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Sample records for human forensic genotyping

  1. Forensic SNP genotyping with SNaPshot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fondevila, M; Børsting, C; Phillips, C

    2017-01-01

    This review explores the key factors that influence the optimization, routine use, and profile interpretation of the SNaPshot single-base extension (SBE) system applied to forensic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Despite being a mainly complimentary DNA genotyping technique...... to routine STR profiling, use of SNaPshot is an important part of the development of SNP sets for a wide range of forensic applications with these markers, from genotyping highly degraded DNA with very short amplicons to the introduction of SNPs to ascertain the ancestry and physical characteristics...... of an unidentified contact trace donor. However, this technology, as resourceful as it is, displays several features that depart from the usual STR genotyping far enough to demand a certain degree of expertise from the forensic analyst before tackling the complex casework on which SNaPshot application provides...

  2. Resolution in forensic microbial genotyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2005-08-30

    Resolution is a key parameter for differentiating among the large number of strain typing methods that could be applied to pathogens involved in bioterror events or biocrimes. In this report we develop a first-principles analysis of strain typing resolution using a simple mathematical model to provide a basis for the rational design of microbial typing systems for forensic applications. We derive two figures of merit that describe the resolving power and phylogenetic depth of a strain typing system. Rough estimates of these figures-of-merit for MLVA, MLST, IS element, AFLP, hybridization microarrays, and other bacterial typing methods are derived from mutation rate data reported in the literature. We also discuss the general problem of how to construct a ''universal'' practical typing system that has the highest possible resolution short of whole-genome sequencing, and that is applicable with minimal modification to a wide range of pathogens.

  3. Forensic SNP Genotyping using Nanopore MinION Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Senne; Gansemans, Yannick; Deleye, Lieselot; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2017-01-01

    One of the latest developments in next generation sequencing is the Oxford Nanopore Technologies’ (ONT) MinION nanopore sequencer. We studied the applicability of this system to perform forensic genotyping of the forensic female DNA standard 9947 A using the 52 SNP-plex assay developed by the SNPforID consortium. All but one of the loci were correctly genotyped. Several SNP loci were identified as problematic for correct and robust genotyping using nanopore sequencing. All these loci contained homopolymers in the sequence flanking the forensic SNP and most of them were already reported as problematic in studies using other sequencing technologies. When these problematic loci are avoided, correct forensic genotyping using nanopore sequencing is technically feasible. PMID:28155888

  4. Biomek®-3000 and GenPlex SNP Genotyping in Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Tomas, Carmen; Hansen, Anders J.;

    2008-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping provides a supplement for conventional short tandem repeats-based kits currently used for human identification. GenPlex (Applied Biosystems (AB), Foster City, CA) is an SNP-genotyping kit based on a multiplex of 48 informative, autosomal SNPs from...... but one sample. The results demonstrate that the Biomek-3000 can perform a series of complex reactions leading to highly consistent forensic genetic SNP-typing results Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  5. Human resources and their possible forensic meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Andrea; Urlić, Ivan; Kasum, Josip

    2015-09-01

    Forensics (forensic--before the Forum) means the application of knowledge from different scientific fields in order to define facts in judicial and/or administrative procedures. Nowadays forensics, besides this, finds its application even in different economic processes. For example, forensics enters the commercial areas of business intelligence and of different security areas. The European Commission recognized the importance of forensics, and underscored the importance of development of its scientific infrastructure in member States. We are witnessing the rise of various tragedies in economic and other kinds of processes. Undoubtedly, the world is increasingly exposed to various forms of threats whose occurrences regularly involve people. In this paper we are proposing the development of a new approach in the forensic assessment of the state of human resources. We are suggesting that in the focus should be the forensic approach in the psychological assessment of awareness of the individual and of the critical infrastructure sector operator (CISO) in determining the level of actual practical, rather than formal knowledge of an individual in a particular field of expertise, or in a specific scientific field, and possible forensic meanings.

  6. Mendel Meets CSI: Forensic Genotyping as a Method to Teach Genetics & DNA Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Scotia; Reiss, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a forensic DNA science laboratory exercise for advanced high school and introductory college level biology courses. Students use a commercial genotyping kit and genetic analyzer or gene sequencer to analyze DNA recovered from a fictitious crime scene. DNA profiling and STR genotyping are outlined. DNA extraction, PCR, and…

  7. Microchip-based forensic short tandem repeat genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Tae; Heo, Hyun Young; Oh, Shin Hye; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-08-01

    Micro total analysis system (μTAS) or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology has advanced over decades, and the high performance for chemical and biological analysis has been well demonstrated with advantages of low sample consumption, rapid analysis time, high-throughput screening, and portability. In particular, μTAS or LOC based genetic applications have been extensively explored, and the short tandem repeat (STR) typing on a chip has garnered attention in the forensic community due to its special use for human identification in the field of mass disaster and missing person investigation, paternity testing, and perpetrator identification. The STR typing process consists of sample collection, DNA extraction, DNA quantitation, STR loci amplification, capillary electrophoretic separation, and STR profiling. Recent progress of microtechnology shows its ability to substitute the conventional analytical tools, and furthermore demonstrates total integration of the whole STR processes on a single wafer for on-site STR typing. In this review article, we highlighted some representative results for fluorescence labeling techniques, microchip-based DNA purification, on-chip polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a capillary electrophoretic microdevice, and a fully integrated microdevice for STR typing.

  8. Next-Generation STR Genotyping Kits for Forensic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero, J J; Hennessy, L K

    2012-01-01

    Forensic DNA typing has been a constantly evolving field driven by innovations from academic laboratories as well as kit manufacturers. Central to these technological advances has been the transition from multilocus-probe restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods to short tandem repeat (STR) PCR-based assays. STRs are now the markers of choice for forensic DNA typing and a wide variety of commercial STR kits have been designed to meet the various needs of a forensic lab. This review provides an overview of the commercial STR kits made available since the year 2000 and explains the rationale for creating these kits. Substantial progress has been made in key areas such as sample throughput, speed, and sensitivity. For example, a significant advancement for databasing labs was the capability of direct amplification from a blood or buccal sample without need for DNA extraction or purification, enabling increased throughput. Other key improvements are greater tolerance for inhibitors (e.g., humic acid, hematin, and tannic acid) present in evidence samples, PCR cycling times decreased by 1-1.5 h, and greater sensitivity with improved buffer components and thermal cycling conditions. These improvements that have been made over the last 11 years have enhanced the ability of forensic laboratories to obtain a DNA profile from more challenging samples. However, with the proliferation of kits from different vendors the primer binding sequences of the loci vary, which could result in discordant events that would need to be resolved either via a database-driven software solution or simply by evaluating discordant samples with multiple kits.

  9. Molecular forensic profiling of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in raw water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, Norma J; Bounsombath, Niravanh; Wallis, Peter; Ong, Corinne S L; Isaac-Renton, Judith L; Neumann, Norman F

    2005-12-01

    The emerging concept of host specificity of Cryptosporidium spp. was exploited to characterize sources of fecal contamination in a watershed. A method of molecular forensic profiling of Cryptosporidium oocysts on microscope slides prepared from raw water samples processed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 1623 was developed. The method was based on a repetitive nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism-DNA sequencing approach that permitted the resolution of multiple species/genotypes of Cryptosporidium in a single water sample.

  10. Validation of the DNATyper™15 PCR Genotyping System for Forensic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the optimization and validation of the DNATyper™15 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR genotyping system for autosomal short tandem repeat (STR amplification at 14 autosomal loci (D6S1043, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D2S1338, D3S1358, D13S317, D8S1179, D16S539, Penta E, D5S818, vWA, D18S51, and FGA and  amelogenin, a sex-determining locus. Several DNATyper™15 assay variables were optimized, including hot start Taq polymerase concentration, Taq polymerase activation time, magnesium concentration, primer concentration, annealing temperature, reaction volume, and cycle number. The performance of the assay was validated with respect to species specificity, sensitivity to template concentration, stability, accuracy, influence of the DNA extraction methods, and the ability to genotype the mixture samples. The performance of the DNATyper™15 system on casework samples was compared with that of two widely used STR amplification kits, Identifiler™ (Applied Biosystems, Carlsbad, CA, USA and PowerPlex 16 ® (Promega, Madison, WI, USA. The conditions for PCR-based DNATyper™15 genotyping were optimized. Contamination from forensically relevant nonhuman DNA was not found to impact genotyping results, and full profiles were generated for all the reactions containing ≥ 0.125 ng of DNA template. No significant difference in performance was observed even after the DNATyper™15 assay components were subjected to 20 freeze-thaw cycles. The performances of DNATyper™15, Identifiler™, and PowerPlex 16 ® were comparable in terms of sensitivity and the ability to genotype the mixed samples and case-type samples, with the assays giving the same genotyping results for all the shared loci. The DNA extraction methods did not affect the performance of any of the systems. Our results demonstrate that the DNATyper™15 system is suitable for genotyping in both forensic DNA database work and case-type samples.

  11. The Rise of Forensic Pathology in Human Medicine: Lessons for Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollanen, M S

    2016-09-01

    The rise of forensic pathology in human medicine has greatly contributed to the administration of justice, public safety and security, and medical knowledge. However, the evolution of human forensic pathology has been challenging. Veterinary forensic pathologists can learn from some of the lessons that have informed the growth and development of human forensic pathology. Three main observations have emerged in the past decade. First, wrongful convictions tell us to use a truth-seeking stance rather than an a priori "think dirty" stance when investigating obscure death. Second, missed homicides and concealed homicides tell us that training and certification are the beginning of reliable forensic pathology. Third, failure of a sustainable institutional arrangement that fosters a combination of service, research, and teaching will lead to stagnation of knowledge. Forensic pathology of humans and animals will flourish, help protect society, and support justice if we embrace a modern biomedical scientific model for our practice. We must build training programs, contribute to the published literature, and forge strong collaborative institutions.

  12. Cognitive neuroscience in forensic science: understanding and utilizing the human element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Itiel E

    2015-08-01

    The human element plays a critical role in forensic science. It is not limited only to issues relating to forensic decision-making, such as bias, but also relates to most aspects of forensic work (some of which even take place before a crime is ever committed or long after the verification of the forensic conclusion). In this paper, I explicate many aspects of forensic work that involve the human element and therefore show the relevance (and potential contribution) of cognitive neuroscience to forensic science. The 10 aspects covered in this paper are proactive forensic science, selection during recruitment, training, crime scene investigation, forensic decision-making, verification and conflict resolution, reporting, the role of the forensic examiner, presentation in court and judicial decisions. As the forensic community is taking on the challenges introduced by the realization that the human element is critical for forensic work, new opportunities emerge that allow for considerable improvement and enhancement of the forensic science endeavour.

  13. Cognitive neuroscience in forensic science: understanding and utilizing the human element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Itiel E.

    2015-01-01

    The human element plays a critical role in forensic science. It is not limited only to issues relating to forensic decision-making, such as bias, but also relates to most aspects of forensic work (some of which even take place before a crime is ever committed or long after the verification of the forensic conclusion). In this paper, I explicate many aspects of forensic work that involve the human element and therefore show the relevance (and potential contribution) of cognitive neuroscience to forensic science. The 10 aspects covered in this paper are proactive forensic science, selection during recruitment, training, crime scene investigation, forensic decision-making, verification and conflict resolution, reporting, the role of the forensic examiner, presentation in court and judicial decisions. As the forensic community is taking on the challenges introduced by the realization that the human element is critical for forensic work, new opportunities emerge that allow for considerable improvement and enhancement of the forensic science endeavour. PMID:26101281

  14. Forensic dentistry in human identification: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Ata-Ali, Fadi

    2014-04-01

    An update is provided of the literature on the role of odontology in human identification, based on a PubMed-Medline search of the last 5 years and using the terms: "forensic dentistry" (n = 464 articles), "forensic odontology" (n = 141 articles) and "forensic dentistry identification" (n = 169 articles). Apart from these initial 774 articles, others considered to be important and which were generated by a manual search and cited as references in review articles were also included. Forensic dentistry requires interdisciplinary knowledge, since the data obtained from the oral cavity can contribute to identify an individual or provide information needed in a legal process. Furthermore, the data obtained from the oral cavity can narrow the search range of an individual and play a key role in the victim identification process following mass disasters or catastrophes. This literature search covering the last 5 years describes the novelties referred to buccodental studies in comparative identification, buccodental evaluation in reconstructive identification, human bites as a method for identifying the aggressor, and the role of DNA in dental identification. The oral cavity is a rich and noninvasive source of DNA, and can be used to solve problems of a social, economic or legal nature. Key words:Forensic identification, DNA, forensic dentistry, rugoscopy, cheiloscopy, saliva.

  15. Comparison between magnetic bead and qPCR library normalisation methods for forensic MPS genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Bhavik; Venables, Samantha; Roffey, Paul

    2017-04-18

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is fast approaching operational use in forensic science, with the capability to analyse hundreds of DNA identity and DNA intelligence markers in multiple samples simultaneously. The ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Kit on MiSeq FGx™ (Illumina) workflow can provide profiles for autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), X chromosome and Y chromosome STRs, identity single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), biogeographical ancestry SNPs and phenotype (eye and hair colour) SNPs from a sample. The library preparation procedure involves a series of steps including target amplification, library purification and library normalisation. This study highlights the comparison between the manufacturer recommended magnetic bead normalisation and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods. Furthermore, two qPCR chemistries, KAPA® (KAPA Biosystems) and NEBNext® (New England Bio Inc.), have also been compared. The qPCR outperformed the bead normalisation method, while the NEBNext® kit obtained higher genotype concordance than KAPA®. The study also established an MPS workflow that can be utilised in any operational forensic laboratory.

  16. Human identification & forensic analyses of degraded or low level DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westen, Antoinette-Andrea

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based human identification is employed in varying situations, such as disaster victim identification, relationship testing and forensic analyses. When DNA is of low quality and/or quantity, standard methods for DNA profiling may not suffice. The research described in this thesis is aimed at the

  17. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  18. Human identification & forensic analyses of degraded or low level DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westen, Antoinette-Andrea

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based human identification is employed in varying situations, such as disaster victim identification, relationship testing and forensic analyses. When DNA is of low quality and/or quantity, standard methods for DNA profiling may not suffice. The research described in this thesis is aimed at the

  19. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  20. Microbial DNA fingerprinting of human fingerprints: dynamic colonization of fingertip microflora challenges human host inferences for forensic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, Sebastian; van Wamel, Willem; Endtz, Hubert P; van Belkum, Alex; Kayser, Manfred

    2010-09-01

    Human fingertip microflora is transferred to touched objects and may provide forensically relevant information on individual hosts, such as on geographic origins, if endogenous microbial skin species/strains would be retrievable from physical fingerprints and would carry geographically restricted DNA diversity. We tested the suitability of physical fingerprints for revealing human host information, with geographic inference as example, via microbial DNA fingerprinting. We showed that the transient exogenous fingertip microflora is frequently different from the resident endogenous bacteria of the same individuals. In only 54% of the experiments, the DNA analysis of the transient fingertip microflora allowed the detection of defined, but often not the major, elements of the resident microflora. Although we found microbial persistency in certain individuals, time-wise variation of transient and resident microflora within individuals was also observed when resampling fingerprints after 3 weeks. While microbial species differed considerably in their frequency spectrum between fingerprint samples from volunteers in Europe and southern Asia, there was no clear geographic distinction between Staphylococcus strains in a cluster analysis, although bacterial genotypes did not overlap between both continental regions. Our results, though limited in quantity, clearly demonstrate that the dynamic fingerprint microflora challenges human host inferences for forensic purposes including geographic ones. Overall, our results suggest that human fingerprint microflora is too dynamic to allow for forensic marker developments for retrieving human information.

  1. Genetic diversity of Bacillus anthracis in Europe: genotyping methods in forensic and epidemiologic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzelle, Sylviane; Thierry, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, a zoonosis relatively common throughout the world, can be used as an agent of bioterrorism. In naturally occurring outbreaks and in criminal release of this pathogen, a fast and accurate diagnosis is crucial to an effective response. Microbiological forensics and epidemiologic investigations increasingly rely on molecular markers, such as polymorphisms in DNA sequence, to obtain reliable information regarding the identification or source of a suspicious strain. Over the past decade, significant research efforts have been undertaken to develop genotyping methods with increased power to differentiate B. anthracis strains. A growing number of DNA signatures have been identified and used to survey B. anthracis diversity in nature, leading to rapid advances in our understanding of the global population of this pathogen. This article provides an overview of the different phylogenetic subgroups distributed across the world, with a particular focus on Europe. Updated information on the anthrax situation in Europe is reported. A brief description of some of the work in progress in the work package 5.1 of the AniBioThreat project is also presented, including (1) the development of a robust typing tool based on a suspension array technology and multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphisms scoring and (2) the typing of a collection of DNA from European isolates exchanged between the partners of the project. The know-how acquired will contribute to improving the EU's ability to react rapidly when the identity and real origin of a strain need to be established.

  2. Forensic medical examination of victims of trafficking in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alempijevic, Djordie; Jecmenica, Dragan; Pavlekic, Snezana; Savic, Slobodan; Aleksandric, Branimir

    2007-01-01

    Trafficking in human beigns (THB) is recognized as a global public health issue as well as a violation of human rights. Trafficking has been identified to be associated with several health risks including psychological trauma, injuries from violence, and substance misuse. Public and media reports suggest that the morbidity and mortality associated with trafficking are substantial. The need of medico-legal healthcare for THB victims is being neglected. Forensic medical examination, as specific intervention, is a highly desirable element of ermegency health care provided for victims of tracking. Acting in such a way, the investigation should establish the facts related to the allegatation of trafficking, thereby assisting in identifying those responsible, but also contributing to the procedures designed to obtain redress for the victims. Local anti-trafficking policies and interventions, however, have not acknowledged these needs. Therefore, the agenda of anti-trafficking policies needs to be redrawn to include forensic medical assessment of victims for legal purposes.

  3. Forensic human identification in the United States and Canada: a review of the law, admissible techniques, and the legal implications of their application in forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holobinko, Anastasia

    2012-10-10

    Forensic human identification techniques are successful if they lead to positive personal identification. However, the strongest personal identification is of no use in the prosecution--or vindication--of an accused if the associated evidence and testimony is ruled inadmissible in a court of law. This review examines the U.S. and Canadian legal rulings regarding the admissibility of expert evidence and testimony, and subsequently explores four established methods of human identification (i.e., DNA profiling, forensic anthropology, forensic radiography, forensic odontology) and one complementary technique useful in determining identity, and the legal implications of their application in forensic cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Forensic considerations when dealing with incinerated human dental remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the human dental identification process relies upon sufficient post-mortem data being recovered to allow for a meaningful comparison with ante-mortem records of the deceased person. Teeth are the most indestructible components of the human body and are structurally unique in their composition. They possess the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, decomposition and prolonged immersion. In most natural as well as man-made disasters, teeth may provide the only means of positive identification of an otherwise unrecognizable body. It is imperative that dental evidence should not be destroyed through erroneous handling until appropriate radiographs, photographs, or impressions can be fabricated. Proper methods of physical stabilization of incinerated human dental remains should be followed. The maintenance of integrity of extremely fragile structures is crucial to the successful confirmation of identity. In such situations, the forensic dentist must stabilise these teeth before the fragile remains are transported to the mortuary to ensure preservation of possibly vital identification evidence. Thus, while dealing with any incinerated dental remains, a systematic approach must be followed through each stage of evaluation of incinerated dental remains to prevent the loss of potential dental evidence. This paper presents a composite review of various studies on incinerated human dental remains and discusses their impact on the process of human identification and suggests a step by step approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Strongyloides stercoralis genotypes in humans in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Guo, Li; Streit, Adrian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the genetic variability of the soil-transmitted nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis, in humans. We sequenced portions of the small subunit rDNA (SSU), including the hyper variable regions (HVR) I and IV from S. stercoralis larvae derived from individuals living in a rural setting in Cambodia. We identified three polymorphic positions, including a previously reported one within the HVR I. HVR IV was invariable. Six different SSU alleles existed in our sample. Although different genotypes of S. stercoralis were found in the same individuals, no heterozygous larvae were found. This indicates that there is no or very little interbreeding between the different genotypes. Further studies are needed to examine if this is because sexual reproduction, which is facultative, is rare in our study area's S. stercoralis population or because what is considered to be S. stercoralis today is actually a complex of closely related species or subspecies.

  6. Forensic entomology of decomposing humans and their decomposing pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R

    2015-02-01

    Domestic pets are commonly found in the homes of decedents whose deaths are investigated by a medical examiner or coroner. When these pets become trapped with a decomposing decedent they may resort to feeding on the body or succumb to starvation and/or dehydration and begin to decompose as well. In this case report photographic documentation of cases involving pets and decedents were examined from 2009 through the beginning of 2014. This photo review indicated that in many cases the pets were cats and dogs that were trapped with the decedent, died and were discovered in a moderate (bloat to active decay) state of decomposition. In addition three cases involving decomposing humans and their decomposing pets are described as they were processed for time of insect colonization by forensic entomological approach. Differences in timing and species colonizing the human and animal bodies were noted as was the potential for the human or animal derived specimens to contaminate one another at the scene.

  7. Development of a candidate method for forensic microbial genotyping using multiplex pyrosequencing combined with a universal biotinylated primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan; Mao, Xuhu; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Hou, Yiping; Yun, Libing

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genotyping can be used for crime scene investigations and contribute to the attribution of biological attacks for microbial forensics. PyroMark ID Pyrosequencer as an accurate detection platform for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been applied to identify and resolve microorganisms involved in closely Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7). To explore more applications and improve the efficiency for pyrosequencing in this field, we developed a method integrated multiplex pyrosequencing with a universal primer. Two multiplex pyrosequencing assays with a universal biotinylated primer were designed to analyze five SNPs located in four gene of E. coli O157:H7 strain. The accuracy of the established assays was validated by genotyping reference strain E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 and E. coli K-12. We also demonstrated that two multiplex pyrosequencing assays were specific and sensitive for genotyping closely related E. coli O157 strains. Reproducibility of results and multiplexing capability were evaluated by a comparison of this method with the monoplex pyrosequencing. Furthermore, these two multiplex pyrosequencing assays have been successfully applied to detect 11 E. coli O157 strains isolated from 1504 Chinese livestock samples. This method reduces costs and time consumption in the process of pyrosequencing analysis, and potentially serves as a rapid tool and reliable candidate strategy for the microbial identification and other genotyping application.

  8. Validation of probabilistic genotyping software for use in forensic DNA casework: Definitions and illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haned, Hinda; Gill, Peter; Lohmueller, Kirk; Inman, Keith; Rudin, Norah

    2016-03-01

    A number of new computer programs have recently been developed to facilitate the interpretation and statistical weighting of complex DNA profiles in forensic casework. Acceptance of such software in the user community, and subsequent acceptance by the court, relies heavily upon their validation. To date, few guidelines exist that describe the appropriate and sufficient validation of such software used in forensic DNA casework. In this paper, we discuss general principles of software validation and how they could be applied to the interpretation software now being introduced into the forensic community. Importantly, we clarify the relationship between a statistical model and its implementation via software. We use the LRmix program to provide specific examples of how these principles can be implemented.

  9. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Improving human forensics through advances in genetics, genomics and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred; de Knijff, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling currently allows the identification of persons already known to investigating authorities. Recent advances have produced new types of genetic markers with the potential to overcome some important limitations of current DNA profiling methods. Moreover, other developments are enabling completely new kinds of forensically relevant information to be extracted from biological samples. These include new molecular approaches for finding individuals previously unknown to investigators, and new molecular methods to support links between forensic sample donors and criminal acts. Such advances in genetics, genomics and molecular biology are likely to improve human forensic case work in the near future.

  11. Typing of 48 autosomal SNPs and amelogenin with GenPlex SNP genotyping system in forensic genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Carmen; Stangegaard, Michael; Børsting, Claus; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Morling, Niels

    2008-12-01

    GenPlex (Applied Biosystems) is a new SNP genotyping system based on an initial PCR amplification followed by an oligo ligation assay (OLA). The OLA consists of the hybridization of allele and locus specific oligonucleotides (ASOs and LSOs) to PCR products and posterior ligation of ASOs and LSOs. The ligation products are immobilized to microtitre plates and reporter oligonucleotides (ZipChute probes) are hybridized to the ligation products. ZipChute probes are subsequently eluted and detected using capillary electrophoresis. Applied Biosystems developed the GenPlex SNP genotyping system with amelogenin and 48 of the 52 SNPs used in the 52 SNP-plex assay developed by the SNPforID consortium. The system requires equipment that is usually found in forensic genetic laboratories. The use of a robot for performance of the pipetting steps is highly recommendable. A total of 286 individuals from Denmark, Somalia and Greenland were investigated with GenPlex using a Biomek 3000 (Beckman Coulter) robot. The results were compared to results obtained with an ISO 17025 accredited SNP typing assay based on single base extension (SBE). With the GenPlex SNP genotyping system, full SNP profiles were obtained in 97.6% of the investigations. Perfect concordance was obtained in duplicate investigations and the SNP genotypes obtained with the GenPlex system were concordant with those of the accredited SBE based SNP typing system except for one result in rs901398 in one of 286 individuals most likely due to a mutation 6 bp downstream of the SNP. Reproducible SNP genotypes were obtained from as little as 250 pg of DNA.

  12. Molecular Forensic Profiling of Cryptosporidium Species and Genotypes in Raw Water

    OpenAIRE

    Ruecker, Norma J.; Bounsombath, Niravanh; Wallis, Peter; Ong, Corinne S.L.; Isaac-Renton, Judith L.; Neumann, Norman F.

    2005-01-01

    The emerging concept of host specificity of Cryptosporidium spp. was exploited to characterize sources of fecal contamination in a watershed. A method of molecular forensic profiling of Cryptosporidium oocysts on microscope slides prepared from raw water samples processed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 1623 was developed. The method was based on a repetitive nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism-DNA sequencing approach that permitted the resolution of multiple sp...

  13. Radiocarbon analysis of human remains: a review of forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubelaker, Douglas H

    2014-11-01

    Radiocarbon analysis of organic materials, with the comparison of values with those of the post-1950 modern bomb curve, has proven useful in forensic science to help evaluate the antiquity of evidence. Applications are particularly helpful in the study of human remains, especially with those displaying advanced decomposition of soft tissues. Radiocarbon analysis can reveal if the remains relate to the modern, post-1950 era and if so, also provide information needed to evaluate the death and birth date. Sample selection and interpretation of results must be guided by knowledge of the formation and remodeling of different human tissues, as well as contextual information and the approximate age at death of the individual represented. Dental enamel does not remodel and thus captures dietary radiocarbon values at the time of juvenile formation. Most other human tissues do remodel but at differing rates and therefore collectively offer key information relative to the estimation of the death date. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Human Factors Effecting Forensic Decision Making: Workplace Stress and Well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanguenat, Amy M; Dror, Itiel E

    2017-05-02

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing openness about the importance of human factors in forensic work. However, most of it focused on cognitive bias, and neglected issues of workplace wellness and stress. Forensic scientists work in a dynamic environment that includes common workplace pressures such as workload volume, tight deadlines, lack of advancement, number of working hours, low salary, technology distractions, and fluctuating priorities. However, in addition, forensic scientists also encounter a number of industry-specific pressures, such as technique criticism, repeated exposure to crime scenes or horrific case details, access to funding, working in an adversarial legal system, and zero tolerance for "errors". Thus, stress is an important human factor to mitigate for overall error management, productivity and decision quality (not to mention the well-being of the examiners themselves). Techniques such as mindfulness can become powerful tools to enhance work and decision quality. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. MLVA genotyping of human Brucella isolates from Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Smits; B. Espinosa; R. Castillo; E. Hall; A. Guillen; M. Zevaleta; R.H. Gilman; P. Melendez; C. Guerra; A. Draeger; A. Broglia; K. Nöckler

    2009-01-01

    Recent human Brucella melitensis isolates from Peru were genotyped by multiple locus variable number repeat analysis. All 24 isolates originated from hospitalized patients living in the central part of Peru and consisted of six genomic groups comprising two to four isolates and nine unique genotypes

  16. Specificity of the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test for detecting human papillomavirus genotype 52 (HPV-52)

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Poljak, Mario; Oštrbenk, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: HPV-52 is one of the most frequent human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes causing significant cervical pathology. The most widely used HPV genotyping assay, the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Linear Array), is unable to identify HPV- 52 status in samples containing HPV-33, HPV-35, and/or HPV-58. Methods: Linear Array HPV-52 analytical specificity was established by testing 100 specimens reactive with the Linear Array HPV- 33/35/52/58 cross-reactive probe, but not with the...

  17. ISFG: Recommendations regarding the use of non-human (animal) DNA in forensic genetic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linacre, A.; Gusmão, L.; Hecht, W.;

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-human DNA typing in forensic science investigations, and specifically that from animal DNA, is ever increasing. The term animal DNA in this document refers to animal species encountered in a forensic science examination but does not include human DNA. Non-human DNA may either be......: the trade and possession of a species, or products derived from a species, which is contrary to legislation; as evidence where the crime is against a person or property; instances of animal cruelty; or where the animal is the offender. The first instance is addressed by determining the species present......, and the other scenarios can often be addressed by assigning a DNA sample to a particular individual organism. Currently there is little standardization of methodologies used in the forensic analysis of animal DNA or in reporting styles. The recommendations in this document relate specifically to animal DNA...

  18. Bones and humanity. On Forensic Anthropology and its constitutive power facing forced disappearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Huffschmid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Forensic anthropologists seek to decipher traces of anonymous dead, to restitute identities of human remains and to provide their families with the possibility to conclude mourning and even of justice. The article explores the contributions and meanings of forensic anthropology as state-independent practice beyond a mereley criminalistic approach, as it was conceptualized by the Argentine pioneers after the last dictatorship in this nation. I conceive this practice as a sort of arqueology of contemporary terror that seeks to confront a specific violence as the forced disappearance of persons and the deshumanization of their dead bodies. The article proposes reading forensic anthropology as a 'situated cience', with its complexities and ambigueties, that operates between nameless bones (the human remains and names without bodies (the so-called disappeared in settings of violent pasts such as Argentina or Guatemala, and especially in Mexico, where mass graves became the new symbol of a horrified present.

  19. Human identification from forensic materials by amplification of a human-specific sequence in the myoglobin gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Ono T; Miyaishi S; Yamamoto Y; Yoshitome K; Ishikawa T.; Ishizu H

    2001-01-01

    We developed a method for human identification of forensic biological materials by PCR-based detection of a human-specific sequence in exon 3 of the myoglobin gene. This human-specific DNA sequence was deduced from differences in the amino acid sequences of myoglobins between humans and other animal species. The new method enabled amplification of the target DNA fragment from 30 samples of human DNA, and the amplified sequences were identical with that already reported. Using this method, we ...

  20. Comparison of two PCR-based human papillomavirus genotyping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Philip E; Porras, Carolina; Quint, Wim G; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Gravitt, Patti E; González, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A; Silva, Sandra; Freer, Enrique; Van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Jiménez, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan

    2008-10-01

    We compared two consensus primer PCR human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping methods for the detection of individual HPV genotypes and carcinogenic HPV genotypes as a group, using a stratified sample of enrollment cervical specimens from sexually active women participating in the NCI/Costa Rica HPV16/18 Vaccine Efficacy Trial. For the SPF(10) method, DNA was extracted from 0.1% of the cervical specimen by using a MagNA Pure LC instrument, a 65-bp region of the HPV L1 gene was targeted for PCR amplification by using SPF(10) primers, and 25 genotypes were detected by reverse-line blot hybridization of the amplicons. For the Linear Array (LA) method, DNA was extracted from 0.5% of the cervical specimen by using an MDx robot, a 450-bp region of the HPV L1 gene was targeted for PCR amplification by using PGMY09/11 L1 primers, and 37 genotypes were detected by reverse-line blot hybridization of the amplicons. Specimens (n = 1,427) for testing by the LA method were randomly selected from strata defined on the basis of enrollment test results from the SPF(10) method, cytology, and Hybrid Capture 2. LA results were extrapolated to the trial cohort (n = 5,659). The LA and SPF(10) methods detected 21 genotypes in common; HPV16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68, and -73 were considered the carcinogenic HPV genotypes. There was no difference in the overall results for grouped detection of carcinogenic HPV by the SPF(10) and LA methods (35.3% versus 35.9%, respectively; P = 0.5), with a 91.8% overall agreement and a kappa value of 0.82. In comparisons of individual HPV genotypes, the LA method detected significantly more HPV16, HPV18, HPV39, HPV58, HPV59, HPV66, and HPV68/73 and less HPV31 and HPV52 than the SPF(10) method; inclusion of genotype-specific testing for HPV16 and HPV18 for those specimens testing positive for HPV by the SPF(10) method but for which no individual HPV genotype was detected abrogated any differences between the LA and SPF

  1. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1-based human RNA quantification to enhance mRNA profiling in forensic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA analysis offers many potential applications in forensic science, and molecular identification of body fluids by analysis of cell-specific RNA markers represents a new technique for use in forensic cases. However, due to the nature of forensic materials that often admixed with nonhuman cellular components, human-specific RNA quantification is required for the forensic RNA assays. Quantification assay for human RNA has been developed in the present study with respect to body fluid samples in forensic biology. The quantitative assay is based on real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial RNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and capable of RNA quantification with high reproducibility and a wide dynamic range. The human RNA quantification improves the quality of mRNA profiling in the identification of body fluids of saliva and semen because the quantification assay can exclude the influence of nonhuman components and reduce the adverse affection from degraded RNA fragments.

  2. Forensic genetics and genomics: Much more than just a human affair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Manuela; Pinto, Nadia; Carracedo, Angel

    2017-01-01

    While traditional forensic genetics has been oriented towards using human DNA in criminal investigation and civil court cases, it currently presents a much wider application range, including not only legal situations sensu stricto but also and, increasingly often, to preemptively avoid judicial processes. Despite some difficulties, current forensic genetics is progressively incorporating the analysis of nonhuman genetic material to a greater extent. The analysis of this material—including other animal species, plants, or microorganisms—is now broadly used, providing ancillary evidence in criminalistics in cases such as animal attacks, trafficking of species, bioterrorism and biocrimes, and identification of fraudulent food composition, among many others. Here, we explore how nonhuman forensic genetics is being revolutionized by the increasing variety of genetic markers, the establishment of faster, less error-burdened and cheaper sequencing technologies, and the emergence and improvement of models, methods, and bioinformatics facilities. PMID:28934201

  3. An Update on the Hazards and Risks of Forensic Anthropology, Part I: Human Remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Dabbs, Gretchen R; Spencer, Jessica R

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews the hazards and risks of practicing forensic anthropology in North America, with a focus on pathogens encountered through contact with unpreserved human remains. Since the publication of Galloway and Snodgrass' seminal paper concerning the hazards of forensic anthropology, research has provided new information about known pathogen hazards, and regulating authorities have updated recommendations for the recognition and treatment of several infections. Additionally, forensic anthropology has gained popularity, exposing an increased number of students and practitioners to these hazards. Current data suggest many occupational exposures to blood or body fluids go unreported, especially among students, highlighting the need for this discussion. For each pathogen and associated disease, this work addresses important history, reviews routes of exposure, provides an overview of symptoms and treatments, lists decontamination procedures, and presents data on postmortem viability. Personal protection and laboratory guidelines should be established and enforced in conjunction with the consideration of these data.

  4. A multiplex SNP genotyping system and its application in forensic science%法医SNP复合检测体系的构建及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彩霞; 于子辉; 贾竟; 魏以梁; 胡兰; 万立华

    2012-01-01

    目的 构建48-SNP位点复合检测体系,用于个体识别、性别鉴定、ABO基因分型.方法 采集225份无关个体样本(血斑及口腔拭子),18份案例样本(不同组织及体液斑),选择43个常染色体位点、4个ABO基因位点和1个性别鉴定位点,根据单碱基延伸技术通过GenomeLabTM SNPstream(R)基因分型系统进行SNP分型;并检测体系灵敏度、同一个体不同组织同一性及模拟腐败检材.结果 48 -SNP体系分型结果与测序结果的一致性为100%,最小DNA检出量为0.25ng,不同组织来源样本检测同一性很好;利用该体系检测225名无关汉族个体,所有位点均符合Hardy-Weinberg平衡,整个系统的随机匹配概率为9.4×10-18,累积非父排除率(CEP)为0.999 788,累积个体识别率大于0.99999999999999999.结论 本文48-SNP体系能同时进行个体识别、ABO基因分型和性别鉴定,可以作为现有STR检验体系的补充.%Objective To develop a multiplexed SNP assay for human identification and evaluate its application value in forensic science. Methods In total, 225 samples of healthy unrelated Han Chinese individuals and 18 casework samples were collected. SNPs were selected according to the principle of high heterozygosity and low Fst value. Typing results of the SNPs were obtained by a minisequencing approach with 12-plex GenomeLab? SNPstream? Genotyping System. In addition, sensitivity, tissue homogeneity and degraded sample detection ability were evaluated for the system. Results The SNP genotypes obtained by the established typing system were fully concordant with sequencing results. The low DNA detection limit was 0. 25 ng. Different tissues of the same person showed consistent SNP types. Allele frequency data for the 48 SNPs were obtained from 225 healthy unrelated Han Chinese individuals. No meaningful deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed for the tested SNPs. The combined DP was more than 0. 999 999 999 999 999 99, and the

  5. Indoors forensic entomology: colonization of human remains in closed environments by specific species of sarcosaprophagous flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Karhunen, Pekka J; Goebeler, Sirkka; Saukko, Pekka; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E

    2010-06-15

    Fly species that are commonly recovered on human corpses concealed in houses or other dwellings are often dependent on human created environments and might have special features in their biology that allow them to colonize indoor cadavers. In this study we describe nine typical cases involving forensically relevant flies on human remains found indoors in southern Finland. Eggs, larvae and puparia were reared to adult stage and determined to species. Of the five species found the most common were Lucilia sericata Meigen, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Protophormia terraenovae Robineau-Desvoidy. The flesh fly Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt is reported for the first time to colonize human cadavers inside houses and a COI gene sequence based DNA barcode is provided for it to help facilitate identification in the future. Fly biology, colonization speed and the significance of indoors forensic entomological evidence are discussed.

  6. Digital Forensics

    OpenAIRE

    Ψευτέλης, Αθανάσιος Δημήτρης

    2013-01-01

    A reprint from American Scientist the magazine of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Since the 1980s, computers have had increasing roles in all aspects of human life—including an involvement in criminal acts. This development has led to the rise of digital forensics, the uncovering and examination of evidence located on all things electronic with digital storage, including computers, cell phones, and networks. Digital forensics researchers and practitione...

  7. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  8. Forensically relevant SNaPshot(®) assays for human DNA SNP analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Bhavik; Daniel, Runa; Phillips, Chris; McNevin, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Short tandem repeats are the gold standard for human identification but are not informative for forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as genetic markers can be applied to both identification and FDP. The concept of DNA intelligence emerged with the potential for SNPs to infer biogeographical ancestry (BGA) and externally visible characteristics (EVCs), which together enable the FDP process. For more than a decade, the SNaPshot(®) technique has been utilised to analyse identity and FDP-associated SNPs in forensic DNA analysis. SNaPshot is a single-base extension (SBE) assay with capillary electrophoresis as its detection system. This multiplexing technique offers the advantage of easy integration into operational forensic laboratories without the requirement for any additional equipment. Further, the SNP panels from SNaPshot(®) assays can be incorporated into customised panels for massively parallel sequencing (MPS). Many SNaPshot(®) assays are available for identity, BGA and EVC profiling with examples including the well-known SNPforID 52-plex identity assay, the SNPforID 34-plex BGA assay and the HIrisPlex EVC assay. This review lists the major forensically relevant SNaPshot(®) assays for human DNA SNP analysis and can be used as a guide for selecting the appropriate assay for specific identity and FDP applications.

  9. Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Understanding Human Migration Patterns and their Utility in Forensic Human Identification Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Holobinko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human migration patterns are of interest to scientists representing many fields. Theories have been posited to explain modern human evolutionary expansion, the diversity of human culture, and the motivational factors underlying an individual or group decision to migrate. Although the research question and subsequent approach may vary between disciplines, one thread is ubiquitous throughout most migration studies: why do humans migrate and what is the result of such an event? While the determination of individual attributes such as age, sex, and ancestry is often integral to migration studies, the positive identification of human remains is usually irrelevant. However, the positive identification of a deceased is paramount to a forensic investigation in which human remains have been recovered and must be identified. What role, if any, might the study of human movement patterns play in the interpretation of evidence associated with unidentified human remains? Due to increasing global mobility in the world's populations, it is not inconceivable that an individual might die far away from his or her home. If positive identification cannot immediately be made, investigators may consider various theories as to how or why a deceased ended up in a particular geographic location. While scientific evidence influences the direction of forensic investigations, qualitative evaluation can be an important component of evidence interpretation. This review explores several modern human migration theories and the methodologies utilized to identify evidence of human migratory movement before addressing the practical application of migration theory to forensic cases requiring the identification of human remains.

  10. Contact-Free Heartbeat Signal for Human Identification and Forensics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Irani, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    been developed for contact-free extraction of the heartbeat signal. We have recently used the contact-free measured heartbeat signal, for bio- metric recognition, and have obtained promising results, indicating the importance of these signals for biometrics recognition and also for forensics......The heartbeat signal, which is one of the physiological signals, is of great importance in many real-world applications, for example, in patient monitoring and biometric recognition. The traditional methods for measuring such this signal use contact-based sensors that need to be installed...... applications. The importance of heartbeat signal, its contact-based and contact-free extraction meth- ods, and the results of its employment for identification purposes, including our very recent achievements, are reviewed in this paper....

  11. Microbial DNA fingerprinting of human fingerprints: dynamic colonization of fingertip microflora challenges human host inferences for forensic purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tims, S.; Wamel, van W.; Endtz, H.P.; Belkum, van A.; Kayser, M.

    2010-01-01

    Human fingertip microflora is transferred to touched objects and may provide forensically relevant information on individual hosts, such as on geographic origins, if endogenous microbial skin species/strains would be retrievable from physical fingerprints and would carry geographically restricted DN

  12. Microbial DNA fingerprinting of human fingerprints: dynamic colonization of fingertip microflora challenges human host inferences for forensic purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Tims (Sebastian); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); H.P. Endtz (Hubert); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHuman fingertip microflora is transferred to touched objects and may provide forensically relevant information on individual hosts, such as on geographic origins, if endogenous microbial skin species/strains would be retrievable from physical fingerprints and would carry geographically r

  13. Microbial DNA fingerprinting of human fingerprints : dynamic colonization of fingertip microflora challenges human host inferences for forensic purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tims, Sebastian; van Wamel, Willem; Endtz, Hubert P.; van Belkum, Alex; Kayser, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Human fingertip microflora is transferred to touched objects and may provide forensically relevant information on individual hosts, such as on geographic origins, if endogenous microbial skin species/strains would be retrievable from physical fingerprints and would carry geographically restricted DN

  14. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation studies of an immunochromatographic 1-step test for the forensic identification of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Sparkes, R; Rudin, O; Gehrig, C; Thali, M; Schmidt, L; Cordier, A; Dirnhofer, R

    1999-05-01

    An immunochromatographic 1-step test for the detection of fecal occult blood was evaluated for applicability for the forensic identification of human blood in stained material. The following experiments were conducted: 1) determination of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay; 2) evaluation of different extraction media for bloodstains (sterile water, Tris buffer pH 7.5 provided in the test kit, 5% ammonia); 3) analysis of biological samples subjected to a variety of environmental insults; and 4) evaluation of casework samples. This immunochromatographic 1-step occult blood test is specific for human (primate) hemoglobin and is at least an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous methods for detecting human hemoglobin in bloodstains. The antigen is insensitive to a variety of environmental insults, except for exposure to certain detergents and household bleaches and prolonged exposure to certain preparations of luminol. The entire assay can be conducted in field testing conditions within minutes. When in the laboratory the supernatant from a DNA extraction is used for the assay, there is essentially no consumption of DNA for determining the presence of human hemoglobin in a forensic sample. The data demonstrate that this test is robust and suitable for forensic analyses.

  16. Human remains found in two wells: a forensic entomology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Paola A; Borrini, Matteo; Dadour, Ian R

    2013-09-01

    When estimating the time since death or manner of death, the identification and the pathological evaluations of a body are generally impeded by post mortem changes. Research and case studies help experts to achieve a more accurate diagnosis, but at present there is scant literature covering topics concerning forensic science and decompositional processes in aquatic environments. The two case studies presented each involve a decomposed body found in a unique aquatic environment; namely wells containing ground water. In Case 1 an entomologist attended the scene and in Case 2 an entomologist was only involved after 20 months when it was decided that the insect evidence collected at the second autopsy may be useful in determining a time frame. The first case highlights the problems associated with body retrieval from aquatic environments as the body was removed it dismembered. Fortunately, the well was able to be drained, so much of the insect evidence was retrieved. In the second case the body was found dismembered but the entomological evidence was overlooked and lost. During the second autopsy insects were found, collected, and sent to an entomologist to help clarify the post mortem interval.

  17. Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Parvovirus B19 Sequences from Eleven Different Countries Confirms the Predominance of Genotype 1 and Suggests the Spread of Genotype 3b▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübschen, Judith M.; Mihneva, Zefira; Mentis, Andreas F.; Schneider, François; Aboudy, Yair; Grossman, Zehava; Rudich, Hagit; Kasymbekova, Kalia; Sarv, Inna; Nedeljkovic, Jasminka; Tahita, Marc C.; Tarnagda, Zekiba; Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco; Gerasimova, A. G.; Moskaleva, T. N.; Tikhonova, Nina T.; Chitadze, Nazibrola; Forbi, J. C.; Faneye, Adedayo O.; Otegbayo, Jesse A.; Charpentier, Emilie; Muller, Claude P.

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 166 human parvovirus B19 sequences from 11 different countries attributed 91.57% to genotype 1, 5.42% to genotype 3b, and 3.01% to genotype 3a. Very similar viruses of genotype 1 circulated widely in Europe and Israel. Genotype 3b seems to show an increasing spread outside of Africa. PMID:19741071

  18. Humanism in forensic psychiatry: the use of the tidal nursing model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Jean Daniel; Holmes, Dave; Buus, Niels

    2008-01-01

    the incapability of such a philosophy to acknowledge the power relationships between individuals and its inability to explain the day-to-day realities experienced in forensic nursing, where the possibility of interpersonal violence reshapes nursing care. The tidal model will be discussed in detail as an example......The humanist school of thought, which finds resonance in many conceptual models and theories designed to guide nursing practice, needs to be understood in the context of the total institution, where the individual is subjected to a mortification of the self, and denied autonomy. This article...... will engage in a critical reflection on how humanism has influenced nursing theorists and the subsequent production of conceptual models and theories, especially as they relate to the field of forensic psychiatric nursing. Although humanism provides optimism for nurse-patient relations, this article explores...

  19. Leveraging Human Thinking Style for User Attribution in Digital Forensic Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeyemi Richard Ikuesan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available User attribution, the process of identifying a human in a digital medium, is a research area that has receive significant attention in information security research areas, with a little research focus on digital forensics. This study explored the probability of the existence of a digital fingerprint based on human thinking style, which can be used to identify an online user. To achieve this, the study utilized Server-side web data of 43-respondents were collected for 10-months as well as a self-report thinking style measurement instrument. Cluster dichotomies from five thinking styles were extracted. Supervised machine-learning techniques were then applied to distinguish individuals on each dichotomy. The result showed that thinking styles of individuals on different dichotomies could be reliably distinguished on the Internet using a Meta classifier of Logistic model tree with bagging technique. The study further modeled how the observed signature can be adopted for a digital forensic process, using high-level universal modeling language modeling process- specifically, the behavioral state-model and use-case modeling process. In addition to the application of this result in forensics process, this result finds relevance and application in human-centered graphical user interface design for recommender system as well as in e-commerce services. It also finds application in online profiling processes, especially in e-learning systems

  20. Microbial DNA fingerprinting of human fingerprints: dynamic colonization of fingertip microflora challenges human host inferences for forensic purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Tims, S.; Wamel, van, JJ Jos; Endtz, H. P.; Belkum, van, A.; Kayser, M

    2009-01-01

    Human fingertip microflora is transferred to touched objects and may provide forensically relevant information on individual hosts, such as on geographic origins, if endogenous microbial skin species/strains would be retrievable from physical fingerprints and would carry geographically restricted DNA diversity. We tested the suitability of physical fingerprints for revealing human host information, with geographic inference as example, via microbial DNA fingerprinting. We showed that the tran...

  1. Human platelet antigen genotyping of platelet donors in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzoni, J; Fagundes, I S; Lunardi, L W; Lindenau, J D-R; Gil, B C; Jobim, M; Dias, V G; Merzoni, L; Sekine, L; Onsten, T G H; Jobim, L F

    2015-10-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPA) are immunogenic structures that result from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) leading to single amino acid substitutions. This study sought to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of HPA-1, HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-4, HPA-5 and HPA-15 in platelet donors from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, and compare their allele frequencies to those observed in other populations. HPA genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP method. The study sample comprised 201 platelet donors (167 Caucasians and 34 non-Caucasians). Allele 'a' was that most commonly found for HPA-1 to 5 in both groups. The HPA-15ab genotype predominated over homozygous genotypes of this system. Fisher's exact test revealed statistically significant differences for the HPA-5 system, with a greater prevalence of the HPA-5b allele in non-Caucasians. The neighbour-joining method and principal components analysis revealed genetic proximity between our Caucasian group and European populations. We conclude that the allele frequencies of HPA-1 to 5 and HPA-15 found in our Caucasian sample are similar to those reported for European populations. These findings corroborate the ethnic makeup of the population of RS. The higher frequency of the HPA-5b allele found in the non-Caucasian group of our sample suggests the possibility of allosensitization in patients who receive platelet transfusions from genetically incompatible donors.

  2. Humanism in forensic psychiatry: the use of the tidal nursing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jean Daniel; Holmes, Dave; Buus, Niels

    2008-09-01

    The humanist school of thought, which finds resonance in many conceptual models and theories designed to guide nursing practice, needs to be understood in the context of the total institution, where the individual is subjected to a mortification of the self, and denied autonomy. This article will engage in a critical reflection on how humanism has influenced nursing theorists and the subsequent production of conceptual models and theories, especially as they relate to the field of forensic psychiatric nursing. Although humanism provides optimism for nurse-patient relations, this article explores the incapability of such a philosophy to acknowledge the power relationships between individuals and its inability to explain the day-to-day realities experienced in forensic nursing, where the possibility of interpersonal violence reshapes nursing care. The tidal model will be discussed in detail as an example of a recently developed humanistic nursing model. Viewed from this perspective, it is clear that humanistic philosophy and its subsequent models of care are in discordance with the highly specialized field of forensic nursing.

  3. Thinking forensics: Cognitive science for forensic practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Gary; Towler, Alice; Growns, Bethany; Ribeiro, Gianni; Found, Bryan; White, David; Ballantyne, Kaye; Searston, Rachel A; Thompson, Matthew B; Tangen, Jason M; Kemp, Richard I; Martire, Kristy

    2017-03-01

    Human factors and their implications for forensic science have attracted increasing levels of interest across criminal justice communities in recent years. Initial interest centred on cognitive biases, but has since expanded such that knowledge from psychology and cognitive science is slowly infiltrating forensic practices more broadly. This article highlights a series of important findings and insights of relevance to forensic practitioners. These include research on human perception, memory, context information, expertise, decision-making, communication, experience, verification, confidence, and feedback. The aim of this article is to sensitise forensic practitioners (and lawyers and judges) to a range of potentially significant issues, and encourage them to engage with research in these domains so that they may adapt procedures to improve performance, mitigate risks and reduce errors. Doing so will reduce the divide between forensic practitioners and research scientists as well as improve the value and utility of forensic science evidence.

  4. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: A statistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Faisal

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1 to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches – genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Conclusion Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  5. Reconstructing recent human phylogenies with forensic STR loci: a statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Suraksha; Khan, Faisal

    2005-09-28

    Forensic Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci are effective for the purpose of individual identification, and other forensic applications. Most of these markers have high allelic variability and mutation rate because of which they have limited use in the phylogenetic reconstruction. In the present study, we have carried out a meta-analysis to explore the possibility of using only five STR loci (TPOX, FES, vWA, F13A and Tho1) to carry out phylogenetic assessment based on the allele frequency profile of 20 world population and north Indian Hindus analyzed in the present study. Phylogenetic analysis based on two different approaches - genetic distance and maximum likelihood along with statistical bootstrapping procedure involving 1000 replicates was carried out. The ensuing tree topologies and PC plots were further compared with those obtained in earlier phylogenetic investigations. The compiled database of 21 populations got segregated and finely resolved into three basal clusters with very high bootstrap values corresponding to three geo-ethnic groups of African, Orientals, and Caucasians. Based on this study we conclude that if appropriate and logistic statistical approaches are followed then even lesser number of forensic STR loci are powerful enough to reconstruct the recent human phylogenies despite of their relatively high mutation rates.

  6. Human papillomavirus genotypes and cervical cancer in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natphopsuk, Sitakan; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Pientong, Chamsai; Sinawat, Supat; Yuenyao, Pissamai; Ishida, Takafumi; Settheetham, Dariwan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer. More than 100 HPV genotypes have been identified; however the distribution varies geographically and according to ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of HPV subtypes among Northeast Thai women. Subjects included 198 cases of SCCA and 198 age-matched, healthy controls. HPV-DNA was amplified by PCR using the consensus primers GP5+/6+ system followed by reverse line blot hybridization genotyping. The prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was 21 (10.1%) and 152 (76.8%) in the controls and in the cases, respectively. High-risk HPV significantly increased the risk for cervical cancer with an OR of 42.4 (95%CI: 22.4-81.4, p<0.001) and an adjusted OR of 40.7-fold (95%CI: 21.5-76.8, p <0.001). HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in the SCCA (56.2%) followed by HPV-58 (17.8%) and HPV-18 (13.6%); whereas HPV-58 (46.4%) was a prominent genotype in the controls followed by HPV-16 (39.3%) and unidentified HPV types (25.0%). These findings indicate that HPV infection remains a critical risk factor for SCCA; particularly, HPV-16, HPV-58 and HPV-18. In order to eradicate cervical cancer, sustained health education, promoted use of prophylactics and a HPV-58 vaccine should be introduced in this region.

  7. The virtual approach to the assessment of skeletal injuries in human skeletal remains of forensic importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanová, Petra; Ross, Ann H; Jurda, Mikoláš; Šplíchalová, Ivana

    2017-07-01

    While assessing skeletal injuries in human skeletal remains, forensic anthropologists are frequently presented with fractured, fragmented, or otherwise modified skeletal remains. The examination of evidence and the mechanisms of skeletal injuries often require that separate osseous elements be permanently or temporarily reassembled or reconstructed. If not dealt with properly, such reconstructions may impede accurate interpretation of the evidence. Nowadays, routine forensic examinations increasingly incorporate digital imaging technologies. As a result, a variety of PC-assisted imaging techniques, collectively referred to as the virtual approach, have been made available to treat fragmentary skeletal remains. The present study employs a 3D virtual approach to assess mechanisms of skeletal injuries, and provides an expert opinion of causative tools in three forensic cases involving human skeletal remains where integrity was compromised by multiple peri- or postmortem alterations resulting in fragmentation and/or incompleteness. Three fragmentary skulls and an incomplete set of foot bones with evidence of perimortem fractures (gunshot wounds) and sharp force trauma (saw marks) were digitized using a desktop laser scanner. The digitized skeletal elements were reassembled in the virtual workspace using functionalities incorporated in AMIRA(®) version 5.0 software, and simultaneously in real physical space by traditional reconstructive approaches. For this study, the original skeletal fragments were substituted by replicas built by 3D printing. Inter-method differences were quantified by mesh-based comparison after the physically reassembled elements had been re-digitized. Observed differences were further reinforced by visualizing local variations using colormaps and other advanced 3D visualization techniques. In addition, intra-operator and inter-operator error was computed. The results demonstrate that the importance of incorporating the virtual approach into the

  8. American alligator proximal pedal phalanges resemble human finger bones: Diagnostic criteria for forensic investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Joseph V; Binetti, Katie M

    2014-07-01

    A scientific approach to bone and tooth identification requires analysts to pursue the goal of empirical falsification. That is, they may attribute a questioned specimen to element and taxon only after having ruled out all other possible attributions. This requires analysts to possess a thorough understanding of both human and non-human osteology, particularly so for remains that may be morphologically similar across taxa. To date, forensic anthropologists have identified several potential 'mimics' for human skeletal remains, including pig teeth and bear paws. Here we document another possible mimic for isolated human skeletal elements--the proximal pedal phalanges of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) closely resemble the proximal and intermediate hand phalanges of adult humans. We detail morphological similarities and differences between these elements, with the goal of providing sufficient information for investigators to confidently falsify the hypothesis that a questioned phalanx is derived from an American alligator.

  9. Exercise, APOE genotype, and the evolution of the human lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichlen, David A.; Alexander, Gene E.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have exceptionally long lifespans compared with other mammals. However, our longevity evolved when our ancestors had two copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, a genotype that leads to a high risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), cardiovascular disease, and increased mortality. How did human aging evolve within this genetic constraint? Drawing from neuroscience, anthropology, and brain-imaging research, we propose the hypothesis that the evolution of increased physical activity approximately 2 million years ago served to reduce the amyloid plaque and vascular burden of APOE ε4, relaxing genetic constraints on aging. This multidisciplinary approach links human evolution with health and provides a complementary perspective on aging and neurodegenerative disease that may help identify key mechanisms and targets for intervention. PMID:24690272

  10. Human papillomavirus testing and genotyping in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the incidence of cervical cancer, but has a low sensitivity for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and requires frequent testing. Several HPV tests have become available commercially. They appear to be more sensitive for high-grade CIN, and may further reduce the incidence of cervical cancer......Mass vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 16 and 18 will, in the long term, reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, but screening will remain an important cancer control measure in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Since the 1960s, cytology screening has helped to reduce...

  11. Review of forensically important entomological specimens collected from human cadavers in Malaysia (2005-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, Rajagopal; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad; Tan, Tian Chye; Lee, Han Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian

    2013-07-01

    Forensic entomological specimens collected from human decedents during crime scene investigations in Malaysia in the past 6 years (2005-2010) are reviewed. A total of 80 cases were recorded and 93 specimens were collected. From these specimens, 10 species of cyclorrphagic flies were identified, consisting of Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) -38 specimens (40.86%), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) -36 specimens (38.70%), Chrysomya villeneuvi (Patton) -2 specimens (2.15%), Chrysomya nigripes (Aubertin) -2 specimens (2.15%), Chrysomya pinguis (Walker) -1 specimen (1.08%), Hermetia illucens (Linnaeus) -1 specimen (1.08%), Hemipyrellia liguriens (Wiedemann) -5 specimens (5.37%), Synthesiomyia nudiseta (Wulp) -1 specimen (1.08%), Megaselia scalaris (Loew)-1 specimen (1.08%) and Sarcophaga ruficornis (Fabricius) -4 specimens (4.30%). In two specimens (2.15%), the maggots were not identifiable. Ch. megacephala and Ch. rufifacies were the commonest species found in human decedents from three different ecological habitats. S. nudiseta is an uncommon species found only on human cadavers from indoors. A total of 75 cases (93.75%) had a single fly infestation and 5 cases (6.25%) had double fly infestation. In conclusion, although large numbers of fly species were found on human decedents, the predominant species are still those of Chrysomya. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. More comprehensive forensic genetic marker analyses for accurate human remains identification using massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambers, Angie D; Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Stoljarova, Monika; Gill-King, Harrell; Assidi, Mourad; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-10-17

    Although the primary objective of forensic DNA analyses of unidentified human remains is positive identification, cases involving historical or archaeological skeletal remains often lack reference samples for comparison. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers an opportunity to provide biometric data in such cases, and these cases provide valuable data on the feasibility of applying MPS for characterization of modern forensic casework samples. In this study, MPS was used to characterize 140-year-old human skeletal remains discovered at a historical site in Deadwood, South Dakota, United States. The remains were in an unmarked grave and there were no records or other metadata available regarding the identity of the individual. Due to the high throughput of MPS, a variety of biometric markers could be typed using a single sample. Using MPS and suitable forensic genetic markers, more relevant information could be obtained from a limited quantity and quality sample. Results were obtained for 25/26 Y-STRs, 34/34 Y SNPs, 166/166 ancestry-informative SNPs, 24/24 phenotype-informative SNPs, 102/102 human identity SNPs, 27/29 autosomal STRs (plus amelogenin), and 4/8 X-STRs (as well as ten regions of mtDNA). The Y-chromosome (Y-STR, Y-SNP) and mtDNA profiles of the unidentified skeletal remains are consistent with the R1b and H1 haplogroups, respectively. Both of these haplogroups are the most common haplogroups in Western Europe. Ancestry-informative SNP analysis also supported European ancestry. The genetic results are consistent with anthropological findings that the remains belong to a male of European ancestry (Caucasian). Phenotype-informative SNP data provided strong support that the individual had light red hair and brown eyes. This study is among the first to genetically characterize historical human remains with forensic genetic marker kits specifically designed for MPS. The outcome demonstrates that substantially more genetic information can be obtained from

  13. Use of non-human DNA analysis in forensic science: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Arati; Hadi, Sibte

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of non-human DNA in forensic science, first reported about two decades ago, is now commonplace. Results have been used as evidence in court in a variety of cases ranging from abduction and murder to patent infringement and dog attack. DNA from diverse species, including commonly encountered pets such as dogs and cats, to plants, viruses and bacteria has been used and the sheer potential offered by such analyses has been proven. In this review, using case examples throughout, we detail the considerable literature in this field.

  14. Typing of 48 autosomal SNPs and amelogenin with GenPlex SNP genotyping system in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Mas, Carmen; Stangegaard, Michael; Børsting, Claus

    2008-01-01

    . The ligation products are immobilized to microtitre plates and reporter oligonucleotides (ZipChute probes) are hybridized to the ligation products. ZipChute probes are subsequently eluted and detected using capillary electrophoresis. Applied Biosystems developed the GenPlex SNP genotyping system...

  15. Investigation of the genotype III to genotype I shift in Japanese encephalitis virus and the impact on human cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na; Adams, James; Fang, Wei; Liu, Si-Qing; Rayner, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito borne disease and is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in the Asia-Pacific area. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can be phylogenetically classified into five genotypes based on nucleotide sequence. In recent years, genotype I (GI) has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant lineage, but the mechanisms behind this displacement event requires elucidation. In an earlier study, we compared host variation over time between the two genotypes and observed that GI appears to have evolved to achieve more efficient infection in hosts in the replication cycle, with the tradeoff of reduced infectivity in secondary hosts such as humans. To further investigate this phenomenon, we collected JEV surveillance data on human cases and, together with sequence data, and generated genotype/case profiles from seven Asia-Pacific countries and regions to characterize the GI/GIII displacement event. We found that, when comprehensive and consistent vaccination and surveillance data was available, and the GIII to GI shift occurred within a well-defined time period, there was a statistically significant drop in JEV human cases. Our findings provide further support for the argument that GI is less effective in infecting humans, who represent a dead end host. However, experimental investigation is necessary to confirm this hypothesis. The study highlights the value of alternative approaches to investigation of epidemics, as well as the importance of effective data collection for disease surveillance and control.

  16. Use of images for human identification in forensic dentistry; A utilizacao de imagens na identificacao humana em odontologia legal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Suzana Papile Maciel; Lopes-Junior, Cesar [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia], e-mail: sumaciel@uol.com.br; Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves da [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Peres, Arsenio Sales [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Saude Coletiva

    2009-03-15

    The present systematic review article is aimed at describing radiological methods utilized for human identification in forensic dentistry. For this purpose, a literature review was undertaken, and out of 45 papers, 19 were selected in accordance with inclusion criteria. Several radiological techniques can be used to assist in both individual and general identification, including determination of gender, ethnic group and, mainly, age. The analysis of ante-mortem and post-mortem radiographic and tomographic images has become an essential tool for human identification in forensic dentistry, particularly with the refinement of techniques resulting from developments in the field of the radiology itself as well as the incorporation of information technology resources to the technique. It can be concluded that, based on an appropriate knowledge on the available methods, forensic dentists can choose the best method to achieve a successful identification with a careful application of the technique and accurate interpretation of data. (author)

  17. Complete genome sequence of human astrovirus genotype 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernet Guy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human astroviruses (HAstVs are one of the important causes of acute gastroenteritis in children. Currently, eight HAstV genotypes have been identified and all but two (HAstV-6 and HAstV-7 have been fully sequenced. We here sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of a HAstV-6 strain (192-BJ07, which was identified in Beijing, China. Results The genome of 192-BJ07 consists of 6745 nucleotides. The 192-BJ07 strain displays a 77.2-78.0% nucleotide sequence identity with other HAstV genotypes and exhibits amino acid sequence identities of 86.5-87.4%, 94.2-95.1%, and 65.5-74.8% in the ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 regions, respectively. Homological analysis of ORF2 shows that 192-BJ07 is 96.3% identical to the documented HAstV-6 strain. Further, phylogenetic analysis indicates that different genomic regions are likely undergoing different evolutionary and selective pressures. No recombination event was observed in HAstV-6 in this study. Conclusion The completely sequenced and characterized genome of HAstV-6 (192-BJ07 provides further insight into the genetics of astroviruses and aids in the surveillance and control of HAstV gastroenteritis.

  18. Enhanced genetic analysis of single human bioparticles recovered by simplified micromanipulation from forensic 'touch DNA' evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-03-09

    DNA profiles can be obtained from 'touch DNA' evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a 'blind-swabbing' approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals' cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim's DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator's DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, 'smart analysis' method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., "clumps") bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material.

  19. [Forensic entomology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açikgöz, Halide Nihal

    2010-01-01

    Odour of the animal or human corpses immediately after death is very attractive for insects and other invertebrates. Blue and green bottle flies from the Calliphoridae family are the first colonizers of cadaver and immediately later necrophagous Diptera from the Sarcophagidae family settle on the same corpse. It is essential to determine the time past after death for elucidating the event in case of the homicide or suspicious death, and it is directly proportional to the post mortem interval expected time, which is based upon the speed of the larval growth. In this article, we purposed to stress the special interest of forensic entomology for the scientists who will apply this science in their forensic researches and case studies, and also to provide information to our judges, prosecutors and law enforcement agents in order to consider the entomological samples to be reliable and applicable evidences as biological stains and hairs. We are of the opinion that if any forensic entomologist is called to the crime scene or if the evidences are collected and then delivered to an entomologist, the forensic cases will be elucidated faster and more accurately.

  20. Skeletal Indicators of Shark Feeding on Human Remains: Evidence from Florida Forensic Anthropology Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michala K; Winburn, Allysha P; Burgess, George H

    2017-05-02

    This research examines a series of six Florida forensic anthropology cases that exhibit taphonomic evidence of marine deposition and shark-feeding activities. In each case, we analyzed patterns of trauma/damage on the skeletal remains (e.g., sharp-force bone gouges and punctures) and possible mechanisms by which they were inflicted during shark predation/scavenging. In some cases, shark teeth were embedded in the remains; in the absence of this evidence, we measured interdental distance from defects in the bone to estimate shark body length, as well as to draw inferences about the potential species responsible. We discuss similarities and differences among the cases and make comparisons to literature documenting diagnostic shark-inflicted damage to human remains from nearby regions. We find that the majority of cases potentially involve bull or tiger sharks scavenging the remains of previously deceased, adult male individuals. This scavenging results in a distinctive taphonomic signature including incised gouges in cortical bone. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Digital Forensics to Intelligent Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair Irons

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we posit that current investigative techniques—particularly as deployed by law enforcement, are becoming unsuitable for most types of crime investigation. The growth in cybercrime and the complexities of the types of the cybercrime coupled with the limitations in time and resources, both computational and human, in addressing cybercrime put an increasing strain on the ability of digital investigators to apply the processes of digital forensics and digital investigations to obtain timely results. In order to combat the problems, there is a need to enhance the use of the resources available and move beyond the capabilities and constraints of the forensic tools that are in current use. We argue that more intelligent techniques are necessary and should be used proactively. The paper makes the case for the need for such tools and techniques, and investigates and discusses the opportunities afforded by applying principles and procedures of artificial intelligence to digital forensics intelligence and to intelligent forensics and suggests that by applying new techniques to digital investigations there is the opportunity to address the challenges of the larger and more complex domains in which cybercrimes are taking place.

  2. Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettell, T. A.; Saferstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of articles appealing to forensic practitioners. Topics include: drugs and poisons, forensic biochemistry, and trace evidence. Lists noteworthy books published on forensic science topics since 1986. (MVL)

  3. Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettell, T. A.; Saferstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of articles appealing to forensic practitioners. Topics include: drugs and poisons, forensic biochemistry, and trace evidence. Lists noteworthy books published on forensic science topics since 1986. (MVL)

  4. Estimation of the pre-burning condition of human remains in forensic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, D; Cunha, E; Thompson, T J U

    2015-09-01

    The determination of the original condition of human remains prior to burning is critical since it may facilitate the reconstruction of circumstances surrounding death in forensic cases. Although the use of heat-induced bone changes is not a completely reliable proxy for determining pre-burning conditions, it is not completely devoid of potential, as we can observe a clear difference in the occurrence of such features between the fleshed and dry bones. In order to quantify this difference and determine its true value for forensic research, the frequencies of heat-induced warping and thumbnail fractures were documented on modern cremations of cadavers from recently deceased individuals and from the cremations of skeletons previously inhumed. The effect of age, sex, time span from death to cremation, duration and temperature of combustion on those frequencies was statistically investigated. Results demonstrated that the heat-induced features were significantly more frequent in the sample of cadavers. In addition, warping was determined to be the most useful indicator of the pre-burning condition of human remains. Temperature of combustion was the only variable having a significant effect on the frequency of both features, suggesting that fluctuation of temperature, along with collagen preservation and recrystallization of the inorganic phase, is paramount for their occurrence. Both warping and thumbnail fractures may eventually be used for the estimation of the pre-burning condition of human remains in lack of other indicators, but their reliability is far from absolute. Ideally, such inference must be supported by other data such as skeletal representation, objects or defleshing marks on the bones.

  5. First forensic records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R A; Soriano, E P; Carvalho, M V D; Caldas-Junior, A F; Souza, E H A; Coelho-Junior, L G T M; Campello, R I C; Almeida, A C; Farias, R C A P; Vasconcellos, A

    2016-07-25

    The aim of this study was to describe the first records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil. The cases reported in this study resulted from forensic analysis of six human skeletons found in northeastern Brazil between 2012 and 2014. Traces of tunnels and nests commonly produced by termites were found on several human bone surfaces as well as the specimens and characteristic signs of osteophagic activity. In four cases, the species were identified: Amitermes amifer Silvestri, 1901, Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky, 1855) (on two skeletons), and Microcerotermes indistinctus Mathews, 1977. In two other cases, the activity of termites on bone surfaces was evidenced by remains of nests and tunnels produced by these insects. At least in the samples of human remains available for this report, the number of termites collected was greater on bones found during autumn, the rainy season in the Northeast of Brazil. The human bones examined showed termites like insects with lots of strength at bone degradation, capable of continuing the process of decomposition of human remains even in completely skeletonized bodies.

  6. First forensic records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Queiroz

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the first records of termite activity on non-fossilized human bones in Brazil. The cases reported in this study resulted from forensic analysis of six human skeletons found in northeastern Brazil between 2012 and 2014. Traces of tunnels and nests commonly produced by termites were found on several human bone surfaces as well as the specimens and characteristic signs of osteophagic activity. In four cases, the species were identified: Amitermes amifer Silvestri, 1901, Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky, 1855 (on two skeletons, and Microcerotermes indistinctus Mathews, 1977. In two other cases, the activity of termites on bone surfaces was evidenced by remains of nests and tunnels produced by these insects. At least in the samples of human remains available for this report, the number of termites collected was greater on bones found during autumn, the rainy season in the Northeast of Brazil. The human bones examined showed termites like insects with lots of strength at bone degradation, capable of continuing the process of decomposition of human remains even in completely skeletonized bodies.

  7. Trace samples of human blood in mosquitoes as a forensic investigation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Oliveira, N C L; Crovella, S

    2015-11-23

    Investigations of any type of crime invariably starts at the crime scene by collecting evidence. Thus, the purpose of this research was to collect and analyze an entomological trace from an environment that is similar to those of indoor crime scenes. Hematophagous mosquitoes were collected from two residential units; saliva of volunteers that were residents in the units was also collected for genetic analysis as reference samples. We examined the allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, and FGA) and amelogenin. A total of 26 female hematophagous mosquitoes were identified as Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus; we were able to obtain 11 forensically valid genetic profiles, with a minimum of 0.028203 ng/μL of human DNA. Thus, the results of this study showed that it was possible to correlate human genetic information from mosquitoes with the volunteer reference samples, which validates the use of this information as forensic evidence. Furthermore, we observed mixed genetic profiles from one mosquito. Therefore, it is clearly important to collect these insects indoors where crimes were committed, because it may be possible to find intact genetic profiles of suspects in the blood found in the digestive tract of hematophagous mosquitoes for later comparison to identify an offender and/or exclude suspects.

  8. Human identification from forensic materials by amplification of a human-specific sequence in the myoglobin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono T

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed a method for human identification of forensic biological materials by PCR-based detection of a human-specific sequence in exon 3 of the myoglobin gene. This human-specific DNA sequence was deduced from differences in the amino acid sequences of myoglobins between humans and other animal species. The new method enabled amplification of the target DNA fragment from 30 samples of human DNA, and the amplified sequences were identical with that already reported. Using this method, we were able to distinguish human samples from those of 21 kinds of animals: the crab-eating monkey, horse, cow, sheep, goat, pig, wild boar, dog, raccoon dog, cat, rabbit, guinea pig, hamster, rat, mouse, whale, chicken, pigeon, turtle, frog, and tuna. However, we were unable to distinguish between human and gorilla samples. This method enabled us to detect the target sequence from 25 pg of human DNA, and the target DNA fragment from blood stored at 37 degrees C for 6 months, and from bloodstains heated at 150 degrees C for 4 h or stored at room temperature for 26 years. Herein we also report a practical application of the method for human identification of a bone fragment.

  9. Prior infection of pigs with a genotype 3 swine hepatitis E virus (HEV) protects against subsequent challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 human HEV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Brenton J; Dryman, Barbara A; Huang, Yao-Wei; Feagins, Alicia R; Leroith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important human pathogen. At least four recognized and two putative genotypes of mammalian HEV have been reported: genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic. The current experimental vaccines are all based on a single strain of HEV, even though multiple genotypes of HEV are co-circulating in some countries and thus an individual may be exposed to more than one genotype. Genotypes 3 and 4 swine HEV is widespread in pigs and known to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to know if prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV will confer protective immunity against subsequent exposure to genotypes 3 and 4 human and swine HEV. In this study, specific-pathogen-free pigs were divided into 4 groups of 6 each. Pigs in the three treatment groups were each inoculated with a genotype 3 swine HEV, and 12 weeks later, challenged with the same genotype 3 swine HEV, a genotype 3 human HEV, and a genotype 4 human HEV, respectively. The control group was inoculated and challenged with PBS buffer. Weekly sera from all pigs were tested for HEV RNA and IgG anti-HEV, and weekly fecal samples were also tested for HEV RNA. The pigs inoculated with swine HEV became infected as evidenced by fecal virus shedding and viremia, and the majority of pigs also developed IgG anti-HEV prior to challenge at 12 weeks post-inoculation. After challenge, viremia was not detected and only two pigs challenged with swine HEV had 1-week fecal virus shedding, suggesting that prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV prevented pigs from developing viremia and fecal virus shedding after challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 HEV. The results from this study have important implications for future development of an effective HEV vaccine.

  10. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping of cutaneous warts in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Maria; Kakourou, Talia; Theodoridou, Maria; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Kabouris, Marios; Louizou, Eirini; Chrousos, George

    2013-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) infects the squamous epithelium of the skin and produces common warts, plantar warts, and flat warts, which occur commonly on the hands, face, and feet. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HPV in warts in children in order to associate the virus with the disease. Sixty-eight children with clinically diagnosed cutaneous warts were recruited. Skin biopsy samples were examined and DNA was extracted using a commercially available kit. To distinguish between the HPV types, we used a specific pair of primers to amplify the HPV DNA. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the L1 region was followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and Luminex xMAP technology. HPV 57 was the predominant type in our study, although the detection of the high-risk HPV type 16 in 33% of our positive samples indicates the presence of mucosal high-risk HPV types in the skin of children. It seems that the newly introduced Luminex assay maximized the discrimination of genotypes even in the case of multiple HPV infections. Or findings also suggest the presence of high-risk HPV types in cutaneous warts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato genotypes infecting humans--review of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rojas, Cristian A; Romig, Thomas; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variability in the species group Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato is well recognised as affecting intermediate host susceptibility and other biological features of the parasites. Molecular methods have allowed discrimination of different genotypes (G1-10 and the 'lion strain'), some of which are now considered separate species. An accumulation of genotypic analyses undertaken on parasite isolates from human cases of cystic echinococcosis provides the basis upon which an assessment is made here of the relative contribution of the different genotypes to human disease. The allocation of samples to G-numbers becomes increasingly difficult, because much more variability than previously recognised exists in the genotypic clusters G1-3 (=E. granulosus sensu stricto) and G6-10 (Echinococcus canadensis). To accommodate the heterogeneous criteria used for genotyping in the literature, we restrict ourselves to differentiate between E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1-3), Echinococcus equinus (G4), Echinococcus ortleppi (G5) and E. canadensis (G6-7, G8, G10). The genotype G1 is responsible for the great majority of human cystic echinococcosis worldwide (88.44%), has the most cosmopolitan distribution and is often associated with transmission via sheep as intermediate hosts. The closely related genotypes G6 and G7 cause a significant number of human infections (11.07%). The genotype G6 was found to be responsible for 7.34% of infections worldwide. This strain is known from Africa and Asia, where it is transmitted mainly by camels (and goats), and South America, where it appears to be mainly transmitted by goats. The G7 genotype has been responsible for 3.73% of human cases of cystic echinococcosis in eastern European countries, where the parasite is transmitted by pigs. Some of the samples (11) could not be identified with a single specific genotype belonging to E. canadensis (G6/10). Rare cases of human cystic echinococcosis have been identified as having been caused by

  12. Forensic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the role forensic psychotherapy has in the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offender patients, and its role in the supervision of individual therapists, staff groups or whole organisations which contain and manage this patient population. Forensic psychotherapy has a valuable role to play in the management of mentally disordered forensic patients. As forensic services continue to develop in Australia and New Zealand and interest in this field continues to grow, then the future of forensic psychotherapy looks bright.

  13. "WHERE SOULS ARE FORGOTTEN" : Cultural Competencies, Forensic Evaluations, and International Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perlin, Michael L.; McClain, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Cultural competency is critical in criminal forensic evaluations. Cultural competency eschews reliance on stereotypes, precluding the mistake of assuming that cultural dictates apply with equal force to all who share a cultural background, thus allowing the forensic examiner to provide a comprehensi

  14. Use of Alternative Primers for Gender Discrimination in Human Forensic Genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    samples were used to valdate the selected condtons across a varety of t ssue types and DNA qualty (table 1). genomic dNA extraction We stored...and processed samples as descrbed n a prevous report.9 Brefly, t ssue and blood were stored at -20° C. Approxmately 25 mg of t ssue was mnced...30 cycles. then 60° C for 30 mn, 4° soak. Electrophoresis Detecton of a 1ul alquot from a 1:3 dluton n dstlled water of each amplficaton

  15. Genotyping of human rhinovirus in adult patients with acute respiratory infections identified predominant infections of genotype A21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lili; Yang, Donghong; Ren, Xianwen; Li, Mingkun; Mu, Xinlin; Wang, Qi; Cao, Jie; Hu, Ke; Yan, Chunliang; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Xiangxin; Chen, Yusheng; Wang, Ruiqin; An, Fucheng; An, Shuchang; Luo, Ming; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yan; Xiang, Zichun; Xiao, Yan; Li, Li; Huang, Fang; Jin, Qi; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is an important causative agent of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). The roles of specific HRV genotypes in patients suffering from ARTIs have not been well established. We recruited 147 adult inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and 291 adult outpatients with upper ARTIs (URTIs). Respiratory pathogens were screened via PCR assays. HRV was detected in 42 patients, with 35 species A, five B and two C. Seventeen genotypes were identified, and HRV-A21 ranked the highest (9/42, 21.4%). The HRV-A21-positive infections were detected in four patients with CAP and in five with URTIs, all without co-infections. The HRV-A21 genome sequenced in this study contained 12 novel coding polymorphisms in viral protein (VP) 1, VP2 EF loop, VP3 knob and 3D regions. The infections of HRV-A21 virus obtained in this study could not be neutralized by antiserum of HRV-A21 prototype strain (VR-1131), indicating remarkable antigenic variation. Metagenomic analysis showed the HRV-A21 reads were dominant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the three HRV-A21-positive patients with severe CAP, in which two dead. Our results highlight an unexpected infection of genotype HRV-A21 in the clinic, indicating the necessity of precise genotyping and surveillance of HRVs to improve the clinical management of ARTIs. PMID:28128353

  16. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-07-30

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0-91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7-83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9-73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9-71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9-15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3-21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7-19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases.

  17. Isolation and genetic characteristics of human genotype 1 Japanese encephalitis virus, China, 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiu-Song Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the predominant genotype of Chinese Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is evolving from genotype 3 to genotype 1. However, in recent years, almost all genotype 1 isolates were from mosquitoes, and genotype 1 has been less associated with human disease than genotype 3. This study reports the isolation of human genotype 1 JEV and its genetic characteristics to provide additional insights into human JE pathogens that are currently circulating in China. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 2009, 31 cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from patients living in Yunnan and Shanxi provinces and were used to inoculate Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells for virus isolation. The JEV strains were identified using immunofluorescent assays and the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenetic analyses based on the partial capsid/pre-membrane and full envelope (E sequences were performed using Clustalx 1.8 software. Three JEV isolates were obtained from a 4-year-old girl and a 2-year-old boy living in Yunnan and an 82-year-old woman in Shanxi. The boy had been immunized with one dose of JE live attenuated vaccine. New isolates were grouped into genotype 1. Amino acid sequence for the viral E protein indicated 95% to 100% identity with each other and with other JEV strains. When compared with a consensus sequence of E protein, two amino acid substitutions were found: Ser(E-123-Asn in the two Yunnan isolates and Lys(E-166-Arg in the Shanxi isolate. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that the genotype 1 of JEV is causing human infections in China. Our observation of a previously vaccinated boy developing JE from genotype 1 virus infection also calls for more detailed studies, both in vitro and in vivo neutralization tests as well as active surveillance, to examine the possibility of a lack of complete protection conferred by the live attenuated JE vaccine against genotype 1 virus.

  18. The uniqueness of the human dentition as forensic evidence: a systematic review on the technological methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ademir; Willems, Guy; Souza, Paulo Henrique Couto; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Thevissen, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    The uniqueness of human dentition is routinely approached as identification evidence in forensic odontology. Specifically in bitemark and human identification cases, positive identifications are obtained under the hypothesis that two individuals do not have the same dental features. The present study compiles methodological information from articles on the uniqueness of human dentition to support investigations into the mentioned hypothesis. In April 2014, three electronic library databases (SciELO®, MEDLINE®/PubMed®, and LILACS®) were systematically searched. In parallel, reference lists of relevant studies were also screened. From the obtained articles (n = 1235), 13 full-text articles were considered eligible. They were examined according to the studied parameters: the sample size, the number of examined teeth, the registration technique for data collection, the methods for data analysis, and the study outcomes. Six combinations of studied data were detected: (1) dental shape, size, angulation, and position (n = 1); (2) dental shape, size, and angulation (n = 4); (3) dental shape and size (n = 5); (4) dental angulation and position (n = 2); (5) dental shape and angulation (n = 1); and (6) dental shape (n = 1). The sample size ranged between 10 and 1099 human dentitions. Ten articles examined the six anterior teeth, while three articles examined more teeth. Four articles exclusively addressed three-dimensional (3D) data registration, while six articles used two-dimensional (2D) imaging. In three articles, both imaging registrations were combined. Most articles (n = 9) explored the data using landmark placement. The other articles (n = 4) comprised digital comparison of superimposed dental contours. Although there were large methodological variations within the investigated articles, the uniqueness of human dentition remains unproved.

  19. Phylogenetic evidence that two distinct Trichuris genotypes infect both humans and non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiana F Ravasi

    Full Text Available Although there has been extensive debate about whether Trichuris suis and Trichuris trichiura are separate species, only one species of the whipworm T. trichiura has been considered to infect humans and non-human primates. In order to investigate potential cross infection of Trichuris sp. between baboons and humans in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, we sequenced the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of adult Trichuris sp. worms isolated from five baboons from three different troops, namely the Cape Peninsula troop, Groot Olifantsbos troop and Da Gama Park troop. This region was also sequenced from T. trichiura isolated from a human patient from central Africa (Cameroon for comparison. By combining this dataset with Genbank records for Trichuris isolated from other humans, non-human primates and pigs from several different countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa, we confirmed the identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes that infect primates. Trichuris sp. isolated from the Peninsula baboons fell into two distinct clades that were found to also infect human patients from Cameroon, Uganda and Jamaica (named the CP-GOB clade and China, Thailand, the Czech Republic, and Uganda (named the DG clade, respectively. The divergence of these Trichuris clades is ancient and precedes the diversification of T. suis which clustered closely to the CP-GOB clade. The identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes infecting both humans and non-human primates is important for the ongoing treatment of Trichuris which is estimated to infect 600 million people worldwide. Currently baboons in the Cape Peninsula, which visit urban areas, provide a constant risk of infection to local communities. A reduction in spatial overlap between humans and baboons is thus an important measure to reduce both cross-transmission and zoonoses of helminthes in Southern Africa.

  20. Phylogenetic evidence that two distinct Trichuris genotypes infect both humans and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasi, Damiana F; O'Riain, Mannus J; Davids, Faezah; Illing, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive debate about whether Trichuris suis and Trichuris trichiura are separate species, only one species of the whipworm T. trichiura has been considered to infect humans and non-human primates. In order to investigate potential cross infection of Trichuris sp. between baboons and humans in the Cape Peninsula, South Africa, we sequenced the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of adult Trichuris sp. worms isolated from five baboons from three different troops, namely the Cape Peninsula troop, Groot Olifantsbos troop and Da Gama Park troop. This region was also sequenced from T. trichiura isolated from a human patient from central Africa (Cameroon) for comparison. By combining this dataset with Genbank records for Trichuris isolated from other humans, non-human primates and pigs from several different countries in Europe, Asia, and Africa, we confirmed the identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes that infect primates. Trichuris sp. isolated from the Peninsula baboons fell into two distinct clades that were found to also infect human patients from Cameroon, Uganda and Jamaica (named the CP-GOB clade) and China, Thailand, the Czech Republic, and Uganda (named the DG clade), respectively. The divergence of these Trichuris clades is ancient and precedes the diversification of T. suis which clustered closely to the CP-GOB clade. The identification of two distinct Trichuris genotypes infecting both humans and non-human primates is important for the ongoing treatment of Trichuris which is estimated to infect 600 million people worldwide. Currently baboons in the Cape Peninsula, which visit urban areas, provide a constant risk of infection to local communities. A reduction in spatial overlap between humans and baboons is thus an important measure to reduce both cross-transmission and zoonoses of helminthes in Southern Africa.

  1. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Shumay

    Full Text Available The dopamine transporter (DAT is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3 is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET with [¹¹C]cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms--3-UTR- and intron 8--VNTRs. The main findings are the following: 1 both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype modulate DAT density in midbrain; 2 ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and 3 age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron 8--genotype groups.

  2. Metagenomic analyses of bacteria on human hairs: a qualitative assessment for applications in forensic science

    OpenAIRE

    Tridico, Silvana R; Murray, Dáithí C.; Addison, Jayne; Kirkbride, Kenneth P; Bunce, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Mammalian hairs are one of the most ubiquitous types of trace evidence collected in the course of forensic investigations. However, hairs that are naturally shed or that lack roots are problematic substrates for DNA profiling; these hair types often contain insufficient nuclear DNA to yield short tandem repeat (STR) profiles. Whilst there have been a number of initial investigations evaluating the value of metagenomics analyses for forensic applications (e.g. examination of compute...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  4. Forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2012-04-01

    Forensic odontology is a specialized field of dentistry which analyses dental evidence in the interest of justice. Forensic odontology embraces all dental specialities and it is almost impossible to segregate this branch from other dental specialities. This review aims to discuss the utility of various dental specialities with forensic odontology.

  5. Forensic DNA typing in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y P

    2009-04-01

    In the field of forensic genetics, essential developmental impulses come from the advances of the molecular biology and human genome projects. This paper overviews existing technologies for forensic genetics in China and gives a perspective of forensic DNA analysis. In China, work has been done in the development of blood group serology of the conventional markers. Forensic scientists in China also contributed to the progress of DNA analysis by the validation of numerous test methods and by optimization of these methods. During these years, forensic DNA analysis in China has experienced tremendous progress towards development of robust, efficient and precise protocols, including the development of short tandem repeat analysis, mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome analysis. Forensic scientists are constantly looking for new methods to further improve DNA typing. Therefore, this paper also focuses on emerging new technologies in China, which represent an interest for forensic genetics.

  6. STR MARKERS. GENOTYPING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Sirbu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available STR (short tandem repeats loci consist of short, repetitive sequence elements of 2-8 bp in length. These abundant repeats are well distributed throughout the human genome and are rich source of highly polymorphic markers. There are literally hundreds of STR systems which have been mapped throughout the human genome. Several dozen have been investigated for application to human identity testing. These STR loci are found on almost every chromosome in the genome. They may be amplified using a variety of PCR primers. Tetranucleotide repeats have been most popular among forensic scientists due to their fidelity in PCR amplification although some tri- and pentanucleotide repeats are also in use. In this paper we intend (far from being exhaustive to present a synthesis of the characteristics of these genetic markers and their applications in genotyping, giving as an example the use of the STRs in a paternity testing case.

  7. Plant genetics for forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaya, David N; Ashley, Mary V

    2012-01-01

    An emerging application for plant DNA fingerprinting and barcoding involves forensic investigations. Examples of DNA analysis of botanical evidence include crime scene analysis, identifying the source of commercial plant products, and investigation of trade in illicit drugs. Here, we review real and potential applications of DNA-based forensic botany and provide a protocol for microsatellite genotyping of leaf material, a protocol that could be used to link a suspect to a victim or to a crime scene.

  8. Forensic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  9. Forensic Identification of Human Blood: comparison of two one-step presumptive tests for blood screening of crime scene samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Belchior Andrade

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Blood is the most common body fluid found at crime scenes. One-step presumptive tests have been designed as a rapid immunological test for the qualitative detection of human hemoglobin in stool samples (faecal occult blood their usefulness for forensic purposes has been demonstrated before. In this study we compare Hexagon OBTI kit and FOB One-step Bioeasy kit sensitivity in the analysis of diluted blood samples. With Hexagon OBTI, positive test results are achieved in whole blood dilutions up to 1:1.000. Sensitivity decreased with aged samples, if samples were not stored under low temperatures regardless of which presumptive test is used. Whole blood tests must take into consideration that “hook” effect may interfere. Comparing both tests, OBTI Hexagon Kit is more sensible to detect diluted blood, showing a wider detection window in all conditions. This is interesting when analyzing forensic samples as forensic analysts usually do not know about the history of the analyzed sample before its collection.

  10. Comparison of Two PCR-Based Human Papillomavirus Genotyping Methods▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Castle, Philip E.; Porras, Carolina; Quint, Wim G.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Gravitt, Patti E.; González, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Silva, Sandra; Freer, Enrique; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Jiménez, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan

    2008-01-01

    We compared two consensus primer PCR human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping methods for the detection of individual HPV genotypes and carcinogenic HPV genotypes as a group, using a stratified sample of enrollment cervical specimens from sexually active women participating in the NCI/Costa Rica HPV16/18 Vaccine Efficacy Trial. For the SPF10 method, DNA was extracted from 0.1% of the cervical specimen by using a MagNA Pure LC instrument, a 65-bp region of the HPV L1 gene was targeted for PCR amp...

  11. Involvement of larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) on human cadavers: a review of 81 forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charabidze, Damien; Colard, Thomas; Vincent, Benoit; Pasquerault, Thierry; Hedouin, Valery

    2014-11-01

    From 1994 to 2013, French forensic entomology laboratories investigated 1,093 cases. Larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) were observed in 81 (7.5%) of these cases. To describe and analyze these 81 cases, eight parameters were used: city, location (indoor or outdoor), decay stage (fresh, decay, or dry), dermestid species and instar (adults and/or larvae), presence of living calliphorid larvae, presence of calliphorid pupae or adults, and presence of other necrophagous species. Eight Dermestidae species were observed: Dermestes frischii (42% of cases), Dermestes undulatus (35.8%), Dermestes peruvianus (12.3%), Dermestes lardarius (9.9%), Dermestes haemorrhoidalis (8.6%), Dermestes maculatus (7.4%), Dermestes bicolor (3.7%), and Dermestes ater (1.2%). Larder beetles primarily developed on human cadavers in outdoor locations in areas with a dry climate and were never reported in oceanic areas (which are characterized by frequent rainfall and high ambient humidity). The number of dermestid species on a single corpse never exceeded three. Typically, one species was found per corpse. Species differed between indoor and outdoor cases, with D. frischii and D. undulatus dominant in outdoor cases, while D. peruvianus dominant in indoor cases. Calliphoridae was found in 88% of the cases, while Hydrotaea and Piophilidae were observed 40% of the time. Regarding Coleoptera, Necrobia spp. (Coleoptera: Cleridae) was observed in 46% of the cases. Lastly, we observed a typical decomposition pattern, with preferential feeding areas on the face, hands, and feet (i.e., the extremities). Pupation chambers on or inside the bones were not observed.

  12. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato GENOTYPES IN DOMESTIC LIVESTOCK AND HUMANS IN GOLESTAN PROVINCE, IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Tanzifi, Asal; Rostami, Sima; Rostami, Masoomeh; Fasihi Harandi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a globally parasitic zoonosis caused by larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus. This study investigated E. granulosus genotypes isolated from livestock and humans in the Golestan province, northern Iran, southeast of the Caspian sea, using partial sequencing data of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase 1 (nad1) mitochondrial genes. Seventy E. granulosus isolates were collected from animals in slaughterhouses: 18 isolates from sheep, 40 from cattle, nine from camels, two from buffaloes and one from a goat, along with four human isolates (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues) from CE patients of provincial hospitals. All isolates were successfully analysed by PCR amplification and sequencing. The sequence analysis found four E. granulosus genotypes among the 74 CE isolates: G1 (78.3%), G2 (2.7%), G3 (15%) and G6 (4%). The G1-G3 complex genotype was found in all of the sheep, goat, cattle and buffalo isolates. Among the nine camel isolates, the frequency of G1-G3 and G6 genotypes were 66.7% and 33.3%, respectively. All four human CE isolates belonged to E. granulosus sensu stricto. This study reports the first occurrence of the G2 genotype in cattle from Iran and confirms the previously reported G3 genotype in camels in the same country.

  13. A Laboratory Exercise for Genotyping Two Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, James; Carlson, Bradley; LeBard, Timothy; McCarthy, Michael; Umali, Finianne; Ashton, Bryce; Rose, Ferrill F., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic decrease in the cost of sequencing a human genome is leading to an era in which a wide range of students will benefit from having an understanding of human genetic variation. Since over 90% of sequence variation between humans is in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a laboratory exercise has been devised in order to…

  14. Contribution statistics can make to "strengthening forensic science"

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available in forensic science Recommendation 3: Research is needed to address issues of accuracy, reliability, and validity in the forensic science disciplines. The National Institute of Forensic Science (NIFS) should competitively fund peer-reviewed research... on Identifying the Needs of the Forensic Sciences Community, 2009]. 4. Human bias and error Recommendation 5: The National Institute of Forensic Science (NIFS) should encourage research programs on human observer bias and sources of human error...

  15. Molecular Advancements in Forensic Odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu Rs, A; Rose, D

    2015-05-11

    Forensic odontology explores the field of human identification through dental tissues in cases where there is destruction of body tissues in criminal investigations and mass disasters. Forensic odontology involves dentists participating in legal and criminal issues. Parameters such as age and gender identification are important in identifying the person or persons. Over the last two decades, the molecular aspect of forensic sciences has increased, and these molecular techniques now provide a novel approach to forensic odontology. Molecular advancements in science like DNA analysis has extended the range of forensic dentistry as teeth possess the character of resistance toward physical or chemical aggressions. Teeth provide the abundant space for DNA, and hence teeth represent an excellent source of genomic DNA. The present paper focusses on molecular advancements in the field of forensic odontology.

  16. Genotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches and human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Keiko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2010-10-01

    Molecular-epidemiological analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches captured in hospitals and from patient urine was performed, employing randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis to investigate the usefulness of RAPD analysis. Four specific bands at positions of 993, 875, 521, and 402 bp were commonly detected using primer 272 in 16 of 45 cockroach-derived strains (35.6%), but not in 21 urine-derived strains. On analysis using primer 208, 4 specific bands at positions of 1,235, 1,138, 1,068, and 303 bp were commonly detected in 15 of the 45 cockroach-derived (33.3%) and 10 of the 21 patient urine-derived (47.6%) strains, in a total of 25 of 66 strains (37.8%). On cluster analysis, 12 (48.5%) and 16 (66.7%) clusters were grouped based on a homology of 89% or greater, using primer 272 and primer 208, respectively, showing that primer 208 was suitable for the confirmation of diversity. Seven patterns were clustered based on 100% homology using either primer, and 6 of these consisted of only cockroach-derived strains. In the individual groups with 100% homology, all strains in the group were isolated at an identical site during the same period. P. aeruginosa isolated from cockroaches showed diverse genotypes suggesting several sources of contamination, indicating the necessity for investigating infection control targeting cockroaches inhabiting hospitals.

  17. The application of silicon sol-gel technology to forensic blood substitute development: Mimicking aspects of whole human blood rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotesbury, Theresa; Illes, Mike; Wilson, Paul; Vreugdenhil, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Solution-gelation chemistry has promising applications in forensic synthetic blood substitute development. This research offers a silicon-based sol-gel approach to creating stable materials that share similar rheological properties to that of whole human blood samples. Room temperature, high water content, silicon sol-gels were created using the organosilane precursors 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and tetraethylorthosilicate along with various concentrations of filler and pigment. Shear-thinning non-Newtonian properties were observed within most formulations of the presented materials. The effects of colloidal concentration, temperature, age and filler addition on the viscosity of the sol-gels were investigated. SEM-EDS analysis was used to identify the behavior of the fillers within the film and support their inclusion for basic bloodstain pattern simulation. A final proposed candidate sol-gel was assessed using a previously reported passive drip simulation test on a hard, dry surface and passed. This works represents encouraging development in providing safe material alternatives to using whole human blood for forensic training and research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human papillomavirus genotyping by multiplex pyrosequencing in cervical cancer patients from India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheryl M Travasso; Mona Anand Mansi; Mansi Samarth; Aditi Deshpande; Chandan Kumar-Sinha

    2008-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in India. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the causative agent of cervical cancer; and infection with the high-risk genotypes, predominantly HPV16 and 18, is the biggest risk factor. Vaccines targeting HPV16 and 18 have been found to confer protection in large-scale clinical trials. HPV genotyping has traditionally been carried out to screen the population “at risk” using indirect methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using consensus primers combined with various DNA hybridization techniques, and often followed by the sequencing of candidate products. Recently, a high-throughput and direct method based on DNA sequencing has been described for HPV genotyping using multiplex pyrosequencing. We present a pilot study on HPV genotyping of cervical cancer and non-malignant cervical samples using multiplex pyrosequencing. Using genomic DNA from cell lines, cervical biopsies, surgical tissues or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples, we could successfully resolve 6 different HPV types out of the 7 tested, with their prevalence found to be in agreement with earlier reports. We also resolved coinfections with two different HPV types in several samples. An HPV16 genotype with a specific and recurrent sequence variation was observed in 8 cancer samples and one non-malignant sample. We find this technique eminently suited for high-throughput applications, which can be easily extended to large sample cohorts to determine a robust benchmark for HPV genotypes prevalent in India.

  19. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-07-01

    In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Women Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages.

  20. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Luuk; Veldhuis, Raymond; Quaglia, Adamo; Epifano, Calogera M.

    2012-01-01

    The improvements of automatic face recognition during the last 2 decades have disclosed new applications like border control and camera surveillance. A new application field is forensic face recognition. Traditionally, face recognition by human experts has been used in forensics, but now there is a

  1. The value of radiocarbon analysis in determining the forensic interest of human skeletal remains found in unusual circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Puentes, Katerina; Soares, António Monge; Santos, Agostinho; Magalhães, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The case under analysis refers to the remains of a young adult female found in a shallow grave during the construction work of a hospital in Northern Portugal. The forensic interest of the finding could not be ruled out since distinguishing features pointing to an archaeological grave were lacking. For example, absence of archaeological artefacts could not establish its forensic significance with certainty, together with the absence of modern objects, such as remnants of clothing or personal objects. In addition, although the remains were badly preserved, the condition may not have resulted from a long post-depositional period, but instead could be explained by the geology of the site and the presence of plant roots. The radiocarbon analysis of the remains was meant to establish the death of the individual to before or after the mid-1950s, from comparison with bomb-curve content values. A value of 0.9789 ± 0.0044 for F(14)C (pmC = 97.19 ± 0.44% Modern or Δ(14)C = -28.1 ± 4.4‰) was obtained, which placed the death of the individual in the pre-mod-1950s period. This report illustrates the use of radiocarbon analysis in establishing whether the human remains are contemporary or not and describes evidence for what appears to be an historic clandestine grave. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced Genetic Analysis of Single Human Bioparticles Recovered by Simplified Micromanipulation from Forensic ‘Touch DNA’ Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K.; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-01-01

    DNA profiles can be obtained from ‘touch DNA’ evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a ‘blind-swabbing’ approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals’ cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim’s DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator’s DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, ‘smart analysis’ method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., “clumps”) bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material. PMID:25867046

  3. Forensic Phonetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Francis

    1991-01-01

    Examines, with skepticism, the history and development of forensic phonetics in response to the publication of "Forensic Phonetics" by J. Baldwin and P. French (1990). Three issues are specifically explored: (1) whether voices are unique, (2) whether a purely auditory approach is adequate, and (3) whether legally sufficient conclusions…

  4. Massively parallel sequencing of forensic STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Ballard, David; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) is reviewing factors that need to be considered ahead of the adoption by the forensic community of short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping by massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies. MPS produces sequence data...... accessible genome assembly, and in place before the uptake of MPS by the general forensic community starts to generate sequence data on a large scale. While the established nomenclature for CE-based STR analysis will remain unchanged in the future, the nomenclature of sequence-based STR genotypes will need...

  5. Quantification and Genotyping of Human Sapoviruses in the Llobregat River Catchment, Spain▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Daisuke; Pérez-Sautu, Unai; Guix, Susana; Pintó, Rosa Maria; Miura, Takayuki; Okabe, Satoshi; Bosch, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Human sapoviruses (SaVs) were quantified and characterized in an 18-month survey conducted along the Llobregat river catchment area in Spain. Sample types included freshwater, untreated and treated wastewater, and drinking water. All genogroups were recovered, and a seasonal distribution was observed. This is the first report of SaV quantification and genotyping in the environment outside Japan. PMID:21148702

  6. Quantification and Genotyping of Human Sapoviruses in the Llobregat River Catchment, Spain▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, Daisuke; Pérez-Sautu, Unai; Guix, Susana; Pintó, Rosa Maria; Miura, Takayuki; Okabe, Satoshi; Bosch, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Human sapoviruses (SaVs) were quantified and characterized in an 18-month survey conducted along the Llobregat river catchment area in Spain. Sample types included freshwater, untreated and treated wastewater, and drinking water. All genogroups were recovered, and a seasonal distribution was observed. This is the first report of SaV quantification and genotyping in the environment outside Japan.

  7. Evidence that the Echinococcus granulosus G6 genotype has an affinity for the brain in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadjjadi, S M; Mikaeili, F; Karamian, M; Maraghi, S; Sadjjadi, F S; Shariat-Torbaghan, S; Kia, E B

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigates the molecular characteristics of cerebral Echinococcus cysts. A total of 10 specimens of cerebral Echinococcus cysts, including six formalin-fixed paraffin blocks and four intact cerebral cysts, were used for this study. The target DNA was successfully amplified from eight samples and sequenced. BLAST analysis indicated that sequenced isolates belong to the Echinococcus granulosus (G6) genotype. All of the eight sampled brain cysts belonged to the G6 genotype, while all of the eight liver cysts belonged to G1. This is a strong indication that G6 has a higher affinity for the human brain than G1.

  8. Expansion of Microbial Forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah E; Sajantila, Antti; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Microbial forensics has been defined as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of evidence related to bioterrorism, biocrimes, hoaxes, or the accidental release of a biological agent or toxin for attribution purposes. Over the past 15 years, technology, particularly massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics advances now allow the characterization of microorganisms for a variety of human forensic applications, such as human identification, body fluid characterization, postmortem interval estimation, and biocrimes involving tracking of infectious agents. Thus, microbial forensics should be more broadly described as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of microbial evidence in criminal and civil cases for investigative purposes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Author Guidelines: The Arab Journal of Forensic Sciences and Forensic Medicine (AJFSFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab Journal of Forensic Sciences & Forensic Medicine

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arab Journal of Forensic Sciences and Forensic Medicine (AJFSFM is a peer-reviewed, open access (CC BY-NC, international journal for publishing original contributions in various fields of forensic science. These fields include, but are not limited to forensic pathology and histochemistry, toxicology(drugs, alcohol, etc., forensic biology (serology, human DNA profiling, entomology, population genetics, forensic chemistry(inks, paints, dyes, explosives, fire accelerants, psychiatry and hypnotics, forensic anthropology and archeology, forensic odontology, fingerprints and impressions, firearms and tool marks, white collar crimes (counterfeit and forgery; questioned documents, digital forensics; cyber-crimes, criminal justice and crime scene investigation, as well as many other disciplines where science and medicine interact with the law.

  10. Genotyping of Giardia lamblia isolates from human in southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkari, B; Ashrafmansori, A; Hatam, G R; Motazedian, M H; Asgari, Q; Mohammadpour, I

    2012-09-01

    Giardia lamblia cysts isolated from human faeces in South of Iran were analyzed with PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay, based on the detection of glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) genes. Among 205 faecal samples from microscopically diagnosed giardiasis patients, the gdh gene was amplified from 172 cases with a semi nested PCR assay and typed by RFLP analysis. Of the 172 positive samples, 128 (74.41%) were typed as assemblage AII, 30 (17.44%) assemblage BIII, 6 (3.49%) assemblage BIV and in 8 (4.66%) isolates, mixed assemblages AII and BIV were detected. Clinical features were available for 52 successfully typed cases and the possible correlation of Giardia assemblages and clinical symptoms was evaluated. Both assemblages caused similar illness, but assemblage AII was significantly more frequently associated with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Since these isolates, A and B, are of human origin, anthroponotic transmission of Giardia can be suggested for the route of infection in this region.

  11. Human papilloma virus (HPV genotypes prevalence in a region of South Italy (Apulia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Franca Coscia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Since human papillomavirus (HPV is the central casual factor in cervical cancer, understanding the epidemiology and geographical area distribution of the most prevalent HPV genotypes constitutes an important step towards development of strategies of prevention. AIM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and to determine HPV types distribution among 822 HPV positive women and some sexual male partners in Apulia (Italy. METHODS. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed by nested-PCR for the L1 region and reverse line blot hybridization allowing the specific detection of 24 HPV genotyping both high risk (HR and low risk (LR. RESULTS. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were HPV 16 (35%, HPV 31 (16% HPV 6 (9%, HPV 58 and 66 (7%, followed by HPV 33 (6%, HPV 18 and 56 (4%, HPV 70 and 45 (3%, HPV 53 and 11 (2%. Currently 1.5% of tested specimens remained unclassified. Multiple infections with at last two different high-risk HPV genotypes were observed in 10% of specimens. CONCLUSIONS. This finding adds knowledge to HPV epidemiological investigation, and addresses further studies aimed to consider public health for identifying groups at risk for cervical cancer.

  12. Distinguishing the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like rotaviruses vs. porcine rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernanda D F; Gregori, F; McDonald, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many animal species. Previous studies have suggested that human Wa-like RVAs share a close evolutionary relationship with porcine RVAs. Specifically, the VP1-VP3 and NSP2-5/6 genes of these viruses are usually classified as genotype 1 with >81% nucleotide sequence identity. Yet, it remains unknown whether the genotype 1 genes and proteins of human Wa-like strains are distinguishable from those of porcine strains. To investigate this, we performed comprehensive bioinformatic analyses using all known genotype 1 gene sequences. The RVAs analyzed represent wildtype strains isolated from humans or pigs at various geographical locations during the years of 2004-2013, including 11 newly-sequenced porcine RVAs from Brazil. We also analyzed archival strains that were isolated during the years of 1977-1992 as well as atypical strains involved in inter-species transmission between humans and pigs. We found that, in general, the genotype 1 genes of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs clustered together in phylogenetic trees and were separate from those of typical modern porcine RVAs. The only exception was for the NSP5/6 gene, which showed no host-specific phylogenetic clustering. Using amino acid sequence alignments, we identified 34 positions that differentiated the VP1-VP3, NSP2, and NSP3 genotype 1 proteins of typical modern human Wa-like RVAs versus typical modern porcine RVAs and documented how these positions vary in the archival/unusual isolates. No host-specific amino acid positions were identified for NSP4, NSP5, or NSP6. Altogether, the results of this study support the notion that human Wa-like RVAs and porcine RVAs are evolutionarily related, but indicate that some of their genotype 1 genes and proteins have diverged over time possibly as a reflection of sequestered replication and protein co-adaptation in their respective hosts.

  13. [The application of mitochondrial genomics to forensic investigations based on human mitochondrial DNA testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Bednarek, Jarosław; Rogalla, Urszula; Woźniak, Marcin; Gorzkiewicz, Marta; Linkowska, Katarzyna; Duleba, Anna; Sliwka, Karol; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present two forensic cases where mitochondrial DNA HVS I and HVS II haplotypes of evidentiary hairs match reference samples. Based on the information retrieved from mtDNA coding region of reference material, we selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located outside the HVS I and HVS II regions that could increase the informativeness of mtDNA analysis. The SNPs were typed via SNaPshot or dideoxy sequencing technology. In both cases the SNP results allowed for unambiguous exlusion of the evidence and for determining that reference samples originated from the same person.

  14. Cold sore susceptibility gene-1 genotypes affect the expression of herpes labialis in unrelated human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriesel, John D; Bhatia, Amiteshwar; Thomas, Alun

    2014-01-01

    Our group has recently described a gene on human chromosome 21, the Cold Sore Susceptibility Gene-1 (CSSG-1, also known as C21orf91), which may confer susceptibility to frequent cold sores in humans. We present here a genotype-phenotype analysis of CSSG-1 in a new, unrelated human population. Seven hundred fifty-eight human subjects were enrolled in a case/control Cold Sore Study. CSSG-1 genotyping, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) serotyping, demographic and phenotypic data was available from 622 analyzed subjects. Six major alleles (H1-H6) were tested for associations with each of the self-reported phenotypes. The statistical analysis was adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity. Genotype-phenotype associations were analyzed from 388 HSV1-seropositive subjects. There were significant CSSG-1 haplotype effects on annual cold sore outbreaks (P=0.006), lifetime cold sores (P=0.012) and perceived cold sore severity (P=0.012). There were relatively consistent trends toward protection from frequent and severe cold sores among those with the H3 or H5/6 haplotypes, whereas those with H1, H2, and H4 haplotypes tended to have more frequent and more severe episodes. Different alleles of the newly described gene CSSG-1 affect the expression of cold sore phenotypes in this new, unrelated human population, confirming the findings of the previous family-based study.

  15. Differences in Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori from Different Human Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersulyte, Dangeruta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Velapatiño, Billie; Su, WanWen; Pan, ZhiJun; Garcia, Claudia; Hernandez, Virginia; Valdez, Yanet; Mistry, Rajesh S.; Gilman, Robert H.; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Hua; Alarcón, Teresa; López-Brea, Manuel; Balakrish Nair, G.; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Datta, Simanti; Shirai, Mutsunori; Nakazawa, Teruko; Ally, Reidwaan; Segal, Isidore; Wong, Benjamin C. Y.; Lam, S. K.; Olfat, Farzad O.; Borén, Thomas; Engstrand, Lars; Torres, Olga; Schneider, Roberto; Thomas, Julian E.; Czinn, Steven; Berg, Douglas E.

    2000-01-01

    DNA motifs at several informative loci in more than 500 strains of Helicobacter pylori from five continents were studied by PCR and sequencing to gain insights into the evolution of this gastric pathogen. Five types of deletion, insertion, and substitution motifs were found at the right end of the H. pylori cag pathogenicity island. Of the three most common motifs, type I predominated in Spaniards, native Peruvians, and Guatemalan Ladinos (mixed Amerindian-European ancestry) and also in native Africans and U.S. residents; type II predominated among Japanese and Chinese; and type III predominated in Indians from Calcutta. Sequences in the cagA gene and in vacAm1 type alleles of the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA) of strains from native Peruvians were also more like those from Spaniards than those from Asians. These indications of relatedness of Latin American and Spanish strains, despite the closer genetic relatedness of Amerindian and Asian people themselves, lead us to suggest that H. pylori may have been brought to the New World by European conquerors and colonists about 500 years ago. This thinking, in turn, suggests that H. pylori infection might have become widespread in people quite recently in human evolution. PMID:10809702

  16. Forensics Investigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... science, and several more offer degrees in chemistry, biochemistry, or genetic engineering with an emphasis on forensic ... Related Videos If you like this career, checkout these videos: Dr. Lois Tully NIST: Explanation of DNA ...

  17. An unusual method of forensic human identification: use of selfie photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Geraldo Elias; Freitas, Sílvia Guzella de; Maia, Luiza Valéria de Abreu; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2016-06-01

    As with other methods of identification, in forensic odontology, antemortem data are compared with postmortem findings. In the absence of dental documentation, photographs of the smile play an important role in this comparison. As yet, there are no reports of the use of the selfie photograph for identification purposes. Owing to advancements in technology, electronic devices, and social networks, this type of photograph has become increasingly common. This paper describes a case in which selfie photographs were used to identify a carbonized body, by using the smile line and image superimposition. This low-cost, rapid, and easy to analyze technique provides highly reliable results. Nevertheless, there are disadvantages, such as the limited number of teeth that are visible in a photograph, low image quality, possibility of morphological changes in the teeth after the antemortem image was taken, and difficulty of making comparisons depending on the orientation of the photo. In forensic odontology, new methods of identification must be sought to accompany technological evolution, particularly when no traditional methods of comparison, such as clinical record charts or radiographs, are available.

  18. Forensic psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Pavšič Mrevlje

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a review of different issues that a forensic psychologists encounter at work. Forensic assessment might be needed in civil law cases, administrative procedures and in criminal law cases. The paper focuses on referrals in criminal law cases regarding matters such as assessing competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility and violence risk assessment. Finally, the role of expert testimony on eyewitness memory, which is not used in practice in Slovenia yet, is presented.

  19. A human genotyping trial to estimate the post-feeding time from mosquito blood meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshige, Yuuji; Hara, Masaaki; Nagai, Atsushi; Hikitsuchi, Tomoyuki; Umeda, Mitsuo; Kawajiri, Yumi; Nakayama, Koji; Suzuki, Koichi; Takada, Aya; Ishii, Akira; Yamamoto, Toshimichi

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes occur almost worldwide, and females of some species feed on blood from humans and other animals to support ovum maturation. In warm and hot seasons, such as the summer in Japan, fed mosquitoes are often observed at crime scenes. The current study attempted to estimate the time that elapsed since feeding from the degree of human DNA digestion in mosquito blood meals and also to identify the individual human sources of the DNA using genotyping in two species of mosquito: Culex pipiens pallens and Aedes albopictus. After stereomicroscopic observation, the extracted DNA samples were quantified using a human DNA quantification and quality control kit and were genotyped for 15 short tandem repeats using a commercial multiplexing kit. It took about 3 days for the complete digestion of a blood meal, and genotyping was possible until 2 days post-feeding. The relative peak heights of the 15 STRs and DNA concentrations were useful for estimating the post-feeding time to approximately half a day between 0 and 2 days. Furthermore, the quantitative ratios derived from STR peak heights and the quality control kit (Q129/Q41, Q305/Q41, and Q305/Q129) were reasonably effective for estimating the approximate post-feeding time after 2-3 days. We suggest that this study may be very useful for estimating the time since a mosquito fed from blood meal DNA, although further refinements are necessary to estimate the times more accurately.

  20. Examination of DNA methylation status of the ELOVL2 marker may be useful for human age prediction in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbieć-Piekarska, Renata; Spólnicka, Magdalena; Kupiec, Tomasz; Makowska, Żanetta; Spas, Anna; Parys-Proszek, Agnieszka; Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Płoski, Rafał; Branicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Age estimation in forensic investigations may complement the prediction of externally visible characteristics and the inference of biogeographical ancestry, thus allowing a better description of an unknown individual. Multiple CpG sites that show linear correlation between age and degree of DNA methylation have been identified in the human genome, providing a selection of candidates for age prediction. In this study, we optimized an assay based on bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing of 7 CpG sites located in the ELOVL2 gene. Examination of 303 blood samples collected from individuals aged 2-75 years allowed selection of the most informative site, explaining 83% of variation in age. The final linear regression model included two CpG sites in ELOVL2 and enabled age prediction with R(2)=0.859, prediction error=6.85 and mean absolute deviation MAD=5.03. Examination of a testing set of 124 blood samples (MAD=5.75) showed that 68.5% of samples were correctly predicted, assuming that chronological and predicted ages matched ± 7 years. It was found that the ELOVL2 methylation status in bloodstains had not changed significantly after 4 weeks of storage in room temperature conditions. Analysis of 45 bloodstains deposited on tissue paper after 5, 10 and 15 years of storage in room conditions indicated that although a gradual decrease of positive PCR results was observed, the general age prediction success rate remained similar and equaled 60-78%. The obtained results show that the ELOVL2 locus provides a very good source of information about human chronological age based on analysis of blood, including bloodstains, and it may constitute a powerful and reliable predictor in future forensic age estimation models.

  1. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages. PMID:27610056

  2. Developmental validation of the IrisPlex system: determination of blue and brown iris colour for forensic intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Susan; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Zuniga, Sofia B; Sijen, Titia; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred; Ballantyne, Kaye N

    2011-11-01

    The IrisPlex system consists of a highly sensitive multiplex genotyping assay together with a statistical prediction model, providing users with the ability to predict blue and brown human eye colour from DNA samples with over 90% precision. This 'DNA intelligence' system is expected to aid police investigations by providing phenotypic information on unknown individuals when conventional DNA profiling is not informative. Falling within the new area of forensic DNA phenotyping, this paper describes the developmental validation of the IrisPlex assay following the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) guidelines for the application of DNA-based eye colour prediction to forensic casework. The IrisPlex assay produces complete SNP genotypes with only 31pg of DNA, approximately six human diploid cell equivalents, and is therefore more sensitive than commercial STR kits currently used in forensics. Species testing revealed human and primate specificity for a complete SNP profile. The assay is capable of producing accurate results from simulated casework samples such as blood, semen, saliva, hair, and trace DNA samples, including extremely low quantity samples. Due to its design, it can also produce full profiles with highly degraded samples often found in forensic casework. Concordance testing between three independent laboratories displayed reproducible results of consistent levels on varying types of simulated casework samples. With such high levels of sensitivity, specificity, consistency and reliability, this genotyping assay, as a core part of the IrisPlex system, operates in accordance with SWGDAM guidelines. Furthermore, as we demonstrated previously, the IrisPlex eye colour prediction system provides reliable results without the need for knowledge on the bio-geographic ancestry of the sample donor. Hence, the IrisPlex system, with its model-based prediction probability estimation of blue and brown human eye colour, represents a useful tool for

  3. Chlamydophila psittaci genotype E/B transmission from African grey parrots to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkinezhad, Taher; Verminnen, Kristel; Van Droogenbroeck, Caroline; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2007-08-01

    Thirty-six birds from a parrot relief and breeding centre, as well as the manager, were examined for the presence of Chlamydophila psittaci. In the relief unit, 5 of 20 African grey parrots showed depression, ruffled feathers, loss of weight and mild dyspnoea. The birds received no antibiotic treatment. Birds of the breeding unit, 14 blue and gold macaws and 2 green-winged macaws, were healthy. They received doxycycline at the start of each breeding season. The manager complained of shortness of breath but took no medication. Using a nested PCR enzyme immunoassay (EIA), Cp. psittaci was detected in the faeces of all five sick birds, as well as in a nasal and pharyngeal swab from the manager. The veterinarian and her assistant became infected while sampling the parrots, as pharyngeal and nasal swabs from both were positive by nested PCR/EIA after visiting the parrot relief and breeding centre, but they showed no clinical signs of infection. Bacteria could be isolated from three of five nested PCR/EIA-positive birds, the manager and the veterinarian, but not from the veterinary assistant. Using an ompA genotype-specific real-time PCR, Cp. psittaci genotype E/B was identified as the transmitted strain. All breeding birds tested negative for Cp. psittaci. This is believed to be the first report on Cp. psittaci genotype E/B transmission from parrots to humans. In contradiction to genotype A strains, which are thought to be highly virulent to both birds and men, the currently described genotype E/B strain apparently caused no severe clinical symptoms in either parrots or humans.

  4. Genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus from domestic animals and humans from Ardabil Province, northwest Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki, A; Akhlaghi, L; Sharbatkhori, M; Razmjou, E; Oormazdi, H; Mohebali, M; Meamar, A R

    2013-12-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is endemic in Iran, particularly in Ardabil Province, where it causes health and economic problems. The genetic pattern of Echinococcus granulosus has been determined in most parts of Iran, except in this area. In the present investigation, 55 larval isolates were collected from humans (11), sheep (19), goats (4) and cattle (21). For analysis of the genetic characteristics of E. granulosus isolates, DNA sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) genes was applied. Fifty isolates were successfully analysed, with 92% (46) and 8% (4) identified as G1 and G3 genotypes, respectively. The sequence analyses of the isolates displayed nine characteristic profiles in cox1 sequences and eight characteristic profiles in nad1 sequences. Based on these results, the sheep strain (G1 genotype) was the most prevalent in humans, sheep, goats and cattle. The buffalo strain (G3 genotype) was not only demonstrated in sheep (1 isolate) and cattle (1 isolate), but also for the first time in two human isolates. These findings will provide information for local control of echinococcosis.

  5. The impact of human-technology cooperation and distributed cognition in forensic science: biasing effects of AFIS contextual information on human experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Itiel E; Wertheim, Kasey; Fraser-Mackenzie, Peter; Walajtys, Jeff

    2012-03-01

    Experts play a critical role in forensic decision making, even when cognition is offloaded and distributed between human and machine. In this paper, we investigated the impact of using Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) on human decision makers. We provided 3680 AFIS lists (a total of 55,200 comparisons) to 23 latent fingerprint examiners as part of their normal casework. We manipulated the position of the matching print in the AFIS list. The data showed that latent fingerprint examiners were affected by the position of the matching print in terms of false exclusions and false inconclusives. Furthermore, the data showed that false identification errors were more likely at the top of the list and that such errors occurred even when the correct match was present further down the list. These effects need to be studied and considered carefully, so as to optimize human decision making when using technologies such as AFIS.

  6. Evaluation of hepatic glutathione transferase Mu 1 and Theta 1 activities in humans and mice using genotype information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Shingo; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Kato, Ayako; Endo, Seiko; Fukahori, Aiko; Shinagawa, Akira; Fischer, Thomas; Mueller, Juergen; Takasaki, Wataru

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the impact of glutathione transferases Mu 1 (GSTM1)- and glutathione transferase Theta 1 (GSTT1)-null genotypes on hepatic GST activities in humans and compared the results with those of Gstm1- and Gstt1-null mice. In liver with GSTM1/Gstm1-null genotype, GST activity toward p-nitrobenzyl chloride (NBC) was significantly decreased in both humans and mice. In addition, in liver with GSTT1/Gstt1-null genotype, GST activity toward dichloromethane (DCM) was significantly decreased in both humans and mice. Therefore, null genotypes of GSTM1/Gstm1 and GSTT1/Gstt1 are considered to decrease hepatic GST activities toward NBC and DCM, respectively, in both humans and mice. This observation shows the functional similarity between humans and mice for GSTM1 and GSTT1 toward some substrates. In the case of NBC and DCM, Gst-null mice would be relevant models for humans with GST-null genotype. In addition, decreases in GST activities toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, trans-4-phenyl-3-buten-2-one, and 1-chloro-2,4,-dinitrobenzene were observed in Gstm1-null mice, and a decrease in GST activity toward 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane was observed in Gstt1-null mice. However, an impact of GST-null genotypes on GST activities toward these substrates was not observed in humans. In the case of these mouse-specific substrates, Gst-null mice may be relevant models for humans regardless of GST genotype, because GST activities, which are higher in wild-type mice than in humans, were eliminated in Gst-null mice. This study shows that comparison of hepatic GST activities between humans and mice using genotype information would be valuable in using Gst-null mice as human models.

  7. Easy and fast detection and genotyping of high-risk human papillomavirus by dedicated DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Valérie; Chevallier, Anne; Magnone, Virginie; Barbry, Pascal; Vandenbos, Fanny; Bongain, André; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2006-11-01

    Persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is correlated with an increased risk of developing a high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesion. A two-step method was developed for detection and genotyping of high-risk HPV. DNA was firstly amplified by asymmetrical PCR in the presence of Cy3-labelled primers and dUTP. Labelled DNA was then genotyped using DNA microarray hybridization. The current study evaluated the technical efficacy of laboratory-designed HPV DNA microarrays for high-risk HPV genotyping on 57 malignant and non-malignant cervical smears. The approach was evaluated for a broad range of cytological samples: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and atypical squamous cells of high-grade (ASC-H). High-risk HPV was also detected in six atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) samples; among them only one cervical specimen was found uninfected, associated with no histological lesion. The HPV oligonucleotide DNA microarray genotyping detected 36 infections with a single high-risk HPV type and 5 multiple infections with several high-risk types. Taken together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the HPV DNA microarray approach. This approach could improve clinical management of patients with cervical cytological abnormalities.

  8. Microsporidia detection and genotyping study of human pathogenic E. bieneusi in animals from Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luz Galván-Díaz

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are ubiquitous parasites infecting all animal phyla and we present evidence that supports their zoonotic potential. Fecal samples taken from domestic (cats and dogs, farm (pigs, rabbits and ostriches and wild animals (foxes from different provinces of Spain were evaluated for microsporidia infection by light microscopy and PCR. After Microsporidia species identification, E. bieneusi genotypes were additionally studied by sequence analysis of the ITS region. Eighty-five samples out of 159 exhibited structures that were compatible with microsporidia spores by Webeŕs stain with 37 of them being confirmed by PCR. Microsporidia species identified included E. bieneusi, E. intestinalis and A. algerae. We report the first diagnosis of E. intestinalis and E. bieneusi in ostriches and A. algerae in pigs. We also provide new information on the molecular characterization of E. bieneusi isolates both in rabbits and ostriches. All of the E. bieneusi genotypes identified belonged to the zoonotic group of genotypes (Group I including genotypes A (dogs, I (pigs, D (rabbits and foxes and type IV (ostriches. Our results demonstrate that microsporidia are present in domestic, farm and wild animals in Spain, corroborating their potential role as a source of human infection and environmental contamination.

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in women from a rural region of Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Paredes-Tello, María Antonia; Pérez-Terrón, Héctor; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2009-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 6, 11, 16, 18, and 31 in Mexican women living in rural areas of Puebla, Mexico and to evaluate risk factors associated with cervical neoplasm in this population. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 326 women at the General Hospital of Metepec, Puebla. Cervical samples were obtained using a cytobrush and tested for HPV genotypes by PCR assays using type-specific primers. A questionnaire was completed regarding gynecological, obstetric, and sexual behavior of the patients. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 25.4%, with two peaks of higher HPV prevalence in those aged 18-24 and 55-64 years. The individual genotype prevalences were: 9.6% HPV6, 4.8% HPV11, 54.2% HPV16, 37.3% HPV18, and 9.6% HPV31. Number of pregnancies was the most important risk factor associated with cervical cancer. HPV16 was the most common type found in all cervical lesions. Genotype 16 or 18 was detected in patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer. We found two peaks of age-specific HPV prevalence similar to findings reported worldwide.

  10. Human papillomavirus genotype prevalence in invasive penile cancers from a registry-based United States population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Y Hernandez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human papillomavirus (HPV is estimated to play an etiologic role in 40%-50% of penile cancers worldwide. Estimates of HPV prevalence in U.S. penile cancer cases are limited. Methods. HPV DNA was evaluated in tumor tissue from 79 invasive penile cancer patients diagnosed in 1998-2005 within the catchment areas of 7 U.S. cancer registries. HPV was genotyped using PCR-based Linear Array and INNO-LiPA assays and compared by demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics and survival. Histological classification was also obtained by independent pathology review. Results. HPV DNA was present in 50 of 79 (63% of invasive penile cancer cases. Sixteen viral genotypes were detected. HPV 16, found in 46% (36/79 of all cases (72% of HPV-positive cases was the most prevalent genotype followed equally by HPV 18, 33, and 45, which each comprised 5% of all cases. Multiple genotypes were detected in 18% of viral positive cases. HPV prevalence did not significantly vary by age, race/ethnicity, population size of geographic region, cancer stage, histology, grade, penile subsite, or prior cancer history. Penile cases diagnosed in more recent years were more likely to be HPV positive. Overall survival did not significantly vary by HPV status. Conclusions. The relatively high prevalence of HPV in our study population provides limited evidence of a more prominent and, possibly, increasing role of infection in penile carcinogenesis in the U.S. compared to other parts of the world.

  11. Genotyping of cystic echinococcosis isolates from clinical samples of human and domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Fadhil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic hydatid disease is a cosmopolitan important disease in both human and animals. Many strains were investigated in this parasite. The aim of study was to characterize genotype variations of Echinococcus granulosus isolates collected from human and domestic animals in Al-Qadisiyah province/ Iraq based on sequencing of nad1 mitochondrial gene. Eighty hydatid cysts of human (12, sheep (15, cattle (36, and camels (17 were collected from hospital and slaughter house of the province, during October 2014 to June 2015; microscopic examination was made for cysts fluid to determine the fertility. DNAs extraction was done for each sample in addition to purify and concentrate of extracted DNA samples was performed to determine nad1 (400bp gene used conventional PCR method. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using NCBI-Blast Alignment identification and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean. Twenty five (10 from human and 5 from each studied animals samples were chosen due to their fertility and high DNA purity, in which three strains (genotypes were investigated including sheep strain (G1 40%, buffalo strain (G3 48% and camel strain (G6 12%, where human samples related to G1(20% and G3(80%; sheep samples related to G1(80% and G3(20%; cattle samples related to G1(60%, G3 (20% and G6 (20%; camels samples related to G1(20%, G3(40% and G6(40%. The dominant strain is a buffalo strain (G3; both of buffalo strain (G3 and sheep strain (G1 represented the actual source of human infection. There is no host specificity of detected genotypes.

  12. Shells and Bones: A Forensic Medicine Study of the Association of Terrestrial Snail Allopeas micra with Buried Human Remains in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Malthus Fonseca; Pujol-Luz, José Roberto; de Assis Pujol-Luz, Cristiane Vieira; de Rosa, Cássio Thyone Almeida; Simone, Luiz Ricardo L; Báo, Sônia Nair; Barros-Cordeiro, Karine Brenda; Pessoa, Larissa; Bissacot, Giovanna

    2015-09-01

    Little is known regarding the scavenger fauna associated with buried human corpses, particularly in clandestine burials. We report the presence of 20 shells of the terrestrial snail Allopeas micra, within hollow bones of human remains buried for 5 years, during the process of collecting DNA material. The fact that a large number of shells of A. micra had been found in the corpse and in the crime scene supports the assumption that there was no attempt to remove the corpse from the area where the crime occurred. Despite this, our observations cannot be used to estimate the postmortem interval because there is no precise knowledge about the development of this species. This is the first record of a terrestrial snail associated with a human corpse and its role in this forensic medicine case. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) genotyping of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bee Yong; Ahmad, Norazah; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Thong, Kwai Lin; Koh, Xiu Pei; Mohd Noor, Azura

    2015-06-02

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. It can cause acute febrile illness in human and is a major health problem. Studies in human brucellosis in Malaysia is limited and so far no genotyping studies has been done on Brucella isolates. The aim of the study was to determine the genetic diversity among Brucella species isolated from human brucellosis, obtained over a 6-year period (2009-2014). In this study, the genotypic characteristics of 43 human Brucella melitensis isolates were analysed using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) which consisted of eight minisatellite loci (panel 1) and eight microsatellite loci; panels 2A (3 microsatellite loci) and panel 2B (5 microsatellite loci). Two human Brucella suis isolates were also investigated using the MLVA assay. Using panel 1 (MLVA8), two genotypes namely genotype 43 and 44 were obtained from the 43 B. melitensis isolates. Using the combination of panels 1 and 2A loci (MLVA11), two genotypes were obtained while using the complete panels 1, 2A and 2B, nine genotypes were obtained. The polymorphisms in using the complete panels (MLVA16) were observed in three loci from panel 2B, which showed a diversity index higher than 0.17. All B. melitensis isolates were closely related to the East Mediterranean group. For B. suis isolates, only genotype 6 and genotype 33 were obtained using panel 1 and MLVA11 respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a low genetic diversity among B. melitensis and B. suis isolates from human patients. Based on the MLVA16 assay, B. melitensis belonging to the East Mediterranean group is responsible for the vast majority of Brucella infections in our Malaysian patients. To our knowledge, this is the first genotyping study of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

  14. [Occurrence of Giardia species and genotypes in humans and animals in Wielkopolska region, Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarczyk, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Giardia is the most common intestinal protozoan parasite found in humans and animals worldwide. Although it has been known for three hundred years, the nomenclature, taxonomy, host specificity, and pathogenicity of Giardia still arouse numerous controversies and ambiguities. Giardia is classified into six species, that are characterised by various ranges of hosts. The most dubious species is G. intestinalis, which includes a dozen or so genotypes, and only two of them (genotype A and B) have wide ranges of hosts, including humans. Moreover, in some genotype assemblages of G. intestinalis certain subgenotypes were distinguished and it was proven that in the same host species various subgenotypes of this parasite may occur. Bearing in mind the significant genetic heterogeneity of G. intestinalis and the fact that various genotypes and subgenotypes of this parasite are characterised by the broad or narrow host specificity, the data concerning the frequency of giardiosis occurrence are insufficient. It is necessary to use molecular biology techniques in order to define the genotype and/or the subgenotype of G. intestinalis that are found in humans and in certain animal species. Furthermore, since more and more pieces of evidence connected with a possibility of the sexual recombination of Giardia are gathered, it is unknown if genotypes and subgenotypes of this parasite are stable in time. The aim of this thesis was to define the frequency of Giardia occurrence in humans and animals in Wielkopolska region, to identify species and genotypes of Giardia that occur in humans and animals, as well as to obtain an axenic culture of the chosen isolates of Giardia from animals and to compare the sequence of the beta-giardin gene fragment obtained from the DNA isolated from cysts and trophozoites in order to check if the axenisation of G. intestinalis leads to the selection of genotypes or if Giardia genotypes are stable in time. Altogether, 2183 faecal samples were examined for

  15. Identification of human DNA in forensic evidence by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a colorimetric gold nanoparticle hybridization probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watthanapanpituck, Khanistha; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Chu, Eric; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2014-11-01

    A DNA test based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric gold nanoparticle (AuNP) hybridization probe to detect the presence of human DNA in forensic evidence was developed. The LAMP primer set targeted eight regions of the human cytochrome b, and its specificity was verified against the DNA of 11 animal species, which included animals closely related to humans, such as chimpanzee and orangutan. By using the AuNP probe, sequence-specific LAMP product could be detected and the test result could be visualized through the change in color. The limit of detection was demonstrated with reproducibility to be as low as 718 fg of genomic DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 100 plasmid DNA copies containing the cytochrome b DNA target region. A simple DNA extraction method for the commonly found forensic biological samples was also devised to streamline the test process. This LAMP-AuNP human DNA test showed to be a robust, specific, and cost-effective tool for the forensic identification of human specimens without requiring sophisticated laboratory instruments.

  16. Electronic-nose applications in forensic science and for analysis of volatile biomarkers in the human breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    AD Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The application of electronic-nose (E-nose) technologies in forensic science is a recent new development following a long history of progress in the development of diverse applications in the related biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. Data from forensic analyses must satisfy the needs and requirements of both the scientific and legal communities. The type of data...

  17. Comparative transcriptional analysis of human macrophages exposed to animal and human isolates of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis with diverse genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiwala, Alifiya S; Janagama, Harish K; Paustian, Michael L; Zhu, Xiaochun; Bannantine, John P; Kapur, Vivek; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2006-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in animals and has been hypothesized to be associated with Crohn's disease in humans. Recently, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates recovered from Crohn's disease patients were shown to have limited diversity, implying the existence of human disease-associated genotypes and strain sharing with animals (A. H. Ghadiali et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 42:5345-5348, 2004). To explore whether these genotypic differences or similarities among human and animal isolates translated to functionally significant attributes such as variance in host preference and/or difference in magnitude of infections, we performed a global scale analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates that were representative of different genotypes and host species using DNA microarrays. Genome-wide characterization of the transcriptional changes was carried out using a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) in response to different genotypes of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates recovered from various hosts. We identified several differentially expressed genes during early intracellular infection, including those involved in common canonical pathways such as NF-kappaB, interleukin-6 (IL-6), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase signaling, as well as genes involved in T helper type 1 (Th1) responses (such as CCL5 ligand) and those that encode several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine receptors. The cattle and human isolates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, regardless of their short sequence repeat (SSR) genotype, induced similar global gene expression patterns in THP-1 cells. They differentially regulated genes necessary for cell survival without causing major alterations in proinflammatory genes. In contrast, the sheep isolates representing diverse SSR genotypes closely resembled the global gene expression pattern of an M

  18. Genotypic prevalence of human papillomavirus infection during normal pregnancy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hwan; Park, Joong Shin; Norwitz, Errol R; Park, Jeong Woo; Kim, Sun Min; Lee, Seung Mi; Park, Chan-Wook; Kim, Byoung Jae; Koo, Ja Nam; Oh, Ig Hwan; Song, Yong Sang

    2014-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary factor in most cases of cervical cancer, but malignant transformation requires the presence of additional cofactors such as pregnancy. Little is known about the effect of pregnancy on genital HPV carriage. We therefore analyzed the prevalence and genotypic patterns of genital HPV infections in normal pregnancies. The prevalence of HPV infection was measured in 960 consecutive normal pregnant or post-partum women by HPV-DNA chip analysis of cervical swabs. Data were analyzed by trimester and adjusted for sociodemographic, reproductive and reported sexual history. The overall prevalence of HPV infection in the population was 24.3%. High-risk HPV genotypes were detected in 68.2% of infected subjects, including HPV 16 (18.7%), 39 (16.4%), 53 (10.1%), and 56 (9.4%). High-risk HPV genotypes were significantly more prevalent in the second trimester (23.8%) compared with the other periods (first trimester, 13.2%; third trimester, 17.4%; post-partum, 15.1%; P = 0.010). However, the high-risk HPV genotypes 16 or 18 were detected most frequently in the third trimester (7.2%) as compared to the other periods (first trimester, 2.9%; second trimester, 5.2%; post-partum, 2.1%; P = 0.03). After adjusting for confounding variables, overall HPV infection (odds ratio = 1.84, 95% confidence interval = 1.24-2.75) and high-risk HPV genotypes (odds ratio = 1.94, 95% confidence interval = 1.23-3.05) were significantly more common in the second trimester. The second trimester may be the most vulnerable period in high-risk HPV infections, which necessitates future investigations. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Distribution of Human Papillomavirus 52 and 58 Genotypes, and Their Expression of p16 and p53 in Cervical Neoplasia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Tae Eun; Kim, Hwal Woong; Lee, Kyung Eun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) 52 and 58 genotypes among women residing in Busan, and the expression of p16 and p53 proteins in cervical neoplasia with HPV 52 and 58 infections...

  20. Forensic pedology, forensic geology, forensic geoscience, geoforensics and soil forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffell, Alastair

    2010-10-10

    We now have a confusing set of five commonly used terms for the application of Earth evidence in forensic science. This confusion is resulting in Earth scientists who use these methods mentioning different terms, sometimes for the same type of study. Likewise, forensic scientists, police/law enforcement officers and those employed by courts of law are becoming confused as to what each term means. A nomenclatural framework (based on the first use of each term) is proposed to encourage consistency in the use of terminology. Generally, the number of Earth science applications has grown through time, from soil and sediment analysis to remote sensing and GIS. The issue of where forensic biology and microbiology sits with these uses of Earth evidence is considered.

  1. Genomic applications in forensic medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    and the quality of the sequences has reached a level where NGS is used in clinical diagnostics of humans. Forensic genetic laboratories have also explored NGS technologies and especially recently, there has been a small explosion in the number of scientific articles and presentations at conferences with forensic...... sequence information may aid mixture interpretation and will increase the statistical weight of the evidence. In this chapter, we provide an overview on conventional DNA diagnostics and the possible applications of single cell sequencing and NGS in forensic medicine....

  2. Aplicaciones de la técnica de aproximación facial forense en la identificación humana individual Usefulness of technique of forensic facial approximation in the individual human identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Serrulla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Valorar el interés y la utilidad de la técnica de aproximación facial forense en la identificación humana individual. Material: Tres esqueletos hallados en contexto arqueológico de cronología situada entre los siglos III y VII. Técnica aplicada sobre restos humanos carbonizados sin identificación. Métodos: Elaboración del croquis antropológico mediante fotografía métrica, método Gerasimov (1955 de reconstrucción del perfil nasal, técnica de Stephan de posicionamiento de los ojos y boca y estimación de las profundidades de partes blandas a partir de la base de datos de De Greef (2006. Obtención de un prototipo de cráneo en polirresina por estereolitografía a partir de las imágenes DICOM obtenidas del escaneado convencional del cráneo. Trabajo artístico en arcilla y pasta de modelar con aplicaciones de pinturas diversas para realizar una escultura en 3D. Las primeras fases de la técnica se han aplicado al caso de la aparición de un cadáver carbonizado sin muestra indubitada de ADN. Generamos varias imágenes en 2D para su distribución por los medios de comunicación. Resultados: La técnica de aproximación facial nos ha permitido acercarnos a conocer el rostro de algunas personas que habitaron A Coruña hace 1600 años. Su aplicación con fines forenses nos ha permitido excluir dos personas desaparecidas pero no ha permitido por el momento identificar la persona fallecida. Conclusiones: Creemos que la técnica de aproximación facial simplificada para imágenes 2D ha demostrado ser una herramienta útil para la identificación humana individual en casos seleccionados.Aims: To assess interest and usefulness of technique of forensic facial approximation in the individual human identification. Material: From three skeletons found in archaeological context with chronology between III to VII century. We have applicated this technique in a case of human remains burned. Methods: We have made the anthropological

  3. Geoethics and Forensic Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Laurance

    2017-04-01

    is required. However, it draws attention to some of the relevant geoethical issues within forensic geology and forensic geoscience. This paper also highlights the need for the development of a set of resources; references and guidelines, standards and protocols, a code of conduct (including for example integrity, accountability, honesty, professional fairness, courtesy, trustworthiness), data sharing and information transparency, education and training, multi-disciplinary collaboration, development of research, fair debate, evaluating uncertainty and risk, regulation and accreditation, effective communication and diplomacy, attendance at crime scenes, presenting evidence in courts of law, dealing with the media and elimination of potential bias. The uptake of Forensic Geoscience brings with it considerable challenges arising from the direct and often very sensitive human interactions. By developing this ethical component to the work that the IUGS-IFG group does, combines technical approaches with sensitive solutions, and also in parallel helps define an ethical framework for forensic geoscientists' research and practice in addressing these challenges.

  4. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations

  5. Genotype profiles of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates recovered from animals, commercial milk, and human beings in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S V; Sohal, J S; Singh, P K; Singh, A V

    2009-09-01

    To understand the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) isolates recovered from domestic and wild ruminants, commercial milk, and human beings in North India. Genotyping of MAP isolates (N=117) recovered from animals, commercial milk, and human beings in different regions of North India between 1998 and 2007 was carried out using IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and short sequence repeat (SSR) typing (G and GGT repeat loci). Of the 117 MAP isolates recovered from North India, bison-type was the predominant (83.8%) genotype followed by cattle-type (16.2%). Bison-type was the exclusive genotype recovered from goats, sheep, buffaloes, and blue bulls. However, both bison-type and cattle-type genotypes were recovered from cattle, humans, and commercial bovine milk samples. The relative distribution of the two genotypes was different in the different regions. Bison-type was the major genotype at the Central Institute for Research on Goats (CIRG), Akos, Ajmer, and Mathura, whereas, cattle-type was the major genotype from New Delhi and Agra. SSR typing of these isolates revealed that all MAP bison-type isolates had an identical profile (7g4ggt) with respect to G and GGT repeat SSR loci. In this study the sheep-type genotype was not found in North India. This study is the first from India to report the presence of two kinds of MAP genotypes (cattle-type and bison-type). However, non-reporting of the sheep-type genotype may not mean that it is absent in North India; the use of multiple culture media to recover MAP from clinical samples for future investigations is advised.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA and STR analyses for human DNA from maggots crop contents: a forensic entomology case from central-southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Cai, J F; Guo, Y D; Xiong, F; Zhang, L; Feng, H; Meng, F M; Fu, Y; Li, J B; Chen, Y Q

    2011-08-01

    Insect larvae and adult insects found on human corpses can provide important forensic evidence however it is useful to be able to prove evidence of association. Without this, it could be claimed that the insect evidence was a contaminant or had been planted on the body. This paper describes how mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and STR analysis of the crop contents of larvae of the blowfly Aldrichina grahami collected from separated body parts was used to provide evidence of association.

  7. Biomek®-3000 and GenPlex in Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Hansen, Anders Johannes

      SNP genotyping provides a supplement for conventional STR-based kits currently used for human identification. GenPlex (Applied Biosystems) is a SNP genotyping kit based on a multiplex of 48 informative, autosomal SNPs from the SNPforID Consortium. Our objective was to setup, implement and valid...... extension system. Full concordance of the results was obtained in all but one sample.   The results demonstrate that the Biomek-3000 can perform a series of complex reactions leading to highly consistent forensic genetic SNP typing results....

  8. Use of DNA technology in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; de Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira; de Oliveira, Fernando Toledo; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2007-06-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring to the main studies on Forensic Dentistry that involve the use of DNA for human identification, and makes an overview of the evolution of this technology in the last years, highlighting the importance of molecular biology in forensic sciences.

  9. Forensic microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    The field of forensic microbiology is fairly new and still evolving. With a threat of bioterror and biocrime, the rapid identification and subtyping of infectious agents is of upmost importance. Microbial genetic analysis is a valuable tool in this arena. The cost to sequence a microbial genome has fallen dramatically in recent years making this method more widely available. Surveillance and vigilance are important as is further research. The United States Department of Homeland Security established the Bioforensics Analysis Center to become the foremost U.S. biodefense research institution involved with bioforensics. Many countries are better prepared for biologic events than ever before, but more work is needed. Most medical laboratory scientists are not familiar with forensic principles or testifying in court. Demonstrating chain of custody and quality assurance are critical so that test results will be admissible in a court of law. The Scientific Working Group on Microbial Genetics and Forensics has published guidelines for forensic microbiology laboratories. Incorporating these guidelines help to provide test results that are useful in legal proceedings. If a laboratory scientist suspects bioterror or biocrime, or other legal case, law enforcement agents must be notified and diagnostic samples preserved. Additional sample testing might be necessary in court cases.

  10. Characterisation of human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes in the Azorean population, Terceira island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Fernando

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus detection is very important for the evaluation of prevention strategies in cervical cancer. In the Azorean population, the virus prevalence has never been studied, and there is no data available to preview a successful outcome with HPV vaccination. In this article, our objective is to characterise the HPV genotypes in Terceira Island, contributing for the epidemiological knowledge on the virus infection. Results Cervical samples were collected from 289 women aged 16–81 in the Gynaecological Outpatient Clinic of the Hospital de Santo Espírito de Angra do Heroísmo (HSEAH. HPV DNA was amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction using the general consensus primers PGMYO9/PGMY11. Commercially available Papillomavirus Clinical Arrays® kits (Genomica were used to perform HPV genotyping. 30 women were HPV positive, with a median age of 41 years old. Our results show that the overall HPV prevalence was 10.49%. Seventeen genotypes were identified, including 58.82% high risk, 17.65% low risk and 23.53% undetermined risk. Conclusion Unlike other epidemiological studies, HPV31 was the most frequent type (26.67% in Terceira Island, followed by HPV16 (10.00%, HPV51, HPV53, HPV70 and HPV82 (6.67%. Further studies are needed to investigate if the HPV types found in our population are associated with the risk of progression to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or cervical cancer.

  11. Human papillomavirus genotyping using an automated film-based chip array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erali, Maria; Pattison, David C; Wittwer, Carl T; Petti, Cathy A

    2009-09-01

    The INFINITI HPV-QUAD assay is a commercially available genotyping platform for human papillomavirus (HPV) that uses multiplex PCR, followed by automated processing for primer extension, hybridization, and detection. The analytical performance of the HPV-QUAD assay was evaluated using liquid cervical cytology specimens, and the results were compared with those results obtained using the digene High-Risk HPV hc2 Test (HC2). The specimen types included Surepath and PreservCyt transport media, as well as residual SurePath and HC2 transport media from the HC2 assay. The overall concordance of positive and negative results following the resolution of indeterminate and intermediate results was 83% among the 197 specimens tested. HC2 positive (+) and HPV-QUAD negative (-) results were noted in 24 specimens that were shown by real-time PCR and sequence analysis to contain no HPV, HPV types that were cross-reactive in the HC2 assay, or low virus levels. Conversely, HC2 (-) and HPV-QUAD (+) results were noted in four specimens and were subsequently attributed to cross-contamination. The most common HPV types to be identified in this study were HPV16, HPV18, HPV52/58, and HPV39/56. We show that the HPV-QUAD assay is a user friendly, automated system for the identification of distinct HPV genotypes. Based on its analytical performance, future studies with this platform are warranted to assess its clinical utility for HPV detection and genotyping.

  12. Forensic entomology in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, J; Krettek, R; Niess, C; Zehner, R; Bratzke, H

    2000-09-11

    Forensic entomology (FE) is increasingly gaining international recognition. In Germany, however, the development of FE has been stagnating, mainly because of the lack of cooperation between police, forensic medicine and entomology. In 1997 a co-operative research project 'Forensic Entomology' was started in Frankfurt/Main at the Center of Legal Medicine and the Research Institute Senckenberg. The aim of this project is to establish FE in Germany as a firmly integrated component of the securing of evidence from human cadavers in cases of suspected homicide. For this purpose we developed a forensic insect collecting kit, and policemen are educated for greater acceptance and better application of FE. The scientific programme focuses on the investigation of the insect succession on cadavers in urban and rural habitats. This also includes new indicator groups (e.g. parasitic wasps) for a more precise calculation of the late post mortem interval. Recently a DNA-based reliable and fast identification method especially for the immature stages of necrophagous insects became part of the project. Preliminary results are reported and two case studies presented.

  13. Human papillomavirus genotype-specific prevalence across the continuum of cervical neoplasia and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joste, Nancy E; Ronnett, Brigitte M; Hunt, William C; Pearse, Amanda; Langsfeld, Erika; Leete, Thomas; Jaramillo, MaryAnn; Stoler, Mark H; Castle, Philip E; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2015-01-01

    The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was established to measure the impact of cervical cancer prevention strategies in the United States. Before widespread human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine implementation, we established the baseline prevalence for a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes across the continuum of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. A population-based sample of 6,272 tissue specimens was tested for 37 HPV genotypes. The number of specimens tested within each diagnostic category was: 541 negative, 1,411 CIN grade 1 (CIN1), 2,226 CIN grade 2 (CIN2), and 2,094 CIN grade 3 (CIN3) or greater. Age-specific HPV prevalence was estimated within categories for HPV genotypes targeted by HPV vaccines. The combined prevalence of HPV genotypes included in the quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines increased from 15.3% and 29.3% in CIN1 to 58.4% and 83.7% in CIN3, respectively. Prevalence of HPV types included in both vaccines tended to decrease with increasing age for CIN1, CIN2, CIN3, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), most notably for CIN3 and SCC. The six most common HPV types in descending order of prevalence were HPV-16, -31, -52, -58, -33, and -39 for CIN3 and HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, -52, and -33 for invasive cancers. Health economic modeling of HPV vaccine impact should consider age-specific differences in HPV prevalence. Population-based HPV prevalence in CIN is not well described, but is requisite for longitudinal assessment of vaccine impact and to understand the effectiveness and performance of various cervical screening strategies in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution in 175 invasive cervical cancer cases from Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Invasive cervical cancer is the second most common malignant tumor affecting Brazilian women. Knowledge on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in invasive cervical cancer cases is crucial to guide the introduction and further evaluate the impact of new preventive strategies based on HPV. We aimed to provide updated comprehensive data about the HPV types’ distribution in patients with invasive cervical cancer. Methods Fresh tumor tissue samples of histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer were collected from 175 women attending two cancer reference hospitals from São Paulo State: ICESP and Hospital de Câncer de Barretos. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Diagnostics, Pleasanton,USA). Results 170 out of 172 valid samples (99%) were HPV DNA positive. The most frequent types were HPV16 (77.6%), HPV18 (12.3%), HPV31 (8.8%), HPV33 (7.1%) and HPV35 (5.9%). Most infections (75%) were caused by individual HPV types. Women with adenocarcinoma were not younger than those with squamous cell carcinoma, as well, as women infected with HPV33 were older than those infected by other HPV types. Some differences between results obtained in the two hospitals were observed: higher overall prevalence of HPV16, absence of single infection by HPV31 and HPV45 was verified in HC-Barretos in comparison to ICESP patients. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is one of the largest studies made with fresh tumor tissues of invasive cervical cancer cases in Brazil. This study depicted a distinct HPV genotype distribution between two centers that may reflect the local epidemiology of HPV transmission among these populations. Due to the impact of these findings on cervical cancer preventive strategies, extension of this investigation to routine screening populations is warranted. PMID:23883423

  15. Colorimetric Detection of 23 Human Papillomavirus Genotypes by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junxiao; Ma, Biao; Fang, Jiehong; Wang, Ye; He, Haizhen; Lin, Wei; Su, Wei; Zhang, Mingzhou

    2017-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is linked to cervical cancer. With the technological development of molecular biology and epidemiology, detection and treatment of HPV has become an important mean to prevent cervical cancer. A simple, rapid, and sensitive colorimetric loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method was established herein to detect 23 HPV genotypes. The sequences of the primers for the LAMP reaction were located in the L1 gene of the HPV genome. As it is a fluorescent dye, calcein was added before the reaction. The reaction was run under isothermal conditions at 65°C for 40 minutes. A positive reaction was indicated by a color change from yellow to fluorescent green. The fluorescence curve diagram represents the monitoring of real time quantitative instrument. 450 cervical swab samples from patients with single infections of 23 different HPV genotypes were examined to evaluate the specificity. The results revealed no cross-reaction with other HPV genotypes. A serial dilution of a cloned plasmid containing 23 HPV L1 gene sequences was employed to evaluate the sensitivity. Different HPV subtypes have different detection capability. The sensitivity of different HPV subtypes tested by LAMP assay was in the range from 1.0 x10 to 4.0 x 103 copies per reaction. The LAMP assay and the RDB (reverse dot blot) were compared for detecting and genotyping HPV among the 450 clinical samples. There were 385 (85.6%) and 375 (83.3%) HPV positive specimens detected by LAMP and RDB, respectively, as well as 306 (68.0%) and 296 (65.8%) for HR-HPV positive specimens. The agreement between the LAMP and RDB assays was 93.3% (κ = 0.75) for HPV positivity and 94.7% (κ = 0.88) for HR-HPV positivity. It was concluded that this colorimetric LAMP assay had potential application for the rapid screening of the HPV infection in resource-limited hospitals or rural clinics.

  16. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of the noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae: adaptation and pathogenesis in the human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Junkal; Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Moleres, Javier; Puig, Carmen; Bengoechea, José A

    2012-12-01

    The human respiratory tract contains a highly adapted microbiota including commensal and opportunistic pathogens. Noncapsulated or nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a human-restricted member of the normal airway microbiota in healthy carriers and an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. The duality of NTHi as a colonizer and as a symptomatic infectious agent is closely related to its adaptation to the host, which in turn greatly relies on the genetic plasticity of the bacterium and is facilitated by its condition as a natural competent. The variable genotype of NTHi accounts for its heterogeneous gene expression and variable phenotype, leading to differential host-pathogen interplay among isolates. Here we review our current knowledge of NTHi diversity in terms of genotype, gene expression, antigenic variation, and the phenotypes associated with colonization and pathogenesis. The potential benefits of NTHi diversity studies discussed herein include the unraveling of pathogenicity clues, the generation of tools to predict virulence from genomic data, and the exploitation of a unique natural system for the continuous monitoring of long-term bacterial evolution in human airways exposed to noxious agents. Finally, we highlight the challenge of monitoring both the pathogen and the host in longitudinal studies, and of applying comparative genomics to clarify the meaning of the vast NTHi genetic diversity and its translation to virulence phenotypes.

  17. Application of DNA-based methods in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jeffrey D; Stevens, Jamie R

    2008-01-01

    A forensic entomological investigation can benefit from a variety of widely practiced molecular genotyping methods. The most commonly used is DNA-based specimen identification. Other applications include the identification of insect gut contents and the characterization of the population genetic structure of a forensically important insect species. The proper application of these procedures demands that the analyst be technically expert. However, one must also be aware of the extensive list of standards and expectations that many legal systems have developed for forensic DNA analysis. We summarize the DNA techniques that are currently used in, or have been proposed for, forensic entomology and review established genetic analyses from other scientific fields that address questions similar to those in forensic entomology. We describe how accepted standards for forensic DNA practice and method validation are likely to apply to insect evidence used in a death or other forensic entomological investigation.

  18. Correlation between PFGE Groups and mrp/epf/sly Genotypes of Human Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasit Tharavichitkul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis infection is a severe zoonotic disease commonly found in Northern Thailand where people often consume raw pork and/or pig’s blood. The most frequent clinical presentations are meningitis, sepsis, and endocarditis with higher rate of mortality and hearing loss sequelae. To clarify the correlation between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of S. suis serotype 2, 62 patient and 4 healthy pig isolates from Northern Thailand were studied. By PFGE analysis, at 66% homology, most human isolates (69.4% and 1 pig isolate were in group A, whereas 14.5% of human isolates and 3 out of 4 pig isolates were in group D. According to mrp/epf/sly genotypes, 80.6% of human isolates were identified in mrp+epf−sly− and only 12.9% were in mrp−epf−sly+ genotypes; in contrast, 1 and 3 pig isolates were detected in these two genotypes, respectively. Interestingly, all isolates of S. suis serotype 2 classified in PFGE groups A, B, and E were set in mrp+epf−sly− genotypes. These data show a close correlation between PFGE groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of human S. suis serotype 2.

  19. Correlation between PFGE Groups and mrp/epf/sly Genotypes of Human Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharavichitkul, Prasit; Wongsawan, Kanreuthai; Takenami, Naoki; Pruksakorn, Sumalee; Fongcom, Achara; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Khanthawa, Banyong; Supajatura, Volaluk; Takai, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis infection is a severe zoonotic disease commonly found in Northern Thailand where people often consume raw pork and/or pig's blood. The most frequent clinical presentations are meningitis, sepsis, and endocarditis with higher rate of mortality and hearing loss sequelae. To clarify the correlation between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of S. suis serotype 2, 62 patient and 4 healthy pig isolates from Northern Thailand were studied. By PFGE analysis, at 66% homology, most human isolates (69.4%) and 1 pig isolate were in group A, whereas 14.5% of human isolates and 3 out of 4 pig isolates were in group D. According to mrp/epf/sly genotypes, 80.6% of human isolates were identified in mrp (+) epf (-) sly (-) and only 12.9% were in mrp (-) epf (-) sly (+) genotypes; in contrast, 1 and 3 pig isolates were detected in these two genotypes, respectively. Interestingly, all isolates of S. suis serotype 2 classified in PFGE groups A, B, and E were set in mrp (+) epf (-) sly (-) genotypes. These data show a close correlation between PFGE groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of human S. suis serotype 2.

  20. A two-step real-time PCR assay for quantitation and genotyping of human parvovirus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, E; Lahtinen, A; Eis-Hübinger, A M; Lappalainen, M; Hedman, K; Söderlund-Venermo, M

    2014-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) of the family Parvoviridae was discovered in a plasma sample of a patient with an undiagnosed acute infection in 2005. Currently, three PARV4 genotypes have been identified, however, with an unknown clinical significance. Interestingly, these genotypes seem to differ in epidemiology. In Northern Europe, USA and Asia, genotypes 1 and 2 have been found to occur mainly in persons with a history of injecting drug use or other parenteral exposure. In contrast, genotype 3 appears to be endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where it infects children and adults without such risk behaviour. In this study, a novel straightforward and cost-efficient molecular assay for both quantitation and genotyping of PARV4 DNA was developed. The two-step method first applies a single-probe pan-PARV4 qPCR for screening and quantitation of this relatively rare virus, and subsequently, only the positive samples undergo a real-time PCR-based multi-probe genotyping. The new qPCR-GT method is highly sensitive and specific regardless of the genotype, and thus being suitable for studying the clinical impact and occurrence of the different PARV4 genotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Forensic historiography: narratives and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukteinis, Albert M

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatrists function, in part, as historians who rely on patient narratives to help them understand presenting mental disorders and explain their causes. Forensic psychiatrists have been skeptical of using narratives, raising concerns about their lack of objectivity and potential for bias. They also have criticized narratives as being more performative than scientific. Recent authors, however, have pointed out that narratives may be helpful in forming forensic opinions and supporting oral testimony, while stressing that their use must be consistent with the ethics espoused by forensic psychiatry. This article reviews the role of narratives in understanding human events and the ubiquitous presence of narratives in the judicial process. It delves into the inescapability of using explicit or implicit narratives in the course of forensic practice, as well as how they may be meaningfully incorporated into evaluations and find expression alongside scientific principles.

  2. Modelling live forensic acquisition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, MM

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of a South African model for Live Forensic Acquisition - Liforac. The Liforac model is a comprehensive model that presents a range of aspects related to Live Forensic Acquisition. The model provides forensic...

  3. Forensically Important Blow Flies Chrysomya pinguis, C. villeneuvi, and Lucilia porphyrina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Case of Human Remains in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monum, Tawatchai; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk; Sukontason, Kom; Samerjai, Chutharat; Limsopatham, Kwankamol; Suwannayod, Suttida; Klong-Klaew, Tunwadee; Wannasan, Anchalee

    2017-02-01

    This is the first study to report Chrysomya pinguis (Walker) and Lucilia porphyrina (Walker) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as forensically important blow fly species from human cadavers in Thailand, in addition to Chrysomya villeneuvi (Patton) already known in Thailand. In 2016, a fully decomposed body of an unknown adult male was discovered in a high mountainous forest during winter in Chiang Mai province. The remains were infested heavily with thousands of blow fly larvae feeding simultaneously on them. Morphological identification of adults reared from the larvae, and molecular analysis based on sequencing of 1,247 bp partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (CO1) of the larvae and puparia, confirmed the above mentioned 3 species. The approving forensic fly evidence by molecular approach was described for the first time in Thailand. Moreover, neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis of the CO1 was performed to compare the relatedness of the species, thereby affirming the accuracy of identification. As species of entomofauna varies among cases in different geographic and climatic circumstances, C. pinguis and L. porphyrina were added to the list of Thai forensic entomology caseworks, including colonizers of human remains in open, high mountainous areas during winter. Further research should focus on these 3 species, for which no developmental data are currently available.

  4. Forensically Important Blow Flies Chrysomya pinguis, C. villeneuvi, and Lucilia porphyrina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Case of Human Remains in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monum, Tawatchai; Sukontason, Kabkaew L.; Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk; Sukontason, Kom; Samerjai, Chutharat; Limsopatham, Kwankamol; Suwannayod, Suttida; Klong-klaew, Tunwadee; Wannasan, Anchalee

    2017-01-01

    This is the first study to report Chrysomya pinguis (Walker) and Lucilia porphyrina (Walker) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as forensically important blow fly species from human cadavers in Thailand, in addition to Chrysomya villeneuvi (Patton) already known in Thailand. In 2016, a fully decomposed body of an unknown adult male was discovered in a high mountainous forest during winter in Chiang Mai province. The remains were infested heavily with thousands of blow fly larvae feeding simultaneously on them. Morphological identification of adults reared from the larvae, and molecular analysis based on sequencing of 1,247 bp partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (CO1) of the larvae and puparia, confirmed the above mentioned 3 species. The approving forensic fly evidence by molecular approach was described for the first time in Thailand. Moreover, neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis of the CO1 was performed to compare the relatedness of the species, thereby affirming the accuracy of identification. As species of entomofauna varies among cases in different geographic and climatic circumstances, C. pinguis and L. porphyrina were added to the list of Thai forensic entomology caseworks, including colonizers of human remains in open, high mountainous areas during winter. Further research should focus on these 3 species, for which no developmental data are currently available. PMID:28285509

  5. A high throughout assay for human papillomavirus genotypes with fluorescence polarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张菊; 闫小君; 孙建中; 陈中灿; 高艳娥; 白玉杰; 刘智广

    2003-01-01

    Objective To develop a simple, cheap, quick, accurate and practical method for a high throughout genotypes assay of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. Methods Crude DNA was extracted by a simplified proteinase K digesting method. HPV common conservative primers: GP5+/6+ system was used to amplify HPV DNA in 127 samples of condylomata acuminatum (CA) and cervical scrapes by PCR, then the PCR product was assayed using a template directing terminator incorporation (TDI) and genotypes were detected with fluorescence polarization (FP). Major HPVs type-specific probes (HPV6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35 and 58) designed by us were hybridized with the specific PCR products and a special fluorescent ddNTP terminator was directly added to the end of the probe under direction of specific PCR products. The results were measured with FP and compared with the results of the DNA sequence. Results Compared with the results of DNA sequencing, the results detected with fluorescence polarization were all correct. The proposed method could detect more than one type of HPV infection, but DNA sequencing method could not. The positive rate of HPV was 100% in 78 CA biopsies. Among them, there were 14 HPV double infections [HPV6B and 11 (9 cases), HPV11 and 16 (4), HPV11 and 18 (1)], 5 HPV triple infections [HPV6B,11 and 16 (4), HPV11,16 and 18 (1)], and one HPV quadruple infection (HPV6B, 11, 16 and 18). The positive rate of HPV was 77% in the 49 cervical scrapes. Six HPV double infections [HPV6B and 11 (2), HPV11 and 16 (1), HPV6B and 16 (1), HPV16 and 18 (1), HPV18 and 58 (1)], 3 HPV triple infections [HPV6B, 11 and 16 (2), HPV11,16 and 18 (1)] and one HPV quadruple infection (HPV6B,11,16 and 18) were detected in cervical cancer scrapes.Conclusions The proposed method allowed a high throughout, special, simple, rapid, automatic and economical detection of HPV-DNA genotyping without a use of labeling probes. It can detect multiple HPV genotype infection and will be and useful tool in HPV

  6. Limited protective effect of the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype on human immunodeficiency virus infection incidence in a cohort of patients with hemophilia and selection for genotypic X4 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K N; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Attermann, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype (which occurs in approximately 2% of the Scand......The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype (which occurs in approximately 2...

  7. Giant magnetoimpedance-based microchannel system for quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus type 16/18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Lei, Chong; Zhang, Ju; Li, Ding; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Bao, Chen-Chen; Hu, Heng-Yao; Chen, Xiang; Cui, Feng; Zhang, Shuang-Xi; Zhou, Yong; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16/18 is carried out by a specially designed giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) based microchannel system. Micropatterned soft magnetic ribbon exhibiting large GMI ratio serves as the biosensor element. HPV genotyping can be determined by the changes in GMI ratio in corresponding detection region after hybridization. The result shows that this system has great potential in future clinical diagnostics and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  8. FORENSIC AUDIT

    OpenAIRE

    Rozas Flores, Alan Errol; Facultad de Ciencias Contables, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The forensic audit is an audit specialist in obtaining evidence to turn them into tests, which are presented in the forum that is in the courts of justice, in order to check crime or settle legal disputes. Currently, major efforts are being carried out by compliance audits and comprehensive audits need to be retrofitted with legal research, to minimize the impunity that comes before economic and financial crimes, such as administrative corruption, corporate fraud and money laundering assets. ...

  9. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis genotyping of human Brucella isolates from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Selçuk; Ivanov, Ivan N; Durmaz, Riza; Bayraktar, Mehmet Refik; Ayaslioglu, Ergin; Uyanik, M Hamidullah; Aliskan, Hikmet; Yasar, Ekrem; Bayramoglu, Gülçin; Arslantürk, Ahmet; Vergnaud, Gilles; Kantardjiev, Todor V

    2011-09-01

    A multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to investigate the epidemiological relationship and genetic diversity among 162 human Brucella isolates collected from all geographic regions of Turkey in an 8-year period (2001 to 2008). The isolates were genotyped by using an MLVA assay developed in Orsay, France (MLVA-16(Orsay)) including eight minisatellite (panel 1) and eight microsatellite (panel 2, subdivided into 2A and 2B) markers. Panels 1 and 2A distinguish 14 genotypes; two of these represented 85% of the strains. Panel 2B displayed a very high discriminatory power. Three loci from panel 2B had diversity index values higher than 0.74. MLVA-16(Orsay) yielded 105 genotypes; 73 were represented by a unique isolate, and 32 included two to eight isolates. The isolates from different patients within the same outbreak or from the same patient before first-line therapy and after relapse showed identical genotypes. A number of MLVA genotypes appeared to be partially restricted to some geographic areas and displayed no annual variation, possibly reflecting persistence of genotypes in certain areas for a time span of at least a decade. This study, representing the first molecular typing results of human Brucella isolates from Turkey, indicated that Turkish human Brucella melitensis isolates were most closely related to the neighboring countries' isolates included in the East Mediterranean group.

  10. Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Genotyping of Human Brucella Isolates from Turkey▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Selçuk; Ivanov, Ivan N.; Durmaz, Rıza; Bayraktar, Mehmet Refik; Ayaşlıoğlu, Ergin; Uyanık, M. Hamidullah; Alışkan, Hikmet; Yaşar, Ekrem; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Arslantürk, Ahmet; Vergnaud, Gilles; Kantardjiev, Todor V.

    2011-01-01

    A multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to investigate the epidemiological relationship and genetic diversity among 162 human Brucella isolates collected from all geographic regions of Turkey in an 8-year period (2001 to 2008). The isolates were genotyped by using an MLVA assay developed in Orsay, France (MLVA-16Orsay) including eight minisatellite (panel 1) and eight microsatellite (panel 2, subdivided into 2A and 2B) markers. Panels 1 and 2A distinguish 14 genotypes; two of these represented 85% of the strains. Panel 2B displayed a very high discriminatory power. Three loci from panel 2B had diversity index values higher than 0.74. MLVA-16Orsay yielded 105 genotypes; 73 were represented by a unique isolate, and 32 included two to eight isolates. The isolates from different patients within the same outbreak or from the same patient before first-line therapy and after relapse showed identical genotypes. A number of MLVA genotypes appeared to be partially restricted to some geographic areas and displayed no annual variation, possibly reflecting persistence of genotypes in certain areas for a time span of at least a decade. This study, representing the first molecular typing results of human Brucella isolates from Turkey, indicated that Turkish human Brucella melitensis isolates were most closely related to the neighboring countries' isolates included in the East Mediterranean group. PMID:21795514

  11. Forensic geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffell, Alastair; McKinley, Jennifer

    2014-02-01

    Geomorphology plays a critical role in two areas of geoforensics: searching the land for surface or buried objects and sampling scenes of crime and control locations as evidence. Associated geoscience disciplines have substantial bodies of work dedicated to their relevance in forensic investigations, yet geomorphology (specifically landforms, their mapping and evolution, soils and relationship to geology and biogeography) have not had similar public exposure. This is strange considering how fundamental to legal enquiries the location of a crime and its evolution are, as this article will demonstrate. This work aims to redress the balance by showing how geomorphology featured in one of the earliest works on forensic science methods, and has continued to play a role in the sociology, archaeology, criminalistics and geoforensics of crime. Traditional landscape interpretation from aerial photography is used to demonstrate how a geomorphological approach saved police time in the search for a clandestine grave. The application geomorphology has in military/humanitarian geography and environmental/engineering forensics is briefly discussed as these are also regularly reviewed in courts of law.

  12. Dental Forensics: Bitemark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forensic odontology (dental forensics can provide useful evidence in both criminal and civil cases, and therefore remains a part of the wider discipline of forensic science. As an example from the toolbox of forensic odontology, the practice and experience on bitemark analysis is reviewed here in brief. The principle of using visible bitemarks in crime victims or in other objects as evidence is fundamentally based on the observation that the detailed pattern of dental imprints tend to be practically unique for each individual. Therefore, finding such an imprint as a bitemark can bear a strong testimony that it was produced by the individual that has the matching dental pattern. However, the comparison of the observed bitemark and the suspected set of teeth will necessarily require human interpretation, and this is not infallible. Both technical challenges in the bitemarks and human errors in the interpretation are possible. To minimise such errors and to maximise the value of bitemark analysis, dedicated procedures and protocols have been developed, and the personnel taking care of the analysis need to be properly trained. In principle the action within the discipline should be conducted as in evidence-based dentristy, i.e. accepted procedures should have known error rates. Because of the involvement of human interpretation, even personal performance statistics may be required from legal expert statements. The requirements have been introduced largely due to cases where false convictions based on bitemark analysishave been overturned after DNA analysis.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i2.76

  13. Towards a systems biology understanding of human health: interplay between genotype, environment and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiere, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has opened the door to the most exciting new era for the holistic system description of human health. It is now possible to study the underlying mechanisms of human health in relation to diet and other environmental factors such as drugs and toxic pollutants. Technological advances make it feasible to envisage that in the future personalized drug treatment and dietary advice and possibly tailored food products can be used for promoting optimal health on an individual basis, in relation to genotype and lifestyle. Life-Science research has in the past very much focused on diseases and how to reestablish human health after illness. Today, the role of food and nutrition in human health and especially prevention of illness is gaining recognition. Diseases of modern civilization, such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer have been shown to be effected by dietary patterns. The risk of disease is often associated with genetic polymorphisms, but the effect is dependent on dietary intake and nutritional status. To understand the link between diet and health, nutritional-research must cover a broad range of areas, from the molecular level to whole body studies. Therefore it provides an excellent example of integrative biology requiring a systems biology approach. The current state and implications of systems biology in the understanding of human health are reviewed. It becomes clear that a complete mechanistic description of the human organism is not yet possible. However, recent advances in systems biology provide a trajectory for future research in order to improve health of individuals and populations. Disease prevention through personalized nutrition will become more important as the obvious avenue of research in life sciences and more focus will need to be put upon those natural ways of disease prevention. In particular, the new discipline of nutrigenomics, which investigates how nutrients interact with humans, taking predetermined genetic

  14. ERIC-PCR Genotyping of Some Campylobacter jejuni Isolates of Chicken and Human Origin in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Heba A; El Hofy, Fatma I; Ammar, Ahmed M; Abd El Tawab, Ashraf A; Hefny, Ahmed A

    2015-12-01

    The public health importance of the genus Campylobacter is attributed to several species causing diarrhea in consumers. Poultry and their meat are considered the most important sources of human campylobacteriosis. In this study, 287 samples from chicken (131 cloacal swabs, 39 chicken skin, 78 chicken meat, and 39 cecal parts) obtained from retail outlets as well as 246 stool swabs from gastroenteritis patients were examined. A representative number of the biochemically identified Campylobacter jejuni isolates were identified by real-time PCR, confirming the identification of the isolates as C. jejuni. Genotyping of the examined isolates (n = 31) by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR) revealed a high discriminatory index of ERIC-PCR (D = 0.948), dividing C. jejuni isolates of chicken and human origins into 18 profiles and four clusters. The 18 profiles obtained indicated the heterogeneity of C. jejuni. Dendrogram analysis showed that four clusters were generated; all human isolates fell into clusters I and III. These observations further support the existence of a genetic relationship between human and poultry isolates examined in the present study. In conclusion, the results obtained support the speculation that poultry and poultry meat have an important role as sources of infection in the acquisition of Campylobacter infection in humans.

  15. Human endometrial side population cells exhibit genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of somatic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC.

  16. High risk human papillomavirus genotyping in clinical samples: evaluation of different commercial tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, F; Rollo, F; Brandi, R; Benevolo, M; Mariani, L; Cercato, M C; Vocaturo, A; Venuti, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the performance of several commercial human papillomavirus (HPV) tests in a cohort of 281 women. The hybrid capture II, the PreTect-HPV-Proofer, the linear array, and DR.HPVTMIVD were utilized to detect and type HPV in parallel with in-house PCR tests followed by direct automated sequencing or by sub-cloning and sequencing. The concordance levels along with other tests were evaluated with a Cohen's K value varying between 0.60 to 0.88, indicating good correlation with nearly perfect agreement between hybrid capture II, (HCII) and the linear array test. High sensitivity was recorded by the linear array and HCII with 100% (95% CI, 0.8021 to 1.0000) detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) III by both methods. Conversely, the PreTect-HPV-Proofer showed high specificity with 12% (95% CI, 0.7966 to 0.9163) positivity on normal samples. The genotyping analysis showed that agreement among tests was only low to moderate with great differences between different HPV types. Multiple infections were detected with poor concordance and sub-cloning assays revealed the presence of a lower number of HPV in comparison to the other methods. In summary, the use of different HPV tests applied to the same group of cervical smears may possibly lead to incongruent results, suggesting the need to standardize type-specific sensitivity of genotyping methods and the need to evaluate their accuracy in detecting multiple HPV infections. This would be a prerequisite for the use of genotyping assays in cervical cancer screening programs.

  17. Multimedia Forensics Is Not Computer Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, Rainer; Freiling, Felix C.; Gloe, Thomas; Kirchner, Matthias

    The recent popularity of research on topics of multimedia forensics justifies reflections on the definition of the field. This paper devises an ontology that structures forensic disciplines by their primary domain of evidence. In this sense, both multimedia forensics and computer forensics belong to the class of digital forensics, but they differ notably in the underlying observer model that defines the forensic investigator’s view on (parts of) reality, which itself is not fully cognizable. Important consequences on the reliability of probative facts emerge with regard to available counter-forensic techniques: while perfect concealment of traces is possible for computer forensics, this level of certainty cannot be expected for manipulations of sensor data. We cite concrete examples and refer to established techniques to support our arguments.

  18. In vitro evaluation of a passive radio frequency identification microchip implanted in human molars subjected to compression forces, for forensic purposes of human identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vitro behavior of a passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID microchip implanted in human molars subjected to compression forces to determine its technical and clinical viability. Materials and Methods: I n vitro experimental study to evaluate the physical behavior of a passive RFID microchip (VeriChip™ implanted in human molars through resin restoration (Filtek P90™ Silorane 3M-ESPE ® to determine the clinical and technical possibilities of the implant and the viability to withstand compression forces exerted by the stomatognathic system during mastication. Results: Through the ANOVA test, it was found that the teeth on which a microchip was implanted show great resistance to compressive forces. It was also evident that teeth with microchips implanted in Class V cavities are more resistant than those implanted in Class I cavities. Conclusions: Although microchip dimensions are big, requiring a sufficiently large cavity, from the biomechanical point of view it is plausible to implant a microchip in a Class V cavity employing restoration material based on resin for forensic purposes of human identification.

  19. Clinical Implications of Human Population Differences in Genome-wide Rates of Functional Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eTorkamani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of recent successes in the use of whole genome sequencing and sophisticated bioinformatics techniques to identify pathogenic DNA sequence variants responsible for individual idiopathic congenital conditions. However, the success of this identification process is heavily influenced by the ancestry or genetic background of a patient with an idiopathic condition. This is so because potential pathogenic variants in a patient’s genome must be contrasted with variants in a reference set of genomes made up of other individuals’ genomes of the same ancestry as the patient. We explored the effect of ignoring the ancestries of both an individual patient and the individuals used to construct reference genomes. We pursued this exploration in two major steps. We first considered variation in the per-genome number and rates likely functional derived (i.e., non-ancestral, based on the chimp genome single nucleotide variants and small indels in 52 individual whole human genomes sampled from 10 different global populations. We took advantage of a suite of computational and bioinformatics techniques to predict the functional effect of over 24 million genomic variants, both coding and non-coding, across these genomes. We found that the typical human genome harbors ~5.5-6.1 million total derived variants, of which ~12,000 are likely to have a functional effect (~5000 coding and ~7000 non-coding. We also found that the rates of functional genotypes per the total number of genotypes in individual whole genomes differ dramatically between human populations. We then created tables showing how the use of comparator or reference genome panels comprised of genomes from individuals that do not have the same ancestral background as a patient can negatively impact pathogenic variant identification. Our results have important implications for clinical sequencing initiatives.

  20. Genotypic characteristics of hydatid cysts isolated from humans in East Azerbaijan Province (2011-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Vahedi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cystic echinococcosis (CE is one of the important helminthic diseases of human and animals, which causes by Echinococcus granulosus. Canids are its definite and grazers especially sheep, and cattle, and also wild herbivores are its intermediate hosts. Human can also be accidentally infected by a parasite. This study aimed to investigate genotypes of the hydatid cysts isolated from hydatidosis patients in order to confine the source of the infection, 2013. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 55 paraffin blocks of identified hydatid cysts have been undergone genotyping using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. The ITS1 region of rDNA has been amplified using BD1 forward and 4s reverse primers. PCR products have been digested using HpaII and RsaI restriction endonucleases. RFLP products studied using gel electrophoresis. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows using the chi-square test. Results: About 29 (52.72%, 16 (29.1%, 3 (5.45%, 3 (5.45%, 1 (1.81%, 1 (1.81%, 1 (1.81% and 1 (1.81% out of 55 hydatid cysts were located in lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, pancreas, brain, and femore, respectively. The frequency of hydatidosis observed higher in patients from rural areas (P = 0.013; odds ratio = 0.599; 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 1.27. Based on RFLP results, the entire studied hydatid cysts identified as sheep strain (G1. Conclusion: According to the results of the present observation, it can be concluded that the majority of cases of human hydatidosis in East Azerbaijan Province are caused by sheep strain (G1 of E. granulosus, which indicates the sheep-doge cycle in the studied area.

  1. Bovine and equine forensic DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Goor, L.H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Animal forensic DNA analysis is being used for human criminal investigations (e.g traces from cats and dogs), wildlife management, breeding and food safety. The most common DNA markers used for such forensic casework are short tandem repeats (STR). Rules and guidelines concerning quality assurance (

  2. Microbes as forensic indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, G; Sarah, J P

    2012-09-01

    The forensic potential of microorganisms is becoming increasingly apparent as a consequence of advances in molecular sciences and genomics. This review discusses instances in which microbes, and in particular bacteria, can impact upon forensic investigations. There is increasing evidence that humans have an extremely diverse 'microbiome' that may prove useful in determining ethnicity, country of origin, and even personal identity. The human microbiome differs between regions of the body and may prove useful for determining the nature of stains such as those caused by saliva and vaginal fluid: it may even be possible to link the stains to the person responsible for them. Similarly, the composition of the microbiome present in a soil sample may prove a useful indicator of geographic origin or as a means of linking people, animals, or objects together or to a specific location. Microorganisms are important in the decay process and also influence the presence and concentration of alcohol, drugs, and other chemicals of forensic relevance. There is also a possibility that the entry of microorganisms into the body during the agonal period may prove useful for the diagnosis of drowning. The transmission of infectious diseases, and in particular sexually-transmitted diseases, can provide evidence linking a victim and a suspect. Microorganisms that cause fatal infections are not always identified at the time of death and may lead to the death being considered 'suspicious'. If a fatal infection can be linked to a hospital or medical procedure it can lead to prosecutions and therefore it is important to determine when and where an infection was acquired. Similarly, naturally acquired infections need to be distinguished from those that result from malicious transmission. Microorganisms can therefore provide evidence in many different forensic scenarios but most of the work is still at the experimental stage and there are therefore many opportunities for further research.

  3. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America.

  4. Prevalence and genotype identification of human JC virus in colon cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Paul Yann; Fung, Chiung-Yau; Chang, Fang-Pei; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chang, Deching

    2008-10-01

    Although JC virus (JCV), a human polyomavirus, has been detected in colon cancers, the association between JCV and colon cancer remains controversial. In Taiwan, the prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer patients has not been reported. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate JCV infection in colon cancers in Taiwan. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 22 colon cancer patients were examined in this study. Nested PCR was performed to detect viral genomic DNA. The product of the nested PCR flanking the JCV regulatory region was sequenced further. Viral large tumor protein, LT, and late capsid protein, VP1, were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nested PCR revealed JCV genomic DNA in 86.4% (19/22) of the colon cancer tissue samples. Both rearranged and archetypal genotypes of JCV were identified. Expression of JCV LT was positive in 63.6% (14/22) of the examined colon cancer tissue samples but not in any adjacent normal region. Expression of viral capsid protein VP1 was not detected in any of the tissues examined. The current study demonstrates that JCV genomic DNA was present in the examined colon cancer tissues. The genotypes of JCV in colon cancer tissues were also identified. Expression of viral early protein but not structural capsid protein was detected in the examined colon cancer tissues. Furthermore, a high prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer tissues in Taiwan was also demonstrated.

  5. Genotyping of human parechoviruses in Iranian young children with aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Naser, Hakimeh Mahdian; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Sohrabi, Amir; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Motamedirad, Mahdieh; Bahramali, Golnaz; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-12-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeV) are classified into 14 genotypes. HPeV1 and HPeV2 are the most prevalent genotypes in young children, which have been associated with mild to severe diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the involvement of HPeVs in aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness in Iran. Viral RNA was extracted from 148 cerebrospinal fluid samples from children meningitis and/or sepsis-like illness. Specific HPeV, HEV real-time PCR and HPeV typing were done to identify the infection rate of these viruses. HPeV and HEV were detected in 64 (43.24 %), 31 (20.94 %) of 148 patients with 10 (6.75 %) coinfection. VP1/VP3 junction region was successfully sequenced from 12 of the HPeV-positive specimens, and all of them were identified as HPeV1. HPeV was more prevalent than HEV in both aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness, so further studies are needed to understand the disease burden of HPeV infections, and clinical manifestations especially in specific illnesses of possible viral etiology. Direct detection of these viruses leads to reduce hospitalization and use of antibiotic, which are often followed by other complications in neonates and young children.

  6. Genotype distribution and the relative risk factors for human papillomavirus in Urumqi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhifang; Meng, Wei; DU, Rong; Zhu, Yuejie; Zhang, Yi; Ding, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV genotype distributions in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China. The related risk factors for high-risk HPV infection was also analyzed. A stratified cluster sampling method was used for the population-based cervical cancer screening of women aged 18-69 years in the Urumqi Saybagh district. Exfoliated cervical cell samples were collected for liquid-based cytology detection and HPV genotyping DNA microarrays. Education level, number of sexual partners, condom use and occupation were used in the multivariate analysis model. The HPV infection rate of women working in service industries was significantly higher compared with those of white-collar workers, community residents and migrant workers. The 35-44-year-old migrant worker group had the highest HPV infection rates among all of the groups in the three different age ranges. The number of marriages, education level, smoking history, number of abortions, use of condoms, number of sexual partners, number of sexual partners in the past five years and occupation were all associated with female HPV infection rate (P<0.05). The 35-44-year-old women were the age group with the highest HPV infection rate. The HPV infection rate of females in service industries was the highest. Education level and condom use were protective factors of HPV infection, while the number of sexual partners and occupation were risk factors for HPV infection.

  7. A New High-Throughput Approach to Genotype Ancient Human Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Nathalie M L; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Mélanie; Bennett, E Andrew; Gorgé, Olivier; Guimaraes, Silvia; Capelli, Nicolas; Le Bailly, Matthieu; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Human gastrointestinal parasites are good indicators for hygienic conditions and health status of past and present individuals and communities. While microscopic analysis of eggs in sediments of archeological sites often allows their taxonomic identification, this method is rarely effective at the species level, and requires both the survival of intact eggs and their proper identification. Genotyping via PCR-based approaches has the potential to achieve a precise species-level taxonomic determination. However, so far it has mostly been applied to individual eggs isolated from archeological samples. To increase the throughput and taxonomic accuracy, as well as reduce costs of genotyping methods, we adapted a PCR-based approach coupled with next-generation sequencing to perform precise taxonomic identification of parasitic helminths directly from archeological sediments. Our study of twenty-five 100 to 7,200 year-old archeological samples proved this to be a powerful, reliable and efficient approach for species determination even in the absence of preserved eggs, either as a stand-alone method or as a complement to microscopic studies.

  8. An efficient genotyping method for genome-modified animals and human cells generated with CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Yajie; Yu, Shanshan; Lu, Lu; Ding, Mingqin; Cheng, Jing; Song, Guoxu; Gao, Xing; Yao, Liangming; Fan, Dongdong; Meng, Shu; Zhang, Xuewen; Hu, Shengdi; Tian, Yong

    2014-09-19

    The rapid generation of various species and strains of laboratory animals using CRISPR/Cas9 technology has dramatically accelerated the interrogation of gene function in vivo. So far, the dominant approach for genotyping of genome-modified animals has been the T7E1 endonuclease cleavage assay. Here, we present a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-based (PAGE) method to genotype mice harboring different types of indel mutations. We developed 6 strains of genome-modified mice using CRISPR/Cas9 system, and utilized this approach to genotype mice from F0 to F2 generation, which included single and multiplexed genome-modified mice. We also determined the maximal detection sensitivity for detecting mosaic DNA using PAGE-based assay as 0.5%. We further applied PAGE-based genotyping approach to detect CRISPR/Cas9-mediated on- and off-target effect in human 293T and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Thus, PAGE-based genotyping approach meets the rapidly increasing demand for genotyping of the fast-growing number of genome-modified animals and human cell lines created using CRISPR/Cas9 system or other nuclease systems such as TALEN or ZFN.

  9. Forensic entomology: a template for forensic acarology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bryan

    2009-10-01

    Insects are used in a variety of ways in forensic science and the developing area of forensic acarology may have a similar range of potential. This short account summarises the main ways in which entomology currently contributes to forensic science and discusses to what extent acarology might also contribute in these areas.

  10. The mouse genome database: genotypes, phenotypes, and models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD's catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations.

  11. Hepatitis B virus genotype G: prevalence and impact in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Doan Y; Balko, Jody; Attar, Nahid; Neak, Enayet; Yuan, He-Jun; Lee, William M; Jain, Mamta K

    2011-09-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HBV. This study examined the prevalence and association of HBV/G to liver fibrosis in co-infected patients. HBV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing of the HBV surface gene or Trugene® HBV 1.0 assay in 133 patients infected with HIV/HBV. Quantitative testing of HBV-DNA, HBeAg, and anti-HBe were performed using the Versant® HBV 3.0 (for DNA) and the ADVIA®Centaur assay. The non-invasive biomarkers Fib-4 and APRI were used to assess fibrosis stage. Genotype A was present in 103/133 (77%) of the cohort, genotype G in 18/133 (14%) with genotypes D in 8/133, (6%), F 2/133 (1.5%), and H 2/133 (1.5%). Genotype G was associated with hepatitis B e antigen-positivity and high HBV-DNA levels. Additionally, HBV/G (OR 8.25, 95% CI 2.3-29.6, P = 0.0012) was associated with advanced fibrosis score using Fib-4, whereas, being black was not (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05-0.07, P = 0.01). HBV/G in this population exhibited a different phenotype than expected for pure G genotypes raising the question of recombination or mixed infections. The frequent finding of HBV/G in co-infected patients and its association with more advanced fibrosis, suggests that this genotype leads to more rapid liver disease progression. Further studies are needed to understand why this genotype occurs more frequently and what impact it has on liver disease progression in patients with HBV/HIV.

  12. Limited protective effect of the CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32 genotype on human immunodeficiency virus infection incidence in a cohort of patients with hemophilia and selection for genotypic X4 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K. N.; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Attermann, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32 genotype (which occurs in ∼2% of the Scandinavian population...

  13. [Recent knowledge on the linkage of strain specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of human citomegalovirus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Human citomegalovirus (CMV) is a beta-herpesvirus able to establish lifelong persistent infections which usually remain asymptomatic. However, severe diseases may develop in immunocompromised subjects (e.g., AIDS patients and transplant recipients) and if acquired in utero. Circulating CMV clinical strains display genetic polymorphisms in multiple genes, which may be implicated in CMV-induced immunopathogenesis, as well as strain-specific tissue-tropism, viral spread in the host cells and virulence, finally determining the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CMV disease. Current literature report a number of studies regarding the main CMV polymorphic genes (UL55-gB, UL144, UL73-gN, UL74-gO), their diagnostic and therapeutic impact, their potential clinical relevance as prognostic markers. This paper aims to critically analyse the results of these studies and evaluate the linkage of strain-specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of CMV disease and their perspective implications.

  14. [Neurobiological determinism: questionable inferences on human freedom of choice and forensic criminal responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniok, F; Hardegger, J; Rossegger, A; Endrass, J

    2006-08-01

    Several authors argue that criminal behavior is generally caused by neurobiological deficits. Based on this neurobiological perspective of assumed causality, the concept of free will is questioned, and the theory of neurobiological determinism of all human behavior is put forward, thus maintaining that human beings are not responsible for their actions, and consequently the principle of guilt should be given up in criminal law. In this context the controversial debate on determinism and indeterminism, which has been held for centuries, has flared up anew, especially within the science of criminal law. When critically examining the current state of research, it becomes apparent that the results do not support the existence of a universally valid neurobiological causality of criminal behavior, nor a theory of an absolute neurobiological determinism. Neither is complete determination of all phenomena in the universe--as maintained--the logical conclusion of the principle of causality, nor is it empirically confirmed. Analyzed methodically, it cannot be falsified, and thus, as a theory which cannot be empirically tested, it represents a dogma against which plausible objections can be made. The criticism of the concept of free will, and even more so of human accountability and criminal responsibility, is not put forward in a valid way. The principle of relative determinism--the evaluation of the degree of determinism of personality factors potentially reducing criminal responsibility, which includes concrete observations and analysis of behavior--thus remains a central and cogent approach to the assessment of criminal responsibility. To sum up, the theories proposed by some authors on the complete neurobiological determinism of human behavior, and the subsequent impossibility of individual responsibility and guilt, reveal both methodical misconception and a lack of empirical foundation.

  15. Application of thermoresponsive HPLC to forensic toxicology: determination of barbiturates in human urine

    OpenAIRE

    Kanno, Sanae; Watanabe, Kanako; HIRANO, SEISHIRO; Yamagishi, Itaru; Gonmori, Kunio; Minakata, Kayoko; Suzuki, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the assays of five barbiturates in human urine using a new thermoresponsive polymer separation column, which is composed of N-isopropylacrylamide polymer. According to elevating the column temperature from 10 ℃ to 50 ℃, five barbiturates, such as metharbital, primidone, phenobarbital, mephobarbital and pentobarbital, became well separated by this method. Five barbiturates showed good linearity in the range of 0.2-10...

  16. Genotypic characterization of Staphylococcus aureus obtained from humans and bovine mastitis samples in India

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    K Prashanth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that also causes important infections in cattle and sheep. The present study aimed to test genetic diversity among strains of S. aureus isolated from cattle (n=34 and humans (n=22 by DNA typing. Materials and Methods: Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP is the genotyping tool used in the study. The presence of the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genes among these strain groups was also checked. Results: A dendrogram deduced from FAFLP showed that all the strains clustered into 10 groups (A-J with a relative genetic divergence of less than 8%. Sixty-seven percent of the isolates from bovine sources clustered together in two clades (A and H, while another major cluster with 13 isolates (59% (Cluster G had all strains from a human host. The remaining strains from both the hosts clustered independently into smaller clusters with the exception of two strains of human origin, which clustered along with a bovine cluster. Thirteen strains belonging to cluster G were highly clonal. About 77% of strains obtained from human infections were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, whereas only 29% of strains from bovine origin were MRSA. Only three strains from human origin showed PVL positive, while no strain from cattle had PVL genes. The complete absence of PVL genes in all the bovine strains in the study appears to be significant. Conclusions: FAFLP can be successfully applied to assess the genetic relationship of S. aureus isolates from different hosts. The study also provided the valuable epidemiological data on S. aureus from bovine sources in India, which is lacking.

  17. Human papillomavirus genotyping by Linear Array and Next-Generation Sequencing in cervical samples from Western Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Miramontes, María Guadalupe; Torres-Reyes, Luis Alberto; Alvarado-Ruíz, Liliana; Romero-Martínez, Salvador Angel; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Verenice; Balderas-Peña, Luz María Adriana; Vallejo-Ruíz, Verónica; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva Irene; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-10-06

    The Linear Array® (LA) genotyping test is one of the most used methodologies for Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping, in that it is able to detect 37 HPV genotypes and co-infections in the same sample. However, the assay is limited to a restricted number of HPV, and sequence variations in the detection region of the HPV probes could give false negatives results. Recently, 454 Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) technology has been efficiently used also for HPV genotyping; this methodology is based on massive sequencing of HPV fragments and is expected to be highly specific and sensitive. In this work, we studied HPV prevalence in cervixes of women in Western Mexico by LA and confirmed the genotypes found by NGS. Two hundred thirty three cervical samples from women Without cervical lesions (WCL, n = 48), with Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN I, n = 98), or with Cervical cancer (CC, n = 87) were recruited, DNA was extracted, and HPV positivity was determined by PCR amplification using PGMY09/11 primers. All HPV- positive samples were genotyped individually by LA. Additionally, pools of amplicons from the PGMY-PCR products were sequenced using 454 NGS technology. Results obtained by NGS were compared with those of LA for each group of samples. We identified 35 HPV genotypes, among which 30 were identified by both technologies; in addition, the HPV genotypes 32, 44, 74, 102 and 114 were detected by NGS. These latter genotypes, to our knowledge, have not been previously reported in Mexican population. Furthermore, we found that LA did not detect, in some diagnosis groups, certain HPV genotypes included in the test, such as 6, 11, 16, 26, 35, 51, 58, 68, 73, and 89, which indicates possible variations at the species level. There are HPV genotypes in Mexican population that cannot be detected by LA, which is, at present, the most complete commercial genotyping test. More studies are necessary to determine the impact of HPV-44, 74, 102 and 114 on the risk of

  18. Development of highly sensitive and specific mRNA multiplex system (XCYR1) for forensic human body fluids and tissues identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Xie, Jianhui; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Huaigu; Ping, Yuan; Chen, Liankang; Gu, Lihua; Hu, Wei; Bi, Gang; Ge, Jianye; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Ziqin

    2014-01-01

    The identification of human body fluids or tissues through mRNA-based profiling is very useful for forensic investigations. Previous studies have shown mRNA biomarkers are effective to identify the origin of biological samples. In this study, we selected 16 tissue specific biomarkers to evaluate their specificities and sensitivities for human body fluids and tissues identification, including porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), hemoglobin beta (HBB) and Glycophorin A (GLY) for circulatory blood, protamine 2 (PRM2) and transglutaminase 4 (TGM4) for semen, mucin 4 (MUC4) and human beta defensin 1(HBD1) for vaginal secretion, matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 11 (MMP7 and MMP11) for menstrual blood, keratin 4(KRT4) for oral mucosa, loricrin (LOR) and cystatin 6 (CST6) for skin, histatin 3(HTN3) for saliva, statherin (STATH) for nasal secretion, dermcidin (DCD) for sweat and uromodulin (UMOD) for urine. The above mentioned ten common forensic body fluids or tissues were used in the evaluation. Based on the evaluation, a reverse transcription (RT) PCR multiplex assay, XCYR1, which includes 12 biomarkers (i.e., HBB, GLY, HTN3, PRM2, KRT4, MMP11, MUC4, DCD, UMOD, MMP7, TGM4, and STATH) and 2 housekeeping genes [i.e., glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and 18SrRNA], was developed. This assay was further validated with real casework samples and mock samples (with both single source and mixture) and it was approved that XCYR1 is effective to identify common body fluids or tissues (i.e., circulatory blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretion, menstrual blood, oral mucosa, nasal secretion, sweat and urine) in forensic casework samples.

  19. Motorcycle accidents in forensic pathology. Human factors, and injury and crash tipologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Lanino

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the main human factors, related to motorcycle accidents, and the accident configuration and the lesive pattern. The present study considers the 200 two-wheel crashes occurred in Italy in the Province of Pavia between 1999 and 2001. For all cases a revision of the injured people’s interviews and their clinical records has been made. All the accidents of the survey have been examined considering the traumatic lesion abscribed to the accident to assess a direct causal link between human factors and the crash tipology and the injury pattern. Chi-square test was used to evaluate the relationship between the variables and a logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association of injury severity with some variables supposed to be predictive factors. Frontal-lateral impact collisions are about 6 times more likely to be caused by a traffic scan error of the other vehicle driver (no rider than other types of crashes (OR= 5,8; p < 0,0001; IC 95%: 2,875-11,736. Contusions-abrasions show the highest percentages in motorcyclists with no coverage worn (p < 0,001 and riders with no clothing have a higher risk to be severely injured than riders with coverage, but it is not statistically significant. Instead, there is not a statistical significant association between: rider’s gender, rider’s age, riding experience and accident configuration; damaged region of the helmet and cranium injury severity.

  20. Evaluation of palatal rugoscopy in dentulous and edentulous cases for human identification in forensic dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério José Scandiuzzi

    2014-03-01

    The search for identity is based on a set of characteristics, which defines the uniqueness of a person. Principles such as classificability, immutability, persistence, practicability and uniqueness must be considered when applying an identification technique. This study aimed to evaluate the use of palatal rugoscopy in dentulous and edentulous volunteers, with or without upper removable denture, for purposes of human identification. In this study 60 subjects were asked to give dental casts and photography of the upper dental arch, defined in the following groups: Group A (n = 30, edentulous patients with full upper removable dentures and Group B (n = 30, dentulous without upper removable partial denture. The rugoscopy analysis method used was Martins-dos-Santos classification, for checking the applicability and success in human identification. It was found that it is possible to use this technique and it has an application of 40% in the group A and 86.66% in the group B. In conclusion, the identification method by palatal rugoscopy is satisfactory for dentulous patients, however in cases of tooth loss and friction cases generated by prosthetic devices, the region of the palate lose its characteristics, but even then it is still possible to be applied.

  1. Forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummer, Olaf H

    2010-01-01

    Forensic toxicology has developed as a forensic science in recent years and is now widely used to assist in death investigations, in civil and criminal matters involving drug use, in drugs of abuse testing in correctional settings and custodial medicine, in road and workplace safety, in matters involving environmental pollution, as well as in sports doping. Drugs most commonly targeted include amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabis, cocaine and the opiates, but can be any other illicit substance or almost any over-the-counter or prescribed drug, as well as poisons available to the community. The discipline requires high level skills in analytical techniques with a solid knowledge of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Modern techniques rely heavily on immunoassay screening analyses and mass spectrometry (MS) for confirmatory analyses using either high-performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography as the separation technique. Tandem MS has become more and more popular compared to single-stage MS. It is essential that analytical systems are fully validated and fit for the purpose and the assay batches are monitored with quality controls. External proficiency programs monitor both the assay and the personnel performing the work. For a laboratory to perform optimally, it is vital that the circumstances and context of the case are known and the laboratory understands the limitations of the analytical systems used, including drug stability. Drugs and poisons can change concentration postmortem due to poor or unequal quality of blood and other specimens, anaerobic metabolism and redistribution. The latter provides the largest handicap in the interpretation of postmortem results.

  2. Forensic entomology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Jens; Krettek, Roman; Zehner, Richard

    Necrophagous insects are important in the decomposition of cadavers. The close association between insects and corpses and the use of insects in medicocriminal investigations is the subject of forensic entomology. The present paper reviews the historical background of this discipline, important postmortem processes, and discusses the scientific basis underlying attempts to determine the time interval since death. Using medical techniques, such as the measurement of body temperature or analysing livor and rigor mortis, time since death can only be accurately measured for the first two or three days after death. In contrast, by calculating the age of immature insect stages feeding on a corpse and analysing the necrophagous species present, postmortem intervals from the first day to several weeks can be estimated. These entomological methods may be hampered by difficulties associated with species identification, but modern DNA techniques are contributing to the rapid and authoritative identification of necrophagous insects. Other uses of entomological data include the toxicological examination of necrophagous larvae from a corpse to identify and estimate drugs and toxicants ingested by the person when alive and the proof of possible postmortem manipulations. Forensic entomology may even help in investigations dealing with people who are alive but in need of care, by revealing information about cases of neglect.

  3. Genetic diversity for grain Zn concentration in finger millet genotypes: Potential for improving human Zn nutrition

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    Ramegowda Yamunarani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly half of the world population suffers from micronutrient malnutrition, particularly Zn deficiency. It is important to understand genetic variation for uptake and translocation behaviors of Zn in relevant crop species to increase Zn concentration in edible parts. In the present study, genetic variation in grain Zn concentration of 319 finger millet genotypes was assessed. Large genetic variation was found among the genotypes, with concentrations ranging from 10 to 86 μg g− 1 grain. Uptake and translocation studies with Zn/65Zn application in 12 selected low-Zn genotypes showed wide variation in root uptake and shoot translocation, with genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 showing greater uptake and translocation. Genotypes GEC164 and GEC543 showed increased grain Zn concentration. Genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 also showed improved yield under Zn treatment. Appreciable variation in grain Zn concentration among finger millet genotypes found in this study offers opportunities to improve Zn nutrition through breeding.

  4. Approaching ethical, legal and social issues of emerging forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP) technologies comprehensively: Reply to ‘Forensic DNA phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes’ by Manfred Kayser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toom, V.; Wienroth, M.; M'charek, A.; Prainsack, B.; Williams, R.; Duster, T.; Heinemann, T.; Kruse, C.; Machado, H.; Murphy, E.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent special issue of the journal on new trends in forensic genetics, Manfred Kayser contributed a review of developments, opportunities and challenges of forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP). In his article he argues that FDP technologies - such as determining eye, hair and skin color - should be

  5. Approaching ethical, legal and social issues of emerging forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP) technologies comprehensively: Reply to ‘Forensic DNA phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes’ by Manfred Kayser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toom, V.; Wienroth, M.; M'charek, A.; Prainsack, B.; Williams, R.; Duster, T.; Heinemann, T.; Kruse, C.; Machado, H.; Murphy, E.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent special issue of the journal on new trends in forensic genetics, Manfred Kayser contributed a review of developments, opportunities and challenges of forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP). In his article he argues that FDP technologies - such as determining eye, hair and skin color - should be

  6. Publishing SNP genotypes of human embryonic stem cell lines: policy statement of the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppers, Bartha M; Isasi, Rosario; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lomax, Geoffrey; Morris, Clive; Murray, Thomas H; Lee, Eng Hin; Perry, Margery; Richardson, Genevra; Sipp, Douglas; Tanner, Klaus; Wahlström, Jan; de Wert, Guido; Zeng, Fanyi

    2011-09-01

    Novel methods and associated tools permitting individual identification in publicly accessible SNP databases have become a debatable issue. There is growing concern that current technical and ethical safeguards to protect the identities of donors could be insufficient. In the context of human embryonic stem cell research, there are no studies focusing on the probability that an hESC line donor could be identified by analyzing published SNP profiles and associated genotypic and phenotypic information. We present the International Stem Cell Forum (ISCF) Ethics Working Party's Policy Statement on "Publishing SNP Genotypes of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines (hESC)". The Statement prospectively addresses issues surrounding the publication of genotypic data and associated annotations of hESC lines in open access databases. It proposes a balanced approach between the goals of open science and data sharing with the respect for fundamental bioethical principles (autonomy, privacy, beneficence, justice and research merit and integrity).

  7. Circulation of human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes in women from Córdoba, Argentina, with squamous intraepithelial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Fernando Venezuela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV can induce a wide spectrum of squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL of varying severity. The aim of the present study was to establish the frequency of HPV infection and identify the genotypes circulating in women from Córdoba, Argentina, in relation to age and cytology. A total of 186 women, between 18 and 65 years old, with antecedents of SIL, underwent a pelvic examination and had cervical cells collected for cytology and HPV DNA detection. Ninety-six samples (51.6% were positive for HPV detection, and sixty-three (65.6% of them showed the presence of at least one HR-HPV. Low- and high-grade SIL showed significant association in patients younger than 35 years of age. We found 18 different genotypes, with a greater presence of HR-HPV. Genotypes 16 and 6 were the most frequent. Seven (7.3% multiple infections, 85.7% of which had at least one HR-HPV, were detected. The detection of a large number of different HPV genotypes is a warning sign. It is thus necessary to strengthen the monitoring of the circulation of high-risk genotypes, currently less prevalent in intraepithelial lesions, as a control measure for the possible impact of the implementation of vaccines against genotypes 16 and 18.

  8. Elimination of bioweapons agents from forensic samples during extraction of human DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbers, Jason; Wilkinson, Della; Hause, Christine C; Smith, Myron L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Laframboise, Denis; Wright, Kathryn E

    2014-11-01

    Collection of DNA for genetic profiling is a powerful means for the identification of individuals responsible for crimes and terrorist acts. Biologic hazards, such as bacteria, endospores, toxins, and viruses, could contaminate sites of terrorist activities and thus could be present in samples collected for profiling. The fate of these hazards during DNA isolation has not been thoroughly examined. Our goals were to determine whether the DNA extraction process used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police eliminates or neutralizes these agents and if not, to establish methods that render samples safe without compromising the human DNA. Our results show that bacteria, viruses, and toxins were reduced to undetectable levels during DNA extraction, but endospores remained viable. Filtration of samples after DNA isolation eliminated viable spores from the samples but left DNA intact. We also demonstrated that contamination of samples with some bacteria, endospores, and toxins for longer than 1 h compromised the ability to complete genetic profiling.

  9. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 genotypes in Kaposi\\\\\\'s sarcoma in Iran by using molecular technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shah Siah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Mediterranean region , Kaposi's sarcoma (KS has a high prevalence especially in patients with AIDS. Iran is located close to the Mediterranean region and the HIV prevalence is increasing in our country . In some stages, Kaposi's sarcoma is morphologically similar to other vascular tumors. Owing to the presence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 in all cases of Kaposi's sarcoma , detection of virus DNA by PCR method can help in the identification of non-diagnostic cases. Moreover, the prevalence of HHV-8 genotypes is different in various regions of the world and in different races. There are limited studies performed on the HHV-8 genotypes in Iranian population. Methods: Patients with Kaposi's sarcoma from 2001 to 2011 who refer to Tehran Razi Hospital were enrolled in this study. HHV-8 DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks and amplification of the virus genome was performed by PCR method . Finally, the target DNA fragment was used for sequencing and genotype determination. Results: PCR was performed on 53 cases. In 8 cases with suspicious morphology, PCR was negative and they were excluded from study. Of remaining 45 cases, 35 had positive PCR results, 7 had negative results and 3 had low PCR product. Samples from 28 cases that had positive PCR results, which were acceptable for genotyping, were chosen for sequencing. Twenty cases had genotype C, 7 cases had genotype A and one case was negative. The results are consistent with other studies in our geographical area. No correlation was found between the different microscopic stages and HHV-8 Genotypes. Conclusion: Since the HHV-8 is obtained in almost 100% of KS lesions and PCR s ensitivity in detection of the virus is close to 100 %, KS diagnosis can be confirmed in suspicious cases by detection of HHV-8 DNA on paraffin blocks. Moreover the prevalence of HHV-8 genotype was determined in Iran.

  10. Natural history of human papillomavirus infection in non-vaccinated young males: low clearance probability in high-risk genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T; Perletti, G; Meacci, F; Magri, V; Verze, P; Palmieri, A; Mazzoli, S; Santi, R; Nesi, G; Mirone, V; Bartoletti, R

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the clearance of type-specific genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in heterosexual, non-HPV-vaccinated males whose female partners were positive to HPV DNA tests. All consecutive men attending the same sexually transmitted diseases (STD) centre between January 2005 and December 2006 were considered for this study. All subjects (n = 1009) underwent a urologic visit and microbiological tests on first void, midstream urine and total ejaculate samples. One hundred and five patients were positive for HPV DNA (10.4 %; mean age: 34.8 ± 5.8 years) and consented to clinical examination and molecular diagnostic assays for HPV detection scheduled every 6 months (median surveillance period of 53.2 months). HPV genotypes were classified as high risk, probable high risk and low risk. HPV-positive samples which did not hybridise with any of the type-specific probes were referred to as positive non-genotypeable. At enrollment, the distribution of HPV genotypes was as follows: high-risk HPV (n = 37), probable high-risk HPV (n = 6), low-risk HPV (n = 23) and non-genotypeable HPV (n = 39). A high HPV genotype concordance between stable sexual partners emerged (kappa = 0.92; p probable high-risk HPV cases, 20/23 (86.9 %) low-risk HPV cases and 31/39 (79.5 %) non-genotypeable cases. The high-risk HPV genotypes showed the lowest rate and probability of viral clearance (p < 0.001). In our series, high-risk HPV infections were more likely to persist over time when compared with other HPV genotypes.

  11. Bone natural autofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy: Preliminary results of a novel useful tool to distinguish between forensic and ancient human skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Luigi; D'Anastasio, Ruggero; Guarnieri, Simone; Viciano, Joan; Mariggiò, Maria

    2017-03-01

    The fast, high-throughput distinction between palaeoanthropological/archaeological remains and recent forensic/clinical bone samples is of vital importance in the field of medico-legal science. In this paper, a novel dating method was developed using the autofluorescence of human bones and the confocal laser scanning microscope as the means to distinguish between archaeological and forensic anthropological skeletal findings. Human bones exhibit fluorescence, typically induced by natural antibiotics that are absorbed by collagen, and provide secondary, exogenous fluorophores. However, primary natural fluorescence (or autofluorescence) caused by enigmatic endogenous fluorophores is also present as a micro-phenomenon, whose nature is still obscure. Here, we show that the endogenous fluorophores are mucopolysaccharides of the Rouget-Neumann sheath and, more relevant, that the intensity of the natural fluorescence in human bone decreases in a relationship to the antiquity of the samples. These results suggest that the autofluorescence of bone is a promising technique for the assessment of skeletal remains that may be potentially of medico-legal interest. A larger study is proposed to confirm these findings and to create a predictive model between the autofluorescence intensity and the time since death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes associated with cervical and breast cancers in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein, Rassi; Behzad, Salehi; Tahar, Mohammadian; Azadeh, Nahavandi Araghi

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is a multi-step disease, and infection with a DNA virus could play a role in one or more of the steps in this pathogenic process. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agent of several cancers. In this study, we determined the prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV infection among Iranian patients with cervix lesions (CL) and breast cancer (BC). The study group consisted of postoperative tissues from patients diagnosed with cervix lesions and breast cancer. We analyzed 250 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 100 cervix lesions and 150 breast cancer samples. Verification of each cancer reported in a relative was sought through the pathology reports of the hospital records. Cervix lesions were collected from 100 patients with squamous metaplasia (SM, n=50), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CINI, n=18, CINII or III, n=8), and cervical carcinoma (CC, n=24). In this study we evaluated the prevalence of HPV by multiplex PCR in cervix lesions and breast cancer. For paraffin-embedded tissues, DNA extracted by the simple boiling method yielded higher proportions of successful gene amplification (99%) for b-actin gene. Overall prevalence of HPV infection was 6% in the SM group, 34.61% in the CIN group, 75% in the CC group, and 34.66% in the BC group. Furthermore, MY09/11 consensus PCR failed to detect 44 (55.69%) of all HPV infections and interestingly, the predominant genotype detected in all cancers was the oncogenic variant HPV16/18; about 34% of women aged 24 to 54 were infected with at least one type of HPV. Our results demonstrate that DNA derived from archival tissues that archived for less than 8 years could be used successfully for HPV genotyping by multiplex PCR. Infection with HPV was prevalent among Iranian women with CC and BC. The results indicate a likely causal role for high-risk HPV in CC and BC, and also offer the possibility of primary prevention of these cancers by vaccination against HPV in Iran.

  13. Prevalence and genotyping of high risk human papillomavirus in cervical cancer samples from Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqa, Abida; Zainab, Maidah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Parish, Joanna L

    2014-07-17

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is established as the cause of cervical carcinoma, therefore, high risk HPV detection may have prognostic significance for the women who are at increased risk of disease progression. The paucity of data on the incidence of cervical cancer in Pakistan makes it difficult to determine disease burden. Even less information is available regarding the prevalent HPV strains in cervical specimens collected from this region. Cervical cancer is a neglected disease in Pakistan in terms of screening, prevention, and vaccination. Identification and accurate genotyping of the virus burden in cancer specimens is important to inform intervention policies for future management of HPV associated disease and to potentially stratify patients dependent on HPV status. In this study, detection and genotyping of HPV types 16 and 18 from 77 cervical specimens were carried out. Consensus primers GP5+/GP6+, which detect 44 genital HPV types, and type specific primers (TS16 and TS18) were used in conjunction with newly designed type specific primers. Using a combination of these methods of detection, a total of 94.81% (95% CI ±4.95) of cervical lesions were positive for HPV. Single infections of HPV16 were detected in 24.68% (95% CI ±9.63) of total samples and HPV18 was found in 25.97% (95% CI ±9.79) samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of samples (40.26%, 95% CI ±10.95) was positive for both HPV16 and 18, indicating a higher incidence of co-infection than previously reported for similar ethnic regions. The HPV genotype of 3.90% of HPV positive samples remained undetected, although these samples were positive with the GP5+/GP6+ primer set indicating infection with an HPV type other than 16 or 18. These data indicate that the overall incidence of high risk HPV infection in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia specimens in Punjab

  14. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

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    Zeyi Deng

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC.HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER was examined by in situ hybridization.Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1% had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%. HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3% HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%. Among 146 (69.9% HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3% and 27 (18.5% contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9% showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2% HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3% of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002 and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061 independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155.Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zeyi; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Agena, Shinya; Pan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunlin; Yamashita, Yukashi; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC). HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER) was examined by in situ hybridization. Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1%) had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%). HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3%) HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%). Among 146 (69.9%) HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3%) and 27 (18.5%) contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9%) showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2%) HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3%) of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002) and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061) independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155). Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  16. Isolation and genotyping of viable Toxoplasma gondii from sheep and goats in Ethiopia destined for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhin, Endrias Zewdu; Abdurahaman, Mukarim; Tessema, Tesfaye Sisay; Tilahun, Getachew; Cox, Eric; Goddeeris, Bruno; Dorny, Pierre; De Craeye, Stephane; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Ajzenberg, Daniel

    2014-09-04

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects humans and a broad spectrum of warm-blooded vertebrates. The present study was undertaken with the objectives of isolation and determining the genotypes of T. gondii strains from sheep and goats slaughtered in East and West Shewa Zones of Oromia Regional State, Central Ethiopia. Hearts of 47 sheep and 44 goats that were seropositive in the Direct Agglutination Test (DAT) were bioassayed in mice. A multiplex PCR assay with 15 microsatellite markers was employed for genotyping of T. gondii isolates from sheep and goats. Viable T. gondii were isolated from 47 (51.65%) animals, 27 sheep and 20 goats. Most isolates caused sub-clinical infections in mice, however, 2 sheep and 1 goat isolates were mouse-virulent, killing mice between 19-27 days post-inoculation. The success of T. gondii isolation in mice increased significantly (P = 0.0001) with higher DAT antibody titers in sheep and goats. Genotyping revealed that 29 (87.88%) of the 33 isolates were Type II, 3 (9.09%) were Type III and 1 (3.03%) was atypical. Three strains (one type II, one type III, and the atypical genotype) were virulent for mice. T. gondii tissue cysts in sheep and goats slaughtered for human consumption are widespread. This is the first report on isolation and genotyping of T. gondii from sheep and goats of Ethiopia.

  17. Complex nature of SNP genotype effects on gene expression in primary human leucocytes

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    Dinesen Lotte C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association studies have been hugely successful in identifying disease risk variants, yet most variants do not lead to coding changes and how variants influence biological function is usually unknown. Methods We correlated gene expression and genetic variation in untouched primary leucocytes (n = 110 from individuals with celiac disease – a common condition with multiple risk variants identified. We compared our observations with an EBV-transformed HapMap B cell line dataset (n = 90, and performed a meta-analysis to increase power to detect non-tissue specific effects. Results In celiac peripheral blood, 2,315 SNP variants influenced gene expression at 765 different transcripts (cis expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs. 135 of the detected SNP-probe effects (reflecting 51 unique probes were also detected in a HapMap B cell line published dataset, all with effects in the same allelic direction. Overall gene expression differences within the two datasets predominantly explain the limited overlap in observed cis-eQTLs. Celiac associated risk variants from two regions, containing genes IL18RAP and CCR3, showed significant cis genotype-expression correlations in the peripheral blood but not in the B cell line datasets. We identified 14 genes where a SNP affected the expression of different probes within the same gene, but in opposite allelic directions. By incorporating genetic variation in co-expression analyses, functional relationships between genes can be more significantly detected. Conclusion In conclusion, the complex nature of genotypic effects in human populations makes the use of a relevant tissue, large datasets, and analysis of different exons essential to enable the identification of the function for many genetic risk variants in common diseases.

  18. Genotypes of human papilloma virus in Sudanese women with cervical pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobi Khater

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes among women with cervical lesion and in invasive cervical cancer is crucial to guide the introduction of prophylactic vaccines. There is no published data concerning HPV and cervical abnormalities in Sudan. This study aimed to define the prevalence of HPV and its subtypes in the cervical smears of women presenting with gynecological complains at Omdurman Military Hospital, Sudan. During the period between March 2003 and April 2004, 135 cervical smears collected from these women, were screened using cytological techniques, and analysed by PCR for (beta-globin and HPV DNA using gel electrophoresis and ELISA. Results Of these 135 smears, there were 94 (69.3% negative, 22 (16.3% positive for inflammation, 12(8.9 mild dyskaryosis, 5 (3.7 moderate dyskaryosis and 2 (1.8 severe dyskaryosis. There were 60.7% ß. globin positive samples for HPV indicating DNA integrity. HPV DNA was identified in three samples (2.2% by gel electrophoresis and. was positive in four samples (2.9% as single and multiple infections by PCR-ELISA. The high risk HPV types 16 and 58 were identified in one sample as a mixed infection. The low risk HPV types 40 and 42 were also found as a mixed infection in another patient. HPV types 58 and 42 were identified in the other two patients. Conclusion HPV type distribution in Sudan appears to differ from that in other countries. The HPV genotypes identified were not associated with cancer.

  19. A novel strategy for human papillomavirus detection and genotyping with SybrGreen and molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szuhai, K; Sandhaus, E; Kolkman-Uljee, SM; Lemaitre, M; Truffert, JC; Dirks, RW; Tanke, HJ; Fleuren, GJ; Schuuring, E; Raap, AK

    2001-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. For identification of the large number of different HPV types found in (pre)malignant lesions, a robust methodology is needed that combines general HPV detection with HPV genotyping. We have developed for

  20. A novel strategy for human papillomavirus detection and genotyping with SybrGreen and molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szuhai, K; Sandhaus, E; Kolkman-Uljee, SM; Lemaitre, M; Truffert, JC; Dirks, RW; Tanke, HJ; Fleuren, GJ; Schuuring, E; Raap, AK

    2001-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. For identification of the large number of different HPV types found in (pre)malignant lesions, a robust methodology is needed that combines general HPV detection with HPV genotyping. We have developed for fo

  1. Tracing the sources of human salmonellosis: a multi-model comparison of phenotyping and genotyping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Smid, Joost; Enserink, Remko; Franz, Eelco; Schouls, Leo; Heck, Max; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella source attribution is usually performed using frequency-matched models, such as the (modified) Dutch and Hald models, based on phenotyping data, i.e. serotyping, phage typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling. However, for practical and economic reasons, genotyping methods such as Multi-locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) are gradually replacing traditional phenotyping of salmonellas beyond the serovar level. As MLVA-based source attribution of human salmonellosis using frequency-matched models is problematic due to the high variability of the genetic targets investigated, other models need to be explored. Using a comprehensive data set from the Netherlands in 2005-2013, this study aimed at attributing sporadic and domestic cases of Salmonella Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Enteritidis to four putative food-producing animal sources (pigs, cattle, broilers, and layers/eggs) using the modified Dutch and Hald models (based on sero/phage typing data) in comparison with a widely applied population genetics model - the asymmetric island model (AIM) - supplied with MLVA data. This allowed us to compare model outcomes and to corroborate whether MLVA-based Salmonella source attribution using the AIM is able to provide sound, comparable results. All three models provided very similar results, confirming once more that most S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis cases are attributable to pigs and layers/eggs, respectively. We concluded that MLVA-based source attribution using the AIM is a feasible option, at least for S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis. Enough information seems to be contained in the MLVA profiles to trace the sources of human salmonellosis even in presence of imperfect temporal overlap between human and source isolates. Besides Salmonella, the AIM might also be applicable to other pathogens that do not always comply to clonal models. This would add further value to current surveillance

  2. Human keratin diseases: the increasing spectrum of disease and subtlety of the phenotype-genotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, A D; McLean, W H

    1999-05-01

    Keratins are obligate heterodimer proteins that form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. Keratins are tissue and differentiation specific and are expressed in pairs of types I and II proteins. The spectrum of inherited human keratin diseases has steadily increased since the causative role of mutations in the basal keratinocyte keratins 5 and 14 in epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was first reported in 1991. At the time of writing, mutations in 15 epithelial keratins and two trichocyte keratins have been associated with human diseases which include EBS, bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens, diffuse and focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, pachyonychia congenita and monilethrix. Mutations in extracutaneous keratins have been reported in oral white sponge naevus and Meesmann's corneal dystrophy. New subtleties of phenotype-genotype correlation are emerging within the keratin diseases with widely varying clinical presentations attributable to similar mutations within the same keratin. Mutations in keratin-associated proteins have recently been reported for the first time. This article reviews clinical, ultrastructural and molecular aspects of all the keratin diseases described to date and delineates potential future areas of research in this field.

  3. Human Platelet Antigen Genotyping and Expression of CD109 (Human Platelet Antigen 15 mRNA in Various Human Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Mee Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CD109 gene encodes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked glycoprotein found in a subset of platelets and endothelial cell, and human platelet antigen (HPA 15 is found on CD109. We evaluated the HPA genotype and/or the CD109 mRNA expression on two peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC, two peripheral bloods (PB, 12 granulocyte products, natural killer (NK-92, B-lymphocyte (CO88BV59-1, K-562 leukemia cell line, human embryonic stem cell (hESC, and human fibroblasts (HF. HPA genotyping was performed by SNaPshot assay and CD109 mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR with SYBR green and melting curve analysis. Genotype HPA-15a/-15a was found in PBSC#1 and two granulocyte products, and HPA-15a/-15b was found in PBSC#2, eight granulocyte products, NK-92, K-562, hESC, and HF, and HPA-15b/-15b was found in two granulocyte products. CD109 mRNA expression was highly increased in HF and increased in CD34+ and CD34− PBSCs and some granulocyte products, compared to the PB. However, the increase of expression level varied among the PBSC and granulocyte products. The CD109 mRNA expression of NK-92, K-562, hESC, and CO 88BV59-1 was not detected. HPA genotype was evaluated in various cells and the expression of CD109, which contains HPA 15, was different among cell lines and high in HF and PBSCs.

  4. American Academy of Forensic Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... College & University Listings FEPAC Accredited Programs Courses in Forensic Odontology Choosing a Career What is Forensic Science? What ... Legislative Corner Forensic Sciences Foundation American Society of Forensic Odontology Research Grants Academy Standards Board (ASB) Account Portal ...

  5. [Forensic pediatric autopsy and medical responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaud, Caroline; Mireau, Etienne; Durigon, Michel

    2005-06-01

    The integrity of the human body is an intangible human right acknowledged to persist after death. Violating the integrity of the human corpse is a penal act sanctioned by the 1994 version of the French Penal Code. There are only three exceptions: for science (medical autopsy), for public health (organ removal for graft), and for justice (forensic autopsy). The parents' written agreement is needed to perform a pediatric medical autopsy but not for a forensic autopsy. For the forensic pathologist, taking oath does not imply an authorization to override the precepts of humanity nor the Hippocratic Oath. The forensic pathologist remains subject to civil and penal law. This is why forensic pathologists have an obligation of excellence besides their obligation of means. A pediatric autopsy is a specific procedure compared with an adult autopsy and requires specific training. Forensic pathologists, like all pathologists, who does not have sufficient expertise should not perform pediatric autopsy but rather call in a qualified pediatric pathologist. Tissues or organs removed during a forensic autopsy can be used only for diagnostic purposes, and the parents' agreement must be obtained for any other use.

  6. Human papillomavirus infections in women seeking cervical Papanicolaou cytology of Durango, Mexico: prevalence and genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes-Romero Miguel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV infection in women from developing countries is an important public health problem. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalences of HPV infection and HPV genotypes in a female population of Durango City, Mexico. Also to determine whether any socio-demographic characteristic from the women associated with HPV infection exists. Methods Four hundred and ninety eight women seeking cervical Papanicolaou examination in three public Health Centers were examined for HPV infection. All women were tested for HPV DNA PCR by using HPV universal primers. In addition, all positive HPV DNA PCR samples were further analyzed for genotyping of HPV genotype 16, 18 and 33. Socio-demographic characteristics from each participant were also obtained. Results Twenty-four out of four hundred and ninety-eight (4.8% women were found infected by HPV. HPV genotype 16 was found in 18 out of the 24 (75% infected women. Two of them were also coinfected by HPV genotype 18 (8.3%. In the rest 6 PCR positive women, genotyping for HPV genotypes 16, 18 and 33 were negative. Conclusion The prevalence of HPV in women of Durango City is low; however, most infected women have high risk HPV genotype. The women who were studied showed low frequency of risk factors for HPV infection and this may explain the low prevalence of HPV infection. The high frequency of high risk HPV genotypes observed might explain the high rate of mortality for cervical cancer in our region.

  7. DNS in Computer Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Fowler Wright

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Domain Name Service (DNS is a critical core component of the global Internet and integral to the majority of corporate intranets. It provides resolution services between the human-readable name-based system addresses and the machine operable Internet Protocol (IP based addresses required for creating network level connections. Whilst structured as a globally dispersed resilient tree data structure, from the Global and Country Code Top Level Domains (gTLD/ccTLD down to the individual site and system leaf nodes, it is highly resilient although vulnerable to various attacks, exploits and systematic failures. This paper examines the history along with the rapid growth of DNS up to its current critical status. It then explores the often overlooked value of DNS query data; from packet traces, DNS cache data, and DNS logs, with its use in System Forensics and more frequently in Network Forensics, extrapolating examples and experiments that enhance knowledge.Continuing on, it details the common attacks that can be used directly against the DNS systems and services, before following on with the malicious uses of DNS in direct system attacks, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS, traditional Denial of Service (DOS attacks and malware. It explores both cyber-criminal activities and cyber-warfare based attacks, and also extrapolates from a number of more recent attacks the possible methods for data exfiltration. It explores some of the potential analytical methodologies including; common uses in Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS, as well as infection and activity tracking in malware traffic analysis, and covers some of the associated methods around technology designed to defend against, mitigate, and/or manage these and other risks, plus the effect that ISP and nation states can have by direct manipulation of DNS queries and return traffic.This paper also investigates potential behavioural analysis and time-lining, which can then be used for the

  8. Forensic psychiatry in Africa: prospects and challenges

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mental health care has always had an important interface with the law.1 Nevertheless, .... protection of the mentally ill user's human rights. According to the South .... Njenga F. Forensic psychiatry:The African experience. World. Psychiatry 2006 ...

  9. An ascorbic acid-enriched tomato genotype to fight UVA-induced oxidative stress in normal human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, Ganna; Raiola, Assunta; Del Giudice, Rita; Barone, Amalia; Frusciante, Luigi; Rigano, Maria Manuela; Monti, Daria Maria

    2016-10-01

    UVA radiations contribute up to 95% of the total UV exposure and are known to induce cell damage, leading to apoptosis. Since the benefic effects of ascorbic acid on human health are well known, a new tomato genotype (named DHO4), highly rich in ascorbic acid, has been recently obtained. Here, we compared the effects of ascorbic acid and hydrophilic DHO4 extracts in protecting human keratinocytes exposed to UVA stress. Keratinocytes were pre-incubated with ascorbic acid or with extracts from the ascorbic acid enriched tomato genotype and irradiated with UVA light. Then, ROS production, intracellular GSH and lipid peroxidation levels were quantified. Western blots were carried out to evaluate mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade, activation of caspase-3 and inflammation levels. We demonstrated that ROS, GSH and lipid peroxidation levels were not altered in cell exposed to UVA stress when cells were pre-treated with ascorbic acid or with tomato extracts. In addition, no evidence of apoptosis and inflammation were observed in irradiated pre-treated cells. Altogether, we demonstrated the ability of an ascorbic acid enriched tomato genotype to counteract UVA-oxidative stress on human keratinocytes. This protective effect is due to the high concentration of vitamin C that acts as free radical scavenger. This novel tomato genotype may be used as genetic material in breeding schemes to produce improved varieties with higher antioxidant levels.

  10. Human parechovirus genotypes -10, -13 and -15 in Pakistani children with acute dehydrating gastroenteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Masroor Alam

    Full Text Available Human parechoviruses are known to cause asymptomatic to severe clinical illness predominantly respiratory and gastroenetric infections. Despite their global prevalence, epidemiological studies have not been performed in Pakistan. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 110 fecal specimen and found 26 (24% positive for viral RNA with HPeV-10 (n = 3, 23%, HPeV-13 (n = 4, 31% and HPeV-15 (n = 6, 46% genotypes. Clinical features of patients with different HPeV genotypes were compared. All HPeV positive children were aged ≤4 years (mean 13.92 months. The male-to-female ratio was 1: 1.17 (46.2 vs 53.8% with significant association (p = .031 to HPeV infectivity. HPeV-10 and -13 were found during summer while HPeV-15 was only detected during late winter season. Disease symptoms were more severe in children infected with HPeV-10 and -13 as compared to HPeV-15. Fever and vomiting were observed in 100% cases of HPeV-10 and -13 while only 17% patients of HPeV-15 had these complaints. Phylogenetic analyses showed that HPeV-10, -13 and -15 strains found in this study have 9-13%, 16.8% and 21.8% nucleotide divergence respectively from the prototype strains and were clustered to distinct genetic lineages. This is the first report of HPeV-15 infection in humans although first identified in rhesus macaques. The arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD motif present at the C-terminal of VP1 responsible for the viral attachment to cellular integrins was not found in all of these strains. In conclusion, these findings enhance our knowledge related to the epidemiology and genetic diversity of the HPeV in Pakistan and support the need for continued laboratory based surveillance programs especially in infants and neonatal clinical settings. Further, the parechovirus pathogenesis, cross-species transmission and disease reservoirs must be ascertained to adopt better prevention measures.

  11. Characteristics of Populations of the Russian Federation over the Panel of Fifteen Loci Used for DNA Identification and in Forensic Medical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Stepanov, V; Balanovsky, O P; Melnikov, A V; Lash-Zavada, A Yu; Khar'kov, V N; Tyazhelova, T V; Akhmetova, V L; Zhukova, O V; Shneider, Yu V; Shil'nikova, I N; Borinskaya, S A; Marusin, A V; Spiridonova, M G; Simonova, K V; Khitrinskaya, I Yu; Radzhabov, M O; Romanov, A G; Shtygasheva, O V; Koshel', S M; Balanovskaya, E V; Rybakova, A V; Khusnutdinova, E K; Puzyrev, V P; Yankovsky, N K

    2011-04-01

    Seventeen population groups within the Russian Federation were characterized for the first time using a panel of 15 genetic markers that are used for DNA identification and in forensic medical examinations. The degree of polymorphism and population diversity of microsatellite loci within the Power Plex system (Promega) in Russian populations; the distribution of alleles and genotypes within the populations of six cities and 11 ethnic groups of the Russian Federation; the levels of intra- and interpopulation genetic differentiation of population; genetic relations between populations; and the identification and forensic medical characteristics of the system of markers under study were determined. Significant differences were revealed between the Russian populations and the U.S. reference base that was used recently in the forensic medical examination of the RF. A database of the allelic frequencies of 15 microsatellite loci that are used for DNA identification and forensic medical examination was created; the database has the potential of becoming the reference for performing forensic medical examinations in Russia. The spatial organization of genetic diversity over the panel of the STR markers that are used for DNA identification was revealed. It represents the general regularities of geographical clusterization of human populations over various types of genetic markers. The necessity to take into account a population's genetic structure during forensic medical examinations and DNA identification of criminal suspects was substantiated.

  12. Practical mobile forensics

    CERN Document Server

    Bommisetty, Satish; Mahalik, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The book is an easy-to-follow guide with clear instructions on various mobile forensic techniques. The chapters and the topics within are structured for a smooth learning curve, which will swiftly empower you to master mobile forensics. If you are a budding forensic analyst, consultant, engineer, or a forensic professional wanting to expand your skillset, this is the book for you. The book will also be beneficial to those with an interest in mobile forensics or wanting to find data lost on mobile devices. It will be helpful to be familiar with forensics in general but no prior experience is re

  13. Limitations in forensic odontology

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    B Kavitha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of using dental evidence in forensic investigation has kindled so much interest in the recent past that forensic odontology is even suggested as the single positive identification method to solve certain forensic cases. In this process, the shortcomings in forensic odontology though few are overlooked. These discrepancies associated with various methods are to be weighed cautiously to make forensic odontology a more accurate, reliable, and reproducible investigatory science. In this paper, we present our understanding of the limitations in various methods employed in forensic odontology.

  14. [Effectiveness of human papillomavirus genotyping for detection of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia compared to anal cytology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-España, Laura; Repiso-Jiménez, Juan Bosco; Fernández-Sánchez, Fernando; Pereda, Teresa; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Fernández-Morano, Teresa; de la Torre-Lima, Javier; Palma, Fermín; Redondo, Maximino; de Troya-Martín, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) -with an aetiological based on high-risk types of human papillomavirus- is increasing in some high-risk groups. Screening for HGAIN includes routine anal cytology and, more recently, HPV genotyping. The main objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of anal cytology and HPV genotyping for the detection of HGAIN. This is a study to determine the correlation of cytological and microbiological findings with anal biopsy findings in a cohort of patients at high risk of developing AIN referred to the department of sexually transmitted infections of the Hospital Costa del Sol, Spain, between January 2008 and December 2014. Of the 151 patients subjected to screening, a total of 92 patients, all of them with the result of three screening test (anal cytology, genotyping and biopsy) were included in the study. Just under two-thirds (62%) of them were HIV-positive. The sensitivity and specificity of anal cytology to detect HGAIN were 52.8 and 85.7%, respectively (k: 0.328), and 78 and 62.8% to detect two or more HPV oncogenic genotypes (k: 0.417). The detection of oncogenic HPV genotypes allowed the identification of 23 new cases of HGAIN that had been underdiagnosed with anal cytology, with 14 cases containing at least three high-risk genotypes. Anal cytology did not show enough sensitivity in HGAIN screening. HPV genotyping has shown to be a useful tool to detect HGAIN cases, although it could lead to an over-diagnosis as a solitary screening procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. MLVA Genotyping Characteristics of Human Brucella melitensis Isolated from Ulanqab of Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Guo; Di, Dong-Dong; Wang, Miao; Liu, Ri-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Piao, Dong-Ri; Tian, Guo-Zhong; Fan, Wei-Xing; Jiang, Hai; Cui, Bu-Yun; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a serious public health problem in Ulanqab, which is a region located in the middle of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region adjacent to Shanxi and Hebei provinces. The disease is prevalent in both the latter provinces and Ulanqab with the highest prevalence of brucellosis occurring in Inner Mongolia. The MLVA-16 scheme is a genotyping tool for assessing genetic diversity and relationships among isolates. Moreover, this genotyping tool can also be applied to epidemiological trace-back investigations. This study reports the occurrence of at least two B. melitensis biovars (1 and 3) in Ulanqab, encompassing 22 and 94 isolates, respectively. B. melitensis biovar 3 was the predominant biovar in the area examined. Panel 1 (MLVA-8) identified three genotypes (42, 63, and 114), with genotype 42 (n = 101) representing 87% of the tested strains. MLVA-11 identified eight genotypes (116, 111, 297, 291, and 342–345) from 116 of the analyzed isolates. All of these isolates were identified as belonging to the East Mediterranean group. Genotype 116 (n = 94) was the predominant genotype and represented 81% of the isolates. The isolates pertaining to this genotype were distributed throughout most of Ulanqab and neighboring regions. The MLVA-16 scheme showed the presence of 69 genotypes, with 46 genotypes being represented by single isolates. This analysis revealed that Ulanqab brucellosis cases had epidemiologically unrelated and sporadic characteristics. The remaining 23 genotypes were shared (between a total of 70 isolates) with each genotype being represented by two to eight isolates. These data indicate that these cases were epidemiologically related. MLVA genotyping confirmed the occurrence of a multipoint outbreak epidemic and intrafamilial brucellosis. Extensive genotype-sharing events were observed among isolates from different regions of Ulanqab and from other provinces of China. These findings suggest either a lack of control of animal movement between

  16. Optimal sample storage and extraction procotols for reliable multilocus genotyping of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, F; Geldof, S; Polman, K; Volckaert, F A M; Huyse, T

    2011-08-01

    Genotyping individual larval stages and eggs of natural parasite populations is complicated by the difficulty of obtaining reliable genotypes from low quantity DNA template. A suitable storage and extraction protocol, together with a thorough quantification of genotyping errors are therefore crucial for molecular epidemiological studies. Here we test the robustness, handling time, ease of use, cost effectiveness and success rate of various fixation (Whatman FTA(®) Classic and Elute Cards, 70% EtOH and RNAlater(®)) and subsequent DNA extraction methods (commercial kits and proteinase K protocol). None of these methods require a cooling chain and are therefore suitable for field collection. Based on a multiplex microsatellite PCR with nine loci the success and reliability of each technique is evaluated by the proportion of samples with at least eight scored loci and the proportion of genotyping errors. If only the former is taken into account, FTA(®) Elute is recommended (83% success; 44% genotyping error; 0.2 €/sample; 1h 20 m handling time). However, when also considering the genotyping errors, handling time and ease of use, we opt for 70% EtOH with the 96-well plate technology followed by a simple proteinase K extraction (73% success; 0% genotyping error; 0.2 €/sample; 15m handling time). For eggs we suggest (1) to pool all eggs per person in 1.5 ml tubes filled with 70% EtOH for transport and (2) to identify each egg to species level prior to genotyping. To this end we extended the Rapid diagnostic PCR developed by Webster et al. (2010) with a S. mansoni-specific primer to discriminate between S. mansoni, S. haematobium and S. bovis in a single PCR reaction. The success rate of genotyping eggs was 75% (0% genotyping error). This is the first study to incorporate genotyping errors through re-amplification for the evaluation of schistosome sampling protocols and the identification of error-prone loci.

  17. First report of an Acanthamoeba genotype T13 isolate as etiological agent of a keratitis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Anna-Lena; Stemplewitz, Birthe; Scheid, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Several strains of free-living amoebae (FLA) belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba are able to cause a painful sight-threatening disease of the cornea designated as Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). In this case report, a 22-year-old woman, wearer of soft contact lenses, was treated after the initial examination, and follow-up laboratory results led to the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. The patient recovered under the targeted therapy, demonstrating that the acanthamoebae were the etiological agents of the keratitis in this case. The acanthamoebae belonged morphologically to group II. Genotyping of the causative Acanthamoeba strain based on sequences of the PCR amplimer ASA.S1 amplified from 18S ribosomal DNA by using the genus-specific primers JDP1 and JDP2 followed. The phylogenetic comparison of ASA.S1 confirmed that the isolated Acanthamoeba strain is closely related to genotype T13 supported by pairwise sequence identities of 97.1-98.0% and bootstrap support of 980 replicates with reference sequences of genotype T13. These results regarding the Acanthamoeba keratitis-causing isolate KaBo expands the number of known pathogenic genotypes to 12. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a T13 Acanthamoeba genotype being associated with keratitis in humans.

  18. Genotypic characterisation of human papillomavirus infections among persons living with HIV infection; a case-control study in Kumasi, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yar, Denis Dekugmen; Salifu, Samson Pandam; Darko, Samuel Nkansah; Annan, Augustina Angelina; Gyimah, Akosua Adumea; Buabeng, Kwame Ohene; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women living with HIV and non-infected women in Ghana. A case-control study was conducted involving 107 women living with HIV aged between 18 and 59 years (cases) and 100 non-HIV-infected apparently healthy women (controls) who were recruited from the Kumasi South Hospital, from July to December, 2014. Cervicovaginal swabs were taken from study participants to characterise 28 high- and low-risk HPV genotypes using a multiplex real-time PCR. The overall mean age for the participants was 40.10 ± 9.76 years. The prevalence of high-risk (hr)-HPV genotypes was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (77.4% vs. 41.6%, P < 0.0001). Overall, HPV 58 and 54 were the most predominant high-risk (18.8%) and low-risk (15.0%) genotypes detected. The two most common hr-HPV genotype isolates were 58 (18.8%) and 35 (15.9%) with 58 being the most prevalent among age group 35-44 years compared with hr-HPV 16, 18, 35 and 45, found predominantly among 18-34 age group. Significant variations exist in HPV genotypes among HIV-infected and uninfected women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. DNA detection and genotypic identification of potentially human-pathogenic microsporidia from asymptomatic pet parrots in South Korea as a risk factor for zoonotic emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Sung-Seok; Lyoo, Young S; Park, Hee-Myung

    2011-12-01

    We detected and identified genotypes of human-pathogenic microsporidia in fecal samples from 51 asymptomatic captive-bred pet parrots in South Korea. Microsporidia were identified in 8 samples (15.7%); 7 parrots tested positive for Encephalitozoon hellem, and 1 parrot tested positive for both E. hellem and Encephalitozoon cuniculi. In genotypic identifications, E. hellem was present in genotypes 1A and 2B and E. cuniculi was present in genotype II. Pet parrots might be a source of human microsporidian infection.

  20. Genotyping of human Brucella melitensis biovar 3 isolated from Shanxi Province in China by MLVA16 and HOOF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brucellosis presents a significant economic burden for China because it causes reproductive failure in host species and chronic health problems in humans. These problems can involve multiple organs. Brucellosis is highly endemic in Shanxi Province China. Molecular typing would be very useful to epidemiological surveillance. The purpose of this study was to assess the diversity of Brucella melitensis strains for epidemiological surveillance. Historical monitoring data suggest that Brucella melitensis biovar 3 is the predominant strain associated with the epidemic of brucellosis in Shanxi Province. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple-locus variable-number repeat analysis (MLVA-16 and hypervariable octameric oligonucleotide fingerprinting (HOOF-print were used to type a human-hosted Brucella melitensis population (81 strains. Sixty-two MLVA genotypes (discriminatory index: 0.99 were detected, and they had a genetic similarity coefficient ranging from 84.9% to 100%. Eighty strains of the population belonged to the eastern Mediterranean group with panel 1 genotypes 42 (79 strains and 43 (1 strain. A new panel 1 genotype was found in this study. It was named 114 MLVAorsay genotype and it showed similarity to the two isolates from Guangdong in a previous study. Brucella melitensis is distributed throughout Shanxi Province, and like samples from Inner Mongolia, the eastern Mediterranean genotype 42 was the main epidemic strain (97%. The HOOF-printing showed a higher diversity than MLVA-16 with a genetic similarity coefficient ranging from 56.8% to 100%. CONCLUSIONS: According to the MLVA-16 and HOOF-printing results, both methods could be used for the epidemiological surveillance of brucellosis. A new genotype was found in both Shanxi and Guangdong Provinces. In areas with brucellosis, the MLVA-16 scheme is very important for tracing cases back to their origins during outbreak investigations. It may facilitate the expansion and eradication

  1. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane.

  2. Global Variation of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Selected Genes Involved in Cervical Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, R S Akram; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of the cervix is ranked second among the top 5 cancers affecting women globally. Parallel to other cancers, it is also a complex disease involving numerous factors such as human papillomavirus (HPV) infection followed by the activity of oncogenes and environmental factors. The incidence rate of the disease remains high in developing countries due to lack of awareness, followed by mass screening programs, various socioeconomic issues, and low usage of preventive vaccines. Over the past 3 decades, extensive research has taken place in cervical malignancy to elucidate the role of host genes in the pathogenesis of the disease, yet it remains one of the most prevalent diseases. It is imperative that recent genome-wide techniques be used to determine whether carcinogenesis of oncogenes is associated with cervical cancer at the molecular level and to translate that knowledge into developing diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The aim of this study was to discuss HPV predominance with their genotype distribution worldwide, and in India, as well as to discuss the newly identified oncogenes related to cervical cancer in current scenario. Using data from various databases and robust technologies, oncogenes associated with cervical malignancies were identified and are explained in concise manner. Due to the advent of recent technologies, new candidate genes are explored and can be used as precise biomarkers for screening and developing drug targets. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions in prion protein-humanized mice carrying distinct codon 129 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ironside, James W; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2013-07-26

    To date, all clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) patients are homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129M/M) of the prion protein (PrP) gene. However, the appearance of asymptomatic secondary vCJD infection in individuals with a PRNP codon 129 genotype other than M/M and transmission studies using animal models have raised the concern that all humans might be susceptible to vCJD prions, especially via secondary infection. To reevaluate this possibility and to analyze in detail the transmission properties of vCJD prions to transgenic animals carrying distinct codon 129 genotype, we performed intracerebral inoculation of vCJD prions to humanized knock-in mice carrying all possible codon 129 genotypes (129M/M, 129M/V, or 129V/V). All humanized knock-in mouse lines were susceptible to vCJD infection, although the attack rate gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The amount of PrP deposition including florid/amyloid plaques in the brain also gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The biochemical properties of protease-resistant abnormal PrP in the brain and transmissibility of these humanized mouse-passaged vCJD prions upon subpassage into knock-in mice expressing bovine PrP were not affected by the codon 129 genotype. These results indicate that individuals with the 129V/V genotype may be more susceptible to secondary vCJD infection than expected and may lack the neuropathological characteristics observed in vCJD patients with the 129M/M genotype. Besides the molecular typing of protease-resistant PrP in the brain, transmission studies using knock-in mice carrying bovine PrP may aid the differential diagnosis of secondary vCJD infection, especially in individuals with the 129V/V genotype.

  4. Approaching ethical, legal and social issues of emerging forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP) technologies comprehensively: Reply to ‘Forensic DNA phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes’ by Manfred Kayser

    OpenAIRE

    Toom, V.; Wienroth, M.; M'Charek, A.; Prainsack, B.; Williams, R.; Duster, T.; Heinemann, T.; C. Kruse; Machado, H; Murphy, E.

    2016-01-01

    In a recent special issue of the journal on new trends in forensic genetics, Manfred Kayser contributed a review of developments, opportunities and challenges of forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP). In his article he argues that FDP technologies - such as determining eye, hair and skin color - should be considered as akin to a "biological witness" with the potential of providing more accurate information than traditional eye witnesses.

  5. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-nan; Yang, Ya-dong; Li, Shu-jin; Yang, Ya-ran; Zhang, Xiao-jing; Fang, Xiang-dong; Yan, Jiang-wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these “nucleosome protected STRs” (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  6. Forensic botany: usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Viivi; Korpelainen, Helena; Kostamo, Kirsi

    2007-10-25

    Two experiments were performed to test the relevance of bryophyte (Plantae, Bryophyta) material for forensic studies. The first experiment was conducted to reveal if, and how well, plant fragments attach to footwear in general. In the test, 16 persons walked outdoors wearing rubber boots or hiking boots. After 24h of use outdoors the boots were carefully cleaned, and all plant fragments were collected. Afterwards, all plant material was examined to identify the species. In the second experiment, fresh material of nine bryophyte species was kept in a shed in adverse conditions for 18 months, after which DNA was extracted and subjected to genotyping to test the quality of the material. Both experiments give support for the usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies. The bryophyte fragments become attached to shoes, where they remain even after the wearer walks on a dry road for several hours. Bryophyte DNA stays intact, allowing DNA profiling after lengthy periods following detachment from the original plant source. Based on these experiments, and considering the fact that many bryophytes are clonal plants, we propose that bryophytes are among the most usable plants to provide botanical evidence for forensic investigations.

  7. Learning Android forensics

    CERN Document Server

    Tamma, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    If you are a forensic analyst or an information security professional wanting to develop your knowledge of Android forensics, then this is the book for you. Some basic knowledge of the Android mobile platform is expected.

  8. Integrating Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  9. Forensic speaker recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwly, Didier

    2009-01-01

    The aim of forensic speaker recognition is to establish links between individuals and criminal activities, through audio speech recordings. This field is multidisciplinary, combining predominantly phonetics, linguistics, speech signal processing, and forensic statistics. On these bases, expert-based

  10. Integrating Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  11. Forensic DNA and bioinformatics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bianchi, Lucia; Liò, Pietro

    The field of forensic science is increasingly based on biomolecular data and many European countries are establishing forensic databases to store DNA profiles of crime scenes of known offenders and apply DNA testing...

  12. Human Papillomavirus Genotype as a Major Determinant of the Course of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niakan M

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Certain types of human papillomavrus (HPV are associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. The aim of theobservations reported here was to determine whether the prognosis for invasive cancers of the uterine cervix is related to the type of human papillomavirus asociated with the tumor. Material and Methods: Twenty Patients with invasive cervical cancer were prospectively registered from 2000 to 2001. HPV typing was performed by insitu hybridization(ISH on DNA extracted from frozen, formal in-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. The specimens mostly represented classifications SCC Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (Table 1. HPV- DNA was detected by insituhybridization, using three different DNA Probes: types 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33/51. Results: HPV DNA was detected in the nuclei of SCC tumor cells in 13(65% of 20 cases. Of the 13 HPV-DNA positive cases three reacted only with the HPV 31/33/51 probe, two reacted only with the 16/18 probe, three showed strong hybridization for both 31/33/51 and 6/11probes, four showed 6/11 and 16/18 genotypes and one case reacted with 31/33/51,6/11and16/18probes. Conclusion: The prognosis for invasive cancers of the uterine cervix is dependent on the oncogenic potential of the associated HPV type. HPV typing may provide a prognostic indicator for individual patients and is of potential use in defining specific therapies against HPV harboring tumor cells. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that HPV infection is the primary cause of cervical neoplasia. Furthermore, they support HPV vaccine research to prevent cervical cancer and efforts to develop HPV DNA diagnostic tests.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic variation among Staphylococcus saprophyticus from human and animal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören; Sakinc, Türkan

    2010-06-10

    The main aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates from human and animal origin. In total, 236 clinical isolates and 15 animal isolates of S. saprophyticus were characterized in respect of the occurrence of 9 potential virulence genes and four surface properties. All strains were PCR positive for the regulatory genes agr, sar >it>A and rot as well as for the surface proteins UafA and Aas. Nearly 90% of the clinical isolates were found to possess the gene for the surface-associated lipase Ssp and 10% for the collagen binding MSCRAMM SdrI. All animal isolates were negative forsdrI. Lipolytic activity could be detected in 66% of the clinical and 46% of the animal isolates. Adherence to collagen type I was shown of 20% of the clinical strains and 6% of the strains of animal origin. Most S. saprophyticus strains showed hydrophobic properties and only few could agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. We described a broad analysis of animal and human S. saprophyticus isolates regarding virulence genes and phenotypic properties such as lipase activity, hydrophobicity, and adherence. While S. saprophyticus strains from animal sources have prerequisites for colonization of the urinary tract like the D-serine-deaminase, out findings suggested that they need to acquire new genes e.g. MSCRAMMS for adherence like sdrI and to modulate their existing properties e.g. increasing the lipase activity or reducing hydrophobicity. These apparently important new genes or properties for virulence have to be further analyzed.

  14. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of human tympanic membrane derived cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Sharon L; Levin, Brett; Heel, Kathryn A; Atlas, Marcus D; Marano, Robert J

    2011-02-01

    The human tympanic membrane (hTM), known more commonly as the eardrum, is a thin, multi-layered membrane that is unique in the body as it is suspended in air. When perforated, the hTM's primary function of sound-pressure transmission is compromised. For the purposes of TM reconstruction, we investigated the phenotype and genotype of cultured primary cells derived from hTM tissue explants, compared to epithelial (HaCaT cells) and mesenchymal (human dermal fibroblasts (HDF)) reference cells. Epithelium-specific ets-1 (ESE-1), E-cadherin, keratinocyte growth factor-1 (KGF-1/FGF-7), keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2/FGF10), fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), variants of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), fibroblast surface protein (FSP), and vimentin proteins were used to assess the phenotypes of all cultured cells. Wholemount and paraffin-embedded hTM tissues were stained with ESE-1 and E-cadherin proteins to establish normal epithelial-specific expression patterns within the epithelial layers. Immunofluorescent (IF) cell staining of hTM epithelial cells (hTMk) demonstrated co-expression of both epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific proteins. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis further demonstrated co-expression of these epithelial and mesenchymal-specific proteins, indicating the subcultured hTMk cells possessed a transitional phenotype. Gene transcript analysis of hTMk cells by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed a down regulation of ESE-1, E-cadherin, FGFR2, variant 1 and variant 2 (FGFR2v1 and FGFR2v2) between low and high passages, and up-regulation of KGF-1, KGF-2, and FGFR1. All results indicate a gradual shift in cell phenotype of hTMk-derived cells from epithelial to mesenchymal.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic variation among Staphylococcus saprophyticus from human and animal isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakinc Türkan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates from human and animal origin. Findings In total, 236 clinical isolates and 15 animal isolates of S. saprophyticus were characterized in respect of the occurrence of 9 potential virulence genes and four surface properties. All strains were PCR positive for the regulatory genes agr, sar>it>A and rot as well as for the surface proteins UafA and Aas. Nearly 90% of the clinical isolates were found to possess the gene for the surface-associated lipase Ssp and 10% for the collagen binding MSCRAMM SdrI. All animal isolates were negative forsdrI. Lipolytic activity could be detected in 66% of the clinical and 46% of the animal isolates. Adherence to collagen type I was shown of 20% of the clinical strains and 6% of the strains of animal origin. Most S. saprophyticus strains showed hydrophobic properties and only few could agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. Conclusions We described a broad analysis of animal and human S. saprophyticus isolates regarding virulence genes and phenotypic properties such as lipase activity, hydrophobicity, and adherence. While S. saprophyticus strains from animal sources have prerequisites for colonization of the urinary tract like the D-serine-deaminase, out findings suggested that they need to acquire new genes e.g. MSCRAMMS for adherence like sdrI and to modulate their existing properties e.g. increasing the lipase activity or reducing hydrophobicity. These apparently important new genes or properties for virulence have to be further analyzed.

  16. Microbial forensics: the next forensic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, Bruce; Murch, Randall; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2005-11-01

    Pathogens and toxins can be converted to bioweapons and used to commit bioterrorism and biocrime. Because of the potential and relative ease of an attack using a bioweapon, forensic science needs to be prepared to assist in the investigation to bring perpetrators to justice and to deter future attacks. A new subfield of forensics--microbial forensics--has been created, which is focused on characterization of evidence from a bioterrorism act, biocrime, hoax, or an inadvertent release. Forensic microbiological investigations are essentially the same as any other forensic investigation regarding processing. They involve crime scene(s) investigation, chain of custody practices, evidence collection, handling and preservation, evidence shipping, analysis of evidence, interpretation of results, and court presentation. In addition to collecting and analyzing traditional forensic evidence, the forensic investigation will attempt to determine the etiology and identity of the causal agent, often in a similar fashion as in an epidemiologic investigation. However, for attribution, higher-resolution characterization is needed. The tools for attribution include genetic- and nongenetic-based assays and informatics to attempt to determine the unique source of a sample or at least eliminate some sources. In addition, chemical and physical assays may help determine the process used to prepare, store, or disseminate the bioweapon. An effective microbial forensics program will require development and/or validation of all aspects of the forensic investigative process, from sample collection to interpretation of results. Quality assurance (QA) and QC practices, comparable to those used by the forensic DNA science community, are being implemented. Lastly, partnerships with other laboratories will be requisite, because many of the necessary capabilities for analysis will not reside in the traditional forensic laboratory.

  17. Cloud Forensics Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Cloud Computing , Forensics , IT Security, Standards, Monitoring, Virtualization. I. INTRODUCTION LOUD computing has come to mean many different...an efficient re-allocation of resources. VI. ACCOUNTABILITY, MONITORING AND FORENSICS The goal of computer forensics is to perform a structured...away from the concept of cloud computing [12 - 14]. We believe, however, that a precise statement of the high assurance and forensics requirements

  18. Molecular genotyping of human Ureaplasma species based on multiple-banded antigen (MBA) gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, F; Ma, Z; James, G; Gordon, S; Gilbert, G L

    2000-09-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum has been divided into 14 serovars. Recently, subdivision of U. urealyticum into two species has been proposed: U. parvum (previously U. urealyticum parvo biovar), comprising four serovars (1, 3, 6, 14) and U. urealyticum (previously U. urealyticum T-960 biovar), 10 serovars (2, 4, 5, 7-13). The multiple-banded antigen (MBA) genes of these species contain both species and serovar/subtype specific sequences. Based on whole sequences of the 5'-ends of MBA genes of U. parvum serovars and partial sequences of the 5'-ends of MBA genes of U. urealyticum serovars, we previously divided each of these species into three MBA genotypes. To further elucidate the relationships between serovars, we sequenced the whole 5'-ends of MBA genes of all 10 U. urealyticum serovars and partial repetitive regions of these genes from all serovars of U. parvum and U. urealyticum. For the first time, all four serovars of U. parvum were clearly differentiated from each other. In addition, the 10 serovars of U. urealyticum were divided into five MBA genotypes, as follows: MBA genotype A comprises serovars 2, 5, 8; MBA genotype B, serovar 10 only; MBA genotype C, serovars 4, 12, 13; MBA genotype D, serovar 9 only; and MBA genotype E comprises serovars 7 and 11. There were no sequence differences between members within each MBA genotype. Further work is required to identify other genes or other regions of the MBA genes that may be used to differentiate U. urealyticum serovars within MBA genotypes A, C and E. A better understanding of the molecular basis of serotype differentiation will help to improve subtyping methods for use in studies of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of these organisms.

  19. Assessing batch effects of genotype calling algorithm BRLMM for the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500 K array set using 270 HapMap samples

    OpenAIRE

    Kaput Jim; Han Tao; Chen James J; Xu Joshua; Fang Hong; Perkins Roger; Shi Leming; Ge Weigong; Su Zhenqiang; Hong Huixiao; Fuscoe James C; Tong Weida

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) aim to identify genetic variants (usually single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) across the entire human genome that are associated with phenotypic traits such as disease status and drug response. Highly accurate and reproducible genotype calling are paramount since errors introduced by calling algorithms can lead to inflation of false associations between genotype and phenotype. Most genotype calling algorithms currently used for GW...

  20. Human Papillomavirus Genotyping After Denaturation of Specimens for Hybrid Capture 2 Testing: Feasibility Study for the HPV Persistence and Progression Cohort†

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping could be clinically useful, depending on the results of large, prospective studies like the HPV Persistence and Progression cohort. The cohort is based on genotyping and follow-up of Hybrid Capture-positive women at Kaiser Permanente, Northern California. HPV DNA testing by Hybrid Capture 2 requires denaturation with alkali, possibly damaging the DNA for optimal PCR-based genotyping. A feasibility study was conducted on paired aliquots of anonymized speci...

  1. Isolation and full-genome sequences of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype I strains from Cambodian human patients, mosquitoes and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Veasna; Choeung, Rithy; Gorman, Christopher; Laurent, Denis; Crabol, Yoann; Mey, Channa; Peng, Borin; Di Francesco, Juliette; Hul, Vibol; Sothy, Heng; Santy, Ky; Richner, Beat; Pommier, Jean-David; Sorn, San; Chevalier, Véronique; Buchy, Philippe; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Cappelle, Julien; Horwood, Paul Francis; Dussart, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis remains the most important cause of viral encephalitis in humans in several southeast Asian countries, including Cambodia, causing at least 65 000 cases of encephalitis per year. This vector-borne viral zoonosis - caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) - is considered to be a rural disease and is transmitted by mosquitoes, with birds and pigs being the natural reservoirs, while humans are accidental hosts. In this study we report the first two JEV isolations in Cambodia from human encephalitis cases from two studies on the aetiology of central nervous system disease, conducted at the two major paediatric hospitals in the country. We also report JEV isolation from Culextritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes and from pig samples collected in two farms, located in peri-urban and rural areas. Out of 11 reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction-positive original samples, we generated full-genome sequences from 5 JEV isolates. Five additional partial sequences of the JEV NS3 gene from viruses detected in five pigs and one complete coding sequence of the envelope gene of a strain identified in a pig were generated. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that JEV detected in Cambodia belonged to genotype I and clustered in two clades: genotype I-a, mainly comprising strains from Thailand, and genotype I-b, comprising strains from Vietnam that dispersed northwards to China. Finally, in this study, we provide proof that the sequenced JEV strains circulate between pigs, Culex tritaeniorhynchus and humans in the Phnom Penh vicinity.

  2. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations

  3. XIRAF: Ultimate Forensic Querying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alink, W.; Bhoedjang, R.; Vries, A.P. de; Boncz, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, XML-based approach towards managing and querying forensic traces extracted from digital evidence. This approach has been implemented in XIRAF, a prototype system for forensic analysis. XIRAF systematically applies forensic analysis tools to evidence files (e.g., hard di

  4. Development of a fast PCR protocol enabling rapid generation of AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® profiles for genotyping of human DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Amanda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional PCR methods for forensic STR genotyping require approximately 2.5 to 4 hours to complete, contributing a significant portion of the time required to process forensic DNA samples. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a fast PCR protocol that enabled amplification of the 16 loci targeted by the AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® primer set, allowing decreased cycling times. Methods Fast PCR conditions were achieved by substituting the traditional Taq polymerase for SpeedSTAR™ HS DNA polymerase which is designed for fast PCR, by upgrading to a thermal cycler with faster temperature ramping rates and by modifying cycling parameters (less time at each temperature and adopting a two-step PCR approach. Results The total time required for the optimized protocol is 26 min. A total of 147 forensically relevant DNA samples were amplified using the fast PCR protocol for Identifiler. Heterozygote peak height ratios were not affected by fast PCR conditions, and full profiles were generated for single-source DNA amounts between 0.125 ng and 2.0 ng. Individual loci in profiles produced with the fast PCR protocol exhibited average n-4 stutter percentages ranging from 2.5 ± 0.9% (THO1 to 9.9 ± 2.7% (D2S1338. No increase in non-adenylation or other amplification artefacts was observed. Minor contributor alleles in two-person DNA mixtures were reliably discerned. Low level cross-reactivity (monomorphic peaks was observed with some domestic animal DNA. Conclusions The fast PCR protocol presented offers a feasible alternative to current amplification methods and could aid in reducing the overall time in STR profile production or could be incorporated into a fast STR genotyping procedure for time-sensitive situations.

  5. Poor Prognosis Associated With Human Papillomavirus α7 Genotypes in Cervical Carcinoma Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, John S.; Iype, Rohan; Armenoult, Lucile S.C. [Translational Radiobiology Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, Janet [Translational Radiobiology Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Applied Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (United Kingdom); Miller, Crispin J. [Applied Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (United Kingdom); Davidson, Susan [Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sanjose, Silvia de; Bosch, Xavier [Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Stern, Peter L. [Immunology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L., E-mail: Catharine.West@manchester.ac.uk [Translational Radiobiology Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype and outcome after radiation therapy and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: HPV genotyping was performed on cervix biopsies by polymerase chain reaction using SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers, followed by deoxyribonucleic acid enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by reverse hybridization line probe assay (LiPA{sub 25}) (version 1) (n=202). PapilloCheck and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to genotype cervix cancer cell lines (n=16). Local progression-free survival after radiation therapy alone was assessed using log-rank and Cox proportionate hazard analyses. Intrinsic radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) using clonogenic assays. Results: Of the 202 tumors, 107 (53.0%) were positive for HPV16, 29 (14.4%) for HPV18, 9 (4.5%) for HPV45, 23 (11.4%) for other HPV genotypes, and 22 (10.9%) were negative; 11 (5.5%) contained multiple genotypes, and 1 tumor was HPV X (0.5%). In 148 patients with outcome data, those with HPVα9-positive tumors had better local progression-free survival compared with α7 patients in univariate (P<.004) and multivariate (hazard ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.76, P=.021) analyses. There was no difference in the median SF2 of α9 and α7 cervical tumors (n=63). In the cell lines, 9 were α7 and 4 α9 positive and 3 negative. There was no difference in SF2 between α9 and α7 cell lines (n=14). Conclusion: The reduced radioresponsiveness of α7 cervical tumors is not related to intrinsic radiosensitivity.

  6. Expanding forensic science through forensic intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaux, Olivier; Talbot Wright, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    Research and Development ('R&D') in forensic science currently focuses on innovative technologies improving the efficiency of existing forensic processes, from the detection of marks and traces at the scene, to their presentation in Court. R&D approached from this perspective provides no response to doubts raised by recent criminological studies, which question the effective contribution of forensic science to crime reduction, and to policing in general. Traces (i.e. forensic case data), as remnants of criminal activity are collected and used in various forms of crime monitoring and investigation. The aforementioned doubts therefore need to be addressed by expressing how information is conveyed by traces in these processes. Modelling from this standpoint expands the scope of forensic science and provides new R&D opportunities. Twelve propositions for R&D are stated in order to pave the way.

  7. Genetic characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from dairy calves: discovery of species/genotypes consistent with those found in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeywardena, Harshanie; Jex, Aaron R; Nolan, Matthew J; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; McAnulty, Robin W; Gasser, Robin B

    2012-12-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are important genera of parasitic protists that can cause significant diarrhoeal diseases in humans and other animals. Depending on the species/genotype of parasite, human infection may be acquired via anthroponotic or zoonotic transmission routes. Here, we undertook a molecular epidemiological investigation of these two genera of parasites in pre- and post-weaned calves from eight locations in Canterbury, New Zealand, by PCR-coupled sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of sequence data for regions in the 60 kDa glycoprotein (pgp60) gene of Cryptosporidium and/or the triose-phosphate isomerase (ptpi) gene of Giardia. The pgp60 and ptpi regions were specifically amplified from 15 (8.3%) and 11 (6.1%) of the 180 individual faecal samples, respectively. The sequences derived from all of the amplicons were aligned with homologous reference sequences and subjected to phylogenetic analysis by Bayesian inference. For Cryptosporidium, three samples contained Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa, subgenotypes IIaA15G3R1, IIaA19G3R1 and IIaA23G4. Twelve samples contained Cryptosporidium hominis genotype Ib, subgenotype IbA10G2R2. While subgenotypes IIaA15G3R1 and IIaA23G4 are new records, IIaA19G3R1 and IbA10G2R2 are commonly found in humans in various countries. For Giardia, two samples contained Giardia duodenalis assemblage A, also common in humans. In contrast, nine samples contained G. duodenalis assemblage E, which is the first report of this assemblage in cattle in New Zealand. Therefore, the present results indicate that dairy calves on the South Island of New Zealand harbour 'zoonotic' genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, which is likely to have significant public health implications.

  8. Genotyping of coeliac-specific human leucocyte antigen in children with type 1 diabetes: does this screening method make sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Elisabeth; Loinger, Martina; Mühlbacher, Annelies; Edlinger, Michael; Steichen, Elisabeth; Meraner, Dagmar; Loacker, Lorin; Weigel, Guenter; Müller, Thomas; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Hofer, Sabine E

    2017-07-01

    Due to a high linkage disequilibrium of diabetes and coeliac-specific human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes, the prevalence of coeliac disease (CD) in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1D) is much higher than in the general population. Recently, the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) revised new screening guidelines in which genotyping for coeliac-specific HLA alleles is recommended for high-risk patients as patients with T1D. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency and distribution of coeliac-specific HLA genotypes in paediatric patients with T1D. HLA genotyping was performed on paediatric patients with T1D, recruited at the Medical University Hospital of Innsbruck and Graz. The test was done by PCR. Statistical analysis was performed with IBM-SPSS V.20. In 121 paediatric patients with T1D (52% male), mean age 13.3 (SD 3.9) years, mean age at diabetes diagnosis 7.4 (SD 3.8) and mean diabetes duration of 5.9 (SD 3.3) years, HLA genotyping was conducted. Ninety-two per cent showed positive HLA DQ2 and/or HLA DQ8 genotypes. Thirty-four per cent carried HLA DQ2, 33% were HLA DQ2+DQ8 positive and 25% of the patients showed positive results for HLA DQ8 alone. Only 8% had no coeliac-specific HLA markers. Four (3%) patients were diagnosed with CD. The majority of paediatric patients with T1D has positive coeliac-specific HLA genotypes DQ2 and/or DQ8. Therefore, genotyping for coeliac-specific HLA alleles as a first-line test in patients with T1D as recommended in the ESPGHAN guidelines does not seem reasonable. Screening for coeliac-specific antibodies needs to be performed on a regular basis for patients with T1D. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Plethora of Cyber Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Sridhar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As threats against digital assets have risen and there is necessitate exposing and eliminating hidden risks and threats. The ability of exposing is called “cyber forensics.” Cyber Penetrators have adopted more sophistical tools and tactics that endanger the operations of the global phenomena. These attackers are also using anti-forensic techniques to hide evidence of a cyber crime. Cyber forensics tools must increase its toughness and counteract these advanced persistent threats. This paper focuses on briefing of Cyber forensics, various phases of cyber forensics, handy tools and new research trends and issues in this fascinated area.

  10. The first genotype determination of Acanthamoeba potential threat to human health, isolated from natural water reservoirs in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Anna; Szostakowska, Beata; Idzińska, Alicja; Chomicz, Lidia

    2014-07-01

    Different species of amoebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba are widely distributed in many parts of the world and known as free-living organisms. Some strains of the protozoans may exist as parasites and cause risk to human health as causative agents of serious human diseases. Currently, in Poland, there is no sufficient information about the distribution of Acanthamoeba strains and their genotypes in the environment. Therefore, 20 environmental surface water samples were collected from different sites located at five water reservoirs in Gdynia, Sopot, and Gdańsk (northern Poland). The material was cultured to obtain Acanthamoeba isolates that were then specifically analyzed with both PCR and real-time PCR assays. Of the 20 samples examined, Acanthamoeba DNA was found in 13 samples tested with the use of real-time PCR; in 10 of them, DNA of the amoeba was also detected using PCR technique. The comparison with sequences available in the GenBank confirmed that the PCR products are fragments of Acanthamoeba 18S rRNA gene and that isolates represent T4 genotype, known as the most common strains related to AK cases. This is the first investigation in Poland describing Acanthamoeba detection in environmental water samples with molecular techniques and genotyping. The results indicate that surface water in Poland may be a source of acanthamoebic strains potentially pathogenic for humans.

  11. Development and Clinical Evaluation of a Highly Sensitive DNA Microarray for Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, TaeJeong; Kim, ChangJin; Woo, SukKyung; Kim, TaeSeung; Jeong, DongJun; Kim, MyungSoon; Lee, Sunwoo; Cho, HyunSill; An, Sungwhan

    2004-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been found in cervical cancer, tonsillar cancer, and certain types of head and neck cancers. We report on a DNA microarray-based method for the simultaneous detection and typing of HPVs. The genotype spectrum discriminated by this HPV DNA microarray includes 15 high-risk HPV genotypes and 12 low-risk HPV genotypes. The HPV DNA microarray showed high degrees of specificity and reproducibility. We evaluated the performance of the HPV DNA microarray by application to three HPV-positive cell lines (HeLa, Caski, and SiHa cells) and two HPV-negative cell lines (C33A and A549 cells). The HPV DNA microarray successfully identified the known types of HPV present in the cell lines. The detection limit of the HPV DNA microarray was at least 100-fold higher than that of PCR. To assess the clinical applicability of the HPV DNA microarray, we performed the HPV genotyping assay with 73 nonmalignant and malignant samples from 39 tonsillar cancer patients. Twenty-five of the 39 (64.1%) malignant samples were positive for HPV, whereas 3 of 34 (8.8%) nonmalignant samples were positive for HPV. This result shows a preferential association of HPV with tonsillar carcinomas. The correlations of the presence of HPV with the grade of differentiation and risk factors were not significant. Our data show that the HPV DNA microarray may be useful for the diagnosis and typing of HPV in large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:15243092

  12. Simple and rapid human papillomavirus genotyping method by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with two restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linghan; Watanabe, Ken; Haruyama, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2013-07-01

    Cervical cancer, the third most common cancer that affects women worldwide, is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and is treatable when detected at an early stage. To date, more than 100 different HPV types have been described, and the development of simple, low-cost, and accurate methods to distinguish HPV genotypes is highly warranted. In this study, an HPV genotyping assay based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was evaluated. This method involved the use of MY09/11 primers followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with the restriction enzymes HpyCH4V and NlaIII. Cervical specimens preserved using CytoRich Blue fluid were collected from 1,134 female volunteers for HPV detection, and 1,111 valid samples were amplified using PCR. The PCR method was sensitive enough to detect 25 copies of HPV18, and three copies of HPV16. Out of 202 PCR-positive samples, HPV genotypes were determined in 189 samples (93.6%) by this RFLP method. Results were then evaluated further by capillary sequencing method. Concordant results between the two tests were as high as 96.0%. Thirteen samples, which tested negative with RFLP, were verified as non-specific amplifications with PCR. In conclusion, this PCR-RFLP method using restriction enzymes HpyCH4V and NlaIII is simple, non-labor intensive, and is applicable for the inexpensive determination of HPV genotypes in clinical samples.

  13. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  14. A utilização de imagens na identificação humana em odontologia legal Use of images for human identification in forensic dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Papile Maciel Carvalho

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo de revisão sistemática tem por objetivo citar os métodos de identificação humana por meio da radiologia, utilizados em odontologia legal. Para isso, realizou-se revisão de literatura com 19 trabalhos selecionados dentre 45 encontrados, após aplicação de critérios de inclusão. Há diversas técnicas radiológicas que podem ser utilizadas para auxiliar na identificação humana, tanto individual como geral, incluindo a determinação do gênero, do grupo étnico e, principalmente, da idade. A análise de radiografias e tomografias ante-mortem e post-mortem tornou-se uma ferramenta fundamental nos processos de identificação em odontologia legal, principalmente com o refinamento das técnicas adquiridas com o avanço da própria radio-logia e com a incorporação da informática. Conclui-se que a partir do conhecimento adequado dos métodos disponíveis, o profissional em odontologia legal pode optar pelo método que melhor preencha as características necessárias para o sucesso da identificação, tendo cuidado na aplicação correta da técnica e na interpretação precisa das informações obtidas.The present systematic review article is aimed at describing radiological methods utilized for human identification in forensic dentistry. For this purpose, a literature review was undertaken, and out of 45 papers, 19 were selected in accordance with inclusion criteria. Several radiological techniques can be used to assist in both individual and general identification, including determination of gender, ethnic group and, mainly, age. The analysis of ante-mortem and post-mortem radiographic and tomographic images has become an essential tool for human identification in forensic dentistry, particularly with the refinement of techniques resulting from developments in the field of the radiology itself as well as the incorporation of information technology resources to the technique. It can be concluded that, based on an appropriate

  15. Use of DNA technology in forensic dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Henrique Alves da Silva; Arsenio Sales-Peres; Rogério Nogueira de Oliveira; Fernando Toledo de Oliveira; Sílvia Helena de Carvalho Sales-Peres

    2007-01-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring...

  16. Bioaccessibility and Human Exposure Assessment of Cadmium and Arsenic in Pakchoi Genotypes Grown in Co-Contaminated Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yanyan; Zheng, Xiaoman; Shohag, Md Jahidul Islam; Gu, Minghua

    2017-08-29

    In many countries cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) commonly coexist in soils contaminated by mining activities, and can easily enter the human body via consumption of leafy vegetables, like the popularly consumed pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.), causing major health concerns. In the present study, bioaccessibility and human exposure of Cd and As were assessed in twenty genotypes of pakchoi cultured at two different levels of co-contamination to identify low health risk genotypes. The bioaccessibilities of Cd and As represent a fraction of the total metals content could be bioaccessible for human, in the present study, significant differences in pakchoi Cd and As bioaccessibility were observed among all tested genotypes and co-contaminated levels. Cd and As bioaccessibility of pakchoi were in the ranges of 24.0-87.6% and 20.1-82.5%, respectively, for in the high level co-contaminated soils, which was significantly higher than for low level co-contaminated soils with 7.9-71.8% for Cd bioaccessibility and 16.1-59.0% for As bioaccessibility. The values of bioaccessible established daily intakes (BEDI) and the total bioaccessible target hazard quotients (TBTHQ) of Cd and As were also considerably higher in high level co-contaminated soils than in low level co-contaminated soils. Two genotypes (Meiguanqinggengcai and Zhenqing60F1) contained relatively low concentrations and bioaccessible Cd and As and, their BEDI and TBTHQ for Cd and As ranged below the tolerable limits set by the FAO/WHO (BEDI of Cd < 0.83 μg kg(-1) bw day(-1), BEDI of As < 3 μg kg(-1) bw day(-1)) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (TBTHQ for Cd and As < 1), this applied for both levels of co-contaminated soils for adults and children. Consequently, these findings suggest identification of safe genotypes in leafy vegetable with low health risk via genotypic screening and breeding methods could be a useful strategy to ensure the safety of food crops grown in those Cd and As co

  17. The circulation of human astrovirus genotypes in the Central West Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andreia Silva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Out of 1,588 faecal samples of children taken from three locations of the Central West Region of Brazil, 57 were positive for astroviruses (HAstVs using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. They were genotyped by nested RT-PCR and/or genomic sequencing. HAstV-1 (42.8%, HAstV-2 (23.2%, HAstV-3 (3.6%, HAstV-4 (14.3% and HAstVs -5, -6, -7 and -8 (1.8% each were detected. In Goiânia and Campo Grande, HAstV-1 was the most frequently detected genotype while in Brasília (DF it was HAstV-2. Shifts in the circulation of astrovirus genotypes were observed in DF and Campo Grande. All samples collected by rectal swabs were viral negative. The astrovirus genotypes were detected in all age groups and there was no correlation between genotype and age group.

  18. A forensic perspective on the genetic identification of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) varieties using STR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara; Oliveira, Manuela; Amorim, António; van Asch, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    The grapevine (Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera) is one of the most important agricultural crops worldwide. A long interest in the historical origins of ancient and cultivated current grapevines, as well as the need to establish phylogenetic relationships and parentage, solve homonymies and synonymies, fingerprint cultivars and clones, and assess the authenticity of plants and wines has encouraged the development of genetic identification methods. STR analysis is currently the most commonly used method for these purposes. A large dataset of grapevines genotypes for many cultivars worldwide has been produced in the last decade using a common set of recommended dinucleotide nuclear STRs. This type of marker has been replaced by long core-repeat loci in standardized state-of-the-art human forensic genotyping. The first steps toward harmonized grapevine genotyping have already been taken to bring the genetic identification methods closer to human forensic STR standards by previous authors. In this context, we bring forward a set of basic suggestions that reinforce the need to (i) guarantee trueness-to-type of the sample; (ii) use the long core-repeat markers; (iii) verify the specificity and amplification consistency of PCR primers; (iv) sequence frequent alleles and use these standardized allele ladders; (v) consider mutation rates when evaluating results of STR-based parentage and pedigree analysis; (vi) genotype large and representative samples in order to obtain allele frequency databases; (vii) standardize genotype data by establishing allele nomenclature based on repeat number to facilitate information exchange and data compilation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Forensic anthropology in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işcan, M Y; Olivera, H E

    2000-03-13

    Forensic anthropology has been one of the fastest growing medico-legal disciplines both in its contribution to the practical needs of the legal system and research accomplishments. New anthropological standards were developed to apply to a specific population of a region. The purpose of this paper is to analyze a large sample of anthropological forensic cases and to review pertinent literature that deals with anthropological standards developed for the population of the continent of Central and South America. Using Uruguay as an example, there was not a single office or anthropologist assigned to analyze human skeletal remains in Uruguay. In 1991 the Laboratorio de Antropología Forense at the Morgue Judicial of Montevideo was created. A total of 189 forensic anthropological cases (276 individuals) were analyzed since this date. Twenty six percent of cases involving human remains were positively identified. The majority came from the Departamento de Montevideo, the largest population district of the country. Most of the cases fell into the 60 to 69 years old age range (35%). Females represented 32% of the total. Since the establishment of the laboratory, the number of forensic cases increased considerably from 20 in 1991 to 40 in 1997. The case studies were accompanied with skull-photo superimposition and facial reconstruction when no other evidence for positive identification was available. This service provided by the laboratory was quickly known to coroners, law enforcement agencies, and other legal authorities and thus utilized not only in Uruguay but also in several other countries in the continent. Because of the obvious need for an anthropologist, there are now university programs to provide forensic anthropological education. Yet, research has lagged behind considerably. Deficiencies are obvious in basic osteological standards of estimating age, calculating stature, determining sex and assessing race that can be applied to populations of the continent

  20. Epidemiological data of different human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical specimens of HIV-1-infected women without history of cervical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla, Sebastian; Darwich, Laila; Cañadas, Maria Paz; Paredes, Roger; Tarrats, Antoni; Castella, Eva; Llatjos, Mariona; Bofill, Margarita; Clotet, Bonaventura; Sirera, Guillem

    2009-02-01

    To study the epidemiology of different human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical samples of HIV-1-infected women with normal Papanicolau smears. : Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort. We selected HIV-1-infected women with 2 consecutive normal Papanicolau smears at baseline and at least 1 baseline and 1 follow-up cervical sample. HPV infection was assessed by second-generation hybrid capture (HC-2) and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR). HPV genotypes were determined by mPCR. From a cohort of 139 women followed up to 4 years, 93 women meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed. The mean period between samples was 20 months (range, 6-44 months). HPV baseline prevalence was 63% [59/93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 53% to 73%] using polymerase chain reaction and 41% (38/93; 95% CI, 31% to 51%) using HC-2, P = 0.007 (kappa, 0.45; P = 0.001). The most prevalent high oncogenic risk genotypes (HR-HPV) were HPV-16 (28%), HPV-33 (18%), HPV-52 (12%), HPV-58 (11%), and HPV-39 (11%). Infection with multiple HPV genotypes was detected in >40% of women. HPV infection persisted at follow-up in 86% (51/59; 95% CI, 77% to 95%) by polymerase chain reaction and 76% (29/38; 95% CI, 62% to 90%) by HC-2. HPV infection persisted in 55% of women with samples available beyond 3 years. The actuarial probabilities of clearance and incidence of HPV infection at 36 months were 16% and 45%, respectively. HPV infection is highly prevalent and persistent among HIV-1-infected women with normal Papanicolau smears. HR-HPV genotypes other than HPV-16 (HPV-33, HPV-52) are frequently detected in HIV-infected women. mPCR provides better surveillance of HPV infection than HC-2 methods.

  1. First genetic analysis of Cryptosporidium from humans from Tasmania, and identification of a new genotype from a traveller to Bali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Anson V; Whipp, Margaret; Hogg, Geoff; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular composition of Cryptosporidium species from humans living in the insular state of Tasmania, Australia. In the present study, we genetically characterized 82 samples of Cryptosporidium from humans following conventional coproscopic testing in a routine, diagnostic laboratory. Using a PCR-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique, targeting portions of the small subunit rRNA (SSU), and 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) loci, we identified two species of Cryptosporidium, including C. hominis (subgenotypes IbA10G2, IdA16, IeA12G3T3, and IfA19G1) and C. parvum (IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA18G3), and a new operational taxonomic unit (OTU) that genetically closely resembled C. wrairi. This OTU was further characterized using markers in the actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP), and 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) genes. This study provides the first characterization of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium from Tasmania, and presents clear genetic evidence, using five independent genetic loci, for a new genotype or species of Cryptosporidium in a Tasmanian person with a recent history of travelling to Bali, Indonesia. It would be interesting to undertake detailed molecular-based studies of Cryptosporidium in Indonesia and neighbouring countries, in conjunction with morphological and experimental investigations of new genotypes.

  2. Genotypic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii Strains Associated with Human Toxoplasmosis in Spain: Direct Analysis from Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Isabel; Rubio, Jose M.; Ramírez, Carmen; Alvar, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    Genetic analysis of the SAG2 locus was performed to determine the prevalence of the different genotypes of Toxoplasma gondii (strain types I, II, and III) associated with human toxoplasmosis in Spain. This determination was made directly from primary clinical samples, obviating the previous process of isolation in mice or cell culture. A total of 34 isolates of T. gondii, collected from immunocompromised patients and congenital infection cases, were analyzed. Restriction fragment length polymorphism in PCR-amplified SAG2 products was used to group strains into one of the three genotypes of T. gondii. Complete characterization of the SAG2 gene was successful in 76.5% of the cases, demonstrating the feasibility of direct genotype analysis from clinical samples of different origins. Strains of T. gondii type II were the most prevalent in immunocompromised patients, with 52% of cases, while strains of type I were present in 75% of the congenital infection cases. These data differ from previous reports that show type II strains to be mostly associated with all kinds of human toxoplasmosis. These differences might be an effect of selection in the process of culture and isolation of the samples performed by other researchers prior to strain characterization. PMID:11283088

  3. Can human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping classify non-16/18 high-risk HPV infection by risk stratification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yeoun Eun; Ki, Eun Young; Lee, Youn Soo; Hur, Soo Young; Lee, Ahwon; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-11-01

    Infection with high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the major cause of invasive cervical cancers. HPV-16 and HPV-18 are known to be responsible for two-thirds of all invasive cervical carcinomas, followed by HPV-45, -31, and -33. Current guidelines only differentiate HPV-16/18 (+) by recommending direct colposcopy for treatment. We tried to evaluate whether there are differences in risk among 12 non-16/18 HR-HPV genotypes in this study. The pathology archive database records of 1,102 consecutive gynecologic patients, who had results for cervical cytology and histology and for HPV testing, as determined by HPV 9G DNA chip, were reviewed. Among the 1,102 patients, 346 were non-16/18 HR-HPV (+) and 231 were HPV-16/18 (+). We calculated the odds ratios for ≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 (CIN 2) of 14 groups of each HR-HPV genotype compared with a group of HR-HPV (-) patients. Based on the odds ratio of each genotype, we divided patients with non-16/18 HR-HPV genotypes (+) into two groups: HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 (+) and HPV-39/51/56/59/66/68 (+). The age-adjusted odds ratios for ≥CIN 2 of the HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 (+) and HPV-39/51/56/59/66/68 (+) groups compared with a HR-HPV (-) group were 11.9 (95% CI, 7.6 to 18.8; p<0.001) and 2.4 (95% CI, 1.4 to 4.3; p<0.001), respectively, while that of the HPV-16/18 (+) group was 18.1 (95% CI, 11.6 to 28.3; p=0.003). The 12 non-16/18 HR-HPV genotypes can be further categorized (HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 vs. HPV-39/51/56/59/66/68) by risk stratification. The HPV-31/33/35/45/52/58 genotypes might need more aggressive action. Large scale clinical trials or cohort studies are necessary to confirm our suggestion.

  4. Genotype-specific differences between mouse CNS stem cell lines expressing frontotemporal dementia mutant or wild type human tau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda E Orr

    Full Text Available Stem cell (SC lines that capture the genetics of disease susceptibility provide new research tools. To assess the utility of mouse central nervous system (CNS SC-containing neurosphere cultures for studying heritable neurodegenerative disease, we compared neurosphere cultures from transgenic mice that express human tau with the P301L familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD mutation, rTg(tau(P301L4510, with those expressing comparable levels of wild type human tau, rTg(tau(wt21221. rTg(tau(P301L4510 mice express the human tau(P301L variant in their forebrains and display cellular, histological, biochemical and behavioral abnormalities similar to those in human FTD, including age-dependent differences in tau phosphorylation that distinguish them from rTg(tau(wt21221 mice. We compared FTD-hallmark tau phosphorylation in neurospheres from rTg(tau(P301L4510 mice and from rTg(tau(wt21221 mice. The tau genotype-specific phosphorylation patterns in neurospheres mimicked those seen in mice, validating use of neurosphere cultures as models for studying tau phosphorylation. Genotype-specific tau phosphorylation was observed in 35 independent cell lines from individual fetuses; tau in rTg(tau(P301L4510 cultures was hypophosphorylated in comparison with rTg(tau(wt21221 as was seen in young adult mice. In addition, there were fewer human tau-expressing cells in rTg(tau(P301L4510 than in rTg(tau(wt21221 cultures. Following differentiation, neuronal filopodia-spine density was slightly greater in rTg(tau(P301L4510 than rTg(tau(wt21221 and control cultures. Together with the recapitulation of genotype-specific phosphorylation patterns, the observation that neurosphere lines maintained their cell line-specific-differences and retained SC characteristics over several passages supports the utility of SC cultures as surrogates for analysis of cellular disease mechanisms.

  5. Genotypic diversity of anogenital human papillomavirus in women attending cervical cancer screening in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube Mandishora, Racheal S; Christiansen, Irene K; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Duri, Kerina; Ngara, Bernard; Rounge, Trine B; Meisal, Roger; Ambur, Ole H; Palefsky, Joel M; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Chirenje, Zvavahera M

    2017-09-01

    Although anogenital cancers have been on a gradual rise in developing countries in the past few decades, they have been understudied. The objective was to investigate genotypic diversity of anogenital HPV amongst women reporting for routine cervical cancer screening in Harare in Zimbabwe. A cross-sectional study that enrolled 144 women ≥18 years from a cervical cancer-screening clinic was performed. Each woman provided a self-collected cervico-vaginal swab (VS) and a clinician-collected anal swab (CCAS). HIV testing was offered and cervical cytology was performed. Both VS and CCAS samples were HPV genotyped, using amplicon sequencing of the L1 gene region with Illumina technology. Mean age of the women was 39.9 (range 18-83 years, SD ± 11.0). HPV prevalence was 72% (104/144) in VS and 48% (69/144) in CCAS. The most common genotypes detected in both VS and CCAS were HPV18, HPV52, and HPV16. Sixty two percent of the subjects had multiple genotypic HPV infections. The odds of being HPV-positive among HIV-infected women were higher than in HIV-negative women in both the vagina and the anus (CCAS OR = 4.8; CI 2.4-9.8, P < 0.001) and (VS OR = 2.9; CI 1.3-6.4, P = 0.005). High HPV prevalence and diverse genotypes were detected in both the vagina and anus. Anal oncogenic HPV infection was common. HPV 52 was one of the most common oncogenic genotypes in both the vagina and anus. HIV co-infection played a significant role in the prevalence of HPV. These data have implications for design of primary and secondary programs for prevention of anogenital cancer in Zimbabwe. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Multiplex genotype determination at a DNA sequence polymorphism cluster in the human immunoglobulin heavy-chain region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Hood, L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-03-20

    We have developed a method for multilocus genotype determination. The method involves using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) for allele discrimination. If a polymorphism is not an RFLP, it is converted into an RFLP during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After amplification and restriction enzyme digestion, samples are analyzed by sequential gel loading during electrophoresis. The efficiency of this method was demonstrated by determining the genotypes of 108 semen samples at seven DNA sequence polymorphic sites identified in the human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region. It was shown that more than 1000 PCR products could be easily analyzed per day per investigator. To show the reliability of this method, some of the typing results were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. By computer simulation, most (98%) polymorphisms were shown to be natural or convertible (by changing 1 bp close to or next to each polymorphic site) RFLPs for the commercially available 4-base cutters. 47 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Forensic Chemistry Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the types of terrorism and crime nowadays, the importance of the forensic sciences can be bett er understood. Forensic science is the application of the wide spectrum of science to answer the question of legal system. It contains the application of the principles, techniques and methods of basic sciences and its main aim is the determination of the physical facts which are important in legal situations. Forensic chemistry is the branch of chemistry which performs the chemical analysis of evidences that used in the courts. Forensic chemist is the professional chemist who analyzes the evidences from crime scene and reaches a result by application of tests. Th us, they have to have a special education. In forensic laboratories candidates who have chemistry/biochemistry undergraduate degree and took biology and forensic chemistry lectures are preferred. It is necessary to design graduate and undergraduate education to train a forensic chemist. Science education should be at the core of the undergraduate education. In addition to this strong laboratory education on both science and forensic science should be given. Th e graduate program of forensic science example should contain forensic science subjects, strong academic lectures on special subjects and research and laboratory components.

  8. [Costicartilage analysis inspection technology in the application of forensic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hang; Xiao, Bi; Yan, Jian-Jun; Ma, Kai-Jun

    2011-10-01

    The traditional costicartilage analysis inspection is limited to morphological inspection. In recent years, with the development of forensic radiology and molecular genetics, the costicartilage analysis inspection technology has been further enriched and developed. At present, the costicartilage analysis inspection technology have been able to be used in the practice of forensic medicine. This paper reviews the research advances about the costicartilage analysis inspection technology in the identification of human gender, age and so on in order to provide the references for forensic appraisers.

  9. Forensic linguistics: Applications of forensic linguistics methods to anonymous letters

    OpenAIRE

    NOVÁKOVÁ, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    The title of my bachelor work is ?Forensic linguistics: Applications of forensic linguistics methods to anonymous letters?. Forensic linguistics is young and not very known branch of applied linguistics. This bachelor work wants to introduce forensic linguistics and its method. The bachelor work has two parts ? theory and practice. The theoretical part informs about forensic linguistics in general. Its two basic aspects utilized in forensic science and respective methods. The practical part t...

  10. Distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes and bacterial vaginosis presence in cervical samples from Paraguayan indigenous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Mongelos

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: A large variety of HPV genotypes was detected and showed a slightly different pattern from previous studies on urban women in Paraguay, with the predominance of HR-HPV. Furthermore, the information of co-infections involved in BV could be useful for the improvement of national prevention programs, as well as for laboratory surveillance of these genital infections.

  11. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumay, E.; Shumay, E.; Chen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-08-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3) is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 11}C] cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms - 3-UTR- and intron 8- VNTRs. The main findings are the following: (1) both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype) modulate DAT density in midbrain; (2) ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and (3) age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron8 - genotype groups.

  12. Role of dental expert in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anoop K; Kumar, Sachil; Rathore, Shiuli; Pandey, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Forensic dentistry has become an integral part of forensic science over the past 100 years that utilizes dental or oro-facial findings to serve the judicial system. This has been due to the dedication of people like Gustafson's, Keiser-Nielson, and Suzuki for this field. They established the essential role which forensic dentistry plays mainly in the identification of human remains. The tooth has been used as weapons and under certain circumstances, may leave information about the identity of the biter. Dental professionals have a major role to play in keeping accurate dental records and providing all necessary information so that legal authorities may recognize mal practice, negligence, fraud or abuse, and identity of unknown individuals. This paper will try to summarize the various roles of dental experts in forensic medicine.

  13. Evaluation of using composite HPV genotyping assay results to monitor human papillomavirus infection burden through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Carol Y

    2015-03-12

    Researchers often group various HPV types into composite measures based on vaccine subtypes, oncogenic potential, or phylogenetic position. Composite prevalence estimates based on PCR genotyping assay results have been calculated to assess HPV infection burden and to monitor HPV vaccine effectiveness. While prevention and intervention strategies can be made based on these prevalence estimates, the discussion on how well these prevalence estimates measure the true underlying infection burdens is limited. A simulation study was conducted to evaluate accuracy of using composite genotyping assay results to monitor HPV infection burden. Data were generated based on mathematical algorithms with prespecified type-specific infection burdens, assay sensitivity, specificity, and correlations between various HPV types. Estimated-to-true prevalence rate ratios and percent reduction of vaccine types were calculated. When "true" underlying type-specific infection burdens were prespecified as the reported prevalence in U.S. and genotyping assay with sensitivity and specificity (0.95, 0.95) was used, estimated-to-true infection prevalence ratios were 2.35, 2.29, 2.18, and 1.46, for the composite measures with 2 high-risk vaccine, 4 vaccine, 14 high-risk and 37 HPV types, respectively. Estimated-to-true prevalence ratios increased when prespecified "true" underlying infection burdens or assay specificity declined. When prespecified "true" type-specific infections of HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 were reduced by 50%, the composite prevalence estimate of 4 vaccine types only decreased by 17% which is much lower than 48% reduction in the prespecified "true" composite prevalence. Composite prevalence estimates calculated based on panels of genotyping assay results generally over-estimate the "true" underlying infection burdens and could under-estimate vaccine effectiveness. Analytical specificity of genotyping assay is as or more important than analytical sensitivity and should be considered in

  14. Database Application Schema Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Quintus Beyers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application schema layer of a Database Management System (DBMS can be modified to deliver results that may warrant a forensic investigation. Table structures can be corrupted by changing the metadata of a database or operators of the database can be altered to deliver incorrect results when used in queries. This paper will discuss categories of possibilities that exist to alter the application schema with some practical examples. Two forensic environments are introduced where a forensic investigation can take place in. Arguments are provided why these environments are important. Methods are presented how these environments can be achieved for the application schema layer of a DBMS. A process is proposed on how forensic evidence should be extracted from the application schema layer of a DBMS. The application schema forensic evidence identification process can be applied to a wide range of forensic settings.

  15. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebrock, Lorie M. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  16. Forensic sciences and forensic odontology: issues for dental hygienists and therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzolese, E; Lepore, M M; Cukovic-Bagic, I; Montagna, F; Di Vella, G

    2008-12-01

    The scientific literature contains very little about the role of the dental hygienist/therapist in the specific areas of forensic investigations and collection of evidence. The authors examine how the contribution of a highly qualified dental hygienist can be particularly helpful during human forensic identification operations and non-accidental traumas like domestic violence, child abuse, neglect and bitemarks. Forensic dental identification of human remains is a highly complex multidisciplinary challenge. It requires the involvement of several professionals who are expert in forensic science. Among these, one or more adequately trained dental hygienists could be involved. Dental hygienists/therapists may also be asked to record cutaneous lesions in two different situations. The first may be the dental office where she/he may detect oval, elliptic, or semicircular lesions on the skin of the uncovered neck, shoulder and arms of a patient. The second is the crime scene or the morgue (if one is involved), which may require a visit by the forensic odontologist called by the medical examiner or the coroner to perform an odontological autopsy. The purpose of our study is to highlight procedures that should be followed by the dental hygienist/therapist in collecting forensic information in the above-mentioned scenarios. As a valuable resource, the authors recommend training of dental hygienists in the area of forensic sciences, with particular attention to information technology and photography.

  17. PCR in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction in the mid-1980s of analyses of minisatellites for DNA analyses, a revolution has taken place in forensic genetics. The subsequent invention of the PCR made it possible to develop forensic genetics tools that allow both very informative routine investigations and still more...... and more advanced, special investigations in cases concerning crime, paternity, relationship, disaster victim identification etc. The present review gives an update on the use of DNA investigations in forensic genetics....

  18. Forensic odontology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Duane E

    2014-06-01

    This article is an overview of the field of forensic odontology, highlighting historical cases, with an emphasis on California cases, and briefly discussing some of the current techniques and issues in the field. As with all fields of dentistry, forensic odontology is adapting to new methodologies, changes in techniques, research findings and legal issues. Today's dentist who works in the forensic arena must face and understand these changes and advancements.

  19. Forensic Chemistry Training

    OpenAIRE

    GERÇEK, Zuhal

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the types of terrorism and crime nowadays, the importance of the forensic sciences can be bett er understood. Forensic science is the application of the wide spectrum of science to answer the question of legal system. It contains the application of the principles, techniques and methods of basic sciences and its main aim is the determination of the physical facts which are important in legal situations. Forensic chemistry is the branch of chemistry which performs the chemical analy...

  20. [Changes in genotype prevalence of human papillomavirus over 10-year follow-up of a cervical cancer screening cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L; Hu, S Y; Zhang, Q; Feng, R M; Zhang, L; Zhao, X L; Ma, J F; Shi, S D; Zhang, X; Pan, Q J; Zhang, W H; Qiao, Y L; Zhao, F H

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic variation of genotypes distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) over 10-year follow-up in a cervical cancer screening cohort. Methods: Based on the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study Ⅰ cohort, we detected HPV genotypes on the well-preserved exfoliated cervical cells from women who were tested HPV positive from year 2005 to year 2014 using reverse linear probe hybridization assay. The changes of prevalence of type-specific HPV over time among the overall population were estimated using linear mixed models. The association between the type-specific HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2 +) was calculated by linear Chi-square test. Finally, the trends of multiple infections of HPV with the increase of the age were analyzed. Results: During the cervical cancer screening of the overall population from 2005 to 2014, the most common genotypes among the population were HPV16 and 52. The prevalence of HPV16 decreased over time from 4.6% in 2005 to 2.2% in 2010 and 2014 (F=8.125, Pcervical cancer screening in the context of regular screening combining with immediate treatment for those CIN2 + women. HPV16 prevalence significantly decreased over time, which indicated that the variation of type-specific HPV prevalence should be considered when regular cervical cancer screening was organized using HPV technique.

  1. Intestinal parasites and genotyping of Giardia duodenalis in children: first report of genotype B in isolates from human clinical samples in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Julio César Torres-Romero; Antonio de Jesus Euan-Canto; Namibya Benito-González; Nayely Padilla-Montaño; Claribel Huchin-Chan; Julio Lara-Riegos; Roberto Cedillo-Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most prevalent enteroparasites in children. This parasite produces several clinical manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of genotypes of G. duodenalis causing infection in a region of southeastern Mexico. G. duodenalis cysts were isolated (33/429) from stool samples of children and molecular genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis, targeting the trioseph...

  2. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab MissionEstablish and maintain a Digital...

  3. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab Mission Establish and maintain a Digital...

  4. SLC24A5 and ASIP as phenotypic predictors in Brazilian population for forensic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F A; de Araújo Lima, Felícia; Gonçalves, F T; de Toledo Gonçalves, Fernanda; Fridman, C; Fridman, Cintia

    2015-07-01

    Pigmentation is a variable and complex trait in humans and it is determined by the interaction of environmental factors, age, disease, hormones, exposure to ultraviolet radiation and genetic factors, including pigmentation genes. Many polymorphisms of these genes have been associated with phenotypic diversity of skin, eyes and hair color in homogeneous populations. Phenotype prediction from biological samples using genetic information has benefited forensic area in some countries, leading some criminal investigations. Herein, we evaluated the association between polymorphisms in the genes SLC24A5 (rs1426654) and ASIP (rs6058017) with skin, eyes and hair colors, in 483 healthy individuals from Brazilian population for attainable use in forensic practice. The volunteers answered a questionnaire where they self-reported their skin, eye and hair colors. The polymorphic homozygous genotype of rs1426654∗A and rs6058017∗A in SLC24A5 and ASIP respectively, showed strongest association with fairer skin (OR 47.8; CI 14.1-161.6 and OR 8.6; CI 2.5-29.8); SLC24A5 alone showed associations with blue eyes (OR 20.7; CI 1.2-346.3) and blond hair (OR 26.6; CI 1.5-460.9). Our data showed that polymorphic genotypes (AA), in both genes, are correlated with characteristics of light pigmentation, while the ancestral genotype (GG) is related to darker traits, corroborating with previous studies in European and African populations. These associations show that specific molecular information of an individual may be useful to access some phenotypic features in an attempt to help forensic investigations, not only on crime scene samples but also in cases of face reconstructions in unknown bodies.

  5. Human leukocyte antigen genotypes and trial of desensitization in patients with oxcarbazepine-induced skin rash: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bolyun; Yu, Hee Joon; Kang, Eun-Suk; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun

    2014-08-01

    Skin rash associated with specific antiepileptic drugs occurs not infrequently and it usually necessitates discontinuation of the causative drugs. An alternative strategy is to desensitize the individual to the offending drug. We checked the human leukocyte antigen genotypes and conducted a pilot study to investigate the usefulness and safety of desensitization in pediatric patients with skin rash associated with oxcarbazepine. We enrolled 19 patients with epilepsy who had discontinued oxcarbazepine because of skin rash despite an initial good response and then became refractory to other antiepileptic drugs along with an individual with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with a similar situation. High-resolution HLA-A and -B genotyping was performed to investigate the genetic risk. The desensitization began with 0.1 mg daily reaching 120 mg on the thirty-first day. Thereafter, the dose was increased at a rate of 12 mg/day. Nineteen patients completed the desensitization protocol to a target dosage over 2-5 months. Five patients developed itching and erythema during desensitization, but the symptoms disappeared after withholding a dose increment transiently. There were no human leukocyte antigen genotypes relevant to aromatic antiepileptic drug-induced severe hypersensitivity reactions. The seizure frequency was reduced to less than at baseline in 18 individuals. This study demonstrated 95% efficacy, including 42% seizure-free patients and the favorable tolerability of desensitization to oxcarbazepine in patients with intractable epilepsy and one patient with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. Screening for sensitive human leukocyte antigen types and exclusion of severe hypersensitivity reactions should precede desensitization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Current and future directions of DNA in wildlife forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca N; Wilson-Wilde, Linzi; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Wildlife forensic science may not have attained the profile of human identification, yet the scale of criminal activity related to wildlife is extensive by any measure. Service delivery in the arena of wildlife forensic science is often ad hoc, unco-ordinated and unregulated, yet many of those currently dedicated to wildlife conservation and the protection of endangered species are striving to ensure that the highest standards are met. The genetic markers and software used to evaluate data in wildlife forensic science are more varied than those in human forensic identification and are rarely standardised between species. The time and resources required to characterise and validate each genetic maker is considerable and in some cases prohibitive. Further, issues are regularly encountered in the construction of allelic databases and allelic ladders; essential in human identification studies, but also applicable to wildlife criminal investigations. Accreditation and certification are essential in human identification and are currently being strived for in the forensic wildlife community. Examples are provided as to how best practice can be demonstrated in all areas of wildlife crime analysis and ensure that this field of forensic science gains and maintains the respect it deserves. This review is aimed at those conducting human identification to illustrate how research concepts in wildlife forensic science can be used in the criminal justice system, as well as describing the real importance of this type of forensic analysis.

  7. Investigator(®) HDplex (Qiagen) reference population database for forensic use in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gustavo; Borosky, Alicia; Corach, Daniel; Llull, Cintia; Locarno, Laura; Lojo, Mercedes; Marino, Miguel; Miozzo, María Cecilia; Modesti, Nidia; Pacharoni, Carla; Pilili, Juan Pablo; Ramella, María Isabel; Sala, Andrea; Schaller, Cecilia; Vullo, Carlos; Toscanini, Ulises

    2017-01-01

    Currently, autosomal Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers represent the method of election in forensic human identification. Commercial kits of most common use nowadays -e.g. PowerPlex(®)Fusion, Promega Corp.; AmpFlSTR GlobalFiler, Thermofisher scientific; Investigator 24Plex QS,Qiagen-, allow the co-amplification of 23 highly polymorphic STR loci providing a high discrimination power in human identity testing. However, in complex kinship analysis and familial database searches involving distant relationships, additional DNA typing is often required in order to achieve well-founded conclusions. The recently developed kit Investigator(®) HDplex (Qiagen) co-amplify twelve autosomal STRs markers (D7S1517, D3S1744, D12S391, D2S1360, D6S474, D4S2366, D8S1132, D5S2500, D18S51, D21S2055, D10S2325, SE33), nine of which are not present in the above mentioned kits, providing a set of efficient supplementary markers for human identification purposes. In this study we genotyped a sample of 980 individuals from urban areas of ten Argentinean provinces using the Investigator(®) HDplex kit, aiming to provide forensic estimates for use in forensic casework and parentage testing in Argentina. We report reference allelic frequency databases for each of the provinces studied as well as for the combined samples. No deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed. A reasonable discrimination capacity and power of exclusion was estimated which allowed predicting an acceptable forensic behavior of this kit, either to be used as the main STR panel for simple cases or as an auxiliary tool in complex cases. Additionally, population comparison tests showed that the studied samples are relatively homogeneous across the country for these STR set. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparing Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Viral Co-Detections, Genotypes and Risk Factors for Severe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Nina; Krokstad, Sidsel; Stenseng, Inger Heimdal; Christensen, Andreas; Skanke, Lars Høsøien; Risnes, Kari Ravndal; Nordbø, Svein Arne; Døllner, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclarified as to whether viral co-detection and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) genotypes relate to clinical manifestations in children with HMPV and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), and if the clinical course and risk factors for severe LRTI differ between HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Methods We prospectively enrolled hospitalized children aged <16 years with LRTI from 2006 to 2015. Children were clinically examined, and nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed using semi-quantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction tests for HMPV, RSV and 17 other pathogens. HMPV-positive samples were genotyped. Results A total of 171 children had HMPV infection. HMPV-infected children with single virus (n = 106) and co-detections (n = 65) had similar clinical manifestations. No clinical differences were found between HMPV genotypes A (n = 67) and B (n = 80). The HMPV-infected children were older (median 17.2 months) than RSV-infected children (median 7.3 months, n = 859). Among single virus-infected children, no differences in age-adjusted LRTI diagnoses were found between HMPV and RSV. Age was an important factor for disease severity among single virus-infected children, where children <6 months old with HMPV had a milder disease than those with RSV, while in children 12–23 months old, the pattern was the opposite. In multivariable logistic regression analysis for each virus type, age ≥12 months (HMPV), and age <6 months (RSV), prematurity, ≥1 chronic disease and high viral loads of RSV, but not high HMPV viral loads, were risk factors for severe disease. Conclusions Among hospitalized children with LRTI, HMPV manifests independently of viral co-detections and HMPV genotypes. Disease severity in HMPV- and RSV-infected children varies in relation to age. A history of prematurity and chronic disease increases the risk of severe LRTI among HMPV- and RSV-infected children. PMID:28095451

  9. The Relationship between PON1 phenotype and PON1-192 genotype in detoxification of three oxons by human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Elaine; Daly, Ann K; Williams, Faith M

    2007-02-01

    Phosphorothioate pesticides (OP) such as diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion are activated to highly toxic oxon metabolites by the cytochromes P450 (P450s), mainly in the liver. Simultaneously, the P450s catalyze detoxification of OP to nontoxic dearylated metabolites. The oxon is then detoxified to the dearylated metabolite by PON1, an A-esterase present in the liver and blood serum. The aims of this study were to define the influence of PON1-192 genotype and phenotype on the capacity of human liver microsomes (n = 27) to detoxify the oxons diazoxon, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and paraoxon. Near physiological assay conditions were used to reflect as closely as possible metabolism in vivo and because the hydrolytic activity of the allelic variants of PON1-192 are differentially affected by a number of conditions. The rates of hydrolysis of diazoxon, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and paraoxon varied 5.7-, 16-, and 56-fold, respectively, regardless of PON1-192 genotype. Individuals with the PON1-192RR genotype preferentially hydrolyzed paraoxon (p < 0.01), and the R allele was associated with higher hydrolytic activity toward chlorpyrifos-oxon, but not diazoxon. There were strongly significant relationships between phenylacetate and paraoxon hydrolysis (p < 0.001) and phenylacetate and chlorpyrifos-oxon hydrolysis (p < 0.001), but not between phenylacetate and diazoxon hydrolysis. These data highlight the importance of PON1 phenotype for efficient hydrolysis of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos-oxon, but environmental and yet unknown genetic factors are more important than PON1-192 genotype in determining capacity to hydrolyze diazoxon.

  10. Human papillomavirus genotype distribution in high grade cervical lesions (CIN 2/3) in France: EDITH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prétet, Jean-Luc; Jacquard, Anne-Carole; Carcopino, Xavier; Monnier-Benoit, Sylvain; Averous, Gerlinde; Soubeyrand, Benoit; Leocmach, Yann; Mougin, Christiane; Riethmuller, Didier

    2008-01-15

    High grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2/3) have a high potential to progress to invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Pap testing including follow-up and treatment of CIN 2/3 is currently the best prevention of ICC, but is associated with morbidity, namely obstetrical adverse effects and psychological distress. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is universally accepted as the necessary cause of ICC. The objective of the present study was to describe the type-specific prevalence of HPV in CIN 2/3 in France and hereby to locally estimate the potential benefit of an HPV 16/18 L1 virus-like particles (VLP) vaccine. A total of 493 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded CIN 2/3 specimens were analyzed. Medical records were examined for patient related data. HPV were genotyped with the INNO-LiPA assay allowing the detection of 24 HPV genotypes. The overall prevalence of LiPA detectable HPV was 98%. The most prevalent genotype was HPV 16 (62%) followed by HPV 31 (15%), 33 (12%), 52 (9%), 51 (8%), 58 (7%), 35 and 18 (4%). Multiple infection with at least two different high-risk (HR) HPV genotypes was observed in 26% of all specimens including 2.6% with HPV 16 and 18 multiple infections. The present study indicates that HPV 16 is by far the most common HPV type associated with CIN 2/3 in France. With an HPV 16 and 18 prevalence of 64%, HPV 16/18 L1 VLP vaccines would be expected to significantly reduce the burden associated with the management and treatment of CIN 2/3 in France. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The human leukocyte antigen genotype has a modest effect on the insulin gene polymorphism-associated susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in the Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, A P; Hermann, R; Knip, M; Simell, O; Akerblom, H K; Ilonen, J

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the known human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated risk, polymorphisms of insulin gene region show association with type 1 diabetes. We analyzed possible interactions between the HLA class II genotypes and -2221 MspI (insulin) INS gene polymorphism in Finnish population, using a series of 1331 diabetic children and 2222 healthy newborns. C/C genotype was increased among diabetic children compared to the controls (83.2 vs 70.1%). This genotype was slightly more common in diabetic children with low or moderate HLA-associated risk than in those with high risk, but INS gene effect was clear in all major HLA-risk genotypes and, thus, can be used as an additional risk prediction marker, irrespective of HLA genotypes.

  12. New genotypes of Orientia tsutsugamushi isolated from humans in Eastern Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hua Yang

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus, an acute febrile illness, is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi. In our study, O. tsutsugamushi was rapidly detected and typed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis of the 56-kDa type-specific antigen (TSA gene. To investigate the genotypes of clinical variants of O. tsutsugamushi, we collected 3223 blood samples from eastern Taiwanese patients with suspected scrub typhus from 2002 to 2008. In total, 505 samples were found to be positive for scrub typhus infection by PCR, and bacteria were isolated from 282 of them. Four prototype genotype strains (Karp, Kato, Kawasaki and Gilliam and eleven different Taiwanese genotype isolates (Taiwan-A, -B, -C, -D, -E, -G, -H, -J, -N, -O and -P were identified by RPLF analysis. Taiwan-H, the major genotype in eastern Taiwan, exhibited prevalence and isolation rates of 47.3% (239/505 and 42.6% (120/282, respectively. We also assessed the genetic relatedness of the 56-kDa TSA gene among eight Taiwan-H isolates, thirteen other Taiwanese isolates and 104 DNA sequences deposited in the GenBank database using MEGA version 5.0 and PHYLIP version 3.66. We found that the Taiwan-H isolates formed into a new cluster, which was designated the Taiwan Gilliam-variant (TG-v cluster to distinguish it from the Japanese Gilliam-variant (JG-v cluster. According to Simplot analysis, TG-v is a new recombinant strain among Gilliam, Ikeda and Kato. Moreover, the Gilliam-Kawasaki cluster had the highest percentage of RFLP cases and was the most frequently isolated type in eastern Taiwan (50.1%, 253/505; 44.0%, 124/282. These findings shed light on the genetic evolution of O. tsutsugamushi into different strains and may be useful in vaccine development and epidemic disease control in the future.

  13. Serotypes, genotypes and antimicrobial resistance patterns of human diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli isolates circulating in southeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Chen, X; Zheng, S; Yu, F; Kong, H; Yang, Q; Cui, D; Chen, N; Lou, B; Li, X; Tian, L; Yang, X; Xie, G; Dong, Y; Qin, Z; Han, D; Wang, Y; Zhang, W; Tang, Y-W; Li, L

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) infection is a major health problem in developing countries. The prevalence and characteristics of DEC have not been thoroughly investigated in China. Consecutive faecal specimens from outpatients with acute diarrhoea in nine sentinel hospitals in southeastern China were collected from July 2009 to June 2011. Bacterial and viral pathogens were detected by culture and RT-PCR, respectively. DEC isolates were further classified into five pathotypes using multiplex PCR. The O/H serotypes, sequence types (STs) and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the DEC isolates were determined. A total of 2466 faecal specimens were collected, from which 347 (14.1%) DEC isolates were isolated. DEC was the dominant bacterial pathogen detected. The DEC isolates included 217 EAEC, 62 ETEC, 52 EPEC, 14 STEC, one EIEC and one EAEC/ETEC. O45 (6.6%) was the predominant serotype. Genotypic analysis revealed that the major genotype was ST complex 10 (87, 25.6%). Isolates belonging to the serogroups or genotypes of O6, O25, O159, ST48, ST218, ST94 and ST1491 were highly susceptible to the majority of antimicrobials. In contrast, isolates belonging to O45, O15, O1, O169, ST38, ST226, ST69, ST31, ST93, ST394 and ST648 were highly resistant to the majority of antimicrobials. DEC accounted for the majority of bacterial pathogens causing acute diarrhoea in southeastern China, and it is therefore necessary to test for all DEC, not only the EHEC O157:H7. Some serogroups or genotypes of DEC were highly resistant to the majority of antimicrobials. DEC surveillance should be emphasized.

  14. Giardia assemblage A: human genotype in muskoxen in the Canadian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy John

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As part of an ongoing program assessing the biodiversity and impacts of parasites in Arctic ungulates we examined 72 fecal samples from muskoxen on Banks Island, Northwest Territories, Canada for Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Cryptosporidium spp. were not detected, but 21% of the samples were positive for Giardia. Sequencing of four isolates of Giardia demonstrated G. duodenalis, Assemblage A, a zoonotic genotype.

  15. Evaluation of using composite HPV genotyping assay results to monitor human papillomavirus infection burden through simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers often group various HPV types into composite measures based on vaccine subtypes, oncogenic potential, or phylogenetic position. Composite prevalence estimates based on PCR genotyping assay results have been calculated to assess HPV infection burden and to monitor HPV vaccine effectiveness. While prevention and intervention strategies can be made based on these prevalence estimates, the discussion on how well these prevalence estimates measure the true underlying infecti...

  16. Model-based prediction of human hair color using DNA variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Branicki (Wojciech); F. Liu (Fan); K. van Duijn (Kate); J. Draus-Barini (Jolanta); E. Pośpiech (Ewelina); S. Walsh (Susan); T. Kupiec (Tomasz); A. Wojas-Pelc (Anna); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPredicting complex human phenotypes from genotypes is the central concept of widely advocated personalized medicine, but so far has rarely led to high accuracies limiting practical applications. One notable exception, although less relevant for medical but important for forensic purposes

  17. Model-based prediction of human hair color using DNA variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Branicki (Wojciech); F. Liu (Fan); K. van Duijn (Kate); J. Draus-Barini (Jolanta); E. Pośpiech (Ewelina); S. Walsh (Susan); T. Kupiec (Tomasz); A. Wojas-Pelc (Anna); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPredicting complex human phenotypes from genotypes is the central concept of widely advocated personalized medicine, but so far has rarely led to high accuracies limiting practical applications. One notable exception, although less relevant for medical but important for forensic

  18. Genotype distribution of cervical human papillomavirus DNA in women with cervical lesions in Bioko, Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carro-Campos Patricia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HVP vaccine is a useful tool for preventing cervical cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine the most frequent HPV genotypes in Equatorial Guinea in order to develop future vaccination strategies to apply in this country. Methods A campaign against cervical cancer was carried out in the area on a total of 1,680 women. 26 of the women, following cytological screening, were treated surgically with a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP. Cases were studied histologically and were genotyped from paraffin blocks by applying a commercial kit that recognized 35 HPV types. Results Cytological diagnoses included 17 HSIL, 1 LSIL, 5 ASC-H and 3 AGUS. Histological diagnosis resulted in 3 cases of microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma stage IA of FIGO, 9 CIN-3, 8 CIN-2, 2 CIN-1, 3 flat condylomas and mild dysplasia of the endocervical epithelium. Fifteen of twenty-five cases genotyped were positive for HPV (60%. HPV 16 and 33 were identified in four cases each, HPV 58 in two other cases, and HPV 18, 31, 52, and 82 in one case, with one HPV 16 and 58 coinfection. Conclusion The frequency of HPV types in the African area varies in comparison to other regions, particularly in Europe and USA. Vaccination against the five most common HPV types (16, 33, 58, 18, and 31 should be considered in the geographic region of West Africa and specifically in Equatorial Guinea.

  19. Genotype-specific concordance of oral and genital human papillomavirus infections among marital couples is low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, K; Rautava, J; Louvanto, K; Syrjänen, K; Grenman, S; Syrjänen, S

    2016-04-01

    Data on genotype-specific concordance of oral-oral and genital-oral HPV infections among marital couples are key to understand HPV transmission between spouses. Genotype-specific concordance of HPV infections (oral/genital) and their co-variates among 131 marital couples were determined during 6-year follow-up (FU). Seven oral scrapings were taken from both spouses, accompanied by six genital samplings from the women and one (at baseline) from the male partners. HPV-genotyping was performed by nested PCR and a Luminex®-based Multimetrix Assay. Demographic data were collected with questionnaires at baseline and study conclusion. Prevalence of oral HPV varied from 10.3 to 27.0 % and 15.8 to 31.3 % in women and men, respectively. At baseline, 37.6 % of the male genital samples were HPV-positive while in female genital samples, HPV prevalence varied from 13.3 to 59.4 %. Only 15 couples had HPV genotype-specific concordance (oral-oral n = 7; male oral-female genital n = 9; female oral-male genital n = 2). In the nested case-control setting, higher number of deliveries (OR 0.145, 95%CI 0.030-0.706, p = 0.017) and higher number of intercourse (OR 0.488, 95%CI 0.243-0.978, p = 0.043) decreased the likelihood of concordant HPV infections while practicing oral sex increased the risk (OR 0.299, 95%CI 0.120-0.748, p = 0.010). In multivariate analysis, the likelihood of concordance was decreased by higher number of pregnancies of the female partner (p = 0.020) and by higher frequency of intercourse reported by the male spouse (p = 0.027). To conclude, asymptomatic HPV infections were common in both spouses while genotype-specific concordance was low. This supports the view that HPV profile of the spouses has been established before the current marital relationship.

  20. Nationwide prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and viral genotype distribution in 37 cities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Guo, Xiao-Lei; Wisman, G Bea A; Schuuring, Ed; Wang, Wen-Feng; Zeng, Zheng-Yu; Zhu, Hong; Wu, Shang-Wei

    2015-07-04

    Type-specific high-risk HPV (hrHPV) infection is related to cervical carcinogenesis. The prevalence of hrHPV infection varies geographically, which might reflect the epidemiological characteristics of cervical cancer among different populations. To establish a foundation for HPV-based screening and vaccination programs in China, we investigated the most recent HPV prevalence and genotypic distributions in different female age groups and geographical regions in China. In 2012, a total of 120,772 liquid-based cytological samples from women enrolled for population- or employee-based cervical screening in 37 Chinese cities were obtained by the Laboratory of Molecular Infectious Diseases of Guangzhou KingMed. A total of 111,131 samples were tested by Hybrid Capture II and the other 9,641 were genotyped using the Tellgenplex™ HPV DNA Assay. The total positive rate for hrHPV was 21.07 %, which ranged from 18.42 % (Nanchang) to 31.94 % (Haikou) and varied by region. The regions of Nanchang, Changsha, Hangzhou, Chengdu, Fuzhou, Guangdong, and Guiyang could be considered the low prevalence regions. Age-specific prevalence showed a "two-peak" pattern, with the youngest age group (15-19 years) presenting the highest hrHPV infection rate (30.55 %), followed by a second peak for the 50-60-year-old group. Overall, the most prevalent genotypes were HPV16 (4.82 %) and HPV52 (4.52 %), followed by HPV58 (2.74 %). Two genotypes HPV6 (4.01 %) and HPV11 (2.29 %) were predominant in the low-risk HPV (lrHPV) type, while the mixed genotypes HPV16 + 52 and HPV52 + 58 were most common in women with multiple infections. This study shows that HPV infection in China has increased to the level of an "HPV-heavy-burden" zone in certain regions, with prevalence varying significantly among different ages and regions. Data from this study represent the most current survey of the nationwide prevalence of HPV infection in China, and can serve as valuable reference to guide nationwide cervical cancer

  1. Forensic entomology: applications and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, J; Richards, C S; Campobasso, C P; Zehner, R; Hall, M J R

    2011-12-01

    Forensic entomology is the science of collecting and analysing insect evidence to aid in forensic investigations. Its main application is in the determination of the minimum time since death in cases of suspicious death, either by estimating the age of the oldest necrophagous insects that developed on the corpse, or by analysing the insect species composition on the corpse. In addition, toxicological and molecular examinations of these insects may help reveal the cause of death or even the identity of a victim, by associating a larva with its last meal, for example, in cases where insect evidence is left at a scene after human remains have been deliberately removed. Some fly species can develop not only on corpses but on living bodies too, causing myiasis. Analysis of larvae in such cases can demonstrate the period of neglect of humans or animals. Without the appropriate professional collection of insect evidence, an accurate and convincing presentation of such evidence in court will be hampered or even impossible. The present paper describes the principles and methods of forensic entomology and the optimal techniques for collecting insect evidence.

  2. Development of two highly sensitive forensic sex determination assays based on human DYZ1 and Alu repetitive DNA elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Amanda; Gobeski, Brianne; Foran, David

    2014-11-01

    Sex determination is a critical component of forensic identification, the standard genetic method for which is detection of the single copy amelogenin gene that has differing homologues on the X and Y chromosomes. However, this assay may not be sensitive enough when DNA samples are minute or highly compromised, thus other strategies for sex determination are needed. In the current research, two ultrasensitive sexing assays, based on real-time PCR and pyrosequencing, were developed targeting the highly repetitive elements DYZ1 on the Y chromosome and Alu on the autosomes. The DYZ1/Alu strategy was compared to amelogenin for overall sensitivity based on high molecular weight and degraded DNA, followed by assaying the sex of 34 touch DNA samples and DNA from 30 hair shafts. The real-time DYZ1/Alu assay proved to be approximately 1500 times more sensitive than its amelogenin counterpart based on high molecular weight DNA, and even more sensitive when sexing degraded DNA. The pyrosequencing DYZ1/Alu assay correctly sexed 26 of the touch DNAs, compared to six using amelogenin. Hair shaft DNAs showed equally improved sexing results using the DYZ1/Alu assays. Overall, both DYZ1/Alu assays were far more sensitive and accurate than was the amelogenin assay, and thus show great utility for sexing poor quality and low quantity DNA evidence.

  3. [Research progress on the phenotype informative SNP in forensic science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, Hong-Du; Huang, Dai-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) refers to the single base sequence variation in specific location of the human genome. Phenotype informative SNP has gradually become one of the research hot spots in forensic science. In this paper, the forensic research situation and application prospect of phenotype informative SNP in the characteristics of hair, eye and skin color, height, and facial feature are reviewed.

  4. Molecular epidemiological analysis of Cryptosporidium spp. in the United Kingdom: results of genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in 1,705 fecal samples from humans and 105 fecal samples from livestock animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauchlin, J; Amar, C; Pedraza-Díaz, S; Nichols, G L

    2000-11-01

    Cryptosporidium present in 1,705 fecal samples from humans and 105 from livestock animals were analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein. Overall, genotype 1 (human exclusive type) was detected in 37.8% of the samples from humans, genotype 2 (broad host range) was detected in 61.5%, a third genotype designated genotype 3 (Cryptosporidium meleagridis) was detected in 0.3%, and both genotypes 1 and 2 were recovered from 0.4%. All samples from livestock yielded genotype 2. Among 469 patients infected during eight drinking water-related outbreaks, five outbreaks were predominantly due to genotype 1, and three were due to genotype 2. Fifty-four samples were collected from patients involved with five swimming pool-associated outbreaks: two outbreaks were due to genotype 1, one was due to genotype 2, and the remaining two involved both genotypes 1 and 2. Among 26 family outbreaks and 1 children's nursery outbreak (2 to 3 members per group), the same genotype was recovered from the different members of each outbreak: 13 were due to genotype 1, and 14 were due to genotype 2. In eighteen patients reporting contact with animals and/or farms, genotype 1 was recovered from one patient and genotype 2 was recovered from the remaining 17. Among the sporadic cases, there were distinct geographical and temporal variations in the distribution of the genotypes. The spring peak in cases was due to genotype 2. Genotype 1 was significantly more common in patients infected during the late-summer-autumn peak and in those with a history of foreign travel.

  5. HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in a population-based split-sample study of well-screened women using CLART HPV2 Human Papillomavirus genotype microarray system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Rebolj, Matejka; Ejegod, Ditte Møller;

    2014-01-01

    , Denmark, an area with a high background risk of cervical cancer where women aged 23-65 years are targeted for organized screening. METHODS: Material from 5,068 SurePath samples of women participating in routine screening and clinical follow-up of cervical abnormalities was tested using liquid based...... cytology, CLART HPV2 and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2). RESULTS: At least one of the 35 defined genotypes was detected by CLART in 1,896 (37%) samples. The most frequent high-risk genotypes were HPV 16 (7%), HPV 52 (5%), and HPV 31 (4%). The most frequent low-risk genotypes were HPV 53 (5%), HPV 61 (4%), and HPV...... CLART showed a higher analytical sensitivity for 13 high-risk HPV genotypes than HC2, and this was found in all age-groups and in women normal cytology. CONCLUSIONS: CLART performed well with a positive reproducibility for high-risk genotypes of 86%, and a negative reproducibility of 97%. This report...

  6. Large scale genotype comparison of human papillomavirus E2-host interaction networks provides new insights for e2 molecular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Muller

    Full Text Available Human Papillomaviruses (HPV cause widespread infections in humans, resulting in latent infections or diseases ranging from benign hyperplasia to cancers. HPV-induced pathologies result from complex interplays between viral proteins and the host proteome. Given the major public health concern due to HPV-associated cancers, most studies have focused on the early proteins expressed by HPV genotypes with high oncogenic potential (designated high-risk HPV or HR-HPV. To advance the global understanding of HPV pathogenesis, we mapped the virus/host interaction networks of the E2 regulatory protein from 12 genotypes representative of the range of HPV pathogenicity. Large-scale identification of E2-interaction partners was performed by yeast two-hybrid screenings of a HaCaT cDNA library. Based on a high-confidence scoring scheme, a subset of these partners was then validated for pair-wise interaction in mammalian cells with the whole range of the 12 E2 proteins, allowing a comparative interaction analysis. Hierarchical clustering of E2-host interaction profiles mostly recapitulated HPV phylogeny and provides clues to the involvement of E2 in HPV infection. A set of cellular proteins could thus be identified discriminating, among the mucosal HPV, E2 proteins of HR-HPV 16 or 18 from the non-oncogenic genital HPV. The study of the interaction networks revealed a preferential hijacking of highly connected cellular proteins and the targeting of several functional families. These include transcription regulation, regulation of apoptosis, RNA processing, ubiquitination and intracellular trafficking. The present work provides an overview of E2 biological functions across multiple HPV genotypes.

  7. Forensic science, genetics and wildlife biology: getting the right mix for a wildlife DNA forensics lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Rob

    2010-09-01

    Wildlife DNA forensics is receiving increasing coverage in the popular press and has begun to appear in the scientific literature in relation to several different fields. Recognized as an applied subject, it rests on top of very diverse scientific pillars ranging from biochemistry through to evolutionary genetics, all embedded within the context of modern forensic science. This breadth of scope, combined with typically limited resources, has often left wildlife DNA forensics hanging precariously between human DNA forensics and academics keen to seek novel applications for biological research. How best to bridge this gap is a matter for regular debate among the relatively few full-time practitioners in the field. The decisions involved in establishing forensic genetic services to investigate wildlife crime can be complex, particularly where crimes involve a wide range of species and evidential questions. This paper examines some of the issues relevant to setting up a wildlife DNA forensics laboratory based on experiences of working in this area over the past 7 years. It includes a discussion of various models for operating individual laboratories as well as options for organizing forensic testing at higher national and international levels.

  8. Forensic Science Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Forensic science technicians, also called crime laboratory technicians or police science technicians, help solve crimes. They examine and identify physical evidence to reconstruct a crime scene. This article discusses everything students need to know about careers for forensic science technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career…

  9. Forensic Science Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Forensic science technicians, also called crime laboratory technicians or police science technicians, help solve crimes. They examine and identify physical evidence to reconstruct a crime scene. This article discusses everything students need to know about careers for forensic science technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career…

  10. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in urine samples from unvaccinated male and female adolescents in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena Rosanna; Panatto, Donatella; Martinelli, Marianna; Amicizia, Daniela; Zotti, Carla Maria; Martinese, Morena; Bonanni, Paolo; Boccalini, Sara; Coppola, Rosa Cristina; Masia, Giuseppina; Meloni, Angelo; Castiglia, Paolo; Piana, Andrea; Gasparini, Roberto; Tanzi, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of vaccination against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in adolescent girls in 2006 has focused virological surveillance on this age group. As few studies have evaluated HPV infections in young populations, further data are needed in order to improve and extend prophylactic policy and to monitor epidemiological changes. The present study aimed at evaluating overall and type-specific HPV prevalence in both female and male adolescents in Italy. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed on urine samples collected from 870 unvaccinated adolescents (369 females, 501 males, 11-18 years of age) in five cities in Italy. Following DNA extraction by means of a commercial kit (NucliSENS(®)-miniMAG(®), bioMérieux), the L1 gene fragment was PCR amplified and genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. HPV DNA was detected in 1.5% of all samples, and in 3% and 0.4% of samples from females and males, respectively. In approximately 70% of HPV DNA positive adolescents, the infection was due to a single genotype, with 88.9% of genotypes belonging to the HR-clade. The only two HPV-positive boys (14 and 18 years old) had HPV-70 genotype. Only one of the 11 HPV-infected girls was in the 11-14 age-group. HPV prevalence was 4.2% in girls aged 15-18 years and 60% of infections were due to vaccine types HPV-16 or HPV-6/-11. This is one of the few studies, the first conducted in Italy, on HPV infection in adolescents. Urine testing is the easier way of detecting HPV infection in younger populations. Our data revealed a very low HPV prevalence, and no infections were observed in the 12-year-old vaccine target population. The majority of infections were seen in females aged 15-18 years. Overall, more than 50% and 30% of the potentially persistent HPV infections detected in this group could have been prevented by the quadrivalent and the bivalent vaccines, respectively.

  11. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in urine samples from unvaccinated male and female adolescents in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bianchi

    Full Text Available The introduction of vaccination against Human Papillomavirus (HPV in adolescent girls in 2006 has focused virological surveillance on this age group. As few studies have evaluated HPV infections in young populations, further data are needed in order to improve and extend prophylactic policy and to monitor epidemiological changes. The present study aimed at evaluating overall and type-specific HPV prevalence in both female and male adolescents in Italy. HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed on urine samples collected from 870 unvaccinated adolescents (369 females, 501 males, 11-18 years of age in five cities in Italy. Following DNA extraction by means of a commercial kit (NucliSENS(®-miniMAG(®, bioMérieux, the L1 gene fragment was PCR amplified and genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. HPV DNA was detected in 1.5% of all samples, and in 3% and 0.4% of samples from females and males, respectively. In approximately 70% of HPV DNA positive adolescents, the infection was due to a single genotype, with 88.9% of genotypes belonging to the HR-clade. The only two HPV-positive boys (14 and 18 years old had HPV-70 genotype. Only one of the 11 HPV-infected girls was in the 11-14 age-group. HPV prevalence was 4.2% in girls aged 15-18 years and 60% of infections were due to vaccine types HPV-16 or HPV-6/-11. This is one of the few studies, the first conducted in Italy, on HPV infection in adolescents. Urine testing is the easier way of detecting HPV infection in younger populations. Our data revealed a very low HPV prevalence, and no infections were observed in the 12-year-old vaccine target population. The majority of infections were seen in females aged 15-18 years. Overall, more than 50% and 30% of the potentially persistent HPV infections detected in this group could have been prevented by the quadrivalent and the bivalent vaccines, respectively.

  12. Evaluation of the InnoTyper® 21 genotyping kit in multi-ethnic populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ristow, Peter Gustav; Barnes, Nicole; Murphy, Gina Pineda

    2017-01-01

    We report the findings of the evaluation of the InnoTyper® 21 genotyping kit for the use of human identification (HID) and paternity testing in South Africa. This novel forensic kit evaluates 20 retrotransposable elements (AC4027, MLS26, ALU79712, NBC216, NBC106, RG148, NBC13, AC2265, MLS09, AC1141......, TARBP, AC2305, HS4.69, NBC51, ACA1766, NBC120, NBC10, NBC102, SB19.12 and NBC148) and the Amelogenin locus for sex determination. The evaluation of the genotyping performance showed no significant spectral pull-up for peak heights between 100 and 30,000 RFUs. All loci presented biallelic patterns except...... applying a Bonferroni correction. This kit also showed minor levels of population structure which could differentiate between the African and non-African population groups. Finally, in challenging casework with severely degraded biological material, the InnoTyper® 21 genotyping kit was compatible...

  13. Influence of metabolic genotypes on biomarkers of exposure to 1,3-butadiene in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Soleo, Leonardo; Warholm, Margareta; Begemann, Petra; Rannug, Agneta; Neumann, Hans-G; Swenberg, James A; Vimercati, Luigi; Colombi, Antonio

    2002-10-01

    Carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene (BD) has been linked to its metabolic activation of genotoxic epoxides. The inherited variations in the activity of BD-metabolizing enzymes may be responsible for individual differences that modulate the effects of BD exposure. In this study, 40 Italian subjects (30 BD-exposed workers and 10 clerks) were investigated to evaluate the role of genetic polymorphism of cytochromes P450 2E1, microsomal epoxide hydrolase, glutathione transferases GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, and alcohol dehydrogenase, on urinary N-acetyl-S-(3,4-hydroxybutyl)-L-cysteine (MI) and hemoglobin N-(2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl)-valine adducts (THBVal). Median urinary MI and THBVal levels were 1.71 mg/g creatinine and 37.0 pmol/g globin in BD-exposed workers (exposure range, 4-201 microg/m(3)) and 1.42 mg/g creatinine and 35.3 pmol/g globin in unexposed subjects. No difference between the two groups was observed. Among all subjects, MI and THBVal levels were significantly correlated (r = 0.333). Smoking positively influenced the formation of THBVal. Higher THBVal levels were found in subjects with GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null genotypes; borderline influences were also noticed for CYP2E1(G(-35)T). An additive effect of combined polymorphisms for CYP2E1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes on the THBVal levels was suggested. A multiple linear regression analysis, where each factor contributed significantly, correlated THBVal levels with smoking, CYP2E1(G(-35)T), GSTT1, and GSTM1 genotypes (r = 0.698). Our results indicate that the THBVal level is influenced by genotypes, and that the analysis of combined polymorphisms may be the key to a better understanding of the role played by polymorphism of BD-metabolizing enzymes.

  14. Genotyping of human parvovirus B19 in clinical samples from Brazil and Paraguay using heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Marcos César Lima de; Ferreira, Ana Maria de Amorim; Santos, Marta Gonçalves Matos dos; Oviedo, Elva Cristina; Bello, Maria Sônia Dal; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça; Maceira, Juan Manuel Piñeiro; von Hubinger, Maria Genoveva; Couceiro, José Nelson dos Santos Silva

    2011-06-01

    Heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing were utilised to genotype human parvovirus B19 samples from Brazil and Paraguay. Ninety-seven serum samples were collected from individuals presenting with abortion or erythema infectiosum, arthropathies, severe anaemia and transient aplastic crisis; two additional skin samples were collected by biopsy. After the procedure, all clinical samples were classified as genotype 1.

  15. Genotyping of human parvovirus B19 in clinical samples from Brazil and Paraguay using heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos César Lima de Mendonça

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing were utilised to genotype human parvovirus B19 samples from Brazil and Paraguay. Ninety-seven serum samples were collected from individuals presenting with abortion or erythema infectiosum, arthropathies, severe anaemia and transient aplastic crisis; two additional skin samples were collected by biopsy. After the procedure, all clinical samples were classified as genotype 1.

  16. Forensic psychiatry in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tariq; Nizami, Asad Tamizuddin; Hirji, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews existing forensic psychiatric services in Pakistan highlighting the role played by the judicial and the medical fraternity in managing the legal and forensic issues of the population of patients with mental illnesses. Until 2001, all legal and forensic issues were dealt with the mental health legislation of 1912, the Lunacy Act of 1912. This was inherited from the British rulers in the Sub-Continent at the time. The Mental Health Ordinance of 2001 could not sustain following the 18th constitutional amendment in 2010, whereby psychiatric healthcare was devolved to the provinces from the previous federal authority. The article also highlights the difficulties and the barriers in implementation of the forensic psychiatric services in Pakistan at various levels within the healthcare system. This article also delves into the current framework of training in forensic psychiatry for postgraduates as well as the assessments and management schedules for the mentally ill offenders at tertiary care institutions in Pakistan.

  17. [The concept of "forensic medicine"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V L

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the definition of forensic medicine and its evolution during the past 300 years is presented. The special character of forensic medicine, its subject-matter, scope of research, procedures, goals and targeted application of forensic medical knowledge are discussed. The original definition of the notion of "forensic medicine" is proposed.

  18. A Novel Forensic Computing Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yunfeng; LU Yansheng

    2006-01-01

    According to the requirement of computer forensic and network forensic, a novel forensic computing model is presented, which exploits XML/OEM/RM data model, Data fusion technology, forensic knowledgebase, inference mechanism of expert system and evidence mining engine. This model takes advantage of flexility and openness, so it can be widely used in mining evidence.

  19. Origin and development of forensic medicine in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharoshah, Magdy Abdel Azim; Zaki, Mamdouh Kamal; Galeb, Sherien Salah; Moulana, Ashraf Abdel Reheem; Elsebaay, Elsebaay Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Egyptians are one of the first civilisations to practice the removal and examination of internal organs of humans. Their practices ranged from embalming to faith healing to surgery and autopsy. Modern radiological studies, together with various forensic techniques, allowed scientists unique glimpses of the state of health in Egypt 4000 years ago and discovered one of the earliest applications of autopsy, the main element of forensic medicine practice today. The Egyptian Forensic Medicine Authority handles a relatively large number of cases annually and depends on different assisting laboratories (forensic histopathology, microbiology, serology unit, DNA laboratory, forensic chemistry laboratory) as well as the Counterfeiting and Forgery unit. Crime scene investigations are performed mainly through the criminal laboratory related to the Ministry of Interior. Forensic Medicine is studied thoroughly in the faculty of medicine (undergraduates), as well as by forensic medical examiners at postgraduate level (diploma, master's and doctorate). This review recommends more scientific cooperation with universities in the field of forensic medicine and related sciences to solve various crimes with meticulous detail. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. FORENSIC COMPUTING MODELS: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

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    Gulshan Shrivastava

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with introducing a technique of digital forensics for reconstruction of events or evidences after the commitment of a crime through any of the digital devices. It shows a clear transparency between Computer Forensics and Digital Forensics and gives a brief description about the classification of Digital Forensics. It has also been described that how the emergences of various digital forensic models help digital forensic practitioners and examiners in doing digital forensics. Further, discussed Merits and Demerits of the required models and review of every major model.

  1. Forensic microbiology and bioterrorism risk (Part II

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    Maria Nasso

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The letters containing anthrax, sent in 2001 in USA, showed that pathogens and toxins can be effectively used for terrorist purposes. A new subfield of forensic science, called “microbial forensics”, has been developed. It is a new scientific discipline dedicated to collect and analyze microbiological evidence from a scene of crime. In addition to collecting and analyzing traditional forensic evidences, the microbial forensic investigation will attempt to determine the identity of the causal agent, as so as epidemiologic investigation, but with higher-resolution characterization. The tools for a successful attribution include genetically based-assays to determine the exact strain of isolate, aiming the individualization of the source of the pathogen used in a biological weapon. Following the 2001 anthrax attacks, genotyping of B. anthracis was done on 8 variable number tandem repeats loci (VNTR polymorphisms, with multilocus variable number tandem repeats (MLVA method. In recent years some research groups have increased the VNTR markers number to 25 loci, while other groups have identified single nucleotide repeat (SNR polymorphisms, which display very high mutation rates. SNR marker system allows the distinguishing of isolates with extremely low levels of genetic diversity within the same MLVA genotype.

  2. Recovery and identification of human remains in post-conflict environments: A comparative study of the humanitarian forensic programs in Cyprus and Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellide, Maria

    2017-10-01

    This study follows the humanitarian forensic programs in Cyprus and Kosovo over a ten-year period with an emphasis on the role of local capacity building. It begins by providing an in-depth historical account of forensic activities, followed by a comparison of the rate of excavations, exhumations and identifications. Through this analysis, a repeated pattern emerges whereby forensic activities in Kosovo start with a surge in values, which drop drastically in the first few years of operations, followed by a steadily declining productivity curve. By contrast, in Cyprus, activities begin modestly, with lower values allowing for some modest growth. Close observation of the two programs provides indications as to the factors that may influence the development of forensic programs as well as the elements that need to be set in place to create an environment conducive to greater sustainability through local ownership and responsibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genotype and Phenotype Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Resistance to Enfuvirtide during Long-Term Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzo, Stefano; Castagna, Antonella; Monachetti, Alessia; Hasson, Hamid; Danise, Anna; Carini, Elisabetta; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Lazzarin, Adriano; Clementi, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide has recently been introduced into clinical practice and has exhibited efficient anti-HIV-1 activity in combination with other antiretroviral agents. In the present study, we addressed the effect of long-term treatment with enfuvirtide on the intrahost evolution of HIV-1. The genotype and phenotype patterns and the relative replication capacity (rRC) of enfuvirtide-resistant HIV-1 mutants were evaluated in samples from 11 subjects (7 virological nonresponders and 4 responders) who received the compound for more than 1 year in combination with different regimens. Selection of one or more mutations clustering in a sequence (amino acids 36 to 45) of the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat was observed in samples from the seven virological nonresponders but not in those from responders. In two subjects who discontinued enfuvirtide, reversion of the resistant genotype was detected within 3 months. Recombinant clones bearing mutated gp41 sequences displayed reduced susceptibilities to enfuvirtide, with the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 0.6 to 12.8 μg/ml, whereas the IC50 for isolates with baseline sequences was 0.013 ± 0.010 μg/ml. Interestingly, long-term monitoring of resistant variants provided evidence that ongoing adaptation to the drug is paralleled by phenotypic changes. A limited drop in the rRC in the absence of drug was observed for clones from four of the seven nonresponders bearing mutations associated with resistance. Overall, the data indicate that the different genotype patterns associated with a detectable degree of HIV-1 resistance to enfuvirtide generated during long-term treatments are characterized by a substantially low genetic barrier, possible ongoing adaptation with increased degrees of resistance, and limited influence on the viral rRC. PMID:15328081

  4. Prevalence of human papillomavirus and its genotype among 1336 invasive cervical cancer patients in Hunan province, central south China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linqian; Wu, Baiping; Li, Junjun; Chen, Liyu

    2015-03-01

    Existing data on the genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) are limited in Hunan province, central south China. To evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection and its genotype among women with invasive cervical cancer in Hunan, a total of 1,336 patients were included in this study between July 2012 and June 2013. Eighteen high-risk and eight low-risk genotypes of HPV were detected by Luminex xMAP technology. The results show that HPV prevalence in invasive cervical cancer in Hunan was 75.7%. A single HPV infection was found in 82.3% of the HPV-positive samples, and 91.8% of the cases had high-risk HPV infection. The most common HPV type was HPV 16 (50.6%), followed by HPV 58 (12.4%), HPV 52 (10.9%), HPV 18 (7.3%), HPV 33 (5.5%), HPV 59 (4.2%), HPV 39 (4.0%), HPV 61 (3.4%), HPV 31 (3.3%), and HPV 56 (3.2%). A single infection with HPV 16 was detected in 42.5% of the samples, which was significantly more frequent than any other HPV type in this population. Dual-infection with HPV 16 and HPV 52 were relatively common. The available vaccines for HPV 16 and 18 are therefore expected to have a substantial impact on reducing the burden of cervical cancer in China, even though HPV 18 showed a lower frequency. In addition to HPV 16 and 18, other HPV types including 58, 52, and 33, should be targeted in the next generation HPV vaccines.

  5. Full genotyping of a highly polymorphic human gene trait by time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Totè

    Full Text Available The ability of detecting the subtle variations occurring, among different individuals, within specific DNA sequences encompassed in highly polymorphic genes discloses new applications in genomics and diagnostics. DQB1 is a gene of the HLA-II DQ locus of the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA system. The polymorphisms of the trait of the DQB1 gene including codons 52-57 modulate the susceptibility to a number of severe pathologies. Moreover, the donor-receiver tissue compatibility in bone marrow transplantations is routinely assessed through crossed genotyping of DQB and DQA. For the above reasons, the development of rapid, reliable and cost-effective typing technologies of DQB1 in general, and more specifically of the codons 52-57, is a relevant although challenging task. Quantitative assessment of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET efficiency between chromophores labelling the opposite ends of gene-specific oligonucleotide probes has proven to be a powerful tool to type DNA polymorphisms with single-nucleotide resolution. The FRET efficiency can be most conveniently quantified by applying a time-resolved fluorescence analysis methodology, i.e. time-correlated single-photon counting, which allows working on very diluted template specimens and in the presence of fluorescent contaminants. Here we present a full in-vitro characterization of the fluorescence responses of two probes when hybridized to oligonucleotide mixtures mimicking all the possible genotypes of the codons 52-57 trait of DQB1 (8 homozygous and 28 heterozygous. We show that each genotype can be effectively tagged by the combination of the fluorescence decay constants extrapolated from the data obtained with such probes.

  6. Diversity of human astrovirus genotypes circulating in children with acute gastroenteritis in Thailand during 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasao, Rungnapa; Khamrin, Pattara; Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2012-11-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide. The objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular epidemiology and genotypic diversity of HAstV circulating in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with diarrhea in Thailand during the year 2000-2011, except for 2004, 2006, and 2009. A total of 1,022 fecal specimens were tested for HAstV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). HAstV was detected at 1.4% (14 of 1,022). All HAstV strains detected in this study were characterized further by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Analysis of 348 bp partial capsid nucleotide sequences revealed that HAstV strains detected were HAstV-1 (1a, 1b, and 1d) (8 strains), HAstV-2 (2c) (3 strains), HAstV-3 (1 strain), and HAstV-5 (2 strains). HAstV-1, the most predominant genotype was detected initially in 2002 and circulated continuously up to 2011. HAstV-2 was detected in year 2001, and 2007 and grouped into a 2c lineage. HAstV-3 was found only in 2000 and HAstV-5 was found in the year 2001. The findings indicate that a wide variety of HAstV strains continue to circulate in children admitted to hospital with acute gastroenteritis in Thailand over a decade. The data provide an epidemiological overview of HAstV infection and HAstV genotype distribution in Thailand.

  7. HPV Direct Flow CHIP: a new human papillomavirus genotyping method based on direct PCR from crude-cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraez-Hernandez, Elsa; Alvarez-Perez, Martina; Navarro-Bustos, Gloria; Esquivias, Javier; Alonso, Sonia; Aneiros-Fernandez, Jose; Lacruz-Pelea, Cesar; Sanchez-Aguera, Magdalena; Santamaria, Javier Saenz; de Antonio, Jesus Chacon; Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose Luis

    2013-10-01

    HPV Direct Flow CHIP is a newly developed test for identifying 18 high-risk and 18 low-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. It is based on direct PCR from crude-cell extracts, automatic flow-through hybridization, and colorimetric detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of HPV Direct Flow CHIP in the analysis of 947 samples from routine cervical screening or the follow-up of abnormal Pap smears. The specimens were dry swab samples, liquid-based cytology samples, or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. The genotype distribution was in agreement with known epidemiological data for the Spanish population. Three different subgroups of the samples were also tested by Linear Array (LA) HPV Genotyping Test (n=108), CLART HPV2 (n=82), or Digene Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) HPV DNA Test (n=101). HPV positivity was 73.6% by HPV Direct Flow CHIP versus 67% by LA, 65.9% by HPV Direct Flow CHIP versus 59.8% by CLART, and 62.4% by HPV Direct Flow CHIP versus 42.6% by HC2. HPV Direct Flow CHIP showed a positive agreement of 88.6% with LA (k=0.798), 87.3% with CLART (k=0.818), and 68.2% with HC2 (k=0.618). In conclusion, HPV Direct Flow CHIP results were comparable with those of the other methods tested. Although further investigation is needed to compare the performance of this new test with a gold-standard reference method, these preliminary findings evidence the potential value of HPV Direct Flow CHIP in HPV vaccinology and epidemiology studies.

  8. Production of interleukin 8 and Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 on human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis with different fimA genotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Yu Cai; Song Ge

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects ofPorphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) with different fimA genotypes on IL-8 and MCP-1 produciton by human umbilical vein endothelial cells and to reveal their the possible role in the development of atherosclerosis.Methods: Pg with different fimA genotypes were cultured with anaerobic and were used to infect HUVEC cells at a MOI of 100. Supernatant IL-8 and MCP-1 contents of cultured HUVEC cells after Pg stimulation at 2 h, 6 h and 24 h, respectively, were detected by ELISA.Results: Supernatant IL-8 and MCP-1 contents of HUVEC cells after Pg stimulation at 2 h, 6 h and 24 h were significantly higher than those in un-stimulation groups (P<0.05), and supernatant IL-8 and MCP-1 contents of HUVEC cells after II fimA and IV fimA genotypes Pg stimulation were significantly higher than those after I fimA genotypes Pg stimulation (P<0.05). Also, supernatant IL-8 and MCP-1 contents of HUVEC cells after II fimA genotypes Pg stimulation were significantly higher than those after IV fimA genotypes Pg stimulation.Conclusion: Pg with II fimA genotypes show a stronger ability to stimulate HUVEC cells to express IL-8 and MCP-1,which may lead a functional disorder of vascular endothelial.

  9. Human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B genotypes in blood of AIDS patients: lack of association with either the viral DNA load in leukocytes or presence of retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G; Boivin, G

    1999-09-01

    It has been suggested that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) glycoprotein B (gB) genotypes could be used as a marker for viral virulence in patients with AIDS. The present study was designed to evaluate a possible association between specific gB genotypes, the presence of HCMV retinitis, and the HCMV viral load. Fifty-four blood samples were obtained from 54 HIV- and HCMV-infected patients. Twenty-seven of these patients were asymptomatic for HCMV, whereas the other 27 patients had been diagnosed recently with HCMV retinitis. HCMV gB genotyping was carried out by using restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified PMNL extracts. Determination of the HCMV viral load in the same specimens was carried out using a quantitative-PCR. HCMV gB genotype 2 was found more frequently than other genotypes in PCR-amplified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) of patients with AIDS (P < 0.05) but not more frequently in samples from patients with HCMV retinitis. No significant association was found between any HCMV gB genotypes and the viral load in blood. In conclusion, the actual HCMV gB genotyping system using PMNL provides no additional benefit over the viral load in blood for identification of HIV-infected subjects at risk of HCMV disease.

  10. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  11. Genotyping of Giardia duodenalis isolates from human subjects in Zabul, using PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Abedi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To uncover the molecular prevalence of Giardia duodenalis by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP in Zabul city, Iran. Methods: Twenty-four stool samples were collected from 215 patients with suspected giardiasis by microscopic examination. To increase the sensitivity of the PCR, the total genomic DNA from isolates was extracted by applying glass beads and the QIAamp Kit. A one-step PCRRFLP method, targeting the glutamate dehydrogenase gene, was utilized to differentiate the assemblages A and B among isolates. Results: The PCR fragment was determined from 30 isolates, RFLP assay of 24 isolates showed 24 (100 isolates as Genotype B group BIII. Conclusions: The results with the glutamate dehydrogenase gene assay demonstrated that the predominant subtype of Giardia duodenalis in the area is BIII, which showed animals are the main reservoir of the isolates in this area.

  12. The association of genotype-based inbreeding coefficient with a range of physical and psychological human traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Karin J H; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Veijola, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Koiranen, Markku; Keller, Matthew C; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-01-01

    Across animal species, offspring of closely related mates exhibit lower fitness, a phenomenon called inbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression in humans is less well understood because mating between close relatives is generally rare and stigmatised, confounding investigation of its effect on fitness-relevant traits. Recently, the availability of high-density genotype data has enabled quantification of variation in distant inbreeding in 'outbred' human populations, but the low variance of inbreeding detected from genetic data in most outbred populations means large samples are required to test effects, and only a few traits have yet been studied. However, it is likely that isolated populations, or those with a small effective population size, have higher variation in inbreeding and therefore require smaller sample sizes to detect inbreeding effects. With a small effective population size and low immigration, Northern Finland is such a population. We make use of a sample of ∼5,500 'unrelated' individuals in the Northern Finnish Birth Cohort 1966 with known genotypes and measured phenotypes across a range of fitness-relevant physical and psychological traits, including birth length and adult height, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, blood pressure, heart rate, grip strength, educational attainment, income, marital status, handedness, health, and schizotypal features. We find significant associations in the predicted direction between individuals' inbreeding coefficient (measured by proportion of the genome in runs of homozygosity) and eight of the 18 traits investigated, significantly more than the one or two expected by chance. These results are consistent with inbreeding depression effects on a range of human traits, but further research is needed to replicate and test alternative explanations for these effects.

  13. The association of genotype-based inbreeding coefficient with a range of physical and psychological human traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin J H Verweij

    Full Text Available Across animal species, offspring of closely related mates exhibit lower fitness, a phenomenon called inbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression in humans is less well understood because mating between close relatives is generally rare and stigmatised, confounding investigation of its effect on fitness-relevant traits. Recently, the availability of high-density genotype data has enabled quantification of variation in distant inbreeding in 'outbred' human populations, but the low variance of inbreeding detected from genetic data in most outbred populations means large samples are required to test effects, and only a few traits have yet been studied. However, it is likely that isolated populations, or those with a small effective population size, have higher variation in inbreeding and therefore require smaller sample sizes to detect inbreeding effects. With a small effective population size and low immigration, Northern Finland is such a population. We make use of a sample of ∼5,500 'unrelated' individuals in the Northern Finnish Birth Cohort 1966 with known genotypes and measured phenotypes across a range of fitness-relevant physical and psychological traits, including birth length and adult height, body mass index (BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, blood pressure, heart rate, grip strength, educational attainment, income, marital status, handedness, health, and schizotypal features. We find significant associations in the predicted direction between individuals' inbreeding coefficient (measured by proportion of the genome in runs of homozygosity and eight of the 18 traits investigated, significantly more than the one or two expected by chance. These results are consistent with inbreeding depression effects on a range of human traits, but further research is needed to replicate and test alternative explanations for these effects.

  14. Re-investigation of the concordance of human NAT2 phenotypes and genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia; Dannappel, Doris; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Golka, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    A comparative study of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) genotyping and phenotyping (caffeine test method) was performed on 211 persons to elucidate apparent discrepancies in the assignment of NAT2*12 and NAT2*13 alleles which occur in the literature. The study used the standard procedures of genotyping (two PCR runs and application of seven restriction enzymes) and phenotyping (determination of the two caffeine metabolites 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil (AFMU) and 1-methylxanthine (1X)), as documented in detail and validated by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The data were consistent with an AFMU/1X molar ratio of 0.85 as cut-off point (antimode) between phenotypically slow and rapid acetylators. Under this provision, several R/S allele combinations did not comply, either fully or partly, with their associated phenotypes. In particular, there was a wide phenotypic overlap of the alleged rapid allele combination groups (i) NAT2*12A/*5A; NAT2*12C/*5D; NAT2*4/*5B, (ii) NAT2*13/*6B; NAT2*4/*6A, and (iii) NAT2*13/*7A; NAT2*4/*7B. These groups obviously contained both phenotypically rapid and slow acetylators. If one assumes that the presence of one "wild type" allele NAT2*4 defines a rapid acetylator the assignment of the alleles NAT2*12A, NAT2*12C, and NAT*13 as determinants of a rapid acetylator phenotype must be questioned. This refers in particular to the nucleotide changes A803G (NAT2*12A, NAT2*12C) and C282T (NAT2*13). Based on discussions in the literature and the data presented here, there is accumulating evidence that current assignments of the NAT2*12 and NAT2*13 alleles as determinants of a rapid acetylator state should be reconsidered.

  15. [Panel of X-linked single-nucleotide polymorphic markers for DNA identification (XSNPid) based on multiplex genotyping by multilocus PCR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V A; Vagaitseva, K V; Kharkov, V N; Cherednichenko, A A; Bocharova, A V

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic markers linked with the X chromosome (X-linked) are used in the field of population and medical genetics, as well as for DNA identification of individuals in forensic science and forensic medicine. We proposed an XSNPid panel that consists of 66 unlinked single nucleotide X chromosome markers and developed a protocol for their multiplex genotyping using multilocus PCR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The XSNPid panel is genotyped within two multiplexes (36 and 30 markers). The developed protocol provides an efficient genotype reading; the fraction of determined genotypes is 98.29%. The high level of gene diversity (0.461) for the X-linked SNPs included in the panel is characteristic of the Russian population. A total of 63 out of 66 markers that provide a high efficiency of genotyping and independent inheritance are suitable for DNA identification purposes. The XSNPid panel is characterized by a very high discriminating ability when studying the Russian population. The probability of genotype coincidence in two unrelated individuals is 9 × 10^(-27) for women and 2 × 10^(-18) for men. Also, the XSNPid panel has a greater multiplex capacity in addition to a higher discriminating ability compared to the other closest analogues of the X chromosome SNP sets, which makes it more cost effective and less time consuming. The XSNPid panel is a convenient tool, not only for individual DNA identification, but also for population genetic studies.

  16. Identification of genotypes of Giardia duodenalis human isolates in Isfahan, Iran, using polymerase chain reaction - Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Pestehchian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: PCR - RFLP assay targeting gdh locus is a sensitive tool and discriminates genotypes, sub genotypes and mixed type of G.duodenalis. Results of our study suggest both anthroponotic and zoonotic origins for the infections respectively.

  17. Spatially Explicit Models to Investigate Geographic Patterns in the Distribution of Forensic STRs: Application to the North-Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Francesco; Finocchio, Andrea; Akar, Nejat; Loutradis, Aphrodite; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel I.; Brdicka, Radim; Jodice, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Human forensic STRs used for individual identification have been reported to have little power for inter-population analyses. Several methods have been developed which incorporate information on the spatial distribution of individuals to arrive at a description of the arrangement of diversity. We genotyped at 16 forensic STRs a large population sample obtained from many locations in Italy, Greece and Turkey, i.e. three countries crucial to the understanding of discontinuities at the European/Asian junction and the genetic legacy of ancient migrations, but seldom represented together in previous studies. Using spatial PCA on the full dataset, we detected patterns of population affinities in the area. Additionally, we devised objective criteria to reduce the overall complexity into reduced datasets. Independent spatially explicit methods applied to these latter datasets converged in showing that the extraction of information on long- to medium-range geographical trends and structuring from the overall diversity is possible. All analyses returned the picture of a background clinal variation, with regional discontinuities captured by each of the reduced datasets. Several aspects of our results are confirmed on external STR datasets and replicate those of genome-wide SNP typings. High levels of gene flow were inferred within the main continental areas by coalescent simulations. These results are promising from a microevolutionary perspective, in view of the fast pace at which forensic data are being accumulated for many locales. It is foreseeable that this will allow the exploitation of an invaluable genotypic resource, assembled for other (forensic) purposes, to clarify important aspects in the formation of local gene pools. PMID:27898725

  18. Developmental validation of the MiSeq FGx Forensic Genomics System for Targeted Next Generation Sequencing in Forensic DNA Casework and Database Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Anne C; Alvarez, Michelle L; Davis, Carey P; Guzmán, Ernesto; Han, Yonmee; Way, Lisa; Walichiewicz, Paulina; Silva, David; Pham, Nguyen; Caves, Glorianna; Bruand, Jocelyne; Schlesinger, Felix; Pond, Stephanie J K; Varlaro, Joe; Stephens, Kathryn M; Holt, Cydne L

    2017-05-01

    Human DNA profiling using PCR at polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci followed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) size separation and length-based allele typing has been the standard in the forensic community for over 20 years. Over the last decade, Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) matured rapidly, bringing modern advantages to forensic DNA analysis. The MiSeq FGx™ Forensic Genomics System, comprised of the ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit, MiSeq FGx™ Reagent Kit, MiSeq FGx™ instrument and ForenSeq™ Universal Analysis Software, uses PCR to simultaneously amplify up to 231 forensic loci in a single multiplex reaction. Targeted loci include Amelogenin, 27 common, forensic autosomal STRs, 24 Y-STRs, 7 X-STRs and three classes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The ForenSeq™ kit includes two primer sets: Amelogenin, 58 STRs and 94 identity informative SNPs (iiSNPs) are amplified using DNA Primer Set A (DPMA; 153 loci); if a laboratory chooses to generate investigative leads using DNA Primer Set B, amplification is targeted to the 153 loci in DPMA plus 22 phenotypic informative (piSNPs) and 56 biogeographical ancestry SNPs (aiSNPs). High-resolution genotypes, including detection of intra-STR sequence variants, are semi-automatically generated with the ForenSeq™ software. This system was subjected to developmental validation studies according to the 2012 Revised SWGDAM Validation Guidelines. A two-step PCR first amplifies the target forensic STR and SNP loci (PCR1); unique, sample-specific indexed adapters or "barcodes" are attached in PCR2. Approximately 1736 ForenSeq™ reactions were analyzed. Studies include DNA substrate testing (cotton swabs, FTA cards, filter paper), species studies from a range of nonhuman organisms, DNA input sensitivity studies from 1ng down to 7.8pg, two-person human DNA mixture testing with three genotype combinations, stability analysis of partially degraded DNA, and effects of five commonly encountered PCR

  19. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia.

  20. Developing digital forensic governance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Digital Forensic (DF) governance framework and its mapping on the SANS ISO/IEC 38500:2009 Corporate governance of information technology structure. DF governance assists organisations in guiding the management team...

  1. Forensic Science: Hair Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Elhannan L.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students use a microscope to do a forensic hair comparative study and a medullary classification. Mounting methods, medulla types, hair photographs, and activities are described. (DS)

  2. Forensic odontology, historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansare, K

    1995-01-01

    According to the old testament Adam was convinced by eve to put a "Bite Mark" on the apple. Interest in Forensic Odontology was heightened in the latter part of 19th Century. The first formal instructional programme was given at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, U.S. Since then the number of cases reported has played a significant role in expanding the role of Forensic Odontology. The earliest reported case was of Lollia Paulina in the year 49 A. D. One of the early reported case is also found in India in the year 1193. In the last few decades, the basic pattern of Forensic Odontology has changed quite a lot. Advances in dental material and laboratory techniques, with improvements in scientific and photographic technology, have made the proof of presentation much to forensic science.

  3. Genotypic characterization of Malaysian human isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from carriage and clinical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakrin, Nik Noorul Shakira Mohamed; Masri, Siti Norbaya; Taib, Niazlin Mohd; Nordin, Syafinaz Amin; Jamal, Farida; Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd

    2014-12-01

    This study characterized carriage and clinical pneumococcal isolates for serotypes, penicillin susceptibility, virulence genes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern of penicillin binding protein (PBP) genes. DNA fingerprint of isolates was generated by BOX-PCR. Majority of serotypes were 23F followed by 19F, 19A and 6A. Twenty-four percent of isolates were penicillin non-susceptible (PNSP). All of the targeted virulence genes were detected in all isolates with the exception of pili; 20.6% (n=22) for PI-1 and 14.0% (n=15) for PI-2. Of the 13 isolates which carried both PI-1 and PI-2, 10 were of clinical origin. Digested pbp-DNA produced three PBP-RFLP profiles for pbp1a (A1 to A3), six profiles for pbp2b (B1 to B6) and seven for pbp2x (X1 to X7) mostly in PNSPs. Based on BOX-PCR analysis, the majority of isolates were genetically diverse with a small number of potentially related isolates carrying pili genes. No obvious genotypic association was observed pertaining to carriage and clinical origin of isolates.

  4. Professionalism in Computer Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Alastair D.; Konstadopoulou, Anastasia

    The paper seeks to address the need to consider issues regarding professionalism in computer forensics in order to allow the discipline to develop and to ensure the credibility of the discipline from the differing perspectives of practitioners, the criminal justice system and in the eyes of the public. There is a need to examine and develop professionalism in computer forensics in order to promote the discipline and maintain the credibility of the discipline.

  5. Column: File Cabinet Forensics

    OpenAIRE

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-01-01

    Researchers can spend their time reverse engineering, performing reverse analysis, or making substantive contributions to digital forensics science. Although work in all of these areas is important, it is the scientific breakthroughs that are the most critical for addressing the challenges that we face.Reverse Engineering is the traditional bread-and-butter of digital forensics research. Companies like Microsoft and Apple deliver computational artifacts (operating systems, applications and ph...

  6. Endodontics and forensic personal identification: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Mohamed Aly Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental identification of a deceased individual is a core task in forensic odontology. The accurate recording of clinical dental procedures has become more important over time because of the increasing trend of lawsuits worldwide. Previous reports have discussed the practical usefulness of endodontic evidence for human identification. Advances in endodontic imaging, root and root canal anatomy, and biomaterials have been consistently emerging in endodontic research and practice. This article provides an update on the interrelationship between endodontics and forensic personal identification.

  7. Forensic entomology and main challenges in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Leonardo; Von Zuben, Cláudio J

    2006-01-01

    Apart from an early case report from China (13th century), the first observations on insects and other arthropods as forensic indicators were documented in Germany and France during mass exhumations in the 1880s by Reinhard, who is considered a co-founder of the discipline. After the French publication of Mégnin's popular book on the applied aspects of forensic entomology, the concept quickly spread to Canada and United States. At that time, researchers recognized that the lack of systematic observations of insects of forensic importance jeopardized their use as indicators of postmortem interval. General advances in insect taxonomy and ecology helped to fill this gap over the following decades. After World Wars, few forensic entomology cases were reported in the scientific literature. From 1960s to the 1980s, Leclercq and Nuorteva were primarily responsible for maintaining the method in Central Europe, reporting isolated cases. Since then, basic research in the USA, Russia and Canada opened the way to the routine use of Entomology in forensic investigations. Identifications of insects associated with human cadavers are relatively few in the literature of the Neotropical region and have received little attention in Brazil. This article brings an overview of historic developments in this field, the recent studies and the main problems and challenges in South America and mainly in Brazil.

  8. Internet and forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamakura, Reddy P.

    1997-02-01

    The Internet is a very powerful and inexpensive tool that was created for the free distribution of knowledge and information. The Internet is a learning tool, a research tool, a virtual library without borders and membership requirements, a journal with instant publication, a help desk, and a newspaper/journal with current information. Very soon, when live audio and video transmission is perfected, the Internet also will be a live classroom and everyday conference. Forensic scientists, laboratories and colleges should make use of information already available on the Internet. They also should actively participate and contribute. Very few forensic scientists and laboratories have made their presence felt by setting up their home pages/web pages. But, there is tremendous growth during the past year. Immense benefits from Internet to forensic community are discussed along with the author's personal experience. Creating on-line searchable data bases in all specialties of forensic science is an urgent need. Leading forensic journals should take a lead and create on-line searchable indexes with abstracts. On line electronic publishing, collaborative research/paper publishing or editing is easy, fast, economical and convenient through the use of the Internet. Creation of Internet repositories of unpublished papers is an idea worth looking into. Internet also can be used to give training, re-training or advanced training to students/forensic scientists.

  9. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R;

    2014-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretat...

  10. Three-dimensional computer visualization of forensic pathology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Jack; Schofield, Damian; Evison, Martin; Woodford, Noel

    2004-03-01

    Despite a decade of use in US courtrooms, it is only recently that forensic computer animations have become an increasingly important form of communication in legal spheres within the United Kingdom. Aims Research at the University of Nottingham has been influential in the critical investigation of forensic computer graphics reconstruction methodologies and techniques and in raising the profile of this novel form of data visualization within the United Kingdom. The case study presented demonstrates research undertaken by Aims Research and the Department of Forensic Pathology at the University of Sheffield, which aims to apply, evaluate, and develop novel 3-dimensional computer graphics (CG) visualization and virtual reality (VR) techniques in the presentation and investigation of forensic information concerning the human body. The inclusion of such visualizations within other CG or VR environments may ultimately provide the potential for alternative exploratory directions, processes, and results within forensic pathology investigations.

  11. MLST genotypes of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler products, dairy cattle and human campylobacteriosis cases in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonaite, Sigita; Tamuleviciene, Egle; Alter, Thomas; Kasnauskyte, Neringa; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2017-06-15

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni is the leading cause of human campylobacteriosis worldwide. We performed a molecular epidemiological study to investigate the genetic relationship among C. jejuni strains isolated from human diarrhoeal patients, broiler products and dairy cattle in Lithuania. The C. jejuni isolates from human clinical cases, dairy cattle and broiler products were genotyped using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Allele numbers for each housekeeping gene, sequence type (ST), and clonal complex (CC) were assigned by submitting the DNA sequences to the C. jejuni MLST database ( http://pubmlst.org/campylobacter ). Based on the obtained sequence data of the housekeeping genes a phylogenetic analysis of the strains was performed and a minimum spanning tree (MST) was calculated. Among the 262 C. jejuni strains (consisting of 43 strains isolated from dairy cattle, 102 strains isolated from broiler products and 117 clinical human C. jejuni strains), 82 different MLST sequence types and 22 clonal complexes were identified. Clonal complexes CC21 and CC353 predominated among the C. jejuni strains. On ST-level, five sequence types (ST-5, ST-21, ST-50, ST-464 and ST-6410) were dominating and these five STs accounted for 35.9% (n = 94) of our isolates. In addition, 51 (19.5%) C. jejuni strains representing 27 (32.9%) STs were reported for the first time in the PubMLST database ( http://pubmlst.org/campylobacter ). The highest Czekanowski index or proportional similarity index (PSI) was calculated for C. jejuni strains isolated from human campylobacteriosis cases and broiler products (PSI = 0.32) suggesting a strong link between broiler strains and human cases. The PSI of dairy cattle and human samples was lower (PSI = 0.11), suggesting a weaker link between bovine strains and human cases. The calculated Simpson's index of all C. jejuni isolates showed a high genetic diversity (D = 0.96). Our results suggest that broiler products are the most important source of

  12. The future of forensic DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The author's thoughts and opinions on where the field of forensic DNA testing is headed for the next decade are provided in the context of where the field has come over the past 30 years. Similar to the Olympic motto of ‘faster, higher, stronger’, forensic DNA protocols can be expected to become more rapid and sensitive and provide stronger investigative potential. New short tandem repeat (STR) loci have expanded the core set of genetic markers used for human identification in Europe and the USA. Rapid DNA testing is on the verge of enabling new applications. Next-generation sequencing has the potential to provide greater depth of coverage for information on STR alleles. Familial DNA searching has expanded capabilities of DNA databases in parts of the world where it is allowed. Challenges and opportunities that will impact the future of forensic DNA are explored including the need for education and training to improve interpretation of complex DNA profiles. PMID:26101278

  13. Comparison of multilocus sequence analysis and virulence genotyping of Escherichia coli from live birds, retail poultry meat, and human extraintestinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzeisen, Jessica L; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Nolan, Lisa K; Johnson, Timothy J

    2013-03-01

    To examine the correlations between virulence genotyping and multilocus sequence analysis of Escherichia coli from poultry and humans, 88 isolates were examined. The isolates were selected from a population of over 1000 based on their assignment to nine different virulence genotyping clusters. Clustering based on multilocus sequence analysis mostly correlated with virulence genotyping, although multilocus sequence analysis demonstrated higher discriminatory ability and greater reliability related to inferred phylogenetic relationships. No distinct patterns in host source were observed using inferred phylogeny through multilocus sequence analysis, indicating that human, avian, and retail meat isolates are diverse, and some belong to multiple shared clonal complexes. Clonal complexes with host source overlap included ST95 and ST23 and additional novel groups, underscoring the diversity of avian pathogenic E. coli and the potential importance of these novel groups as avian and zoonotic pathogens.

  14. The interface between forensic science and technology: how technology could cause a paradigm shift in the role of forensic institutes in the criminal justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Ate; Mapes, Anna; Geradts, Zeno; van Eijk, Erwin; Koper, Carola; van den Berg, Jorrit; Verheij, Saskia; van der Steen, Marcel; van Asten, Arian

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the importance of modern technology in forensic investigations is discussed. Recent technological developments are creating new possibilities to perform robust scientific measurements and studies outside the controlled laboratory environment. The benefits of real-time, on-site forensic investigations are manifold and such technology has the potential to strongly increase the speed and efficacy of the criminal justice system. However, such benefits are only realized when quality can be guaranteed at all times and findings can be used as forensic evidence in court. At the Netherlands Forensic Institute, innovation efforts are currently undertaken to develop integrated forensic platform solutions that allow for the forensic investigation of human biological traces, the chemical identification of illicit drugs and the study of large amounts of digital evidence. These platforms enable field investigations, yield robust and validated evidence and allow for forensic intelligence and targeted use of expert capacity at the forensic institutes. This technological revolution in forensic science could ultimately lead to a paradigm shift in which a new role of the forensic expert emerges as developer and custodian of integrated forensic platforms.

  15. The interface between forensic science and technology: how technology could cause a paradigm shift in the role of forensic institutes in the criminal justice system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Ate; Mapes, Anna; Geradts, Zeno; van Eijk, Erwin; Koper, Carola; van den Berg, Jorrit; Verheij, Saskia; van der Steen, Marcel; van Asten, Arian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the importance of modern technology in forensic investigations is discussed. Recent technological developments are creating new possibilities to perform robust scientific measurements and studies outside the controlled laboratory environment. The benefits of real-time, on-site forensic investigations are manifold and such technology has the potential to strongly increase the speed and efficacy of the criminal justice system. However, such benefits are only realized when quality can be guaranteed at all times and findings can be used as forensic evidence in court. At the Netherlands Forensic Institute, innovation efforts are currently undertaken to develop integrated forensic platform solutions that allow for the forensic investigation of human biological traces, the chemical identification of illicit drugs and the study of large amounts of digital evidence. These platforms enable field investigations, yield robust and validated evidence and allow for forensic intelligence and targeted use of expert capacity at the forensic institutes. This technological revolution in forensic science could ultimately lead to a paradigm shift in which a new role of the forensic expert emerges as developer and custodian of integrated forensic platforms. PMID:26101289

  16. Evaluation of a Probe-Based PCR-ELISA System for Simultaneous Semi Quantitative Detection and Genotyping of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Infection in Clinical Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkhabifard, Majid; Javid, Naeme; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Ghaemi, Amir; Tabarraei, Alijan

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common opportunistic pathogen that causes serious complications in immunosuppressed patients and infected newborns. In this study, PCR-ELISA was optimized for semi-quantitative detection of infection in clinical specimens and simultaneous genotyping of glycoprotein B for 4 major genotypes, due to its significance. During DIG-labeling PCR, a pair of primers amplifies a fragment of variable region of the glycoprotein B encoding sequence. Under optimized conditions, labeled Target amplicons hybridize to biotinated specific probes and are detected in an ELISA system. PCR-ELISA system showed specific performance with detection limit of approximately 100 copies of CMV DNA. The linear correlation was observed between the PCR-ELISA results (OD) and logarithmic scale of CMV (r=0.979). Repeatability of PCR-ELISA detection system for intra-assay and inter-assay was evaluated for negative and positive samples. In optimized conditions of hybridization, differentiation between genotypes of glycoprotein B was feasible using genotype-specific probes in PCR-ELISA genotyping system. In comparison with sequencing method, genotyping system was confirmed with kappa index of 1. PCR-ELISA is proposed as an applicable and reliable technique for semi-quantitative diagnosis and typing of the infection. This technique is flexible to apply in a variety of molecular fields.

  17. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV and co-infections in cervical cytologic specimens from two outpatient gynecological clinics in a region of southeast Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egea-Cortines Marcos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical cytologic specimens from Murcia Region, (southeast Spain, to obtain information regarding the possible effect of the ongoing vaccination campaign against HPV16 and HPV18. Methods A total of 458 cytologic specimens were obtained from two outpatient gynecological clinics. These included 288 normal benign (N/B specimens, 56 atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASC-US, 75 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL and 39 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL. HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results The most frequent genotype found was HPV16 (14.9% in N/B; 17.9% in ASC-US; 29.3% in LSIL and 33.3% HSIL. Distribution of other genotypes was heavily dependent on the cytologic diagnoses. Co-infections were found in 15.3% of N/B, 10.7% of ASC-US, 48% of LSIL and 25.6% of HSIL cases (significantly different at p Conclusion HPV vaccination might prevent 34.6% and 35.8% of LSIL and HSIL, respectively. Co-infection rate is dependent on both cytologic diagnosis and HPV genotype. Moreover, genotypes belonging to A5, A7 and A9 species are more often found as co-infections than genotype pertaining to A6 species. This suggests that phylogenetically related genotypes might have in common similar grades of dependency for cervical epithelium colonization.

  18. Computational intelligence in digital forensics forensic investigation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choo, Yun-Huoy; Abraham, Ajith; Srihari, Sargur

    2014-01-01

    Computational Intelligence techniques have been widely explored in various domains including forensics. Analysis in forensic encompasses the study of pattern analysis that answer the question of interest in security, medical, legal, genetic studies and etc. However, forensic analysis is usually performed through experiments in lab which is expensive both in cost and time. Therefore, this book seeks to explore the progress and advancement of computational intelligence technique in different focus areas of forensic studies. This aims to build stronger connection between computer scientists and forensic field experts.   This book, Computational Intelligence in Digital Forensics: Forensic Investigation and Applications, is the first volume in the Intelligent Systems Reference Library series. The book presents original research results and innovative applications of computational intelligence in digital forensics. This edited volume contains seventeen chapters and presents the latest state-of-the-art advancement ...

  19. Genetic characterization of human-derived hydatid cysts of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in Heilongjiang Province and the first report of G7 genotype of E. canadensis in humans in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiemin; Yang, Dong; Zeng, Zhaolin; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Aiqin; Piao, Daxun; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jianping; Shen, Yujuan; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Weizhe

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) is one of the most important zoonotic parasitic diseases worldwide and 10 genotypes (G1-G10) have been reported. In China, almost all the epidemiological and genotyping studies of E. granulosus s.l. are from the west and northwest pasturing areas. However, in Heilongjiang Province of northeastern China, no molecular information is available on E. granulosus s.l. To understand and to speculate on possible transmission patterns of E. granulosus s.l., we molecularly identified and genotyped 10 hydatid cysts from hepatic CE patients in Heilongjiang Province based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1), cytochrome b (cytb) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) genes. Two genotypes were identified, G1 genotype (n = 6) and G7 genotype (n = 4). All the six G1 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1 locus; three and two different sequences were obtained at the cytb and nad1 loci, respectively, with two cytb gene sequences not being described previously. G7 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1, cytb and nad1 loci; however, the cytb gene sequence was not described previously. This is the first report of G7 genotype in humans in China. Three new cytb gene sequences from G1 and G7 genotypes might reflect endemic genetic characterizations. Pigs might be the main intermediate hosts of G7 genotype in our investigated area by homology analysis. The results will aid in making more effective control strategies for the prevention of transmission of E. granulosus s.l.

  20. Genetic characterization of human-derived hydatid cysts of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in Heilongjiang Province and the first report of G7 genotype of E. canadensis in humans in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiemin Zhang

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l. is one of the most important zoonotic parasitic diseases worldwide and 10 genotypes (G1-G10 have been reported. In China, almost all the epidemiological and genotyping studies of E. granulosus s.l. are from the west and northwest pasturing areas. However, in Heilongjiang Province of northeastern China, no molecular information is available on E. granulosus s.l. To understand and to speculate on possible transmission patterns of E. granulosus s.l., we molecularly identified and genotyped 10 hydatid cysts from hepatic CE patients in Heilongjiang Province based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1, cytochrome b (cytb and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1 genes. Two genotypes were identified, G1 genotype (n = 6 and G7 genotype (n = 4. All the six G1 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1 locus; three and two different sequences were obtained at the cytb and nad1 loci, respectively, with two cytb gene sequences not being described previously. G7 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1, cytb and nad1 loci; however, the cytb gene sequence was not described previously. This is the first report of G7 genotype in humans in China. Three new cytb gene sequences from G1 and G7 genotypes might reflect endemic genetic characterizations. Pigs might be the main intermediate hosts of G7 genotype in our investigated area by homology analysis. The results will aid in making more effective control strategies for the prevention of transmission of E. granulosus s.l.

  1. Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in cytologic abnormalities from unvaccinated women living in north-western Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Motta, Ana Pastora; Ordóñez, José Luis; González-Celador, Rafael; Rivas, Belen; Macías, María Del Carmen García; Bullón, Agustín; Abad, María Del Mar

    2011-03-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursors low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) are associated with infection by human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular HPV 16 and 18. The distribution of the HPV genotype varies with the severity of cervical disease, age and the geographic location of the patients. We report the results of a population study carried out in a region of north-western (NW) Spain aimed at determining the prevalence of single and multiple infections by 35 types of HPV using low-density microarrays for 113 cases with negative for intraepithelial lesions or malignancies; 588 with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS)/LSIL; 183 with HSIL; and seven cases of squamous cell carcinomas. Of the 891 patients analysed, 50.2% had single infections and 49.8% had multiple HPV infections. In women aged below 30 years, there was a predominance of multiple infections (p = 0.027). ASCUS/LSIL was associated with multiple and HSIL with single infections (p = 0.025). We observed significant increases in the percentage of infections due to a high-risk (HR) type of HPV when the severity of the cytological lesion increased (p = 0.001). No relationship was found between greater aggressiveness in the cytological diagnosis and a higher number of HPV types involved in multiple infections. The five most frequent genotypes were HPV 16 (26.3%), 53 (18.2%), 51 (17.3%), 6 (14.8%) and 66 (13.1%). The prevalence of HPV 16, 33 and 58 increased significantly from ACUS/LSIL to HSIL and the prevalence of HPV 51, 53 and 66 decreased. HPV 16 was the only genotype that showed a significant increase in prevalence when the severity of the cytological disease increased in single infections (p = 0.0001). The implementation of bivalent prophylactic vaccination could potentially lead to prevention in 32% of the population included in the study - in at least a quarter of patients with ACUS/LSIL (26.7%), and in half

  2. From Computer Forensics to Forensic Computing: Investigators Investigate, Scientists Associate

    OpenAIRE

    Dewald, Andreas; Freiling, Felix C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws a comparison of fundamental theories in traditional forensic science and the state of the art in current computer forensics, thereby identifying a certain disproportion between the perception of central aspects in common theory and the digital forensics reality. We propose a separation of what is currently demanded of practitioners in digital forensics into a rigorous scientific part on the one hand, and a more general methodology of searching and seizing digital evidence an...

  3. GENOTYPING HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE-16 ISOLATES FROM PERSISTENTLY INFECTED PROMISCUOUS INDIVIDUALS AND CERVICAL NEOPLASIA PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBELKUM, A; JUFFERMANS, L; SCHRAUWEN, L; VANDOORNUM, G; BURGER, M; QUINT, W

    1995-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence variation in the noncoding region of the genome of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was determined by direct sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA fragments amplified by PCR. Individuals of diverse sexual promiscuity and/or cervicopathology we

  4. Genotyping human papillomavirus type 16 isolates from persistently infected promiscuous individuals and cervical neoplasia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); L. Juffermans (Leon); L. Schrauwen (Lianne); M. Burger; G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); W.G.V. Quint (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide sequence variation in the noncoding region of the genome of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was determined by direct sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA fragments amplified by PCR. Individuals of diverse sex

  5. Attribution of 12 High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotypes to Infection and Cervical Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joura, Elmar A.; Ault, Kevin A.; Bosch, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We estimated the prevalence and incidence of 14 human papillomavirus (HPV) types (6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59) in cervicovaginal swabs, and the attribution of these HPV types in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), using predefined a...

  6. Evaluation of phenotypic and genotypic methods for subtyping Campylobacter jejuni isolates from humans, poultry, and cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Engberg, J.; Fussing, V.

    2000-01-01

    Six methods for subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni were compared and evaluated with a collection of 90 isolates from poultry, cattle, and sporadic human clinical cases as well as from a waterborne outbreak. The applied methods were Penner heat-stable serotyping; automated ribotyping (Ribo...

  7. Physical status of multiple human papillomavirus genotypes in flow-sorted cervical cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Christine F. W.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; Szuhai, Karoly; Kolkman-Uljee, Sandra; Vrede, M. Albert; Peters, Alexander A. W.; Schtturing, Ed; Fleuren, Gert Jan

    2007-01-01

    Multiple human papilloma virus (HPV) infections have been detected in cervical cancer. To investigate the significance of multiple HPV infections, we studied their prevalence in cancer samples from a low-risk (Dutch) and a high-risk (Surinamese) population and the correlation of HPV infection with t

  8. Oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes and the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women, with more than half a million new cases worldwide each year. In the majority of cervical cancers a persistent infection with high-risk (hr) Human papillomavirus (HPV) types has been proven to be the causative agent. Prevention of cervical ca

  9. Oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes and the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women, with more than half a million new cases worldwide each year. In the majority of cervical cancers a persistent infection with high-risk (hr) Human papillomavirus (HPV) types has been proven to be the causative agent. Prevention of cervical ca

  10. Genotyping and molecular characterization of hepatitis B virus from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals in southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euphodia Makondo

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are hyperendemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The HBV genotypes prevailing in HIV-infected Africans are unknown. Our aim was to determine the HBV genotypes in HIV-infected participants and to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. From 71 HBV DNA(+ve HIV-infected participants, 49 basic core promoter/precore (BCP/PC and 29 complete S regions were successfully sequenced. Following phylogenetic analysis of 29 specimens in the complete S region, 28 belonged to subgenotype A1 and one to D3. Mutations affecting HBeAg expression at the transcriptional (1762T1764A, translational (Kozak 1809-1812, initiation 1814-1816, G1896A with C1858T, or post translational levels (G1862T, were responsible for the high HBeAg-negativity observed. The G1862T mutation occurred only in subgenotype A1 isolates, which were found in one third (7/21 of HBsAg(-ve participants, but in none of the 18 HBsAg(+ve participants (p200 IU per ml (p<0.05 and only sS174N occurred more frequently in HBsAg(-ve than in HBsAg(+ve individuals (p<0.05. Prior to initiation of ART, ten percent, 3 of 29 isolates sequenced, had drug resistance mutations rtV173L, rtL180M+rtM204V and rtV214A, respectively. This study has provided important information on the molecular characteristics of HBV in HIV-infected southern Africans prior to ART initiation, which has important clinical relevance in the management of HBV/HIV co-infection in our unique setting.

  11. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Yoan; Vinken, Lore; Kourí, Vivian; Pérez, Lissette; Álvarez, Alina; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Fonseca, Carlos; Pérez, Jorge; Correa, Consuelo; Soto, Yudira; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial assays.

  12. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Alemán

    Full Text Available As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial

  13. The prevalence and genotypic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii in human sera and brain tissue from individuals in Scotland between 2006 - 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Up to date information about the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in humans is lacking for the UK population, with even less information available about the prevalence of the parasite in people in Scotland. To address this, two different study groups were used to determine the prevalence and genotyp...

  14. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in self-obtained cervicovaginal samples by using the FTA cartridge: new possibilities for cervical cancer screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenselink, C.H.; Bie, R.P. de; Hamont, D. van; Bakkers, J.M.J.E.; Quint, W.G.V.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping in self-sampled genital smears applied to an indicating FTA elute cartridge (FTA cartridge). The study group consisted of 96 women, divided into two sample sets. All samples were analyzed by the HPV SPF(10)-Line Blot 25. Set 1

  15. Aplicaciones de la técnica de aproximación facial forense en la identificación humana individual Usefulness of technique of forensic facial approximation in the individual human identification

    OpenAIRE

    F. Serrulla; Gómez, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objetivos: Valorar el interés y la utilidad de la técnica de aproximación facial forense en la identificación humana individual. Material: Tres esqueletos hallados en contexto arqueológico de cronología situada entre los siglos III y VII. Técnica aplicada sobre restos humanos carbonizados sin identificación. Métodos: Elaboración del croquis antropológico mediante fotografía métrica, método Gerasimov (1955) de reconstrucción del perfil nasal, técnica de Stephan de posicionamiento de los ojos y...

  16. Aplicaciones de la técnica de aproximación facial forense en la identificación humana individual Usefulness of technique of forensic facial approximation in the individual human identification

    OpenAIRE

    F. Serrulla; M. Gómez

    2008-01-01

    Objetivos: Valorar el interés y la utilidad de la técnica de aproximación facial forense en la identificación humana individual. Material: Tres esqueletos hallados en contexto arqueológico de cronología situada entre los siglos III y VII. Técnica aplicada sobre restos humanos carbonizados sin identificación. Métodos: Elaboración del croquis antropológico mediante fotografía métrica, método Gerasimov (1955) de reconstrucción del perfil nasal, técnica de Stephan de posicionamiento de los ojos y...

  17. Interrogation of allelic chromatin states in human cells by high-density ChIP-genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Nicholas; Adoue, Véronique; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Kwan, Tony; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-09-01

    Allele-specific (AS) assessment of chromatin has the potential to elucidate specific cis-regulatory mechanisms, which are predicted to underlie the majority of the known genetic associations to complex disease. However, development of chromatin landscapes at allelic resolution has been challenging since sites of variable signal strength require substantial read depths not commonly applied in sequencing based approaches. In this study, we addressed this by performing parallel analyses of input DNA and chromatin immunoprecipitates (ChIP) on high-density Illumina genotyping arrays. Allele-specificity for the histone modifications H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K27ac, H3K27me3, and H3K36me3 was assessed using ChIP samples generated from 14 lymphoblast and 6 fibroblast cell lines. AS-ChIP SNPs were combined into domains and validated using high-confidence ChIP-seq sites. We observed characteristic patterns of allelic-imbalance for each histone-modification around allele-specifically expressed transcripts. Notably, we found H3K4me1 to be significantly anti-correlated with allelic expression (AE) at transcription start sites, indicating H3K4me1 allelic imbalance as a marker of AE. We also found that allelic chromatin domains exhibit population and cell-type specificity as well as heritability within trios. Finally, we observed that a subset of allelic chromatin domains is regulated by DNase I-sensitive quantitative trait loci and that these domains are significantly enriched for genome-wide association studies hits, with autoimmune disease associated SNPs specifically enriched in lymphoblasts. This study provides the first genome-wide maps of allelic-imbalance for five histone marks. Our results provide new insights into the role of chromatin in cis-regulation and highlight the need for high-depth sequencing in ChIP-seq studies along with the need to improve allele-specificity of ChIP-enrichment.

  18. Occurrence, Virulence Factors, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Chicken Products and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bayomi, Rasha M; Ahmed, Heba A; Awadallah, Maysa A I; Mohsen, Rasha A; Abd El-Ghafar, Abeer E; Abdelrahman, Mahmoud A

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus in food is a consequence of inadequate hygienic handling and processing, posing a potential risk to public health. The current study aimed to characterize virulence factors, as well as antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolated from retail chicken products and hand swabs from vendors in Egypt. In addition, genetic relatedness of the isolates from chicken and humans was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using protein A as a target. A total of 110 samples were collected from chicken products (n = 80) and vendors (n = 30). Overall, 30 (37.5%) chicken products samples were positive for S. aureus, whereas hand swabs from meat handlers revealed that 18 (60%) were positive. Ten MRSA strains were characterized by the presence of the mecA gene, comprising seven isolates from chicken and three from humans. Virulence-associated factors were evaluated by PCR, revealing that 31.3% of S. aureus isolates harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, whereas 10.4% were positive for the sea and sed genes each, and only two isolates were positive for γ-hemolysin-associated gene. Genotyping using spa PCR-RFLP showed identical restriction banding patterns of MRSA isolates of human and chicken meat origin, indicating the genetic relatedness of the isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize PVL-positive MRSA from chicken products and to utilize spa-RFLP for evaluating the genetic relatedness between MRSA of human and chicken origin in Egypt.

  19. Genotyping of Hydatid Cyst Isolated from Human and Domestic Animals in Ilam Province, Western Iran Using PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dousti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydatidosis or cystic hydatid disease is one of the most important diseases in human and animals. Identification of strains is important for improvement of control and prevention of dis­ease. The aim of this study was to determine the strains isolated from human and domestic animals in Ilam Province, Iran, using PCR-RFLP method.Methods: Respectively, 30 and 4 animal and human hydatid cysts were collected from different slaughter­houses and hospitals of the province. Protoscolices were separated and their DNA genome was extracted by extraction kit. rDNA-ITS1 of each isolated samples was duplicated by BD1(Forward and 4s (Reverse Primers. PCR products were studied by electrophoresis and then were digested using TaqI, HpaII, RsaI and AluI restriction enzymes. RFLP products were studied using electrophoresis on 1% agar gel.Result: A fragment of 1000bp was produced from amplification of rDNA-ITS1 of protoscolices using PCR method. After digestion of PCR product by AluI enzyme, 200bp and 800bp, by RsaI, 655bp and 345bp and by HpaII 700bp and 300bp sizes were obtained. TaqI enzyme had no change in fragment size and it remained 1000bp. Considering the method, Ilam strains was specified as E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1-G3.Conclusions: Although sheep strain (G1 is dominated in human and different animal in Iran and the world, but more efforts should be done to clarify the true genotype of Ilam strains specified as E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1-G3.

  20. Digital forensic standards: international progress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, MM

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available With the explosion of digital crime, digital forensics is more often applied. The digital forensic discipline developed rather rapidly, but up to date very little international standardization with regard to processes, procedures or management has...

  1. World of Forensic Laboratory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? The World of Forensic Laboratory Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... made-for-television lab scenario, real-life forensic laboratories' analyses of evidence are much slower. For example, ...

  2. Adherence to and invasion of human intestinal cells by Arcobacter species and their virulence genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Alkeskas, Aldukali; Günter, Claudia; Forsythe, Stephen J; Figueras, María José

    2013-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter is composed of 17 species which have been isolated from various sources. Of particular interest are A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, and A. skirrowii, as these have been associated with human cases of diarrhea, the probable transmission routes being through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water and food. To date, only limited studies of virulence traits in this genus have been undertaken. The present study used 60 Arcobacter strains isolated from different sources, representing 16 of the 17 species of the genus, to investigate their ability to adhere to and invade the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. In addition, the presence of five putative virulence genes (ciaB, cadF, cj1349, hecA, and irgA) was screened for in these strains by PCR. All Arcobacter species except A. bivalviorum and Arcobacter sp. strain W63 adhered to Caco-2 cells, and most species (10/16) were invasive. The most invasive species were A. skirrowii, A. cryaerophilus, A. butzleri, and A. defluvii. All invasive strains were positive for ciaB (encoding a putative invasion protein). Other putative virulence genes were present in other species, i.e., A. butzleri (cadF, cj1349, irgA, and hecA), A. trophiarum (cj1349), A. ellisii (cj1349), and A. defluvii (irgA). No virulence genes were detected in strains which showed little or no invasion of Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that many Arcobacter species are potential pathogens of humans and animals.

  3. Eponyms in forensic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nečas, Pavel; Hejna, Petr

    2012-12-01

    The phenomenon of eponymous terms in forensic pathology is described in this paper. The authors analyzed representative textbooks (monographs) dealing with forensic pathology in both English and German and identified several eponymous terms. The paper aims to present to the reader the most important eponymous terms in forensic pathology. Included in the paper are the following terms: Beckwith's Sign, Casper's Rule, Krönlein's Shot, Lichtenberg's Figures, Nysten's Law, Paltauf's Spots, Puppe's Rule, Sehrt's Sign, Simon's Sign, Sveshnikov's Sign, Tardieu's Spots, Wischnewski Spots, Wydler's Sign. The spread of eponymous terms throughout various languages is mentioned. The linguistic basis of such terms as well as their advantages and disadvantages in specialist fields, and indeed in even wider circles, is discussed. The authors state that the main function of these terms is to facilitate the open flow of unambiguous information among scholars. Eponymous terms in forensic pathology are characteristic for the German speaking countries and for all countries influenced by the German school of forensic pathology. Their usage in the Anglo-Saxon world is much less widespread, meaning they do not occur very often in English monographs and textbooks.

  4. Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In the past 50 years forensic psychological practice has expanded dramatically. Because the practice of forensic psychology differs in important ways from more traditional practice areas (Monahan, 1980) the "Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists" were developed and published in 1991 (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic…

  5. Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In the past 50 years forensic psychological practice has expanded dramatically. Because the practice of forensic psychology differs in important ways from more traditional practice areas (Monahan, 1980) the "Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists" were developed and published in 1991 (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic…

  6. Forensics on a Shoestring Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Joseph A.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, forensic science has gained popularity thanks in part to high-profile court cases and television programs. Although the cost of forensic equipment and supplies may initially seem too expensive for the typical high school classroom, the author developed an activity that incorporates forensics into her 10th-grade biology curriculum…

  7. Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) Genotypes and Multiple Infections in Cervical Abnormalities from Northern Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Pengyan; Ren, Yan; Du, Jingyun; Jiang, Jianjun; Jia, Xuesong; Chen, Chuangfu; Wang, Yuanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes often coexist within the cervical epithelia and are frequently detected together in various grades of the cervical neoplasia. To date, only a few reports exist on multiple HPV infections of HPV in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (XUAR). In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of High-Risk HPV (HR-HPV) genotypes and multiple infections. Cervical cytology samples were collected from 428 women who presented cervical abnormalities. Genotyping of HPV was performed by polymerase chain reaction-sequencing based typing (PCR-SBT) using consensus primers and specific primers. Of them, 166 samples were positive for HPV according to PCR results using the consensus primers. These samples contained cervical abnormalities enriched with inflammation (n = 107), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I (n = 19), CINII-III (n = 9) and cervical cancer (n = 31). Of the 166 HPV positive samples as determined by PCR analysis, 151 were further typed by PCR-SBT using 19 pairs of genotype-specific primers. Using this method, 17 different HR-HPV genotypes were identified. The most frequently observed HPV genotypes were HPV16 (44.0%, 73/166), 53 (28.9%, 48/166), 52 (25.3%, 42/166), 58 (22.3%, 37/166) and 35 (17.5%, 29/166). The proportions of single and multiple infections in the HPV-positive specimens were 34.9% and 65.1%, respectively. Multiple HPV types were most prevalent in the inflammatory state (63.0%), followed by cervical cancer (24.1%), CINI (11.1%), and CINII-III (1.9%). The results of our data analyses suggested that i) multiple HPV infection is not necessarily correlated with the severity of cervical abnormalities; and ii) among the multiple HPV infections, double infections combined with HPV16 is the most common. In addition, L1 full-length sequences of the top five high-risk HPV genotypes were amplified and sequenced. According to the L1 sequence of the epidemic genotypes that were amplified, we found that these

  8. Evaluation of mRNA markers for estimating blood deposition time: Towards alibi testing from human forensic stains with rhythmic biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Lech (Karolina); F. Liu (Fan); K. Ackermann (Katrin); V.L. Revell (Victoria); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); D.J. Skene (Debra); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDetermining the time a biological trace was left at a scene of crime reflects a crucial aspect of forensic investigations as - if possible - it would permit testing the sample donor's alibi directly from the trace evidence, helping to link (or not) the DNA-identified sample donor with th

  9. Human monoclonal antibodies to a novel cluster of conformational epitopes on HCV E2 with resistance to neutralization escape in a genotype 2a isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    The majority of broadly neutralizing antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) are against conformational epitopes on the E2 glycoprotein. Many of them recognize overlapping epitopes in a cluster, designated as antigenic domain B, that contains residues G530 and D535. To gain information on other...... regions that will be relevant for vaccine design, we employed yeast surface display of antibodies that bound to genotype 1a H77C E2 mutant proteins containing a substitution either at Y632A (to avoid selecting non-neutralizing antibodies) or D535A. A panel of nine human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs......) was isolated and designated as HC-84-related antibodies. Each HMAb neutralized cell culture infectious HCV (HCVcc) with genotypes 1-6 envelope proteins with varying profiles, and each inhibited E2 binding to the viral receptor CD81. Five of these antibodies neutralized representative genotypes 1-6 HCVcc...

  10. Study comparing human papillomavirus (HPV) real-time multiplex PCR and Hybrid Capture II INNO-LiPA v2 HPV genotyping PCR assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftner, Thomas; Germ, Liesje; Swoyer, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genotyping is an essential test to establish efficacy in HPV vaccine clinical trials and HPV prevalence in natural history studies. A number of HPV DNA genotyping methods have been cited in the literature, but the comparability of the outcomes from the different...... methods has not been well characterized. Clinically, cytology is used to establish possible HPV infection. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of HPV multiplex PCR assays compared to those of the testing scheme of the Hybrid Capture II (HCII) assay followed by an HPV PCR/line hybridization assay...... (HCII-LiPA v2). SurePath residual samples were split into two aliquots. One aliquot was subjected to HCII testing followed by DNA extraction and LiPA v2 genotyping. The second aliquot was shipped to a second laboratory, where DNA was extracted and HPV multiplex PCR testing was performed. Comparisons...

  11. Column: File Cabinet Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Garfinkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers can spend their time reverse engineering, performing reverse analysis, or making substantive contributions to digital forensics science. Although work in all of these areas is important, it is the scientific breakthroughs that are the most critical for addressing the challenges that we face.Reverse Engineering is the traditional bread-and-butter of digital forensics research. Companies like Microsoft and Apple deliver computational artifacts (operating systems, applications and phones to the commercial market. These artifacts are bought and used by billions. Some have evil intent, and (if society is lucky, the computers end up in the hands of law enforcement. Unfortunately the original vendors rarely provide digital forensics tools that make their systems amenable to analysis by law enforcement. Hence the need for reverse engineering.(see PDF for full column

  12. Differential detection of Human Papillomavirus genotypes and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by four commercial assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah;

    2016-01-01

    Laboratories can nowadays choose from >100 Human Papillomavirus (HPV) assays for cervical screening. Our previous analysis based on the data from the Danish Horizon study, however, showed that four widely used assays, Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART and APTIMA, frequently do not detect...... the same HPV infections. Here, we determined the characteristics of the concordant (all four assays returning a positive HPV test result) and discordant samples (all other HPV-positive samples) in primary cervical screening at 30-65 years (n=2859) and in a concurrent referral population from the same...... catchment area (n=885). HPV testing followed the manufacturers' protocols. Women with abnormal cytology were managed according to the routine recommendations. Cytology-normal/HPV-positive women were invited for repeated testing in 18 months. Screening history and histologically confirmed cervical...

  13. Human papillomavirus genotyping after denaturation of specimens for Hybrid Capture 2 testing: feasibility study for the HPV persistence and progression cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMere, Brandon J; Kornegay, Janet; Fetterman, Barbara; Sadorra, Mark; Shieh, Jen; Castle, Philip E

    2007-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping could be clinically useful, depending on the results of large, prospective studies like the HPV persistence and progression (PaP) cohort. The cohort is based on genotyping and follow-up of Hybrid Capture-positive women at Kaiser Permanente, Northern California. HPV DNA testing by Hybrid Capture 2 requires denaturation with alkali, possibly damaging the DNA for optimal PCR-based genotyping. A feasibility study was conducted on paired aliquots of anonymized specimens from 100 women with low-grade intraepithelial lesion cytology. Test aliquots were left in denaturant for 10 or 18h at 4 degrees C and then neutralized; comparison aliquots were not denatured but diluted to match the timing, temperature, concentration and salt conditions of the treated specimens. The masked aliquots were tested using a commercialized PCR-based assay that detects of 37 HPV genotypes. There was no overall effect of treatment on test positivity or number of types. HPV16 was marginally more likely to be detected in untreated versus treated aliquots (P=0.09) but HPV45 was marginally more likely to be detected in treated than untreated aliquots (P=0.07), suggesting that these differences represented chance (intra-test variability). It can be concluded that residual Hybrid Capture-positive specimens can be genotyped by PCR after Hybrid Capture 2 processing.

  14. Detection of Common, Emerging and Uncommon VP4, and VP7 Human Group A Rotavirus Genotypes from Urban Sewage Samples in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, Luis Fernando Lopez; Victoria, Matías; Lizasoain, Andrés; García, Mariana; Berois, Mabel; Cristina, Juan; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Colina, Rodney

    2015-12-01

    Environmental approach has proven to be a useful tool for epidemiological studies demonstrating through environmental studies the diversity of viruses circulating in a given population. The aim of this study was to perform a phylogenetic characterization of the group A rotavirus (RVA) glycoprotein (G)- and protease-sensitive (P)-genotypes obtained from sewage samples (n = 116) collected in six cities of Uruguay during March 2011 to April 2013. A worldwide standardized semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR (SNM RT-PCR) protocol directed against VP4 and VP7 genes were conducted for RVA detection and consensual DNA fragments were submitted to nucleotide sequencing. P and/or G genotype was successfully determined by phylogenetic analysis in 61% (n = 37) of the positive samples obtained by SNM RT-PCR (n = 61). The RVA genotypes were as follow: G1 (n = 2), G2 (n = 14), G3 (n = 5), G12 (n = 2), P[4] (n = 4), P[8] (n = 16), and P[3] (n = 2). Interestingly, through phylogenetic analysis, emerging, and uncommon human genotypes could be detected. Results obtained from the comparison of RVA genotypes detected in the current study and Uruguayan RVA strains previously described for contemporary clinical pediatric cases showed that monitoring sewage may be a good screening option for a rapid and economical overview of the circulating genotypes in the surrounding human population and a useful approximation to study RVA epidemiology in a future vaccine monitoring program. The present study represents the first report in Uruguay that describes the phylogenetic diversity of RVA from urban sewage samples.

  15. Building a forensic ancestry panel from the ground up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, C; Parson, W; Lundsberg, Birgitte Møller;

    2014-01-01

    Emerging next-generation sequencing technologies will enable DNA analyses to add pigmentation predictive and ancestry informative (AIM) SNPs to the range of markers detectable from a single PCR test. This prompted us to re-appraise current forensic and genomics AIM-SNPs and from the best sets...... to minimize bias when estimating co-ancestry proportions in individuals with admixed ancestries. The differentiation of European from Middle East or South Asian ancestries was not chosen as a characteristic in order to concentrate on introducing Oceanian differentiation for the first time in a forensic AIM......-specific divergence in at least four groups. We describe subsets of 88, 55, 28, 20 and 12 AIMs, enabling both new and existing SNP genotyping technologies to exploit the best markers identified for forensic ancestry analysis....

  16. Building a forensic ancestry panel from the ground up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, C; Parson, W; Lundsberg, Birgitte Møller

    2014-01-01

    Emerging next-generation sequencing technologies will enable DNA analyses to add pigmentation predictive and ancestry informative (AIM) SNPs to the range of markers detectable from a single PCR test. This prompted us to re-appraise current forensic and genomics AIM-SNPs and from the best sets...... to minimize bias when estimating co-ancestry proportions in individuals with admixed ancestries. The differentiation of European from Middle East or South Asian ancestries was not chosen as a characteristic in order to concentrate on introducing Oceanian differentiation for the first time in a forensic AIM......-specific divergence in at least four groups. We describe subsets of 88, 55, 28, 20 and 12 AIMs, enabling both new and existing SNP genotyping technologies to exploit the best markers identified for forensic ancestry analysis....

  17. The prevalence and genotype of human papillomavirus on cervical samples from an Irish female population with external genital warts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cremin, Suzanne M

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cervical genotype profile of females who presented to an STI Clinic with external genital warts (EGW); and to determine the potential vaccine coverage prior to the uptake of the HPV vaccines. Sixty-one cervical scrapings were taken from females aged 18-35 y who had external genital warts or a history of external genital warts. The resulting 50 samples that were positive for HPV-DNA were subjected to genotype identification. Forty-six of these samples had detectable genotypes by LIPA analysis and most (78%, 36\\/46) had multiple low risk (LR) and high risk (HR) genotypes on the cervix. Twenty-five of these samples (54%) had more than 1 HR genotype. Of the 36 patients who had any HR genotypes, 18 (50%) were identified to have the most oncogenic HPV genotypes, namely 16 and 18. Three of these samples had both 16 and 18 on the cervix. The presence of multiple HR genotypes on the majority of cervical samples from a self-referred population of females with EGW is presented. This study is of importance since persistent HR-HPV is the necessary risk factor in the development of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix. Gardisil, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine would have been useful in the prevention of 28% (13\\/46) of these infections.

  18. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  19. Forensic anthropology in Europe: an assessment of current status and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranioti, Elena; Paine, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Forensic anthropology is the discipline that traditionally deals with the examination of human remains for legal purposes and it derives from the fields of anatomy, physical anthropology and forensic medicine. For more than a century, forensic anthropologists in the United States have been offering their services in the court of law complementing the medico-legal investigation of other forensic professionals. The current status in European countries is presented here. The development of forensic anthropology varies significantly among the countries of Europe. Whereas some countries show a long history of research activity in the forensic sciences, including forensic anthropology (i.e. France, Germany and Spain), others are exhibiting a recent, rapid development (i.e. United Kingdom). In some cases, forensic anthropologists are employed within the academic realm (i.e. U.K., Denmark, Portugal, Turkey), forensic institutions (Netherlands) or government organizations (Spain, Hungary), although the vast majority of them remain limited to freelance activities on a sporadic basis. Often, European scientists that deal with skeletal remains come from nonphysical anthropology disciplines such as archaeology, forensic medicine and biology. In many cases they do not have adequate training equivalent to the forensic anthropologists in the USA. Naturally, without common training and a common legal system, an accreditation system for Europe will be difficult to implement.

  20. Efficient replication of genotype 3a and 4a hepatitis C virus replicons in human hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Scheel, Troels K H; Gottwein, Judith M;

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C, the quest for pan-genotype, effective, and well-tolerated inhibitors continues. To facilitate these efforts, it is desirable to have in vitro replication systems for all major HCV genotypes. However, cell culture replication systems exist...... for only genotypes 1a, 1b, and 2a. In this study, we generated G418-selectable subgenomic replicons for prototype strains of genotypes 3a (S52) and 4a (ED43). Production of G418-resistant colonies by S52 and ED43 in Huh-7.5 cells required the amino acid substitutions S2210I and R2882G, respectively, cell...... culture adaptive mutations originally reported for genotype 1b replicons. RNA replication was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and detection of viral protein. Sequencing of multiple independent replicon clones revealed the presence of additional nonsynonymous mutations. Interestingly...

  1. La geomatica forense e il Forensic GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Carlucci

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La Conferenza ASITA 2012, tenutasi lo scorso novembre a Vicenza, ha rivelato una piacevole sorpresa con unasessione speciale che ha visto magistrati, avvocati e geomatici coinvolti per discutere l'aspetto relativo all’impattodella determinazione scientifica in iter giudiziari quali i contesti investigativi e processuali.AbstractIn the ASITA Conference 2012, held last November in Vicenza,a special session on “Forensic geomatics”, with judges and lawyers involved to discuss a very important aspect about the impact of scientific geomatics determinations arising during the judicial process of contexts analysis and investigative proceedings. 

  2. Integrating the microbiome as a resource in the forensics toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas H; Gomez, Andres; Singh, Harinder; Nelson, Karen E; Brinkac, Lauren M

    2017-09-01

    The introduction of DNA fingerprinting to forensic science rapidly expanded the available evidence that could be garnered from a crime scene and used in court cases. Next generation sequencing technologies increased available genetic data that could be used as evidence by orders of magnitude, and as such, significant additional genetic information is now available for use in forensic science. This includes DNA from the bacteria that live in and on humans, known as the human microbiome. Next generation sequencing of the human microbiome demonstrates that its bacterial DNA can be used to uniquely identify an individual, provide information about their life and behavioral patterns, determine the body site where a sample came from, and estimate postmortem intervals. Bacterial samples from the environment and objects can also be leveraged to address similar questions about the individual(s) who interacted with them. However, the applications of this new field in forensic sciences raises concerns on current methods used in sample processing, including sample collection, storage, and the statistical power of published studies. These areas of human microbiome research need to be fully addressed before microbiome data can become a regularly incorporated evidence type and routine procedure of the forensic toolkit. Here, we summarize information on the current status of microbiome research as applies to the forensic field, the mathematical models used to make predictions, and the possible legal and practical difficulties that can limit the application of microbiomes in forensic science. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes in women with cervical alterations from north Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G D Deluca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical cancer remains a major public health problem in northern Argentina, showing the highest mortality rate in the country (approximately 22 cases/100000 women. Objective: The aim of this study was to provide epidemiological data on the prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV in women with pre-neoplastic lesions before the massive introduction of HPV vaccination in the country. Materials and Methods: Exfoliated cervical cells were collected to screen for HPV using the widely known MY09/11 PCR, followed by the restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP technique from a total of 714 women with previously diagnosed atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LG-SIL and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HG-SIL. Results: Overall HPV prevalence was 48.2% in ASCUS (24 different HPV types detected, 66.5% in LG-SIL (37 HPV types detected and 82.6% in HG-SIL (16 HPV types detected. HPV-16 was the most prevalent type among all cases. With respect to multiple HPV infections, 9.6% were observed in ASCUS, 14.3% in LG-SIL and 11.4% in HG-SIL. Conclusion: The major strength of our study is the assessment of a large series of women with cytological alterations in this region. The information attained will be useful as a regional baseline for future epidemiological vigilance, in the context of the national HPV vaccination program.

  4. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid technology in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pankaj; Datta, Sonia Sood

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) analysis methods have been applied to forensic cases. Forensic dental record comparison has been used for human identification in cases where destruction of bodily tissues or prolonged exposure to the environment has made other means of identification impractical, that is, after fire exposure or mass disaster. Teeth play an important role in identification and criminology, due to their unique characteristics and relatively high degree of physical and chemical resistance. The use of a DNA profile test in forensic dentistry offers a new perspective in human identification. The DNA is responsible for storing all the genetic material and is unique to each individual. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article gives an overview of the evolution of DNA technology in the last few years, highlighting its importance in cases of forensic investigation.

  5. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid technology in forensic dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Datta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA analysis methods have been applied to forensic cases. Forensic dental record comparison has been used for human identification in cases where destruction of bodily tissues or prolonged exposure to the environment has made other means of identification impractical, that is, after fire exposure or mass disaster. Teeth play an important role in identification and criminology, due to their unique characteristics and relatively high degree of physical and chemical resistance. The use of a DNA profile test in forensic dentistry offers a new perspective in human identification. The DNA is responsible for storing all the genetic material and is unique to each individual. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article gives an overview of the evolution of DNA technology in the last few years, highlighting its importance in cases of forensic investigation.

  6. Genotyping, levels of expression and physical status of human papilloma virus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma among Colombian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erira, Alveiro; Motta, Leidy Angélica; Chala, Andrés; Moreno, Andrey; Gamboa, Fredy; García, Dabeiba Adriana

    2015-10-23

    One of the risk factors for squamous cell oropharyngeal carcinoma is infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV), with prevalences that vary depending on the geographical region.  To identify the most frequent HPV viral types in oropharyngeal cancer, the levels of expression and the physical condition of the viral genome.  Forty-six patients were included in the study from among those attending head and neck surgical services in the cities of Bogotá, Manizales and Bucaramanga. In the histopathological report all study samples were characterized as oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. DNA extraction was subsequently performed for HPV genotyping and to determine the physical state of the viral genome, as well as RNA to determine viral transcripts using real-time PCR.  HPV prevalence in tumors was 21.74% (n=10) and the most common viral type was HPV-16 (nine cases). Viral expression for HPV-16 was low (one of 11 copies) and the predominant physical state of the virus was mixed (eight cases), with disruption observed at the E1 - E2 binding site (2525 - 3720 nucleotides).  The prevalence of HPV associated with oropharyngeal carcinoma among the Colombian study population was 21.7%, which is relatively low. The most frequent viral type was HPV-16, found in a mixed form and with low expression of E7, possibly indicating a poor prognosis for these patients.

  7. A Schisandra-Derived Compound Schizandronic Acid Inhibits Entry of Pan-HCV Genotypes into Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xi-Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Hai-Sheng; Xu, Qing-Qiang; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Tang, Hai-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Zhe; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent progress in the development of hepatitis C virus (HCV) inhibitors, cost-effective antiviral drugs, especially among the patients receiving liver transplantations, are still awaited. Schisandra is a traditional medicinal herb used to treat a range of liver disorders including hepatitis for thousands of years in China. To isolate the bioactive compounds of schisandra for the treatment of HCV infection, we screened a schisandra-extracts library and identified a tetracyclic triterpenoid, schizandronic acid (SZA), as a novel HCV entry inhibitor. Our findings suggested that SZA potently inhibited pan-HCV genotype entry into hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes without interfering virus binding on cell surface or internalization. However, virion-cell fusion process was impaired in the presence of SZA, along with the increased host membrane fluidity. We also found that SZA inhibited the spread of HCV to the neighboring cells, and combinations of SZA with interferon or telaprevir resulted in additive synergistic effect against HCV. Additionally, SZA diminished the establishment of HCV infection in vivo. The SZA target is different from conventional direct-acting antiviral agents, therefore, SZA is a potential therapeutic compound for the development of effective HCV entry inhibitors, especially for patients who need to prevent HCV reinfection during the course of liver transplantations. PMID:27252043

  8. Genotypic Characterization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Derived from Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive Individuals Residing in Sorong, West Papua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witaningrum, Adiana Mutamsari; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Khairunisa, Siti Qamariyah; Yunifiar M, Muhammad Qushai; Indriati, Dwi Wahyu; Bramanthi, Rendra; Nasronudin; Kameoka, Masanori

    2016-08-01

    Papua and West Papua provinces have the highest prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Indonesia; however, data on the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 are limited. We conducted a genotypic study on HIV-1 genes derived from antiretroviral therapy-naive individuals residing in Sorong, West Papua. HIV-1 genomic fragments were amplified from 43 peripheral blood samples, and sequencing analysis of the genes was carried out. Of the 43 samples, 41 protease (PR), 31 reverse transcriptase (RT), 26 gag, and 25 env genes were sequenced. HIV-1 subtyping revealed that CRF01_AE (48.8%, 21/43) and subtype B (41.9%, 18/43) were the major subtypes prevalent in the region, whereas other recombinant forms were also detected. Major drug resistance-associated mutations for PR inhibitors were not detected; however, mutations for the RT inhibitors, A62V and E138A, appeared in a few samples, indicating the possible emergence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in Sorong, West Papua.

  9. Genotypic and phenotypic modifications of Neisseria meningitidis after an accidental human passage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Omer

    Full Text Available A scientist in our laboratory was accidentally infected while working with Z5463, a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A strain. She developed severe symptoms (fever, meningism, purpuric lesions that fortunately evolved with antibiotic treatment to complete recovery. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis confirmed that the isolate obtained from the blood culture (Z5463BC was identical to Z5463, more precisely to a fourth subculture of this strain used the week before the contamination (Z5463PI. In order to get some insights into genomic modifications that can occur in vivo, we sequenced these three isolates. All the strains contained a mutated mutS allele and therefore displayed an hypermutator phenotype, consistent with the high number of mutations (SNP, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism detected in the three strains. By comparing the number of SNP in all three isolates and knowing the number of passages between Z5463 and Z5463PI, we concluded that around 25 bacterial divisions occurred in the human body. As expected, the in vivo passage is responsible for several modifications of phase variable genes. This genomic study has been completed by transcriptomic and phenotypic studies, showing that the blood strain used a different haemoglobin-linked iron receptor (HpuA/B than the parental strains (HmbR. Different pilin variants were found after the in vivo passage, which expressed different properties of adhesion. Furthermore the deletion of one gene involved in LOS biosynthesis (lgtB results in Z5463BC expressing a different LOS than the L9 immunotype of Z2491. The in vivo passage, despite the small numbers of divisions, permits the selection of numerous genomic modifications that may account for the high capacity of the strain to disseminate.

  10. Exploring trends in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Gowhar, Owais; Ain, Tasneem S; Sultan, Saima

    2014-12-01

    Forensic odontology nowadays has become a developing science and is of great importance to society. It is important that dental practitioners should have a proper knowledge of forensics as the need has increased greatly over the last decades due to the unprecedented demand from the criminal justice including terrorism in Kashmir valley (J&K India). Data was collected based on questionnaire survey among qualified dental practitioners related to their awareness of forensic odontology. A total number of 235 dental practitioners responded to the questionnaire. RESULTS showed that there was a low confidence, in handling of forensic odontology related cases among dental practitioners and majority of dental practitioners were not having any formal training in forensic odontology. Each dental practitioner has a responsibility to understand the forensic implications associated with the practice of his profession and thus he should work sincerely enough so to ensure his contribution in the field of forensic odontology.

  11. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira da; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence, Genotype Distribution and Risk Factors for Cervical Human Papillomavirus Infection in the Grand Tunis Region, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhaoui, Monia; Ennaifer, Emna; Letaief, Hajer; Salsabil, Rejaibi; Lassili, Thalja; Chahed, Karim; Bougatef, Souha; Bahrini, Asma; El Fehri, Emna; Ouerhani, Kaouther; Paez Jimenez, Adela; Guizani, Ikram; Boubaker, Med Samir; Ben Alaya, Nissaf Bouafif Ép

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination should be considered a key cervical cancer prevention strategy in Tunisia, where Pap smear screening is not efficient. This study aims to estimate the prevalence and to identify risk factors associated with HPV infection among women from Grand Tunis, Tunisia. We conducted a cross-sectional study, between December 2012 and May 2013. Eligible women for this study were those aged 18-65 years, sexually active, who sought medical attention at their primary health care centre or clinic in Grand Tunis, Tunisia and who gave written consent. A liquid-based Pap smear sample was obtained from all women using a cervical brush. Only women with betaglobin positive test were further analysed for HPV detection and typing. A nested-PCR of the L1 region was performed followed by reverse line blot hybridization to facilitate the specific detection of 31 HPV genotypes. Multiple logistic regression modeling was used for the analysis of associations between variables with some considered possible confounders after checking for interactions. A total of 391 women were enrolled in this study and 325 out of the 391 cervical samples were positive for the betaglobin test. Overall HPV prevalence was 13.2% [9.8%-17.5%], with the following most prevalent HPV genotypes: HPV6 (40%), HPV40 (14%), HPV16 (12%), HPV52 (9%), HPV31 and HPV59 (7%), followed by HPV68 (4%). Mean age of HPV positive women was 40.7±0.92 years. Independently associated risk factors of HPV infection were smoking (OR:2.8 [0.8-9.6]), low income (OR:9.6 [1.4-63.4), bad housing type (OR:2.5 [1-6.8]), partner with multiple sexual relationship (OR:4.5 [0.9-22.9]) and single women (widowed, divorced, separated, never married) (OR:6.9 [1.1-42.2]). This study provides the first national-based estimate of HPV prevalence in Tunisia. Our findings contribute to the evidence on the current burden of HPV infection, the critical role of sexual behaviour and socioeconomic status and

  13. DR_SEQAN: a PC/Windows-based software to evaluate drug resistance using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez-Arias Luis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotypic assays based on DNA sequencing of part or the whole reverse transcriptase (RT- and protease (PR-coding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genome have become part of the routine clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to complex interactions between mutations found in viral genes. Results DR_SEQAN is a tool to analyze RT and PR sequences. The program output includes a list containing all of the amino acid changes found in the query sequence in comparison with the sequence of a wild-type HIV-1 strain. Translation of codons containing nucleotide mixtures can result in potential ambiguities or heterogeneities in the amino acid sequence. The program identifies all possible combinations of 2 or 3 amino acids that derive from translation of triplets containing nucleotide mixtures. In addition, when ambiguities affect codons relevant for drug resistance, DR_SEQAN allows the user to select the appropriate mutation to be considered by the program's drug resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance is predicted using a rule-based algorithm, whose efficiency and accuracy has been tested with a large set of drug susceptibility data. Drug resistance predictions given by DR_SEQAN were consistent with phenotypic data and coherent with predictions provided by other publicly available algorithms. In addition, the program output provides two tables showing published drug susceptibility data and references for mutations and combinations of mutations found in the analyzed sequence. These data are retrieved from an integrated relational database, implemented in Microsoft Access, which includes two sets of non-redundant core tables (one for combinations of mutations in the PR and the other for combinations in the RT. Conclusion DR_SEQAN is an easy to use off-line application that provides expert advice on HIV genotypic resistance interpretation. It is

  14. Giardia duodenalis in Damascus, Syria: Identification of Giardia genotypes in a sample of human fecal isolates using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyzing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skhal, Dania; Aboualchamat, Ghalia; Al Nahhas, Samar

    2016-02-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a common gastrointestinal parasite that infects humans and many other mammals. It is most prevalent in many developing and industrialized countries. G. duodenalis is considered to be a complex species. While no morphological distinction among different assemblages exist, it can be genetically differentiated into eight major assemblages: A to H. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic heterogeneity of G. duodenalis in human isolates (a study conducted for the first time in Syria). 40 fecal samples were collected from three different hospitals during the hot summer season of 2014. Extraction of genomic DNA from all Giardia positive samples (based on a microscopic examination) was performed using QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit. β-giardin gene was used to differentiate between different Giardia assemblages. The 514 bp fragment was amplified using the Polymerase Chain Reaction method, followed by digestion in HaeIII restriction enzyme. Our result showed that genotype A was more frequent than genotype B, 27/40 (67.5%); 4/40 (10%) respectively. A mixed genotype of A+B was only detected in 9 isolates (22.5%). This is the first molecular study performed on G. duodenalis isolates in Syria in order to discriminate among the different genotypes. Further expanded studies using more genes are needed to detect and identify the Giardia parasite at the level of assemblage and sub-assemblage.

  15. Multifarious applications of atomic force microscopy in forensic science investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Tharmavaram, Maithri; Rawtani, Deepak; Kumar, Sumit; Agrawal, Y

    2017-04-01

    Forensic science is a wide field comprising of several subspecialties and uses methods derived from natural sciences for finding criminals and other evidence valid in a legal court. A relatively new area; Nano-forensics brings a new era of investigation in forensic science in which instantaneous results can be produced that determine various agents such as explosive gasses, biological agents and residues in different crime scenes and terrorist activity investigations. This can be achieved by applying Nanotechnology and its associated characterization techniques in forensic sciences. Several characterization techniques exist in Nanotechnology and nano-analysis is one such technique that is used in forensic science which includes Electron microscopes (EM) like Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM), Raman microscopy (Micro -Raman) and Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) like Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Atomic force microscopy enables surface characterization of different materials by examining their morphology and mechanical properties. Materials that are immeasurable such as hair, body fluids, textile fibers, documents, polymers, pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), etc. are often encountered during forensic investigations. This review article will mainly focus on the use of AFM in the examination of different evidence such as blood stains, forged documents, human hair samples, ammunitions, explosives, and other such applications in the field of Forensic Science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic diversity for grain Zn concentration in finger millet genotypes:Potential for improving human Zn nutrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramegowda Yamunarani; Geetha Govind; Venkategowda Ramegowda; Harshavardhan Vokkaliga Thammegowda; Shankar Ambarahalli Guligowda

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of the world population suffers from micronutrient malnutrition,particularly Zn deficiency.It is important to understand genetic variation for uptake and translocation behaviors of Zn in relevant crop species to increase Zn concentration in edible parts.In the present study,genetic variation in grain Zn concentration of 319 finger millet genotypes was assessed.Large genetic variation was found among the genotypes,with concentrations ranging from 10 to 86 μg g-1grain.Uptake and translocation studies with Zn/65 Zn application in 12 selected low-Zn genotypes showed wide variation in root uptake and shoot translocation,with genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 showing greater uptake and translocation.Genotypes GEC164 and GEC543 showed increased grain Zn concentration.Genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 also showed improved yield under Zn treatment.Appreciable variation in grain Zn concentration among finger millet genotypes found in this study offers opportunities to improve Zn nutrition through breeding.

  17. eCOMPAGT integrates mtDNA: import, validation and export of mitochondrial DNA profiles for population genetics, tumour dynamics and genotype-phenotype association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Specht Günther

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is widely being used for population genetics, forensic DNA fingerprinting and clinical disease association studies. The recent past has uncovered severe problems with mtDNA genotyping, not only due to the genotyping method itself, but mainly to the post-lab transcription, storage and report of mtDNA genotypes. Description eCOMPAGT, a system to store, administer and connect phenotype data to all kinds of genotype data is now enhanced by the possibility of storing mtDNA profiles and allowing their validation, linking to phenotypes and export as numerous formats. mtDNA profiles can be imported from different sequence evaluation programs, compared between evaluations and their haplogroup affiliations stored. Furthermore, eCOMPAGT has been improved in its sophisticated transparency (support of MySQL and Oracle, security aspects (by using database technology and the option to import, manage and store genotypes derived from various genotyping methods (SNPlex, TaqMan, and STRs. It is a software solution designed for project management, laboratory work and the evaluation process all-in-one. Conclusions The extended mtDNA version of eCOMPAGT was designed to enable error-free post-laboratory data handling of human mtDNA profiles. This software is suited for small to medium-sized human genetic, forensic and clinical genetic laboratories. The direct support of MySQL and the improved database security options render eCOMPAGT a powerful tool to build an automated workflow architecture for several genotyping methods. eCOMPAGT is freely available at http://dbis-informatik.uibk.ac.at/ecompagt.

  18. Parricide: a forensic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Soraia; Santos, Agostinho; Dias, Isabel; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2014-02-01

    Parricide is the act of murdering one's father (patricide), mother (matricide) or other close relative, but usually not children (infanticide). It is a rare event and little information is available on this topic. This study aims to increase knowledge about this phenomenon, promoting the timely detection of problematic cases and avoiding fatalities. A retrospective study based on the autopsy reports of parricide victims performed by the North Services of the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of Portugal between 2003 and 2011, as well as on the judicial outcome of each case, was performed. Seven cases of parricide were found, corresponding to 1.7% of all the homicides undergoing forensic evaluated. Victims and perpetrators were typically males. The assaults occurred all at home, in the presence of witnesses, and the perpetrator remained at the scene after the crime. The main alleged reasons were untreated psychiatric illness and financial conflicts in the cases of adult parricide, and attempts to protect the mother from intimate partner violence in younger ones. The judicial outcomes ranged from acquittal for nonimputability to conviction for murder, manslaughter or involuntary manslaughter. This study was carried out on a forensic sample and it is useful to implement strategies to prevent parricide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Forensic postmortem computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lykke Schrøder; Lundemose, Sissel; Banner, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    differences. CONCLUSIONS: Noninvasive in situ PMCT methods for organ measuring, as performed in this study, are not useful tools in forensic pathology. The best method to estimate organ volume is a CT-scan of the eviscerated organ. PMCT-determined CTR seems to be useless for ascertaining cardiomegaly...

  20. Forensic radiology in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, T; Sumathy, C; Elumalai, M; Sathasivasubramanian, S; Kannan, A

    2015-04-01

    Radiography can play an important part in forensic odontology, mainly to establish identification. This may take the precise form of comparison between antemortem and postmortem radiographs. Radiographs may also be taken to determine the age of a minor victim and even help in the assessment of the sex and ethnic group. Comparable radiographs are an essential factor to confirm identification in a mass disaster.

  1. Forensic science in medicine:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    laboratory in the beginning of the twentieth ... rendering clinical forensic medical and medico-legal ... rates of interpersonal violence, in all its forms, in the world ... the total spectrum of scientific analysis .... fingerprinting) are complex and labour.

  2. Forensic importance of jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzinić, Lana; Goreta, Miroslav; Jukić, Vlado; Dordević, Veljko; Koić, Elvira; Herceg, Miroslav

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the investigation is to define as clearly as possible specific forensic psychiatric characteristics of persons who committed homicide and or attempted due to jealousy (the nature and severity of psychopathology, the level of responsibility, danger for the community, intensity and nature of aggression, the victimologic dimension, the relation of alcohol and jealousy). A retrospective method based on forensic psychiatric expertises in the period 1975-1999 was used. They encompassed 200 examinees that committed murder or attempted it. The results show the connection of psychotic jealousy with the highest degree of danger in diagnostic categories of paranoid psychosis and paranoid schizophrenia. The time span from the first manifestations of jealousy until the actual commitment of a crime is the longest in personality disorders and the shortest in schizophrenia. Exogenous provoking situations were dominant for committing homicide due to jealousy in personality disorders. Acute alcohol intoxication has a specific significance in crime due to jealousy in the same diagnostic category. Clear criteria were designed for forensic psychiatric evaluation of murder and attempts of homicide caused by jealousy, which will be of help in everyday practice in the field forensic work and treatment.

  3. MLVA genotyping of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus isolates from different animal species and humans and identification of Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from cattle in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jiang

    Full Text Available In China, brucellosis is an endemic disease and the main sources of brucellosis in animals and humans are infected sheep, cattle and swine. Brucella melitensis (biovars 1 and 3 is the predominant species, associated with sporadic cases and outbreak in humans. Isolates of B. abortus, primarily biovars 1 and 3, and B. suis biovars 1 and 3 are also associated with sporadic human brucellosis. In this study, the genetic profiles of B. melitensis and B. abortus isolates from humans and animals were analyzed and compared by multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA. Among the B. melitensis isolates, the majority (74/82 belonged to MLVA8 genotype 42, clustering in the 'East Mediterranean' group. Two B. melitensis biovar 1 genotype 47 isolates, belonging to the 'Americas' group, were recovered; both were from the Himalayan blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur, a wild animal. The majority of B. abortus isolates (51/70 were biovar 3, genotype 36. Ten B. suis biovar 1 field isolates, including seven outbreak isolates recovered from a cattle farm in Inner Mongolia, were genetically indistinguishable from the vaccine strain S2, based on MLVA cluster analysis. MLVA analysis provided important information for epidemiological trace-back. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to associate Brucella cross-infection with the vaccine strain S2 based on molecular comparison of recovered isolates to the vaccine strain. MLVA typing could be an essential assay to improve brucellosis surveillance and control programs.

  4. Developing Forensic Mental Healthcare in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salize, Hans Joachim; Lavikainen, Juha; Seppänen, Allan; Gjocaj, Milazim

    2014-01-01

    In many economically struggling societies, forensic psychiatry is still in its initial developmental stages and thus forensic patients pose an ongoing challenge for the healthcare and juridical systems. In this article, we present the various issues and problems that arose when establishing the first forensic psychiatric institute in Kosovo – a country whose population has constantly been reported as suffering from a high psychiatric morbidity due to long-lasting traumatic experiences during the war of 1999. The implementation of a new forensic psychiatric institute in the developing mental healthcare system of Kosovo, still characterized by considerable shortages, required substantial effort on various levels. On the policy and financial level, it was made possible by a clear intent and coordinated commitment of all responsible national stakeholders and authorities, such as the Ministries of Health and Justice, and by the financial contribution of the European Commission. Most decisive in terms of the success of the project was capacity building in human resources, i.e., the recruitment and training of motivated staff. Training included essential clinical and theoretical issues as well as clearly defined standard operation procedures, guidelines, and checklists to aid daily routine work and the management of challenging situations. PMID:24779004

  5. Developing forensic mental healthcare in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Joachim Salize

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many economically struggling societies forensic psychiatry is still in its initial developmental stages and thus forensic patients pose an ongoing challenge for the healthcare and juridical systems. In this article we present the various issues and problems that arose when establishing the first forensic psychiatric institute in Kosovo- a country whose population has constantly been reported as suffering from a high psychiatric morbidity due to long-lasting traumatic experiences during the war of 1999. The implementation of a new forensic psychiatric institute in the developing mental healthcare system of Kosovo, still characterized by considerable shortages, required substantial effort on various levels. On the policy and financial level, it was made possible by a clear intent and coordinated commitment of all responsible national stakeholders and authorities, such as the Ministries of Health and Justice, and by the financial contribution of the European Commission. Most decisive in terms of the success of the project was capacity building in human resources, i.e. the recruitment and training of motivated staff. Training included essential clinical and theoretical issues as well as clearly defined standard operation procedures, guidelines and checklists to aid daily routine work and the management of challenging situations.

  6. Perceptual expertise in forensic facial image comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David; Phillips, P Jonathon; Hahn, Carina A; Hill, Matthew; O'Toole, Alice J

    2015-09-07

    Forensic facial identification examiners are required to match the identity of faces in images that vary substantially, owing to changes in viewing conditions and in a person's appearance. These identifications affect the course and outcome of criminal investigations and convictions. Despite calls for research on sources of human error in forensic examination, existing scientific knowledge of face matching accuracy is based, almost exclusively, on people without formal training. Here, we administered three challenging face matching tests to a group of forensic examiners with many years' experience of comparing face images for law enforcement and government agencies. Examiners outperformed untrained participants and computer algorithms, thereby providing the first evidence that these examiners are experts at this task. Notably, computationally fusing responses of multiple experts produced near-perfect performance. Results also revealed qualitative differences between expert and non-expert performance. First, examiners' superiority was greatest at longer exposure durations, suggestive of more entailed comparison in forensic examiners. Second, experts were less impaired by image inversion than non-expert students, contrasting with face memory studies that show larger face inversion effects in high performers. We conclude that expertise in matching identity across unfamiliar face images is supported by processes that differ qualitatively from those supporting memory for individual faces.

  7. 3D imaging in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sam; Jones, Carl; Plassmann, Peter

    2010-06-16

    This paper describes the investigation of a new 3D capture method for acquiring and subsequent forensic analysis of bite mark injuries on human skin. When documenting bite marks with standard 2D cameras errors in photographic technique can occur if best practice is not followed. Subsequent forensic analysis of the mark is problematic when a 3D structure is recorded into a 2D space. Although strict guidelines (BAFO) exist, these are time-consuming to follow and, due to their complexity, may produce errors. A 3D image capture and processing system might avoid the problems resulting from the 2D reduction process, simplifying the guidelines and reducing errors. Proposed Solution: a series of experiments are described in this paper to demonstrate that the potential of a 3D system might produce suitable results. The experiments tested precision and accuracy of the traditional 2D and 3D methods. A 3D image capture device minimises the amount of angular distortion, therefore such a system has the potential to create more robust forensic evidence for use in courts. A first set of experiments tested and demonstrated which method of forensic analysis creates the least amount of intra-operator error. A second set tested and demonstrated which method of image capture creates the least amount of inter-operator error and visual distortion. In a third set the effects of angular distortion on 2D and 3D methods of image capture were evaluated.

  8. Animal experimentation in forensic sciences: How far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, C; Maderna, E; Rendinelli, A; Gibelli, D

    2015-09-01

    In the third millennium where ethical, ethological and cultural evolution seem to be leading more and more towards an inter-species society, the issue of animal experimentation is a moral dilemma. Speaking from a self-interested human perspective, avoiding all animal testing where human disease and therapy are concerned may be very difficult or even impossible; such testing may not be so easily justifiable when suffering-or killing-of non human animals is inflicted for forensic research. In order to verify how forensic scientists are evolving in this ethical issue, we undertook a systematic review of the current literature. We investigated the frequency of animal experimentation in forensic studies in the past 15 years and trends in publication in the main forensic science journals. Types of species, lesions inflicted, manner of sedation or anesthesia and euthanasia were examined in a total of 404 articles reviewed, among which 279 (69.1%) concerned studies involving animals sacrificed exclusively for the sake of the experiment. Killing still frequently includes painful methods such as blunt trauma, electrocution, mechanical asphyxia, hypothermia, and even exsanguination; of all these animals, apparently only 60.8% were anesthetized. The most recent call for a severe reduction if not a total halt to the use of animals in forensic sciences was made by Bernard Knight in 1992. In fact the principle of reduction and replacement, frequently respected in clinical research, must be considered the basis for forensic science research needing animals.

  9. Distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes among HIV-negative women with and without cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C McDonald

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Large studies describing the profile of high-risk Human papillomavirus (hrHPV genotypes among women in sub-Saharan Africa are lacking. Here we describe the prevalence and distribution of hrHPV genotypes among HIV-negative women in South Africa, with and without cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. METHODS: We report data on 8,050 HIV-negative women, aged 17-65 years, recruited into three sequential studies undertaken in Cape Town, South Africa. Women had no history of previous cervical cancer screening. Cervical samples were tested for hrHPV DNA using the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2 assay and all positive samples were genotyped using a PCR-based assay (Line Blot. Women underwent colposcopy and biopsy/endocervical curettage to determine CIN status. The prevalence and distribution of specific hrHPV genotypes were examined by age and CIN status. RESULTS: Overall, 20.7% (95% CI, 19.9-21.6% of women were hrHPV-positive by HC2, with women with CIN having the highest rates of positivity. Prevalence decreased with increasing age among women without CIN; but, a bimodal age curve was observed among women with CIN. HPV 16 and 35 were the most common hrHPV genotypes in all age and CIN groups. HPV 45 became more frequent among older women with CIN grade 2 or 3 (CIN2,3. Younger women (17-29 years had more multiple hrHPV genotypes overall and in each cervical disease group than older women (40-65 years. CONCLUSION: HPV 16, 35, and 45 were the leading contributors to CIN 2,3. The current HPV vaccines could significantly reduce HPV-related cervical disease; however, next generation vaccines that include HPV 35 and 45 would further reduce cervical disease in this population.

  10. Forensic learning disability nursing skills and competencies: a study of forensic and non-forensic nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom; Phipps, Dianne

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the skills and competencies of forensic learning disability nurses in the United Kingdom. The two sample populations were forensic learning disability nurses from the high, medium, and low secure psychiatric services and non-forensic learning disability nurses from generic services. An information gathering schedule was used to collect the data; of 1200 schedules, 643 were returned for a response rate of 53.5%. The data identified the "top ten" problems that forensic learning disability nurses may encounter, the skills and competencies necessary to overcome them, and the areas that need to be developed in the future. The results indicated that the forensic learning disability nurses tended to focus on the physical aspects to the role whilst the non-forensic learning disability nurses tended to perceive the forensic role in relational terms. This has implications for practice, policy, and procedures.

  11. Probabilistic expert systems for forensic inference from DNA markers in horses: applications to confirm genealogies with lack of genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Marina; Bocci, Chiara; Bonuglia, Margherita; Grasso, Cinzia; Merigioli, Sara; Russo, Alessandra; De Iuliis, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellites have been used for parentage testing and individual identification in forensic science because they are highly polymorphic and show abundant sequences dispersed throughout most eukaryotic nuclear genomes. At present, genetic testing based on DNA technology is used for most domesticated animals, including horses, to confirm identity, to determine parentage, and to validate registration certificates. But if genetic data of one of the putative parents are missing, verifying a genealogy could be questionable. The aim of this paper is to illustrate a new approach to analyze complex cases of disputed relationship with microsatellites markers. These cases were solved by analyzing the genotypes of the offspring and other horses' genotypes in the pedigrees of the putative dam/sire with probabilistic expert systems (PESs). PES was especially efficient in supplying reliable, error-free Bayesian probabilities in complex cases with missing pedigree data. One of these systems was developed for forensic purposes (FINEX program) and is particularly valuable in human analyses. We applied this program to parentage analysis in horses, and we will illustrate how different cases have been successfully worked out.

  12. Forensic Application of Human Characters Inferred from DNA%DNA来源人特征刻画的法庭科学应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙启凡; 赵蕾; 江丽; 权养科; 赵兴春; 李彩霞

    2015-01-01

    , forensic DNA test mainly relies on STR (short tandem repeats) multiplex ampliifcation. But STR primarily localizes in the non-coding region of a genome, thus dififcult to provide more information about the phenotypic characteristics of people. Therefore, the current DNA tests are mostly used for “comparison and match”, demonstrating unavailability for cases without target suspects and/or any other clues although the biologic samples collected from the scene have plenty of biological information waiting for exposure and exploitation. Recently, the depiction of human characters inferred from DNA is becoming an important research hotspot in forensic community. Such information as the one of anthropology, physiology, pathology and/or phenotype can be deduced from the donor’s DNA that the feature of an individual’s appearance, disease attributes, ethnic and geographical afifliation would be portrayed. At present, some related technology and methods have gradually begun to be employed in criminal casework.In this paper,we summarize the general situation of the research depicting human characters inferred from DNA and extrapolate its developmental trend.

  13. Clonal complex 398 methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus: a frequent unspecialized human pathogen with specific phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Chroboczek

    Full Text Available Clonal complex 398 livestok-associated-MRSA (CC398 LA-MRSA clone is described as a major animal pathogen that can also colonize and infect humans. CC398 methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (CC398 MSSA is less described. We identified 126 CC398 MSSA strains of human origin within 6380 S. aureus isolates gathered between 2009 and 2011, from the French National Reference Centre for Staphylococci. They were characterized using antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing, DNA microarrays (Identibac S. aureus Genotyping ®, Alere, CC398-specific sequence PCR, ermT (encoding macrolides résistance PCR. Fifty-three CC398 LA-MRSA collected from French pigs and veal were used as comparators, and phylogenetic relations between human CC398 MSSA and animal CC398 MRSA populations were explored on the basis of spa-typing and DNA microarrays. CC398 MSSA were able to induce a large spectrum of infections (especially skin, bloodstream, and pneumonias. The prevalence rate of this clone was high in MSSA population, i.e., 24.7% in a local prospective study on nasal colonization, and 7.5% in a national prospective study on infective endocarditis. CC398 MSSA isolates were frequently (89% erythromycin resistant, due to the presence of the ermT gene, a gene not detected in erythromycin resistant CC398 LA-MRSA strains. Expression of staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn and the chemotaxis inhibitory protein (chp, was also specific to this population. The CC398 MRSA signature included also a panel of antibiotic resistance genes, especially a type IV or V cassette mec and tetM. CC398 MSSA and CC398 LA-MRSA populations were closely related based on spa-typing and DNA microarrays, with the MRSA strains forming the most derived lineage in phylogenic trees. Both MSSA and MRSA populations may come from common ancestors, which would have evolved in the settings of different selective pressures, explaining the acquisition of ermT, chp and scn for MSSA, and

  14. VP4 and VP7 genotyping by reverse transcription-PCR of human rotavirus in mexican children with acute diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Castillo, A; Villa, A V; Ramírez González, J E; Mayén Pimentel, E; Melo Munguía, M; Díaz De Jesús, B; Olivera Díaz, H; García Lozano, H

    2000-10-01

    Dual typing (VP4 and VP7) of rotavirus obtained from 257 Mexican children during three epidemiological seasons was performed by reverse transcription-PCR. The P1G1 genotype was the most prevalent (40%), followed by P1G3 (19%) and P2G2 (16%). Thirty-one specimens (12%) presented mixed infections, while some genotypes were not found. This is the first dual typing of isolates from diarrhea cases in Mexico.

  15. Whole genotype constellation of prototype feline rotavirus strains FRV-1 and FRV64 and their phylogenetic relationships with feline-like human rotavirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchan, Punita; Sasaki, Eriko; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Do, Loan Phuong; Doan, Yen Hai; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    Feline rotaviruses, members of the species Rotavirus A, are an infrequent source of zoonotic infections, and were previously shown by RNA-RNA hybridization assays to possess two distinct genomic RNA constellations, represented by strains FRV-1 and FRV64. Due to the lack of whole genome sequence information for FRV-1, human rotavirus strain AU-1 has been used as a surrogate for the genotype constellation of feline rotaviruses. The aim of this study was to determine the whole genome sequence of FRV-1 and FRV64 to help understand the genetic relationships among existing feline rotaviruses from the evolutionary perspective. The genotype constellations of FRV-1 and FRV64 were G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T3-E3-H3 and G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C2-M3-A9-N2-T3-E3-H6, respectively. FRV-1 has a genotype constellation identical to that of the AU-1 strain. Although for individual genes they shared lineages, with the exception of genes encoding VP2, VP6 and VP7, the sequence identity between FRV-1 and AU-1 was considered to be sufficiently high for the AU-1 to be regarded as an example of the direct transmission of a feline rotavirus to a child. On the other hand, the FRV64 strain was not only similar in all the 11 genome segments to another feline rotavirus strain, Cat97, but also to canine rotavirus strains (K9 and CU-1) and feline/canine-like human rotavirus strains (Ro1845 and HCR3A). In conclusion, this study revealed intermingled sharing of genotypes and lineages among feline rotaviruses, suggesting the occurrence of frequent reassortment events over the course of evolution to emerge in four genotype constellations represented by FRV-1, FRV64/Cat97, Cat2 and BA222 strains.

  16. In vitro evaluation of a passive radio frequency identification microchip implanted in human molars subjected to compression forces, for forensic purposes of human identification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moreno, Freddy; Vallejo, Diego; Garzón, Herney; Moreno, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro behavior of a passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) microchip implanted in human molars subjected to compression forces to determine its technical and clinical viability...

  17. D5S2500 is an ambiguously characterized STR: Identification and description of forensic microsatellites in the genomics age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C; Parson, W; Amigo, J; King, J L; Coble, M D; Steffen, C R; Vallone, P M; Gettings, K B; Butler, J M; Budowle, B

    2016-07-01

    In the process of establishing short tandem repeat (STR) sequence variant nomenclature guidelines in anticipation of expanded forensic multiplexes for massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it was discovered that the STR D5S2500 has multiple positions and genomic characteristics reported. This ambiguity is because the marker named D5S2500 consists of two different microsatellites forming separate components in the capillary electrophoresis multiplexes of Qiagen's HDplex (Hilden, Germany) and AGCU ScienTech's non-CODIS STR 21plex (Wuxi, Jiangsu, China). This study outlines the genomic details used to identify each microsatellite and reveals the D5S2500 marker in HDplex has the correctly assigned STR name, while the D5S2500 marker in the AGCU 21plex, closely positioned a further 1643 nucleotides in the human reference sequence, is an unnamed microsatellite. The fact that the D5S2500 marker has existed as two distinct STR loci undetected for almost ten years, even with reported discordant genotypes for the standard control DNA, underlines the need for careful scrutiny of the genomic properties of forensic STRs, as they become adapted for sequence analysis with MPS systems. We make the recommendation that precise chromosome location data must be reported for any forensic marker under development but not in common use, so that the genomic characteristics of the locus are validated to the same level of accuracy as its allelic variation and forensic performance. To clearly differentiate each microsatellite, we propose the name D5S2800 be used to identify the Chromosome-5 STR in the AGCU 21plex.

  18. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection: Molecular Epidemiology, Genotyping, Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors among Arab Women in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Anushree; Skariah, Sini; Dargham, Soha R.; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Mohamed-Nady, Nady; Amuna, Paul; Al-Thani, Asma A. J.; Sultan, Ali A.

    2017-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infections are known to cause cervical cancer worldwide, however, limited information is currently available on prevalence, types distribution and risk factors for HPV infection in the Arab countries. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study exclusively of women of Arabic origin residing in Qatar (n = 406) who were selected from the Women’s Hospital at Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) and Health Centers of the Primary Health Care Corporation in Doha, Qatar over the period March 2013 to August 2014. Socio-demographic, behavioral and clinical data were collected. Four hundred and six cervical smears and 292 blood samples were included in the study. HPV typing was done using HPV type-specific primers-based real-time PCR, and Sanger sequencing. HPV-IgG and IgM were quantified using ELISA assays. The prevalence of HPV infection amongst Qatari and non-Qatari Arab women were 9.8% and 6.1%, respectively and 7.6% and 16.7% in women with normal and abnormal cytology, respectively. HPV 81 was the most commonly found genotype in women with normal cytology (34.5%), whereas HPV 81, 16 and 59 in women with abnormal cytology (25.0% each). All the HPV DNA positive women were seronegative and HPV-IgG prevalence was higher in Qatari women than in non-Qatari Arab women. None of the studied factors had any significant association with HPV-DNA positivity or HPV-IgG seropositivity. The overall identified HPV DNA prevalence and HPV seroprevalence among Arab women in Qatar were on the low side compared to global levels. PMID:28046025

  19. Drug-drug Interaction between Losartan and Paclitaxel in Human Liver Microsomes with Different CYP2C8 Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Yuji; Senda, Asuna; Toda, Takaki; Hayakawa, Toru; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2015-06-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8*3 allele is associated with reduced metabolic activity of paclitaxel. This study was aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of losartan on paclitaxel metabolism in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to determine the impact of the CYP2C8*3 polymorphism. HLMs that contained the CYP2C8*1 homozygote (HL60) or CYP2C8*3 heterozygote (HL54) genotype were used for the inhibition study. Losartan, at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, significantly inhibited paclitaxel metabolism by 29% and 57% in the HL60 (p losartan and the CYP3A4-selective inhibitors, erythromycin and ketoconazole, caused a greater inhibition of the paclitaxel metabolism than quercetin, a CYP2C8-selective inhibitor. This demonstrated that the paclitaxel metabolism was mainly catalysed by CYP3A4 in HL60. There were no significant differences found for the inhibitory effects caused by the four inhibitors of the paclitaxel metabolism in HL54, indicating that both CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 play important roles in paclitaxel metabolism in HL54. These findings suggest that 50 μmol/L of losartan inhibits both CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 in HLMs. In summary, losartan inhibited paclitaxel metabolism, with concentrations over 50 μmol/L in HLMs. The CYP2C8*3 allele carriers are likely susceptible to the interactions of losartan and CYP3A4 inhibitors to paclitaxel metabolism.

  20. Prevalence and genotypic characterization of Human Parvovirus B19 in children with measles- and rubella-like illness in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farhad; Sarshari, Behrang; Ghavami, Nastaran; Meysami, Parisa; Shadab, Azadeh; Salimi, Hamid; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2016-06-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a prototype of the Erythroparvovirus genus in Parvoviridae family. B19V infections are often associated with fever and rash, and can be mistakenly reported as measles or rubella. Differential diagnosis of B19V illness is necessary for case management and also for public health control activities, particularly in outbreak situations in which measles or rubella is suspected. To investigate the causative role of B19V infection in children with measles- and rubella-like illness, a total of 583 sera from children with exanthema were tested for presence of B19V by determining anti-B19V IgG and IgM antibodies by ELISA as well as B19V DNA detection by nested PCR. DNA positive samples were assessed further for determination of viral load and sequence analysis by Real-Time PCR and Sanger sequencing method, respectively. Out of 583 patients, 112 (19.21%) patients were positive for B19V-IgM antibody, 110 (18.87%) were positive for B19V-IgG antibody, and 63 (10.81%) were positive for B19V viral DNA. The frequency of B19V-IgG antibodies were increased with age; that is children under 6 year old showed 7.11% seroprevalence for B19V-IgG as compared to 18.39% and 28.91% for age groups 6 to >11 and 11-14 years old, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the NS1-VPu1 overlapping region revealed that all sequenced B19V-DNA belonged to genotype 1. The results of this study may aid the surveillance programs aiming at eradicating measles/rubella virus in Iran, as infections with B19V can be mistakenly reported as measles or rubella if laboratory testing is not conducted.

  1. A hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine comprising envelope glycoproteins gpE1/gpE2 derived from a single isolate elicits broad cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, John Lok Man; Chen, Chao; Wong, Jason

    2013-01-01

    of genotype 1a). Cross neutralization was tested in Huh-7.5 human hepatoma cell cultures using infectious recombinant HCV (HCVcc) expressing structural proteins of heterologous HCV strains from all known major genotypes, 1-7. Vaccination induced significant neutralizing antibodies against heterologous HCV...

  2. Use of Sequenom sample ID Plus® SNP genotyping in identification of FFPE tumor samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Miller

    Full Text Available Short tandem repeat (STR analysis, such as the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® Plus kit, is a standard, PCR-based human genotyping method used in the field of forensics. Misidentification of cell line and tissue DNA can be costly if not detected early; therefore it is necessary to have quality control measures such as STR profiling in place. A major issue in large-scale research studies involving archival formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues is that varying levels of DNA degradation can result in failure to correctly identify samples using STR genotyping. PCR amplification of STRs of several hundred base pairs is not always possible when DNA is degraded. The Sample ID Plus® panel from Sequenom allows for human DNA identification and authentication using SNP genotyping. In comparison to lengthy STR amplicons, this multiplexing PCR assay requires amplification of only 76-139 base pairs, and utilizes 47 SNPs to discriminate between individual samples. In this study, we evaluated both STR and SNP genotyping methods of sample identification, with a focus on paired FFPE tumor/normal DNA samples intended for next-generation sequencing (NGS. The ability to successfully validate the identity of FFPE samples can enable cost savings by reducing rework.

  3. 人类疱疹病毒8型基因型的研究进展%Advances in the genotyping of human herpesvirus 8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓东; 惠艳

    2009-01-01

    人类疱疹病毒8型广泛存在于各种临床表型的Kaposi肉瘤中,其基因型分布呈现种族与地域特异性.了解Kaposi肉瘤患者中HHV-8基因型特征及分布情况,探讨其与Kaposi肉瘤临床可能的相关性和演变及传播等具有重要意义.并对HHV-8病毒体及其基因组特征,K1和K15基因位点的生物学功能.HHV-8基因型演变呈现地域与种族特异性进行概述.%Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) exists widely in the tissue of various clinical phenotypes of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS).The distribution of HHV-8 genotype shows a race and geographical specificity.So,it is important to understand the characteristic and distribution of HHV-8 genotype,and to explore the possible relationship of HHV-8 genotype to elinical phenotypes of KS as well as the transmission and evolution of HHV-8.This article gives a review on the race and geographical specificity of evoluation of HHV-8 genotype.

  4. Prevalence of human cosavirus and saffold virus with an emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menage, Lucy; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-09-01

    Human cosavirus and saffold virus are both newly discovered members of the Picornaviridae family. It has been suggested that these viruses may be the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis. In this study, 1093 stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis between January 2014 and December 2016, were screened for cosavirus and saffold virus using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The viral genotypes were then established via nucleotide sequencing. Here, cosavirus was detected in 16 of 1093 stool samples (1.5%) and saffold virus was detected in 18 of 1093 stool samples (1.6%). The saffold virus genotypes 1 (16.7%), 2 (50%) and 6 (33.3%), and the cosavirus genetic groups A (87.5%), C (6.25%) and D (6.25%), were all identified across the three-year study period. Interestingly, saffold virus genotype 6 has now been detected for the first time in Thailand. The present study provides the prevalence of cosavirus and saffold virus with the emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel, Non-Radioactive, Simple and Multiplex PCR-cRFLP Methods for Genotyping Human SP-A and SP-D Marker Alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan DiAngelo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified an allele of the human SP-A2 gene that occurs with greater frequency in an RDS population [12]. Because of the importance of SP-A in normal lung function and its newly emerging role in innate host defense and regu-lation of inflammatory processes, we wish to better characterize genotypes of both SP-A1 and SP-A2 genes. It has been determined that SP-D shares similar roles in immune response. Therefore, in this report we 1 describe a novel, non radioactive PCR based-cRFLP method for genotyping both SP-A and SP-D; 2 describe two previously unpublished biallelic polymorphisms within the SP-D gene; 3 present the partial sequence of one new SP-A1 allele (6A14 and describe other new SP-A1 and SP-A2 alleles; and 4 describe additional methodologies for SP-A genotype assessment. The ability to more accurately and efficiently genotype samples from individuals with various pulmonary diseases will facilitate population and family based association studies. Genetic poly-morphisms may be identified that partially explain individual disease susceptibility and/or treatment effectiveness.

  6. Next generation sequencing and its applications in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2015-01-01

    matured during the last 10 years, and the quality of the sequences has reached a level where NGS is used in clinical diagnostics of humans. Forensic genetic laboratories have also explored NGS technologies and especially in the last year, there has been a small explosion in the number of scientific...... articles and presentations at conferences with forensic aspects of NGS. These contributions have demonstrated that NGS offers new possibilities for forensic genetic case work. More information may be obtained from unique samples in a single experiment by analyzing combinations of markers (STRs, SNPs...... and will increase the statistical weight of the evidence. In this review, we will give an introduction to NGS and single-molecule sequencing, and we will discuss the possible applications of NGS in forensic genetics....

  7. Analytical and Radiochemistry for Nuclear Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dry, Donald E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Podlesak, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-26

    Information about nonproliferation nuclear forensics, activities in forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, radio analytical work at LANL, radiochemical characterization capabilities, bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities, and future interests in forensics interactions.

  8. Psiquiatria forense e direitos humanos nos pólos da vida: crianças, adolescentes e idosos Forensic psychiatry and human rights along the course of life: children, adolescents and elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerson Laks

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Crianças/adolescentes e idosos são alvo fácil para atos de violência, seja por sua fragilidade e dependência, seja por não serem considerados testemunhas confiáveis para denunciar os casos de abuso e maus-tratos. Temas como violência, capacidade civil e responsabilidade penal de crianças, adolescentes e idosos guardam correlações interessantes de serem avaliadas. Esse artigo faz uma revisão crítica do tema, compara e discute os Estatutos da Criança e do Adolescente e o Estatuto do Idoso no Brasil. DISCUSSÃO: Os abusos ou maus-tratos podem ser examinados a partir de dois aspectos: 1 fatores preditivos para sua ocorrência (perfil do abusado e do abusador e 2 agravos à saúde física e mental. CONCLUSÃO: O Brasil conta hoje com legislação avançada para proteção dessas populações vulneráveis e o tema de violência e maus tratos contra crianças e idosos deve ser parte da preocupação de clínicos e psiquiatras que tratam desses pacientes.OBJECTIVE: Children/adolescents and elderly are frequent victims of violent acts either because of their frailty and dependency or because they are not considered as reliable subjects to present cases of abuse against the perpetrators. There is an interesting relationship between civil capacities and legal responsibilities of minors and elderly. This is a critical review of minor and elder abuse that also presents and compares the Brazilian laws regarding the rights and responsibilities of elderly and minor subjects. DISCUSSION: Abuse may be examined regarding two aspects: 1 predictive factors of their occurrence (a profile of the abused and of the abuser, and 2 consequences for mental and physical health. CONCLUSION: This legislation is modern and protective of these vulnerable populations. Examining and diagnosing violence and abuse against children and elderly subjects must be part of the clinical and forensic practice of doctors and especially of psychiatrists.

  9. Automation and integration of polymerase chain reaction with capillary electrophoresis for high throughput genotyping and disease diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, N.

    1999-02-12

    Genotyping is to detect specific loci in the human genome. These loci provide important information for forensic testing, construction of genetic linkage maps, gene related disease diagnosis and pharmacogenetic research. Genotyping is becoming more and more popular after these loci can be easily amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Capillary electrophoresis has its unique advantages for DNA analysis due to its fast heat dissipation and ease of automation. Four projects are described in which genotyping is performed by capillary electrophoresis emphasizing different aspects. First, the author demonstrates a principle to determine the genotype based on capillary electrophoresis system. VNTR polymorphism in the human D1S80 locus was studied. Second, the separation of four short tandem repeat (STR) loci vWF, THO1, TPOX and CSF1PO (CTTv) by using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was studied in achieving high resolution and preventing rehybridization of the DNA fragments. Separation under denaturing, non-denaturing conditions and at elevated temperature was discussed. Third, a 250 {micro}m i.d., 365 {micro}m o.d. fused silica capillary was used as the microreactor for PCR. Fourth, direct PCR from blood was studied to simplify the sample preparation for genotyping to minimum.

  10. Mitochondria in anthropology and forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Tomasz; Rogalla, Urszula

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria's role in crucial metabolic pathways is probably the first answer which comes to our minds for the question: what do these tiny organelles serve for? However, specific features of their DNA made them extremely useful also in the field of anthropology and forensics. MtDNA analyses became a milestone in the complex task of unraveling earliest human migrations. Evidence provided by these experiments left no doubts on modern humans origins pointing to Africa being our cradle. It also contributed to interpretation of putative ways of our dispersal around Asia and Americas thousands years ago. On the other hand, analysis of mtDNA is well established and valuable tool in forensic genetics. When other definitely more popular markers give no answer on identity, it is the time to employ information carried by mitochondria. This chapter summarizes not only current reports on the role of mitochondria in forensics and reconstruction of modern humans phylogeny, but also calls one's attention to a broad range of difficulties and constraints associated with mtDNA analyses.

  11. Identical twins in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Morling, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the number of forensic genetic loci used for identification purposes results in infinitesimal random match probabilities. These probabilities are computed under assumptions made for rather simple population genetic models. Often, the forensic expert reports likelihood ratios, where...... published results accounting for close familial relationships. However, we revisit the discussion to increase the awareness among forensic genetic practitioners and include new information on medical and societal factors to assess the risk of not considering a monozygotic twin as the true perpetrator...

  12. Frequency of alpha- and beta-haemolysin in Staphylococcus aureus of bovine and human origin - A comparison between pheno- and genotype and variation in phenotypic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Larsen, H.D.; Eriksen, N.H.R.;

    1999-01-01

    change in expression of haemolysins after subcultivation in human and bovine blood and milk was studied in selected isolates. alpha-haemolysin was expressed phenotypically in 39 (37%) of the bovine isolates, in 59 (59%) of the human carrier isolates, and in 40 (67%) of the isolates from septicaemia. beta......The phenotypic expression of haemolysins and the presence of genes encoding alpha and beta-haemolysin were determined in 105 Sraphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis, 100 isolates from the nostrils of healthy humans, and 60 isolates from septicaemia in humans. Furthermore, the possible......-haemolysin was expressed in 76 (72%) bovine, 11 (11%) carrier, and 8 (13%) septicaemia isolates. Significantly more bovine than human isolates expressed beta-haemolysin and significantly fewer expressed alpha-haemolysin. Genotypically, the gene encoding alpha-haemolysin was detected in all isolates. A significant...

  13. Forensic geotechnical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, GL

    2016-01-01

    In this edited volume on advances in forensic geotechnical engineering, a number of technical contributions by experts and professionals in this area are included. The work is the outcome of deliberations at various conferences in the area conducted by Prof. G.L. Sivakumar Babu and Dr. V.V.S. Rao as secretary and Chairman of Technical Committee on Forensic Geotechnical Engineering of International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMGE). This volume contains papers on topics such as guidelines, evidence/data collection, distress characterization, use of diagnostic tests (laboratory and field tests), back analysis, failure hypothesis formulation, role of instrumentation and sensor-based technologies, risk analysis, technical shortcomings. This volume will prove useful to researchers and practitioners alike.

  14. Veterinary Forensic Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney-Brant, S M

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists working in diagnostic laboratories are sometimes presented with cases involving animal poisonings that become the object of criminal or civil litigation. Forensic veterinary toxicology cases can include cases involving animal cruelty (malicious poisoning), regulatory issues (eg, contamination of the food supply), insurance litigation, or poisoning of wildlife. An understanding of the appropriate approach to these types of cases, including proper sample collection, handling, and transport, is essential so that chain of custody rules are followed and proper samples are obtained for toxicological analysis. Consultation with veterinary toxicologists at the diagnostic laboratory that will be processing the samples before, during, and after the forensic necropsy can help to ensure that the analytical tests performed are appropriate for the circumstances and findings surrounding the individual case. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Computer networks forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratomir Đ. Đokić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Digital forensics is a set of scientific methods and procedures for collection, analysis and presentation of evidence that can be found on the computers, servers, computer networks, databases, mobile devices, as well as all other devices on which can store (save data. Digital forensics, computer networks is an examination of digital evidence that can be found on servers and user devices, which are exchanged internal or external communication through local or public networks. Also there is a need for identifying sites and modes of origin messages, establish user identification, and detection types of manipulation by logging in to your account. This paper presents the basic elements of computer networks, software used to communicate and describe the methods of collecting digital evidence and their analysis.

  16. Investigating forensic nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, S

    1995-01-01

    Forensic nurses are making a positive impact in our society today. They are reaching out to aid victims of violence by not only attending to their injuries and emotional distress, but also by identifying, collecting, and preserving vital evidence that will be needed to assist their patients to seek justice through the legal system. Misinterpretation or failure to properly obtain evidence may result in a miscarriage of justice. Helping victims obtain validation of their injustice is crucial to their healing process and may be of critical importance in the effort to avoid further victimization. Forensic nurses work with victims of child abuse, elder abuse, domestic violence, sexual assault, and persons involved with violence or imminent death. This area includes psychiatric specialists who intervene not only with victims but also with perpetrators of violent and/or sexual acts.

  17. SSL based Webmail Forensic Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manesh T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this era of information technology, email applications are the foremost and extensively used electronic communication technology. Emails are profusely used to exchange data and information using several frontend applications from various service providers by its users. Currently most of the email clients and service providers now moved to secured data communications using SSL or TLS security for their data exchanged. Cyber criminals and terrorists have started by means of this mode for exchanging their malicious information in their transactions. Forensic experts have to face greater difficulty and multiple challenges in tracing crucial forensic information from network packets as the communication is secured. These challenges might affect the digital forensic experts in procuring substantial evidences against such criminals from their working environments. This research work revels working background of SSL based webmail forensic engine, which decrypt respective communication or network session and also reconstruct the actual message contents of webmail applications. This digital forensic engine is compatible to work with in proxy servers and other computing environments and enables forensic reconstruction followed by analysis of webmail clients. Proposed forensic engine employs is a high-speed packet capturing hardware module, a sophisticated packet reformation algorithm; restores email header and messages from encrypted stream of SMTP and POP3 network sessions. Proposed forensic engine also support cyber investigation team with generated forensic report and prosecution of culprits by judiciary system of the specific country.

  18. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    Modern diagnostic imagining techniques are gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Denmark has been involved in the development of this use of imaging techniques from the beginning. The Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Southern Denmark acquired a helical computed tomography (CT...... AND METHODS: This thesis investigated 900 forensic cases that were CT-scanned and autopsied at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, from 2006-2011. The scanner was a Siemens Somatom Spirit dual-slice CT-scanner with a Siemens Syngo MultiModality workstation. Contrast enhancement...

  19. About forensic phonetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Hollien

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article sets forth the goals and content of Forensic Phonetics and its major elements. Considered are 1 the processing and analysis of spoken utterances, 2 enhancement of speech intelligibility (re: surveillance and other recordings, 3 authentication of recordings, 4 speaker identification, and 5 detection of deception, intoxication, and emotions in speech. Stress in speech, and the psychological stress evaluation systems that some individuals attempt to use as lie detectors also will be considered.

  20. Research in Computer Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    from many other sorts of systems. It includes viewgraphs covering a wide range of topics in digital forensic, audio recordings and examples from real...graphics files, video files and audio files; PDF format files; executable files or binary data files; files housing email archives and/or active... Steganography , combines encryption and data hiding to create a file system that makes digital evidence recovery and reconstruction very difficult. 24 139