20 species are convinced to be highly hemerophilous. Most of the found species were eurytopic, only 14 prefered subneutral or basic substrata. Many of them produced sporogonia, what indicates high reproduction potential. It seems that the phenomenon of synanthropisation is limited mainly to places in which cement (as mortar or concrete has been used. The list of bryophytes found around all the anthropogenic sites and along the tourist roads in the summit region of Polish part of the massif with brief characteristics of their ecological preferences has been included.

  1. Brain activity dynamics in human parietal regions during spontaneous switches in bistable perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megumi, Fukuda; Bahrami, Bahador; Kanai, Ryota; Rees, Geraint

    2015-02-15

    The neural mechanisms underlying conscious visual perception have been extensively investigated using bistable perception paradigms. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that the right anterior superior parietal (r-aSPL) and the right posterior superior parietal lobule (r-pSPL) have opposite roles in triggering perceptual reversals. It has been proposed that these two areas are part of a hierarchical network whose dynamics determine perceptual switches. However, how these two parietal regions interact with each other and with the rest of the brain during bistable perception is not known. Here, we investigated such a model by recording brain activity using fMRI while participants viewed a bistable structure-from-motion stimulus. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM), we found that resolving such perceptual ambiguity was specifically associated with reciprocal interactions between these parietal regions and V5/MT. Strikingly, the strength of bottom-up coupling between V5/MT to r-pSPL and from r-pSPL to r-aSPL predicted individual mean dominance duration. Our findings are consistent with a hierarchical predictive coding model of parietal involvement in bistable perception and suggest that visual information processing underlying spontaneous perceptual switches can be described as changes in connectivity strength between parietal and visual cortical regions.

  2. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons establish region-specific, long-range projections in the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Julius A; Koch, Philipp; Derouiche, Amin; Brüstle, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    While the availability of pluripotent stem cells has opened new prospects for generating neural donor cells for nervous system repair, their capability to integrate with adult brain tissue in a structurally relevant way is still largely unresolved. We addressed the potential of human embryonic stem cell-derived long-term self-renewing neuroepithelial stem cells (lt-NES cells) to establish axonal projections after transplantation into the adult rodent brain. Transgenic and species-specific markers were used to trace the innervation pattern established by transplants in the hippocampus and motor cortex. In vitro, lt-NES cells formed a complex axonal network within several weeks after the initiation of differentiation and expressed a composition of surface receptors known to be instrumental in axonal growth and pathfinding. In vivo, these donor cells adopted projection patterns closely mimicking endogenous projections in two different regions of the adult rodent brain. Hippocampal grafts placed in the dentate gyrus projected to both the ipsilateral and contralateral pyramidal cell layers, while axons of donor neurons placed in the motor cortex extended via the external and internal capsule into the cervical spinal cord and via the corpus callosum into the contralateral cortex. Interestingly, acquisition of these region-specific projection profiles was not correlated with the adoption of a regional phenotype. Upon reaching their destination, human axons established ultrastructural correlates of synaptic connections with host neurons. Together, these data indicate that neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells are endowed with a remarkable potential to establish orthotopic long-range projections in the adult mammalian brain.

  3. Analysis of polymorphisms and haplotype structure of the human thymidylate synthase genetic region: a tool for pharmacogenetic studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Ghosh

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5FU, a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, inhibits the DNA replicative enzyme, thymidylate synthase (Tyms. Prior studies implicated a VNTR (variable numbers of tandem repeats polymorphism in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR of the TYMS gene as a determinant of Tyms expression in tumors and normal tissues and proposed that these VNTR genotypes could help decide fluoropyrimidine dosing. Clinical associations between 5FU-related toxicity and the TYMS VNTR were reported, however, results were inconsistent, suggesting that additional genetic variation in the TYMS gene might influence Tyms expression. We thus conducted a detailed genetic analysis of this region, defining new polymorphisms in this gene including mononucleotide (poly A:T repeats and novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs flanking the VNTR in the TYMS genetic region. Our haplotype analysis of this region used data from both established and novel genetic variants and found nine SNP haplotypes accounting for more than 90% of the studied population. We observed non-exclusive relationships between the VNTR and adjacent SNP haplotypes, such that each type of VNTR commonly occurred on several haplotype backgrounds. Our results confirmed the expectation that the VNTR alleles exhibit homoplasy and lack the common ancestry required for a reliable marker of a linked adjacent locus that might govern toxicity. We propose that it may be necessary in a clinical trial to assay multiple types of genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS region to meaningfully model linkage of genetic markers to 5FU-related toxicity. The presence of multiple long (up to 26 nt, polymorphic monothymidine repeats in the promoter region of the sole human thymidylate synthetic enzyme is intriguing.

  4. Regions within the N-terminal domain of human topoisomerase I exert important functions during strand rotation and DNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Rikke Frølich; Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Westergaard, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The human topoisomerase I N-terminal domain is the only part of the enzyme still not crystallized and the function of this domain remains enigmatical. In the present study, we have addressed the specific functions of individual N-terminal regions of topoisomerase I by characterizing mutants lacking...... amino acid residues 1–202 or 191–206 or having tryptophane-205 substituted by glycine in a broad variety of in vitro activity assays. As a result of these investigations we find that mutants altered in the region 191–206 distinguished themselves from the wild-type enzyme by a faster strand rotation step...... support a model according to which tryptophane-205 and possibly other residues located between position 191–206 coordinates the restriction of free strand rotation during the topoisomerization step of catalysis. Moreover, tryptophane-205 appears important for the function of the bulk part of the N...

  5. Environmental changes and human work in the region of the Upper Paraná River floodplain: processes and interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EA. Tomanik

    Full Text Available The environment and society constitute a complex of elements and interactions. Thus, an understanding of the processes in which the environment and psychosocial elements are involved may not be gained from knowledge of just one isolated variable. Based on such premises, the present paper, which summarizes the results of a series of studies, adopts work relationships as its main focus, but in addition, it has two complementary objectives. One is to present some analyses on the interaction between human actions and the environmental changes that have been taking place in the region of the Upper Paraná River floodplain and in its boundaries. A secondary aim is to show how those two factors have been changing people's working and living conditions and the identity configuration of some of the human groups that live at that site.

  6. Seroprevalence of brucellosis in animals and human populations in the western mountains region in Libya, December 2006-January 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M O; Elmeshri, S E; Abuzweda, A R; Blauo, M; Abouzeed, Y M; Ibrahim, A; Salem, H; Alzwam, F; Abid, S; Elfahem, A; Elrais, A

    2010-07-29

    Brucellosis is a global zoonotic disease, endemic in North African countries and around the Mediterranean.A prospective study of Brucella seroprevalence was conducted in north-western Libya (western mountains region). Blood samples collected over 13 months in the period December 2006 to January 2008 from 561 animals (goats, sheep, cattle and camels) and 546 human volunteers were tested for Brucella using the Rose Bengal test, tube agglutination test and ELISA assays. Amongst livestock, 31% of goats and 42% of cattle were seropositive. Human samples showed a high seropositivity of 40%, with 95 (43%) of the 221 positive samples positive for IgM, indicating active or recent infection. Control measures are needed to reduce this high prevalence of brucellosis in Libya.

  7. Distinct representations of configural and part information across multiple face-selective regions of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golarai, Golijeh; Ghahremani, Dara G; Eberhardt, Jennifer L; Gabrieli, John D E

    2015-01-01

    Several regions of the human brain respond more strongly to faces than to other visual stimuli, such as regions in the amygdala (AMG), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the fusiform face area (FFA). It is unclear if these brain regions are similar in representing the configuration or natural appearance of face parts. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of healthy adults who viewed natural or schematic faces with internal parts that were either normally configured or randomly rearranged. Response amplitudes were reduced in the AMG and STS when subjects viewed stimuli whose configuration of parts were digitally rearranged, suggesting that these regions represent the 1st order configuration of face parts. In contrast, response amplitudes in the FFA showed little modulation whether face parts were rearranged or if the natural face parts were replaced with lines. Instead, FFA responses were reduced only when both configural and part information were reduced, revealing an interaction between these factors, suggesting distinct representation of 1st order face configuration and parts in the AMG and STS vs. the FFA.

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Region Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms are Associated with Leprosy Susceptibility in Vietnam and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Andrea; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Singh, Meenakshi; Orlova, Marianna; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Katoch, Kiran; Gao, Xiaojiang; Thai, Vu Hong; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Carrington, Mary; Abel, Laurent; Mehra, Narinder; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggested the existence of unidentified leprosy susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. To identify such genetic risk factors, a high-density association scan of a 1.9-mega-base (Mb) region in the HLA complex was performed. Among 682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 59 were associated with leprosy (P leprosy families. Genotyping of these SNPs in an independent sample of 292 Vietnamese single-case leprosy families replicated the association of 12 SNPs (P leprosy and 371 control subjects from North India. These results implicated class I alleles in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:21459816

  9. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer.

  10. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Patillon

    Full Text Available VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2 is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK. This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8, and PRSS8 with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  11. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillon, Blandine; Luisi, Pierre; Blanché, Hélène; Patin, Etienne; Cann, Howard M; Génin, Emmanuelle; Sabbagh, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2) is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK). This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8), and PRSS8) with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  12. Regional-specific effects of ovarian hormone loss on synaptic plasticity in adult human APOE targeted replacement mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Klein

    Full Text Available The human apolipoprotein ε4 allele (APOE4 has been implicated as one of the strongest genetic risk factors associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD and in influencing normal cognitive functioning. Previous studies have demonstrated that mice expressing human apoE4 display deficits in behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes compared to those with apoE3. Ovarian hormones have also been shown to be important in modulating synaptic processes underlying cognitive function, yet little is known about how their effects are influenced by apoE. In the current study, female adult human APOE targeted replacement (TR mice were utilized to examine the effects of human APOE genotype and long-term ovarian hormone loss on synaptic plasticity in limbic regions by measuring dendritic spine density and electrophysiological function. No significant genotype differences were observed on any outcomes within intact mice. However, there was a significant main effect of genotype on total spine density in apical dendrites in the hippocampus, with post-hoc t-tests revealing a significant reduction in spine density in apoE3 ovariectomized (OVX mice compared to sham operated mice. There was also a significant main effect of OVX on the magnitude of LTP, with post-hoc t-tests revealing a decrease in apoE3 OVX mice relative to sham. In contrast, apoE4 OVX mice showed increased synaptic activity relative to sham. In the lateral amygdala, there was a significant increase in total spine density in apoE4 OVX mice relative to sham. This increase in spine density was consistent with a significant increase in spontaneous excitatory activity in apoE4 OVX mice. These findings suggest that ovarian hormones differentially modulate synaptic integrity in an apoE-dependent manner within brain regions that are susceptible to neurophysiological dysfunction associated with AD.

  13. Regionalized life cycle impact assessment of air pollution on the global scale: Damage to human health and vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zelm, Rosalie; Preiss, Philipp; van Goethem, Thomas; Van Dingenen, Rita; Huijbregts, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We developed regionalized characterization factors (CFs) for human health damage from particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone, and for damage to vegetation from ozone, at the global scale. These factors can be used in the impact assessment phase of an environmental life cycle assessment. CFs express the overall damage of a certain pollutant per unit of emission of a precursor, i.e. primary PM2.5, nitrogen oxides (NOx), ammonia (NH3), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). The global chemical transport model TM5 was used to calculate intake fractions of PM2.5 and ozone for 56 world regions covering the whole globe. Furthermore, region-specific effect and damage factors were derived, using mortality rates, background concentrations and years of life lost. The emission-weighted world average CF for primary PM2.5 emissions is 629 yr kton-1, varying up to 3 orders of magnitude over the regions. Larger CFs were obtained for emissions in central Asia and Europe, and smaller factors in Australia and South America. The world average CFs for PM2.5 from secondary aerosols, i.e. NOx, NH3, and SO2, is 67.2 to 183.4 yr kton-1. We found that the CFs for ozone human health damage are 2-4 orders of magnitude lower compared to the CFs for damage due to primary PM2.5 and PM2.5 precursor emissions. Human health damage due to the priority air pollutants considered in this study was 1.7·10-2 yr capita-1 worldwide in year 2010, with primary PM2.5 emissions as the main contributor (62%). The emission-weighted world average CF for ecosystem damage due to ozone was 2.5 km2 yr kton-1 for NMVOCs and 8.7 m2 yr kg-1 for NOx emissions, varying 2-3 orders of magnitude over the regions. Ecosystem damage due to the priority air pollutants considered in this study was 1.6·10-4 km2 capita-1 worldwide in 2010, with NOx as the main contributor (72%). The spatial range in CFs stresses the importance of including spatial variation in life cycle impact assessment of

  14. A stage—specific protein factor binding to a CACCC motif in both human β—globin gene promoter and 5‘—HS2 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNTONG; YADICHEN; 等

    1994-01-01

    The DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) of human β-globin locus control region(LCR) is required for the high level expression of human β-globin genes.In the present study,a stage-specific protein factor (LPF-β) was identified in the nuclear extract prepared from mouse fetal liver at d 18 of gestation,which could bind to the HS2 region of human β-globin LCR.We also found that the shift band of LPF-β factor could be competed by human β-globin promoter.However,it couldn't be competed by human ε-globin promoter or by human Aγ-globin promoter.Furthermore,our data demonstrated that the binding-sequence of LPF-β factor is 5'CACACCCTA 3',which is located at the HS2 region of β-LCR(from-10845 to-10853 bp)and human β-globin promoter(from-92 to -84 bp).We speculated that these regions containing the CACCC box in both the human β-globin promoter and HS2 might function as stage selector elements in the regulation of human β-globin switching and the LPF-β factor might be a stage-specific protein factor involved in the regulation of human β-globin gene expression.

  15. Regional nitrogen budgets and riverine N & P fluxes for the drainages to the North Atlantic Ocean: Natural and human influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, R.W.; Billen, G.; Swaney, D.; Townsend, A.; Jaworski, N.; Lajtha, K.; Downing, J.A.; Elmgren, Ragnar; Caraco, N.; Jordan, T.; Berendse, F.; Freney, J.; Kudeyarov, V.; Murdoch, P.; Zhu, Z.-L.

    1996-01-01

    We present estimates of total nitrogen and total phosphorus fluxes in rivers to the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 regions in North America, South America, Europe, and Africa which collectively comprise the drainage basins to the North Atlantic. The Amazon basin dominates the overall phosphorus flux and has the highest phosphorus flux per area. The total nitrogen flux from the Amazon is also large, contributing 3.3 Tg yr-1 out of a total for the entire North Atlantic region of 13.1 Tg yr-1. On a per area basis, however, the largest nitrogen fluxes are found in the highly disturbed watersheds around the North Sea, in northwestern Europe, and in the northeastern U.S., all of which have riverine nitrogen fluxes greater than 1,000 kg N km-2 yr-1. Non-point sources of nitrogen dominate riverine fluxes to the coast in all regions. River fluxes of total nitrogen from the temperate regions of the North Atlantic basin are correlated with population density, as has been observed previously for fluxes of nitrate in the world's major rivers. However, more striking is a strong linear correlation between river fluxes of total nitrogen and the sum of anthropogenically-derived nitrogen inputs to the temperate regions (fertilizer application, human-induced increases in atmospheric deposition of oxidized forms of nitrogen, fixation by leguminous crops, and the import/export of nitrogen in agricultural products). On average, regional nitrogen fluxes in rivers are only 25% of these anthropogenically derived nitrogen inputs. Denitrification in wetlands and aquatic ecosystems is probably the dominant sink, with storage in forests perhaps also of importance. Storage of nitrogen in groundwater, although of importance in some localities, is a very small sink for nitrogen inputs in all regions. Agricultural sources of nitrogen dominate inputs in many regions, particularly the Mississippi basin and the North Sea drainages. Deposition of oxidized nitrogen, primarily of industrial origin, is the

  16. Human impact on fluvial sediments: how to distinguish regional and local sources of heavy metals contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novakova T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Regional contamination of southern Moravia (SE part of the Czech Republic by heavy metals and magnetic particles during the 20th century was quantified in fluvial sediments of the Morava River. The influence of local sources to the regional contamination of the river sediments and impact of sampling sites heterogeneity were studied in profiles with different sedimentology (facies and lithology. For this purpose, hundreds of samples were obtained from regulated channel banks and naturally inundated floodplains and proxy elementary analyses have been carried out by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (ED XRF, further calibrated by ICP MS. Magnetic susceptibility as a proxy of industrial contamination was determined and the age model has been obtained by 210Pb dating method. After establishing the lithological background from floodplain profiles, assessment of heavy metal contamination was done by using enrichment factors (EFs of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr and magnetic susceptibility. Floodplain sedimentary profiles were found to be realiable for assessment of contamination and reconstruction of large scale, i.e. a really averaged regional contamination, while regulated channel banks are suitable for obtaining of more or less qualitative information of influence of local point sources in the area because sediments from regulated river banks qualitatively reflect the actual local contamination of the river system. It allowed us to distinguish the influence of local sources of contamination by comparing with more spatially averaged contamination signal from more distal floodplain profiles. The study area is rather weakly contaminated (EF ∼ 1-2, while individual sediment strata from regulated channel banks contains several times larger concentrations of heavy metals.

  17. Experimental determination of the regional deposition of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlhofen, W.; Gebhart, J.; Heyder, J.

    1980-06-01

    The experimental techniques and the results of inhalation studies with radioaerosols on normal non-smokers for mouth-breathing are described and discussed. Monodisperse iron oxide particles tagged with /sup 198/Au are produced with a spinning top generator in the aerodynamic size range between 1 to 10 ..mu..m. An aerosol inhalation apparatus enables the subjects to breathe under standardized conditions with respect to tidal volume and breathing frequency. The calculation of total deposition is based upon measurements of the number of in- and exhaled particles per breath by means of photometric methods and pneumotachography. The retention of the radioactive particles present in the body after aerosol administration is measured with a body counter designed and constructed for these experiments. Retention measurements as functions of time after inhalation are carried out in extrathoracic-, chest- and stomach-position. The body counter consists of four shielded NaF(Tl)-dectors. Characteristic feature of the body counter is its low sensitivity to neighboring organs and to neighboring regions within the respiratory tract. For the evaluation of extrathoracic deposition, the activity measured in the stomach immediately after inhalation is added to extrathoracic activity. The elimination of material from the chest is found to be much slower for the material deposited in the alveolar region than for the amount deposited in the tracheobronchial tree. This allows the intrathoracic deposition to be divided into tracheolbronchial and alveolar deposition by means of the different slopes of the normalized chest retention function. Different normalized chest retention functions are presented and analyzed with respect to their different elimination rats belonging to the tracheobronchial and alveolar region. Total, tracheobronchial, alveolar and extrathoracic deposition data are reported in the aerodynamic diameter range between 1 and 10 ..mu..m.

  18. Frequency specificity of regional homogeneity in the resting-state human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Song

    Full Text Available Resting state-fMRI studies have found that the inter-areal correlations in cortical networks concentrate within ultra-low frequencies (0.01-0.04 Hz while long-distance connections within subcortical networks distribute over a wider frequency range (0.01-0.14 Hz. However, the frequency characteristics of regional homogeneity (ReHo in different areas are still unclear. To examine the ReHo properties in different frequency bands, a data-driven method, Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD, was adopted to decompose the time series of each voxel into several components with distinct frequency bands. ReHo values in each of the components were then calculated. Our results showed that ReHo in cortical areas were higher and more frequency-dependent than those in the subcortical regions. BOLD oscillations of 0.02-0.04 Hz mainly contributed to the cortical ReHo, whereas the ReHo in limbic areas involved a wider frequency range and were dominated by higher-frequency BOLD oscillations (>0.08 Hz. The frequency characteristics of ReHo are distinct between different parts of the striatum, with the frequency band of 0.04-0.1 Hz contributing the most to ReHo in caudate nucleus, and oscillations lower than 0.02 Hz contributing more to ReHo in putamen. The distinct frequency-specific ReHo properties of different brain areas may arise from the assorted cytoarchitecture or synaptic types in these areas. Our work may advance the understanding of the neural-physiological basis of local BOLD activities and the functional specificity of different brain regions.

  19. Assessment of Human Organism's Intake of Trace Elements from Staple Foodstuffs in Central Region of Russia

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbunov, A V; Okina, O I; Frontasyeva, M A; Gundorina, S F

    2004-01-01

    The trace element content of raw materials and foodstuffs produced from them, typical for basket of goods of residents of Central Russia, was examined. An excess of permissible levels of some trace elements was observed. This phenomenon is explained in terms of different factors such as pollution of the environment, industrial technologies, biological peculiarities of raw materials of animal and vegetable origin. An assessment of human organism's trace element intake of different food allowances is given. This study was undertaken in the framework of IAEA CRP (Contract No. 11927/R2).

  20. Cryodamage to plasma membrane integrity in head and tail regions of human sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-JieZHU; Xue-GaoLIU

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of cryopreservation on the plasma membrane integrity in the head and tail regions of individual sperm, and the relationship between intact cryopreserved sperm and its motility and zona-free hamster oocyte penetration rate. Methods: The eosin Y exclusion and the hypoosmotic swelling tests were combined to form a single test (HOS-EY test) to identify the spermatozoa with four types of membrane integrity. Results: After cryopreservation, there was a marked decline in the percentage of spermatozoa with Type IV membrane integrity (head membrane intact/tail membrane intact), and a significant increase in those with Type Ⅰ (head membrane damaged/tail membrane damaged) and Type Ⅲ (head membrane damaged/tail membrane intact) membrane integrity (n = 50, P0.05). Conclusion: (1) The HOS-EY test has the advantage of showing four patterns of membrane integrity in individual spermatozoon; (2) Cryopreservation causes a significant membrane rupture in the head and tail regions of spermatozoa; Type IT[ is the main transitional state of membrane cryodamage; (3) Cryodamage to head and tail membrane may occur independently; the presence of an intact tail membrane does not necessarily indicate the intactness of head membrane. (4) Intact membranes am closely related to postthaw motility, but do not reflect the fertilizing potential.

  1. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, G.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Lluberas, S.; Craiem, D.; Armentano, Rl

    2011-09-01

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  2. [Humane professional attitudes of doctors in the health region of Sousse (Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daouas, F; Ben Abdelaziz, A; Mtiraoui, A; Nabli Ajmi, T

    2002-06-01

    The new chronic and multi-factorial morbidity, the limited efficiency of classical medicine, as well as the preponderant position currently occupied by an individual in social life have imposed a patient-oriented approach as an ideal model of medical practice. The objective of this work is to evaluate physicians' listening skills, their empathy and their participation with patients in the health region of Sousse. It is a descriptive and transversal study on a collective of 133 practitioners working in the Sousse region in both the liberal and public sectors of care. Data were collected during the year 1999 through an auto-managed questionnaire. Among the main results: 28% of doctors declared having had difficulties while communicating with their patients and 31% of those asked do not give a great deal of importance to the psycho-social aspects of their patients. Only 31% of practitioners were in favour of patients participating in the decision-making process. This survey demonstrates that the domination of the bio-medical model of care, as much in teaching field as in medical practice, has weakened the basic competencies necessary for humanitarian medical practice based on the respect and the implication of the patient. Reforming the medical teaching curriculum with a focus on the person suffering and orientating the professional environment towards the community are both indispensable in order to reach a reconciliation between the patient's needs and the care available.

  3. Regional differences within the human supraspinous and interspinous ligaments: a sheet plastination study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gillian M; Zhang, Ming

    2002-08-01

    The extent to which neighboring muscles and the fascia contribute to the formation of the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments is not clear from the literature. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the midline attachments of tendons and the posterior layer of thoracolumbar fascia in order to determine their respective contributions to the formation of these ligaments throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Study of the dense connective tissue organization in the posterior ligamentous system was carried out on two cadavers serially sectioned into thin (2.5-mm) epoxy resin plastinated slices. Additional observations were taken from a gross anatomical study of the midline anatomy in two adult cadavers. The results show that the spinal attachments of trapezius, rhomboideus major and splenius cervicis combine with the deep fascia to form the supraspinous ligament in the upper thoracic spine. The posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia makes a major contribution to the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments in the lower thoracic spine. In addition to the posterior layer of thoracolumbar fascia, longissimus thoracis and multifidus combine to form the lumbar supraspinous and interspinous ligaments. Their spinal attachments produce a system of dense connective tissue with marked regional variation in fiber orientation and arrangement. The findings support the description of the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments as structures formed by both muscle tendons and aponeuroses along the length of the thoracic and lumbar spine, with regional differences in their connective tissue architecture.

  4. Characterisation of the promoter region of the human DNA-repair gene Rad51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, L; Haase, S; Fischer, D; Kolberg, H C; Stürzbecher, H W

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory elements of the 5'-flanking region of the DNA-repair gene Rad51 were analysed to characterise pathological alterations of Rad51 mRNA expression during tumour development. Various fragments of the Rad51 promoter were cloned into the pGL3 reporter vector and the respective promoter activity was determined by luciferase assays in transfected U2-OS cells. Transcription factor binding was identified using Protein/DNA arrays. The region encompassing base pairs -204 to -58 was identified as crucial for Rad51 gene transcription. Down regulator sequences are present upstream (-305 to -204) and downstream (-48 and +204) of this core promoter element. Promoter activity is significantly enhanced by substituting G at the polymorphic positions +135 and +172 for C and T, respectively. Transcription factors Ets1/PEA3, E2F1, p53, EGR1, and Stat5 were identified as relevant for regulating expression of Rad51. We identified three separate cis-sequence elements within the Rad51 transcriptional promoter, one ensuring basal levels of expression and two elements limiting expression to relatively low levels. The characterisation of transcription factor binding might help to explain high-level expression of Rad51 in a variety of solid tumours. The polymorphic sites appear important for the increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Balancing Selection within the Human Phenylalanine Hydroxylase (PAH Gene Region in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mowla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Genetic diversity of three polymorphic markers in the phenylalanine hydroxylase(PAH gene region including PvuII(a, PAHSTR and MspI were investigated.Methods:Unrelated individuals (n=139 from the Iranian populations were genotyped using primers specific to PAH gene markers including PvuII(a,MspI and PAHSTR. The amplified products for PvuII(a,MspI were digested using the appropriate restriction enzymes and separated on 1.5% agarose. The PAHSTR alleles were identified using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by silver staining. The exact size of the STR alleles was determined by sequencing. The allele frequency and population status of the alleles were estimated using PHASE, FBAT and GENEPOP software.Results: The estimated degree of heterozygosity for PAHSTR, MspI and PvuII (a was 66%, 56% and 58%, respectively. The haplotype estimation analysis of the markers resulted in nine informative haplotypes with frequencies ≥5%.Moreover,the results obtained from Ewens-Watterson test for neutrality suggested that the markers were under balancing selection in the Iranian population.Conclusion:These findings suggested the presence of genetic diversity at these three markers in the PAH gene region. Therefore, the markers could be considered as functional markers for linkage analysis of the PAH gene mutations in the Iranian families with the PKU disease.

  6. Spatial distribution of human Schistosoma japonicum infections in the Dongting Lake Region, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Raso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to spatially model the effect of demographic, reservoir hosts and environmental factors on human Schistosoma japonicum infection prevalence in the Dongting Lake area of Hunan Province, China and to determine the potential of each indicator in targeting schistosomiasis control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cross-sectional serological, coprological and demographic data were obtained from the 2004 nationwide periodic epidemiologic survey for Hunan Province. Environmental data were downloaded from the USGS EROS data centre. Bayesian geostatistical models were employed for spatial analysis of the infection prevalence among study participants. A total of 47,139 participants from 47 administrative villages were selected. Age, sex and occupation of residents and the presence of infected buffaloes and environmental factors, i.e. NDVI, distance to the lake and endemic type of setting, were significantly associated with S. japonicum infection prevalence. After taking into account spatial correlation, however, only demographic factors (age, sex and occupation and the presence of infected buffaloes remained significant indicators. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Long established demographic factors, as well presence of host reservoirs rather than environmental factors are driving human transmission. Findings of this work can be used for epidemiologic surveillance and for the future planning of interventions in the Dongting Lake area of Hunan Province.

  7. Regions of common inter-individual DNA methylation differences in human monocytes: genetic basis and potential function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christopher; Leitão, Elsa; Wallner, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Sinha, Anupam; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Steffens, Michael; Ebert, Peter; Rahmann, Sven; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2017-07-26

    There is increasing evidence for inter-individual methylation differences at CpG dinucleotides in the human genome, but the regional extent and function of these differences have not yet been studied in detail. For identifying regions of common methylation differences, we used whole genome bisulfite sequencing data of monocytes from five donors and a novel bioinformatic strategy. We identified 157 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with four or more CpGs, almost none of which has been described before. The DMRs fall into different chromatin states, where methylation is inversely correlated with active, but not repressive histone marks. However, methylation is not correlated with the expression of associated genes. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of the five donors revealed evidence for a role of cis-acting genetic variation in establishing methylation patterns. To validate this finding in a larger cohort, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using SNP genotypes and 450k array methylation data from blood samples of 1128 individuals. Only 30/157 (19%) DMRs include at least one 450k CpG, which shows that these arrays miss a large proportion of DNA methylation variation. In most cases, the GWAS peak overlapped the CpG position, and these regions are enriched for CREB group, NF-1, Sp100 and CTCF binding motifs. In two cases, there was tentative evidence for a trans-effect by KRAB zinc finger proteins. Allele-specific DNA methylation occurs in discrete chromosomal regions and is driven by genetic variation in cis and trans, but in general has little effect on gene expression.

  8. Human neuroimaging studies on the hippocampal CA3 region – integrating evidence for pattern separation and completion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eDeuker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human functional magnetic imaging (fMRI studies have long investigated the hippocampus without differentiating between its subfields, even though theoretical models and rodent studies suggest that subfields support different and potentially even opposite functions. The CA3 region of the hippocampus has been ascribed a pivotal role both in initially forming associations during encoding and in reconstructing a memory representation based on partial cues during retrieval. These functions have been related to pattern separation and pattern completion, respectively. In recent years, studies using high-resolution fMRI in humans have begun to separate different hippocampal subregions and identify the role of the CA3 subregion relative to the other subregions. However, some of these findings have been inconsistent with theoretical models and findings from electrophysiology. In this review, we describe selected recent studies and highlight how their results might help to define different processes and functions that are presumably carried out by the CA3 region, in particular regarding the seemingly opposing functions of pattern separation and pattern completion. We also describe how these subfield-specific processes are related to behavioral, functional and structural alterations in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. We conclude with discussing limitations of functional imaging and briefly outline possible future developments of the field.

  9. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Western Ontario, A4-833 London Regional Cancer Centre, 800 Commissioners Road E., London, Ontario, N6A 4L6 Canada (Canada); Mymryk, Joe S., E-mail: jmymryk@uwo.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Western Ontario, A4-833 London Regional Cancer Centre, 800 Commissioners Road E., London, Ontario, N6A 4L6 Canada (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Regional Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  10. Computational identification of new structured cis-regulatory elements in the 3'-untranslated region of human protein coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowei Sylvia; Brown, Chris M

    2012-10-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acids (RNAs) contain a large number of cis-regulatory RNA elements that function in many types of post-transcriptional regulation. These cis-regulatory elements are often characterized by conserved structures and/or sequences. Although some classes are well known, given the wide range of RNA-interacting proteins in eukaryotes, it is likely that many new classes of cis-regulatory elements are yet to be discovered. An approach to this is to use computational methods that have the advantage of analysing genomic data, particularly comparative data on a large scale. In this study, a set of structural discovery algorithms was applied followed by support vector machine (SVM) classification. We trained a new classification model (CisRNA-SVM) on a set of known structured cis-regulatory elements from 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) and successfully distinguished these and groups of cis-regulatory elements not been strained on from control genomic and shuffled sequences. The new method outperformed previous methods in classification of cis-regulatory RNA elements. This model was then used to predict new elements from cross-species conserved regions of human 3'-UTRs. Clustering of these elements identified new classes of potential cis-regulatory elements. The model, training and testing sets and novel human predictions are available at: http://mRNA.otago.ac.nz/CisRNA-SVM.

  11. In silico prediction of structure and functions for some proteins of male-specific region of the human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Chinmoy; Polash, Ahsan Habib; Islam, Md Tariqul; Shafrin, Farhana

    2013-12-01

    Male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) comprises 95% of its length that is functionally active. This portion inherits in block from father to male offspring. Most of the genes in the MSY region are involved in male-specific function, such as sex determination and spermatogenesis; also contains genes probably involved in other cellular functions. However, a detailed characterization of numerous MSY-encoded proteins still remains to be done. In this study, 12 uncharacterized proteins of MSY were analyzed through bioinformatics tools for structural and functional characterization. Within these 12 proteins, a total of 55 domains were found, with DnaJ domain signature corresponding to be the highest (11%) followed by both FAD-dependent pyridine nucleotide reductase signature and fumarate lyase superfamily signature (9%). The 3D structures of our selected proteins were built up using homology modeling and the protein threading approaches. These predicted structures confirmed in detail the stereochemistry; indicating reasonably good quality model. Furthermore the predicted functions and the proteins with whom they interact established their biological role and their mechanism of action at molecular level. The results of these structure-functional annotations provide a comprehensive view of the proteins encoded by MSY, which sheds light on their biological functions and molecular mechanisms. The data presented in this study may assist in future prognosis of several human diseases such as Turner syndrome, gonadal sex reversal, spermatogenic failure, and gonadoblastoma.

  12. Human and ecotoxicological impacts assessment from the Mexican oil industry in the Coatzacoalcos region, as revealed by the USEtox model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Mora, M A; Rodríguez-Pérez, B; Martínez-Delgadillo, S A; Rosa-Domínguez, E; Nolasco-Hipólito, C

    2014-01-01

    Human and ecotoxicological impacts were analyzed in the lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River (Veracruz, State in Mexico). High pollution levels of contaminants from the oil industry have been reported in natural streams and the Coatzacoalcos River and in their sediments. USEtox model was employed to evaluate environmental fate, exposure, and effect of nine organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and one of which was in the group of polychlorinated biphenyls), a heavy metal (lead), and the effect of the industrial wastewater emitted into the river, on the Coatzacoalcos region. Most of these compounds are highly toxic; they bioaccumulate in human and animal tissue, mainly in the fatty tissues and can damage different organs and systemic targets such as the liver, kidney, hormonal system, nervous system, etc., of both humans and wildlife. The model estimates that 96% (3,247 kg/day) of organic compounds is transferred from the water into air, whereas only 4% (151 kg/day) remains in the water. In addition, it predicts that humans are mainly exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) congeners (28 and 153) by eating contaminated fish, due to PCBs accumulating in the fish fat tissue. The number of cases of cancer and noncancer (1 in 862 habitants per additional kilogram) is expected to have an increment due to the higher PCBs exposure of human population. Genetic damages in fishes, earthworms, and toads have been observed and related to higher exposure to organic compounds. The relationship between the field reported data and those one predicted by the USEtox model have been confirmed empirically by using the nonparametric correlation analysis (Spearman's rho). Based on the USEtox model, the environmental stress in the Coatzacoalcos industrial zone is between 2 and 6 orders of magnitude over geometric mean of acute aquatic EC₅₀s. We think that USEtox model can be used to expand the number of substances that have the current water quality guidelines to

  13. Regional variations of cell surface carbohydrates in human oral stratified epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedtofte, P; Dabelsteen, Erik; Hakomori, S

    1984-01-01

    such as non-keratinized, parakeratinized, and orthokeratinized stratified squamous epithelium. The material included buccal and palatal epithelium from 20 persons with blood group A or O, gingival, and alveolar epithelium from 10 persons with blood group A or B, and buccal metaplastically keratinized......-acetyllactosamine by murine monoclonal antibodies. Each antigen showed a similar staining pattern in buccal and alveolar epithelium (non-keratinized) which differed considerably from that seen in palatal and gingival epithelium (ortho- and parakeratinized). The expression of blood group antigens A or B and the precursor...... antigen H type 2 chains in metaplastically keratinized buccal epithelium was found to differ significantly from that seen in normal non-keratinized buccal epithelium. The regional variations demonstrated in cell surface carbohydrates are suggested to reflect differences in tissue differentiation....

  14. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    neuroimaging studies have focused mainly on identifying the parts of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that contribute to visually guided movements. We used event-related TMS and force perturbations of the reaching hand to test whether the same sub-regions of the left PPC contribute to the processing...... of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception...... was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive...

  15. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160-Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 A resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6(1)22/P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 A. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  16. Biomass gasification technology nationalization and human resources formation in North region: GASEIBRAS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Suani Teixeira; Velazquez, Silvia Maria Stortini Gonzalez; Santos, Sandra Maria Apolinario dos; Lora, Beatriz Acquaro [Centro Nacional de Referencia em Biomassa (CENBIO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: suani@iee.usp.br, e-mail: sgvelaz@iee.usp.br, e-mail: sandra@iee.usp.br, e-mail: blora@iee.usp.br

    2008-07-01

    Gasification systems already developed in Brazil are not adjusted to the electricity production at isolated communities, because this models that supply a gas with satisfactory properties to this end, are projected to operate with coal and not with biomass in natura, what implies in the biomass transformation in coal with all the environmental impacts and loss of thermodynamic income associates to this practical. These problems had been surpassed with the GASEIFAMAZ Project development realized by CENBIO in the last two years. The project, that it aimed to make possible the electricity supply expansion in communities without energy access in the country north region, consisted of two gasification systems importation from the Indian Institute of Science, tests accomplishment and its transference to an isolated community. (author)

  17. Regional blood flow during exercise in humans measured by near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Langberg, Henning; Olesen, J

    2000-01-01

    Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the tracer indocyanine green (ICG), we quantified blood flow in calf muscle and around the Achilles tendon during plantar flexion (1-9 W). For comparison, blood flow in calf muscle was determined by dye dilution in combination with magnetic resonance...... imaging measures of muscle volume, and, for the peritendon region, blood flow was measured by (133)Xe washout. From rest to a peak load of 9 W, NIRS-ICG blood flow in calf muscle increased from 2.4+/-0.2 to 74+/-5 ml x 100 ml tissue(-1) x min(-1), similar to that measured by reverse dye (77+/-6 ml x 100...

  18. Positron emission tomography study of regional cerebral blood flow and flow-metabolism coupling during general anaesthesia with xenon in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rex, S; Meyer, P. T; Baumert, J.-H; Rossaint, R; Fries, M; Büll, U; Schaefer, W. M

    2008-01-01

    Background The effects of xenon on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are controversial. Moreover, the precise sites of action at which xenon exerts its effects in the human brain remain to be established...

  19. Targeted Differentiation of Regional Ventral Neuroprogenitors and Related Neuronal Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liankai Chi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryoid body (EB formation and adherent culture (AD paradigms are equivalently thought to be applicable for neural specification of human pluripotent stem cells. Here, we report that sonic hedgehog-induced ventral neuroprogenitors under EB conditions are fated to medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, while the AD cells mostly adopt a floor-plate (FP fate. The EB-MGE later on differentiates into GABA and cholinergic neurons, while the AD-FP favors dopaminergic neuron specification. Distinct developmental, metabolic, and adhesion traits in AD and EB cells may potentially account for their differential patterning potency. Gene targeting combined with small-molecule screening experiments identified that concomitant inhibition of Wnts, STAT3, and p38 pathways (3i could largely convert FP to MGE under AD conditions. Thus, differentiation paradigms and signaling regulators can be integrated together to specify distinct neuronal subtypes for studying and treating related neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.

  20. Regional calcium distribution and ultrasound images of the vessel wall in human carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Uzonyi, I.; Szíki, G. Á.; Magyar, M. T.; Molnár, S.; Ida, Y.; Csiba, L.

    2005-04-01

    Arterial calcification can take place at two sites in the vessel wall: the intima and the media. Intimal calcification occurs exclusively within atherosclerotic plaques, while medial calcification may develop independently. Extensive calcified plaques in the carotid arteries can be easily detected by B-mode ultrasonic imaging. The calcium content might correlate with the ultrasound reflectance of the vessel wall, and could be a surrogate marker for arteriosclerosis. In this study, segments of human carotid arteries collected at autopsy were examined by ultrasonography in vitro and calcium distributional maps of sections from the same segments were determined by particle induced X-ray emission. Our aim was to make a first step towards investigating the relationship between the calcium distributional maps and the respective ultrasound images.

  1. Characterization of Dielectric Responses of Human Cancer Cells in the Terahertz Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Keiichiro; Ogawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Kondo, Naoshi; Irisawa, Akiyoshi; Imamura, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    Terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, in combination with a two-interface model, is used to determine the complex dielectric constants of cultured human cancer cells (DLD-1, HEK293 and HeLa). Picosecond and sub-picosecond water dynamics are dominant in the measured complex dielectric constants of these cells. We demonstrate that dielectric responses below 1.0 THz best characterize the particular water dynamics of cancer cells when compared with extracellular water. Debye-Lorentz fitting revealed that this is due to a significantly attenuated slow relaxation mode and enhanced fast relaxation mode of the water in these cancer cells. These findings could lead to a new procedure to digitally evaluate cellular activities or functions, in terms of intracellular water dynamics, and remove the veil from the mysterious intracellular milieu.

  2. Transient impairment of the axolemma following regional anaesthesia by lidocaine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Krarup, Christian

    2014-07-01

    The local anaesthetic lidocaine is known to block voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs), although at high concentration it was also reported to block other ion channel currents as well as to alter lipid membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the clinical regional anaesthetic action of lidocaine could be accounted for solely by the block of VGSCs or whether other mechanisms are also relevant. We tested the recovery of motor axon conduction and multiple measures of excitability by 'threshold-tracking' after ultrasound-guided distal median nerve regional anaesthesia in 13 healthy volunteers. Lidocaine caused rapid complete motor axon conduction block localized at the wrist. Within 3 h, the force of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and median motor nerve conduction studies returned to normal. In contrast, the excitability of the motor axons at the wrist remained markedly impaired as indicated by a 7-fold shift of the stimulus-response curves to higher currents with partial recovery by 6 h and full recovery by 24 h. The strength-duration properties were abnormal with markedly increased rheobase and reduced strength-duration time constant. The changes in threshold during electrotonus, especially during depolarization, were markedly reduced. The recovery cycle showed increased refractoriness and reduced superexcitability. The excitability changes were only partly similar to those previously observed after poisoning with the VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin. Assuming an unaltered ion-channel gating, modelling indicated that, apart from up to a 4-fold reduction in the number of functioning VGSCs, lidocaine also caused a decrease of passive membrane resistance and an increase of capacitance. Our data suggest that the lidocaine effects, even at clinical 'sub-blocking' concentrations, could reflect, at least in part, a reversible structural impairment of the axolemma.

  3. Additive effects of cortisol and growth hormone on regional and systemic lipolysis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurhuus, C B; Gravholt, C H; Nielsen, S; Pedersen, S B; Møller, N; Schmitz, O

    2004-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and cortisol are important to ensure energy supplies during fasting and stress. In vitro experiments have raised the question whether GH and cortisol mutually potentiate lipolysis. In the present study, combined in vivo effects of GH and cortisol on adipose and muscle tissue were explored. Seven lean males were examined four times over 510 min. Microdialysis catheters were inserted in the vastus lateralis muscle and in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the thigh and abdomen. A pancreatic-pituitary clamp was maintained with somatostatin infusion and replacement of GH, insulin, and glucagon at baseline levels. At t = 150 min, administration was performed of NaCl (I), a 2 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) hydrocortisone infusion (II), a 200-microg bolus of GH (III), or a combination of II and III (IV). Systemic free fatty acid (FFA) turnover was estimated by [9,10-3H]palmitate appearance. Circulating levels of glucose, insulin, and glucagon were comparable in I-IV. GH levels were similar in I and II (0.50 +/- 0.08 microg/l, mean +/- SE). Peak levels during III and IV were approximately 9 microg/l. Cortisol levels rose to approximately 900 nmol/l in II and IV. Systemic (i.e., palmitate fluxes, s-FFA, s-glycerol) and regional (interstitial adipose tissue and skeletal muscle) markers of lipolysis increased in response to both II and III. In IV, they were higher and equal to the isolated additive effects of the two hormones. In conclusion, we find that GH and cortisol stimulate systemic and regional lipolysis independently and in an additive manner when coadministered. On the basis of previous studies, we speculate that the mode of action is mediated though different pathways.

  4. Distinctive properties of the 5'-untranslated region of human hsp70 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsova, Maria P; Sizova, Daria V; Dmitriev, Sergei E; Ivanov, Dmitri S; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2003-06-20

    A relaxed cap-dependence of translation of the mRNA-encoding mammalian heat shock protein Hsp70 may suggest that its 5'-untranslated region (UTR) possesses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). In this study, this possibility has been tested in transfected cells using plasmids that express dicistronic mRNAs. Using a reporter gene construct, Renilla luciferase/Photinus pyralis luciferase, we show that the 216-nt long 5'-UTR of Hsp70 mRNA acts as an IRES that directs ribosomes to the downstream start codon by a cap-independent mechanism. The relative activity of this IRES (100-fold over the empty vector) is similar to that of the classical picornaviral IRESs. Additional controls indicate that this high expression of the downstream reporter is not due to readthrough from the upstream cistron, nor is it due to translation of cryptic monocistronic transcripts. The effect of small deletions within the 5'-UTR of Hsp70 mRNA on the IRES activity varies in dependence on their position within the 5'-UTR sequence. With the exception of deletion of nt 33-50, it is small for the 5'-terminal half of the 5'-UTR and rather strong for the 3'-terminal section. However, neither of these small deletions abolishes the IRES activity completely. Excision of larger sections (>50 nt) by truncation of the 5'-UTR from the 5'-end or by internal deleting results in a dramatic impairment of the IRES function. Taken together, these data suggest that the IRES activity of the 5'-UTR of Hsp70 mRNA requires integrity of almost the entire sequence of the 5'-UTR. The data are discussed in terms of a model that allows a three-dimensional rather than linear mode of selection of the initiation region surrounding the start codon of Hsp70 mRNA.

  5. Regional assignment of the human uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) gene to chromosome 10q25.2----q26.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrin, K H; Warner, C A; Yoo, H W; Goodfellow, P J; Tsai, S F; Desnick, R J

    1991-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase [UROS; hydroxymethylbilane hydro-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.2.1.75] is the fourth enzyme in the human heme biosynthetic pathway. The recent isolation of the cDNA encoding human UROS facilitated its chromosomal localization. Human UROS sequences were specifically amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genomic DNA of two independent panels of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. There was 100% concordance for the presence of the human UROS PCR product and human chromosome 10. For each of the other chromosomes, there was 19%-53% discordance with human UROS. The chromosomal assignment was confirmed by Southern hybridization analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids with the full-length UROS cDNA. Using human-rodent hybrids containing different portions of human chromosome 10, we assigned the UROS gene to the region 10q25.2----q26.3.

  6. HISTOLOGICAL STUDY OF HUMAN MAMMARY GLAND IN WOMEN OF NORTH EASTERN REGION OF INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santona

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The “mamma” or “breast” is a modified, ectodermal, glandular structure located in the superficial fascia of the anterior chest wall. In female they are evolved to secrete milk for the nourishment of their offspring. They are also present in a rudimentary form in males. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After obtaining institutional ethical clearance t he specimens of human mammary gland were divided into two groups i.e. reproductive (14 to 49 and post - menopausal (50 and above age. The specimens of both the age group were collected from fresh unembalmed human cadaver. The slides were prepared using the standard laboratory procedure. Stained slides were studied for different structures of the mammary gland such as the glandular structures, ducts and myoepithelial cells. Diameters of the ducts were measured in both age groups. The data were analyzed to ca lculate the mean and ‘t’ test was applied to find out the significant difference between mean values. RESULTS: The average diameter of the lactiferous duct as measured by micrometer scale was 2.0 mm and 0.83 mm in reproductive and post - menopausal age group respectively. Calculated value of t’= 4.68. d. f. (degree of freedom =18, P <0.01. Therefore the diameter of lactiferous duct between reproductive and postmenopausal age group differs significantly. DISCUSSION: The results obtained in this study are comp ared with the available established findings of other workers to draw a definite conclusion in the histomorphological aspect of reproductive and postmenopausal age group. CONCLUSION: Though different generations of sophisticated investigations such as mole cular level studies have evolved for the early detection of breast carcinoma, the knowledge of the normal developmental histological changes is most important which will help to detect early abnormal changes of the breast if any

  7. Region-wide assessment of the capacity for human nutrition training in West Africa: current situation, challenges, and way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Sodjinou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a dearth of information on existing nutrition training programs in West Africa. A preliminary step in the process of developing a comprehensive framework to strengthen human capacity for nutrition is to conduct an inventory of existing training programs. Objective: This study was conducted to provide baseline data on university-level nutrition training programs that exist in the 16 countries in West Africa. It also aimed to identify existing gaps in nutrition training and propose solutions to address them. Design: Participating institutions were identified based on information provided by in-country key informants, UNICEF offices or through internet searches. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews during on-site visits or through self-administered questionnaires. Simple descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed. Results: In total, 83 nutrition degree programs comprising 32 B.Sc. programs, 34 M.Sc. programs, and 17 Ph.D. programs were identified in the region. More than half of these programs were in Nigeria. Six countries (Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, The Gambia, and Togo offered no nutrition degree program. The programs in francophone countries were generally established more recently than those in anglophone countries (age: 3.5 years vs. 21.4 years. Programs were predominantly (78% run by government-supported institutions. They did not provide a comprehensive coverage of all essential aspects of human nutrition. They were heavily oriented to food science (46%, with little emphasis on public health nutrition (24% or overnutrition (2%. Annual student intakes per program in 2013 ranged from 3 to 262; 7 to 40; and 3 to 10, respectively, for bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs while the number of graduates produced annually per country ranged from 6 to 271; 3 to 64; and 1 to 18, respectively. External collaboration only existed in 15% of the programs. In-service training programs on

  8. Region-wide assessment of the capacity for human nutrition training in West Africa: current situation, challenges, and way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodjinou, Roger; Fanou, Nadia; Deart, Lucie; Tchibindat, Félicité; Baker, Shawn; Bosu, William; Pepping, Fré; Delisle, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    There is a dearth of information on existing nutrition training programs in West Africa. A preliminary step in the process of developing a comprehensive framework to strengthen human capacity for nutrition is to conduct an inventory of existing training programs. This study was conducted to provide baseline data on university-level nutrition training programs that exist in the 16 countries in West Africa. It also aimed to identify existing gaps in nutrition training and propose solutions to address them. Participating institutions were identified based on information provided by in-country key informants, UNICEF offices or through internet searches. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews during on-site visits or through self-administered questionnaires. Simple descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed. In total, 83 nutrition degree programs comprising 32 B.Sc. programs, 34 M.Sc. programs, and 17 Ph.D. programs were identified in the region. More than half of these programs were in Nigeria. Six countries (Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, The Gambia, and Togo) offered no nutrition degree program. The programs in francophone countries were generally established more recently than those in anglophone countries (age: 3.5 years vs. 21.4 years). Programs were predominantly (78%) run by government-supported institutions. They did not provide a comprehensive coverage of all essential aspects of human nutrition. They were heavily oriented to food science (46%), with little emphasis on public health nutrition (24%) or overnutrition (2%). Annual student intakes per program in 2013 ranged from 3 to 262; 7 to 40; and 3 to 10, respectively, for bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs while the number of graduates produced annually per country ranged from 6 to 271; 3 to 64; and 1 to 18, respectively. External collaboration only existed in 15% of the programs. In-service training programs on nutrition existed in less than half of the countries

  9. Low prevalence of human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the northwest region of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Dana; Salvador, Christianne; Orosa, Jose; Racelis, Sheryl; Leaño, Modesty; Sanchez, Danilo; Angeles, Lara Mae; Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Ramos, John Donnie; Pawlita, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background Geographic heterogeneity of human papillomavirus (HPV) involvement in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been observed over the last few years. This trend has not been evaluated in the Philippines. Hence, this study aims to provide for the first time a data on the prevalence of HPV in HNSCC in the northwestern region of the Philippines. Methods Two hundred one (201) biopsy samples (179 formalin fixed paraffin embedded and 22 fresh frozen) from 163 Filipino HNSCC cases (oral cavity = 88; larynx = 60; oropharynx = 15) diagnosed between 2003 to 2013 were initially included in this study. HPV DNA was detected by two methods: (1) BSGP5+/6+-PCR/ multiplex human papillomavirus genotyping and (2) TaqMan probes-based real-time qPCR. Presence of HPV type-specific transcripts were also analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR with subsequent hybridization to oligonucleotide probes coupled to Luminex beads. Co-amplification of the β-globin and ubiquitin C genes served as internal positive controls for DNA and RNA analyses, respectively. Results and conclusions Of the 163, 82 (50.3%) cases had at least one tissue sample that was valid for molecular analysis. Only two of the DNA valid cases (2.4%) were HPV DNA-positive (HPV11 and HPV33). All HPV mRNA assays rendered negative results except for HPV11 transcripts. Results of this study may indicate that there is probably very low prevalence of HPV-associated HNSCC among Filipino adults living in a rural region of the Philippines. This study could serve as a benchmark for designing follow-up studies that would assess possible changes in trends of HNSCC among Filipinos in different ethnic regions of the country, especially urban areas in which the population is expected to adapt Western style sexual behavior. A prospective sampling of fresh frozen tissue is also highly recommended to ensure better molecular analyses. PMID:28199413

  10. Role of DNA methylation in expression control of the IKZF3-GSDMA region in human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussette, Sanny; Al Tuwaijri, Abeer; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Elzein, Samar; Farias, Raquel; Bérubé, Julie; Ho, Bianca; Laprise, Catherine; Goodyer, Cynthia G; Rousseau, Simon; Naumova, Anna K

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal region 17q12-q21 is associated with asthma and harbors regulatory polymorphisms that influence expression levels of all five protein-coding genes in the region: IKAROS family zinc finger 3 (Aiolos) (IKZF3), zona pellucida binding protein 2 (ZPBP2), ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3 (ORMDL3), and gasdermins A and B (GSDMA, GSDMB). Furthermore, DNA methylation in this region has been implicated as a potential modifier of the genetic risk of asthma development. To further characterize the effect of DNA methylation, we examined the impact of treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) that causes DNA demethylation, on expression and promoter methylation of the five 17q12-q21 genes in the human airway epithelium cell line NuLi-1, embryonic kidney epithelium cell line 293T and human adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7. 5-aza-dC treatment led to upregulation of expression of GSDMA in all three cell lines. ZPBP2 was upregulated in NuLi-1, but remained repressed in 293T and MCF-7 cells, whereas ORMDL3 was upregulated in 293T and MCF-7 cells, but not NuLi-1. Upregulation of ZPBP2 and GSDMA was accompanied by a decrease in promoter methylation. Moreover, 5-aza-dC treatment modified allelic expression of ZPBP2 and ORMDL3 suggesting that different alleles may respond differently to treatment. We also identified a polymorphic CTCF-binding site in intron 1 of ORMDL3 carrying a CG SNP rs4065275 and determined its methylation level. The site's methylation was unaffected by 5-aza-dC treatment in NuLi-1 cells. We conclude that modest changes (8-13%) in promoter methylation levels of ZPBP2 and GSDMA may cause substantial changes in RNA levels and that allelic expression of ZPBP2 and ORMDL3 is mediated by DNA methylation.

  11. Patterns of association in the human metaphase complement: ring analysis and estimation of associativity of specific chromosome regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, T C; Flehinger, B J; Squire, R D

    1978-02-23

    The pattern of metaphase chromosome association in the human complement was studied by two methods of statistical analysis of interchromosomal distances. Those methods included ring analysis in which a characteristic position of the centromere of each chromosome relative to the center of a two dimensional representation of a metaphase complement was defined, and estimation of the capacity for associativity of each of three regions of each chromosome: the centromere (c) and the ends of each arm (p, q). The following information was obtained: 1. In general, the distance from the center is directly related to chromosome size. 2. The most notable deviation from that size-related progression is displayed by the X chromosomes. The markedly peripheral position of the X is characteristic of both X's of the female and the single X of the male. 3. The relative associativity of each chromosome of the complement is, in general, inversely related to size with an additional preferential capacity of associativity displayed by the acrocentric chromosomes. Analyses of the different inter-regional classes established that the supplementary associativity factor of the acrocentric chromosomes was inherent in their pericentromeric and p-arm regions and excluded the ends of the q arms from participation in that factor. 4. Those analyses demonstrated that the specific morphology or 'geometry' of the acrocentric chromosomes contributes little to their high relative associativity. In addition to the tendency for the c/p regions of the acrocentric chromosomes to associate with each other, presumably because of their common function in nucleolar organization, those regions also displayed a propensity to associate with the distal regions of the arms of other chromosomes. A molecular basis for that propensity other than that of ribosomal DNA is postulated to be that of other fractions of highly reiterated DNA sequences. 5. Analysis of the relative associativities of each of the three regions

  12. Human milk POPs and neonatal risk trend from 1982 to 2009 in the same geographic region in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukavić, T; Vojinović Miloradov, M; Mihajlović, I; Ristivojević, A

    2013-04-01

    Three groups of POPs - DDT, HCH and PCBs were monitored in early human milk for 27 years (1982-2009), as a measure of environmental pollution in the same geographic region (South Bačka, Voyvodina, Serbia). Measurements were performed using ECD GC Varian 3400. Concetrations of DDT and HCH had general decreasing trend from 1982 to 2009. However, the concentrations of both groups of compounds showed small rises in 1994. Concentrations of PCBs had general decreasing trend from 1982 to 2009 - smooth and steep only till 1994 and with two small peaks in 2003 and 2009. The latest estimated daily intake of DDT and HCH was well below the EU upper limit for pesticides in food intended for infants and small children. Although the estimated daily intake of PCBs was far below the upper limit for daily milk products in Serbia, its increase in 2003 and 2009 is a clear indication of environmental influx of these compounds after the 1994 measurements. The likely explanation for such POP profiles in South Bačka could have been a series of negative environmental impacts escalating in 1999, after which four hot spots were identified in Serbia (Novi Sad, Pančevo, Bor and Kragujevac) by UNEP. The results of this monitoring showed that although a long standing environmental presence of POPs has a decreasing trend, their occasional output in the environment may cause bioaccumulation and biomagnification in human organisms which already start in the neonatal age through mother-child transfer via human milk.

  13. Assessing Risks from Cyclones for Human Lives and Livelihoods in the Coastal Region of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quader, Mohammad Abdul; Khan, Amanat Ullah; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2017-07-25

    As a disaster prone country, Bangladesh is regularly hit by natural hazards, including devastating cyclones, such as in 1970, 1991 and 2007. Although the number of cyclones' fatalities reduced from 0.3 million in 1970 to a few thousand or fewer in recent events, loss of lives and impact on livelihoods remains a concern. It depends on the meteorological characteristics of cyclone and the general vulnerability and capacity of the exposed population. In that perspective, a spatially explicit risk assessment is an essential step towards targeted disaster risk reduction. This study aims at analyzing the spatial variation of the different factors contributing to the risk for coastal communities at regional scale, including the distribution of the hazards, exposure, vulnerability and capacity. An exploratory factor analysis method is used to map vulnerability contrasts between local administrative units. Indexing and ranking using geospatial techniques are used to produce maps of exposure, hazard, vulnerability, capacities and risk. Results show that vulnerable populations and exposed areas are distributed along the land sea boundary, islands and major inland rivers. The hazard, assessed from the density of historical cyclone paths, is highest in the southwestern part of the coast. Whereas cyclones shelters are shown to properly serve the most vulnerable populations as priority evacuation centers, the overall pattern of capacity accounting for building quality and road network shows a more complex pattern. Resultant risk maps also provide a reasonable basis from which to take further structural measures to minimize loss of lives in the upcoming cyclones.

  14. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Reed, John C. [Program on Apoptosis, Cancer Center, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Pascual, Jaime, E-mail: pascual@burnham.org [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  15. A MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF HUMAN THYROID GLAND IN THE POPULATION OF NORTH - EASTERN REGION OF INDIA

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    Debabani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Due to the high incidence of thyroid disorders in the North - Eastern population of India a study was undertaken in Guwahati Medical College to see the age related changes in the morphology of the gland in the ca davers of this region. AIM : The study was done to compare the dimensions of the thyroid gland in this population with different studies around the world to see if it can throw any light why thyroid disorders are more common in this population and help clin icians to deal better. MATERIALS AND METHOD : The specimens were divided into three groups according to their ages. Twenty (21 specimens (both male and female were taken from each age group. Statistical analysis was done by paired t - test and t was taken a s significant if the value of t was greater than 2.18. SUMMARY : A study of all together of 63 specimen were taken up to see if any morphological differences in dimension exists in various age groups viz. pediatrics , adults and elderly and co relate with fi ndings of previous workers and was statistically analyzed. CONCLUSION : The study showed that there was no morphological difference of this population with that of previous studies done in other parts of the world. Perhaps a histological study in molecular level will throw more light why this stratum of population is so vulnerable to thyroid disorders.

  16. JC virus/human immunodeficiency virus 1 co-infection in the Brazilian Amazonian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Maria Vieira Cayres-Vallinoto

    Full Text Available Abstract JC virus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family and is associated to a severe disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, which is gradually increasing in incidence as an opportunistic infection among AIDS patients. The present study aimed to investigate the occurrence of JCV among HIV-1 carriers including their types and molecular subtypes and the possible association with disease. Urine samples from 66 HIV-1 infected subjects were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (215 bp and IG (610 bp regions using the polymerase chain reaction. JCV was detected in 32% of the samples. The results confirmed the occurrence of type B (subtype Af2; in addition, another polyomavirus, BKV, was also detected in 1.5% of samples of the HIV-1 infected subjects. Apparently, there was no significant difference between mono- (HIV-1 only and co-infected (HIV-1/JCV subjects regarding their TCD4+/TCD8+ lymphocyte counts or HIV-1 plasma viral load. Self admitted seizures, hearing and visual loses were not significantly different between the two groups.

  17. CpG traffic lights are markers of regulatory regions in humans

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.

    2016-12-29

    DNA methylation is involved in regulation of gene expression. Although modern methods profile DNA methylation at single CpG sites, methylation levels are usually averaged over genomic regions in the downstream analyses. In this study we demonstrate that single CpG methylation can serve as a more accurate predictor of gene expression compared to average promoter / gene body methylation. CpG positions with significant correlation between methylation and expression of a gene nearby (named CpG traffic lights) are evolutionary conserved and enriched for exact TSS positions and active enhancers. Among all promoter types, CpG traffic lights are especially enriched in poised promoters. Genes that harbor CpG traffic lights are associated with development and signal transduction. Methylation levels of individual CpG traffic lights vary between cell types dramatically with the increased frequency of intermediate methylation levels, indicating cell population heterogeneity in CpG methylation levels. Being in line with the concept of the inherited stochastic epigenetic variation, methylation of such CpG positions might contribute to transcriptional regulation. Alternatively, one can hypothesize that traffic lights are markers of absent gene expression resulting from inactivation of their regulatory elements. The CpG traffic lights provide a promising insight into mechanisms of enhancer activity and gene regulation linking methylation of single CpG to expression.

  18. A key region in the human parietal cortex for processing proprioceptive hand feedback during reaching movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Thielscher, Axel; Peer, Angelika; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Seemingly effortless, we adjust our movements to continuously changing environments. After initiation of a goal-directed movement, the motor command is under constant control of sensory feedback loops. The main sensory signals contributing to movement control are vision and proprioception. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused mainly on identifying the parts of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) that contribute to visually guided movements. We used event-related TMS and force perturbations of the reaching hand to test whether the same sub-regions of the left PPC contribute to the processing of proprioceptive-only and of multi-sensory information about hand position when reaching for a visual target. TMS over two distinct stimulation sites elicited differential effects: TMS applied over the posterior part of the medial intraparietal sulcus (mIPS) compromised reaching accuracy when proprioception was the only sensory information available for correcting the reaching error. When visual feedback of the hand was available, TMS over the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) prolonged reaching time. Our results show for the first time the causal involvement of the posterior mIPS in processing proprioceptive feedback for online reaching control, and demonstrate that distinct cortical areas process proprioceptive-only and multi-sensory information for fast feedback corrections.

  19. The circulation of human astrovirus genotypes in the Central West Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andreia Silva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Out of 1,588 faecal samples of children taken from three locations of the Central West Region of Brazil, 57 were positive for astroviruses (HAstVs using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. They were genotyped by nested RT-PCR and/or genomic sequencing. HAstV-1 (42.8%, HAstV-2 (23.2%, HAstV-3 (3.6%, HAstV-4 (14.3% and HAstVs -5, -6, -7 and -8 (1.8% each were detected. In Goiânia and Campo Grande, HAstV-1 was the most frequently detected genotype while in Brasília (DF it was HAstV-2. Shifts in the circulation of astrovirus genotypes were observed in DF and Campo Grande. All samples collected by rectal swabs were viral negative. The astrovirus genotypes were detected in all age groups and there was no correlation between genotype and age group.

  20. Synaptic genes are extensively downregulated across multiple brain regions in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Nicole C; Coleman, Paul D; Cribbs, David H; Rogers, Joseph; Gillen, Daniel L; Cotman, Carl W

    2013-06-01

    Synapses are essential for transmitting, processing, and storing information, all of which decline in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because synapse loss only partially accounts for the cognitive declines seen in aging and AD, we hypothesized that existing synapses might undergo molecular changes that reduce their functional capacity. Microarrays were used to evaluate expression profiles of 340 synaptic genes in aging (20-99 years) and AD across 4 brain regions from 81 cases. The analysis revealed an unexpectedly large number of significant expression changes in synapse-related genes in aging, with many undergoing progressive downregulation across aging and AD. Functional classification of the genes showing altered expression revealed that multiple aspects of synaptic function are affected, notably synaptic vesicle trafficking and release, neurotransmitter receptors and receptor trafficking, postsynaptic density scaffolding, cell adhesion regulating synaptic stability, and neuromodulatory systems. The widespread declines in synaptic gene expression in normal aging suggests that function of existing synapses might be impaired, and that a common set of synaptic genes are vulnerable to change in aging and AD.

  1. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upma; Kumar, Parvinder; Raina, T. R.; Sharma, Kuldeep; Gupta, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes. PMID:20859508

  2. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes.

  3. Human exposure to indoor radon: a survey in the region of Guarda, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louro, Alina; Peralta, Luís; Soares, Sandra; Pereira, Alcides; Cunha, Gilda; Belchior, Ana; Ferreira, Luís; Monteiro Gil, Octávia; Louro, Henriqueta; Pinto, Paulo; Rodrigues, António Sebastião; Silva, Maria João; Teles, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as the city of Guarda at the northeast of Portugal. This gas is recognised as a carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoke. Therefore, the knowledge of radon concentrations inside the houses (where people stay longer) is important from the point of view of radiological protection. The main goal of this study was to assess the radon concentration in an area previously identified with a potentially high level of residential radon. The radon concentration was measured using CR-39 detectors, exposed for a period of 2 months in 185 dwellings in the Guarda region. The radon concentration in studied dwellings, ranged between 75 and 7640 Bq m(-3), with a geometric mean of 640 Bq m(-3) and an arithmetic mean of 1078 Bq m(-3). Based on a local winter-summer radon concentration variation model, these values would correspond to an annual average concentration of 860 Bq m(-3). Several factors contribute to this large dispersion, the main one being the exact location of housing construction in relation to the geochemical nature of the soil and others the predominant building material and ventilation. Based on the obtained results an average annual effective dose of 15 mSv y(-1) is estimated, well above the average previously estimated for Portugal.

  4. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (Ppain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (Ppain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (Ppain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.

  5. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in pterygia from different geographical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, F; Moore, P S; Ugalde, J; Perra, M T; Scarpa, A; Sirigu, P

    2003-01-01

    Background/aims: The aetiology and pathogenesis of pterygia remain unclear and the involvement of human papillomavirus (HPV) is controversial. 41 pterygia from two geographic locations were evaluated for the presence of HPV DNA. Methods: 41 pterygium biopsies (17 from Italy and 24 from Ecuador) were analysed using the L1C1 and PU-1ML primer sets by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis. Results: 22 of the 41 pterygia (54%) were positive for HPV, including all 17 Italian cases and 5/24 (21%) Ecuadorean cases. DNA sequencing of the 22 positive cases showed that 11 were HPV type 52, four were type 54, five were candHPV90, and two of unknown genotype. Conclusions: The major differences in the frequency of HPV in geographically distant populations might suggest a possible explanation for the vast differences in the reported detection rates. Three subtypes of HPV were found in this sample of pterygia. None the less, these results suggest that HPV may have a pathogenic role in pterygium. PMID:12812887

  6. Innervation of the sinu-atrial node and neighbouring regions in two human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orts Llorca, F; Domenech Mateu, J M; Puerta Fonolla, J

    1979-03-01

    In human embryos of 20 to 23 mm (36 to 40 days) it is possible to identify on the right side a nerve that we may call the sinusal, which originates by several roots from the nervus vagus dexter (Figs. 1A, B, D), descending through the right ventrolateral face of the primary trachea and right bronchus (Fig. 2, arrows). Beaded in appearance, it gives a fine anastomotic branch which, passing in front of the arteria pulmonalis dextra, passes to the left side (Figs. 2B, C, D; AN). At this level it gives the large branch for the nodus sinoatrialis which, penetrating through the wall of the superior vena cava, provides a rich innervation for the nodus sinoatrialis which is already in an advanced stage of differentiation (Fig. 3, 2; Cy, D, AN). Afterwards it gives fine branches which, following the atrial fold, are distributed throughout the posterior face of the atrium dextrum (Fig. 3). It increases in diameter and, passing through the angle formed by the right pulmonary veins with the atrium dextrum, reaches the intrapericardial portion of the inferior vena cava in the vicinity of its outlet from the atrium (Fig. 3, arrows). The whole innervation is parasympathetic at the stages studied.

  7. Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in women from a rural region of Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Paredes-Tello, María Antonia; Pérez-Terrón, Héctor; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2009-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 6, 11, 16, 18, and 31 in Mexican women living in rural areas of Puebla, Mexico and to evaluate risk factors associated with cervical neoplasm in this population. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 326 women at the General Hospital of Metepec, Puebla. Cervical samples were obtained using a cytobrush and tested for HPV genotypes by PCR assays using type-specific primers. A questionnaire was completed regarding gynecological, obstetric, and sexual behavior of the patients. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 25.4%, with two peaks of higher HPV prevalence in those aged 18-24 and 55-64 years. The individual genotype prevalences were: 9.6% HPV6, 4.8% HPV11, 54.2% HPV16, 37.3% HPV18, and 9.6% HPV31. Number of pregnancies was the most important risk factor associated with cervical cancer. HPV16 was the most common type found in all cervical lesions. Genotype 16 or 18 was detected in patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer. We found two peaks of age-specific HPV prevalence similar to findings reported worldwide.

  8. STUDY OF SACRAL HIATUS IN DRY HUMAN SACRA IN NEPAL, PARSA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malarvani T

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sacrum is a large triangular bone, formed by the fusion of five sacral vertebrae. The opening at the caudal end of sacral canal is known as sacral hiatus. It is formed due to the failure of fusion of laminae of the fifth (occasionally fourth sacral vertebra. Sacrum is one of the bones which exhibit variations and the variation of sacral hiatus is of great clinical significance because it may also leads to mechanical low back pain. Previous works on the morphometrical study on the sacral hiatus is limited, especially in Nepal, Parsa population. The present study was undertaken to help in filling this gap at least to a certain extent and also made an attempt to find out the variations of sacrum. Materials: One hundred dry human sacra were collected from the Department of Anatomy of National medical college & Teaching Hospital, Nepal. Methods & Observations: The morphometrical studies were done, and the parameters (Shape, length, Transverse width & Antero-posterior width of sacral hiatus and level of apex & base of sacral hiatus were measured with the help of divider, the observations were recorded, tabulated & analyzed. Result: The study showed a significant co-relation between anatomical variations of sacral hiatus with the previous studies.

  9. International and Regional Institutional Dialogues for Human Rights for LGBT persons: The quest for recognition, anti-discrimination, and marriage in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    There is a rich interplay between civil society organizations and institutions involved in human rights norm diffusion and the ‘ricochet’ of ideas at the regional level across Southeast Asia. There is a broad discussion occurring about human rights for LGBT persons and SOGI rights (Sexual Orientatio

  10. International and Regional Institutional Dialogues for Human Rights for LGBT persons: The quest for recognition, anti-discrimination, and marriage in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    There is a rich interplay between civil society organizations and institutions involved in human rights norm diffusion and the ‘ricochet’ of ideas at the regional level across Southeast Asia. There is a broad discussion occurring about human rights for LGBT persons and SOGI rights (Sexual

  11. International and Regional Institutional Dialogues for Human Rights for LGBT persons: The quest for recognition, anti-discrimination, and marriage in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    There is a rich interplay between civil society organizations and institutions involved in human rights norm diffusion and the ‘ricochet’ of ideas at the regional level across Southeast Asia. There is a broad discussion occurring about human rights for LGBT persons and SOGI rights (Sexual Orientatio

  12. Hydrological response to land cover changes and human activities in arid regions using a geographic information system and remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereif H Mahmoud

    Full Text Available The hydrological response to land cover changes induced by human activities in arid regions has attracted increased research interest in recent decades. The study reported herein assessed the spatial and quantitative changes in surface runoff resulting from land cover change in the Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia between 1990 and 2000 using an ArcGIS-surface runoff model and predicted land cover and surface runoff depth in 2030 using Markov chain analysis. Land cover maps for 1990 and 2000 were derived from satellite images using ArcGIS 10.1. The findings reveal a 26% decrease in forest and shrubland area, 28% increase in irrigated cropland, 1.5% increase in sparsely vegetated land and 0.5% increase in bare soil between 1990 and 2000. Overall, land cover changes resulted in a significant decrease in runoff depth values in most of the region. The decrease in surface runoff depth ranged from 25-106 mm/year in a 7020-km2 area, whereas the increase in such depth reached only 10 mm/year in a 243-km2 area. A maximum increase of 73 mm/year was seen in a limited area. The surface runoff depth decreased to the greatest extent in the central region of the study area due to the huge transition in land cover classes associated with the construction of 25 rainwater harvesting dams. The land cover prediction revealed a greater than twofold increase in irrigated cropland during the 2000-2030 period, whereas forest and shrubland are anticipated to occupy just 225 km2 of land area by 2030, a significant decrease from the 747 km2 they occupied in 2000. Overall, changes in land cover are predicted to result in an annual increase in irrigated cropland and dramatic decline in forest area in the study area over the next few decades. The increase in surface runoff depth is likely to have significant implications for irrigation activities.

  13. Hydrological response to land cover changes and human activities in arid regions using a geographic information system and remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Shereif H; Alazba, A A

    2015-01-01

    The hydrological response to land cover changes induced by human activities in arid regions has attracted increased research interest in recent decades. The study reported herein assessed the spatial and quantitative changes in surface runoff resulting from land cover change in the Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia between 1990 and 2000 using an ArcGIS-surface runoff model and predicted land cover and surface runoff depth in 2030 using Markov chain analysis. Land cover maps for 1990 and 2000 were derived from satellite images using ArcGIS 10.1. The findings reveal a 26% decrease in forest and shrubland area, 28% increase in irrigated cropland, 1.5% increase in sparsely vegetated land and 0.5% increase in bare soil between 1990 and 2000. Overall, land cover changes resulted in a significant decrease in runoff depth values in most of the region. The decrease in surface runoff depth ranged from 25-106 mm/year in a 7020-km2 area, whereas the increase in such depth reached only 10 mm/year in a 243-km2 area. A maximum increase of 73 mm/year was seen in a limited area. The surface runoff depth decreased to the greatest extent in the central region of the study area due to the huge transition in land cover classes associated with the construction of 25 rainwater harvesting dams. The land cover prediction revealed a greater than twofold increase in irrigated cropland during the 2000-2030 period, whereas forest and shrubland are anticipated to occupy just 225 km2 of land area by 2030, a significant decrease from the 747 km2 they occupied in 2000. Overall, changes in land cover are predicted to result in an annual increase in irrigated cropland and dramatic decline in forest area in the study area over the next few decades. The increase in surface runoff depth is likely to have significant implications for irrigation activities.

  14. Potential control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 asp expression by alternative splicing in the upstream untranslated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Michael S; Birch, Katherine E; Deacon, Nicholas J; Mosse, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    The negative-sense asp open reading frame (ORF) positioned opposite to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env gene encodes the 189 amino acid, membrane-associated ASP protein. Negative-sense transcription, regulated by long terminal repeat sequences, has been observed early in HIV-1 infection in vitro. All subtypes of HIV-1 were scanned to detect the negative-sense asp ORF and to identify potential regulatory sequences. A series of highly conserved upstream short open reading frames (sORFs) was identified. This potential control region from HIV-1(NL4-3), containing six sORFs, was cloned upstream of the reporter gene EGFP. Expression by transfection of HEK293 cells indicated that the introduction of this sORF region inhibits EGFP reporter expression; analysis of transcripts revealed no significant changes in levels of EGFP mRNA. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (RT-PCR) further demonstrated that the upstream sORF region undergoes alternative splicing in vitro. The most abundant product is spliced to remove sORFs I to V, leaving only the in-frame sORF VI upstream of asp. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of typical splice donor- and acceptor-site motifs. Mutation of the highly conserved splice donor and acceptor sites modulates, but does not fully relieve, inhibition of EGFP production. The strong conservation of asp and its sORFs across all HIV-1 subtypes suggests that the asp gene product may have a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. Alternative splicing of the upstream sORF region provides a potential mechanism for controlling expression of the asp gene.

  15. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, the East Anatolian Region of Turkey 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Emine; Parlak, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. While anthrax is rare in developed countries, it is endemic in Turkey. The names of the different forms of the disease refer to the manner of entry of the spores into the body-cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalation, and injection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics, epidemiological history, treatment, and outcomes of patients with anthrax. Eighty-two cases of anthrax hospitalized at Atatürk University Faculty of Medicine Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology in 2008-2014 were examined retrospectively. Gender, age, occupation, year, history, clinical characteristics, character of lesions, length of hospitalization, and outcomes were recorded. Thirty (36.6%) patients were female and 52 (63.4%) patients were male; ages were 18-69 and mean age was 43.77 ± 13.05. The mean incubation period was 4.79 ± 3.76 days. Cases were largely identified in August (41.5%) and September (25.6%). Sixty-nine (84.1%) of the 82 patients had been given antibiotics before presentation. Lesions were most common on the fingers and arms. The most common occupational groups were housewives (36.6%) and people working in animal husbandry (31.7%). All patients had histories of contact with diseased animals and animal products. Penicillin-group antibiotics (78%) were most commonly used in treatment. One patient (1.2%) died from anthrax meningitis. The mean length of hospitalization was 8.30 ± 5.36 days. Anthrax is an endemic disease of economic and social significance for the region. Effective public health control measures, risk group education, vaccination of animals, and decontamination procedures will reduce the number of cases.

  16. Social and human capital as determining factors of entrepreneurship in the Spanish Regions

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    Isabel Neira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship, innovation and creativity are considered key factors of the economic growth because they usually bring on behaviors aligned with the market development, productivity and social cohesion. This study aims to analyze the factors that influence the entrepreneurial role, and provide a better understanding of this behavior from a dynamic perspective, in order to support policies for encouraging entrepreneurship. To do this we used the data presented in the report of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM, in its 2011 edition, which is based on an empirical analysis of a sample of 27,000 Spanish citizens.The results confirm that the perception of market opportunities, and having the skills and knowledge required to create new companies are explanatory factors of the entrepreneurial activity. However, it is also possible to assert that the increase of the entrepreneurial activity rate motivated by the need of self-employment of the entrepreneur influences the increase of fear of failure, and this could generate a dynamic harmful to the business creation in the medium term.Our model aims to support the decisions of public institutions about the incentive measures for entrepreneurs. This work contributes to the study of entrepreneurship and business creation from a multidisciplinary perspective, incorporating psychological, sociological and economic approaches from a dynamic perspective. It also allows an in-depth analysis of factors undetected with other methodologies.We examined the determining factors of entrepreneurship by estimating a logit model based on entrepreneur’s social capital (networking and the geographical location (region of the business activity. This analysis has shown significant differences of these factors according to the stage of the entrepreneurial process. These results have let discuss the implications for the entrepreneurial dynamic, in order to support new policies in favor of entrepreneurship.

  17. Regional structural differences across functionally parcellated Brodmann areas of human primary somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa-María; Besle, Julien; Mougin, Olivier; Gowland, Penny; Bowtell, Richard; Schluppeck, Denis; Francis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    Ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI is ideally suited for structural and functional imaging of the brain. High-resolution structural MRI can be used to map the anatomical boundaries between functional domains of the brain by identifying changes related to the pattern of myelination within cortical gray matter, opening up the possibility to study the relationship between functional domains and underlying structure in vivo. In a recent study, we demonstrated the correspondence between functional (based on retinotopic mapping) and structural (based on changes in T2(⁎)-weighted images linked to myelination) parcellations of the primary visual cortex (V1) in vivo at 7T (Sanchez-Panchuelo et al., 2012b). Here, we take advantage of the improved BOLD CNR and high spatial resolution achievable at 7T to study regional structural variations across the functionally defined areas within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in individual subjects. Using a traveling wave fMRI paradigm to map the internal somatotopic representation of the index, middle, and ring fingers in S1, we were able to identify multiple map reversals at the tip and base, corresponding to the boundaries between Brodmann areas 3a, 3b, 1 and 2. Based on high resolution structural MRI data acquired in the same subjects, we inspected these functionally-parcellated Brodmann areas for differences in cortical thickness and MR contrast measures (magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and signal intensity in phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images) that are sensitive to myelination. Consistent area-related differences in cortical thickness and MTR/PSIR measurements were found across subjects. However these measures did not have sufficient sensitivity to allow definition of areal boundaries.

  18. Human papilloma virus and esophageal carcinoma in a Latin-American region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Herrera-Goepfert; Marcela Lizano; Suminori Akiba; Adela Carrillo-García; Mauricio Becker-D'Acosta

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) in a non-selected Mexican population.METHODS: Cases with a pathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were obtained from Department of Pathology files, at the National Cancer Institute in Mexico City during the period between 2000 and 2008. Slides from each case were reviewed and cases with sufficient neoplastic tissue were selected for molecular analysis. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue samples for polymerase chain reaction analysis to detect HPV DNA sequences. Demographic and clinical data of each patient were retrieved from corresponding clinical records.RESULTS: HPV was detected in 15 (25%) of ESCCs. HPV-16 was the most frequently observed genotype, followed by HPV-18; HPV-59 was also detected inone case. Unfortunately, HPV genotype could not be established in three cases due to lack of material for direct sequencing, although universal primers detected the presence of HPV generic sequences. No low-risk HPV genotypes were found nor was HPV-16/18 co-infection. HPV presence in ESCC was not significantly associated with gender, age, alcohol consumption, smoking, anatomic location, or histologic grade. All patients belonged to low and very low socioeconomic strata, and were diagnosed at advanced disease stage. Male patients were most commonly affected and the male:female ratio in HPV-positive ESCC increased twofold in comparison with HPV-negative cases (6.5:1 vs 3.1:1).CONCLUSION: High prevalence of high-risk HPV in ESCC in Mexico does not support the hypothesis that HPV-associated ESCC is more common in areas with higher ESCC incidence rates.

  19. Association of a Human FABP1 Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism with Altered Serum Triglyceride Levels.

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    Xian-E Peng

    Full Text Available Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP, also known as fatty acid-binding protein 1 (FABP1, is a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism. Elevated FABP1 levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and metabolic syndromes. In this study, we examine the association of FABP1 gene promoter variants with serum FABP1 and lipid levels in a Chinese population. Four promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of FABP1 gene were genotyped in a cross-sectional survey of healthy volunteers (n = 1,182 from Fuzhou city of China. Results showed that only the rs2919872 G>A variant was significantly associated with serum TG concentration(P = 0.032.Compared with the rs2919872 G allele, rs2919872 A allele contributed significantly to reduced serum TG concentration, and this allele dramatically decreased the FABP1 promoter activity(P < 0.05. The rs2919872 A allele carriers had considerably lower serum FABP1 levels than G allele carriers (P < 0.01. In the multivariable linear regression analysis, the rs2919872 A allele was negatively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = -0.320, P = 0.003, while serum TG levels were positively associated with serum FABP1 levels (β = 0.487, P = 0.014. Our data suggest that compared with the rs2919872 G allele, the rs2919872 A allele reduces the transcriptional activity of FABP1 promoter, and thereby may link FABP1 gene variation to TG level in humans.

  20. Integrated Futures for Europe's Mountain Regions: Reconciling Biodiversity Conservation and Human Livelihoods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan Mitchley; Martin F. Price; Joseph Tzanopoulos

    2006-01-01

    Europe's mountains cover nearly half of the continent's area and are home to one fifth of the European population. Mountain areas are hotspots of biodiversity and agriculture has played a multifunctional role in defining and sustaining mountain biodiversity. Ongoing trends of agricultural decline are having negative impacts on mountain biodiversity.This paper presents results from an interdisciplinary European research project, BioScene, which investigated the relationship between agriculture and biodiversity in six mountain study areas across Europe to provide recommendations for reconciling biodiversity conservation with social and economic activities through an integrated rural development strategy.BioScene used scenario analysis and stakeholder participation as tools for structuring the analysis of alternative mountain futures. Three main BioScene scenarios were evaluated: Business as Usual (BaU),Agricultural Liberalisation (Lib), Managed Change for Biodiversity (MCB). BioScene brought together ecologists, economists, sociologists and rural geographers, to carry out interdisciplinary analysis of the scenarios: identifying key drivers of change, assessing the biodiversity consequences and evaluating costeffectiveness. BioScene used a sustainability assessment to integrate the research outputs across natural and social science disciplines to assess the broader sustainability of the scenarios in terms of biodiversity,natural resources, rural development, social development, economic development and institutional capacity. The sustainability assessment showed that the MCB scenario was potentially the most sustainable of the three BioScene scenarios. Through the reconciliation of potentially conflicting objectives,such as conservation, economic development and human livelihoods, and with a strong participatory planning approach, the MCB scenario could represent an alternative approach to BaU for sustainable rural development in Europe's mountains. BioScene confirms

  1. Evaluating Coupled Human-Hydrologic Systems in High Altitude Regions: A Case Study of the Arun Watershed, Eastern Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, K.; Bookhagen, B.; Tague, C.; Lopez-Carr, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Himalaya exhibit dynamic ecological, hydrological, and climatic extremes that magnify the variability and extent of natural hazards, resulting in destruction to both physical and human landscapes. Coupled with poverty, these factors intensify local communities' vulnerability to climate change. This study highlights the Arun watershed in eastern Nepal as a case study to evaluate how local communities in high altitude regions are managing their water for domestic and agricultural needs while coping with extreme events, such as floods and landslides. Remotely-sensed precipitation, snowpack and glacial extent data from the past decade are combined with preliminary results from extensive field-based community surveys in the Arun watershed. The analysis of remotely-sensed data will describe seasonal trends in water availability, glacial lake growth, and the spatial variation of these trends within the basin. These hydrologic changes will be linked to the human survey analysis, which will provide an understanding of locals' perceptions of water challenges and the current water management strategies within the basin. Particular attention will be given to a comparison between the eastern and western tributaries of the Arun River, where the catchments are mainly rain-fed (eastern) versus glacial-fed (western). This contrast will highlight how different hydrologic scenarios evidenced from remote-sensing data motivate diverse human water management responses as defined in field surveys. A particular focus will be given to management decisions related to agriculture expansion and hydropower development. This synthesis of remote-sensing and social research methodologies provides a valuable perspective on coupled human-hydrologic systems.

  2. Descriptive Epidemiology of Human Thyroid Cancer: Experience from a Regional Registry and the Volcanic Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino eMalandrino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer (TC, the most common endocrine tumor, has steadily increased worldwide due to the increase of the papillary histotype. The reasons for this spread have not been established. In addition to more sensitive thyroid nodule screening, the effect of environmental factors cannot be excluded. Because high incidences of TC were found in volcanic areas (Hawaii and Iceland, a volcanic environment may play a role in the pathogenesis of TC.In January 2002, the Regional Register for Thyroid Cancer was instituted in Sicily. With a population of approximately 5 million inhabitants with similar genetic and lifestyle features, the coexistence in Sicily of rural, urban, industrial, moderate-to-low iodine intake and volcanic areas provides a conducive setting for assessing the environmental influences on the etiology of TC.In Sicily, between 2002 and 2004, 1,950 new cases of TC were identified, with an age-standardized rate (world ASR(w=17.8/100000 in females and 3.7/100000 in males and a high female/male ratio (4.3:1.0. The incidence of TC was heterogeneous within Sicily. There were 2.3 times more cases in the Catania province (where most of the inhabitants live in the volcanic area of Mt. Etna: ASR(w=31.7/105 in females and 6.4/105 in males vs 14.1 in females and 3.0 in males in the rest of Sicily. Multivariate analysis documented that residents in the volcanic area of Mt. Etna had a higher risk of TC, compared to the residents in urban, industrial and iodine deficient areas of Sicily. An abnormally high concentration of several chemicals was found in the drinking water of the Mt. Etna aquifer, which provides water to most of the residents in the Catania province. Our data suggest that environmental carcinogen(s of volcanic origin may promote papillary TC. Additional analyses, including cancer biological and molecular features, will allow a better understanding of risk factors and etiopathogenetic mechanisms.

  3. Human papillomavirus knowledge and vaccine acceptability among adolescents in a Greek region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, P A; Aletras, V H; Niakas, D A

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this research was twofold: (1) develop an instrument to assess knowledge regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) and its vaccine and utilize this instrument to measure knowledge levels of Greek adolescents in Lyceum schools of Western Thessaloniki; and (2) examine the associations of the resultant knowledge measure scores with sociodemographic characteristics. Cross-sectional survey with complex sampling design. A total of 268 students of three Lyceum schools in Western Thessaloniki responded anonymously to a questionnaire during February-March 2013. The instrument was developed by literature review. Answers of respondents to individual questions were initially presented in terms of absolute and relative frequencies. Knowledge items were presented by gender along with appropriate chi-squared tests. Next, the development and validation of a knowledge score was pursued with Rasch analysis. Raw scores of dichotomous true/false items were converted to interval-level adjusted student scores, and the reliability and validity of the model were assessed. Finally, the effect of sociodemographic variables on the knowledge measure was explored by multivariate linear regression. Analysis of individual items documented low knowledge for both female and male students along with a limited role of doctors as information agents and little associated encouragement toward vaccination. Vaccine uptake was low with many young girls being largely unwilling to vaccinate in the future primarily due to the fear of side-effects and lack of information. Person location parameters (knowledge scores) were derived from a Rasch model with satisfactory reliability and validity. The resultant validated measure confirmed the low knowledge levels of Greek students. Nationality and birthplace seemed to affect knowledge level. Further improvement and validation of the knowledge measure used in this study can assist nationwide surveys in order to examine student knowledge regarding HPV and its

  4. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing the non-tandem repeat regions of the human mucin MUC4 in pancreatic cancer.

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    Maneesh Jain

    Full Text Available The MUC4 mucin is a high molecular weight, membrane-bound, and highly glycosylated protein. It is a multi-domain protein that is putatively cleaved into a large mucin-like subunit (MUC4α and a C-terminal growth-factor like subunit (MUC4β. MUC4 plays critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions and is aberrantly overexpressed in several cancers, including those of the pancreas, cervix, breast and lung. It is also a potential biomarker for the diagnosis, prognosis and progression of several malignancies. Further, MUC4 plays diverse functional roles in cancer initiation and progression as evident from its involvement in oncogenic transformation, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, motility and invasion, and resistance to chemotherapy in human cancer cells. We have previously generated a monoclonal antibody 8G7, which is directed against the TR region of MUC4, and has been extensively used to study the expression of MUC4 in several malignancies. Here, we describe the generation of anti-MUC4 antibodies directed against the non-TR regions of MUC4. Recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST-fused MUC4α fragments, both upstream (MUC4α-N-Ter and downstream (MUC4α-C-Ter of the TR domain, were used as immunogens to immunize BALB/c mice. Following cell fusion, hybridomas were screened using the aforementioned recombinant proteins ad lysates from human pancreatic cell lines. Three anti MUC4α-N-Ter and one anti-MUC4α-C-Ter antibodies were characterized by several inmmunoassays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting, immunofluorescene, flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation using MUC4 expressing human pancreatic cancer cell lines. The antibodies also reacted with the MUC4 in human pancreatic tumor sections in immunohistochemical analysis. The new domain-specific anti-MUC4 antibodies will serve as important reagents to study the structure-function relationship of MUC4 domains and for the development of MUC4

  5. The application of the human beta-globin gene locus control region and murine erythroleukemia cell system to the expression and pharmacological characterization of human endothelin receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Whiting, E; Bath, C; Tang, E; Brennand, J

    1995-06-01

    The cDNAs encoding both A and B subtypes of the human endothelin receptor have been inserted into mammalian cell expression vectors that utilize the human globin gene, locus control region. These constructs have been introduced into murine erythroleukemia cells and inducible high level expression of the receptors has been achieved (approximately 1.5-pM/mg membrane protein and approximately 13,500 binding sites/cell for both receptor subtypes). Cell lines expressing these receptors were obtained on a rapid time scale (3-4 weeks), facilitated by the need for the analysis of only small numbers of cell clones/receptor (approximately 6). Competitive binding assays with endothelin-1 gave IC50s of 130 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-A receptor and 160 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-B receptor. Similar studies with the different isoforms of endothelin, sarafatoxin-S6b and -S6c, BQ123 and BQ3020, all gave the expected selectivity profiles. The IC50s for all compounds were in close agreement with those reported for native receptors. Thus, this expression system, which has several advantages over other described expression systems, is capable of rapidly providing large quantities of receptor for detailed pharmacological analyses or drug screening. In addition, the expressed receptors display the expected pharmacological profiles in the absence of any complicating, competing interactions from other subtypes or binding sites.

  6. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich J.;

    2015-01-01

    target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods: We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from...... the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions: We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein......Background: Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often...

  7. Multiplex genotype determination at a DNA sequence polymorphism cluster in the human immunoglobulin heavy-chain region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Hood, L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-03-20

    We have developed a method for multilocus genotype determination. The method involves using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) for allele discrimination. If a polymorphism is not an RFLP, it is converted into an RFLP during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After amplification and restriction enzyme digestion, samples are analyzed by sequential gel loading during electrophoresis. The efficiency of this method was demonstrated by determining the genotypes of 108 semen samples at seven DNA sequence polymorphic sites identified in the human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region. It was shown that more than 1000 PCR products could be easily analyzed per day per investigator. To show the reliability of this method, some of the typing results were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. By computer simulation, most (98%) polymorphisms were shown to be natural or convertible (by changing 1 bp close to or next to each polymorphic site) RFLPs for the commercially available 4-base cutters. 47 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Genetic Dissection of the AZF Regions of the Human Y Chromosome: Thriller or Filler for Male (Infertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Navarro-Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The azoospermia factor (AZF regions consist of three genetic domains in the long arm of the human Y chromosome referred to as AZFa, AZFb and AZFc. These are of importance for male fertility since they are home to genes required for spermatogenesis. In this paper a comprehensive analysis of AZF structure and gene content will be undertaken. Particular care will be given to the molecular mechanisms underlying the spermatogenic impairment phenotypes associated to AZF deletions. Analysis of the 14 different AZF genes or gene families argues for the existence of functional asymmetries between the determinants; while some are prominent players in spermatogenesis, others seem to modulate more subtly the program. In this regard, evidence supporting the notion that DDX3Y, KDM5D, RBMY1A1, DAZ, and CDY represent key AZF spermatogenic determinants will be discussed.

  9. The extent of shifts in vegetation phenology between rural and urban areas within a human-dominated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallimer, Martin; Tang, Zhiyao; Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-04-01

    Urbanization is one of the major environmental challenges facing the world today. One of its particularly pressing effects is alterations to local and regional climate through, for example, the Urban Heat Island. Such changes in conditions are likely to have an impact on the phenology of urban vegetation, which will have knock-on implications for the role that urban green infrastructure can play in delivering multiple ecosystem services. Here, in a human-dominated region, we undertake an explicit comparison of vegetation phenology between urban and rural zones. Using satellite-derived MODIS-EVI data from the first decade of the 20th century, we extract metrics of vegetation phenology (date of start of growing season, date of end of growing season, and length of season) for Britain's 15 largest cities and their rural surrounds. On average, urban areas experienced a growing season 8.8 days longer than surrounding rural zones. As would be expected, there was a significant decline in growing season length with latitude (by 3.4 and 2.4 days/degree latitude in rural and urban areas respectively). Although there is considerable variability in how phenology in urban and rural areas differs across our study cities, we found no evidence that built urban form influences the start, end, or length of the growing season. However, the difference in the length of the growing season between rural and urban areas was significantly negatively associated with the mean disposable household income for a city. Vegetation in urban areas deliver many ecosystem services such as temperature mitigation, pollution removal, carbon uptake and storage, the provision of amenity value for humans and habitat for biodiversity. Given the rapid pace of urbanization and ongoing climate change, understanding how vegetation phenology will alter in the future is important if we wish to be able to manage urban greenspaces effectively.

  10. Genomic structure and paralogous regions of the inversion breakpoint occurring between human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Y; Grossmann, B; Tsend-Ayush, E; Grützner, F; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Yang, F; Haaf, T

    2005-01-01

    Intrachromosomal duplications play a significant role in human genome pathology and evolution. To better understand the molecular basis of evolutionary chromosome rearrangements, we performed molecular cytogenetic and sequence analyses of the breakpoint region that distinguishes human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2. FISH with region-specific BAC clones demonstrated that the breakpoint-flanking sequences are duplicated intrachromosomally on orangutan 2 and human 3q21 as well as at many pericentromeric and subtelomeric sites throughout the genomes. Breakage and rearrangement of the human 3p12.3-homologous region in the orangutan lineage were associated with a partial loss of duplicated sequences in the breakpoint region. Consistent with our FISH mapping results, computational analysis of the human chromosome 3 genomic sequence revealed three 3p12.3-paralogous sequence blocks on human chromosome 3q21 and smaller blocks on the short arm end 3p26-->p25. This is consistent with the view that sequences from an ancestral site at 3q21 were duplicated at 3p12.3 in a common ancestor of orangutan and humans. Our results show that evolutionary chromosome rearrangements are associated with microduplications and microdeletions, contributing to the DNA differences between closely related species. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The normal human chondro-osseous junctional region: evidence for contact of uncalcified cartilage with subchondral bone and marrow spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoddart Robert W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondro-osseous junctional region of diarthrodial joints is peculiarly complex and may be considered to consist of the deepest layer of non-calcified cartilage, the tidemark, the layer of calcified cartilage, a thin cement line (between the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone and the subchondral bone. A detailed knowledge of the structure, function and pathophysiology of the normal chondro-osseous junction is essential for an understanding of the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Methods Full thickness samples from human knee joints were processed and embedded in paraffin wax. One hundred serial sections (10 μm thick were taken from the chondro-osseous junctional region of a block from the medial tibial plateau of a normal joint. They were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and photographed. For a simple physical reconstruction images of each 10th sequential tissue section were printed and the areas of the photomicrographs containing the chondro-osseous junctional region were cut out and then overlaid so as to create a three-dimensional (3D model of this region. A 3D reconstruction was also made using computer modelling. Results Histochemical staining revealed some instances where prolongations of uncalcified cartilage, delineated by the tidemark, dipped into the calcified cartilage and, in places, abutted onto subchondral bone and marrow spaces. Small areas of uncalcified cartilage containing chondrocytes (virtual islands were seen, in two-dimensional (2D sections, to be apparently entombed in calcified matrix. The simple physical 3D reconstruction confirmed that these prolongations of uncalcified cartilage were continuous with the cartilage of zone IV and demonstrated that the virtual islands of uncalcified cartilage were cross-sections of these prolongations. The computer-generated 3D reconstructions clearly demonstrated that the uncalcified prolongations ran through the calcified cartilage to touch bone and

  12. Impacts of global, regional, and sectoral black carbon emission reductions on surface air quality and human mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anenberg, S. C.; Talgo, K.; Arunachalam, S.; Dolwick, P.; Jang, C.; West, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    As a component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC) is associated with premature human mortality. BC also affects climate by absorbing solar radiation and reducing planetary albedo. Several studies have examined the climate impacts of BC emissions, but the associated health impacts have been studied less extensively. Here, we examine the surface PM2.5 and premature mortality impacts of halving anthropogenic BC emissions globally and individually from eight world regions and three major economic sectors. We use a global chemical transport model, MOZART-4, to simulate PM2.5 concentrations and a health impact function to calculate premature cardiopulmonary and lung cancer deaths. We estimate that halving global anthropogenic BC emissions reduces outdoor population-weighted average PM2.5 by 542 ng m-3 (1.8 %) and avoids 157 000 (95 % confidence interval, 120 000-194 000) annual premature deaths globally, with the vast majority occurring within the source region. Most of these avoided deaths can be achieved by halving emissions in East Asia (China; 54 %), followed by South Asia (India; 31 %), however South Asian emissions have 50 % greater mortality impacts per unit BC emitted than East Asian emissions. Globally, halving residential, industrial, and transportation emissions contributes 47 %, 35 %, and 15 % to the avoided deaths from halving all anthropogenic BC emissions. These contributions are 1.2, 1.2, and 0.6 times each sector's portion of global BC emissions, owing to the