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Sample records for human focal epilepsy

  1. Diagnostic imaging in focal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.

    2013-01-01

    Focal epilepsies account for 60% of all seizure disorders worldwide. In this review the classic and new classification system of epileptic seizures and syndromes as well as genetic forms are discussed. Magnetic resonance (MR) is the technique of choice for diagnostic imaging in focal epilepsy because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast. The review is focused on the lack of consensus of imaging protocols and reported findings in refractory epilepsy. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics are depicted. Diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development as two major causes of refractory focal epilepsy is described in details. Some promising new techniques as positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT) and MR and PET/CT fusion are briefly discussed. Also the relevance of adequate imaging in focal epilepsy, some practical points in imaging interpretation and differential diagnosis are highlighted. (author)

  2. SPECT in Focal Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion changes during seizures were first observed in the 1930s. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT was developed in the 1970s, and tracers suitable for the imaging of regional cerebral perfusion (rCP became available in the 1980s. The method was first used to study rCP in the interictal phase, and this showed areas of low perfusion in a proportion of cases, mainly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsies. However, the trapping paradigm of tracers such as hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO provided a practicable method of studying changes in rCP during seizures, and a literature was established in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing a typical sequence of changes during and after seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin; the ictal phase was associated with large increases in perfusion throughout the temporal lobe, with first the lateral, then the mesial temporal lobe becoming hypoperfused in the postictal phase. Activation and inhibition of other structures, such as the basal ganglia and frontal cortex, were also seen. Studies of seizures originating elsewhere in the brain have shown a variety of patterns of change, according to the structures involved. These changes have been used practically to aid the process of localisation of the epileptogenic zone so that epilepsy surgery can be planned.

  3. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    epigenetic factors involved that might also explain low observed twin concordance? The genetic (and epigenetic) models for different IFEs, their comorbidities, and their similarities to other neurodevelopmental disorders deserve investigation in the coming years. In so doing, we will probably learn much about normal brain functioning. This is because these disorders, perhaps more than any other human brain disease, are disorders of functional brain systems (even though these functional networks may not yet be fully defined). In June 2012, an international group of clinical and basic science researchers met in London under the auspices of the Waterloo Foundation to discuss and debate these issues in relation to IFEs. This Waterloo Foundation Symposium on the Idiopathic Focal Epilepsies: Phenotype to Genotype witnessed presentations that explored the clinical phenomenology, phenotypes and endophenotypes, and genetic approaches to investigation of these disorders. In parallel, the impact of these epilepsies on children and their families was reviewed. The papers in this supplement are based upon these presentations. They represent an updated state-of-the-art thinking on the topics explored. The symposium led to the formation of international working groups under the umbrella of "Luke's Idiopathic Focal Epilepsy Project" to investigate various aspects of the idiopathic focal epilepsies including: semiology and classification, genetics, cognition, sleep, high-frequency oscillations, and parental resources (see www.childhood-epilepsy.org). The next sponsored international workshop, in June 2014, was on randomised controlled trials in IFEs and overnight learning outcome measures.

  4. Focal epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Gulløv, Christina Hedal; Fredholm, Merete

    2009-01-01

    and deceased) were ascertained through a telephone interview using a standardised questionnaire regarding seizure history and phenomenology. Living dogs were invited to a detailed clinical evaluation. Litters more than five years of age, or where epilepsy was present in all offspring before the age of five......, were included in the calculations of inheritance. results: Out of 199 family members, 66 dogs suffered from epilepsy. The prevalence of epilepsy in the family was 33%. Fifty-five dogs experienced focal seizures with or without secondary generalisation, while four dogs experienced primary generalised...... seizures. In seven dogs, seizures could not be classified. The mode of inheritance of epilepsy was simple Mendelian. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study identified that the Belgian shepherd suffers from genetically transmitted focal epilepsy. The seizure phenomenology expressed by family members have...

  5. DEPDC5 takes a second hit in familial focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew P

    2018-04-30

    Loss-of-function mutations in a single allele of the gene encoding DEP domain-containing 5 protein (DEPDC5) are commonly linked to familial focal epilepsy with variable foci; however, a subset of patients presents with focal cortical dysplasia that is proposed to result from a second-hit somatic mutation. In this issue of the JCI, Ribierre and colleagues provide several lines of evidence to support second-hit DEPDC5 mutations in this disorder. Moreover, the authors use in vivo, in utero electroporation combined with CRISPR-Cas9 technology to generate a murine model of the disease that recapitulates human manifestations, including cortical dysplasia-like changes, focal seizures, and sudden unexpected death. This study provides important insights into familial focal epilepsy and provides a preclinical model for evaluating potential therapies.

  6. CT scan findings in focal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Eiki; Mihara, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Kunimitsu; Yamashita, Kenji; Asakura, Tetsuhiko

    1980-01-01

    In 80 cases of focal epilepsy, excluding such cases as late onset after the age of 30 and traumatic or expansive lesions, the epileptogenic foci have been studied by comparing the CT findings with the seizure types and the EEG findings. The results were as follows: (1) Abnormal CT findings were observed in 36% of the patients. (2) These findings were classified into 4 large groups: localized cerebral atrophy, localized low density, localized high density with contrast enhancement and diffuse cerebral atrophy. (3) The incidence of CT abnormality was higher in the cases with continuous and localized EEG abnormality than in the cases with other types of EEG abnormality. In 48% of the cases, the location of the abnormal CT findings coincided with their EEG foci. (4) In the cases of temporal lobe epilepsy without abnormal CT images, the print-out data compared with the bilateral promised temporal regions, before and after contrast enhancement. The EMI-No. of the medial temporal focus increased more than that of the contralateral side in 3 cases out of 4 after contrast-media injection. (5) Moreover, for the purpose of comparing the CT findings on general seizures with those in focal seizures, we have studied 80 cases of general seizures. In the cases of the general seizures, abnormal CT findings were observed in only 16%. These abnormal findings were diffuse in 5 cases, localized in 6 cases, and combined in 3 cases. (author)

  7. Structural and effective connectivity in focal epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Parker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with medically-refractory focal epilepsy may be candidates for neurosurgery and some may require placement of intracranial EEG electrodes to localise seizure onset. Assessing cerebral responses to single pulse electrical stimulation (SPES may give diagnostically useful data. SPES produces cortico-cortical evoked potentials (CCEPs, which infer effective brain connectivity. Diffusion-weighted images and tractography may be used to estimate structural brain connectivity. This combination provides the opportunity to observe seizure onset and its propagation throughout the brain, spreading contiguously along the cortex explored with electrodes, or non-contiguously. We analysed CCEPs and diffusion tractography in seven focal epilepsy patients and reconstructed the effective and structural brain networks. We aimed to assess the inter-modal similarity of the networks at a large scale across the cortex, the effective and structural connectivity of the ictal-onset zone, and investigate potential mechanisms of non-contiguous seizure spread. We found a significant overlap between structural and effective networks. Effective network CCEP amplitude, baseline variation, and outward connectivity was higher at ictal-onset zones, while structural connection strength within the ictal-onset zone tended to be higher. These findings support the concept of hyperexcitable cortex being associated with seizure generation. The high prevalence of structural and effective connections from the ictal-onset zone to sites of non-contiguous spread suggests that macroscopic structural and effective connections are plausible routes for non-contiguous seizure spread.

  8. Concordance of MRI and EEG Focal Slowing in Nonsyndromic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Kangwon National University, Korea, and The Epilepsy Center, Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, USA studied the correlation and significance of EEG focal slowing and focal MRI abnormalities in 253 children with nonsyndromic epilepsy.

  9. Seven tesla MRI improves detection of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory focal epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veersema, Tim J; Ferrier, Cyrille H; van Eijsden, Pieter; Gosselaar, Peter H; Aronica, Eleonora; Visser, Fredy; Zwanenburg, Jaco M; de Kort, Gerard A P; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Luijten, Peter R; Braun, Kees P J

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine whether the use of 7 tesla (T) MRI in clinical practice leads to higher detection rates of focal cortical dysplasias in possible candidates for epilepsy surgery. Methods: In our center patients are referred for 7 T MRI if lesional focal epilepsy is

  10. A targeted resequencing gene panel for focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Myers, Candace T; Carvill, Gemma L; Regan, Brigid M; Damiano, John A; Mullen, Saul A; Newton, Mark R; Nair, Umesh; Gazina, Elena V; Milligan, Carol J; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Mefford, Heather C

    2016-04-26

    We report development of a targeted resequencing gene panel for focal epilepsy, the most prevalent phenotypic group of the epilepsies. The targeted resequencing gene panel was designed using molecular inversion probe (MIP) capture technology and sequenced using massively parallel Illumina sequencing. We demonstrated proof of principle that mutations can be detected in 4 previously genotyped focal epilepsy cases. We searched for both germline and somatic mutations in 251 patients with unsolved sporadic or familial focal epilepsy and identified 11 novel or very rare missense variants in 5 different genes: CHRNA4, GRIN2B, KCNT1, PCDH19, and SCN1A. Of these, 2 were predicted to be pathogenic or likely pathogenic, explaining ∼0.8% of the cohort, and 8 were of uncertain significance based on available data. We have developed and validated a targeted resequencing panel for focal epilepsies, the most important clinical class of epilepsies, accounting for about 60% of all cases. Our application of MIP technology is an innovative approach that will be advantageous in the clinical setting because it is highly sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective for screening large patient cohorts. Our findings indicate that mutations in known genes likely explain only a small proportion of focal epilepsy cases. This is not surprising given the established clinical and genetic heterogeneity of these disorders and underscores the importance of further gene discovery studies in this complex syndrome. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G.; Bayly, Marta A.; van Kempen, Marjan J. A.; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Yendle, Simone C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G.; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J.; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated with KCNT1, we examined individuals affected with focal epilepsy or an epileptic encephalopathy for mutations in the gene. We identified KCNT1 mutations in 12 previously unreported patients with focal epilepsy, multifocal epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and in a family with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), in addition to patients with NFLE and MMFSI. In contrast to the 100% penetrance so far reported for KCNT1 mutations, we observed incomplete penetrance. It is notable that we report that the one KCNT1 mutation, p.Arg398Gln, can lead to either of the two distinct phenotypes, ADNFLE or MMFSI, even within the same family. This indicates that genotype–phenotype relationships for KCNT1 mutations are not straightforward. We demonstrate that KCNT1 mutations are highly pleiotropic and are associated with phenotypes other than ADNFLE and MMFSI. KCNT1 mutations are now associated with Ohtahara syndrome, MMFSI, and nocturnal focal epilepsy. They may also be associated with multifocal epilepsy and cardiac disturbances. PMID:26122718

  12. Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cerminara, Caterina; El Malhany, Nadia; Roberto, Denis; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain is an unusual partial epilepsy characterized by paroxysmal episodes of abdominal or visceral pain, disturbance of awareness and electroencephalographic abnormalities. We describe a new case of ictal abdominal pain in which gastrointestinal complaints were the only manifestation of seizures and review the previously described pediatric patients. In our patient clinical findings, ictal EEG abnormalities, and a good response to antiepileptic drugs allowed...

  13. White matter integrity and cerebral network topology in focal epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide more than fifty million people suffer from recurrent spontaneous seizures. Seizures are considered to be harmful to the brain and may have adverse long-term behavioral and cognitive consequences in particular in people with focal epilepsies that do not respond to pharmacotherapy.

  14. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated w...

  15. [A case of focal epilepsy manifesting multiple psychiatric auras].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezura, Michinori; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jin, Kazutaka; Kato, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Masaki; Fujikawa, Mayu; Aoki, Masashi; Nakasato, Nobukazu

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of epilepsy with multiple types of focal seizures that were misdiagnosed as psychiatric disorders. A 20-year-old female patient presented with a variety of episodes, including loss of consciousness, deja vu, fear, delusion of possession, violent movements, and generalized convulsions. Each of these symptoms appeared in a stereotypic manner. She was initially diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder and treated with psychoactive medications, which had no effect. Long-term video electroencephalography revealed that her episodes of violent movement with impaired consciousness and secondarily generalized seizure were epileptic events originating in the right hemisphere. High-field brain magnetic resonance imaging for detecting subtle lesions revealed bilateral lesions from periventricular nodular heterotopia. Her final diagnosis was right hemispheric focal epilepsy. Carbamazepine administration was started, which successfully controlled all seizures. The present case demonstrates the pitfall of diagnosing focal epilepsy when it presents with multiple types of psychiatric aura. Epilepsy should thus be included in differential diagnoses, considering the stereotypic nature of symptoms, to avoid misdiagnosis.

  16. Focal epilepsies in adult patients attending two epilepsy centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilioli, Isabella; Vignoli, Aglaia; Visani, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    , and we evaluated the risk factors associated with AED resistance using logistic regression analysis. We further grouped AED-resistant patients in different grades (I, II, and III) according to the number of AEDs already tried as proposed by Perucca. KEY FINDINGS: AED resistance occurred in 57...... consecutively after 1990 and followed regularly at two epilepsy centers. We systematically collected the clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data using a custom-written database. We classified the patients as seizure-free or AED resistant according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria...... control (14.9% needed three or more AEDs). Furthermore, among seizure-free patients who could be previously classified as resistant to two or more AEDs, 52.2% reached seizure freedom while receiving treatment with "new generation" AEDs. SIGNIFICANCE: The ILAE classification of AED resistance, as well...

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow in focal cortical epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristina Dupont; Oikawa, T; Sveinsdottir, E

    1976-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in ten patients with focal cortical epilepsy. The blood flow was measured by the intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 (133Xe), and the isotope clearance was recorded by a multidetector scintillation camera with 254 detectors. Three patients were....... This finding accords with earlier studies. All nine patients studied in the interictal phase showed, either spontaneously or during activation by intermittent light, focal flow increases in areas presumed to comprise the epileptic focus. These interictal hyperemic foci probably reflect subictal neuronal...

  18. Perampanel for focal epilepsy: insights from early clinical experience

    OpenAIRE

    Trinka, E.; Steinhoff, B. J.; Nikanorova, M.; Brodie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Perampanel is approved for adjunctive therapy of focal epilepsy with or without secondarily generalized seizures in patients aged >12 years. This narrative review uses real-world and clinical trial data to elucidate perampanel's role in the clinic. Audit data show good tolerability with perampanel and higher freedom-from-seizure rates in elderly vs younger patients. When using perampanel in elderly patients, special attention should be given to comorbidities and co-medication to avoid potenti...

  19. Mutations in SLC12A5 in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stödberg, Tommy; McTague, Amy; Ruiz, Arnaud J.; Hirata, Hiromi; Zhen, Juan; Long, Philip; Farabella, Irene; Meyer, Esther; Kawahara, Atsuo; Vassallo, Grace; Stivaros, Stavros M.; Bjursell, Magnus K.; Stranneheim, Henrik; Tigerschiöld, Stephanie; Persson, Bengt; Bangash, Iftikhar; Das, Krishna; Hughes, Deborah; Lesko, Nicole; Lundeberg, Joakim; Scott, Rod C.; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Smith, Holly; Gissen, Paul; Schorge, Stephanie; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Topf, Maya; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Harvey, Robert J.; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A.

    2015-01-01

    The potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2, encoded by SLC12A5, plays a fundamental role in fast synaptic inhibition by maintaining a hyperpolarizing gradient for chloride ions. KCC2 dysfunction has been implicated in human epilepsy, but to date, no monogenic KCC2-related epilepsy disorders have been described. Here we show recessive loss-of-function SLC12A5 mutations in patients with a severe infantile-onset pharmacoresistant epilepsy syndrome, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS). Decreased KCC2 surface expression, reduced protein glycosylation and impaired chloride extrusion contribute to loss of KCC2 activity, thereby impairing normal synaptic inhibition and promoting neuronal excitability in this early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:26333769

  20. LGI2 truncation causes a remitting focal epilepsy in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija H Seppälä

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available One quadrillion synapses are laid in the first two years of postnatal construction of the human brain, which are then pruned until age 10 to 500 trillion synapses composing the final network. Genetic epilepsies are the most common neurological diseases with onset during pruning, affecting 0.5% of 2-10-year-old children, and these epilepsies are often characterized by spontaneous remission. We previously described a remitting epilepsy in the Lagotto romagnolo canine breed. Here, we identify the gene defect and affected neurochemical pathway. We reconstructed a large Lagotto pedigree of around 34 affected animals. Using genome-wide association in 11 discordant sib-pairs from this pedigree, we mapped the disease locus to a 1.7 Mb region of homozygosity in chromosome 3 where we identified a protein-truncating mutation in the Lgi2 gene, a homologue of the human epilepsy gene LGI1. We show that LGI2, like LGI1, is neuronally secreted and acts on metalloproteinase-lacking members of the ADAM family of neuronal receptors, which function in synapse remodeling, and that LGI2 truncation, like LGI1 truncations, prevents secretion and ADAM interaction. The resulting epilepsy onsets at around seven weeks (equivalent to human two years, and remits by four months (human eight years, versus onset after age eight in the majority of human patients with LGI1 mutations. Finally, we show that Lgi2 is expressed highly in the immediate post-natal period until halfway through pruning, unlike Lgi1, which is expressed in the latter part of pruning and beyond. LGI2 acts at least in part through the same ADAM receptors as LGI1, but earlier, ensuring electrical stability (absence of epilepsy during pruning years, preceding this same function performed by LGI1 in later years. LGI2 should be considered a candidate gene for common remitting childhood epilepsies, and LGI2-to-LGI1 transition for mechanisms of childhood epilepsy remission.

  1. Second-hit mosaic mutation in mTORC1 repressor DEPDC5 causes focal cortical dysplasia-associated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribierre, Théo; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bacq, Alexandre; Baldassari, Sara; Marsan, Elise; Chipaux, Mathilde; Muraca, Giuseppe; Roussel, Delphine; Navarro, Vincent; Leguern, Eric; Miles, Richard; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2018-04-30

    DEP domain-containing 5 protein (DEPDC5) is a repressor of the recently recognized amino acid-sensing branch of the mTORC1 pathway. So far, its function in the brain remains largely unknown. Germline loss-of-function mutations in DEPDC5 have emerged as a major cause of familial refractory focal epilepsies, with case reports of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Remarkably, a fraction of patients also develop focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a neurodevelopmental cortical malformation. We therefore hypothesized that a somatic second-hit mutation arising during brain development may support the focal nature of the dysplasia. Here, using postoperative human tissue, we provide the proof of concept that a biallelic 2-hit - brain somatic and germline - mutational mechanism in DEPDC5 causes focal epilepsy with FCD. We discovered a mutation gradient with a higher rate of mosaicism in the seizure-onset zone than in the surrounding epileptogenic zone. Furthermore, we demonstrate the causality of a Depdc5 brain mosaic inactivation using CRISPR-Cas9 editing and in utero electroporation in a mouse model recapitulating focal epilepsy with FCD and SUDEP-like events. We further unveil a key role of Depdc5 in shaping dendrite and spine morphology of excitatory neurons. This study reveals promising therapeutic avenues for treating drug-resistant focal epilepsies with mTORC1-targeting molecules.

  2. Slow Activity in Focal Epilepsy During Sleep and Wakefulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Tombini, Mario; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to test differences between healthy subjects and patients with respect to slow wave activity during wakefulness and sleep. Methods Fifteen patients affected by nonlesional focal epilepsy originating within temporal areas and fourteen matched controls underwent a 24-hour EEG....... The effect was widespread for alpha band and above, while localized over the affected hemisphere for delta (sleep cycle 1, P = .006; sleep cycle 2, P = .008; sleep cycle 3, P = .017). The analysis of interhemispheric differences showed that the only frequency band stronger over the affected regions...

  3. Familial temporal lobe epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia type IIIa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fábera, Petr; Krijtová, H.; Tomášek, M.; Krýsl, D.; Zámečník, J.; Mohapl, M.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Marusič, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 31, Sep 2015 (2015), s. 120-123 ISSN 1059-1311 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14489 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : familial temporal lobe epilepsy * focal cortical dysplasia * epilepsy surgery * genetics of epilepsy Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.109, year: 2015

  4. Genetics Home Reference: familial focal epilepsy with variable foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with FFEVF have developed psychiatric disorders (such as schizophrenia ), behavioral problems, or intellectual disability. It is unclear ... 5 links) American Epilepsy Society Brain Foundation (Australia) CURE: Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy Epilepsy Foundation ...

  5. Perampanel for focal epilepsy: insights from early clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinka, E; Steinhoff, B J; Nikanorova, M; Brodie, M J

    2016-03-01

    Perampanel is approved for adjunctive therapy of focal epilepsy with or without secondarily generalized seizures in patients aged >12 years. This narrative review uses real-world and clinical trial data to elucidate perampanel's role in the clinic. Audit data show good tolerability with perampanel and higher freedom-from-seizure rates in elderly vs younger patients. When using perampanel in elderly patients, special attention should be given to comorbidities and co-medication to avoid potential interactions or adverse events. Slower titration is generally recommended, and seizure control should be reassessed at a dose of 4 mg before further dose increases. Perampanel efficacy is similar in adolescents and adults; however, somnolence, nasopharyngitis, and aggression are more frequent in adolescents vs the overall population. Individualized and slow-dose titration can minimize adverse events. Low serum concentrations of perampanel may occur in patients also receiving some enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs; a perampanel dose increase may be required. Adverse events of importance with perampanel include dizziness; anger, aggression, and hostile behavior (particularly in adolescents); and falls (particularly in patients >65 years). An individualized approach to dosing, including slower up-titration and bedtime dosing, reduces dizziness risk. Other drugs may cause or aggravate dizziness; reducing concomitant drugs may be necessary when up-titrating perampanel. It would seem clinically appropriate to give due consideration to avoiding use in patients with a history of anger or hostile/aggressive behavior. The possibility of such behaviors should be discussed with patients before starting perampanel, with monitoring during up-titration. Slower up-titration of perampanel in older patients helps reduce fall risk. © 2015 The Authors. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Indices of resective surgery effectiveness for intractable nonlesional focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Warren T; Ganapathy, Gobi R; Munoz, David; Lee, Donald H

    2004-01-01

    Among 70 patients with intractable focal epilepsy and no specific lesion, as determined by both MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and histopathology, outcome after resective surgery was polarized: 26 (37%) became seizure free (SF), and 27 (39%) were not helped. Eighteen (42%) of 43 standard temporal resections rendered patients SF, somewhat more than eight (30%) of 27 other procedures. To seek reliable prognostic factors, the subsequent correlative data compared features of the 26 SF patients with those of the 27 not helped. Although ictal semiology guided the site of surgical resection, it and other aspects of seizure and neurologic history failed to predict surgical outcome. However, two aspects of preoperative scalp EEGs correlated with SF outcomes: (a) among 25 patients in whom >50% of clinical seizures arose from the later resected lobe and no other origins, 18 (72%) became SF compared with seven (28%) of 25 with other ictal profiles; (b) 13 (93%) of 14 temporal lobe patients whose interictal and ictal EEGs lacked features indicative of multifocal epileptogenesis became SF compared with five (33%) of 15 with such components. The considered need for subdural (SD) EEG reduced SF outcome from 18 (90%) of 20 patients without SD to eight (24%) of 33 with SD; this likely reflected an insufficient congruity of ictal semiology and interictal and ictal scalp EEG for localizing epileptogenesis. Within this SD group, >50% of clinical seizure origins from a later resected lobe increased SF outcome somewhat: from two (14%) of 14 without this attribute to six (40%) of 15 with it; 100% of such origins increased SF outcome from two (12%) of 16 to six (46%) of 13.

  7. The role of executive functioning in memory performance in pediatric focal epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepeta, Leigh N.; Casaletto, Kaitlin Blackstone; Terwilliger, Virginia; Facella-Ervolini, Joy; Sady, Maegan; Mayo, Jessica; Gaillard, William D.; Berl, Madison M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Learning and memory are essential for academic success and everyday functioning, but the pattern of memory skills and its relationship to executive functioning in children with focal epilepsy is not fully delineated. We address a gap in the literature by examining the relationship between memory and executive functioning in a pediatric focal epilepsy population. Methods Seventy children with focal epilepsy and 70 typically developing children matched on age, intellectual functioning, and gender underwent neuropsychological assessment, including measures of intelligence (WASI/DAS), as well as visual (CMS Dot Locations) and verbal episodic memory (WRAML Story Memory and CVLT-C). Executive functioning was measured directly (WISC-IV Digit Span Backward; CELF-IV Recalling Sentences) and by parent report (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF)). Results Children with focal epilepsy had lower delayed free recall scores than controls across visual and verbal memory tasks (p = 0.02; partial η2 = .12). In contrast, recognition memory performance was similar for patients and controls (p = 0.36; partial η2 = .03). Children with focal epilepsy demonstrated difficulties in working memory (p = 0.02; partial η2 = .08) and planning/organization (p = 0.02) compared to controls. Working memory predicted 9–19% of the variance in delayed free recall for verbal and visual memory; organization predicted 9–10% of the variance in verbal memory. Patients with both left and right focal epilepsy demonstrated more difficulty on verbal versus visual tasks (p = 0.002). Memory performance did not differ by location of seizure foci (temporal vs. extra-temporal, frontal vs. extra-frontal). Significance Children with focal epilepsy demonstrated memory ability within age-level expectations, but delayed free recall was inefficient compared to typically developing controls. Memory difficulties were not related to general cognitive impairment or seizure localization

  8. [Functional connectivity and complex networks in focal epilepsy. Pathophysiology and therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Jesús; Sola, Rafael G; Vega-Zelaya, Lorena; Garnes, Óscar; Ortega, Guillermo J

    2014-05-01

    The traditional surgical approach to treat drug-resistant focal epileptic patients is in the resection or disconnection of the epileptic focus. However, a significant minority of patients continue to experience seizures after surgery, which shows the incomplete level of knowledge that currently we have of this pathology. This paper introduces some concepts of functional connectivity and complex networks methodology with its application to the study of neurophysiological recordings from patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy. In order to fully understand the new developments in the area of complex networks and its applications to the study of epilepsy, we will here review fundamental concepts in complex networks methodology, synchronization and functional connectivity. Some of the most recent published works dealing with focal epilepsy viewed under this new perspective will be revised and commented. We think that a wider perspective in the study of epilepsy, such as the one reviewed in this work, will allow epileptologists to consider surgical alternatives in the usual treatment of focal epilepsy at those currently performed in most medical centers around the world. Combining the traditional knowledge with new insights provided by network theory will certainly fill many of the gaps we have today in the fragmented understanding of epilepsy.

  9. Familial temporal lobe epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia type IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabera, Petr; Krijtova, Hana; Tomasek, Martin; Krysl, David; Zamecnik, Josef; Mohapl, Milan; Jiruska, Premysl; Marusic, Petr

    2015-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) represents a common cause of refractory epilepsy. It is considered a sporadic disorder, but its occasional familial occurrence suggests the involvement of genetic mechanisms. Siblings with intractable epilepsy were referred for epilepsy surgery evaluation. Both patients were examined using video-EEG monitoring, MRI examination and PET imaging. They underwent left anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Electroclinical features pointed to left temporal lobe epilepsy and MRI examination revealed typical signs of left-sided hippocampal sclerosis and increased white matter signal intensity in the left temporal pole. PET examination confirmed interictal hypometabolism in the left temporal lobe. Histopathological examination of resected tissue demonstrated the presence FCD type IIIa, i.e. hippocampal sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia in the left temporal pole. We present a unique case of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in siblings, characterized by an identical clinical profile and histopathology of FCD type IIIa, who were successfully treated by epilepsy surgery. The presence of such a high concordance between the clinical and morphological data, together with the occurrence of epilepsy and febrile seizures in three generations of the family pedigree points towards a possible genetic nature of the observed FCD type IIIa. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Large-scale cortico-subcortical functional networks in focal epilepsies: The role of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Výtvarová

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Focal epilepsies affect large-scale brain networks beyond the epileptogenic zones. Cortico-subcortical functional connectivity disturbance was displayed in LTLE, FLE, and POLE. Significant changes in the resting-state functional connectivity between cortical and subcortical structures suggest an important role of the BG and thalamus in focal epilepsies.

  11. Autoantibodies to neuronal antigens in children with focal epilepsy and no prima facie signs of encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borusiak, Peter; Bettendorf, Ulrich; Wiegand, Gert; Bast, Thomas; Kluger, Gerhard; Philippi, Heike; Münstermann, Dieter; Bien, Christian G

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing awareness of neuronal autoantibodies and their impact on the pathogenesis of epilepsy. We investigated children with focal epilepsy in order to provide an estimate of autoantibody frequency within a pediatric population without prima facie evidence of encephalitis using a broad panel of autoantibodies. This was done to assess the specificity of antibodies and to see whether antibodies might be of modifying influence on the course of focal epilepsies. We searched for autoantibodies in 124 patients with focal epilepsy (1-18 years; mean 10; 6 years). Sera were tested using a broad panel of surface and intracellular antigens. We found autoantibodies in 5/124 patients (4%): high-positive GAD65 antibodies (n = 1), low-positive GAD65 antibodies (N = 1), VGKC complex antibodies not reactive with LGI1 or CASPR2 (n = 3). We did not find any distinctive features distinguishing antibody positive patients from those without antibodies. The antibodies found in this cohort are probably neither disease-specific nor pathogenic. This has been suggested before for these antigenic targets. Moreover, they do not seem to modify disease severity in the antibody-positive epilepsy patients. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MRI-negative focal cortical dysplasias and seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, K; Dimova, P.; Penkov, M.; Nachev, G.; Kostadinova, I.; Zlatareva, D.; Gabrovsky, K.; Naydenov, E.; Romansky, K.; Marinov, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The focal cortical dysplasias (FCD) are a main cause of drug-resistant epilepsies. The MRI appearance of FCD is specific but some FCD remain hidden for the MRI. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the success rate of epilepsy surgery in patients with FCD and especially MRI-negative FCD during the first 6 years of the epilepsy surgery program of University Hospital 'St. Ivan Rilski', Sofia. Material and methods: Fourteen patients with drug resistant epilepsy and focal cortical dysplasias were operated on from January 2006 to april 2012. The mean age at surgery was 13 years (7-35 years) and the mean age of epilepsy onset was 7 years (1 year - 19 years). The presurgical work-up have included preoperative MRI (1.5T, GE) and seizures registration with video- EEG in all patients, PET-CT in 4 patients and invasive EEG in 5 patients. Eleven patients have MRI-positive cortical dysplasia and 3 patients were MRI negative. Results: Complete seizure control (Engel class I) was achieved in 9 patients, significant improvement (Engel class II) was observed in 3 patients and two patients remain without improvement (Engel class IV). In the small group of 3 patients with MRI-negative FCD, complete seizure control was achieved in two patients. No significant improvement was observed in one patient with MRI-negative FCD and one patient with MRI-positive FCD. Discussion: FCD type I are frequently invisible for the MRI and the localization of the epileptogenic zone is a difficult problem. Many studies have demonstrated the negative predictive value of MRI-negative FCD regarding seizure control after epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy. Conclusions: Patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and MRI-negative FCD are good candidates for epilepsy surgery but need comprehensive presurgical workup including PET-CT and invasive-EEG.

  13. The Ketogenic Diet Improves Recently Worsened Focal Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Nathalie; Pinton, Florence; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Nabbout, Rima

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We observed a dramatic response to the ketogenic diet in several patients with highly refractory epilepsy whose seizure frequency had recently worsened. This study aimed to identify whether this characteristic was a useful indication for the ketogenic diet. Method: From the 70 patients who received the ketogenic diet during a 3-year period at…

  14. Adult-onset epilepsy in focal cortical dysplasia of Taylor type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, A. M.; Cascino, G. D.; Elger, C. E.; Devinsky, O.; Laff, R.; Najjar, S.; Sperling, M. R.; LoRusso, G.; Cossu, M.; Urbach, H.; Aronica, E.; Meyer, F. B.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Dubeau, F.; Andermann, F.

    2005-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia of Taylor type (FCDT) usually presents with seizures at an early age, whereas adult onset of epilepsy is uncommon. We reviewed the medical records of 213 patients with FCDT. In 21 patients (10%), age at seizure onset ranged from 18 to 55 years (mean 25.3). The outcome of

  15. Interictal and Postictal Performances on Dichotic Listening Test in Children with Focal Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, G.; Wiegand, G.; Stephani, U.

    2011-01-01

    Dichotic listening test (DL) is an important tool to disclose speech dominance in healthy subjects and in clinical cases. The aim of this study was to probe if focal epilepsy in children reveals a corresponding suppression of the ear reports contralateral to seizure onset site. Thus, 15 children and adolescents with clinically and…

  16. Focal cortical malformations in children with early infantile epilepsy and PCDH19 mutations: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Mary; Korff, Christian M; Ranza, Emmanuelle; Bernasconi, Andrea; Lübbig, Anja; Nangia, Srishti; Ramelli, Gian Paolo; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Nordli, Douglas R; Bast, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    In this case report we assess the occurrence of cortical malformations in children with early infantile epilepsy associated with variants of the gene protocadherin 19 (PCDH19). We describe the clinical course, and electrographic, imaging, genetic, and neuropathological features in a cohort of female children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. All five children (mean age 10y) had an early onset of epilepsy during infancy and a predominance of fever sensitive seizures occurring in clusters. Cognitive impairment was noted in four out of five patients. Radiological evidence of cortical malformations was present in all cases and, in two patients, validated by histology. Sanger sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification analysis of PCDH19 revealed pathogenic variants in four patients. In one patient, array comparative genomic hybridization showed a microdeletion encompassing PCDH19. We propose molecular testing and analysis of PCDH19 in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy, with onset in early infancy, seizures in clusters, and fever sensitivity. Structural lesions are to be searched in patients with PCDH19 pathogenic variants. Further, PCDH19 analysis should be considered in epilepsy surgery evaluation even in the presence of cerebral structural lesions. Focal cortical malformations and monogenic epilepsy syndromes may coexist. Structural lesions are to be searched for in patients with protocadherin 19 (PCDH19) pathogenic variants with refractory focal seizures. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  17. Germline and somatic mutations in the MTOR gene in focal cortical dysplasia and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Chipaux, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of somatic MTOR mutations in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and of germline MTOR mutations in a broad range of epilepsies. METHODS: We collected 20 blood-brain paired samples from patients with FCD and searched for somatic variants using deep-targeted gene panel...... sequencing. Germline mutations in MTOR were assessed in a French research cohort of 93 probands with focal epilepsies and in a diagnostic Danish cohort of 245 patients with a broad range of epilepsies. Data sharing among collaborators allowed us to ascertain additional germline variants in MTOR. RESULTS: We...... detected recurrent somatic variants (p.Ser2215Phe, p.Ser2215Tyr, and p.Leu1460Pro) in the MTOR gene in 37% of participants with FCD II and showed histologic evidence for activation of the mTORC1 signaling cascade in brain tissue. We further identified 5 novel de novo germline missense MTOR variants in 6...

  18. Seizure outcome after AED failure in pediatric focal epilepsy: impact of underlying etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C; Nickels, Katherine C

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to identify long-term seizure outcome in pediatric nonsyndromic focal epilepsy after failure of serial antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) due to lack of efficacy. Children (1 month-17 years) with new-onset focal epilepsy not meeting the criteria for a defined electroclinical syndrome diagnosed between 1980 and 2009 while residing in Olmsted County, MN, were retrospectively identified. Medical records of those followed for ≥2 years were reviewed to assess etiology, the number of AEDs that failed due to lack of efficacy, and seizure outcome at final follow-up. Etiology was classified into structural/metabolic, genetic, or unknown. Favorable outcome was defined as seizure freedom ≥1 year, on or off AEDs, without prior epilepsy surgery. Poor outcome was defined as ongoing seizures in the preceding year or having undergone prior epilepsy surgery. Nonsyndromic focal epilepsy accounted for 275/468 (59%) of all patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy--of these, 256 (93%) were followed for a minimum of two years and were included in the study. Median duration of follow-up was 10.0 years. At least one AED had failed due to lack of efficacy in 100 (39.1%) children. Favorable outcomes occurred in 149/156 (95.5%) children with no AED failure, 16/30 (53.3%) with one AED failure, 8/25 (32%) with two AED failures, and only 2/45 (4.4%) with three AED failures. After two AED failures, the seizures of nearly one-quarter of children who had epilepsy with an unknown cause responded favorably to the third AED compared with only 7.8% of the cohort that had epilepsy with a structural/metabolic cause. Children with a remote brain insult had a significantly higher likelihood of favorable outcome with serial AEDs than those with other structural abnormalities. Etiology is an important determinant of pharmacoresistance in nonsyndromic focal epilepsy. Surgical evaluation should be considered after failure of 1-2 AEDs in those who have epilepsy with structural causes, excluding

  19. Thermography Examination of Abdominal Area Skin Temperatures in Individuals With and Without Focal-Onset Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Hollis H; Cayce, Charles Thomas; Herrin, Jeph

    Early osteopathic theory and practice, and the work of the medical intuitive Edgar Cayce suggested that the abdominal areas of individuals with epilepsy would manifest "cold spots." The etiology for this phenomenon was thought to be abdominal adhesions caused by inflammation and viscero-somatic reflexes caused by adhesions or injury to visceral or musculoskeletal system structures. Indeed, until that advent of electroencephalography in the 1930s, medical practice regarding epilepsy focused on abdominal neural and visceral structures. Following two hypotheses were formulated to evaluate any abdominal temperature phenomena: (1) an abdominal quadrant division analysis would find one or more quadrants "colder" in the focal-onset epilepsy group (ICD9-CM 345.4 and 345.5) compared to controls. (2) Total abdominal areas of individuals with focal-onset epilepsy wound be colder than a control group. Overall, 50 patients with the diagnosis of focal-onset epilepsy were recruited from the office of the Epilepsy Foundation of Florida and 50 control subjects with no history of epilepsy were recruited through advertising to the public. Under controlled room conditions all subjects had infrared thermographic images made and recorded by Med-Hot Model MH-731 FLIR equipment. There were no significant demographic difference between experimental patients and control subjects, though the control group tended to be younger and more often male; however, these were controlled for in all analyses. In the quadrant analysis, there were significant differences in that more epileptic patients had colder left upper abdominal quadrant temperatures than the control group (66.8% versus 44.9%; P = .030). In the total abdominal analysis, however, there were no significant differences. The results support the hypothesis that individuals with focal-onset epilepsy have colder abdominal areas. If substantiated in further research, present study results will require further examination of the mechanisms of

  20. Voxel based morphometry of FLAIR MRI in children with intractable focal epilepsy: Implications for surgical intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riney, Catherine J.; Chong, William K.; Clark, Chris A.; Cross, J. Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in particular fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), has transformed the delineation of structural brain pathology associated with focal epilepsy. However, to date there is no literature on voxel based morphometry (VBM) of FLAIR in children with epilepsy. The aim of this study was to explore the role of visual and VBM assessment of FLAIR in pre-operative investigation of children with intractable focal epilepsy. Methods: Children with intractable epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and children with intractable cryptogenic focal epilepsy (CFE) were investigated. FLAIR and T1-weighted MRI were acquired on a 1.5T MRI scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). VBM was performed using SPM5 (Wellcome Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, London). Results: Eight children with FCD (M = 5, age 7.9–17.3 years) and 14 children with CFE (M = 8, 7.8–16.8 years) were enrolled. VBM of FLAIR detected 7/8 (88%) of FCD whilst VBM of T1-weighted MRI detected only 3/8 (38%) FCD. VBM of FLAIR detected abnormality in 4/14 children with CFE, in 2/14 (14%) the abnormality was concordant with other data on the epileptogenic zone and with visible abnormality on repeat visual inspection of MR data. VBM of T1-weighed MRI detected abnormality in 2/14 children with CFE, none of which correlated with visible abnormality. Discussion: This study highlights the important role that FLAIR imaging has in the pre-operative assessment of children with intractable epilepsy. VBM of FLAIR may provide important information allowing selection of children with intractable CFE who are likely to benefit from further neuroradiological or neurophysiological evaluation.

  1. Heterogeneous contribution of microdeletions in the development of common generalised and focal epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palma, Eduardo; Helbig, Ingo; Klein, Karl Martin; Anttila, Verneri; Horn, Heiko; Reinthaler, Eva Maria; Gormley, Padhraig; Ganna, Andrea; Byrnes, Andrea; Pernhorst, Katharina; Toliat, Mohammad R; Saarentaus, Elmo; Howrigan, Daniel P; Hoffman, Per; Miquel, Juan Francisco; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Nürnberg, Peter; Lerche, Holger; Zimprich, Fritz; Neubauer, Bern A; Becker, Albert J; Rosenow, Felix; Perucca, Emilio; Zara, Federico; Weber, Yvonne G; Lal, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Background Microdeletions are known to confer risk to epilepsy, particularly at genomic rearrangement ‘hotspot’ loci. However, microdeletion burden not overlapping these regions or within different epilepsy subtypes has not been ascertained. Objective To decipher the role of microdeletions outside hotspots loci and risk assessment by epilepsy subtype. Methods We assessed the burden, frequency and genomic content of rare, large microdeletions found in a previously published cohort of 1366 patients with genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) in addition to two sets of additional unpublished genome-wide microdeletions found in 281 patients with rolandic epilepsy (RE) and 807 patients with adult focal epilepsy (AFE), totalling 2454 cases. Microdeletions were assessed in a combined and subtype-specific approaches against 6746 controls. Results When hotspots are considered, we detected an enrichment of microdeletions in the combined epilepsy analysis (adjusted p=1.06×10−6,OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.35). Epilepsy subtype-specific analyses showed that hotspot microdeletions in the GGE subgroup contribute most of the overall signal (adjusted p=9.79×10−12, OR 7.45, 95% CI 4.20–13.5). Outside hotspots , microdeletions were enriched in the GGE cohort for neurodevelopmental genes (adjusted p=9.13×10−3,OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.62–4.94). No additional signal was observed for RE and AFE. Still, gene-content analysis identified known (NRXN1, RBFOX1 and PCDH7) and novel (LOC102723362) candidate genes across epilepsy subtypes that were not deleted in controls. Conclusions Our results show a heterogeneous effect of recurrent and non-recurrent microdeletions as part of the genetic architecture of GGE and a minor contribution in the aetiology of RE and AFE. PMID:28756411

  2. Heterogeneous contribution of microdeletions in the development of common generalised and focal epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palma, Eduardo; Helbig, Ingo; Klein, Karl Martin; Anttila, Verneri; Horn, Heiko; Reinthaler, Eva Maria; Gormley, Padhraig; Ganna, Andrea; Byrnes, Andrea; Pernhorst, Katharina; Toliat, Mohammad R; Saarentaus, Elmo; Howrigan, Daniel P; Hoffman, Per; Miquel, Juan Francisco; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Nürnberg, Peter; Lerche, Holger; Zimprich, Fritz; Neubauer, Bern A; Becker, Albert J; Rosenow, Felix; Perucca, Emilio; Zara, Federico; Weber, Yvonne G; Lal, Dennis

    2017-09-01

    Microdeletions are known to confer risk to epilepsy, particularly at genomic rearrangement 'hotspot' loci. However, microdeletion burden not overlapping these regions or within different epilepsy subtypes has not been ascertained. To decipher the role of microdeletions outside hotspots loci and risk assessment by epilepsy subtype. We assessed the burden, frequency and genomic content of rare, large microdeletions found in a previously published cohort of 1366 patients with genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) in addition to two sets of additional unpublished genome-wide microdeletions found in 281 patients with rolandic epilepsy (RE) and 807 patients with adult focal epilepsy (AFE), totalling 2454 cases. Microdeletions were assessed in a combined and subtype-specific approaches against 6746 controls. When hotspots are considered, we detected an enrichment of microdeletions in the combined epilepsy analysis (adjusted p=1.06×10 -6 ,OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.35). Epilepsy subtype-specific analyses showed that hotspot microdeletions in the GGE subgroup contribute most of the overall signal (adjusted p=9.79×10 -12 , OR 7.45, 95% CI 4.20-13.5). Outside hotspots , microdeletions were enriched in the GGE cohort for neurodevelopmental genes (adjusted p=9.13×10 -3 ,OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.62-4.94). No additional signal was observed for RE and AFE. Still, gene-content analysis identified known ( NRXN1 , RBFOX1 and PCDH7 ) and novel ( LOC102723362 ) candidate genes across epilepsy subtypes that were not deleted in controls. Our results show a heterogeneous effect of recurrent and non-recurrent microdeletions as part of the genetic architecture of GGE and a minor contribution in the aetiology of RE and AFE. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. A Population-Based Study of Long-term Outcomes of Cryptogenic Focal Epilepsy in Childhood: Cryptogenic Epilepsy is NOT Probably Symptomatic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Grossardt, Brandon R; So, Elson L; Nickels, Katherine C

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term outcome in a population-based group of children with cryptogenic vs symptomatic focal epilepsy diagnosed from 1980–2004 and to define the course of epilepsy in the cryptogenic group. Methods We identified all children residing in Olmsted County, MN, 1 month through 17 years with newly diagnosed, non-idiopathic focal epilepsy from 1980–2004. Children with idiopathic partial epilepsy syndromes were excluded. Medical records were reviewed to determine etiology, results of imaging and EEG studies, treatments used, and long-term outcome. Children were defined as having symptomatic epilepsy if they had a known genetic or structural/metabolic etiology, and as cryptogenic if they did not. Key Findings Of 359 children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy, 215 (60%) had non-idiopathic focal epilepsy. Of these, 206 (96%) were followed for more than 12 months. Ninety five children (46%) were classified as symptomatic. Median follow-up from diagnosis was similar in both groups, being 157 months (25%ile, 75%ile 89, 233) in the cryptogenic group vs 134 months (25%ile, 75%ile 78, 220) in the symptomatic group (p=0.26). Of 111 cryptogenic cases, 66% had normal cognition. Long-term outcome was significantly better in those with cryptogenic vs symptomatic etiology (intractable epilepsy at last follow-up, 7% vs 40%, p<0.001; seizure-freedom at last follow-up, 81% vs 55%, p<0.001). Of those who achieved seizure-freedom at final follow-up, 68% of the cryptogenic group versus only 46% of the symptomatic group were off antiepileptic medications (p=0.01). One third of the cryptogenic group had a remarkably benign disorder, with no seizures seen after initiation of medication, or in those who were untreated, after the second afebrile seizure. A further 5% had seizures within the first year but remained seizure-free thereafter. With the exception of perinatal complications, which predicted against seizure remission, no other factors were found to significantly

  4. Interval analysis of interictal EEG: pathology of the alpha rhythm in focal epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrzowski, Jan; Siemiński, Mariusz; Sarnowska, Anna; Jedrzejczak, Joanna; Nyka, Walenty M.

    2015-11-01

    The contemporary use of interictal scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in the context of focal epilepsy workup relies on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges. The high-specificity performance of this marker comes, however, at a cost of only moderate sensitivity. Zero-crossing interval analysis is an alternative to Fourier analysis for the assessment of the rhythmic component of EEG signals. We applied this method to standard EEG recordings of 78 patients divided into 4 subgroups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and nonepileptic patients with headache. Interval-analysis based markers were capable of effectively discriminating patients with epilepsy from those in control subgroups (AUC~0.8) with diagnostic sensitivity potentially exceeding that of visual analysis. The identified putative epilepsy-specific markers were sensitive to the properties of the alpha rhythm and displayed weak or non-significant dependences on the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) taken by the patients. Significant AED-related effects were concentrated in the theta interval range and an associated marker allowed for identification of patients on AED polytherapy (AUC~0.9). Interval analysis may thus, in perspective, increase the diagnostic yield of interictal scalp EEG. Our findings point to the possible existence of alpha rhythm abnormalities in patients with epilepsy.

  5. Characterization of Functional and Structural Integrity in Experimental Focal Epilepsy: Reduced Network Efficiency Coincides with White Matter Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, W.M.; Dijkhuizen, R.M.; van Meer, M.P.A.; Van der Hel, W.S.; Verlinde, S.A.M.W.; van Nieuwenhuizen, O.; Viergever, M.A.; Stam, C.J.; Braun, K.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although focal epilepsies are increasingly recognized to affect multiple and remote neural systems, the underlying spatiotemporal pattern and the relationships between recurrent spontaneous seizures, global functional connectivity, and structural integrity remain largely unknown.

  6. EFFICACY OF RUFINAMIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT FOCAL EPILEPSIES IN PAEDIATRIC PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Shchederkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among drug-resistant epilepsies, epileptic syndromes, characterized by combination of several types of seizures, are considered to be the most difficult in terms of treatment. Lennox–Gastaut syndrome is one of them. It manifests with polymorphic seizures (tonic axial, myatonic, atypical absence seizures, status epilepticus of minor motor seizures, myoclonic, generalized convulsive, and focal seizures. This is a heterogeneous disease, represented by a complex of clinical and electroencephalographic manifestations with various etiology. Current review is devoted to a novel antiepileptic drug rufinamide, which has a new mechanism of action. The drug has been registered in Russia in 2015. The authors also describe their own experience of rufinamide usage in the treatment of drug-resistant focal epilepsy as a part of multicomponent therapy for polymorphic seizures. One patient achieved clinical remission for 16 months; the second one had more than 50 % decrease in seizures frequency with a remission of drop-attacks.

  7. Incidence of lesions as described by MRI in focal epilepsy of frontal and temporal onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, C.; Gruenwald, F.; Biersack, H.J.; Ostertun, B.; Solymosi, L.; Schild, H.; Bockisch, A.; Elger, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: Today, MRI is an integral part of the presurgical evaluation of patients suffering from partial epilepsy. These patients frequently show focal morphological abnormalities with potential epileptogenic character and surgical resection of these lesions is associated with superior postsurgical outcome as to seizure frequency. Apart from easily detectable defects, such as post-traumatic lesions or cerebral infarction, as wide variety of mainly small abnormalities can be detected using MRI. Methods: In this study, 484 patients suffering from partial epilepsy of temporal or frontal onset were evaluated for the incidence of different lesions in this population. Results: All lesions found were included without evaluating their potential epileptogenicity, which remains to be proven using other procedures (EEG, SPECT, PET, etc.). Involvement of the hippocampal formation was a major finding in temporal lobe epilepsy, which could be detected as sclerosis (T2w-images), atrophy (T2w-TSE or T1w-IR-images) or both (15%). In addition and in declining frequency various tumors (14%), post-traumatic lesion (-5%), and focal cortical dysplasia or other disturbances of cortical integrity (-4%) were found. These lesions are detectable with best contrast on different sequences. As a consequence it is suggested to acquire sequences in 3 dimensions including a T1w-SE, two (coronal and axial) double-echo-SE sequences and similarily two T1w-IR-sequences. The application of contrast media can be restricted to special questions, derived either from the first imaging results or from the patients history. Conclusion: Using qualitative data for interpretation, the sensitivity as to the detection of any focal pathology of a recent-generation MRI in this population was 75%, with 79% for temporal lobe epilepsies and 67% for frontal lobe epilepsies. Quantitative measurements of hippocampal volume or signal seem to be able to increase the sensitivity of the method. (orig.) [de

  8. 3 Tesla MRI-negative focal epilepsies: Presurgical evaluation, postoperative outcome and predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogias, Evangelos; Klingler, Jan-Helge; Urbach, Horst; Scheiwe, Christian; Schmeiser, Barbara; Doostkam, Soroush; Zentner, Josef; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias

    2017-12-01

    To investigate presurgical diagnostic modalities, clinical and seizure outcome as well as predictive factors after resective epilepsy surgery in 3 Tesla MRI-negative focal epilepsies. This retrospective study comprises 26 patients (11 males/15 females, mean age 34±12years, range 13-50 years) with 3 Tesla MRI-negative focal epilepsies who underwent resective epilepsy surgery. Non-invasive and invasive presurgical diagnostic modalities, type and localization of resection, clinical and epileptological outcome with a minimum follow-up of 1year (range 1-11 years, mean 2.5±2.3years) after surgery as well as outcome predictors were evaluated. All patients underwent invasive video-EEG monitoring after implantation of intracerebral depth and/or subdural electrodes. Ten patients received temporal and 16 extratemporal or multilobar (n=4) resections. There was no perioperative death or permanent morbidity. Overall, 12 of 26 patients (46%) were completely seizure-free (Engel IA) and 65% had a favorable outcome (Engel I-II). In particular, seizure-free ratio was 40% in the temporal and 50% in the extratemporal group. In the temporal group, long duration of epilepsy correlated with poor seizure outcome, whereas congruent unilateral FDG-PET hypometabolism correlated with a favorable outcome. In almost two thirds of temporal and extratemporal epilepsies defined as "non-lesional" by 3 Tesla MRI criteria, a favorable postoperative seizure outcome (Engel I-II) can be achieved with accurate multimodal presurgical evaluation including intracranial EEG recordings. In the temporal group, most favorable results were obtained when FDG-PET displayed congruent unilateral hypometabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The phenotypic spectrum of ARHGEF9 includes intellectual disability, focal epilepsy and febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl Martin; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Eilam, Anda; Gilad, Ronit; Blatt, Ilan; Rosenow, Felix; Kanaan, Moien; Helbig, Ingo; Afawi, Zaid

    2017-07-01

    Mutations or structural genomic alterations of the X-chromosomal gene ARHGEF9 have been described in male and female patients with intellectual disability. Hyperekplexia and epilepsy were observed to a variable degree, but incompletely described. Here, we expand the phenotypic spectrum of ARHGEF9 by describing a large Ethiopian-Jewish family with epilepsy and intellectual disability. The four affected male siblings, their unaffected parents and two unaffected female siblings were recruited and phenotyped. Parametric linkage analysis was performed using SNP microarrays. Variants from exome sequencing in two affected individuals were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. All affected male siblings had febrile seizures from age 2-3 years and intellectual disability. Three developed afebrile seizures between age 7-17 years. Three showed focal seizure semiology. None had hyperekplexia. A novel ARHGEF9 variant (c.967G>A, p.G323R, NM_015185.2) was hemizygous in all affected male siblings and heterozygous in the mother. This family reveals that the phenotypic spectrum of ARHGEF9 is broader than commonly assumed and includes febrile seizures and focal epilepsy with intellectual disability in the absence of hyperekplexia or other clinically distinguishing features. Our findings suggest that pathogenic variants in ARHGEF9 may be more common than previously assumed in patients with intellectual disability and mild epilepsy.

  10. 7T MRI in focal epilepsy with unrevealing conventional field strength imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Barba, Carmen; Tassi, Laura; Cosottini, Mirco; Tosetti, Michela; Costagli, Mauro; Bramerio, Manuela; Bartolini, Emanuele; Biagi, Laura; Cossu, Massimo; Pelliccia, Veronica; Symms, Mark R; Guerrini, Renzo

    2016-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic yield of 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and characterizing structural lesions in patients with intractable focal epilepsy and unrevealing conventional (1.5 or 3T) MRI. We conducted an observational clinical imaging study on 21 patients (17 adults and 4 children) with intractable focal epilepsy, exhibiting clinical and electroencephalographic features consistent with a single seizure-onset zone (SOZ) and unrevealing conventional MRI. Patients were enrolled at two tertiary epilepsy surgery centers and imaged at 7T, including whole brain (three-dimensional [3D] T1 -weighted [T1W] fast-spoiled gradient echo (FSPGR), 3D susceptibility-weighted angiography [SWAN], 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR]) and targeted imaging (2D T2*-weighted dual-echo gradient-recalled echo [GRE] and 2D gray-white matter tissue border enhancement [TBE] fast spin echo inversion recovery [FSE-IR]). MRI studies at 1.5 or 3T deemed unrevealing at the referral center were reviewed by three experts in epilepsy imaging. Reviewers were provided information regarding the suspected localization of the SOZ. The same team subsequently reviewed 7T images. Agreement in imaging interpretation was reached through consensus-based discussions based on visual identification of structural abnormalities and their likely correlation with clinical and electrographic data. 7T MRI revealed structural lesions in 6 (29%) of 21 patients. The diagnostic gain in detection was obtained using GRE and FLAIR images. Four of the six patients with abnormal 7T underwent epilepsy surgery. Histopathology revealed focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in all. In the remaining 15 patients (71%), 7T MRI remained unrevealing; 4 of the patients underwent epilepsy surgery and histopathologic evaluation revealed gliosis. 7T MRI improves detection of epileptogenic FCD that is not visible at conventional field strengths. A dedicated protocol including whole brain FLAIR and GRE images at 7T

  11. Value of repeat brain MRI in children with focal epilepsy and negative findings on initial MRI

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    Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jee Hun; Yoo, So Young; Hwang, Sook Min; Lee, Mun Hyang [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the value of repeat brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying potential epileptogenic lesions in children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy. Our Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. During a 15-year period, 257 children (148 boys and 109 girls) with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy were included. After re-evaluating both initial and repeat MRIs, positive results at repeat MRI were classified into potential epileptogenic lesions (malformation of cortical development and hippocampal sclerosis) and other abnormalities. Contributing factors for improved lesion conspicuity of the initially overlooked potential epileptogenic lesions were analyzed and classified into lesion factors and imaging factors. Repeat MRI was positive in 21% (55/257) and negative in 79% cases (202/257). Of the positive results, potential epileptogenic lesions comprised 49% (27/55) and other abnormalities comprised 11% of the cases (28/257). Potential epileptogenic lesions included focal cortical dysplasia (n = 11), hippocampal sclerosis (n = 10), polymicrogyria (n = 2), heterotopic gray matter (n = 2), microlissencephaly (n = 1), and cortical tumor (n = 1). Of these, seven patients underwent surgical resection. Contributing factors for new diagnoses were classified as imaging factors alone (n = 6), lesion factors alone (n = 2), both (n = 18), and neither (n = 1). Repeat MRI revealed positive results in 21% of the children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy, with 50% of the positive results considered as potential epileptogenic lesions. Enhanced MRI techniques or considering the chronological changes of lesions on MRI may improve the diagnostic yield for identification of potential epileptogenic lesions on repeat MRI.

  12. Value of repeat brain MRI in children with focal epilepsy and negative findings on initial MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jee Hun; Yoo, So Young; Hwang, Sook Min; Lee, Mun Hyang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the value of repeat brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying potential epileptogenic lesions in children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy. Our Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study and waived the requirement for informed consent. During a 15-year period, 257 children (148 boys and 109 girls) with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy were included. After re-evaluating both initial and repeat MRIs, positive results at repeat MRI were classified into potential epileptogenic lesions (malformation of cortical development and hippocampal sclerosis) and other abnormalities. Contributing factors for improved lesion conspicuity of the initially overlooked potential epileptogenic lesions were analyzed and classified into lesion factors and imaging factors. Repeat MRI was positive in 21% (55/257) and negative in 79% cases (202/257). Of the positive results, potential epileptogenic lesions comprised 49% (27/55) and other abnormalities comprised 11% of the cases (28/257). Potential epileptogenic lesions included focal cortical dysplasia (n = 11), hippocampal sclerosis (n = 10), polymicrogyria (n = 2), heterotopic gray matter (n = 2), microlissencephaly (n = 1), and cortical tumor (n = 1). Of these, seven patients underwent surgical resection. Contributing factors for new diagnoses were classified as imaging factors alone (n = 6), lesion factors alone (n = 2), both (n = 18), and neither (n = 1). Repeat MRI revealed positive results in 21% of the children with initial MRI-negative focal epilepsy, with 50% of the positive results considered as potential epileptogenic lesions. Enhanced MRI techniques or considering the chronological changes of lesions on MRI may improve the diagnostic yield for identification of potential epileptogenic lesions on repeat MRI

  13. Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures: three patients treated with the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Roberto; Noli, Daniel; Cachia, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    We present three patients with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures treated with the ketogenic diet. Between February 1, 2012 and January 31, 2014, three patients who met the diagnostic criteria for migrating focal seizures in infancy at our department were placed on the ketogenic diet and followed for a minimum of seven months. Two of the three children responded well to the ketogenic diet. One of these patients became seizure-free and his neuropsychological performance also significantly improved. The other child had a seizure reduction of 75% to 99% with only weekly seizures and moderate psychomotor improvement. For these two patients who responded well to the ketogenic diet, hospital admission was not required. The remaining patient had a seizure reduction of less than 50%. Tolerability of the diet was good in all three patients. Early treatment with the ketogenic diet should be considered for epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures to control seizures and status epilepticus, and avoid progressive cognitive impairment.

  14. Ear-EEG detects ictal and interictal abnormalities in focal and generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, I. C.; Kidmose, P.; Christensen, C. B.

    2017-01-01

    -EEG and scalp-EEG from 15 patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy. EEGs were compared visually by independent neurophysiologists. Correlation and time-frequency analysis was used to quantify the similarity between ear and scalp electrodes. Spike-averages were used to assess similarity of interictal...... and frequency dynamics can be observed from visual inspection and time-frequency analysis. Spike averages derived from ear-EEG electrodes yield a recognizable spike appearance. Conclusions Our results suggest that ear-EEG can reliably detect electroencephalographic patterns associated with focal temporal lobe...... seizures. Interictal spike morphology from sufficiently large temporal spike sources can be sampled using ear-EEG. Significance Ear-EEG is likely to become an important tool in clinical epilepsy monitoring and diagnosis....

  15. Temporal lobe epilepsy and focal cortical dysplasia in children: A tip to find the abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Luca; Whitehead, Matthew T; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Sepeta, Leigh N; Oluigbo, Chima O; Havens, Kathryn; Freilich, Emily R; Schreiber, John M; Gaillard, William D

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate an association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and pathologic characteristics in children who had surgery for medically refractory epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We retrospectively studied 110 children who had epilepsy surgery. Twenty-seven patients with FCD were included. Thirteen had temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 14 had extra-temporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE). Three patients had associated mesial temporal sclerosis. Preoperative 3T MRIs interleaved with nine controls were blindly re-reviewed and categorized according to signal alteration. Pathologic specimens were classified according to the 2011 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and compared to MRI studies. Rates of pathology subtypes differed between TLE and ETLE (χ 2 (3) = 8.57, p = 0.04). FCD type I was more frequent in TLE, whereas FCD type II was more frequent in ETLE. In the TLE group, nine patients had temporal tip abnormalities. They all exhibited gray-white matter blurring with decreased myelination and white matter hyperintense signal. Blurring involved the whole temporal tip, not just the area of dysplasia. These patients were less likely to demonstrate cortical thickening compared to those without temporal tip findings (χ 2 (1) = 9.55, p = 0.002). Three of them had FCD Ib, three had FCD IIa, two had FCD IIIa, and one had FCD IIb; MRI features could not entirely distinguish between FCD subtypes. TLE patients showed more pronounced findings than ETLE on MRI (χ 2 (1) = 11.95, p = 0.003, odds ratio [OR] 18.00). In all cases of FCD, isolated blurring was more likely to be associated with FCD II, whereas blurring with decreased myelination was seen with FCD I (χ 2 (6) = 13.07, p = 0.042). Our study described associations between MRI characteristics and pathology in children with FCD and offered a detailed analysis of temporal lobe tip abnormalities and FCD subtypes in children with TLE. These findings may contribute to the

  16. Determining the relationship between sleep architecture, seizure variables and memory in patients with focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A; Ricci, Monica; van Schalkwijk, Frank J; Mohamed, Armin; van der Werf, Ysbrand D

    2016-06-01

    Sleep has been shown to be important to memory. Both sleep and memory have been found to be abnormal in patients with epilepsy. In this study, we explored the effects that nocturnal epileptiform discharges and the presence of a hippocampal lesion have on sleep patterns and memory. Twenty-five patients with focal epilepsy who underwent a 24-hr ambulatory EEG also completed the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (EMQ). The EEG record was scored for length of time spent in the various sleep stages, time spent awake after sleep onset, and rapid eye movement (REM) latency. Of these sleep variables, only REM latency differed when the epilepsy patients were divided on the bases of either presence/absence of nocturnal discharges or presence/absence of a hippocampal lesion. In both cases, presence of the abnormality was associated with longer latency. Furthermore, longer REM latency was found to be a better predictor of EMQ score than either number of discharges or presence of a hippocampal lesion. Longer REM latency was associated with a smaller percentage of time spent in slow-wave sleep in the early part of the night and may serve as a particularly sensitive marker to disturbances in sleep architecture. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Young woman with a four-year history of epilepsy and progressive focal cortical atrophy — What is the diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of disease progression in drug-refractory epilepsy is poorly understood. We report the case of a young woman with a four-year history of epilepsy that progressed rapidly as evidenced by the development of progressive focal cortical atrophy. She underwent biopsy that showed perinatal ischemia and a prominent inflammatory response, including T-cell infiltration and microglial activation. There was no consensus reached on the final diagnosis although the hypothesis of dual pathology (adult variant of Rasmussen's encephalitis and perinatal stroke was considered. The possible role of inflammation in the progression of epilepsy caused by a “static” lesion (perinatal stroke is discussed.

  18. Early classification of childhood focal idiopathic epilepsies: is it possible at the first seizure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Roberto; Pistorio, Angela; Pignatelli, Sara; Rossi, Alessandra; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Striano, Pasquale; Verrotti, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the possibility of early syndrome classification of idiopathic partial epilepsies in children at the first seizure. In this observational study we prospectively evaluated 298 patients, aged between 1 month and 17 years and consecutively referred for the first unprovoked focal seizure. The whole cohort included 133 patients; the final analysis was carried out on 107 (59 males) individuals. Age at the first seizure ranged between 2.3 and 13.0 years. Clinical and EEG data of all patients were independently reviewed by two medical doctors. Patients were followed-up for at least 5 years, with a mean period of follow-up of 6.9 years. After the first seizure, a specific syndrome could be diagnosed in eighty (74.7%) children. In particular, Childhood Epilepsy with Centro-Temporal Spikes (CECTS) 42.9% of cases, Panayiotopoulos Syndrome (PS) 28.9%, idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut (ICOE-G) 2.8%. Unclassified cases were 25.4%. At the end of the follow-up, the diagnosis was confirmed in 72 of 80 children (90%): BCECTS 89% of patients, PS 90% and ICOE-G 100%: among the unclassified cases, in 11 patients (40.7%) the diagnosis did not change, whereas 16 patients (59.3%) evolved into other syndromes or into atypical forms. At the onset an initial diagnosis is possible in the majority of cases; epilepsy syndromes can be identified at the time of the initial diagnosis and at follow up this diagnosis has not to be revised in 90% of the cases. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sex differences in human epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivanka

    2014-09-01

    In the majority of neuropsychiatric conditions, marked gender-based differences have been found in the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and therapy of disease. Emerging data suggest that gender differences exist also in the epidemiology, and pathophysiology of epilepsy. The present review summarizes the current information regarding gender and epilepsy. These differences are regarded from the perspective of innate sex differences in cerebral morphology, structural and functional connections, and assuming that these differences may render men and women differently vulnerable to epileptogenicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental focal neocortical epilepsy is associated with reduced white matter volume growth : results from multiparametric MRI analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, Wim; van Meer, Maurits P A; van der Marel, Kajo; Zwartbol, René; Viergever, Max A.; Braun, Kees P J; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal epilepsy has recently been associated with remote white matter damage, including reduced white matter volume. Longitudinal assessment of these white matter changes, in relation to functional mechanisms and consequences, may be ideally done by in vivo neuroimaging in well-controlled

  1. Improvement of visual field defects after focal resection for occipital lobe epilepsy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Hamasaki, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo; Yamada, Kazumichi

    2018-03-01

    Improvement of visual field defects after surgical treatment for occipital lobe epilepsy is rare. Here, the authors report on a 24-year-old man with a 15-year history of refractory epilepsy that developed after he had undergone an occipital craniotomy to remove a cerebellar astrocytoma at the age of 4. His seizures started with an elementary visual aura, followed by secondary generalized tonic-clonic convulsion. Perimetry revealed left-sided incomplete hemianopia, and MRI showed an old contusion in the right occipital lobe. After evaluation with ictal video-electroencephalography, electrocorticography, and mapping of the visual cortex with subdural electrodes, the patient underwent resection of the scarred tissue, including the epileptic focus at the occipital lobe. After surgery, he became seizure free and his visual field defect improved gradually. In addition, postoperative 123 I-iomazenil (IMZ) SPECT showed partly normalized IMZ uptake in the visual cortex. This case is a practical example suggesting that neurological deficits attributable to the functional deficit zone can be remedied by successful focal resection.

  2. Left frontal meningioangiomatosis associated with type IIIc focal cortical dysplasia causing refractory epilepsy and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Alexandre; Mellerio, Charles; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Still, Megan; Zerah, Michel; Bourgeois, Marie; Pallud, Johan

    2018-03-29

    We report the surgical management of a lesional drug-resistant epilepsy caused by a meningioangiomatosis associated with a type IIIc focal cortical dysplasia located in the left supplementary motor area in a young male patient. A first anatomical-based partial surgical resection was performed at 11 years old under general anaesthesia without intraoperative mapping, which allowed for postoperative seizure control (Engel IA) for six years. The patient then presented with intractable right sensatory and aphasic focal onset seizures despite two appropriate antiepileptic drugs. A second functional-based surgical resection was performed using intraoperative cortico-subcortical functional mapping with direct electrical stimulation under awake conditions. A complete surgical resection was performed and a left partial supplementary motor area syndrome was observed. At six postoperative months, the patient is seizure free (Engel IA) with an ongoing decrease in antiepileptic drug therapy. Intraoperative functional brain mapping can be applied to preserve the brain function and networks around a meningioangiomatosis to facilitate the resection of potentially epileptogenic perilesional dysplastic cortex and to tailor the extent of resection to functional boundaries. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Effects of focal brain cooling on extracellular concentrations of neurotransmitters in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Sadahiro; Inoue, Takao; Imoto, Hirochika; Suehiro, Eiichi; Maruta, Yuichi; Hirayama, Yuya; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2017-04-01

    Brain hypothermia controls epileptic discharge and reduces extracellular concentrations of glutamate (Glu), an excitatory neurotransmitter. We aimed to determine the effects of focal brain cooling (FBC) on levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter. The relationship between Glu or GABA concentrations and the severity of epileptic symptoms was also analyzed. Patients with intractable epilepsy underwent FBC at lesionectomized (n = 11) or hippocampectomized (n = 8) regions at 15°C for 30 min using custom-made cooling devices. Concentrations of Glu (n = 18) and GABA (n = 12) were measured in extracellular fluid obtained through microdialysis using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The reduction rate of neurotransmitter levels and its relationship with electrocorticography (ECoG) signal changes in response to FBC were measured. We found no relationship between the concentrations of Glu or GABA and seizure severity. There was a significant decrease in the concentration of Glu to 66.3% of control levels during the cooling period (p = 0.001). This rate of reduction correlated with ECoG power (r 2 = 0.68). Cortical and hippocampal GABA levels significantly (p = 0.02) and nonsignificantly decreased to 47.7% and 32.4% of control levels, respectively. However, the rate of this reduction did not correlate with ECoG (r 2 = 0.11). Although the decrease in hippocampal GABA levels was not significant due to wide variations in its concentration, the levels of cortical GABA and Glu were decreased following FBC. FBC suppresses epileptic discharge and the release of both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. The reduction in Glu levels further contributes to the reduction in epileptic discharge. However, the reduction in the levels of GABA has no impact on ECoG. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Small Lesion Size Is Associated with Sleep-Related Epilepsy in Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type II

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    Bo Jin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the neuroimaging and clinical features associated with sleep-related epilepsy (SRE in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD type II.MethodsPatients with histopathologically proven FCD type II were included from three epilepsy centers. SRE was defined according to the video EEG findings and seizure history. Cortical surface reconstruction and volume calculation were performed using FreeSurfer. The lesions were manually delineated on T1 volumetric MRI using the ITK-SNAP software. The lesion volumes were normalized by the intracranial volume of each patient. The lesions were classified as small or large by placing a threshold based on quantitative (whether the lesion was detected on MRI report and qualitative (volume criteria.ResultsA total of 77 consecutive patients were included. Of them, 36 had SRE and 41 had non-SRE. An earlier age of epilepsy onset, high seizure frequency, regional interictal EEG findings, and favorable surgical outcome were characteristic in both groups. Small lesions were defined as those having a volume <3,217 mm3. In total, 60.9% of the patients with SRE (25/41 had small FCD lesion, which was significantly higher than the non-SRE group (9/34, 26.5%, p = 0.005. Small lesion size was the only predictor significantly associated with SRE in the overall type II group by multivariate analyses (p = 0.016. Although the proportion of patients who had frontal FCD and SRE was higher than non-frontal FCD (54.5 vs. 27.3%, p = 0.043, the relationship between SRE and lesion location was not confirmed by multivariate analysis. Thalamic volume and seizure semiology were not statistically different between the SRE and non-SRE group. The significant association between lesion size and SRE was reproducible in type IIb and IIa subgroups.SignificanceSRE is common in patients with FCD type II. Small FCD type II lesions are significantly associated with SRE. Although our findings cannot be applied to

  5. Expression and cellular distribution of multidrug transporter proteins in two major causes of medically intractable epilepsy: Focal cortical dysplasia and glioneuronal tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, E.; Gorter, J. A.; Jansen, G. H.; van Veelen, C. W. M.; van Rijen, P. C.; Leenstra, S.; Ramkema, M.; Scheffer, G. L.; Scheper, R. J.; Troost, D.

    2003-01-01

    The cell-specific distribution of multidrug resistance extrusion pumps was studied in developmental glioneuronal lesions, including focal cortical dysplasia (15 cases) and ganglioglioma (15 cases) from patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Lesional, perilesional, as well as normal brain

  6. In vivo inhibition of incorporation of (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into proteins in experimental focal epilepsy

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    Coutinho-Netto, J.; Boyar, M.M.; Abdul-Ghani, A.S.; Bradford, H.F.

    1982-08-01

    The in vivo incorporation of (/sup 14/C) from (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose into rat brain proteins from different cortical areas was examined in three different experimental focal epilepsies: cobalt, freeze-lesions, and tityustoxin. When (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose was injected intraperitoneally into awake and unrestrained animals with marked signs of epileptic hyperactivity, the inhibition of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-amino acids into trichloracetic acid (TCA)-insoluble proteins was highest in the focal (sensorimotor) area when compared with distant regions (approx. 60%), but less when compared with the contralateral (sensorimotor) region (approx. 23%). Greatly decreased incorporation caused by both cobalt and freeze-lesion-induced epilepsies was also observed in the contralateral area when a comparison was made with distant regions (approx. 50%), but there were no significant differences in protein-specific radioactivity between the different distant areas.

  7. Differences in Memory Functioning between Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and/or Focal Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sylvia E.; Kibby, Michelle Y.; Cohen, Morris J.; Stanford, Lisa; Park, Yong; Strickland, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has shown that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and epilepsy are frequently comorbid and that both disorders are associated with various attention and memory problems. Nonetheless, limited research has been conducted comparing the two disorders in one sample to determine unique versus shared deficits. Hence, we investigated differences in working memory and short-term and delayed recall between children with ADHD, focal epilepsy of mixed foci, comorbid ADHD/epilepsy and controls. Participants were compared on the Core subtests and the Picture Locations subtest of the Children’s Memory Scale (CMS). Results indicated that children with ADHD displayed intact verbal working memory and long-term memory (LTM), as well as intact performance on most aspects of short-term memory (STM). They performed worse than controls on Numbers Forward and Picture Locations, suggesting problems with focused attention and simple span for visual-spatial material. Conversely, children with epilepsy displayed poor focused attention and STM regardless of modality assessed, which affected encoding into LTM. The only loss over time was found for passages (Stories). Working memory was intact. Children with comorbid ADHD/epilepsy displayed focused attention and STM/LTM problems consistent with both disorders, having the lowest scores across the four groups. Hence, focused attention and visual-spatial span appear to be affected in both disorders, whereas additional STM/encoding problems are specific to epilepsy. Children with comorbid ADHD/epilepsy have deficits consistent with both disorders, with slight additive effects. This study suggests that attention and memory testing should be a regular part of the evaluation of children with epilepsy and ADHD. PMID:26156331

  8. Accelerated long-term forgetting in focal epilepsies with special consideration given to patients with diagnosed and suspected limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstaedter, Christoph; Winter, Babette; Melzer, Nico; Lohmann, Hubertus; Witt, Juri-Alexander

    2018-01-31

    Accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) is a phenomenon found in late onset epilepsy and in transient epileptic amnesia (TEA). Here we evaluated ALF in patients with focal epilepsies and limbic encephalitis (LE) in particular. ALF was assessed in 36 patients with focal epilepsy and 154 healthy subjects using an extended version of the Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT), with free recall after 30 min and again after one week. From these patients, 89% had temporal lobe epilepsy; 42% left-lateralized; 39% right; 19% bilateral; 17% were diagnosed with hippocampal sclerosis; 64% displayed features indicating LE; 52% with amygdala pathology, and 61% were antibody positive. ALF was defined as either having unimpaired free recall after 30 min and impaired recall after a week (A) or as a loss in recall exceeding the absolute (B) and percentage loss (C) in the interval of the 30 min and one week recall seen in controls by more than one standard deviation. Repeated measures analysis revealed an association between LE and ALF. Depending on its definition (A, B, or C), ALF was evident in 31%, 42%, or 67% of the patients. Poor verbal memory and ALF (C) were prominent in left-lateralized epilepsies. ALF (A) appeared more frequently in auto-antibody negative patients with LE, ALF (B) less frequently with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures during the interval did not explain ALF. Depending on its definition, ALF is seen in patients with normal or impaired memory at ½ h. ALF seems related to LE but might as well be the first sign of memory impairment in patients with milder epilepsies and not yet definite structural temporal lobe pathology. Longitudinal assessment would be essential for discerning when ALF becomes evident, whether conditions exist in which ALF precedes short-term forgetting, and whether ALF responds to treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. KANSL1 variation is not a major contributing factor in self-limited focal epilepsy syndromes of childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A Myers

    Full Text Available KANSL1 haploinsufficiency causes Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS, characterized by dysmorphic features and intellectual disability; amiable personality, congenital malformations and seizures also commonly occur. The epilepsy phenotypic spectrum in KdVS is broad, but most individuals have focal seizures with some having a phenotype resembling the self-limited focal epilepsies of childhood (SFEC. We hypothesized that variants in KANSL1 contribute to pathogenesis of SFEC.We screened KANSL1 for single nucleotide variants in 90 patients with SFEC. We then screened a cohort of 208 patients with two specific SFEC syndromes, childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (CECTS and atypical childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (ACECTS for KANSL1 variants. The second cohort was also used to evaluate minor allelic variants that appeared overrepresented in the initial cohort.One variant, p.Lys104Thr, was predicted damaging and appeared overrepresented in our 90-patient cohort compared to Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD allele frequency (0.217 to 0.116, with no homozygotes in gnomAD. However, there was no difference in p.Lys104Thr allele frequency in the follow-up CECTS/ACECTS cohort and controls. Four rare KANSL1 variants of uncertain significance were identified in the CECTS/ACECTS cohort.Our data do not support a major role for KANSL1 variants in pathogenesis of SFEC.

  10. Optimising EEG-fMRI for Localisation of Focal Epilepsy in Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Centeno

    Full Text Available Early surgical intervention in children with drug resistant epilepsy has benefits but requires using tolerable and minimally invasive tests. EEG-fMRI studies have demonstrated good sensitivity for the localization of epileptic focus but a poor yield although the reasons for this have not been systematically addressed. While adults EEG-fMRI studies are performed in the "resting state"; children are commonly sedated however, this has associated risks and potential confounds. In this study, we assessed the impact of the following factors on the tolerability and results of EEG-fMRI in children: viewing a movie inside the scanner; movement; occurrence of interictal epileptiform discharges (IED; scan duration and design efficiency. This work's motivation is to optimize EEG-fMRI parameters to make this test widely available to paediatric population.Forty-six children with focal epilepsy and 20 controls (6-18 underwent EEG-fMRI. For two 10 minutes sessions subjects were told to lie still with eyes closed, as it is classically performed in adult studies ("rest sessions", for another two sessions, subjects watched a child friendly stimulation i.e. movie ("movie sessions". IED were mapped with EEG-fMRI for each session and across sessions. The resulting maps were classified as concordant/discordant with the presumed epileptogenic focus for each subject.Movement increased with scan duration, but the movie reduced movement by ~40% when played within the first 20 minutes. There was no effect of movie on the occurrence of IED, nor in the concordance of the test. Ability of EEG-fMRI to map the epileptogenic region was similar for the 20 and 40 minute scan durations. Design efficiency was predictive of concordance.A child friendly natural stimulus improves the tolerability of EEG-fMRI and reduces in-scanner movement without having an effect on IED occurrence and quality of EEG-fMRI maps. This allowed us to scan children as young as 6 and obtain localising

  11. Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  12. Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18[F]FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18[F]FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references

  13. Real-life memory and spatial navigation in patients with focal epilepsy: ecological validity of a virtual reality supermarket task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, P; Lahr, D; Kohsik, A; Dyck, E; Markowitsch, H J; Bien, C G; Botsch, M; Piefke, M

    2014-02-01

    Ecological assessment and training of real-life cognitive functions such as visual-spatial abilities in patients with epilepsy remain challenging. Some studies have applied virtual reality (VR) paradigms, but external validity of VR programs has not sufficiently been proven. Patients with focal epilepsy (EG, n=14) accomplished an 8-day program in a VR supermarket, which consisted of learning and buying items on a shopping list. Performance of the EG was compared with that of healthy controls (HCG, n=19). A comprehensive neuropsychological examination was administered. Real-life performance was investigated in a real supermarket. Learning in the VR supermarket was significantly impaired in the EG on different VR measures. Delayed free recall of products did not differ between the EG and the HCG. Virtual reality scores were correlated with neuropsychological measures of visual-spatial cognition, subjective estimates of memory, and performance in the real supermarket. The data indicate that our VR approach allows for the assessment of real-life visual-spatial memory and cognition in patients with focal epilepsy. The multimodal, active, and complex VR paradigm may particularly enhance visual-spatial cognitive resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transient attenuation of visual evoked potentials during focal status epilepticus in a patient with occipital lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Hsu, Shih-Pin; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chang, Chen-Sheng; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2010-06-01

    Seizures originating in the occipital areas are relatively uncommon. They are usually characterized by visual hallucinations and illusions or other symptoms related to the eyes and vision. In a 54-year-old woman with occipital lobe epilepsy, complex visual hallucinations, illusions, and migraine-like headache constitute the major clinical manifestations. During focal status epilepticus, ictal electroencephalography revealed rhythmic focal spikes in the right occipital region, rapidly propagating to the right parietal and contralateral occipital areas. Ictal brain single-photon emission computed topography revealed hyperperfusion of the right occipital region. Using a full-field pattern-shift visual evoked potential (VEP) study, we found that the P100 responses on both sides were markedly attenuated in amplitude during occipital focal status epilepticus, whereas the latencies of the VEPs were normal. The amplitude and morphology of P100 responses on both sides, however, returned to the normal range 7 days after cessation of the seizures. In addition to clinical seizure semiology, scalp EEG, SPECT and neuroimaging studies, VEP studies may be used as a supplementary examination tool to provide further information in the patients with occipital lobe seizures or epilepsies.

  15. Focal epilepsy presenting as a bath-induced paroxysmal event/breath-holding attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Stutchfield

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Water reflex epilepsy can mimic a range of other conditions, and a high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis. Children with water reflex epilepsy can achieve a good quality of life with modified bathing and appropriate antiepileptic medication.

  16. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epilepsia What Is Epilepsy? Epilepsy comes from a Greek word meaning "to hold or seize," and people ... for epilepsy than somebody whose family has no history of seizures. How Can Doctors Help? If a ...

  17. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) induced by oxcarbazepine in idiopathic focal epilepsy in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlidis, Elena; Rubboli, Guido; Nikanorova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) is an age-related disorder characterized by neuropsychological regression, epilepsy and a typical EEG pattern of continuous epileptiform activity (> 85%) during NREM sleep. Cases of worsening or induction of ESES with phenytoin...

  18. Characterization of functional and structural integrity in experimental focal epilepsy: reduced network efficiency coincides with white matter changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem M Otte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although focal epilepsies are increasingly recognized to affect multiple and remote neural systems, the underlying spatiotemporal pattern and the relationships between recurrent spontaneous seizures, global functional connectivity, and structural integrity remain largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we utilized serial resting-state functional MRI, graph-theoretical analysis of complex brain networks and diffusion tensor imaging to characterize the evolution of global network topology, functional connectivity and structural changes in the interictal brain in relation to focal epilepsy in a rat model. Epileptic networks exhibited a more regular functional topology than controls, indicated by a significant increase in shortest path length and clustering coefficient. Interhemispheric functional connectivity in epileptic brains decreased, while intrahemispheric functional connectivity increased. Widespread reductions of fractional anisotropy were found in white matter regions not restricted to the vicinity of the epileptic focus, including the corpus callosum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our longitudinal study on the pathogenesis of network dynamics in epileptic brains reveals that, despite the locality of the epileptogenic area, epileptic brains differ in their global network topology, connectivity and structural integrity from healthy brains.

  19. Ear-EEG detects ictal and interictal abnormalities in focal and generalized epilepsy - A comparison with scalp EEG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibrandtsen, I C; Kidmose, P; Christensen, C B; Kjaer, T W

    2017-12-01

    Ear-EEG is recording of electroencephalography from a small device in the ear. This is the first study to compare ictal and interictal abnormalities recorded with ear-EEG and simultaneous scalp-EEG in an epilepsy monitoring unit. We recorded and compared simultaneous ear-EEG and scalp-EEG from 15 patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy. EEGs were compared visually by independent neurophysiologists. Correlation and time-frequency analysis was used to quantify the similarity between ear and scalp electrodes. Spike-averages were used to assess similarity of interictal spikes. There were no differences in sensitivity or specificity for seizure detection. Mean correlation coefficient between ear-EEG and nearest scalp electrode was above 0.6 with a statistically significant decreasing trend with increasing distance away from the ear. Ictal morphology and frequency dynamics can be observed from visual inspection and time-frequency analysis. Spike averages derived from ear-EEG electrodes yield a recognizable spike appearance. Our results suggest that ear-EEG can reliably detect electroencephalographic patterns associated with focal temporal lobe seizures. Interictal spike morphology from sufficiently large temporal spike sources can be sampled using ear-EEG. Ear-EEG is likely to become an important tool in clinical epilepsy monitoring and diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieser, H.G. [University Hospital, Dep. of Neurology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    PET has added valuable information to our knowledge of the human epilepsies. The most important observations have been the identification of localized regions of interictal cerebral dysfunction in patients with partial epilepsy, revealed with PET as local hypometabolism, hypoperfusion, or (in one study) enhanced {mu}opiate receptor binding. The following general conclusions about the anatomy of epilepsy can be drawn from interictal PET studies: (1) interictal neuronal dysfunction is not limited to the site of ictal onset, nor to brain areas immediately adjacent to structural damage, (2) temporal lobe dysfunction is most commonly encountered, usually in association with primary epileptogenic lesions in mesial temporal structures, but also on occasion with lateral temporal or extratemporal epileptogenic lesions which preferentially propagate to mesial temporal structures to give rise to complex partial seizures. It is now accepted that interictal {sup 18}F-FDG PET correctly lateralises the primarily epileptic temporal lobe in approximately 70% of patients. As a consequence of inclusion of PET into the UCLA presurgical evaluation protocol, Engel et al. were able to operate on 28% of the patients without using invasive methods, (3) local isolated neocortical dysfunction associated with simple partial seizures is only rarely revealed by PET, (4) remote interictal cerebral dysfunction associated with complex partial seizures is not necessarily limited to the involved TL, since contralateral temporal, extemporal neocortical and cerebral dysfunction may also be seen, (5) a variety of anatomical patterns of interictal cerebral dysfunction occur in secondary generalized epilepsies, which may be related to symptoms and signs, (6) no diffuse or localized interictal cerebral dysfunction has been identified by PET in patients with primary generalized childhood absence seizures. (author) 29 refs.

  1. Psychiatric comorbidity in patients with two prototypes of focal versus generalized epilepsy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Gerardo Maria de Araújo; Mazetto, Lenon; da Silva, Joyce Macedo; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2011-06-01

    The frequency of psychiatric disorders (PD) in a homogeneous series of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS) compared to patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) was evaluated, aiming to determine the frequency of PD and possible differences in psychiatric diagnoses between these two epileptic syndromes. Data from 248 patients with refractory TLE-MTS and from 124 JME patients were reviewed and compared. There was a high prevalence of PD in both groups of epilepsy patients, present in 100 TLE-MTS (41%) and in 58 JME patients (46.7%). Mood (23.7%), anxiety (13.7%) and psychotic (11.6%) disorders were the most frequent diagnoses in TLE-MTS group, while mood and anxiety disorders (25% and 21%, respectively) were the most common PD among JME. Psychoses were significantly associated with TLE-MTS (p=0.01). These observations are concordant with our previous study, reforcing the existence of a possible anatomic correlation of PD and brain structures involved in both epilepsy syndromes. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Adult patients treated for focal epilepsy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in combination in France: description according to the 2009 ILAE definition of AED resistance (ESPERA study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespignani, H; de Zélicourt, M; Laurendeau, C; Fagnani, F; Levy-Bachelot, L; Murat, C; Kahane, P; de Toffol, B

    2014-02-01

    To describe the adult population treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in combination for focal epilepsy according to the definition of AED resistance proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) in 2009 and to evaluate its implementation in current practice. ESPERA was a multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study with a clinical data collection covering the past 12 months conducted by neurologists. Classifications according to AED responsiveness established by investigators for each enrolled patient were revised by two experts. Seventy-one neurologists enrolled 405 patients. Their mean age was 42.7 years (sex-ratioM/F 0.98). According to the investigators, 60% of epilepsies were drug-resistant, 37% drug-responsive and 3% had an undefined drug-responsiveness. After revision of experts, 71% of epilepsies were classified as drug resistant, 22% as responsive and 7% as undefined. Among the participating neurologists, 76% have made at least one error in classifying their patients according to the 2009 ILAE definition of AED resistance. Because of epilepsy, 24% of patients (age≤65) were inactive and 42% could not drive (respectively 29 and 49% of patients with AED resistant epilepsy). Half of patients had at least one other chronic condition. Number of prescribed drugs in combination and health care resource utilisation were significantly higher in patients with drug-resistant epilepsies than in patients with drug responsive epilepsies. ESPERA study shows that the use of new definition of drug-resistance in everyday practice seems difficult without any additional training and that the social and professional disability is frequent in adults with focal epilepsies treated with polytherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The delta between postoperative seizure freedom and persistence: Automatically detected focal slow waves after epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Schönherr

    2017-01-01

    Significance: The quantity of delta activity could be used as a diagnostic marker for recurrent seizures. The close relation to epileptic spike localizations and the resection volume of patients with successful second surgery imply involvement in seizure recurrence. This initial evidence suggests a potential application in the planning of second epilepsy surgery.

  4. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems. Other Organizations Epilepsy Foundation National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Questions Questions to Ask Your Doctor What causes epilepsy? What are symptoms other than seizures? What should ...

  5. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  6. Sequential motor task (Luria's Fist-Edge-Palm Test in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Silvia Molleis Galego Miziara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the sequential motor manual actions in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and compares the results with matched control group, through the application of Luria's fist-edge-palm test. The children with BECTS underwent interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and School Performance Test (SPT. Significant difference occurred between the study and control groups for manual motor action through three equal and three different movements. Children with lower school performance had higher error rate in the imitation of hand gestures. Another factor significantly associated with the failure was the abnormality in SPECT. Children with BECTS showed abnormalities in the test that evaluated manual motor programming/planning. This study may suggest that the functional changes related to epileptiform activity in rolandic region interfere with the executive function in children with BECTS.

  7. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eventually become less frequent or disappear altogether. What Causes Epilepsy? This's no clear-cut answer to why people ... epilepsy. Often doctors can't pinpoint the exact cause of a person's epilepsy. But scientists do know that some things can ...

  8. Surgical treatment for medically refractory focal epilepsy in a patient with fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmuir, Cynthia; Richardson, Mark; Ghearing, Gena

    2015-10-01

    Medication resistant temporal lobe epilepsy occurs in a small population of patients with fragile X syndrome. We present the case of a 24-year-old man with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and fragile X syndrome who underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy resulting in cessation of seizures. Our patient was diagnosed with fragile X syndrome with a fully mutated, fully methylated FMR1 gene resulting in 572 CGG repeats. He developed seizures initially controlled with Depakote monotherapy, but progressed to become medically refractive to combination treatment with Depakote, lamotrigine and zonisamide. Prolonged video EEG monitoring revealed interictal left temporal sharp waves and slowing as well as subclinical and clinical seizures, each with left temporal onset. 3T MRI was consistent with left mesial temporal sclerosis. After discussing the case in our multidisciplinary surgical epilepsy conference, he was referred for presurgical evaluation including neuropsychological testing and Wada testing. He underwent an asleep left anterior temporal lobectomy, sparing the superior temporal gyrus. Pathology showed neuronal loss and gliosis in the hippocampus and amygdala. Twelve months after surgery, the patient has not experienced a seizure. He is described by his parents as less perseverative and less restless. We have presented the case of a 24 year-old-man with fragile X syndrome who underwent successful left anterior temporal lobectomy for the treatment of medically refractory epilepsy who is now seizure free without further functional impairment. This case report demonstrates the feasibility of surgical treatment for a patient with comorbid fragile X syndrome and mesial temporal sclerosis. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and clas......-sification. More than two thirds of patients with epilepsy can obtain complete seizure control. The remainders, counting around 12.000 patients in Denmark, having medical refractory epilepsy should be considered for other treatment options; epilepsy surgery or other non-pharmacological treatment....

  10. Aspectos clínicos y electroencefalográficos de la epilepsia focal en el niño Clinical and electroencephalographic features of focal epilepsy present in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albia Pozo Alonso

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue caracterizar un grupo de pacientes con epilepsias focales, según aspectos clínicos y electroencefalográficos. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo y prospectivo de 185 niños con diagnóstico de epilepsia focal (2 o más crisis epilépticas no provocadas, con edades entre un mes y 14 años, que fueron hospitalizados en el Departamento de Neuropediatría del Hospital «William Soler» entre diciembre de 2001 y diciembre de 2003. RESULTADOS. La edad media de inicio de la primera crisis epiléptica fue de 5 años. El tipo de crisis epiléptica focal más frecuente fue la simple (49,2 %. El 48,6 % de los niños presentó etiología idiopática y el 33,0 % sintomática. Los factores de la etiología sintomática más frecuentes fueron los prenatales (56,2 %. El 91,4 % de los pacientes presentó electroencefalogramas iniciales interictales anormales. El electroencefalograma focal se observó en el 37,3 % de los niños y el multifocal en el 24,9 %. El síndrome epiléptico más frecuente fue la epilepsia benigna con puntas centrotemporales (5,9 %. CONCLUSIONES. Los niños con epilepsia focal tienen variadas manifestaciones clínicas y electroencefalográficas, y en la mayoría de los pacientes no es posible identificar un síndrome epiléptico.INTRODUCTION: The aim of present paper was to characterize a group of patients presenting with focal epilepsies by clinical and electroencephalographic features. METHODS: Authors made a descriptive and cross-sectional study in 185 children diagnosed with focal epilepsy (two or more non-provoked epilepsy crises, aged from one month to 14, admitted in Neurology Department of "William Soler" Children Hospital between December 2001 to December 2003. RESULTS: Mean age of the first epilepsy crisis was at 5 years. The more frequent type of focal epilepsy crisis was the simple one (49, 2%. The 48, 6% of children presented with a idiopathic origin, and the 33

  11. Initial experience in hybrid PET-MRI for evaluation of refractory focal onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hae W; Jewells, Valerie; Sheikh, Arif; Zhang, Jingwen; Zhu, Hongtu; An, Hongyu; Gao, Wei; Shen, Dinggang; Hadar, Eldad; Lin, Weili

    2015-09-01

    We aim to evaluate the utility/improved accuracy of hybrid PET/MR compared to current practice separate 3T MRI and PET-CT imaging for localization of seizure foci. In a pilot study, twenty-nine patients undergoing epilepsy surgery evaluation were imaged using PET/MR. This subject group had 29 previous clinical 3T MRI as well as 12 PET-CT studies. Prior clinical PET and MR images were read sequentially while the hybrid PET/MR was concurrently read. The median interval between hybrid PET/MR and prior imaging studies was 5 months (range 1-77 months). In 24 patients, there was no change in the read between the clinical exams and hybrid PET/MR while new anatomical or functional lesions were identified by hybrid PET/MR in 5 patients without significant clinical change. Four new anatomical MR lesions were seen with concordant PET findings. The remaining patient revealed a new abnormal PET lesion without an MR abnormality. All new PET/MR lesions were clinically significant with concordant EEG and/or SPECT results as potential epileptic foci. Our initial hybrid PET-MRI experience increased diagnostic yields for detection of potential epileptic lesions. This may be due to the unique advantage of improved co-registration and simultaneous review of both structural and functional data. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The diminishing dominance of the dominant hemisphere: Language fMRI in focal epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Tailby

    2017-01-01

    Our data highlight the importance of considering language as a complex task where lateralisation varies at the subhemispheric scale. This is especially important for presurgical planning for focal resections where the concept of ‘hemispheric dominance’ may be misleading. This is a precision medicine approach that enables objective evaluation of language dominance within specific brain regions and can reveal surprising and unexpected anomalies that may be clinically important for individual cases.

  13. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Aulich, A. [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Reifenberger, G. [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kiwit, J.C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[{sup 123}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  14. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J.; Aulich, A.; Reifenberger, G.; Kiwit, J.C.W.; Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D.

    2000-01-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[ 123 I]iodo-α-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  15. Alteration of consciousness in focal epilepsy: the global workspace alteration theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Fabrice; McGonigal, Aileen; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of consciousness (AOC) is an important clinical manifestation of partial seizures that greatly impacts the quality of life of patients with epilepsy. Several theories have been proposed in the last fifty years. An emerging concept in neurology is the global workspace (GW) theory that postulates that access to consciousness (from several sensorial modalities) requires transient coordinated activity from associative cortices, in particular the prefrontal cortex and the posterior parietal associative cortex. Several lines of evidence support the view that partial seizures alter consciousness through disturbance of the GW. In particular, a nonlinear relation has been shown between excess of synchronization in the GW regions and the degree of AOC. Changes in thalamocortical synchrony occurring during the spreading of the ictal activity seem particularly involved in the mechanism of altered consciousness. This link between abnormal synchrony and AOC offers new perspectives in the treatment of the AOC since means of decreasing consciousness alteration in seizures could improve patients' quality of life. © 2013.

  16. Stereotyped high-frequency oscillations discriminate seizure onset zones and critical functional cortex in focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Gurses, Candan; Sha, Zhiyi; Quach, Michael M; Sencer, Altay; Bebek, Nerses; Curry, Daniel J; Prabhu, Sujit; Tummala, Sudhakar; Henry, Thomas R; Ince, Nuri F

    2018-01-30

    High-frequency oscillations in local field potentials recorded with intracranial EEG are putative biomarkers of seizure onset zones in epileptic brain. However, localized 80-500 Hz oscillations can also be recorded from normal and non-epileptic cerebral structures. When defined only by rate or frequency, physiological high-frequency oscillations are indistinguishable from pathological ones, which limit their application in epilepsy presurgical planning. We hypothesized that pathological high-frequency oscillations occur in a repetitive fashion with a similar waveform morphology that specifically indicates seizure onset zones. We investigated the waveform patterns of automatically detected high-frequency oscillations in 13 epilepsy patients and five control subjects, with an average of 73 subdural and intracerebral electrodes recorded per patient. The repetitive oscillatory waveforms were identified by using a pipeline of unsupervised machine learning techniques and were then correlated with independently clinician-defined seizure onset zones. Consistently in all patients, the stereotypical high-frequency oscillations with the highest degree of waveform similarity were localized within the seizure onset zones only, whereas the channels generating high-frequency oscillations embedded in random waveforms were found in the functional regions independent from the epileptogenic locations. The repetitive waveform pattern was more evident in fast ripples compared to ripples, suggesting a potential association between waveform repetition and the underlying pathological network. Our findings provided a new tool for the interpretation of pathological high-frequency oscillations that can be efficiently applied to distinguish seizure onset zones from functionally important sites, which is a critical step towards the translation of these signature events into valid clinical biomarkers.awx374media15721572971001. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on

  17. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and cl...

  18. [Formula: see text]Differences in memory functioning between children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and/or focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sylvia E; Kibby, Michelle Y; Cohen, Morris J; Stanford, Lisa; Park, Yong; Strickland, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has shown that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and epilepsy are frequently comorbid and that both disorders are associated with various attention and memory problems. Nonetheless, limited research has been conducted comparing the two disorders in one sample to determine unique versus shared deficits. Hence, we investigated differences in working memory (WM) and short-term and delayed recall between children with ADHD, focal epilepsy of mixed foci, comorbid ADHD/epilepsy and controls. Participants were compared on the Core subtests and the Picture Locations subtest of the Children's Memory Scale (CMS). Results indicated that children with ADHD displayed intact verbal WM and long-term memory (LTM), as well as intact performance on most aspects of short-term memory (STM). They performed worse than controls on Numbers Forward and Picture Locations, suggesting problems with focused attention and simple span for visual-spatial material. Conversely, children with epilepsy displayed poor focused attention and STM regardless of the modality assessed, which affected encoding into LTM. The only loss over time was found for passages (Stories). WM was intact. Children with comorbid ADHD/epilepsy displayed focused attention and STM/LTM problems consistent with both disorders, having the lowest scores across the four groups. Hence, focused attention and visual-spatial span appear to be affected in both disorders, whereas additional STM/encoding problems are specific to epilepsy. Children with comorbid ADHD/epilepsy have deficits consistent with both disorders, with slight additive effects. This study suggests that attention and memory testing should be a regular part of the evaluation of children with epilepsy and ADHD.

  19. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a spectrum of brain disorders ranging from severe, life-threatening and disabling, to ones that are much more benign. In epilepsy, the normal pattern of neuronal activity becomes disturbed, causing strange sensations, emotions, and behavior or sometimes convulsions, muscle ...

  20. Inflammatory mediators in human epilepsy : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Evelien E.; van den Munckhof, Bart; Braun, Kees P J; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; de Jager, Wilco; Jansen, Floor E.

    Background: Accumulating evidence suggests a role for inflammation in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that investigated inflammatory mediators in human epilepsy. Studies reporting on inflammatory mediators in serum,

  1. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Excitation in temporal lobe epilepsy : focus on the glutamate-glutamine cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hel, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most frequent type of human focal epilepsy. Despite ample availability of anti-epileptic dugs, about 30% of TLE patients are pharmaco-resistant. Surgical removal of the epileptogenic focus, which usually includes the

  3. Partial monosomy Xq(Xq23 --> qter) and trisomy 4p(4p15.33 --> pter) in a woman with intractable focal epilepsy, borderline intellectual functioning, and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartocci, Arnaldo; Striano, Pasquale; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Fichera, Marco; Castiglia, Lucia; Galesi, Ornella; Michelucci, Roberto; Elia, Maurizio

    2008-06-01

    Studies of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities may provide information about clinical and EEG phenotypes and possibly to identify new epilepsy genes. We describe a female patient with intractable focal epilepsy, borderline intellectual functioning, and facial dysmorphisms, in whom genetic study (i.e., karyotype and array-CGH analysis) revealed a distal trisomy 4p and distal monosomy Xq. Although any genetic hypothesis remains speculative, several genes are located in the 4p chromosome segment involved in the rearrangement, some of which may be related to epilepsy.

  4. Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation, particularly transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), are emerging as realistic tools for seizure control. Numerous open-label trials and a few recent randomized controlled trials suggest the capacity of both techniques to suppress seizures. Additionally, specialized TMS protocols aimed to map cortical function and to measure cortical excitability may have realistic roles as diagnostic tools in epilepsy. As the prevalence of drug-resistant epilepsy has not changed in recent years, TMS and tDCS offer noninvasive and nonpharmacological options to improve control of intractable seizures. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Focal epilepsy as a long term sequela of Parvovirus B19 encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Concetta Ilenia; Costanzo, Carmela Maria; Franchina, Concetta; Castiglione, Giacomo; Giuliano, Loretta; Russo, Raffaela; Conti, Alessandro; Sofia, Vito; Scalia, Guido

    2016-07-01

    Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19), the etiological agent of the fifth disease, is associated with a large spectrum of pathologies, among which is encephalitis. Since it has been detected from the central nervous system in children or in immunocompromised patients, its causative role in serious neurological manifestations is still unclear. Here we report the case of an 18-year-old healthy boy who developed encephalitis complicated by prolonged status epilepticus. The detection of PVB19 DNA in his serum and, subsequently, in his cerebrospinal fluid supports the hypothesis that this virus could potentially play a role in the pathogenesis of neurological complications. In addition, the detection of viral DNA and the presence of specific IgM and IgG antibodies in serum, together with clinical findings such as skin rash, support the presence of a disseminated viral infection. In the presence of neurological disorders, especially when there are no specific signs, but seizures and rash are present, it is important to search for PVB19 both in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Moreover, the introduction of the PVB19 DNA test into diagnostic protocols of neuropathies, especially those undiagnosed, could clarify the etiological agent that otherwise could remain unrecognized. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Comparative effectiveness of eight antiepileptic drugs in adults with focal refractory epilepsy: the influence of age, gender, and the sequence in which drugs were introduced onto the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Jussi; Peltola, Jukka; Raitanen, Jani; Alapirtti, Tiina; Rainesalo, Sirpa

    2017-07-01

    The first objective was to determine the long-term retention rate of eight antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) commonly used as adjunctive therapy in adults with focal refractory epilepsy. Second, we assessed the effects of age and gender on retention rates. Third, we examined if the retention rate could be influenced by the sequence in which the AEDs had entered the market. Patients with focal refractory epilepsy treated with any of the eight AEDs in Tampere University Hospital were identified retrospectively (N = 507). Retention rates were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Follow-up started at the first date of treatment and each individual was followed a maximum of 36 months. We calculated the following 3-year retention rates: lacosamide 77.1% (N = 137), lamotrigine 68.3% (N = 177), levetiracetam 66.7% (N = 319), clobazam 65.6% (N = 130), topiramate 61.6% (N = 178), zonisamide 60.4% (N = 103), pregabalin 54.6% (N = 127), and gabapentin 40.2% (N = 66). Lacosamide, levetiracetam, and clobazam were the most effective AEDs in the elderly. The retention rate for pregabalin was higher in males (65%) than females (51%) whereas females had higher retention rates for both topiramate (72 vs. 58%) and zonisamide (67 vs. 57%). The retention rate was influenced by the sequence in which these AEDs entered the market. We provide important information about practical aspects of these eight AEDs, revealing that there are differences in their effectiveness as adjunctive treatment for focal refractory epilepsy. Most importantly, the retention rate appears to be influenced by the sequence in which these AEDs were introduced onto the market.

  7. COMPARATIVE EFFICАCY AND TOLERABILITY OF MONOTHERAPY WITH DEPAKINE CHRONOSPHERE, DRUGS OF CARBAMAZEPINE GROUP WITH EXTENDED RELEASE AND OXCARBAZEPINE IN SYMPTOMATIC AND CRYPTOGENIC FOCAL EPILEPSY (SVT. LUKA’S INSTITUTE OF CHILD NEUROLOGY AND EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on comparative efficаcy and tolerability of monotherapy with Depakine chronosphere, drugs of Carbamazepine group with extended release and oxcarbazepine in symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy has been conducted at Svt. Luka’s Institute of Child Neurology and Epilepsy (ICNE (Moscow. This retrospective study covers a random sample of patients treated in ICNE in the period from December 1, 2013 to September 1, 2014.  The study included 131 patients aged 1 to 18 years with symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy receiving treatment with one of the study drugs in monotherapy: group 1 – monotherapy with Depakine chronosphere (n = 56; group 2 – monotherapy with drugs of carbamazepine group with extended release (n = 55; group 3 – monotherapy with oxcarbazepine (trileptal (n = 20. The obtained results allow us to conclude that the effectiveness of Depakin chronosphere, carbamazepine with extended release and oxcarbazepine in monotherapy of symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy was comparable (statistically significant differences in efficacy were not found. However, carbamazepine was awarded the highest frequency of seizures aggravation. Drugs showed approximately same tolerability (statistically significant differences in tolerability were not found. However, withdrawal of the drug due to side effects was the rarest in Depakine (3.5 %, and withdrawal due to intolerance was higher in carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine (5 and 10 % respectively. Depakinum and oxcarbazepine had the best results in the blocking of pathological activity on the electroencephalogram, whereas carbamazepine was clearly inferior to them. In this regard, complete clinical-electroencephalographic remission (lasting 12 months or more was achieved under treatment of Depakine chromosphere in 21.5 % of cases, oxcarbazepi on therapy for 12 months was similar in all study drugs. Considering that the objective of epilepsy treatment is to achieve complete

  8. Epilepsy surgery in children and adolescents with malformations of cortical development--outcome and impact of the new ILAE classification on focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlebner, Angelika; Gröppel, Gudrun; Dressler, Anastasia; Reiter-Fink, Edith; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela; Dorfer, Christian; Czech, Thomas; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Coras, Roland; Blümcke, Ingmar; Feucht, Martha

    2014-11-01

    To determine long-term efficacy and safety of epilepsy surgery in children and adolescents with malformations of cortical development (MCD) and to identify differences in seizure outcome of the various MCD subgroups. Special focus was set on the newly introduced International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). This is a single center retrospective cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data. age at surgery classification schemes (Barkovich et al., 2012. Brain. 135, 1348-1369; Palmini et al., 2004. Neurology. 62, S2-S8) and the ILAE classification for FCD recently proposed by Blümcke in 2011. Seizure outcome was classified using the ILAE classification proposed by Wieser in 2001. 60 Patients (51.7% male) were included. Follow up was up to 14 (mean 4.4 ± 3.2) years. Mean age at surgery was 8.0 ± 6.0 (median 6.0) years; mean age at epilepsy onset was 2.9 ± 3.2 (median 2.0) years; duration of epilepsy before surgery was 4.8 ± 4.4 (median 3.0) years. 80% of the patients were seizure free at last follow-up. AEDs were successfully withdrawn in 56.7% of all patients. Extended surgery, lesion localization in the temporal lobes and absence of inter-ictal spikes in postsurgical EEG recordings were predictive of favorable seizure outcomes after surgery. However, no association was found between outcome and MCD sub-types. Epilepsy surgery is highly effective in carefully selected drug-resistant children with MCD. Surrogate markers for complete resection of the epileptogenic zone remain the only significant predictors for seizure freedom after surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 123I-iomazenil brain receptor SPECT in focal epilepsy. In comparison with 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Wang Tongge; Huang Li; Michael Cordes

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT in diagnosis of focal epilepsy in comparison with 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring. Methods 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT was performed on 40 patients with focal epilepsy. The results were compared with those obtained by 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring. Results: In 40 patients, the sensitivity of Video/EEG monitoring for localization of epileptogenic area was 95% (38/40). The sensitivity of 123 I-iomazenil brain receptor SPECT, 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI for localization of epileptogenic area compared with Video/EEG monitoring ('gold standard') was 65.8%(25/38), 55.3%(21/38) and 47.4%(18/38), respectively. The localization of epileptogenic area with 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT was in concordance with Video/EEG monitoring in 20 patients, 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT in 15 patients and MRI in 16 patients, respectively. The sensitivity of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT combined with MRI for localization of epileptogenic area was 84.2%(32/38). Conclusions: 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT is a useful method in detecting and localizing epileptogenic area. The combination of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT and MRI has a high sensitivity for detecting epileptogenic area

  10. Comparative Long-Term Effectiveness of a Monotherapy with Five Antiepileptic Drugs for Focal Epilepsy in Adult Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pan; He, Ru-Qian; Bao, Yi-Xin; Zheng, Rong-Yuan; Xu, Hui-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare long-term effectiveness of five antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for monotherapy of adult patients with focal epilepsy in routine clinical practice. Methods Adult patients with focal epilepsy, who were prescribed with carbamazepine (CBZ), valproate (VPA), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), or oxcarbazepine (OXC) as monotherapy, during the period from January 2004 to June 2012 registered in Wenzhou Epilepsy Follow Up Registry Database (WEFURD), were included in the study. Prospective long-term follow-up was conducted until June 2013. The endpoints were time to treatment failure, time to seizure remission, and time to first seizure. Results This study included 654 patients: CBZ (n=125), VPA (n=151), LTG (n=135), TPM (n=76), and OXC (n=167). The retention rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC at the third year were 36.1%, 32.4%, 57.6%, 37.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. For time to treatment failure, LTG was significantly better than CBZ and VPA (LTG vs. CBZ, hazard ratio, [HR] 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.96], LTG vs. VPA, 0.53 [0.37-0.74]); TPM was worse than LTG (TPM vs. LTG, 1.77 [1.15-2.74]), and OXC was better than VPA (0.86 [0.78-0.96]). After initial target doses, the seizure remission rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC were 63.0%, 77.0%, 83.6%, 67.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. LTG was significantly better than CBZ (1.44 [1.15-1.82]) and OXC (LTG vs. OXC, 0.76 [0.63-0.93]); OXC was less effective than LTG in preventing the first seizure (1.20 [1.02-1.40]). Conclusion LTG was the best, OXC was better than VPA only, while VPA was the worst. The others were equivalent for comparisons between five AEDs regarding the long-term treatment outcomes of monotherapy for adult patients with focal epilepsy in a clinical practice. For selecting AEDs for these patients among the first-line drugs, LTG is an appropriate first choice; others are reservation in the first-line but VPA is not. PMID:26147937

  11. Comparative Long-Term Effectiveness of a Monotherapy with Five Antiepileptic Drugs for Focal Epilepsy in Adult Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Yi Zeng

    Full Text Available To evaluate and compare long-term effectiveness of five antiepileptic drugs (AEDs for monotherapy of adult patients with focal epilepsy in routine clinical practice.Adult patients with focal epilepsy, who were prescribed with carbamazepine (CBZ, valproate (VPA, lamotrigine (LTG, topiramate (TPM, or oxcarbazepine (OXC as monotherapy, during the period from January 2004 to June 2012 registered in Wenzhou Epilepsy Follow Up Registry Database (WEFURD, were included in the study. Prospective long-term follow-up was conducted until June 2013. The endpoints were time to treatment failure, time to seizure remission, and time to first seizure.This study included 654 patients: CBZ (n=125, VPA (n=151, LTG (n=135, TPM (n=76, and OXC (n=167. The retention rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC at the third year were 36.1%, 32.4%, 57.6%, 37.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. For time to treatment failure, LTG was significantly better than CBZ and VPA (LTG vs. CBZ, hazard ratio, [HR] 0.80 [95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.96], LTG vs. VPA, 0.53 [0.37-0.74]; TPM was worse than LTG (TPM vs. LTG, 1.77 [1.15-2.74], and OXC was better than VPA (0.86 [0.78-0.96]. After initial target doses, the seizure remission rates of CBZ, VPA, LTG, TPM, and OXC were 63.0%, 77.0%, 83.6%, 67.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. LTG was significantly better than CBZ (1.44 [1.15-1.82] and OXC (LTG vs. OXC, 0.76 [0.63-0.93]; OXC was less effective than LTG in preventing the first seizure (1.20 [1.02-1.40].LTG was the best, OXC was better than VPA only, while VPA was the worst. The others were equivalent for comparisons between five AEDs regarding the long-term treatment outcomes of monotherapy for adult patients with focal epilepsy in a clinical practice. For selecting AEDs for these patients among the first-line drugs, LTG is an appropriate first choice; others are reservation in the first-line but VPA is not.

  12. Surgical pathology of epilepsy-associated non-neoplastic cerebral lesions: a brief introduction with special reference to hippocampal sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Hajime; Hori, Tomokatsu; Vinters, Harry V.

    2014-01-01

    Among epilepsy-associated non-neoplastic lesions, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS) and malformation of cortical development (MCD) including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), are the two most frequent causes of drug-resistant focal epilepsies constituting about 50% of all surgical pathology of epilepsy. Several distinct histological patterns have been historically recognized in both HS and FCD, and several studies have tried to perform clinicopathological correlation; results, however, have been controversial, particularly in terms of postsurgical seizure outcome. Recently, the International League Against Epilepsy constituted a Task Forces of Neuropathology and FCD within the Commission on Diagnostic Methods, to establish an international consensus of histological classification of HS and FCD, respectively, based on agreement with the recognition of the importance of defining a histopathological classification system that reliably has some clinicopathological correlation. Such consensus classifications are likely to facilitate future clinicopathological study. Meanwhile, we reviewed neuropathology of 41 surgical cases of mTLE, and confirmed three type/patterns of HS along with no HS, based on the qualitative evaluation of the distribution and severity of neuronal loss and gliosis within hippocampal formation; i.e., HS type 1 (61%) equivalent to ‘classical’ Ammon’s horn sclerosis, HS type 2 (2%) representing CA1 sclerosis, HS type 3 (17%) equivalent to end folium sclerosis, and no HS (19%). Furthermore we performed a neuropathological comparative study on mTLE-HS and dementia associated HS (d-HS) in elderly, and confirmed that neuropathological features differ between mTLE-HS and d-HS in the distribution of hippocampal neuronal loss and gliosis, morphology of reactive astrocytes and their protein expression, and presence of concomitant neurodegenerative changes particularly Alzheimer type and TDP-43 pathologies. These

  13. Intraoperative Magnetic-Resonance Tomography and Neuronavigation During Resection of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type II in Adult Epilepsy Surgery Offers Better Seizure Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Karl; Kasper, Burkhard S; Heynold, Elisabeth; Coras, Roland; Sommer, Björn; Rampp, Stefan; Hamer, Hajo M; Blümcke, Ingmar; Buchfelder, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one important cause of drug-resistant epilepsy potentially curable by epilepsy surgery. We investigated the options of using neuronavigation and intraoperative magnetic-resonance tomographical imaging (MRI) to avoid residual epileptogenic tissue during resection of patients with FCD II to improve seizure outcome. Altogether, 24 patients with FCD II diagnosed by MRI (16 female, 8 male; mean age 34 ± 10 years) suffered from drug-resistant electroclinical and focal epilepsy for a mean of 20.7 ± 5 years. Surgery was performed with preoperative stereoelectroencephalography (in 15 patients), neuronavigation, and intraoperative 1.5T-iopMRI in all 24 investigated patients. In 75% of patients (18/24), a complete resection was performed. In 89% (16/18) of completely resected patients, we documented an Engel I seizure outcome after a mean follow-up of 42 months. All incompletely resected patients had a worse outcome (Engel II-III, P < 0.0002). Patients with FCD IIB had also significant better seizure outcome compared with patients diagnosed as having FCD IIA (82% vs. 28%, P < 0.02). In 46% (11/24) of patients, intraoperative second-look surgeries due to residual lesions detected during the intraoperative MRI were performed. In these 11 patients, there were significant more completely seizure free patients (73% vs. 38% Engel IA), compared with 13 patients who finished surgery after the first intraoperative MRI (P < 0.05). Excellent seizure outcome after surgery of patients with FCD II positively correlated with the amount of resection, histologic subtype, and the use of intraoperative MRI, especially when intraoperative second-look surgeries were performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factores pronósticos de recurrencia de la epilepsia focal en el niño Prognostic factors of recurrence of focal epilepsy in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albia Pozo Alonso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar los factores pronósticos de recurrencia de las crisis epilépticas focales a los 2 años del diagnóstico y del inicio del tratamiento. MÉTODOS. Este estudio observacional, analítico y prospectivo incluyó a 207 niños que presentaron dos o más crisis epilépticas focales no provocadas, hospitalizados en el Departamento de Neuropediatría del Hospital «William Soler», entre diciembre de 2001 y diciembre de 2003. Al final de los 2 años de seguimiento, 185 pacientes concluyeron el estudio. RESULTADOS. El 33,5 % de los pacientes presentó recurrencias de las crisis epilépticas focales al finalizar el estudio. Constituyeron factores de riesgo de recurrencia de las crisis epilépticas focales los siguientes: edad menor de un año, etiología sintomática, presencia de antecedentes personales de crisis neonatales sintomáticas y discapacidades neurológicas y la persistencia de descargas en el electroencefalograma (EEG evolutivo. El análisis de regresión logística demostró como variables pronósticas de recurrencia la etiología sintomática (p = 0,000; OR = 3,107, el antecedente personal de crisis neonatales sintomáticas (p = 0,037; OR = 4,623 y la persistencia de descargas en el EEG evolutivo (p = 0,000; OR = 2,109. CONCLUSIONES. El antecedente personal de crisis neonatales sintomáticas constituyó el factor independiente con mayor influencia en las recurrencias de las crisis epilépticas focales.INTRODUCTION: The objective of present paper was to determine the recurrent prognostic factors of focal epileptic crises at 2 years of diagnosis and of treatment onset. METHODS: This prospective, analytical and observational study included 207 children presenting two or more non-provoked epileptic crises, admitted in Neuropediatrics Department of "William Soler" Hospital between December, 2001 and December, 2003. At a two years follow-up, 185 patients concluded the study. RESULTS: The

  15. Ictal 18F-FDG PET/MRI in a Patient With Cortical Heterotopia and Focal Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabria, Ferdinando F; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio; Gambardella, Antonio; Labate, Angelo; Cherubini, Andrea; Gullà, Domenico; Tafuri, Benedetta; Sabatini, Umberto; Vescio, Virginia; Quattrone, Aldo

    2017-10-01

    A 19-year-old man with epilepsy underwent ictal F-FDG PET/MRI, showing a 5 mm heterotopic nodule in the periventricular white matter, adjacent to the frontal horn of the left lateral ventricle (SUVmax, 5.5; glucidic cerebral metabolic rate, 0.317 μmol/mL). A repeated F-FDG PET/MRI, during seizure freedom, showed, at visual analysis, subtle decrease of the nodule metabolism. SUVmax and glucidic cerebral metabolic rate were clearly reduced to 3.7 and 0.226, respectively. Ictal F-FDG PET/MRI could be useful in epilepsy because of the added value of SUVmax and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose analysis to understand the relationship between heterotopy and epilepsy.

  16. Atypical language laterality is associated with large-scale disruption of network integration in children with intractable focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M; Morgan, Benjamin R; Doesburg, Sam M; Taylor, Margot J; Pang, Elizabeth W; Donner, Elizabeth; Go, Cristina Y; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter

    2015-04-01

    Epilepsy is associated with disruption of integration in distributed networks, together with altered localization for functions such as expressive language. The relation between atypical network connectivity and altered localization is unknown. In the current study we tested whether atypical expressive language laterality was associated with the alteration of large-scale network integration in children with medically-intractable localization-related epilepsy (LRE). Twenty-three right-handed children (age range 8-17) with medically-intractable LRE performed a verb generation task in fMRI. Language network activation was identified and the Laterality index (LI) was calculated within the pars triangularis and pars opercularis. Resting-state data from the same cohort were subjected to independent component analysis. Dual regression was used to identify associations between resting-state integration and LI values. Higher positive values of the LI, indicating typical language localization were associated with stronger functional integration of various networks including the default mode network (DMN). The normally symmetric resting-state networks showed a pattern of lateralized connectivity mirroring that of language function. The association between atypical language localization and network integration implies a widespread disruption of neural network development. These findings may inform the interpretation of localization studies by providing novel insights into reorganization of neural networks in epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Zoomed MRI Guided by Combined EEG/MEG Source Analysis: A Multimodal Approach for Optimizing Presurgical Epilepsy Work-up and its Application in a Multi-focal Epilepsy Patient Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ü; Rampp, S; Wollbrink, A; Kugel, H; Cho, J -H; Knösche, T R; Grova, C; Wellmer, J; Wolters, C H

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of source analysis based on electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) has gained considerable attention in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. However, in many cases the source analysis alone is not used to tailor surgery unless the findings are confirmed by lesions, such as, e.g., cortical malformations in MRI. For many patients, the histology of tissue resected from MRI negative epilepsy shows small lesions, which indicates the need for more sensitive MR sequences. In this paper, we describe a technique to maximize the synergy between combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis and high resolution MRI. The procedure has three main steps: (1) construction of a detailed and calibrated finite element head model that considers the variation of individual skull conductivities and white matter anisotropy, (2) EMEG source analysis performed on averaged interictal epileptic discharges (IED), (3) high resolution (0.5 mm) zoomed MR imaging, limited to small areas centered at the EMEG source locations. The proposed new diagnosis procedure was then applied in a particularly challenging case of an epilepsy patient: EMEG analysis at the peak of the IED coincided with a right frontal focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), which had been detected at standard 1 mm resolution MRI. Of higher interest, zoomed MR imaging (applying parallel transmission, 'ZOOMit') guided by EMEG at the spike onset revealed a second, fairly subtle, FCD in the left fronto-central region. The evaluation revealed that this second FCD, which had not been detectable with standard 1 mm resolution, was the trigger of the seizures.

  18. Spectroscopic imaging of the pilocarpine model of human epilepsy suggests that early NAA reduction predicts epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, W A; Lado, F A; de Lanerolle, N C; Takahashi, K; Pan, C; Hetherington, H P

    2007-08-01

    Reduced hippocampal N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) is commonly observed in patients with advanced, chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). It is unclear, however, whether an NAA deficit is also present during the clinically quiescent latent period that characterizes early TLE. This question has important implications for the use of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in the early identification of patients at risk for TLE. To determine whether NAA is diminished during the latent period, we obtained high-resolution (1)H spectroscopic imaging during the latent period of the rat pilocarpine model of human TLE. We used actively detuneable surface reception and volume transmission coils to enhance sensitivity and a semiautomated voxel shifting method to accurately position voxels within the hippocampi. During the latent period, 2 and 7 d following pilocarpine treatment, hippocampal NAA was significantly reduced by 27.5 +/- 6.9% (P NAA deficit is not due to neuron loss and therefore likely represents metabolic impairment of hippocampal neurons during the latent phase. Therefore, spectroscopic imaging provides an early marker for metabolic dysfunction in this model of TLE.

  19. Initial experience with SPECT imaging of the brain using I-123 p-iodoamphetamine in focal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaManna, M.M.; Sussman, N.M.; Harner, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen patients with complex partial seizures refractory to medical treatment were examined with routine electroencephalography (EEG), video EEG monitoring, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological tests and interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with I-123 iodoamphetamine (INT). In 18 patients, SPECT identified areas of focal reduction in tracer uptake that correlated with the epileptogenic focus identified on the EEG. In addition, SPECT disclosed other areas of neurologic dysfunction as elicited on neuropsychological tests. Thus, IMP SPECT is a useful tool for localizing epileptogenic foci and their associated dynamic deficits

  20. Anormalidades focais no pequeno mal epiléptico EEG focal abnormalities in P.M. epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Camargo Lima

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados 31 pacientes com crises clínicas tipo P.M. cujos eletrencefalogramas revelaram disritmia centrencefálica secundária a atividade irritativa focal. A sua freqüência entre as disritmias centrencefálicas foi de 27% (19% secundárias a foco de localização profunda e 8% secundárias a foco de localização cortical. O tipo clínico das crises foi analizado, sendo ressaltado o fato de que 8 pacientes não apresentaram crise tipo P.M. puro (ausência: 4 apresentaram P.M. mioclônico e 4 P.M. acinético. A alta incidência de antecedentes pessoais de valor (33% foi enfatizada.Thirty one patients with P.M. epileptic crisis whose EEG showed centrencephalic disrythmia secondary to focal irritating activity where thoroughly observed. 19% of the cases showed centroencephalic disrythmia secondary to deeply situated focus and 8% to focus of cortical situation; in these cases the temporal projection was predominant. The clinical type of the crisis was analysed with emphasis on the fact that 8 patients did not show a "sheer" P.M. type crisis (absence: 4 showed mioclonic P.M. and 4 akynetic P.M. The high incidency of personal antecedents (33% is emphasized.

  1. Initial experience with SPECT imaging of the brain using I-123 p-iodoamphetamine in focal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Manna, M.M.; Sussman, N.M.; Harner, R.N.; Kaplan, L.R.; Hershey, B.L.; Bernstein, D.R.; Parker, J.A.; Wolodzko, J.G.; Popky, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with complex partial seizures refractory to medical treatment were examined with routine electroencephalography (EEG), closed-circuit television EEG (CCTV-EEG), CT and MR imaging, neuropsychological tests, and interictal single photon emission CT with I-123 rho-iodoamphetamine (IMP SPECT). In three patients CT and MR imaging results correlated with the epileptogenic foci as identified on CCTV-EEG. In 21 patients SPECT identified areas of focal reduction in tracer uptake that correlated with the epileptogenic focus identified on CCTV-EEG. In addition, SPECT disclosed other areas of neurologic dysfunction as elicited on neuropsychological tests. Thus, IMP SPECT is a useful tool for localizing epileptogenic foci and their associated dynamic deficits

  2. Lacosamide as add-on treatment of focal symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romigi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of epileptic seizures in the presence of hepatic disease is not uncommon in clinical practice. Selecting an appropriate AED for patients affected by liver failure who have new-onset epileptic seizures can be challenging. We describe a 64-year-old man affected by liver cirrhosis. The patient developed partial epilepsy with secondary generalization because of an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parieto-occipital regions. After the neurosurgery procedure, seizures reappeared and were initially managed with levetiracetam. After one month, the patient experienced clusters of seizures while on stable treatment with levetiracetam. Pregabalin as add-on was not tolerated; therefore, he received a low dose of phenobarbital as add-on treatment. The patient developed hepatic encephalopathy. Phenobarbital was immediately stopped, and oral lacosamide was added. A rapid recovery of encephalopathy with a 6-month seizure freedom was obtained. The patient died 6 months later because of progressive impairment of liver function. Lacosamide may represent an alternative to other AEDs in patients with liver failure; however, further prospective evaluation of its efficacy and safety in this clinical setting is needed.

  3. Changes in glutamate concentration, glucose metabolism, and cerebral blood flow during focal brain cooling of the epileptogenic cortex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujii, Masami; Inoue, Takao; He, Yeting; Maruta, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Suehiro, Eiichi; Imoto, Hirochika; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Oka, Fumiaki; Matsumoto, Mishiya; Owada, Yuji; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2014-05-01

    Recently, focal brain cooling (FBC) was proposed as a method for treating refractory epilepsy. However, the precise influence of cooling on the molecular basis of epilepsy has not been elucidated. Thus the aim of this study was to assess the effect of FBC on glutamate (Glu) concentration, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and glucose metabolism in patients with intractable epilepsy. Nine patients underwent FBC at 15°C for 30 min prior to cortical resection (n = 6) or hippocampectomy (n = 3). Measurement of metabolites and CBF, as well as electrocorticography (ECoG), was performed. Epileptic discharge (ED), as observed by ECoG, disappeared in the cooling period and reappeared in the rewarming period. Glu concentrations were high during the precooling period and were reduced to 51.2% during the cooling period (p = 0.025). Glycerol levels showed a similar decrease (p = 0.028). Lactate concentration was high during the precooling period and was reduced during the cooling period (21.3% decrease; p = 0.005). Glucose and pyruvate levels were maintained throughout the procedure. Changes in CBF were parallel to those observed by ECoG. FBC reduced EDs and concentrations of Glu and glycerol. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of FBC. Our findings confirm that FBC is a reasonable and optimal treatment option for patients with intractable epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... not previously implicated in epilepsy and provides further evidence about the genetic architecture of these disorders, with the ultimate aim of assisting in disease classification and prognosis. The data suggest that specific loci can act pleiotropically raising risk for epilepsy broadly, or can have effects...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...

  5. Menstrual cycle worsening of epileptic seizures in women with symptomatic focal epilepsy Piora de crises epilépticas durante o período menstrual em mulheres com epilepsia focal sintomática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Belini Bazán

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hormonal fluctuation is responsible for worsening of epileptic seizures during the menstrual cycle. OBJETIVE: To identify irregularities in the menstrual cycles of women with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE and extratemporal focal epilepsy (ETFE and correlate the frequency of seizures during the menstrual cycles. METHOD: We evaluated prospectively women in the menacme with MTLE and ETFE. Calendars were provided for these patients, and they were asked to mark their seizure frequency according to the menses. Calendars were reviewed in each routine medical appointment. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients with MTLE and 14 with ETFE were evaluated. We registered 211 cycles in the patients with MTLE and 49 in those with ETFE. Irregular menstrual cycles were found in 28 (28/39, 71.7% patients with MTLE and 6 (6/14, 42.8% with ETFE (p=0.052. Premenstrual seizure worsening was observed in 46 (21.8% patients with MTLE and 9 (18.3% with ETFE (p=0.596. Menstrual worsening was observed in 47 (22.2% patients with MTLE and 15 (30.6% with ETFE (p=0. 217. Ovulatory worsening was observed in 36 (17% patients with MTLE and 13 (26.5% with ETFE (p=0,126. Catamenial worsening was observed in 58 (27.4% of the patients with MTLE and in 17 (34.7% of the patients with ETFE (p=0.315. CONCLUSION: There was no difference between the group of patients with MTLE and ETFE regarding the frequency of irregular cycles and seizure worsening during the premenstrual, menstrual, catamenial or ovulatory periods.INTRODUÇÃO: Admite-se que a flutuação hormonal seja a responsável para a piora de crises epilépticas no período catamenial. OBJETIVO: Identificar irregularidades nos ciclos menstruais de mulheres com epilepsia de lobo temporal mesial (ELTM e epilepsia focal extratemporal (EFET; e relacionar a frequencia de crises durante o ciclo menstrual. MÉTODO: Avaliamos mulheres na menacme, que apresentem quadro clínico laboratorial compatível com ELTM e EFET. Foram

  6. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia: report of 3 cases with human papillomavirus DNA sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, S E; Tokman Yildirim, Benay; Sarisoy, S

    2011-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a benign proliferative viral infection of the oral mucosa that is related to Human Papil-lomavirus (HPV), mainly subtypes 13 and 32. Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, the reported cases among Caucasians are relatively rare. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Histopathologically, it is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, fusion, and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges and the cells named mitozoids. The purpose of this case report was to present 3 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in a pediatric age group. Histopathological and clinical features of cases are discussed and DNA sequencing analysis is reported in which HPV 13, HPV 32, and HPV 11 genomes are detected.

  7. Role of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) and proton density magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and evaluation of lesion extent of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Jitender; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy; Singh, Atampreet; Rathore, Chathurbhuj; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Bahuleyan, Biji

    2010-01-01

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often associated with epilepsy. Identification of FCD can be difficult due to subtle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. Though fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence detects the majority of these lesions, smaller lesions may go unnoticed while larger lesions may be poorly delineated. Purpose: To determine the ability of a specialized epilepsy protocol in visualizing and delineating the extent of FCD. Material and Methods: We compared the imaging findings in nine patients with cortical malformation who underwent routine epilepsy MR imaging as well as a specialized epilepsy protocol. All imaging was done on a 1.5T MR unit. The specialized epilepsy protocol included 3D FLAIR in the sagittal plane as well as proton density (PD) and high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images in the transverse plane. Results: In all nine patients, the specialized protocol identified lesion anatomy better. In three patients in whom routine MRI was normal, the specialized epilepsy protocol including 3D FLAIR helped in identifying the lesions. One of these patients underwent surgery, and histo-pathology revealed a cortical dysplasia. In one patient, lesion characterization was improved, while in the remaining patients the extent of the FCD was more clearly demonstrated in the 3D FLAIR and PD images. Statistical analysis of images for cortical thickness, cortical signal intensity, adjacent white matter abnormalities, and gray-white matter junction showed significant statistical difference in the ability of 3D FLAIR to assess these aspects over conventional images. PD images were also found superior to the routine epilepsy protocol in assessment of cortical signal, adjacent white matter, and gray-white matter junction. Conclusion: Specialized MRI sequences and techniques should be performed whenever there is a high suspicion of cortical dysplasia, especially when they remain occult on conventional MR protocols. These techniques

  8. Stretch activates human myometrium via ERK, caldesmon and focal adhesion signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunping Li

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available An incomplete understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for myometrial activation from the quiescent pregnant state to the active contractile state during labor has hindered the development of effective therapies for preterm labor. Myometrial stretch has been implicated clinically in the initiation of labor and the etiology of preterm labor, but the molecular mechanisms involved in the human have not been determined. We investigated the mechanisms by which gestation-dependent stretch contributes to myometrial activation, by using human uterine samples from gynecologic hysterectomies and Cesarean sections. Here we demonstrate that the Ca requirement for activation of the contractile filaments in human myometrium increases with caldesmon protein content during gestation and that an increase in caldesmon phosphorylation can reverse this inhibitory effect during labor. By using phosphotyrosine screening and mass spectrometry of stretched human myometrial samples, we identify 3 stretch-activated focal adhesion proteins, FAK, p130Cas, and alpha actinin. FAK-Y397, which signals integrin engagement, is constitutively phosphorylated in term human myometrium whereas FAK-Y925, which signals downstream ERK activation, is phosphorylated during stretch. We have recently identified smooth muscle Archvillin (SmAV as an ERK regulator. A newly produced SmAV-specific antibody demonstrates gestation-specific increases in SmAV protein levels and stretch-specific increases in SmAV association with focal adhesion proteins. Thus, whereas increases in caldesmon levels suppress human myometrium contractility during pregnancy, stretch-dependent focal adhesion signaling, facilitated by the ERK activator SmAV, can contribute to myometrial activation. These results suggest that focal adhesion proteins may present new targets for drug discovery programs aimed at regulation of uterine contractility.

  9. Localization Accuracy of Distributed Inverse Solutions for Electric and Magnetic Source Imaging of Interictal Epileptic Discharges in Patients with Focal Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heers, Marcel; Chowdhury, Rasheda A; Hedrich, Tanguy; Dubeau, François; Hall, Jeffery A; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Distributed inverse solutions aim to realistically reconstruct the origin of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) from noninvasively recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. Our aim was to compare the performance of different distributed inverse solutions in localizing IEDs: coherent maximum entropy on the mean (cMEM), hierarchical Bayesian implementations of independent identically distributed sources (IID, minimum norm prior) and spatially coherent sources (COH, spatial smoothness prior). Source maxima (i.e., the vertex with the maximum source amplitude) of IEDs in 14 EEG and 19 MEG studies from 15 patients with focal epilepsy were analyzed. We visually compared their concordance with intracranial EEG (iEEG) based on 17 cortical regions of interest and their spatial dispersion around source maxima. Magnetic source imaging (MSI) maxima from cMEM were most often confirmed by iEEG (cMEM: 14/19, COH: 9/19, IID: 8/19 studies). COH electric source imaging (ESI) maxima co-localized best with iEEG (cMEM: 8/14, COH: 11/14, IID: 10/14 studies). In addition, cMEM was less spatially spread than COH and IID for ESI and MSI (p < 0.001 Bonferroni-corrected post hoc t test). Highest positive predictive values for cortical regions with IEDs in iEEG could be obtained with cMEM for MSI and with COH for ESI. Additional realistic EEG/MEG simulations confirmed our findings. Accurate spatially extended sources, as found in cMEM (ESI and MSI) and COH (ESI) are desirable for source imaging of IEDs because this might influence surgical decision. Our simulations suggest that COH and IID overestimate the spatial extent of the generators compared to cMEM.

  10. Global Health: Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amza

    2018-04-01

    Epilepsy is a frequently misunderstood and highly stigmatized condition. Major treatment gaps exist across the world, most so in areas of financial constraint. Classification permits the best approaches to treatment and to ascertaining prognosis. The International League Against Epilepsy's new classification system emphasizes clinical aspects and utilizes all available resources to determine whether it is a focal or generalized epilepsy. The most important tools are a careful history, clinical examination, electroencephalography, and appropriate neuroimaging. Inadequate, delayed, and incomplete evaluation may lead to misdiagnosis and costly mismanagement. Treatment is generally pharmacological, with approximately 20 to 30% of patients eventually proving refractory to medications and thus becoming potential surgical candidates. The type of epilepsy, age, gender, comorbidities, drug interactions, and drug cost are important factors in choosing an antiepileptic drug (AED). The teratogenic potential of some AEDs, weight gain, and menstrual hormone-related issues are important considerations in women. The impact of AEDs on bone health is critical in all age groups, particularly in the elderly. Psychiatric problems, mostly depression and anxiety, can have a great impact on seizure control and overall quality of life. Finally, effective partnerships and collaborations can bring resources, both human and financial, to regions that would otherwise find it impossible to effect change on their own. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Quantifying interictal metabolic activity in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, T.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, J. Jr.; Christenson, P.D.; Zhang, J.X.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of patients with complex partial seizures of unilateral temporal lobe origin have interictal temporal hypometabolism on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) studies. Often, this hypometabolism extends to ipsilateral extratemporal sites. The use of accurately quantified metabolic data has been limited by the absence of an equally reliable method of anatomical analysis of PET images. We developed a standardized method for visual placement of anatomically configured regions of interest on FDG PET studies, which is particularly adapted to the widespread, asymmetric, and often severe interictal metabolic alterations of temporal lobe epilepsy. This method was applied by a single investigator, who was blind to the identity of subjects, to 10 normal control and 25 interictal temporal lobe epilepsy studies. All subjects had normal brain anatomical volumes on structural neuroimaging studies. The results demonstrate ipsilateral thalamic and temporal lobe involvement in the interictal hypometabolism of unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Ipsilateral frontal, parietal, and basal ganglial metabolism is also reduced, although not as markedly as is temporal and thalamic metabolism

  12. Diagnostic methods for extra-temporal neocortical focal epilepsies: present and future Métodos diagnósticos das epilepsias focais neocorticais extratemporais: presente e futuro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo André Amorim Leite

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The progress of epilepsies diagnosis has been great, but, amongst the diagnostic detailing that demand research, one of the most important is the essential lateralization and localization of epileptogenic zone, considered as the cerebral cortex region, that removed, will result in a free state of seizures. The present study aims to analyze the possible uses of proton spectroscopy for clinical and pre-surgical evaluation of focal extratemporal epilepsies, since this group presents the highest difficulty degree for lateralizing and locating epileptogenic zones. In almost all cases, a non invasive diagnosis can be performed using routine electroencephalography, video-electroencephalography - considered as gold standard, and magnetic resonance imaging. However, when the results of these exams are contradictory, some patients need invasive techniques, as the intra-cranial video-EEG, using deep electrodes, sub-dural strip and grid, that are associated with increased diagnostic cost and risk of complications, as cerebral hemorrhages and intra-cranial infections. Proton spectroscopy appears as a possibility, given its capacity to evaluate cerebral metabolism, by N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA, creatine (Cre and choline (Cho concentrations, amongst other metabolites. This non invasive method may provide time reduction of this evaluation and reliable level improvement for this topographical diagnosis.Tem sido grande o progresso no diagnóstico das epilepsias, mas dentre os detalhamentos diagnósticos a exigir pesquisas, estão a lateralização e a localização precisas da zona epileptogênica, considerada como a região do córtex cerebral que, removida, irá resultar num estado livre de crises. Por meio de revisão da literatura, o objetivo deste estudo é expor e analisar os métodos diagnósticos das epilepsias neocorticais extratemporais, dadas as características que as tornam mais complexas do que as epilepsias temporais visto que estas apresentam o

  13. Human fibroblasts display a differential focal adhesion phenotype relative to chimpanzee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Alexander S; Chen, Annie Y; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of documented differences between humans and our closest relatives in responses to wound healing and in disease susceptibilities, suggesting a differential cellular response to certain environmental factors. In this study, we sought to look at a specific cell type, fibroblasts, to examine differences in cellular adhesion between humans and chimpanzees in visualized cells and in gene expression. We have found significant differences in the number of focal adhesions between primary human and chimpanzee fibroblasts. Additionally, we see that adhesion related gene ontology categories are some of the most differentially expressed between human and chimpanzee in normal fibroblast cells. These results suggest that human and chimpanzee fibroblasts may have somewhat different adhesive properties, which could play a role in differential disease phenotypes and responses to external factors. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  14. Strong memory in time series of human magnetoencephalograms can identify photosensitive epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulmetyev, R. M.; Yulmetyeva, D. G.; Haenggi, P.; Shimojo, S.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2007-01-01

    To discuss the salient role of statistical memory effects in human brain functioning, we have analyzed a set of stochastic memory quantifiers that reflects the dynamical characteristics of neuromagnetic responses of magnetoencephalographic signals to a flickering stimulus of different color combinations from a group of control subjects, and compared them with those for a patient with photosensitive epilepsy. We have discovered that the emergence of strong memory and the accompanying transition to a regular and robust regime of chaotic behavior of signals in separate areas for a patient most likely identifies the regions where the protective mechanism against the occurrence of photosensitive epilepsy is located

  15. Time reversibility of intracranial human EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heyden, M. J.; Diks, C.; Pijn, J. P. M.; Velis, D. N.

    1996-02-01

    Intracranial electroencephalograms from patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy were tested for time reversibility. If the recorded time series is irreversible, the input of the recording system cannot be a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. We confirmed experimentally that the measurement equipment did not introduce irreversibility in the recorded output when the input was a realisation of a linear Gaussian random process. In general, the non-seizure recordings are reversible, whereas the seizure recordings are irreversible. These results suggest that time reversibility is a useful property for the characterisation of human intracranial EEG recordings in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  16. The human epilepsy mutation GABRG2(Q390X) causes chronic subunit accumulation and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jing-Qiong; Shen, Wangzhen; Zhou, Chengwen; Xu, Dong; Macdonald, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    Genetic epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases are two common neurological disorders that are conventionally viewed as being unrelated. A subset of patients with severe genetic epilepsies who have impaired development and often go on to die of their disease respond poorly to anticonvulsant drug therapy, suggesting a need for new therapeutic targets. Previously, we reported that multiple GABAA receptor epilepsy mutations result in protein misfolding and abnormal receptor trafficking. We have now developed a model of a severe human genetic epileptic encephalopathy, the Gabrg2(+/Q390X) knock-in mouse. We found that, in addition to impairing inhibitory neurotransmission, mutant GABAA receptor γ2(Q390X) subunits accumulated and aggregated intracellularly, activated caspase 3 and caused widespread, age-dependent neurodegeneration. These findings suggest that the fundamental protein metabolism and cellular consequences of the epilepsy-associated mutant γ2(Q390X) ion channel subunit are not fundamentally different from those associated with neurodegeneration. Our results have far-reaching relevance for the identification of conserved pathological cascades and mechanism-based therapies that are shared between genetic epilepsies and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Similar PDK1-AKT-mTOR pathway activation in balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons of type II focal cortical dysplasia with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-xiang; Lin, Kun; Kang, De-zhi; Liu, Xin-xiu; Wang, Xing-fu; Zheng, Shu-fa; Yu, Liang-hong; Lin, Zhang-ya

    2015-05-01

    Dysmorphic neurons and balloon cells constitute the neuropathological hallmarks of type II focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) with refractory epilepsy. The genesis of these cells may be critical to the histological findings in type II FCD. Recent work has shown enhanced activation of the mTOR cascade in both balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons, suggesting a common pathogenesis for these two neuropathological hallmarks. A direct comparative analysis of balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons might identify a molecular link between balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons. Here, we addressed whether PDK1-AKT-mTOR activation differentiates balloon cells from dysmorphic neurons. We used immunohistochemistry with antibodies against phosphorylated (p)-PDK1 (Ser241), p-AKT (Thr308), p-AKT (Ser473), p-mTOR (Ser2448), p-P70S6K (Thr229), and p-p70S6 kinase (Thr389) in balloon cells compared with dysmorphic neurons. Strong or moderate staining for components of the PDK1-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway was observed in both balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons. However, only a few pyramidal neurons displayed weak staining in control group (perilesional neocortex and histologically normal neocortex). Additionally, p-PDK1 (Ser241) and p-AKT (Thr308) staining in balloon cells were stronger than in dysmorphic neurons, whereas p-P70S6K (Thr229) and p-p70S6 kinase (Thr389) staining in balloon cells was weaker than in dysmorphic neurons. In balloon cells, p-AKT (Ser473) and p-mTOR (Ser2448) staining was comparable with the staining in dysmorphic neurons. Our data support the previously suggested pathogenic relationship between balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons concerning activation of the PDK1-AKT-mTOR, which may play important roles in the pathogenesis of type II FCD. Differential expression of some components of the PDK1-AKT-mTOR pathway between balloon cells and dysmorphic neurons may result from cell-specific gene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue Expressions of Soluble Human Epoxide Hydrolase-2 Enzyme in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Merdin Lyutviev; Kemerdere, Rahsan; Baran, Oguz; Inal, Berrin Bercik; Gumus, Alper; Coskun, Cihan; Yeni, Seher Naz; Eren, Bulent; Uzan, Mustafa; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2017-10-01

    We sought to simply demonstrate how levels of soluble human epoxide hydrolase-2 show changes in both temporal the cortex and hippocampal complex in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 20 patients underwent anterior temporal lobe resection due to temporal lobe epilepsy. The control group comprised 15 people who died in traffic accidents or by falling from a height, and their autopsy findings were included. Adequately sized temporal cortex and hippocampal samples were removed from each patient during surgery, and the same anatomic structures were removed from the control subjects during the autopsy procedures. Each sample was stored at -80°C as rapidly as possible until the enzyme assay. The temporal cortex in the epilepsy patients had a significantly higher enzyme level than did the temporal cortex of the control group (P = 0.03). Correlation analysis showed that as the enzyme level increases in the temporal cortex, it also increases in the hippocampal complex (r 2  = 0.06, P = 0.00001). More important, enzyme tissue levels showed positive correlations with seizure frequency in both the temporal cortex and hippocampal complex in patients (r 2  = 0.7, P = 0.00001 and r 2  = 0.4, P = 0.003, respectively). The duration of epilepsy was also positively correlated with the hippocampal enzyme level (r 2  = 0.06, P = 0.00001). Soluble human epoxy hydrolase enzyme-2 is increased in both lateral and medial temporal tissues in temporal lobe epilepsy. Further studies should be conducted as inhibition of this enzyme has resulted in a significant decrease in or stopping of seizures and attenuated neuroinflammation in experimental epilepsy models in the current literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in flip/flop splicing of astroglial AMPA receptors in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Gerald; Schröder, Wolfgang; Hinterkeuser, Stefan; Schumacher, Thekla; Schramm, Johannes; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Recent data suggested a role for glial cells in epilepsy. This study sought to identify and functionally characterize AMPA receptors expressed by astrocytes in human hippocampal tissue resected from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Patch-clamp and fast application methods were combined to investigate astrocytes in situ and after fresh isolation from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Relying on presurgical and histopathologic analysis, we divided human specimens into two groups, Ammon's horn sclerosis (AHS) and lesion-associated epilepsy. Fast application of glutamate and kainate evoked receptor currents in all cells studied. Reversal-potential analysis revealed an intermediate Ca2+ permeability of the receptor channels that did not vary between the two groups of patients. However, preapplication of the AMPA receptor-specific modulator, cyclothiazide, disclosed differences in flip-flop splicing. This treatment considerably enhanced the receptor conductance, with potentiation being significantly stronger in cells from AHS specimens compared with lesion-associated cells, suggesting upregulation of AMPA receptor flip splice variants in astrocytes of the sclerotic tissue. Compelling evidence has been accumulated showing direct and rapid signaling between neurons and glial cells. Our data suggest that in AHS patients, neuronally released glutamate will lead to an enhanced and prolonged depolarization of astrocytes, which might be involved in seizure generation and spread in this particular condition of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

  20. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  1. Focal seizure associated with human parvovirus B19 infection in a non-encephalopathic child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Debopam; Willis, Erin

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute symptomatic (at the time of documented brain insult) seizures and single unprovoked seizures are 29-39 and 23-61 per 100 000 per year, respectively. After stabilization of the patient, finding the etiology of the seizure is of paramount importance. A careful history and physical examination may allow a diagnosis without need for further evaluation. In the literature, severe central nervous system involvement has been reported from human parvovirus B19 infection. We reported a previously healthy 7-year-old girl who presented after an episode of focal seizure. She was afebrile and didn't have any focal neurological abnormalities. She had erythematous malar rash along with reticulating pattern of rash over her both upper extremities. Parvovirus infection was suspected due to the characteristic erythematous malar rash. Serum human parvovirus B19 DNA polymerase chain reaction was positive which was consistent with acute parvovirus infection. Further confirmation of current infection was done with Sandwich enzyme immunoassays showing positive anti-B19 IgM Index (>1.1). IgG index was equivocal (0.9-1.1). We report an extremely rare presentation of non-febrile seizure from acute parvovirus infection in a child without encephalopathy who had an excellent recovery. Timely diagnosis can provide counselling regarding future seizure recurrence risk, curtail expenditure from expensive diagnostic work up and provide additional recommendations about potential risks to a pregnant caregiver.

  2. Imaging of the epilepsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Imaging of epilepsy patients is challenging, since epileptogenic lesions (defined as structural lesions causally related to the epilepsy syndrome) may be small and often do not change during life. Prior clinical information about the epilepsy syndrome and the semiology of the seizures is needed in order to plan the examination properly. The effort to detect an epileptogenic lesion is directed to partial (focal) epilepsy syndromes whereas - by definition - no lesion is identified in idiopathic epilepsies. Most patients with partial epilepsies suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsies. In these patients, 2- to 3-mm-thick T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) fast spin echo slices along or perpendicular to the temporal lobe length axis have the highest diagnostic efficacy. In contrast, in patients with extratemporal lobe epilepsies perpendicular FLAIR slices through the anatomic region, from which, due to clinical and EEG criteria, the seizures are likely to originate, are preferred. The imaging features of common epileptogenic lesions (hippocampal sclerosis, long-term epilepsy-associated tumours, focal cortical dysplasias, vascular malformations, encephalitis including limbic and Rasmussen's encephalitis, gyral scarring including ulegyria) are detailed in the second section of this paper. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of the epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.

    2005-01-01

    Imaging of epilepsy patients is challenging, since epileptogenic lesions (defined as structural lesions causally related to the epilepsy syndrome) may be small and often do not change during life. Prior clinical information about the epilepsy syndrome and the semiology of the seizures is needed in order to plan the examination properly. The effort to detect an epileptogenic lesion is directed to partial (focal) epilepsy syndromes whereas - by definition - no lesion is identified in idiopathic epilepsies. Most patients with partial epilepsies suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsies. In these patients, 2- to 3-mm-thick T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) fast spin echo slices along or perpendicular to the temporal lobe length axis have the highest diagnostic efficacy. In contrast, in patients with extratemporal lobe epilepsies perpendicular FLAIR slices through the anatomic region, from which, due to clinical and EEG criteria, the seizures are likely to originate, are preferred. The imaging features of common epileptogenic lesions (hippocampal sclerosis, long-term epilepsy-associated tumours, focal cortical dysplasias, vascular malformations, encephalitis including limbic and Rasmussen's encephalitis, gyral scarring including ulegyria) are detailed in the second section of this paper. (orig.)

  4. Stability of rotors and focal sources for human atrial fibrillation: focal impulse and rotor mapping (FIRM) of AF sources and fibrillatory conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Vijay; Baykaner, Tina; Rostamian, Armand; Daubert, James P; Hummel, John; Krummen, David E; Trikha, Rishi; Miller, John M; Tomassoni, Gery F; Narayan, Sanjiv M

    2014-12-01

    Several groups report electrical rotors or focal sources that sustain atrial fibrillation (AF) after it has been triggered. However, it is difficult to separate stable from unstable activity in prior studies that examined only seconds of AF. We applied phase-based focal impulse and rotor mapping (FIRM) to study the dynamics of rotors/sources in human AF over prolonged periods of time. We prospectively mapped AF in 260 patients (169 persistent, 61 ± 12 years) at 6 centers in the FIRM registry, using baskets with 64 contact electrodes per atrium. AF was phase mapped (RhythmView, Topera, Menlo Park, CA, USA). AF propagation movies were interpreted by each operator to assess the source stability/dynamics over tens of minutes before ablation. Sources were identified in 258 of 260 of patients (99%), for 2.8 ± 1.4 sources/patient (1.8 ± 1.1 in left, 1.1 ± 0.8 in right atria). While AF sources precessed in stable regions, emanating activity including spiral waves varied from collision/fusion (fibrillatory conduction). Each source lay in stable atrial regions for 4,196 ± 6,360 cycles, with no differences between paroxysmal versus persistent AF (4,290 ± 5,847 vs. 4,150 ± 6,604; P = 0.78), or right versus left atrial sources (P = 0.26). Rotors and focal sources for human AF mapped by FIRM over prolonged time periods precess ("wobble") but remain within stable regions for thousands of cycles. Conversely, emanating activity such as spiral waves disorganize and collide with the fibrillatory milieu, explaining difficulties in using activation mapping or signal processing analyses at fixed electrodes to detect AF rotors. These results provide a rationale for targeted ablation at AF sources rather than fibrillatory spiral waves. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Focal Electrically Administered Therapy (FEAT): Device parameter effects on stimulus perception in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J.; Linder, Katie; Ricci, Raffaella; Li, Xingbao; Anderson, Berry; Arana, Ashley; Nahas, Ziad; Amassian, Vahe; Long, James; George, Mark S.; Sackeim, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Focal Electrically-Administered Therapy (FEAT) is a new method of transcranial electrical stimulation capable of focal modulation of cerebral activity. Other than invasive studies in animals and examination of motor output in humans, there are limited possibilities for establishing basic principles about how variation in stimulus parameters impact on patterns of intracortical stimulation. This study used a simpler paradigm, and evaluated the effects of different stimulation parameters on subjective perception of the quality and location of scalp pain. Methods In two studies, 19 subjects were randomly stimulated over the left forehead, varying the anode-cathode arrangement, the intensity of stimulation, the electrode size and placement, and whether the current flow was unidirectional or bidirectional. Subjects rated the location of the sensation, and its quality. Results The perceived center of stimulation moved toward the cathode, regardless of placement. This shift in subjective sensation was more prominent when the electricity was unidirectional. Additionally, more intense stimulation, as well as stimulation with a smaller electrode, caused greater perceived pain. Unidirectional stimulation was rated more painful when traveling from a large anode to a small cathode and less painful when traveling from a small anode to a large cathode. Finally, participants were more likely to perceive the electrical stimulation as moving towards a specific direction when the intensity was high than when it was low. Conclusions The intensity and location of sensations can be manipulated by varying the intensity, current direction, or geometry of electrodes. PMID:19092677

  6. Intraoperative hyperventilation vs remifentanil during electrocorticography for epilepsy surgery - a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Madsen, F F; Moltke, F B

    2010-01-01

    different brain regions in the same patient. METHODS: Hyperventilation and ultra short acting opioid remifentanil were used separately as intraoperative precipitatants of seizure patterns, while recording from subdural and intraventricular electrodes in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy. Two different...... ictal onset zones appeared in response to hyperventilation and remifentanil. Both zones were resected and the patient has remained essentially seizure free for 1 year. Furthermore, this is the first description of hyperventilation used as an intraoperative seizure precipitant in human focal epilepsy....

  7. History of epilepsy: nosological concepts and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the development of the nosological views of the epilepsies, from prehistoric times to the present, and highlight how these views are reflected by terminology and classification. Even the earliest written documents reveal awareness that there are multiple forms of epilepsy, and it is surprising that they should be included under the same disease concept, perhaps because the generalised tonic-clonic seizure served as a common denominator. The Hippocratic doctrine that the seat of epilepsy is in the brain may be rooted in earlier knowledge of traumatic seizures. Galenus differentiated cases where the brain was the primary site of origin from others where epilepsy was concomitant with illness in other parts of the body. This laid the fundament for the distinction between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies, the definition of which changed considerably over time. The description of the multiple seizure types as they are known at present started in the late 18th century. Attempts to classify seizure types began in the late 19th century, when Jackson formulated a comprehensive pathophysiological definition of epilepsy. Electroencephalography supported a second dichotomy, between seizures with localised onset and others with immediate involvement of both hemispheres which became known as "generalised". In recent years, advanced methods of studying brain function in vivo, including the generation of both spontaneous and reflex epileptic seizures, have revolutionised our understanding of focal and "generalised" human ictogenesis. Both involve complex neuronal networks which are currently being investigated.

  8. Focal epithelial hyperplasia in a human immuno-deficiency virus patient treated with laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Vecchio, Alessandro Del; Romeo, Umberto

    2014-07-16

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a rare disease of the oral mucosa; it is mostly found in children or young adults who are immunosuppressed and who live in regions with low socioeconomic status. It is characterized by asymptomatic papules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Healing can be spontaneous, and treatment is indicated if there are aesthetic or functional complications. Human papillomavirus, especially genotypes 13 and 32, has been associated with FEH and is detected in the majority of lesions. Histopathologically, FEH is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, and fusion and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges. A 37-year-old male patient was referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences at the Sapienza University of Rome, complaining of numerous exophytic lesions in his mouth. He stated that the lesions were not painful but he had experienced occasional bleeding after incidental masticatory trauma. He had received no previous treatment for the oral lesions. His medical history revealed that he was human immuno-deficiency virus positive and was a smoker with numerous, asymptomatic oral papules clinically and histologically corresponding to FEH. The labial and buccal mucosa were especially affected by lesions. Surgical treatment was performed using a 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate laser (SmartLite, Deka, Florence, Italy) in continuous mode with a 300 μm fiber and power of 1.4 W (power density 1980.22 W/cm(2)). After anesthesia without vasoconstrictors, the lesions were tractioned with sutures or an Allis clamp and then completely excised. The lesions were preserved in 10% formalin for histological examination, which confirmed the clinical diagnosis of FEH. In this case, the laser allowed excellent control of bleeding, without postoperative sutures, and optimal wound healing.

  9. Relación entre electroencefalograma y neuroimagen en niños con epilepsia focal de difícil control Relation between electroencephalogram and neuroimaging present in children with epilepsy of difficult control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Valdivia Álvarez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. Las epilepsias focales son las más frecuentes en los niños, y la resistencia al tratamiento farmacológico puede estar presente hasta en el 30 % de los pacientes. Se realizó este estudio con el objetivo de dirigir la atención hacia la coincidencia topográfica de los paroxismos electroencefalográficos, con lesiones estructurales demostrables por neuroimagen, para facilitar el diseño de estrategias terapéuticas futuras. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, longitudinal prospectivo, con 44 niños con diagnóstico de epilepsia focal de difícil control, ingresados en el Servicio de Neuropediatría del Hospital Pediátrico Docente «Juan M. Márquez», entre enero de 2003 y junio de 2007. Se realizaron estudios por electroencefalograma (EEG al ingreso y videoelectroencefalograma, además de estudios de neuroimagen por tomografía axial o resonancia magnética nuclear. RESULTADOS. Los paroxismos en EEG involucraron el lóbulo frontal hasta en el 68 % de los pacientes. En el 48 % de los pacientes, los paroxismos electroencefalográficos coinciden con zonas de alteración estructural según neuroimagen, más frecuentes en el lóbulo frontal. En el 25 % no hay coincidencia topográfica y en el 27 % no se precisan alteraciones estructurales. CONCLUSIONES. En las epilepsias focales de difícil control se debe prestar especial atención a las zonas elocuentes con coincidencia entre el EEG y la neuroimagen, para evaluar de forma temprana las alternativas quirúrgicas de tratamiento.INTRODUCTION: Focal epilepsies are the more frequent conditions in children and a pharmacologic treatment resistance could be present up to 30% of patients. Aim of present paper was to direct the attention to topographic coincidence of electroencephalographic paroxysms with structural lesions by neuroimaging facilitating the future therapeutical strategies design. METHODS: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective study was conducted in 44 children

  10. Activity of the anticonvulsant lacosamide in experimental and human epilepsy via selective effects on slow Na+ channel inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Dominik; Opitz, Thoralf; Niespodziany, Isabelle; Wolff, Christian; Beck, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    In human epilepsy, pharmacoresistance to antiepileptic drug therapy is a major problem affecting ~30% of patients with epilepsy. Many classical antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated sodium channels, and their potent activity in inhibiting high-frequency firing has been attributed to their strong use-dependent blocking action. In chronic epilepsy, a loss of use-dependent block has emerged as a potential cellular mechanism of pharmacoresistance for anticonvulsants acting on voltage-gated sodium channels. The anticonvulsant drug lacosamide (LCM) also targets sodium channels, but has been shown to preferentially affect sodium channel slow inactivation processes, in contrast to most other anticonvulsants. We used whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in acutely isolated cells to investigate the effects of LCM on transient Na + currents. Furthermore, we used whole-cell current clamp recordings to assess effects on repetitive action potential firing in hippocampal slices. We show here that LCM exerts its effects primarily via shifting the slow inactivation voltage dependence to more hyperpolarized potentials in hippocampal dentate granule cells from control and epileptic rats, and from patients with epilepsy. It is important to note that this activity of LCM was maintained in chronic experimental and human epilepsy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficacy of LCM in inhibiting high-frequency firing is undiminished in chronic experimental and human epilepsy. Taken together, these results show that LCM exhibits maintained efficacy in chronic epilepsy, in contrast to conventional use-dependent sodium channel blockers such as carbamazepine. They also establish that targeting slow inactivation may be a promising strategy for overcoming target mechanisms of pharmacoresistance. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. 77 FR 59197 - Epilepsy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Epilepsy... Program Expansion Supplement Award to the Epilepsy Foundation of America. SUMMARY: The Health Resources... Child Health Bureau's Epilepsy Program to the Epilepsy Foundation of America (U23MC19824) to support...

  12. Survival of mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in humans with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seress, László; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József; Klemm, Joyce; Byrne, Richard; Bakay, Roy A E

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis can be identified in most patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Surgical removal of the sclerotic hippocampus is widely performed to treat patients with drug-resistant mesial TLE. In general, both epilepsy-prone and epilepsy-resistant neurons are believed to be in the hippocampal formation. The hilar mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are usually considered one of the most vulnerable types of neurons. The aim of this study was to clarify the fate of mossy cells in the hippocampus in epileptic humans. Of the 19 patients included in this study, 15 underwent temporal lobe resection because of drug-resistant TLE. Four patients were used as controls because they harbored tumors that had not invaded the hippocampus and they had experienced no seizures. Histological evaluation of resected hippocampal tissues was performed using immunohistochemistry. Mossy cells were identified in the control as well as the epileptic hippocampi by using cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide immunohistochemistry. In most cases the number of mossy cells was reduced and thorny excrescences were smaller in the epileptic hippocampi than in controls; however, there was a significant loss of pyramidal cells and a partial loss of granule cells in the same epileptic hippocampi in which mossy cell loss was apparent. The loss of mossy cells could be correlated with the extent of hippocampal sclerosis, patient age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and frequency of seizures. In many cases large numbers of mossy cells were present in the hilus of the dentate gyrus when most pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and CA3 areas of the Ammon's horn were lost, suggesting that mossy cells may not be more vulnerable to epileptic seizures than the hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  13. The parietal epithelial cell is crucially involved in human idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Henry; Smeets, Bart; van der Laak, Jeroen; Steenbergen, Eric; Wetzels, Jack

    2005-10-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the most common patterns of glomerular injury encountered in human renal biopsies. Epithelial hyperplasia, which can be prominent in FSGS, has been attributed to dedifferentiation and proliferation of podocytes. Based on observations in a mouse model of FSGS, we pointed to the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In the present study we investigated the relative role of PECs and podocytes in human idiopathic FSGS. We performed a detailed study of lesions from a patient with recurrent idiopathic FSGS by serial sectioning, marker analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction of glomeruli. We have studied the expression of markers for podocytes, PECs, mesangial cells, endothelium, and myofibroblasts. We also looked at proliferation and composition of the deposited extracellular matrix (ECM). We found that proliferating epithelial cells in FSGS lesions are negative for podocyte and macrophage markers, but stain for PEC markers. The composition of the matrix deposited by these cells is identical to Bowman's capsule. Our study demonstrates that PECs are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of FSGS lesions.

  14. Positron emission tomography in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Goto, Ikuo

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed with the 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose method on 29 patients with epilepsy (generalized epilepsy, 4; partial epilepsy, 24; undetermined type, 1). The subjects were restricted to patients with epilepsy without focal abnormality on X-CT. All the patients with generalized epilepsy showed a normal pattern on PET. Fourteen out of the 24 patients with partial epilepsy and the 1 with epilepsy of undermined type showed focal hypometabolism on PET. The hypometabolic zone was localized in areas including the temporal cortex in 11 patients, frontal in 2 and thalamus in 1. The location of hypometabolic zone and that of interictal paroxysmal activity on EEG were well correlated in most patients. The patients with poorly-controlled seizure showed a higher incidence of PET abnormality (12 out of 13) than those with well-controlled seizures (2 out of 11). The incidence of abnormality on PET and MRI and the location of both abnormality were not necessarily coincident. These results indicated that the PET examination in epilepsy provides valuable information about the location of epileptic focus, and that the findings on PET in patients with partial epilepsy may be one of the good indicators about the intractability of partial epilepsy, and that PET and MRI provide complementary information in the diagnosis of epilepsy. (author)

  15. FOCAL CORTICAL DYSPLASIAS: CLINICAL AND ELECTRO-NEUROIMAGING CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a notable advance made in epileptology, resistant epilepsies account for approximately 30 % of all forms of epilepsy particularly in patients with focal seizures. One of the main causes of therapy-resistant focal epilepsies is focal cortical dysplasias (FCD. This term was first introduced by D. Taylor et al. in 1971. FCD belongs to abnormal cortical development. Among all abnormalities of cortical development, FCD in surgically treated children amounts to 75 %. FCD is the most common cause of resistant epilepsy in children and the most frequent reason for diagnosing cryptogenic focal epilepsy with intractable seizures. The author gives a detailed literature review dedicated to FCD as a cause of resistant epilepsy, including the classification and histologic characteristics of FCD, its clinical manifestations and prognosis, and approaches to medical and surgical treatments. 

  16. Identification of a novel idiopathic epilepsy locus in Belgian Shepherd dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seppälä, Eija H.; Koskinen, Lotta L.E.; Gulløv, Christina Hedal

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in dogs, with an incidence ranging from 0.5% to up to 20% in particular breeds. Canine epilepsy can be etiologically defined as idiopathic or symptomatic. Epileptic seizures may be classified as focal with or without secondary generalization...... collected 159 cases and 148 controls and confirmed the presence of epilepsy through epilepsy questionnaires and clinical examinations. The MRI was normal while interictal EEG revealed abnormalities and variable foci in the clinically examined affected dogs. A genome-wide association study using Affymetrix...... mutation. It would establish the affected breed as a novel therapeutic model, help to develop a DNA test for breeding purposes and introduce a novel candidate gene for human idiopathic epilepsies....

  17. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky's novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuil, Piet H A

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881) suffered from epilepsy. Some type of psychopathology can be found in about 25% of the characters of his novels. Some of them have seizures. In at least five of them Dostoevsky clearly intends them to have epilepsy. Others are more likely to be created as people with hysteria or sometimes, for instance, possession. In this essay an inventory is given by more or less comprehensive quotes of different types of seizures in five novels. The seizures are named in the novels with a varying vocabulary based on the concepts of nosology in the 19th century, the knowledge of Dostoevsky of these concepts, his own experiences, and problems in translation and transliteration. In the discussion, analysis of the role these factors played in the understanding of what Dostoevsky really expressed is given attention. Special attention is given to the so-called ecstatic aura. This element of focal epileptic seizures is so rare that in the past the description of it raised doubts on its existence as such and therefore the embellishment by Dostoevsky, describing his own experience and/or that of his epileptic characters Kirillov and Myshkin. The consequence of this analytic approach, however, should not be losing one's amazement of the genius polyphonic creativity of Dostoevsky to integrate so many profound aspects of the human and especially the Russian soul in the characters of his novels. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Dapagliflozin in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: a combined human-rodent pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekeran, Harindra; Reich, Heather N; Hladunewich, Michelle A; Cattran, Daniel; Lovshin, Julie A; Lytvyn, Yuliya; Bjornstad, Petter; Lai, Vesta; Tse, Josephine; Cham, Leslie; Majumder, Syamantak; Bowskill, Bridgit B; Kabir, M Golam; Advani, Suzanne L; Gibson, Ian W; Sood, Manish M; Advani, Andrew; Cherney, David Z I

    2018-03-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is an important cause of nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition (SGLT2i) therapy attenuates the progression of diabetic nephropathy, but it remains unclear whether SGLT2i provides renoprotection in nondiabetic CKD such as FSGS. The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of 8 wk of dapagliflozin on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in humans and in experimental FSGS. Secondary end points were related to changes in renal hemodynamic function, proteinuria, and blood pressure (BP). GFR (inulin) and renal plasma flow (para-aminohippurate), proteinuria, and BP were measured in patients with FSGS ( n = 10), and similar parameters were measured in subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats. In response to dapagliflozin, changes in GFR, renal plasma flow, and 24-h urine protein excretion were not statistically significant in humans or rats. Systolic BP (SBP) decreased in SNx rats (196 ± 26 vs. 165 ± 33 mmHg; P < 0.001), whereas changes were not statistically significant in humans (SBP 112.7 ± 8.5 to 112.8 ± 11.2 mmHg, diastolic BP 71.8 ± 6.5 to 69.6 ± 8.4 mmHg; P = not significant), although hematocrit increased (0.40 ± 0.05 to 0.42 ± 0.05%; P = 0.03). In archival kidney tissue from a separate patient cohort, renal parenchymal SGLT2 mRNA expression was decreased in individuals with FSGS compared with controls. Short-term treatment with the SGLT2i dapagliflozin did not modify renal hemodynamic function or attenuate proteinuria in humans or in experimental FSGS. This may be related to downregulation of renal SGLT2 expression. Studies examining the impact of SGLT2i on markers of kidney disease in patients with other causes of nondiabetic CKD are needed.

  19. Integrating artificial intelligence with real-time intracranial EEG monitoring to automate interictal identification of seizure onset zones in focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajah, Yogatheesan; Berry, Brent; Cimbalnik, Jan; Kremen, Vaclav; Van Gompel, Jamie; Stead, Matt; Brinkmann, Benjamin; Iyer, Ravishankar; Worrell, Gregory

    2018-08-01

    An ability to map seizure-generating brain tissue, i.e. the seizure onset zone (SOZ), without recording actual seizures could reduce the duration of invasive EEG monitoring for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. A widely-adopted practice in the literature is to compare the incidence (events/time) of putative pathological electrophysiological biomarkers associated with epileptic brain tissue with the SOZ determined from spontaneous seizures recorded with intracranial EEG, primarily using a single biomarker. Clinical translation of the previous efforts suffers from their inability to generalize across multiple patients because of (a) the inter-patient variability and (b) the temporal variability in the epileptogenic activity. Here, we report an artificial intelligence-based approach for combining multiple interictal electrophysiological biomarkers and their temporal characteristics as a way of accounting for the above barriers and show that it can reliably identify seizure onset zones in a study cohort of 82 patients who underwent evaluation for drug-resistant epilepsy. Our investigation provides evidence that utilizing the complementary information provided by multiple electrophysiological biomarkers and their temporal characteristics can significantly improve the localization potential compared to previously published single-biomarker incidence-based approaches, resulting in an average area under ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.73 in a cohort of 82 patients. Our results also suggest that recording durations between 90 min and 2 h are sufficient to localize SOZs with accuracies that may prove clinically relevant. The successful validation of our approach on a large cohort of 82 patients warrants future investigation on the feasibility of utilizing intra-operative EEG monitoring and artificial intelligence to localize epileptogenic brain tissue. Broadly, our study demonstrates the use of artificial intelligence coupled with careful feature engineering in

  20. Neurological Disease Rises from Ocean to Bring Model for Human Epilepsy to Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid of macroalgal origin was used for traditional and medicinal purposes in Japan and largely forgotten until its rediscovery in diatoms that poisoned 107 people after consumption of contaminated mussels. The more severely poisoned victims had seizures and/or amnesia and four died; however, one survivor unexpectedly developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE a year after the event. Nearly a decade later, several thousand sea lions have stranded on California beaches with neurological symptoms. Analysis of the animals stranded over an eight year period indicated five clusters of acute neurological poisoning; however, nearly a quarter have stranded individually outside these events with clinical signs of a chronic neurological syndrome similar to TLE. These poisonings are not limited to sea lions, which serve as readily observed sentinels for other marine animals that strand during domoic acid poisoning events, including several species of dolphin and whales. Acute domoic acid poisoning is five-times more prominent in adult female sea lions as a result of the proximity of their year-round breeding grounds to major domoic acid bloom events. The chronic neurological syndrome, on the other hand, is more prevalent in young animals, with many potentially poisoned in utero. The sea lion rookeries of the Channel Islands are at the crossroads of domoic acid producing harmful algal blooms and a huge industrial discharge site for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs. Studies in experimental animals suggest that chronic poisoning observed in immature sea lions may result from a spatial and temporal coincidence of DDTs and domoic acid during early life stages. Emergence of an epilepsy syndrome from the ocean brings a human epilepsy model to life and provides unexpected insights into interaction with legacy contaminants and expression of disease at different life stages.

  1. Upregulation of adenosine kinase in astrocytes in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Zurolo, Emanuele; Iyer, Anand; de Groot, Marjolein; Anink, Jasper; Carbonell, Caterina; van Vliet, Erwin A; Baayen, Johannes C; Boison, Detlev; Gorter, Jan A

    2011-09-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK) represents the key metabolic enzyme for the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels in the brain. In adult brain, ADK is primarily present in astrocytes. Several lines of experimental evidence support a critical role of ADK in different types of brain injury associated with astrogliosis, which is also a prominent morphologic feature of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We hypothesized that dysregulation of ADK is an ubiquitous pathologic hallmark of TLE. Using immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, we investigated ADK protein expression in a rat model of TLE during epileptogenesis and the chronic epileptic phase and compared those findings with tissue resected from TLE patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In rat control hippocampus and cortex, a low baseline expression of ADK was found with mainly nuclear localization. One week after the electrical induction of status epilepticus (SE), prominent up-regulation of ADK became evident in astrocytes with a characteristic cytoplasmic localization. This increase in ADK persisted at least for 3-4 months after SE in rats developing a progressive form of epilepsy. In line with the findings from the rat model, expression of astrocytic ADK was also found to be increased in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of patients with TLE. In addition, in vitro experiments in human astrocyte cultures showed that ADK expression was increased by several proinflammatory molecules (interleukin-1β and lipopolysaccharide). These results suggest that dysregulation of ADK in astrocytes is a common pathologic hallmark of TLE. Moreover, in vitro data suggest the existence of an additional layer of modulatory crosstalk between the astrocyte-based adenosine cycle and inflammation. Whether this interaction also can play a role in vivo needs to be further investigated. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. The diagnostic utility of 3D-ESI rotating and moving dipole methodology in the pre-surgical evaluation of MRI-negative childhood epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Angelo; Lallas, Matt; Jayakar, Prasanna; Miller, Ian; Hyslop, Ann; Dunoyer, Catalina; Resnick, Trevor; Duchowny, Michael

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates whether a combined rotating dipole (RD) and moving dipole (MD) solution enhances three-dimensional electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging (3D-ESI) localization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative pediatric patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We retrospectively selected 14 MRI-negative patients with FCD from a cohort of 60 pediatric patients previously used to evaluate the diagnostic utility of 3D-ESI in epilepsy surgery. Patients were younger than 18 years at time of surgery and had at least 1 year of outcome data. RD and MD models were constructed for each interictal spike or sharp wave, and it was determined whether each inverse algorithm localized within the surgical resection cavity (SRC). We also compared the 3D-ESI findings and surgical outcome with positron emission tomography (PET) and ictal single photon emission computed tomography (iSPECT). RD analyses revealed a high concordance with the SRC (78.6%), particularly for temporal lobe resection (100.0%), and showed superior localization compared to PET and iSPECT, with the highest correlation in FCD type I and temporal lobe resection. Furthermore, the RD method was superior to iSPECT in FCD type II cases and to PET in extratemporal resections. RD and MD results were comparable, but in 18.2% of patients with FCD type I with localizing RDs, the MD solution was only partially within the SRC; in all of these patients 3D-ESI also correlated with superior surgical outcome compared to PET and iSPECT, especially when RD and MD solutions were analyzed together. 3D-ESI in MRI-negative cases showed superior localization compared to iSPECT or PET, especially in FCD type I and temporal lobe epilepsy, and correlated with superior surgical outcome compared to iSPECT and PET at 1 year and 2 years postoperatively, especially when RD and MD solutions were analyzed together. These findings suggest that 3D-ESI based on a combined RD-MD solution improves surgical accuracy in

  3. Focal epithelial hyperplasia associated with human papillomavirus 13 and common human leukocyte antigen alleles in a Turkish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoğlu, Gülşen; Metin, Ahmet; Ceylan, Gülay Güleç; Emre, Selma; Akpolat, Demet; Süngü, Nuran

    2015-02-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a rare and benign papillomatous disease of the oral cavity, which is closely associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 13 and 32. Genetic susceptibility to HPV infections are supported by recent studies involving the human leukocyte antigen system (HLA). In this report, we aimed to determine the clinicopathological features of a Turkish family with FEH and to detect the shared HLA DR and DQ types. HPV DNA typing of tissue samples and HLA determination from blood samples of four family members were performed by polymerase chain reaction. Histopathological examination of all patients revealed acanthotic papillomatous epidermis, koilocytes, apoptotic keratinocytes, and mitosoid bodies. HPV13 was detected by polymerase chain reaction. HLA DQA1*0501, HLA DQB1*0302, and HLA DRB1*11 alleles were common in all family members. HLA DRB1*04 was detected in three of them. This report is the first step for the investigation of involvement of HLA types in the pathogenesis of Turkish patients with FEH. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Transient reduction in theta power caused by interictal spikes in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manling Ge; Jundan Guo; Yangyang Xing; Zhiguo Feng; Weide Lu; Xinxin Ma; Yuehua Geng; Xin Zhang

    2017-07-01

    The inhibitory impacts of spikes on LFP theta rhythms(4-8Hz) are investigated around sporadic spikes(SSs) based on intracerebral EEG of 4 REM sleep patients with temporal lobe epilepsy(TLE) under the pre-surgical monitoring. Sequential interictal spikes in both genesis area and extended propagation pathway are collected, that, SSs genesis only in anterior hippocampus(aH)(possible propagation pathway in Entorhinal cortex(EC)), only in EC(possible propagation pathway in aH), and in both aH and EC synchronously. Instantaneous theta power was estimated by using Gabor wavelet transform, and theta power level was estimated by averaged over time and frequency before SSs(350ms pre-spike) and after SSs(350ms post-spike). The inhibitory effect around spikes was evaluated by the ratio of theta power level difference between pre-spike and post-spike to pre-spike theta power level. The findings were that theta power level was reduced across SSs, and the effects were more sever in the case of SSs in both aH and EC synchronously than either SSs only in EC or SSs only in aH. It is concluded that interictal spikes impair LFP theta rhythms transiently and directly. The work suggests that the reduction of theta power after the interictal spike might be an evaluation indicator of damage of epilepsy to human cognitive rhythms.

  5. Human papillomavirus-32-associated focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying HPV-16-positive papilloma-like lesions in oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Wang, Jiayi; Lei, Lei; Li, Yanzhong; Zhou, Min; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus infection can cause a variety of benign or malignant oral lesions, and the various genotypes can cause distinct types of lesions. To our best knowledge, there has been no report of 2 different human papillomavirus-related oral lesions in different oral sites in the same patient before. This paper reported a patient with 2 different oral lesions which were clinically and histologically in accord with focal epithelial hyperplasia and oral papilloma, respectively. Using DNA extracted from these 2 different lesions, tissue blocks were tested for presence of human papillomavirus followed by specific polymerase chain reaction testing for 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, and 32 subtypes in order to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Finally, human papillomavirus-32-positive focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying human papillomavirus-16-positive oral papilloma-like lesions were detected in different sites of the oral mucosa. Nucleotide sequence sequencing further confirmed the results. So in our clinical work, if the simultaneous occurrences of different human papillomavirus associated lesions are suspected, the multiple biopsies from different lesions and detection of human papillomavirus genotype are needed to confirm the diagnosis.

  6. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed.

  7. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  8. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  9. [Tropical causes of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J

    Eighty-five percent of all epileptics live in tropical regions. Prenatal risk factors, traumatic brain injuries and different parasitic infestations of the central nervous system (CNS) are the reasons behind the high prevalence of epilepsy. This work reviews the main parasitic infestations causing epilepsy in the tropics. Neurocysticercosis is the main cause of focal epilepsy in early adulthood in endemic areas (30-50%). All the phases of cysticerci (viable, transitional and calcified) are associated with epileptic seizures. Anti-cysticercus treatment helps get rid of cysticerci faster and reduces the risk of recurrence of seizures in patients with viable cysts. Symptomatic epilepsy can be the first manifestation of neuroschistosomiasis in patients without any systemic symptoms. The pseudotumoral form can trigger seizures secondary to the presence of granulomas and oedemas in the cerebral cortex. The eggs of Schistosoma japonicum are smaller, reach the CNS more easily and trigger epileptic seizures more frequently. Toxocariasis and sparganosis are other parasitic infestations that can give rise to symptomatic seizures. The risk factors for suffering chronic epilepsy after cerebral malaria are a positive familial history of epilepsy and a history of episodes of fever and cerebral malaria that began with coma or which progressed with multiple, prolonged epileptic seizures. About 20% of patients with cerebral infarction secondary to Chagas disease present late vascular epilepsy as a complication. Very few studies have been conducted to examine the prognosis, risk of recurrence and modification of the natural course of seizures associated with tropical parasitic infestations, except for the case of neurocysticercosis.

  10. Sequential motor task (Luria's Fist-Edge-Palm Test in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes Tarefa motora sequencial (Teste de Lúria punho-lado-palma em crianças com epilepsia focal benigna da infância com descarga centrotemporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Silvia Molleis Galego Miziara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the sequential motor manual actions in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and compares the results with matched control group, through the application of Luria's fist-edge-palm test. The children with BECTS underwent interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and School Performance Test (SPT. Significant difference occurred between the study and control groups for manual motor action through three equal and three different movements. Children with lower school performance had higher error rate in the imitation of hand gestures. Another factor significantly associated with the failure was the abnormality in SPECT. Children with BECTS showed abnormalities in the test that evaluated manual motor programming/planning. This study may suggest that the functional changes related to epileptiform activity in rolandic region interfere with the executive function in children with BECTS.Esse estudo avaliou ações motoras manuais sequenciais em crianças com epilepsia focal benigna da infância com descarga centrotemporal (EBICT e comparou os resultados com o grupo controle pareado, através do teste de Lúria (punho-lado-palma. As crianças com EBICT realizaram single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT interictal e Teste de Desempenho Escolar (TDE. Foram encontradas diferenças significativas entre os dois grupos nas atividades motoras de três movimentos iguais e três movimentos diferentes. As crianças com piores resultados no TDE e com SPECT alterado apresentaram mais erros no teste de imitação manual. Crianças com epilepsia fracassaram nos testes de avaliação motora que envolvem programação/planejamento. Esse estudo sugere que mudanças funcionais relacionadas à atividade epileptiforme na região rolândica interfere com as funções executivas de crianças com EBICT.

  11. Focal myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kransdorf, M.J.; Temple, H.T.; Sweet, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Focal myositis is a pseudotumor of soft tissue that typically occurs in the deep soft tissue of the extremities, and is a relatively rare lesion. There is a wide clinical spectrum, with approximately one-third of patients with focal myositis subsequently developing polymyositis, and clinical symptoms of generalized weakness, fever, myalgia, and weight loss, with elevation of creatine phosphokinase. We report the case of a patient with focal myositis who subsequently developed myositis ossificans-like features. (orig.)

  12. Temporal-spatial characteristics of phase-amplitude coupling in electrocorticogram for human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruihua; Ren, Ye; Liu, Chunyan; Xu, Na; Li, Xiaoli; Cong, Fengyu; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Wang, YuPing

    2017-09-01

    Neural activity of the epileptic human brain contains low- and high-frequency oscillations in different frequency bands, some of which have been used as reliable biomarkers of the epileptogenic brain areas. However, the relationship between the low- and high-frequency oscillations in different cortical areas during the period from pre-seizure to post-seizure has not been completely clarified. We recorded electrocorticogram data from the temporal lobe and hippocampus of seven patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The modulation index based on the Kullback-Leibler distance and the phase-amplitude coupling co-modulogram were adopted to quantify the coupling strength between the phase of low-frequency oscillations (0.2-10Hz) and the amplitude of high-frequency oscillations (11-400Hz) in different seizure epochs. The time-varying phase-amplitude modulogram was used to analyze the phase-amplitude coupling pattern during the entire period from pre-seizure to post-seizure in both the left and right temporal lobe and hippocampus. Channels with strong modulation index were compared with the seizure onset channels identified by the neurosurgeons and the resection channels in the clinical surgery. The phase-amplitude coupling strength (modulation index) increased significantly in the mid-seizure epoch and decrease significantly in seizure termination and post-seizure epochs (ptemporal cortex and hippocampus. The "fall-max" phase-amplitude modulation pattern, i.e., high-frequency amplitudes were largest in the low-frequency phase range [-π, 0], which corresponded to the falling edges of low-frequency oscillations, appeared in the middle period of the seizures at epileptic focus channels. Channels with strong modulation index appeared on the corresponding left or right temporal cortex of surgical resection and overlapped with the clinical resection zones in all patients. The "fall-max" pattern between the phase of low-frequency oscillation and amplitude of high

  13. Language recovery after epilepsy surgery of the Broca's area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilit Mnatsakanyan

    Full Text Available Epilepsy surgery is indicated in select patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Seizure freedom or significant reduction of seizure burden without risking new neurological deficits is the expected goal of epilepsy surgery. Typically, when the seizure onset zone overlaps with eloquent cortex, patients are excluded from surgery.We present a patient with drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy who underwent successful surgery with resection of Broca's area, primarily involving the pars triangularis (BA 45. We report transient expressive aphasia followed by recovery of speech. This case provides new insights into adult neuroplasticity of the language network. Keywords: Epilepsy surgery, Eloquent cortex, Language and epilepsy, Refractory epilepsy, Electrocorticography

  14. Focal myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, H.R.; Dahlstrom, J.E.; Bennett, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Focal myositis is a rare, benign focal inflammation of muscle. The lesion often presents as a mass that may be mistaken for a soft tissue sarcoma. This report describes the MRI and histopathological features of a case and illustrates how the diagnosis may be suspected on the basis of the MR findings. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  15. Scintigraphic assessment of focal platelet accumulations following infrainguinal bypass surgery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina G; Hesse, B; Eiberg, J

    1997-01-01

    . In 28 patients undergoing in situ vein (n = 24), composite vein-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (n = 1) or PTFE (n = 3) bypass surgery, assumed vascular injuries were recorded intraoperatively. Autologous indium-111-labelled platelets were injected into the inflow artery immediately after restoration...... antiplatelet therapy or vein graft diameter. Only 2 of the 20 intragraft platelet depositions occurred in areas where intra-operative vascular injury was suspected. In the composite graft and the PTFE grafts, diffuse activity was observed throughout the entire bypass. In conclusion, focal activity...

  16. Anatomy-based reconstruction of FDG-PET images with implicit partial volume correction improves detection of hypometabolic regions in patients with epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia diagnosed on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffin, Karolien; Baete, Kristof; Nuyts, Johan; Laere, Koen van; Van Paesschen, Wim; Dupont, Patrick; Palmini, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Detection of hypometabolic areas on interictal FDG-PET images for assessing the epileptogenic zone is hampered by partial volume effects. We evaluated the performance of an anatomy-based maximum a-posteriori (A-MAP) reconstruction algorithm which combined noise suppression with correction for the partial volume effect in the detection of hypometabolic areas in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). FDG-PET images from 14 patients with refractory partial epilepsy were reconstructed using A-MAP and maximum likelihood (ML) reconstruction. In all patients, presurgical evaluation showed that FCD represented the epileptic lesion. Correspondence between the FCD location and regional metabolism on a predefined atlas was evaluated. An asymmetry index of FCD to normal cortex was calculated. Hypometabolism at the FCD location was detected in 9/14 patients (64%) using ML and in 10/14 patients (71%) using A-MAP reconstruction. Hypometabolic areas outside the FCD location were detected in 12/14 patients (86%) using ML and in 11/14 patients (79%) using A-MAP reconstruction. The asymmetry index was higher using A-MAP reconstruction (0.61, ML 0.49, p=0.03). The A-MAP reconstruction algorithm improved visual detection of epileptic FCD on brain FDG-PET images compared to ML reconstruction, due to higher contrast and better delineation of the lesion. This improvement failed to reach significance in our small sample. Hypometabolism outside the lesion is often present, consistent with the observation that the functional deficit zone tends to be larger than the epileptogenic zone. (orig.)

  17. Anatomy-based reconstruction of FDG-PET images with implicit partial volume correction improves detection of hypometabolic regions in patients with epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia diagnosed on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffin, Karolien; Baete, Kristof; Nuyts, Johan; Laere, Koen van [University Hospital Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Center, Leuven (Belgium); Van Paesschen, Wim [University Hospital Leuven, Neurology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Dupont, Patrick [University Hospital Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Center, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Laboratory of Cognitive Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Palmini, Andre [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre Epilepsy Surgery Program, Hospital Sao Lucas, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    Detection of hypometabolic areas on interictal FDG-PET images for assessing the epileptogenic zone is hampered by partial volume effects. We evaluated the performance of an anatomy-based maximum a-posteriori (A-MAP) reconstruction algorithm which combined noise suppression with correction for the partial volume effect in the detection of hypometabolic areas in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). FDG-PET images from 14 patients with refractory partial epilepsy were reconstructed using A-MAP and maximum likelihood (ML) reconstruction. In all patients, presurgical evaluation showed that FCD represented the epileptic lesion. Correspondence between the FCD location and regional metabolism on a predefined atlas was evaluated. An asymmetry index of FCD to normal cortex was calculated. Hypometabolism at the FCD location was detected in 9/14 patients (64%) using ML and in 10/14 patients (71%) using A-MAP reconstruction. Hypometabolic areas outside the FCD location were detected in 12/14 patients (86%) using ML and in 11/14 patients (79%) using A-MAP reconstruction. The asymmetry index was higher using A-MAP reconstruction (0.61, ML 0.49, p=0.03). The A-MAP reconstruction algorithm improved visual detection of epileptic FCD on brain FDG-PET images compared to ML reconstruction, due to higher contrast and better delineation of the lesion. This improvement failed to reach significance in our small sample. Hypometabolism outside the lesion is often present, consistent with the observation that the functional deficit zone tends to be larger than the epileptogenic zone. (orig.)

  18. Focal myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kransdorf, M.J. [Saint Mary`s Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiol.]|[Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Temple, H.T. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)]|[Department of Orthopedic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States); Sweet, D.E. [Department of Orthopedic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Focal myositis is a pseudotumor of soft tissue that typically occurs in the deep soft tissue of the extremities, and is a relatively rare lesion. There is a wide clinical spectrum, with approximately one-third of patients with focal myositis subsequently developing polymyositis, and clinical symptoms of generalized weakness, fever, myalgia, and weight loss, with elevation of creatine phosphokinase. We report the case of a patient with focal myositis who subsequently developed myositis ossificans-like features. (orig.) With 3 figs., 25 refs.

  19. MR contribution in surgery of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiners, L.C.; Valk, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Veelen, C.W.M. van

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of MR imaging in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy considered for surgical therapy is discussed. In this review we focus on: (a) focal abnormalities (mesial temporal sclerosis, focal migration disorders, hamartomatous lesions and low-grade tumours, phakomatosis and vascular malformations) associated with therapy-resistant partial epilepsy, requiring resective surgery; (b) abnormalities leading to generalized seizures that require more drastic surgical procedures, such as callosotomy and functional hemispherectomy; and (c) localisation of implanted depth-electrodes. (orig.)

  20. Electroencephalographic patterns in Ethiopian patients with epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2mikitser

    Conclusion: The most common EEG abnormalities in Ethiopian patients with epilepsy are focal interictal epileptiform discharges, typically ..... EEG is a valuable investigative tool. In the advent of more sophisticated neuroimaging methods, epilepsy remains one of the few common clinical problems routinely demanding EEG.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: epilepsy-aphasia spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Szepetowski P, Scheffer IE, Mefford HC. GRIN2A mutations cause epilepsy-aphasia spectrum disorders. Nat Genet. 2013 Sep;45( ... Neubauer BA, Biskup S, von Spiczak S. Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes. Nat Genet. 2013 Sep;45( ...

  2. Case Report of Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia (Heck's Disease) with Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Human Papillomavirus 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Mary A; Gordon, Katie; Firan, Miahil; Rady, Peter; Agim, Nnenna

    2016-05-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is an uncommon benign proliferation of oral mucosa caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly subtypes 13 and 32. The disease typically presents in young Native American patients and is characterized by multiple asymptomatic papules and nodules on the oral mucosa, lips, tongue, and gingiva. The factors that determine susceptibility to FEH are unknown, but the ethnic and geographic distribution of FEH suggests that genetic predisposition, particularly having the human lymphocytic antigen DR4 type, may be involved in pathogenesis. We report a case of FEH with polymerase chain reaction detection of HPV13 in a healthy 11-year-old Hispanic girl and discuss the current understanding of disease pathogenesis, susceptibility, and treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  4. Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-Convergence on axonal guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaalund, Sanne S; Venø, Morten T; Bak, Mads

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown...... to be dysregulated in epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases, and we hypothesized that miRNAs could be involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS. METHODS: miRNA expression was quantified in hippocampal specimens from human patients using miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction RT...

  5. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  6. Protective influence of hyaluronic acid on focal adhesion kinase activity in human skin fibroblasts exposed to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donejko, Magdalena; Rysiak, Edyta; Galicka, Elżbieta; Terlikowski, Robert; Głażewska, Edyta Katarzyna; Przylipiak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol and hyaluronic acid (HA) on cell survival and apoptosis in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Regarding the mechanism of ethanol action on human skin fibroblasts, we investigated cell viability and apoptosis, expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the influence of HA on those processes. Studies were conducted in confluent human skin fibroblast cultures that were treated with 25 mM, 50 mM, and 100 mM ethanol or with ethanol and 500 µg/mL HA. Cell viability was examined using methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and NC-300 Nucleo-Counter. Imaging of the cells using a fluorescence microscope Pathway 855 was performed to measure FAK expression. Depending on the dosage, ethanol decreased cell viability and activated the process of apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. HA prevented the negative influence of ethanol on cell viability and prevented apoptosis. The analysis of fluorescence imaging using BD Pathway 855 High-Content Bioimager showed the inhibition of FAK migration to the cell nucleus, depending on the increasing concentration of ethanol. This study proves that downregulation of signaling pathway of FAK is involved in ethanol-induced apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. The work also indicates a protective influence of HA on FAK activity in human skin fibroblasts exposed to ethanol.

  7. Ex vivo study of dentate gyrus neurogenesis in human pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, M; Fernández, M; Del Vecchio, G; Lizzo, G; Marucci, G; Giulioni, M; Pozzati, E; Antonelli, T; Lanzoni, G; Bagnara, G P; Giardino, L; Calzà, L

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenesis in adult humans occurs in at least two areas of the brain, the subventricular zone of the telencephalon and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampal formation. We studied dentate gyrus subgranular layer neurogenesis in patients subjected to tailored antero-mesial temporal resection including amygdalohippocampectomy due to pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using the in vitro neurosphere assay. Sixteen patients were enrolled in the study; mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was present in eight patients. Neurogenesis was investigated by ex vivo neurosphere expansion in the presence of mitogens (epidermal growth factor + basic fibroblast growth factor) and spontaneous differentiation after mitogen withdrawal. Growth factor synthesis was investigated by qRT-PCR in neurospheres. We demonstrate that in vitro proliferation of cells derived from dentate gyrus of TLE patients is dependent on disease duration. Moreover, the presence of MTS impairs proliferation. As long as in vitro proliferation occurs, neurogenesis is maintained, and cells expressing a mature neurone phenotype (TuJ1, MAP2, GAD) are spontaneously formed after mitogen withdrawal. Finally, formed neurospheres express mRNAs encoding for growth (vascular endothelial growth factor) as well as neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor). We demonstrated that residual neurogenesis in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus in TLE is dependent on diseases duration and absent in MTS. © 2010 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2010 British Neuropathological Society.

  8. Prolonged life of human acute hippocampal slices from temporal lobe epilepsy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickham, J; Brödjegård, N G; Vighagen, R

    2018-01-01

    Resected hippocampal tissue from patients with drug-resistant epilepsy presents a unique possibility to test novel treatment strategies directly in target tissue. The post-resection time for testing and analysis however is normally limited. Acute tissue slices allow for electrophysiological...... granule whole-cell recordings, can be consistently induced in these slices, underlying the usefulness of this methodology for testing and/or validating novel treatment strategies for epilepsy....

  9. HAb18G/CD147 regulates vinculin-mediated focal adhesion and cytoskeleton organization in cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liang

    Full Text Available Focal adhesions (FAs, integrin-mediated macromolecular complexes located at the cell membrane extracellular interface, have been shown to regulate cell adhesion and migration. Our previous studies have indicated that HAb18G/CD147 (CD147 is involved in cytoskeleton reorganization and FA formation in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these processes remain unclear. In the current study, we determined that CD147 was involved in vinculin-mediated FA focal adhesion formation in HCC cells. We also found that deletion of CD147 led to reduced vinculin-mediated FA areas (P<0.0001, length/width ratios (P<0.0001, and mean intensities (P<0.0001. CD147 promoted lamellipodia formation by localizing Arp2/3 to the leading edge of the cell. Deletion of CD147 significantly reduced the fluorescence (t1/2 recovery times (22.7±3.3 s of vinculin-mediated focal adhesions (P<0.0001. In cell-spreading assays, CD147 was found to be essential for dynamic focal adhesion enlargement and disassembly. Furthermore, the current data showed that CD147 reduced tyrosine phosphorylation in vinculin-mediated focal adhesions, and enhanced the accumulation of the acidic phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Together, these results revealed that CD147 is involved in vinculin-mediated focal adhesion formation, which subsequently promotes cytoskeleton reorganization to facilitate invasion and migration of human HCC cells.

  10. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Kesmodel, Ulrik S

    2016-01-01

    . RESULTS: A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0......BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment...

  11. Focal physiological uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism during somatosensory stimulation in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, P.T.; Raichle, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) was studied using multiple sequential administrations of 15 O-labeled radiotracers and positron emission tomography. In the resting state an excellent correlation between CBF and CMRO 2 was found when paired measurements of CBF and CMRO 2 from multiple (30-48) brain regions were tested in each of 33 normal subjects. Regional uncoupling of CBF and CMRO 2 was found, however, during neuronal activation induced by somatosensory stimulation. Stimulus-induced focal augmentation of cerebral blood flow (29% mean) far exceeded the concomitant local increase in tissue metabolic rate (mean, 5%), when resting-state and stimulated-state measurements were obtained in each of 9 subjects. Stimulus duration had no significant effect on response magnitude or on the degree of CBF-CMRO 2 uncoupling observed. Dynamic, physiological regulation of CBF by a mechanism (neuronal or biochemical) dependent on neuronal firing per se, but independent of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, is hypothesized

  12. Utility of the indium 111-labeled human immunoglobulin G scan for the detection of focal vascular graft infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaMuraglia, G.M.; Fischman, A.J.; Strauss, H.W.; Keech, F.; Wilkinson, R.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Rubin, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to diagnose and localize vascular graft infections has been a major challenge. Recent studies in animal models and humans with focal bacterial infection have shown that radiolabeled, polyclonal, human immunoglobulin G accumulates at the site of inflammation and can serve as the basis for an imaging technique. This study investigated this new technique for the diagnosis and localization of vascular graft infections. Twenty-five patients with suspected vascular infections involving grafts (22), atherosclerotic aneurysms (2), and subclavian vein thrombophlebitis (1) were studied. Gamma camera images of the suspected area were obtained between 5 and 48 hours after intravenous administration of 1.5 to 2.0 mCi (56 to 74 mBq) of indium 111-labeled, human, polyclonal immunoglobulin G. Scan results were interpreted without clinical information about the patient and were subsequently correlated with surgical findings, other imaging modalities, and/or clinical follow-up. In 10 of 10 patients found to have positive scan results, localized infections were confirmed at the involved sites. In 14 of 15 patients whose scan results were interpreted as negative, no vascular infections were identified at follow-up. The patient with false-negative results and recurrent bacteremia from an aortoduodenal fistula was found to have a negative scan outcome at a time when his disease was quiescent. These data suggest that nonspecific, human, indium 111-labeled immunoglobulin G scanning can be a useful noninvasive means of localizing vascular infections

  13. Surgical treatment of convexity focal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi; Iio, Masaaki.

    1987-01-01

    We have hitherto applied PET study in 72 epileptic patients. The main contents of their seizures consists of complex partial in 32, elementary partial in 32, generalized in 6, and others in 3 cases. We administered perorally 10 mCi glucose labeled with C11 produced in the JSW Baby Cyclotron for the study of CMRG(cerebral metabolic rate of glucose). The continuous inhalation method of CO 2 and O 2 labeled with O15 produced in the same cyclotron was also employed for measurement of rCBE(cerebral blood flow) and CMRO 2 (cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen). In both studies, epileptic foci were shown as well demarcated hypometabolic zones with decreased CMRG, rCBF or CMRO 2 . The locations of PET diagnosed foci were not contradictory with the clinical symptoms, scalp EEGs or X-ray CT findings. Of the 32 patients with the convexity epileptic foci, 8 patients underwent surgical treatment. Prior to the surgical intervention, subdural strip electrodes were inserted in the four cases for further assessment of focus locations. Subdural EEG disclosed very active brain activity with high amplitude 4 to 5 times scalp EEG and revealed epileptiform discharges most of which were not detected by scalp recording. PET scans did not characterize epileptogenic nature of a lesion. Subdural recording therefore was useful for detecting the foci responsible for habitual seizures in the cases with multiple PET foci. Ambiguous hypometabolic zones on PECT images also could be confirmed by the subdural technique. Of the 8 operated cases, five patients are seizure free, one is signigicantly improved and two are not improved although the postoperative follow-up is too short for precise evaluation. (J.P.N.)

  14. Major vault protein (MVP) gene polymorphisms and drug resistance in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Radhab, Saradalekshmi Koramannil; Radha, Koramannil; Sathyan, Sanish; Vijai, Joseph; Banerjee, Moinak; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath

    2013-09-10

    The human major vault protein (MVP) has been implicated in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Over expression of MVP has also been reported in brain tissue samples from antiepileptic drug (AED)-resistant human focal epilepsies. To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involving the MVP gene and AED-resistance, we compared the distribution of three SNPs in the MVP gene, rs4788187, rs3815824 and rs3815823, among 220 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype of AED-resistant epilepsy syndrome), 201 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype of AED-responsive epilepsy syndrome) and 213 ethnically matched non-epilepsy controls. All the patients and controls were residents of the South Indian state of Kerala for more than three generations. We did not find any significant difference in allele and genotypic frequencies of the studied SNPs between AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts, and between AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts independently and pooled together when compared with the controls. We conclude that rs4788187, rs3815824, rs3815823 variants of the MVP gene are associated neither with predisposition for epilepsy nor with AED-resistance in the population that we have studied. Our results suggest the need for further research into the link between MVP and AED-resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the one before it. Some children have a strange sensation before a seizure. Sensations may be tingling, ... Prognosis) Most children with epilepsy live a normal life. Certain types of childhood epilepsy go away or ...

  16. Validation of epilepsy diagnoses in the Danish National Hospital Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob; Vestergaard, Mogens; Olsen, Jørn

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the diagnosis of epilepsy in the Danish National Hospital Register. METHODS: We randomly selected 200 patients registered with epilepsy in the Danish National Hospital Register between 1977 and 2002 and validated the diagnosis according to the guidelines developed...... by the International League Against Epilepsy. RESULTS: We reviewed the medical records of 188 (94%) persons from 57 departments at 41 hospitals. The epilepsy diagnoses were confirmed in 153 patients, providing a positive predictive value for epilepsy of 81% (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 75-87%). Among the 35...... for syndrome classification was 60% (95% CI: 44-74%) for epilepsy with complex focal seizures and 35% (95% CI: 22-51%) for primary generalized epilepsy. CONCLUSION: The validity of the epilepsy diagnoses in the Danish National Hospital Register has a moderate to high positive predictive value for epilepsy...

  17. Electroencephalography in dogs with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Høgenhaven, H; Flagstad, Annette Borgbjerg

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder.......To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder....

  18. MicroRNA and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: Whole miRNome profiling of human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencurova, Petra; Baloun, Jiri; Musilova, Katerina; Radova, Lenka; Tichy, Boris; Pail, Martin; Zeman, Martin; Brichtova, Eva; Hermanova, Marketa; Pospisilova, Sarka; Mraz, Marek; Brazdil, Milan

    2017-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a severe neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. mTLE is frequently accompanied by neurodegeneration in the hippocampus resulting in hippocampal sclerosis (HS), the most common morphological correlate of drug resistance in mTLE patients. Incomplete knowledge of pathological changes in mTLE+HS complicates its therapy. The pathological mechanism underlying mTLE+HS may involve abnormal gene expression regulation, including posttranscriptional networks involving microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNA expression deregulation has been reported in various disorders, including epilepsy. However, the miRNA profile of mTLE+HS is not completely known and needs to be addressed. Here, we have focused on hippocampal miRNA profiling in 33 mTLE+HS patients and nine postmortem controls to reveal abnormally expressed miRNAs. In this study, we significantly reduced technology-related bias (the most common source of false positivity in miRNA profiling data) by combining two different miRNA profiling methods, namely next generation sequencing and miRNA-specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These methods combined have identified and validated 20 miRNAs with altered expression in the human epileptic hippocampus; 19 miRNAs were up-regulated and one down-regulated in mTLE+HS patients. Nine of these miRNAs have not been previously associated with epilepsy, and 19 aberrantly expressed miRNAs potentially regulate the targets and pathways linked with epilepsy (such as potassium channels, γ-aminobutyric acid, neurotrophin signaling, and axon guidance). This study extends current knowledge of miRNA-mediated gene expression regulation in mTLE+HS by identifying miRNAs with altered expression in mTLE+HS, including nine novel abnormally expressed miRNAs and their putative targets. These observations further encourage the potential of microRNA-based biomarkers or therapies. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against

  19. Novel approaches to epilepsy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kokaia, Merab

    2013-01-01

    The aim of epilepsy treatment is to achieve complete seizure freedom. Nonetheless, numerous side effects and seizure resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affecting about 30-40% of all patients are main unmet needs in today's epileptology. For this reason, novel approaches to treat epilepsy......, and inhibitory neurotransmitters. We also address new molecular-genetic approaches utilizing optogenetic technology. The therapeutic strategies presented herein are predominately aimed toward treatment of partial/focal epilepsies, but could also be envisaged for targeting key seizure propagation areas...... are highly needed. Herein, we highlight recent progress in stem-cell-based and gene transfer-based therapies in epilepsy according to findings in animal models and address their potential clinical application. Multiple therapeutic targets are described, including neuropeptides, neurotrophic factors...

  20. Characterization of neurons in the cortical white matter in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Zsófia; Janszky, József; Sétáló, György; Horváth, Réka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Seress, László; Ábrahám, Hajnalka

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter, and to investigate their distribution in mesial temporal sclerosis. Immunohistochemistry and quantification of neurons were performed on surgically resected tissue sections of patients with therapy-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal lobe tissues of patients with tumor but without epilepsy and that from autopsy were used as controls. Neurons were identified with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against NeuN, calcium-binding proteins, transcription factor Tbr1 and neurofilaments. We found significantly higher density of neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy than in that of controls. Based on their morphology and neurochemical content, both excitatory and inhibitory cells were present among these neurons. A subset of neurons in the white matter was Tbr-1-immunoreactive and these neurons coexpressed NeuN and neurofilament marker SMI311R. No colocalization of Tbr1 was observed with the inhibitory neuronal markers, calcium-binding proteins. We suggest that a large population of white matter neurons comprises remnants of the subplate. Furthermore, we propose that a subset of white matter neurons was arrested during migration, highlighting the role of cortical maldevelopment in epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ictal and peri-ictal oscillations in the human basal ganglia in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rektor, I.; Kuba, R.; Brázdil, M.; Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2011), s. 512-517 ISSN 1525-5050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : basal ganglia * oscillations * epilepsy * ictal Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2011

  2. Resveratrol and Estradiol Exert Disparate Effects on Cell Migration, Cell Surface Actin Structures, and Focal Adhesion Assembly in MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas G. Azios

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a grape polyphenol, is thought to be a cancer preventive, yet its effects on metastatic breast cancer are relatively unknown. Since cancer cell invasion is dependent on cell migration, the chemotactic response of MDA-MB-231 metastatic human breast cancer cells to resveratrol, estradiol (E2, or epidermal growth factor (EGF was investigated. Resveratrol decreased while E2 and EGF increased directed cell migration. Resveratrol may inhibit cell migration by altering the cytoskeleton. Resveratrol induced a rapid global array of filopodia and decreased focal adhesions and focal adhesion kinase (FAK activity. E2 or EGF treatment did not affect filopodia extension but increased lamellipodia and associated focal adhesions that are integral for cell migration. Combined resveratrol and E2 treatment resulted in a filopodia and focal adhesion response similar to resveratrol alone. Combined resveratrol and EGF resulted in a lamellipodia and focal adhesion response similar to EGF alone. E2 and to a lesser extent resveratrol increased EGFR activity. The cytoskeletal changes and EGFR activity in response to E2 were blocked by EGFR1 inhibitor indicating that E2 may increase cell migration via crosstalk with EGFR signaling. These data suggest a promotional role for E2 in breast cancer cell migration but an antiestrogenic, preventative role for resveratrol.

  3. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  4. Manipulation of the response of human endothelial colony-forming cells by focal adhesion assembly using gradient nanopattern plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Long-Hui; Joo, Hyung Joon; Kim, Dae Hwan; Seo, Ha-Rim; Kim, Jung Suk; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Huang, Li-Hua; Na, Ji Eun; Lim, I-Rang; Kim, Jong-Ho; Rhyu, Im Joo; Hong, Soon Jun; Lee, Kyu Back; Lim, Do-Sun

    2018-01-01

    Nanotopography plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cellular responses. Nonetheless, little is known about how the gradient size of nanostructural stimuli alters the responses of endothelial progenitor cells without chemical factors. Herein, the fabrication of gradient nanopattern plates intended to mimic microenvironment nanotopography is described. The gradient nanopattern plates consist of nanopillars of increasing diameter ranges [120-200 nm (GP 120/200), 200-280 nm (GP 200/280), and 280-360 nm (GP 280/360)] that were used to screen the responses of human endothelial colony-forming cells (hECFCs). Nanopillars with a smaller nanopillar diameter caused the cell area and perimeter of hECFCs to decrease and their filopodial outgrowth to increase. The structure of vinculin (a focal adhesion marker in hECFCs) was also modulated by nanostructural stimuli of the gradient nanopattern plates. Moreover, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) gene expression was significantly higher in hECFCs cultured on GP 120/200 than in those on flat plates (no nanopillars), and ROCK suppression impaired the nanostructural-stimuli-induced vinculin assembly. These results suggest that the gradient nanopattern plates generate size-specific nanostructural stimuli suitable for manipulation of the response of hECFCs, in a process dependent on ROCK signaling. This is the first evidence of size-specific nanostructure-sensing behavior of hECFCs. Nano feature surfaces are of growing interest as materials for a controlled response of various cells. In this study, we successfully fabricated gradient nanopattern plates to manipulate the response of blood-derived hECFCs without any chemical stimulation. Interestingly, we find that the sensitive nanopillar size for manipulation of hECFCs is range between 120 nm and 200 nm, which decreased the area and increased the filopodial outgrowth of hECFCs. Furthermore, we only modulate the nanopillar size to increase ROCK expression can be an

  5. Ipsiversive ictal eye deviation in inferioposterior temporal lobe epilepsy-Two SEEG cases report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xingzhou; Zuo, Lijun; Guo, Qiang; Chen, Qi; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-02-21

    Versive seizure characterized by conjugate eye movement during epileptic seizure has been considered commonly as one of the most valuable semiological signs for epilepsy localization, especially for frontal lobe epilepsy. However, the lateralizing and localizing significance of ictaleye deviation has been questioned by clinical observation of a series of focal epilepsy studies, including frontal, central, temporal, parietal and occipital epilepsy. Two epileptic cases characterized by ipsiversive eye deviation as initial clinical sign during the habitual epileptic seizures are presented in this paper. The localization of the epileptogenic zone of both of the cases has been confirmed as inferioposterior temporal region by the findings of ictalstereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) and a good result after epileptic surgery. Detailed analysis of the exact position of the key contacts of the SEEG electrodes identified the overlap between the location of the epileptogenic zone and human MT/MST complex, which play a crucial role in the control of smooth pursuit eye movement. Ipsiversive eye deviation could be the initial clinical sign of inferioposterior temporal lobe epilepsy and attribute to the involvement of human MT/MST complex, especially human MST whichwas located on the anterior/dorsal bank of the anterior occipital sulcus (AOS).

  6. Human-derived physiological heat shock protein 27 complex protects brain after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Teramoto

    Full Text Available Although challenging, neuroprotective therapies for ischemic stroke remain an interesting strategy for countering ischemic injury and suppressing brain tissue damage. Among potential neuroprotective molecules, heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is a strong cell death suppressor. To assess the neuroprotective effects of HSP27 in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we purified a "physiological" HSP27 (hHSP27 from normal human lymphocytes. hHSP27 differed from recombinant HSP27 in that it formed dimeric, tetrameric, and multimeric complexes, was phosphorylated, and contained small amounts of αβ-crystallin and HSP20. Mice received intravenous injections of hHSP27 following focal cerebral ischemia. Infarct volume, neurological deficit scores, physiological parameters, and immunohistochemical analyses were evaluated 24 h after reperfusion. Intravenous injections of hHSP27 1 h after reperfusion significantly reduced infarct size and improved neurological deficits. Injected hHSP27 was localized in neurons on the ischemic side of the brain. hHSP27 suppressed neuronal cell death resulting from cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. Recombinant HSP27 (rHSP27, which was artificially expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and dephosphorylated hHSP27 did not have brain protective effects, suggesting that the phosphorylation of hHSP27 may be important for neuroprotection after ischemic insults. The present study suggests that hHSP27 with posttranslational modifications provided neuroprotection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and that the protection was mediated through the inhibition of apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Intravenously injected human HSP27 should be explored for the treatment of acute ischemic strokes.

  7. Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling by Integrin α6β1 Supports Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Self-Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Diaz, Luis G; Kim, Jin Koo; Laperle, Alex; Palecek, Sean P; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2016-07-01

    Self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-known as pluripotent stem cells (PSC)-is influenced by culture conditions, including the substrate on which they are grown. However, details of the molecular mechanisms interconnecting the substrate and self-renewal of these cells remain unclear. We describe a signaling pathway in hPSCs linking self-renewal and expression of pluripotency transcription factors to integrin α6β1 and inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Disruption of this pathway results in hPSC differentiation. In hPSCs, α6β1 is the dominant integrin and FAK is not phosphorylated at Y397, and thus, it is inactive. During differentiation, integrin α6 levels diminish and Y397 FAK is phosphorylated and activated. During reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPSCs, integrin α6 is upregulated and FAK is inactivated. Knockdown of integrin α6 and activation of β1 integrin lead to FAK phosphorylation and reduction of Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, suggesting that integrin α6 functions in inactivation of integrin β1 and FAK signaling and prevention of hPSC differentiation. The N-terminal domain of FAK, where Y397 is localized, is in the nuclei of hPSCs interacting with Oct4 and Sox2, and this immunolocalization is regulated by Oct4. hPSCs remodel the extracellular microenvironment and deposit laminin α5, the primary ligand of integrin α6β1. Knockdown of laminin α5 resulted in reduction of integrin α6 expression, phosphorylation of FAK and decreased Oct4. In conclusion, hPSCs promote the expression of integrin α6β1, and nuclear localization and inactivation of FAK to supports stem cell self-renewal. Stem Cells 2016;34:1753-1764. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Emotional Prosody Processing in Epilepsy: Some Insights on Brain Reorganization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Alba-Ferrara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistant epilepsy is one of the most complex, multifactorial and polygenic neurological syndrome. Besides its dynamicity and variability, it still provides us with a model to study brain-behavior relationship, giving cues on the anatomy and functional representation of brain function. Given that onset zone of focal epileptic seizures often affects different anatomical areas, cortical but limited to one hemisphere, this condition also let us study the functional differences of the left and right cerebral hemispheres. One lateralized function in the human brain is emotional prosody, and it can be a useful ictal sign offering hints on the location of the epileptogenic zone. Besides its importance for effective communication, prosody is not considered an eloquent domain, making resective surgery on its neural correlates feasible. We performed an Electronic databases search (Medline and PsychINFO from inception to July 2017 for studies about prosody in epilepsy. The search terms included “epilepsy,” “seizure,” “emotional prosody,” and “vocal affect.” This review focus on emotional prosody processing in epilepsy as it can give hints regarding plastic functional changes following seizures (preoperatively, resection (post operatively, and also as an ictal sign enabling the assessment of dynamic brain networks. Moreover, it is argued that such reorganization can help to preserve the expression and reception of emotional prosody as a central skill to develop appropriate social interactions.

  9. Emotional Prosody Processing in Epilepsy: Some Insights on Brain Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Ferrara, Lucy; Kochen, Silvia; Hausmann, Markus

    2018-01-01

    Drug resistant epilepsy is one of the most complex, multifactorial and polygenic neurological syndrome. Besides its dynamicity and variability, it still provides us with a model to study brain-behavior relationship, giving cues on the anatomy and functional representation of brain function. Given that onset zone of focal epileptic seizures often affects different anatomical areas, cortical but limited to one hemisphere, this condition also let us study the functional differences of the left and right cerebral hemispheres. One lateralized function in the human brain is emotional prosody, and it can be a useful ictal sign offering hints on the location of the epileptogenic zone. Besides its importance for effective communication, prosody is not considered an eloquent domain, making resective surgery on its neural correlates feasible. We performed an Electronic databases search (Medline and PsychINFO) from inception to July 2017 for studies about prosody in epilepsy. The search terms included "epilepsy," "seizure," "emotional prosody," and "vocal affect." This review focus on emotional prosody processing in epilepsy as it can give hints regarding plastic functional changes following seizures (preoperatively), resection (post operatively), and also as an ictal sign enabling the assessment of dynamic brain networks. Moreover, it is argued that such reorganization can help to preserve the expression and reception of emotional prosody as a central skill to develop appropriate social interactions.

  10. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both

  11. Functional brain networks and prediction models in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diessen, E.G.A.L. van

    2015-01-01

    Modern network science revolutionized the field of neuroscience and revealed significant insights into the organization of the brain. Throughout this thesis we applied a network analytical approach to improve our understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying focal epilepsy. The presented

  12. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  13. Personalized translational epilepsy research - Novel approaches and future perspectives: Part II: Experimental and translational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; van Alphen, Natascha; Becker, Albert; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Deichmann, Ralf; Deller, Thomas; Freiman, Thomas; Freitag, Christine M; Gehrig, Johannes; Hermsen, Anke M; Jedlicka, Peter; Kell, Christian; Klein, Karl Martin; Knake, Susanne; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Liebner, Stefan; Norwood, Braxton A; Omigie, Diana; Plate, Karlheinz; Reif, Andreas; Reif, Philipp S; Reiss, Yvonne; Roeper, Jochen; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Schorge, Stephanie; Schratt, Gerhard; Schwarzacher, Stephan W; Steinbach, Joachim P; Strzelczyk, Adam; Triesch, Jochen; Wagner, Marlies; Walker, Matthew C; von Wegner, Frederic; Rosenow, Felix

    2017-11-01

    Despite the availability of more than 15 new "antiepileptic drugs", the proportion of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy has remained constant at about 20-30%. Furthermore, no disease-modifying treatments shown to prevent the development of epilepsy following an initial precipitating brain injury or to reverse established epilepsy have been identified to date. This is likely in part due to the polyetiologic nature of epilepsy, which in turn requires personalized medicine approaches. Recent advances in imaging, pathology, genetics, and epigenetics have led to new pathophysiological concepts and the identification of monogenic causes of epilepsy. In the context of these advances, the First International Symposium on Personalized Translational Epilepsy Research (1st ISymPTER) was held in Frankfurt on September 8, 2016, to discuss novel approaches and future perspectives for personalized translational research. These included new developments and ideas in a range of experimental and clinical areas such as deep phenotyping, quantitative brain imaging, EEG/MEG-based analysis of network dysfunction, tissue-based translational studies, innate immunity mechanisms, microRNA as treatment targets, functional characterization of genetic variants in human cell models and rodent organotypic slice cultures, personalized treatment approaches for monogenic epilepsies, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, therapeutic focal tissue modification, computational modeling for target and biomarker identification, and cost analysis in (monogenic) disease and its treatment. This report on the meeting proceedings is aimed at stimulating much needed investments of time and resources in personalized translational epilepsy research. This Part II includes the experimental and translational approaches and a discussion of the future perspectives, while the diagnostic methods, EEG network analysis, biomarkers, and personalized treatment approaches were addressed in Part I [1]. Copyright © 2017

  14. Personalized translational epilepsy research - Novel approaches and future perspectives: Part I: Clinical and network analysis approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Felix; van Alphen, Natascha; Becker, Albert; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Deichmann, Ralf; Deller, Thomas; Freiman, Thomas; Freitag, Christine M; Gehrig, Johannes; Hermsen, Anke M; Jedlicka, Peter; Kell, Christian; Klein, Karl Martin; Knake, Susanne; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Liebner, Stefan; Norwood, Braxton A; Omigie, Diana; Plate, Karlheinz; Reif, Andreas; Reif, Philipp S; Reiss, Yvonne; Roeper, Jochen; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Schorge, Stephanie; Schratt, Gerhard; Schwarzacher, Stephan W; Steinbach, Joachim P; Strzelczyk, Adam; Triesch, Jochen; Wagner, Marlies; Walker, Matthew C; von Wegner, Frederic; Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-11-01

    Despite the availability of more than 15 new "antiepileptic drugs", the proportion of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy has remained constant at about 20-30%. Furthermore, no disease-modifying treatments shown to prevent the development of epilepsy following an initial precipitating brain injury or to reverse established epilepsy have been identified to date. This is likely in part due to the polyetiologic nature of epilepsy, which in turn requires personalized medicine approaches. Recent advances in imaging, pathology, genetics and epigenetics have led to new pathophysiological concepts and the identification of monogenic causes of epilepsy. In the context of these advances, the First International Symposium on Personalized Translational Epilepsy Research (1st ISymPTER) was held in Frankfurt on September 8, 2016, to discuss novel approaches and future perspectives for personalized translational research. These included new developments and ideas in a range of experimental and clinical areas such as deep phenotyping, quantitative brain imaging, EEG/MEG-based analysis of network dysfunction, tissue-based translational studies, innate immunity mechanisms, microRNA as treatment targets, functional characterization of genetic variants in human cell models and rodent organotypic slice cultures, personalized treatment approaches for monogenic epilepsies, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, therapeutic focal tissue modification, computational modeling for target and biomarker identification, and cost analysis in (monogenic) disease and its treatment. This report on the meeting proceedings is aimed at stimulating much needed investments of time and resources in personalized translational epilepsy research. Part I includes the clinical phenotyping and diagnostic methods, EEG network-analysis, biomarkers, and personalized treatment approaches. In Part II, experimental and translational approaches will be discussed (Bauer et al., 2017) [1]. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  15. DEPDC5 as a potential therapeutic target for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2017-06-01

    Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin (DEP) domain-containing protein 5 (DEPDC5) is a protein subunit of the GTPase-activating proteins towards Rags 1 (GATOR1) complex. GATOR1 is a recently identified modulator of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. mTOR is a key regulator of cell proliferation and metabolism; disruption of the mTOR pathway is implicated in focal epilepsy, both acquired and genetic. Tuberous sclerosis is the prototypic mTOR genetic syndrome with epilepsy, however GATOR1 gene mutations have recently been shown to cause lesional and non-lesional focal epilepsy. Areas covered: This review summarizes the mTOR pathway, including regulators and downstream effectors, emphasizing recent developments in the understanding of the complex role of the GATOR1 complex. We review the epilepsy types associated with mTOR overactivity, including tuberous sclerosis, polyhydramnios megalencephaly symptomatic epilepsy, cortical dysplasia, non-lesional focal epilepsy and post-traumatic epilepsy. Currently available mTOR inhibitors are discussed, primarily rapamycin analogs and ATP competitive mTOR inhibitors. Expert opinion: DEPDC5 is an attractive therapeutic target in focal epilepsy, as effects of DEPDC5 agonists would likely be anti-epileptogenic and more selective than currently available mTOR inhibitors. Therapeutic effects might be synergistic with certain existing dietary therapies, including the ketogenic diet.

  16. Genetic models of absence epilepsy: New concepts and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Stein, J.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery, development and use of genetic rodent models of absence epilepsy have led to a new theory about the origin of absence seizures, which has gained impact within the international epilepsy community. A focal zone has been identified in the perioral region of the somatosensory cortex in

  17. HIPPOCAMPAL SCLEROSIS IN EPILEPSY AND CHILDHOOD FEBRILE SEIZURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUKS, JBM; COOK, MJ; FISH, DR; STEVENS, JM; SHORVON, SD

    1993-01-01

    The connection between hippocampal sclerosis and childhood febrile seizures (CFS) is a contentious issue in the study of epilepsy. We investigated 107 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy by high-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 20 had a history of CFS, 45 had focal (26) or

  18. Targeting Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abilities of people with epilepsy, fear seizures, or lack knowledge about seizure first aid or are not comfortable ... they help eliminate barriers to care, such as lack of transportation or ... both English- and Spanish-speaking adults with epilepsy. Researchers are ...

  19. Epilepsie aktuell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Hüelsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.

    2016-01-01

    of the consensus statements “IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals” and “IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in German language to inform German veterinarians and professional...... circles about new knowledge and innovations in these fields. In the first part of the article, it is explained, why a new classification system of epilepsy and a common language to describe the disease is necessary. The proposals of the IVETF regarding the classification system and the terminology...... Richtlinien zur Klassifikation und Empfehlungen zu allen Aspekten der Epilepsie bei Hund und Katze in englischer Sprache publiziert (IVETF, 2015a, b). Im vorliegenden Artikel werden die Inhalte der Konsenspapiere „IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion...

  20. Partial (focal) seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Instructions Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Abou-Khalil BW, ...

  1. Reflex epileptic mechanisms in humans: Lessons about natural ictogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The definition of reflex epileptic seizures is that specific seizure types can be triggered by certain sensory or cognitive stimuli. Simple triggers are sensory (most often visual, more rarely tactile or proprioceptive; simple audiogenic triggers in humans are practically nonexistent) and act within seconds, whereas complex triggers like praxis, reading and talking, and music are mostly cognitive and work within minutes. The constant relation between a qualitatively, often even quantitatively, well-defined stimulus and a specific epileptic response provides unique possibilities to investigate seizure generation in natural human epilepsies. For several reflex epileptic mechanisms (REMs), this has been done. Reflex epileptic mechanisms have been reported less often in focal lesional epilepsies than in idiopathic "generalized" epilepsies (IGEs) which are primarily genetically determined. The key syndrome of IGE is juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), where more than half of the patients present reflex epileptic traits (photosensitivity, eye closure sensitivity, praxis induction, and language-induced orofacial reflex myocloni). Findings with multimodal investigations of cerebral function concur to indicate that ictogenic mechanisms in IGEs largely (ab)use preexisting functional anatomic networks (CNS subsystems) normally serving highly complex physiological functions (e.g., deliberate complex actions and linguistic communication) which supports the concept of system epilepsy. Whereas REMs in IGEs, thus, are primarily function-related, in focal epilepsies, they are primarily localization-related. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic and Reflex Epilepsies, Audiogenic Seizures and Strains: From Experimental Models to the Clinic". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epilepsy and radiological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomberg, T.

    2005-01-01

    Epilepsy is a heterogenous group of disorders with multiple causes. Clinical management of epilepsy patients requires knowledge of seizure syndromes, causes, and imaging features. The aim of radiological investigations is to recognize the underlying cause of epilepsy. The main indications for neuroimaging studies are partial and secondarily generalized seizures, patients with neurological signs and intractable seizures, and patients with focal signs on EEG. Partial seizures of any type are more likely to be associated with a focus that may be identified on neuroimaging. MRI is the method of choice for evaluating structural abnormalities of the brain. High resolution MRI and dedicated imaging technique are needed for detection of subtle pathological changes as cortical dysplasias and temporal medial sclerosis. Other lesions that may be detected include neoplasms, vascular malformations, destructive lesions following brain injury, stroke, infection, etc. CT continues to be the technique for the investigation of patients with seizures under certain conditions. New techniques such as functional MRI, MR spectroscopy, SPECT, receptor PET and magnetic source imaging are becoming clinical tools for improving diagnosis [et

  3. Classification of Focal and Non Focal Epileptic Seizures Using Multi-Features and SVM Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraam, N; Raghu, S

    2017-09-02

    Identifying epileptogenic zones prior to surgery is an essential and crucial step in treating patients having pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a significant measurement benchmark to assess patients suffering from epilepsy. This paper investigates the application of multi-features derived from different domains to recognize the focal and non focal epileptic seizures obtained from pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy patients from Bern Barcelona database. From the dataset, five different classification tasks were formed. Total 26 features were extracted from focal and non focal EEG. Significant features were selected using Wilcoxon rank sum test by setting p-value (p z > 1.96) at 95% significance interval. Hypothesis was made that the effect of removing outliers improves the classification accuracy. Turkey's range test was adopted for pruning outliers from feature set. Finally, 21 features were classified using optimized support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation. Bayesian optimization technique was adopted to minimize the cross-validation loss. From the simulation results, it was inferred that the highest sensitivity, specificity, and classification accuracy of 94.56%, 89.74%, and 92.15% achieved respectively and found to be better than the state-of-the-art approaches. Further, it was observed that the classification accuracy improved from 80.2% with outliers to 92.15% without outliers. The classifier performance metrics ensures the suitability of the proposed multi-features with optimized SVM classifier. It can be concluded that the proposed approach can be applied for recognition of focal EEG signals to localize epileptogenic zones.

  4. Familial risk of epilepsy: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peljto, Anna L.; Barker-Cummings, Christie; Vasoli, Vincent M.; Leibson, Cynthia L.; Hauser, W. Allen; Buchhalter, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Almost all previous studies of familial risk of epilepsy have had potentially serious methodological limitations. Our goal was to address these limitations and provide more rigorous estimates of familial risk in a population-based study. We used the unique resources of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all 660 Rochester, Minnesota residents born in 1920 or later with incidence of epilepsy from 1935–94 (probands) and their 2439 first-degree relatives who resided in Olmsted County. We assessed incidence of epilepsy in relatives by comprehensive review of the relatives’ medical records, and estimated age-specific cumulative incidence and standardized incidence ratios for epilepsy in relatives compared with the general population, according to proband and relative characteristics. Among relatives of all probands, cumulative incidence of epilepsy to age 40 was 4.7%, and risk was increased 3.3-fold (95% confidence interval 2.75–5.99) compared with population incidence. Risk was increased to the greatest extent in relatives of probands with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (standardized incidence ratio 6.0) and epilepsies associated with intellectual or motor disability presumed present from birth, which we denoted ‘prenatal/developmental cause’ (standardized incidence ratio 4.3). Among relatives of probands with epilepsy without identified cause (including epilepsies classified as ‘idiopathic’ or ‘unknown cause’), risk was significantly increased for epilepsy of prenatal/developmental cause (standardized incidence ratio 4.1). Similarly, among relatives of probands with prenatal/developmental cause, risk was significantly increased for epilepsies without identified cause (standardized incidence ratio 3.8). In relatives of probands with generalized epilepsy, standardized incidence ratios were 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.93–15.31) for generalized epilepsy and 2.5 (95% confidence interval 0.92–4.00) for focal epilepsy. In relatives of

  5. Multimedia human brain database system for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy with content-based image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multimedia database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted MRI and FLAIR MRI and ictal and interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication pretty much fits with the surgeons" expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  6. Isolated amygdala enlargement in temporal lobe epilepsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, S M Jessica; Cook, Mark J; D'Souza, Wendyl J

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the seizure characteristics and treatment outcomes in patient groups with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) identified with isolated amygdala enlargement (AE) on magnetic resonance imaging studies. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant studies using the keywords 'amygdala enlargement', 'epilepsy', and 'seizures' in April 2015. Human studies, written in English, that investigated cohorts of patients with TLE and AE were included. Of 204 abstracts initially identified using the search strategy, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria (11 epilepsy studies and 3 psychiatry studies). Ultimately, 8 full studies on AE and TLE involving 107 unique patients were analyzed. Gender distribution consisted of 50 males and 57 females. Right amygdala enlargement was seen in 39 patients, left enlargement in 58 patients, and bilateral enlargement in 7 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 28 patients, with the most common finding being dysplasia/hamartoma or focal cortical dysplasia. Most studies involved small samples of less than 12 patients. There was a wide discrepancy in the methods used to measure amygdala volume, in both patients and controls, hindering comparisons. Most TLE with AE studies observed a later age of seizure onset (mean: 32.2years) compared with studies involving TLE with HS (mean of mid- to late childhood). A higher frequency of complex partial seizures compared with that of convulsive seizures is seen in patients with AE (67-100% vs. 26-47%), and they have an excellent response to antiepileptic drugs (81.8%-100% of seizure-free patients). All studies that included controls also found a significant difference in frequency of seizure types between their cases and controls. Reliable assessment of amygdala volume remains a critical issue hindering better understanding of the clinical management and research of this focal epilepsy syndrome. Within these limitations, the literature suggests

  7. Seroprevalence and risk factors of human cysticercosis and taeniasis prevalence in a highly endemic area of epilepsy in Bangoua, west Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Dschanou, Armel Romeo; Moyou-Somo, Roger; Sako, Yasuhito; Ito, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Cysticercosis caused by the larvae of Taenia solium is a serious and emerging threat to public health in the endemic areas as well as in the non-endemic areas. Neurocysticercosis, an affection of the central nervous system is a leading cause of epilepsy in endemic areas. This study was carried out to investigate human cysticercosis, taeniasis and risk factors, and also their association with epilepsy in Bangoua, west Cameroon where epilepsy is highly prevalent. Out of 384 people investigated, 12 (3.1%) exhibited antibody response against low molecular weight antigens of T. solium by ELISA. Immunoblot revealed that six persons (1.6%) were seropositive with the same antigens. Among 61 epileptic patients, only one was seropositive by immunoblot and the study did not find any statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in seropositivity to T. solium between epileptic persons (1/61, 1.6%) and non-epileptic group (5/323, 1.5%). In addition, cysticercosis was associated with households eating pork meat from pigs slaughtered at home, but not with other factors. The risk factors including pig farming, the consumption of pork meat, vegetables, and non-drinkable water were attenuated by the relatively good hygiene and pig husbandry practices of the population. No egg of Taenia was found in stool by microscopic examination. All data obtained in this study suggested that cysticercosis might not be the principal causative agent of epilepsy in this area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Epilepsy - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or antiepileptic drugs), may reduce the number of future seizures: These drugs are taken by mouth. Which ... 23986299 . Wiebe S. The epilepsies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  9. Reduced Language Connectivity in Pediatric Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh N., Sepeta; Louise J., Croft; Lauren A., Zimmaro; Elizabeth S., Duke; Virginia K., Terwilliger; Benjamin E., Yerys; Xiaozhen., You; Chandan J., Vaidya; William D., Gaillard; Madison M., Berl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Functional connectivity (FC) among language regions is decreased in adults with epilepsy compared to controls, but less is known about FC in children with epilepsy. We sought to determine if language FC is reduced in pediatric epilepsy, and examined clinical factors that associate with language FC in this population. Methods We assessed FC during an age-adjusted language task in children with left-hemisphere focal epilepsy (n=19) compared to controls (n=19). Time series data were extracted for three left ROIs and their right homologues: inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and Wernicke's area (WA) using SPM8. Associations between FC and factors such as cognitive performance, language dominance, and epilepsy duration were assessed. Results Children with epilepsy showed decreased interhemispheric connectivity compared to controls, particularly between core left language regions (IFG, WA) and their right hemisphere homologues, as well as decreased intrahemispheric right frontal FC. Increased intrahemispheric FC between left IFG and left WA was a positive predictor of language skills overall, and naming ability in particular. FC of language areas was not affected by language dominance, as the effects remained when only examining study participants with left language dominance. Overall FC did not differ according to duration of epilepsy or age of onset. Significance FC during a language task is reduced in children, similar to findings in adults. In specific, children with left focal epilepsy demonstrated decreased interhemispheric FC in temporal and frontal language connections and decreased intrahemispheric right frontal FC. These differences were present near the onset of epilepsy. Greater FC between left language centers is related to better language ability. Our results highlight that connectivity of language areas has a developmental pattern and is related to cognitive ability. PMID:25516399

  10. Intrinsic neurophysiological properties of hilar ectopic and normotopic dentate granule cells in human temporal lobe epilepsy and a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, A L; Sagher, O; Parent, J M; Murphy, G G

    2015-02-15

    Hilar ectopic dentate granule cells (DGCs) are a salient feature of aberrant plasticity in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and most rodent models of the disease. Recent evidence from rodent TLE models suggests that hilar ectopic DGCs contribute to hyperexcitability within the epileptic hippocampal network. Here we investigate the intrinsic excitability of DGCs from humans with TLE and the rat pilocarpine TLE model with the objective of comparing the neurophysiology of hilar ectopic DGCs to their normotopic counterparts in the granule cell layer (GCL). We recorded from 36 GCL and 7 hilar DGCs from human TLE tissue. Compared with GCL DGCs, hilar DGCs in patient tissue exhibited lower action potential (AP) firing rates, more depolarized AP threshold, and differed in single AP waveform, consistent with an overall decrease in excitability. To evaluate the intrinsic neurophysiology of hilar ectopic DGCs, we made recordings from retrovirus-birthdated, adult-born DGCs 2-4 mo after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus or sham treatment in rats. Hilar DGCs from epileptic rats exhibited higher AP firing rates than normotopic DGCs from epileptic or control animals. They also displayed more depolarized resting membrane potential and wider AP waveforms, indicating an overall increase in excitability. The contrasting findings between disease and disease model may reflect differences between the late-stage disease tissue available from human surgical specimens and the earlier disease stage examined in the rat TLE model. These data represent the first neurophysiological characterization of ectopic DGCs from human hippocampus and prospectively birthdated ectopic DGCs in a rodent TLE model. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNA(Phe) transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNA(Phe). © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Epilepsy diagnostic and treatment needs identified with a collaborative database involving tertiary centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Szurhaj, William; Vercueil, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Cances, Claude; Auvin, Stéphane; Chassagnon, Serge; Napuri, Sylvia; Allaire, Catherine; Derambure, Philippe; Marchal, Cécile; Caubel, Isabelle; Ricard-Mousnier, Brigitte; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Pinard, Jean-Marc; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; de Baracé, Claire; Kahane, Philippe; Gautier, Agnès; Hamelin, Sophie; Coste-Zeitoun, Delphine; Rosenberg, Sarah-Dominique; Clerson, Pierre; Nabbout, Rima; Kuchenbuch, Mathieu; Picot, Marie-Christine; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-05-01

    To obtain perspective on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers in France, and describe etiology, epilepsy syndromes, and identify factors of drug resistance and comorbidities. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the characteristics of 5,794 pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy included in a collaborative database in France between 2007 and 2013. Comparisons between groups used Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test for binary or categorical variables. Factors associated with drug resistance and intellectual disability were evaluated in multi-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean age at inclusion was 17.9 years; children accounted for 67%. Epilepsy was unclassified in 20% of patients, and etiology was unknown in 65%, including those with idiopathic epilepsies. Etiologies differed significantly in adult- when compared to pediatric-onset epilepsy; however, among focal structural epilepsies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis began as often in the pediatric as in adult age range. Drug resistance concerned 53% of 4,210 patients evaluable for seizure control and was highest in progressive myoclonic epilepsy (89%), metabolic diseases (84%), focal cortical dysplasia (70%), other cortical malformations (69%), and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (67%). Fifty-nine percent of patients with focal structural epilepsy and 69% with epileptic encephalopathies were drug resistant; however, 40-50% of patients with West syndrome and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep were seizure-free. Ages at onset in infancy and in young adults shared the highest risk of drug resistance. Epilepsy onset in infancy comprised the highest risk of intellectual disability, whereas specific cognitive impairment affected 36% of children with idiopathic focal epilepsy. Our study provides a snapshot on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers and discloses needs for diagnosis and treatment

  13. Osthole Suppresses the Migratory Ability of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells via Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common type of primary and malignant tumor occurring in the adult central nervous system. GBM often invades surrounding regions of the brain during its early stages, making successful treatment difficult. Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the dried C. monnieri fruit, has been shown to suppress tumor migration and invasion. However, the effects of osthole in human GBM are largely unknown. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is important for the metastasis of cancer cells. Results from this study show that osthole can not only induce cell death but also inhibit phosphorylation of FAK in human GBM cells. Results from this study show that incubating GBM cells with osthole reduces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 expression and cell motility, as assessed by cell transwell and wound healing assays. This study also provides evidence supporting the potential of osthole in reducing FAK activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility in human GBM cells.

  14. Mechanisms underlying the attachment and spreading of human osteoblasts: from transient interactions to focal adhesions on vitronectin-grafted bioactive surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Paola; Scorzeto, Michele; Vassanelli, Stefano; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Ghezzo, Francesca; Messina, Grazia M L; Iucci, Giovanna; Battaglia, Valentina; Sivolella, Stefano; Bagno, Andrea; Polzonetti, Giovanni; Marletta, Giovanni; Dettin, Monica

    2013-04-01

    The features of implant devices and the reactions of bone-derived cells to foreign surfaces determine implant success during osseointegration. In an attempt to better understand the mechanisms underlying osteoblasts attachment and spreading, in this study adhesive peptides containing the fibronectin sequence motif for integrin binding (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) or mapping the human vitronectin protein (HVP) were grafted on glass and titanium surfaces with or without chemically induced controlled immobilization. As shown by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, human osteoblasts develop adhesion patches only on specifically immobilized peptides. Indeed, cells quickly develop focal adhesions on RGD-grafted surfaces, while HVP peptide promotes filopodia, structures involved in cellular spreading. As indicated by immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, focal adhesions kinase activation is delayed on HVP peptides with respect to RGD while an osteogenic phenotypic response appears within 24h on osteoblasts cultured on both peptides. Cellular pathways underlying osteoblasts attachment are, however, different. As demonstrated by adhesion blocking assays, integrins are mainly involved in osteoblast adhesion to RGD peptide, while HVP selects osteoblasts for attachment through proteoglycan-mediated interactions. Thus an interfacial layer of an endosseous device grafted with specifically immobilized HVP peptide not only selects the attachment and supports differentiation of osteoblasts but also promotes cellular migration. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. No unified reward prediction error in local field potentials from the human nucleus accumbens: evidence from epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Rutledge, Robb B; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Kopitzki, Klaus; Kowski, Alexander B; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), cyclic voltammetry, and single-unit electrophysiology studies suggest that signals measured in the nucleus accumbens (Nacc) during value-based decision making represent reward prediction errors (RPEs), the difference between actual and predicted rewards. Here, we studied the precise temporal and spectral pattern of reward-related signals in the human Nacc. We recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from the Nacc of six epilepsy patients during an economic decision-making task. On each trial, patients decided whether to accept or reject a gamble with equal probabilities of a monetary gain or loss. The behavior of four patients was consistent with choices being guided by value expectations. Expected value signals before outcome onset were observed in three of those patients, at varying latencies and with nonoverlapping spectral patterns. Signals after outcome onset were correlated with RPE regressors in all subjects. However, further analysis revealed that these signals were better explained as outcome valence rather than RPE signals, with gamble gains and losses differing in the power of beta oscillations and in evoked response amplitudes. Taken together, our results do not support the idea that postsynaptic potentials in the Nacc represent a RPE that unifies outcome magnitude and prior value expectation. We discuss the generalizability of our findings to healthy individuals and the relation of our results to measurements of RPE signals obtained from the Nacc with other methods. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    The term 'cortical tremor' was first introduced by Ikeda and colleagues to indicate a postural and action-induced shivering movement of the hands which mimics essential tremor, but presents with the electrophysiological findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. The association between autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) was first recognized in Japanese families and is now increasingly reported worldwide, although it is described using different acronyms (BAFME, FAME, FEME, FCTE and others). The disease usually takes a benign course, although drug-resistant focal seizures or slight intellectual disability occur in some cases. Moreover, a worsening of cortical tremor and myoclonus is common in advanced age. Although not yet recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), this is a well-delineated epilepsy syndrome with remarkable features that clearly distinguishes it from other myoclonus epilepsies. Moreover, genetic studies of these families show heterogeneity and different susceptible chromosomal loci have been identified.

  17. [Epilepsy, cognition and ketogenic diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Penas, J J

    2018-03-01

    Most individuals with epilepsy will respond to pharmacologic treatment; however, approximately 20-30% will develop medically refractory epilepsy. Cognitive side effects of antiepileptic drugs are common and can negatively affect tolerability, compliance, and long-term retention of the treatment. Ketogenic diet is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for these children with refractory epilepsy without any negative effect on cognition or behavior. To review the current state of experimental and clinical data concerning the neuroprotective and cognitive effects of the ketogenic diet in both humans and animals. In different animal models, with or without epilepsy, the ketogenic diet seems to have neuroprotective and mood-stabilizing effects. In the observational studies in pediatric epilepsy, improvements during treatment with the ketogenic diet are reported in behavior and cognitive function, particularly with respect to attention, alertness, activity level, socialization, and sleep quality. One randomized controlled trial in patients with pediatric refractory epilepsy showed a mood and cognitive activation during ketogenic diet treatment. Ketogenic diet shows a positive impact on behavioral and cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with refractory epilepsy. More specifically, an improvement is observed in mood, sustained attention, and social interaction.

  18. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 99mTc-HM-PAO SPECT of epileptic patients showing focal paroxysm on electroencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaishi, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Fujino, Osamu; Kamayachi, Satoshi; Fujita, Takehisa; Enokido, Hisashi; Komatsuzaki, Hideki; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Hirayama, Tsunenori

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of 99m Tc-HM-PAO SPECT in diagnosing epilepsy was studied. The subjects were 33 epileptic patients, ranging in age from 5 years and 5 months to 28 years and 3 months, who showed focal paroxysm on electroencephalograms. Lowered accumulation site was found on SPECT in 19 patients. Four patients with abnormal findings on X-ray CT or MRI showed lowered accumulation and focal paroxysm at the same site. Of 29 patients with normal X-ray CT or MRI findings, 15 (52%) showed lowered accumulation. Five patients showed a focal paroxysm at the site of lowered accumulation. In 8 patients the focal paroxysm site was partly coincided with the accumulation site. In some patients the focal site predicted by the findings of clinical symptoms and the lowered accumulation site coincided. SPECT is therefore a useful method in diagnosing a focal site in epilepsy and considered to reflect the severity of disease. (Y.S.)

  20. Managing Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person’s healthcare provider, and family and friends. What parents or caregivers can do Talk with your child’s heath care ... management resources for people with epilepsy and their caregivers. Learn more on our Find Support page . What can I do to keep my seizures in ...

  1. Trends in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh; Botre, Abhijit; Udani, Vrajesh

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery has become an accepted treatment for drug resistant epilepsy in infants and children. It has gained ground in India over the last decade. Certain epilepsy surgically remediable syndromes have been delineated and should be offered surgery earlier rather than later, especially if cognitive/behavioral development is being compromised. Advances in imaging, particularly in MRI has helped identify surgical candidates. Pre-surgical evaluation includes clinical assessment, structural and functional imaging, inter-ictal EEG, simultaneous video -EEG, with analysis of seizure semiology and ictal EEG and other optional investigations like neuropsychology and other newer imaging techniques. If data are concordant resective surgery is offered, keeping in mind preservation of eloquent cortical areas subserving motor, language and visual functions. In case of discordant data or non-lesional MRI, invasive EEG maybe useful using a two-stage approach. With multi-focal / generalized disease, palliative surgery like corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation maybe useful. A good outcome is seen in about 2/3rd of patients undergoing resective surgery with a low morbidity and mortality. This review outlines important learning aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery for the general pediatrician.

  2. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Katherine C.; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Moseley, Brian D.; Wirrell, Elaine C.

    2012-01-01

    The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome. PMID:22957247

  3. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the AES Annual Meeting. More info here . Epilepsy Currents American Epilepsy Society Journal Impact Factor More ... P450 enzyme overexpression during spontaneous recurrent seizures More Epilepsy Professional News AES Status Epilepticus guideline for treatment ...

  4. Clinical presentation of neurocysticercosis-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Kevin R; Burneo, Jorge G

    2017-11-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system and a major risk factor for seizures and epilepsy. Seizure types in NCC vary largely across studies and seizure semiology is poorly understood. We discuss here the studies regarding seizure types and seizure semiology in NCC, and examine the clinical presentation in patients with NCC and drug-resistant epilepsy. We also provide evidence of the role of MRI and EEG in the diagnosis of NCC-related epilepsy. Focal seizures are reported in 60-90% of patients with NCC-related epilepsy, and around 90% of all seizures registered prospectively are focal not evolving to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures. A great number of cases suggest that seizure semiology is topographically related to NCC lesions. Patients with hippocampal sclerosis and NCC have different clinical and neurophysiological characteristics than those with hippocampal sclerosis alone. Different MRI protocols have allowed to better differentiate NCC from other etiologies. Lesions' stages might account on the chances of finding an interictal epileptiform discharge. Studies pursuing the seizure onset in patients with NCC are lacking and they are specially needed to determine both whether the reported events of individual cases are seizures, and whether they are related to the NCC lesion or lesions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Neurocysticercosis and Epilepsy". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Epilepsy Genetics—Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Annapurna; Lowenstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Human epilepsy is a common and heterogeneous condition in which genetics play an important etiological role. We begin by reviewing the past history of epilepsy genetics, a field that has traditionally included studies of pedigrees with epilepsy caused by defects in ion channels and neurotransmitters. We highlight important recent discoveries that have expanded the field beyond the realm of channels and neurotransmitters and that have challenged the notion that single genes produce single disorders. Finally, we project toward an exciting future for epilepsy genetics as large-scale collaborative phenotyping studies come face to face with new technologies in genomic medicine. PMID:21277190

  6. Do people with epilepsy have a different lifestyle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Clara; Quintas, Sonia; Ruiz-Tornero, Ana María; Alemán, Guadalupe; Gago-Veiga, Ana Betariz; de Toledo, María; Vivancos, Jose

    2017-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases. Its high prevalence, economic relevance and impact on daily life make it crucial that we study this condition in further detail. Our study seeks to investigate whether the lifestyle of people diagnosed with epilepsy is different to that of people without epilepsy, in order to better understand our patients. We designed and delivered a questionnaire about quality of life and daily habits to patients from our hospital's Epilepsy Unit. We also delivered the questionnaire to a control group with similar demographic characteristics. Lifestyle differences between patients and control group members were analyzed. Patients were further divided according to the type of epilepsy, time since diagnosis, seizure frequency and pharmacotherapy. A total of 278 people were interviewed (85 patients, 193 controls). There was no difference in educational level, marital status and healthy habits (sports, reading and diet) between the groups. However, patients with epilepsy were more often unemployed (pepilepsy. In terms of the type of epilepsy, patients with focal epilepsy exercised more than those with generalized epilepsy; no other statistically significant differences were found between the individuals studied. Epilepsy diagnosis does not seem to negatively alter the daily life of patients; in fact, many adopt a healthier lifestyle after diagnosis. The risk of antidepressant/anxiolytic intake is, however, higher, which could reflect the impact this chronic condition still has at a social level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Forms of Epilepsies and other Paroxysmal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E.; Poduri, Annapurna; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mechanisms explain the pathophysiology of many forms of epilepsy and other paroxysmal disorders such as alternating hemiplegia of childhood, familial hemiplegic migraine, and paroxysmal dyskinesias. Epilepsy is a key feature of well-defined genetic syndromes including Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Rett syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and others. There is an increasing number of singe gene causes or susceptibility factors associated with several epilepsy syndromes, including the early onset epileptic encephalopathies, benign neonatal/infantile seizures, progressive myoclonus epilepsies, genetic generalized and benign focal epilepsies, epileptic aphasias, and familial focal epilepsies. Molecular mechanisms are diverse, and a single gene can be associated with a broad range of phenotypes. Additional features, such as dysmorphisms, head size, movement disorders, and family history may provide clues to a genetic diagnosis. Genetic testing can impact medical care and counseling. We discuss genetic mechanisms of epilepsy and other paroxysmal disorders, tools and indications for genetic testing, known genotype-phenotype associations, the importance of genetic counseling, and a look towards the future of epilepsy genetics. PMID:25192505

  8. High-Throughput Data of Circular RNA Profiles in Human Temporal Cortex Tissue Reveals Novel Insights into Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaxin; Lin, Haijun; Sun, Zhenrong; Kong, Guanyi; Yan, Xu; Wang, Yujiao; Wang, Xiaoxuan; Wen, Yanhua; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hongkun; Jia, Mei; Shi, Zhongfang; Xu, Rong; Yang, Shaohua; Yuan, Fang

    2018-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a class of long noncoding RNAs with a closed loop structure that regulate gene expression as microRNA sponges. CircRNAs are more enriched in brain tissue, but knowledge of the role of circRNAs in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has remained limited. This study is the first to identify the global expression profiles and characteristics of circRNAs in human temporal cortex tissue from TLE patients. Temporal cortices were collected from 17 TLE patients and 17 non-TLE patients. Total RNA was isolated, and high-throughput sequencing was used to profile the transcriptome of dysregulated circRNAs. Quantitative PCR was performed for the validation of changed circRNAs. In total, 78983 circRNAs, including 15.29% known and 84.71% novel circRNAs, were detected in this study. Intriguingly, 442 circRNAs were differentially expressed between the TLE and non-TLE groups (fold change≥2.0 and FDR≤0.05). Of these circRNAs, 188 were up-regulated, and 254 were down-regulated in the TLE patient group. Eight circRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. Remarkably, circ-EFCAB2 was intensely up-regulated, while circ-DROSHA expression was significantly lower in the TLE group than in the non-TLE group (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that circ-EFCAB2 binds to miR-485-5p to increase the expression level of the ion channel CLCN6, while circ-DROSHA interacts with miR-1252-5p to decrease the expression level of ATP1A2. The dysregulations of circRNAs may reflect the pathogenesis of TLE and circ-EFCAB2 and circ-DROSHA might be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers in TLE patients. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. A mouse model of DEPDC5-related epilepsy: Neuronal loss of Depdc5 causes dysplastic and ectopic neurons, increased mTOR signaling, and seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Jones, Brandon M; Wolfson, Rachel L; Super, Chloe E; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Sabatini, David M; Sahin, Mustafa; Poduri, Annapurna

    2018-03-01

    DEPDC5 is a newly identified epilepsy-related gene implicated in focal epilepsy, brain malformations, and Sudden Unexplained Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). In vitro, DEPDC5 negatively regulates amino acid sensing by the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, but the role of DEPDC5 in neurodevelopment and epilepsy has not been described. No animal model of DEPDC5-related epilepsy has recapitulated the neurological phenotypes seen in patients, and germline knockout rodent models are embryonic lethal. Here, we establish a neuron-specific Depdc5 conditional knockout mouse by cre-recombination under the Synapsin1 promotor. Depdc5 flox/flox -Syn1 Cre (Depdc5cc+) mice survive to adulthood with a progressive neurologic phenotype that includes motor abnormalities (i.e., hind limb clasping) and reduced survival compared to littermate control mice. Depdc5cc+ mice have larger brains with increased cortical neuron size and dysplastic neurons throughout the cortex, comparable to the abnormal neurons seen in human focal cortical dysplasia specimens. Depdc5 results in constitutive mTORC1 hyperactivation exclusively in neurons as measured by the increased phosphorylation of the downstream ribosomal protein S6. Despite a lack of increased mTORC1 signaling within astrocytes, Depdc5cc+ brains show reactive astrogliosis. We observed two Depdc5cc+ mice to have spontaneous seizures, including a terminal seizure. We demonstrate that as a group Depdc5cc+ mice have lowered seizure thresholds, as evidenced by decreased latency to seizures after chemoconvulsant injection and increased mortality from pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. In summary, our neuron-specific Depdc5 knockout mouse model recapitulates clinical, pathological, and biochemical features of human DEPDC5-related epilepsy and brain malformations. We thereby present an important model in which to study targeted therapeutic strategies for DEPDC5-related conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroreceptor imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The neurochemical processes that mediate seizures in humans are not fully understood. PET has contributed to our understanding of the neurochemical abnormalities of epilepsy with studies of cerebral metabolism and, more recently, regional neuroreceptor binding. We have focused on inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors that may (1) be decreased, thus facilitating seizure initiation, or (2) increase in response to seizure activity. Opiate receptors are believed to mediate anticonvulsant effects of the endogenous opioids. Accordingly, [ 11 C]carfentanil, a ligand selective for the mu-opiate receptor, displays increased binding in temporal neocortex ipsilateral to seizure foci in complex partial epilepsy. This finding is consistent with activation of the endogenous opiate system in response to seizure activity. [ 11 C]diprenorphine, a ligand that labels mu-, delta- and kappa-opiate receptors with equal affinity, shows little or no change in temporal cortex. Together, these findings suggest a decrease in delta- or kappa-receptors. The development of delta- and kappa-selective receptor ligands will help to elucidate the involvement of these opiate receptors in human epilepsy. The benzodiazepine-GABA receptor complex is the most prevalent in mediating inhibitory brain processes. Use of the benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor ligand [ 11 C]RO 15-1788 has shown decreases in BZD receptors in human epilepsy in one study, but this has not been observed in a current study. Thus, the existence of reduced inhibitory processes that might enhance seizure initiation remains uncertain at present. Future studies of receptors for excitatory transmitters will provide additional insight into alternate factors potentially responsible for the initiation of seizures

  11. Focal femoral condyle resurfacing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, S A

    2013-03-01

    Focal femoral inlay resurfacing has been developed for the treatment of full-thickness chondral defects of the knee. This technique involves implanting a defect-sized metallic or ceramic cap that is anchored to the subchondral bone through a screw or pin. The use of these experimental caps has been advocated in middle-aged patients who have failed non-operative methods or biological repair techniques and are deemed unsuitable for conventional arthroplasty because of their age. This paper outlines the implant design, surgical technique and biomechanical principles underlying their use. Outcomes following implantation in both animal and human studies are also reviewed. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:301-4.

  12. Human iPSC Derived GABA Ergic Precursor Cell Therapy for Chronic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    of hMGE progenitors (obtained from hPSCs expanded from human embryonic stem cells) that were transduced with DREADDs through CRISPR/Cas9 technology...regions and cell layers of the hippocampus, which include the subgranular zone and the dentate hilus in the dentate gyrus, and strata oriens and...have migrated extensively in the dentate hilus (A3) and into different layers of the CA1 subfield. DG, dentate gyrus; DH, dentate hilus; GCL, granule

  13. Research implications of the Institute of Medicine Report, Epilepsy Across the Spectrum: Promoting Health and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Beck, Vicki; Begley, Charles E.; Bishop, Malachy L.; Cushner-Weinstein, Sandra; Holmes, Gregory L.; Shafer, Patricia O.; Sirven, Joseph I.; Austin, Joan K.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2012 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released the report, Epilepsy Across The Spectrum: Promoting Health And Understanding. This report examined the public health dimensions of the epilepsies with a focus on four areas: public health surveillance and data collection and integration; population and public health research; health policy, health care, and human services; and education for providers, people with epilepsy and their families, and the public. The report provided recommendations and research priorities for future work in the field of epilepsy that relate to: increasing the power of data on epilepsy; prevention of epilepsy; improving health care for people with epilepsy; improving health professional education about epilepsy; improving quality of life for people with epilepsy; improving education about epilepsy for people with epilepsy and families; and raising public awareness about epilepsy. For this article, the authors selected one research priority from each of the major chapter themes in the IOM report: expanding and improving the quality of epidemiological surveillance in epilepsy; developing improved interventions for people with epilepsy and depression; expanding early identification/screening for learning impairments in children with epilepsy; evaluating and promoting effective innovative teaching strategies; accelerating research on the identification of risk factors and interventions that increase employment and improve quality of life for people with epilepsy and their families; assessing the information needs of people with epilepsy and their families associated with epilepsy-related risks, specifically sudden unexpected death in epilepsy; and developing and conducting surveys to capture trends in knowledge, awareness, attitudes, and beliefs about epilepsy over time and in specific population subgroups. For each research priority selected, examples of research are provided that will advance the field of epilepsy and improve the lives

  14. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Farquhar, Robyn G; Mandigers, Paul J J

    2015-01-01

    the years reflecting always in parts the current proposals coming from the human epilepsy organisation the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). It has however not been possible to gain agreed consensus, "a common language", for the classification and terminology used between veterinary and human...... neurologists and neuroscientists, practitioners, neuropharmacologists and neuropathologists. This has led to an unfortunate situation where different veterinary publications and textbook chapters on epilepsy merely reflect individual author preferences with respect to terminology, which can be confusing...... to the readers and influence the definition and diagnosis of epilepsy in first line practice and research studies.In this document the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) discusses current understanding of canine epilepsy and presents our 2015 proposal for terminology and classification...

  15. Abdominal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, N.; Razzaq, A.

    2004-01-01

    Abdominal epilepsy (AE) is a rather uncommon clinical entity in children that might create diagnostic confusion especially when it lacks the typical manifestations of an epileptic seizure. We report the case of a young boy having apparently unexplained episodes of paroxysmal abdominal symptoms with no other suggestion of an underlying epileptic disorder. The case also explains how the clinical presentation can be misleading unless a high index of suspicion is maintained to reach the ultimate diagnosis. (author)

  16. Recent advances in measuring cerebral blood flow and metabolism in human aging, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, sleep and the epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.S.; Baylor Univ., Houston, TX

    1986-01-01

    The 133 Xe inhalation method, positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, X-ray transmission tomography by inhalation of 37.5% stable xenon gas during CT scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques contributions to knowledge of normal aging, cerebrovascular disorders, the dementias, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, normal and abnormal sleep, migraine and cluster headache are summarized. 62 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Epilepsy in Qatar: Causes, treatment, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Naim; Melikyan, Gayane; Al Hail, Hassan; Al Jurdi, Ayman; Aqeel, Faten; Elzafarany, Abdullah; Abuhadra, Nour; Laswi, Mujahed; Alsamman, Yasser; Uthman, Basim; Deleu, Dirk; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Alarcon, Gonzalo; Azar, Nabil; Streletz, Leopold; Mahfoud, Ziyad

    2016-10-01

    Qatar is a small country on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. Its population is a unique mixture of native citizens and immigrants. We aimed to describe the features of epilepsy in Qatar as such information is virtually lacking from the current literature. We summarized information retrospectively collected from 468 patients with epilepsy seen through the national health system adult neurology clinic. Epilepsy was classified as focal in 65.5% of the cases and generalized in 23%. Common causes of epilepsy were as follows: stroke (9%), hippocampal sclerosis (7%), infections (6%), and trauma (6%). Sixty-six percent of patients were receiving a single antiepileptic drug, with levetiracetam being the most frequently prescribed drug (41% of subjects). When the patients were divided by geographical background, remote infections caused the epilepsy in 15% of Asian patients (with neurocysticercosis accounting for 10%) but only in 1% of Qatari and 3% of Middle East/North African subjects (with no reported neurocysticercosis) (pepilepsy in Qatar. The geographical origin of patients adds to the heterogeneity of this disorder. Neurocysticercosis should be in the etiological differential diagnosis of epilepsy in patients coming from Southeast Asian countries, despite the fact that it is not endemic to Qatar. The choice of antiepileptic drugs is influenced by the availability of individual agents in the patients' native countries but had no bearing on the final seizure outcome. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Opioid System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Burtscher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy is considered to be one of the most common and severe forms of focal epilepsies. Patients often develop cognitive deficits and emotional blunting along the progression of the disease. The high incidence of resistance to antiepileptic drugs and a frequent lack of admissibility to surgery poses an unmet medical challenge. In the urgent quest of novel treatment strategies, neuropeptides are interesting candidates, however, their therapeutic potential has not yet been exploited. This review focuses on the functional role of the endogenous opioid system with respect to temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically in the hippocampus. The role of dynorphins and kappa opioid receptors (KOPr as modulators of neuronal excitability is well understood: both the reduced release of glutamate as well of postsynaptic hyperpolarization were shown in glutamatergic neurons. In line with this, low levels of dynorphin in humans and mice increase the risk of epilepsy development. The role of enkephalins is not understood so well. On one hand, some agonists of the delta opioid receptors (DOPr display pro-convulsant properties probably through inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. On the other hand, enkephalins play a neuro-protective role under hypoxic or anoxic conditions, most probably through positive effects on mitochondrial function. Despite the supposed absence of endorphins in the hippocampus, exogenous activation of the mu opioid receptors (MOPr induces pro-convulsant effects. Recently-expanded knowledge of the complex ways opioid receptors ligands elicit their effects (including biased agonism, mixed binding, and opioid receptor heteromers, opens up exciting new therapeutic potentials with regards to seizures and epilepsy. Potential adverse side effects of KOPr agonists may be minimized through functional selectivity. Preclinical data suggest a high potential of such compounds to control seizures, with a strong predictive validity toward human

  19. Focal Transplantation of Human iPSC-Derived Glial-Rich Neural Progenitors Improves Lifespan of ALS Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Kondo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of glial-rich neural progenitors has been demonstrated to attenuate motor neuron degeneration and disease progression in rodent models of mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1-mediated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, translation of these results into a clinical setting requires a renewable human cell source. Here, we derived glial-rich neural progenitors from human iPSCs and transplanted them into the lumbar spinal cord of ALS mouse models. The transplanted cells differentiated into astrocytes, and the treated mouse group showed prolonged lifespan. Our data suggest a potential therapeutic mechanism via activation of AKT signal. The results demonstrated the efficacy of cell therapy for ALS by the use of human iPSCs as cell source.

  20. Therapy-related change of corpus callosum in a young patient with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feitova, V.; Krupa, P.; Feit, J.

    2002-01-01

    Focal nonhemorrhagic lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum in a patient with epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs was observed with MRI imaging. We have found only one such case during the past 2 years (series of MRI examinations of approximately 500 patients with various forms of epilepsy). (orig.)

  1. 16p11.2 600 kb Duplications confer risk for typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinthaler, Eva M; Lal, Dennis; Lebon, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. Its molecular basis is largely unknown and a complex genetic etiology is assumed in the majority of affected individuals. The present study tested whether six large recurrent copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q1...

  2. Network Alterations Supporting Word Retrieval in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzner, Andrea B.; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    Although the hippocampus is not considered a key structure in semantic memory, patients with medial-temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have deficits in semantic access on some word retrieval tasks. We hypothesized that these deficits reflect the negative impact of focal epilepsy on remote cerebral structures. Thus, we expected that the networks that…

  3. The occurrence and characteristics of auras in a large epilepsy cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakken, K O; Solaas, M H; Kjeldsen, M J

    2009-01-01

    = 1897) and 39% of those with active epilepsy (n = 765) had experienced an aura. Six percent reported more than one type. Non-specified auras were most frequently reported (35%), followed by somatosensory (11%) and vertiginous (11%). While the majority of those reporting auras (59%) had focal epilepsies...... is underestimated, especially in children and those with learning disabilities....

  4. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  5. Dostoevsky's epilepsy: a new approach to retrospective diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayport, Shirley M Ferguson; Rayport, Mark; Schell, Carolyn A

    2011-11-01

    There has been considerable debate about Fyodor Dostoevsky's epilepsy. Was his epilepsy generalized or focal? Was the dramatic ecstatic experience an epileptic phenomenon or a literary invention? We compared probable epileptically related behavioral manifestations in The Idiot with experiences of current patients, studied with a modern interdisciplinary approach involving neurosurgery, neurology, and neuropsychiatry. Patients were studied by all disciplines starting with their initial evaluation and trial of antiseizure medication, during hospitalization for long-term monitoring for epilepsy at scalp and depth levels with electrical brain stimulation, during intraoperative interviews, and in long-term postoperative follow-up. Behavioral manifestations, clearly shown to be phenomena of the epilepsy in our patients, were the template for defining the epileptic nature of the behavioral symptomatology described by Dostoevsky in his literary character, Prince Myshkin. We conclude that Dostoevsky had temporolimbic epilepsy and that the ecstatic experience is an epileptic phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Noninvasive treatment alternative for intractable startle epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Klinkenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a treatment alternative for intractable, startle-provoked, epileptic seizures in four children aged between 8 and 14. Three of the four children had symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. They all suffered from intractable epilepsy precipitated by sudden sounds. The fact that seizures tended to occur with high frequency – more than one seizure a day – had a clear impact on daily life. Clinical seizure pattern demonstrated asymmetric tonic posturing in all four children. Three children experienced several seizure types including focal seizure onset. All children had focal neurological signs or learning disabilities or a combination of both. Our noninvasive treatment method using psychoeducational counseling and sound generators was applied in four children, resulting in a seizure frequency reduction of ≥50% in two of them.

  7. Radiolabeled, nonspecific, polyclonal human immunoglobulin in the detection of focal inflammation by scintigraphy: Comparison with gallium-67 citrate and technetium-99m-labeled albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Needleman, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Hansen, W.P.; Kramer, P.B.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The accumulation of nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin (IgG) radiolabeled with 125 I or 111 In was compared to that of [ 67 Ga]citrate and [ 99m Tc]albumin in rats with deep thigh inflammation due to Escherichia coli infection. Serial scintigrams were acquired at 1, 3, 24, and in some cases, 48 hr after injection. As early as 3 hr postinjection, [ 111 In]IgG showed greater accumulation at the lesion than [ 99m Tc]HSA (p less than 0.01). Both [ 125 I]IgG and [ 111 In]IgG showed greater accumulation than [ 67 Ga]citrate (p less than 0.01). At 24 hr, IgG image definition increased, while HSA image definition decreased, and the intensity of accumulation of both IgG preparations was greater than that of [ 67 Ga]citrate or [ 99m Tc]HSA (p less than 0.01). At all imaging times, [ 67 Ga]citrate accumulation was surprisingly low. In inflammation produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, or turpentine, [ 111 In]IgG accumulation was similar to the results obtained with Escherichia coli. These studies suggest that focal sites of inflammation can be detected with radiolabeled nonspecific human polyclonal IgG

  8. Focal dermal hypoplasia without focal dermal hypoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contreras-Capetillo, Silvina N.; Lombardi, Maria Paola; Pinto-Escalante, Doris; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2014-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH; Goltz-Gorlin syndrome) is an X-linked dominant disorder affecting mainly tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. The phenotype is characterized by hypoplastic linear skin lesions, eye malformations, hair and teeth anomalies, and multiple limbs malformations. The

  9. Surgical and postmortem pathology studies: contribution for the investigation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Hamad, Ana Paula Andrade; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Lancellotti, Carmen Lucia Penteado; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki

    2012-12-01

    Pathology studies in epilepsy patients bring useful information for comprehending the physiopathology of various forms of epilepsy, as well as aspects related to response to treatment and long-term prognosis. These studies are usually restricted to surgical specimens obtained from patients with refractory focal epilepsies. Therefore, most of them pertain to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and malformations of cortical development (MCD), thus providing information of a selected group of patients and restricted regions of the brain. Postmortem whole brain studies are rarely performed in epilepsy patients, however they may provide extensive information on brain pathology, allowing the analysis of areas beyond the putative epileptogenic zone. In this article, we reviewed pathology studies performed in epilepsy patients with emphasis on neuropathological findings in TLE with MTS and MCD. Furthermore, we reviewed data from postmortem studies and discussed the importance of performing these studies in epilepsy populations.

  10. Surgical and postmortem pathology studies: contribution for the investigation of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira Caboclo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathology studies in epilepsy patients bring useful information for comprehending the physiopathology of various forms of epilepsy, as well as aspects related to response to treatment and long-term prognosis. These studies are usually restricted to surgical specimens obtained from patients with refractory focal epilepsies. Therefore, most of them pertain to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and malformations of cortical development (MCD, thus providing information of a selected group of patients and restricted regions of the brain. Postmortem whole brain studies are rarely performed in epilepsy patients, however they may provide extensive information on brain pathology, allowing the analysis of areas beyond the putative epileptogenic zone. In this article, we reviewed pathology studies performed in epilepsy patients with emphasis on neuropathological findings in TLE with MTS and MCD. Furthermore, we reviewed data from postmortem studies and discussed the importance of performing these studies in epilepsy populations.

  11. Polymicrogyria-associated epilepsy: a multi-center phenotypic study from the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Catherine; Ramgopal, Sriram; Fallil, Zianka; Parulkar, Isha; Alongi, Richard; Knowlton, Robert; Poduri, Annapurna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Polymicrogyria (PMG) is an epileptogenic malformation of cortical development. We describe the clinical epilepsy and imaging features of a large cohort with PMG-related epilepsy. Methods Participants were recruited through the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project, a multi-center collaborative effort to collect detailed phenotypic data on individuals with epilepsy. We reviewed phenotypic data from participants with epilepsy and PMG. Key Findings We identified 87 participants, 43 female and 44 male, with PMG and epilepsy. Median age of seizure onset was 3 years (range <1 month-37 years). Most presented with focal epilepsy (87.4%), some in combination with seizures generalized from onset (23.0%). Focal seizures with dyscognitive features were most common (54.3%). Of those presenting with generalized seizure types, infantile spasms were most prevalent (45.2%). The most common topographic pattern was perisylvian PMG (77.0%), of which the majority was bilateral (56.7%). Generalized PMG presented with an earlier age of seizure onset (median age of 8 months) and an increased prevalence of developmental delay prior to seizure onset (57.1%). Of the focal, unilateral and asymmetric bilateral groups where PMG was more involved in one hemisphere, the majority (71.4%) of participants had seizures that lateralized to the same hemisphere as the PMG or the hemisphere with greater involvement. Significance Participants with PMG had both focal and generalized onset of seizures. Our data confirm the involvement of known topographic patterns of PMG and suggest that more extensive distributions of PMG present with an earlier age of seizure onset and increased prevalence of developmental delay prior to seizure onset. PMID:23750890

  12. Clinicopathological study on refractory epilepsy treated by several epilepsy surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LI

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe and investigate the clinicopathological features and types of refractory epilepsy treated by several epilepsy surgeries. Methods There were 19 patients with age less than 20 years who underwent 2 (16/19 or 3 (3/19 epilepsy surgeries. After pathological examination, pathological diagnosis and subtype was made according to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD classification proposed by International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE Diagnostic Methods Commission in 2011 and World Health Organization (WHO Classification of Tumors of Central Nervous System in 2007. Results The operation intervals were 1-10 years (average 4.24 years. The pathological diagnoses after first operation were FCDⅠb in 2 cases (2/19, FCDⅡa in 2 cases (2/19, FCDⅢa in one case (1/19, FCDⅢd in one case (1/19, 5 cases of tumor lesions [2 (2/19 of astrocytoma, one (1/19 of oligoastrocytoma, one (1/ 19 of mixed germ cell tumor, one (1/19 of hysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT], one case (1/19 of hamartoma, one case (1/19 of angioma, one case (1/19 of heterotopic gray matter, and 4 cases (4/19 of ulegyria. The last one (1/19 underwent corpus callosal incision. Pathological diagnoses after reoperation were FCDⅢa in 4 cases (4/19, FCDⅢb in 4 cases (4/19, FCDⅢc in one case (1/19, FCDⅢd in 8 cases (8/19, dual pathology (FCDⅢa with oligoastrocytoma and with glial scar and/or ulegyria in 2 cases (2/19. Patients were followed up for 0.50-5.00 years after second or third operation (average 2.34 years, and the results showed Engel Ⅰ in 10 patients (10/19, Engel Ⅱ in 6 patients (6/19 and Engel Ⅲ in 3 patients (3/19. The rate of good prognosis was 84.21%. Conclusions The pathological diagnoses of brain tissue resected from patients accepting several epilepsy surgeries are mainly FCD Ⅲ and dual pathology. It is suggested that the second or third operation would be effective for refractory epilepsy patients who underwent surgery already. DOI: 10

  13. Focal epithelial hyperplasia by human papillomavirus (HPV)-32 misdiagnosed as HPV-16 and treated with combination of retinoids, imiquimod and quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemigniani, Franco; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferrer, Berta; García-Patos, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck's disease is a rare, benign and asymptomatic mucosal proliferation associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, mainly with genotypes 13 and 32. We report a florid case of FEH in an 11-year-old Haitian girl with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Cryotherapy was previously performed on numerous occasions with no results. We decided to prescribe a non-invasive and more comfortable treatment. A combination of topical retinoid and imiquimod cream was well tolerated and led to an important improvement. The evidence of infection by HPV-16 detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, prompted us to prescribe the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (types 6, 11,16 and 18). Subsequent PCR sequencing with generic primers GP5-GP6 and further BLAST comparative analysis confirmed that genomic viral sequence in our case truly corresponded with HPV-32. This molecular misdiagnosis can be explained by the similarity between genomic sequences of both HPV-16 and -32 genotypes. At the 1-year follow up, we observed total clinical improvement and no recurrences of the disease. Complete healing in this case may correspond to a potential action of topical retinoid, imiquimod and the cross-protection mechanism of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. 3D cell cultures of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells are radiosensitized by the focal adhesion kinase inhibitor TAE226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehlgans, Stephanie; Lange, Inga; Eke, Iris; Cordes, Nils

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a main player in integrin signaling and survival, is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and therefore postulated as potential target in cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing potential of the FAK inhibitor TAE226 in three-dimensional (3D) tumor cell cultures. Materials and methods: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells (FaDu, UT-SCC15, UT-SCC45), lung cancer cells (A549), colorectal carcinoma cells (DLD-1, HCT-116) and pancreatic tumor cells (MiaPaCa2, Panc1) were treated with different concentrations of TAE226 (0-1 μm; 1 or 24 h) without or in combination with irradiation (0-6 Gy, X-ray, single dose). Subsequently, 3D clonogenic survival assays (laminin-rich extracellular matrix) and Western blotting (expression/phosphorylation, e.g. FAK, Akt, ERK1/2) were performed. Results: All investigated 3D cell cultures showed a dose-dependent reduction in clonogenic survival by TAE226. Intriguingly, TAE226 only significantly radiosensitized 3D HNSCC cell cultures accompanied by a pronounced dephosphorylation of FAK, Akt and ERK1/2. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate TAE226 as potent FAK inhibitor that enhances the cellular radiosensitivity particularly of HNSCC cells grown in a 3D cell culture model. Future in vitro and in vivo investigations will clarify, to which extent this approach might be clinically relevant for radiotherapy of HNSCC.

  15. A young infant with musicogenic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Kao, Pan-Fu

    2003-05-01

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a relatively rare form of epilepsy. In its pure form, it is characterized by epileptic seizures that are provoked exclusively by listening to music. The usual type of seizure is partial complex or generalized tonic-clonic. Precipitating factors are quite specific, such as listening to only one composition or the actual playing of music on an instrument. However, simple sound also can be a trigger. We report a 6-month-old infant with musicogenic epilepsy. She manifested right-sided focal seizures with occasional generalization. The seizures were frequently triggered by loud music, especially that by the Beatles. The interictal electroencephalography results were normal. Ictal spikes were present throughout the left temporal area during continuous electroencephalograpic monitoring. Brain magnetic resonance imaging results were normal, whereas single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain revealed hypoperfusion of the left temporal area. The young age and epileptogenic left temporal lobe lesion in this patient with musicogenic epilepsy were unusual characteristics. Theoretically, three levels of integration are involved in music processing in the brain. The involved integration of this infant's brain may be the sensory level rather than the emotional level. Nevertheless, the personal musicality and musical style of the Beatles might play an important role in this patient's epilepsy.

  16. Tailored unilobar and multilobar resections for orbitofrontal-plus epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Demitre; Bulacio, Juan; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Najm, Imad; Bingaman, William; González-Martínez, Jorge

    2014-10-01

    Surgery for frontal lobe epilepsy often has poor results, likely because of incomplete resection of the epileptogenic zone. To present our experience with a series of patients manifesting 2 different anatomo-electro-clinical patterns of refractory orbitofrontal epilepsy, necessitating different surgical approaches for resection in each group. Eleven patients with refractory epilepsy involving the orbitofrontal region were consecutively identified over 3 years in whom stereoelectroencephalography identified the epileptogenic zone. All patients underwent preoperative evaluation, stereoelectroencephalography, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Demographic features, seizure semiology, imaging characteristics, location of the epileptogenic zone, surgical resection site, and pathological diagnosis were analyzed. Surgical outcome was correlated with type of resection. Five patients exhibited orbitofrontal plus frontal epilepsy with the epileptogenic zone consistently residing in the frontal lobe; after surgery, 4 patients were free of disabling seizures (Engel I) and 1 patient improved (Engel II). The remaining 6 patients had multilobar epilepsy with the epileptogenic zone located in the orbitofrontal cortex associated with the temporal polar region (orbitofrontal plus temporal polar epilepsy). After surgery, all 6 patients were free of disabling seizures (Engel I). Pathology confirmed focal cortical dysplasia in all patients. We report no complications or mortalities in this series. Our findings highlight the importance of differentiating between orbitofrontal plus frontal and orbitofrontal plus temporal polar epilepsy in patients afflicted with seizures involving the orbitofrontal cortex. For identified cases of orbitofrontal plus temporal polar epilepsy, a multilobar resection including the temporal pole may lead to improved postoperative outcomes with minimal morbidity or mortality.

  17. Familial epilepsy in Algeria: Clinical features and inheritance profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentouf, Amina; Dahdouh, Aïcha; Guipponi, Michel; Oubaiche, Mohand Laïd; Chaouch, Malika; Hamamy, Hanan; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2015-09-01

    To document the clinical characteristics and inheritance pattern of epilepsy in multigeneration Algerian families. Affected members from extended families with familial epilepsy were assessed at the University Hospital of Oran in Algeria. Available medical records, neurological examination, electroencephalography and imaging data were reviewed. The epilepsy type was classified according to the criteria of the International League Against Epilepsy and modes of inheritance were deduced from pedigree analysis. The study population included 40 probands; 23 male (57.5%) and 17 female subjects (42.5%). The mean age of seizure onset was 9.5 ± 6.1 years. According to seizure onset, 16 patients (40%) had focal seizures and 20 (50%) had generalized seizures. Seizure control was achieved for two patients (5%) for 10 years, while 28 (70%) were seizure-free for 3 months. Eleven patients (27.5%) had prior febrile seizures, 12 were diagnosed with psychiatric disorders and four families had syndromic epilepsy. The consanguinity rate among parents of affected was 50% with phenotypic concordance observed in 25 families (62.5%). Pedigree analysis suggested autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance with or without reduced penetrance in 18 families (45%), probable autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance in 14 families (35%), and an X-linked recessive inheritance in one family. This study reveals large Algerian families with multigenerational inheritance of epilepsy. Molecular testing such as exome sequencing would clarify the genetic basis of epilepsy in some of our families. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The clinical value of computerized axial tomography in patients without focal neurological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundorf, E.; Nielson, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    74 randomly selected patients with non-focal cerebral symptoms and a normal neurologic examination were referred from neurologic departments to CT scan of the brain. 29 patients had generalised epilepsy of long duration. In 26 patients (90%) with epilepsy the Ct scan was normal. 2 patients (7%) had cerebral atrophy, 1 (3%) showed porencephaly (.) 41 (91%) of the patients without epileptic features had a normal CT scan. 4 (9%) presented cerebral atrophy. In this survey, Ct scanning did not contribute to a focal diagnosis in patients with diffuse cerebral features. (orig.) [de

  19. Focal lesions in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Budinger, T.F.; Tobias, C.A.; Born, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    This report reviews the animal and human studies currently in progress at LBL with heavy-ion beams to induce focal lesions in the central nervous system, and discusses the potential future prospects of fundamental and applied brain research with heavy-ion beams. Methods are being developed for producing discrete focal lesions in the central nervous system using the Bragg ionization peak to investigate nerve pathways and neuroendocrine responses, and for treating pathological disorders of the brain

  20. Activation of LILRB2 signal pathway in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and in a pilocarpine induced epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jiong; Li, Wei; Liang, Chao; Chen, Bing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Lukang; Zang, Zhenle; Yu, Sixun; Liu, Shiyong; Li, Song; Yang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a frequent form of focal intractable epilepsy in adults, but the specific mechanism underlying the epileptogenesis of TLE is still unknown. Human leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B2 (LILRB2) (the murine homolog gene called paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B, or PirB), participates in the process of synaptic plasticity and neurite growth in the central nervous system (CNS), suggesting a potential role of LILRB2 in epilepsy. However, the expression pattern of LILRB2 and the downstream molecular signal in intractable TLE remains poorly understood. In the present study, western blotting and immunohistochemistry results showed that LILRB2 expression was upregulated in the temporal neocortex of patients with TLE. Moreover, protein levels of LILRB2 negatively correlated with the frequency of seizures in TLE patients. In the pilocarpine-induced C57BL/6 mouse model, PirB upregulation in the hippocampus began 12h after status epilepticus (SE), reached a peak at 7days and then maintained a significantly high level until day 60. Similarly, we found a remarkable increase in PirB expression at 1day, 7days and30days post-SE in the temporal cortex. Double-labeled immunofluorescence showed that LILRB2/PirB were highly expressed in neurons and astrocytes but not microglia. In addition, protein levels of POSH, SHROOM3, ROCK1 and ROCK2, the important downstream factors of the LILRB2 pathway, were significantly increased in the epileptic foci of TLE patients and located on the NeuN-positive neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes. Taken together, our results indicate that LILRB2/PirB may be involved in the process of TLE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian; Sander, Thomas; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Thiele, Holger; Krause, Roland; Lehesjoki, Anna Elina; Nürnberg, Peter; Palotie, Aarno; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Helbig, Ingo; Becker, Albert J.; Schoch, Susanne; Hansen, Jörg; Dorn, Thomas; Hohl, Christin; Lüscher, Nicole; von Spiczak, Sarah; Lemke, Johannes R.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Claes, Lieve; Deprez, Liesbet; Smets, Katrien; Dyck, Tine Van; Deconinck, Tine; De Jonghe, Peter; Møller, Rikke S.; Klitten, Laura L.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Campus, Kiel; Ostertag, Philipp; Trucks, Hol ger; Elger, Christian E.; Kleefuß-Lie, Ailing A.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Gaus, Verena; Janz, Dieter; Schmitz, Bettina; Klein, Karl Martin; Reif, Philipp S.; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Hamer, Hajo M.; Rosenow, Felix; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Koeleman, Bobby P C; de Kovel, Carolien; Lindhout, Dick; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Steinboeck, Hannelore; Neo-phytou, Birgit; Geldner, Julia; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Haberlandt, Edda; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Altmueller, Janine; Nuernberg, Peter; Neubauer, Bernd; Sirén, Auli

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A

  2. Investigation of GRIN2A> in common epilepsy phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Steinbrücker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A muta...

  3. Does early ischemic lesion induce cognitive impairment and epilepsy?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Máttéffyová, Adéla; Tsenov, Grygoriy; Otáhal, Jakub

    -, - (2005), s. 30-30 [Conference of the Czech Neuroscience Society /5./, The Annual Meeting of the Network of European Neuroscience Institutes. 19.11.2005-21.11.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : focal ischemia * cognitive impairment * development of epilepsy Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. Genetic models of absence epilepsy: New concepts and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Coenen, A.M.L.; Schwartzkroin, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery, development, and use of genetic rodent models of absence epilepsy have led to a new theory about the origin of absence seizures. A focal zone has been identified in the peri-oral region of the somatosensory cortex in WAG/Rij and GAERS – the two most commonly used models – from which

  5. Amygdala enlargement: Temporal lobe epilepsy subtype or nonspecific finding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Anny; Thesen, Thomas; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; McDonald, Carrie R; Jackson, Graeme D; Vaughan, David N; Blackmon, Karen

    2017-05-01

    Amygdala enlargement (AE) is observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), which has led to the suggestion that it represents a distinct TLE subtype; however, it is unclear whether AE is found at similar rates in other epilepsy syndromes or in healthy controls, which would limit its value as a marker for focal epileptogenicity. We compared rates of AE, defined quantitatively from high-resolution T1-weighted MRI, in a large multi-site sample of 136 patients with nonlesional localization related epilepsy (LRE), including TLE and extratemporal (exTLE) focal epilepsy, 34 patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), and 233 healthy controls (HCs). AE was found in all groups including HCs; however, the rate of AE was higher in LRE (18.4%) than in IGE (5.9%) and HCs (6.4%). Patients with unilateral LRE were further evaluated to compare rates of concordant ipsilateral AE in TLE and exTLE, with the hypothesis that rates of ipsilateral AE would be higher in TLE. Although ipsilateral AE was higher in TLE (19.4%) than exTLE (10.5%), this difference was not significant. Furthermore, among the 25 patients with unilateral LRE and AE, 13 (52%) had either bilateral AE or AE contralateral to seizure onset. Results suggest that AE, as defined with MRI volumetry, may represent an associated feature of nonlesional localization related epilepsy with limited seizure onset localization value. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Listening to Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunquell, Phillip J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses what epilepsy is and what it is not, defines types of epileptic seizures, identifies epilepsy syndromes, discusses antiepileptic drugs, describes seizure surgery, and examines issues of quality of life. (JDD)

  7. Potential use and challenges of functional connectivity mapping in intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Todd Constable

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to assess functional connectivity in the human brain for surgical planning in intractable epilepsy. This approach has the potential to predict outcomes for a given surgical procedure based on the pre-surgical functional organization of the brain. Functional connectivity can also identify cortical regions that are organized differently in epilepsy patients either as a direct function of the disease or through indirect compensatory responses. Functional connectivity mapping can also potentially help identify epileptogenic tissue, whether this is a single focal location or a network of seizure-generating tissues and this information can assist in guiding the implantation of electrodes for invasive monitoring. This review covers the basics of connectivity analysis and discusses particular issues associated with analyzing such data. These issues include how to define nodes, as well as differences between connectivity analyses of individual nodes, groups of nodes, and whole-brain assessment at the voxel level. The need for arbitrary thresholds in some connectivity analyses is discussed and a solution to this problem is reviewed. Overall, functional connectivity analysis is becoming an important tool for assessing functional brain organization in surgical planning in epilepsy.

  8. Multifocal epilepsy: the role of palliative resection - intractable frontal and occipital lobe epilepsy secondary to radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Harvey, A Simon; Flanagan, Danny; Fitt, Gregory; Berlangieri, Sam; Jackson, Graeme D; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2008-12-01

    Patients with multifocal epilepsy are often considered unsuitable for epilepsy surgery. We report an adolescent with intractable frontal and occipital lobe seizures, secondary to complications of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia as a young child. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were complicated by bilateral, posterior leukoencephalopathy and later an acquired frontal cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM). Detailed electro-clinical and imaging studies showed multiple, frontal lobe seizures per day with less frequent and non-debilitating, simple, occipital lobe seizures. Focal resection of the frontal CCM abolished the socially-disabling seizures with resultant marked improvement in the patient's quality of life at 12 months. Careful analysis of the type and impact of focal seizures in the setting of multifocal epilepsy may demonstrate that one seizure type is more deleterious to quality of life and may be amenable to surgery. In this situation, the patient may benefit significantly from surgery to resect the more active epileptic focus.

  9. CD147-targeting siRNA inhibits cell-matrix adhesion of human malignant melanoma cells by phosphorylating focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibaba, Rie; Higashi, Yuko; Su, Juan; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Kanekura, Takuro

    2012-01-01

    CD147/basigin, highly expressed on the surface of malignant tumor cells including malignant melanoma (MM) cells, plays a critical role in the invasiveness and metastasis of MM. Metastasis is an orchestrated process comprised of multiple steps including adhesion and invasion. Integrin, a major adhesion molecule, co-localizes with CD147/basigin on the cell surface. Using the human MM cell line A375 that highly expresses CD147/basigin, we investigated whether CD147/basigin is involved in adhesion in association with integrin. CD147/basigin was knocked-down using siRNA targeting CD147 to elucidate the role of CD147/basigin. Cell adhesion was evaluated by adhesion assay on matrix-coated plates. The localization of integrin was inspected under a confocal microscope and the expression and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a downstream kinase of integrin, were examined by western blot analysis. Silencing of CD147/basigin in A375 cells by siRNA induced the phosphorylation of FAK at Y397. Integrin identified on the surface of parental cells was distributed in a speckled fashion in the cytoplasm of CD147 knockdown cells, resulting in morphological changes from a round to a polygonal shape with pseudopodial protrusions. Silencing of CD147/basigin in A375 cells clearly weakened their adhesiveness to collagen I and IV. Our results suggest that CD147/basigin regulates the adhesion of MM cells to extracellular matrices and of integrin β1 signaling via the phosphorylation of FAK. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Systemic treatment of focal brain injury in the rat by human umbilical cord blood cells being at different level of neural commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornicka-Pawlak, El Bieta; Janowski, Miroslaw; Habich, Aleksandra; Jablonska, Anna; Drela, Katarzyna; Kozlowska, Hanna; Lukomska, Barbara; Sypecka, Joanna; Domanska-Janik, Krystyna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness of intra-arterial infusion of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) derived cells at different stages of their neural conversion. Freshly isolated mononuclear cells (D-0), neurally directed progenitors (D-3) and neural-like stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood (NSC) were compared. Focal brain damage was induced in rats by stereotactic injection of ouabain into dorsolateral striatum Three days later 10(7) of different subsets of HUCB cells were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Following surgery rats were housed in enriched environment for 30 days. Behavioral assessment consisted of tests for sensorimotor deficits (walking beam, rotarod, vibrissae elicited forelimb placing, apomorphine induced rotations), cognitive impairments (habit learning and object recognition) and exploratory behavior (open field). Thirty days after surgery the lesion volume was measured and the presence of donor cells was detected in the brain at mRNA level. At the same time immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue was performed to estimate the local tissue response of ouabain injured rats and its modulation after HUCB cells systemic treatment. Functional effects of different subsets of cord blood cells shared substantial diversity in various behavioral tests. An additional analysis showed that D-0 HUCB cells were the most effective in functional restoration and reduction of brain lesion volume. None of transplanted cord blood derived cell fractions were detected in rat's brains at 30(th) day after treatment. This may suggest that the mechanism(s) underlying positive effects of HUCB derived cell may concern the other than direct neural cell supplementation. In addition increased immunoreactivity of markers indicating local cells proliferation and migration suggests stimulation of endogenous reparative processes by HUCB D-0 cell interarterial infusion.

  11. LEFTY2 Controls Migration of Human Endometrial Cancer Cells via Focal Adhesion Kinase Activity (FAK) and miRNA-200a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowayed, Nour; Salker, Madhuri S; Zeng, Ni; Singh, Yogesh; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    LEFTY2, a suppressor of cell proliferation, tumor growth, regulator of stemness and embryonic differentiation, is a negative regulator of cancer cell reprogramming. Malignant transformation may lead to migration requiring loss of adhesion and gain of migratory activity. Signaling involved in the orchestration of migration, proliferation and spreading of cells include focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The present study explored whether LEFTY2 influences the proliferation marker MKi67, FAK activity, E-cadherin abundance and migration of Ishikawa human endometrial carcinoma cells. Moreover, the study explored the involvement of microRNA-200a (miR-200a), which is known to regulate cellular adhesion by targeting E-Cadherin. FAK activity was estimated from FAK phosphorylation quantified by Western blotting, migration utilizing a wound healing assay, miR-200a and MKi67 expression levels utilizing qRT-PCR, cell proliferation and apoptosis using BrdU and Annexin V staining, respectively, and E-Cadherin (E-Cad) abundance, using confocal microscopy. LEFTY2 (25 ng/ml, 48 hours) treatment was followed by decrease of MKi67 expression, FAK activity and migration. LEFTY2 upregulated miRNA-200a and E-Cad protein level in Ishikawa cells. The effect of LEFTY2 on migration was mimicked by FAK inhibitor PF 573228 (50 µM). Addition of LEFTY2 in the presence of PF-573228 did not result in a further significant decline of migration. In conclusion, LEFTY2 down-regulates MKi67 expression and FAK activity, up-regulates miR-200a and E-cadherin, and is thus a powerful negative regulator of endometrial cell proliferation and migration. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a cause of epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Monacelli, Debora; Castagnino, Miriam; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a variety of inherited connective tissue disorders that have been described in association with various neurological features. Until now the neurological symptoms have not been studied in detail; therefore, the aim of this review is to analyze the possible association between EDS, epilepsy and periventricular heterotopia (PH). We have carried out a critical review of all cases of epilepsy in EDS patients with and without PH. Epilepsy is a frequent neurological manifestation of EDS; generally, it is characterized by focal seizures with temporo-parieto-occipital auras and the most common EEG findings epileptiform discharges and slow intermittent rhythm with delta-theta waves. Epilepsy in EDS patients is usually responsive to common antiepileptic therapy; very few cases of drug resistant focal epilepsy requested surgical treatment, with favorable results in terms of outcome. Epilepsy is the most common presenting neurological manifestation associated with PH in EDS patients. Abnormal anatomic circuitries (including heterotopic nodules) could generate epilepsy in patients with PH. Among the principal neurological manifestations, epilepsy and PH have a considerable importance and can influence the long-term evolution of these patients. We hypothesize that PH may determine the epileptic manifestations in patients with EDS; much remains to be learnt about the relationships between nodules and the epileptic manifestations in EDS syndrome. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Memory Functioning in Children with Epilepsy: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Childhood Absence Epilepsy, and Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Robalo, Conceição; Simões, Mário Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal ...

  14. Focal retinal phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Quan V; Freund, K Bailey; Klancnik, James M; Sorenson, John A; Cunningham, Emmett T; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    To report three cases of solitary, focal retinal phlebitis. An observational case series. Three eyes in three patients were noted to have unilateral decreased vision, macular edema, and a focal retinal phlebitis, which was not at an arteriovenous crossing. All three patients developed a branch retinal vein occlusion at the site of inflammation. These patients had no other evidence of intraocular inflammation, including vitritis, retinitis, retinal vasculitis, or choroiditis, nor was there any systemic disorder associated with inflammation, infection, or coagulation identified. Focal retinal phlebitis appears to be an uncommon and unique entity that produces macular edema and ultimately branch retinal vein occlusion. In our patients, the focal phlebitis and venous occlusion did not occur at an arteriovenous crossing, which is the typical site for branch retinal venous occlusive disease. This suggests that our cases represent a distinct clinical entity, which starts with a focal abnormality in the wall of a retinal venule, resulting in surrounding exudation and, ultimately, ends with branch retinal vein occlusion.

  15. RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 mutations in rolandic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M; Altmüller, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Partial deletions of the gene encoding the neuronal splicing regulator RBFOX1 have been reported in a range of neurodevelopmental diseases, including idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The RBFOX1 protein and its homologues (RBFOX2 and RBFOX3) regulate alternative splicing of many neuronal transcripts...... involved in the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability. In this study, we explored if structural microdeletions and exonic sequence variations in RBFOX1, RBFOX2, RBFOX3 confer susceptibility to rolandic epilepsy (RE), a common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. By high-density SNP array screening...... that exon deletions and truncating mutations of RBFOX1 and RBFOX3 contribute to the genetic variance of partial and generalized idiopathic epilepsy syndromes....

  16. Epilepsy and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi

    1984-01-01

    The glucose metabolism of interictal epileptic foci in human brains were analyzed by positron emission tomography. The seizure patterns of 29 epileptic patients were as follows; complex partial 13 cases, elementary partial 9 cases, and generalized 7 cases. 11 C was produced by a JSW medical cyclotron BC105 and was randomly tagged to glucose prepared by photosynthesis. Data sampling by PET was started 15 minutes after peroral administration of 11 C-glucose to the patients. Three slices with 1.75 cm distance were obtained by a single scanning. In temporal lobe epilepsy, three slices were selected as 2.0 cm, 3.75 cm and 5.5 cm above orbitomeatal line. The basal ganglia were scanned 4.5 -- 5.0 cm and the motor and sensory strips were 5.0 -- 9.0 cm above OML. The glucose metabolic rate was expressed with color scales and qualitatively estimated. The results disclosed an obvious hypometabolic zone around a focus area in 22 cases (76%) out of the 29 subjects. This hypometabolic zone was observed in 12 cases (92%) of 13 complex partial, 9 cases (78%) of 9 elementary partial, and 3 cases (43%) of 7 generalized seizure patterns. In temporal lobe epilepsy, the location of the hypometabolic zone was different according to the clinical symptoms. The patients with automatism, pseudoabsence, autonomic, and emotional symptoms had its foci in the mesial portion of the temporal lobe. On the other hand, the patients with psychical seizure revealed its low metabolic area in the lateral temporal cortex. In the elementary partial epilepsy, the hypoactive zones were observed in the motor, sensory, and visual cortical area in accordance with the clinical symptoms. Very interestingly, an explicit cortical focus was discovered in two cases of the generalized epilepsy. In these cases the mechanism of secondary generalization was supposed to proceed in the expression of their clinical symptoms. In one Lennox-Gastaut case, a unilateral temporal lobe was involved as the seizure focus. (J.P.N.)

  17. Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

  18. Recurrent Bilateral Focal Myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagafuchi, Hiroko; Nakano, Hiromasa; Ooka, Seido; Takakuwa, Yukiko; Yamada, Hidehiro; Tadokoro, Mamoru; Shimojo, Sadatomo; Ozaki, Shoichi

    This report describes a rare case of recurrent bilateral focal myositis and its successful treatment via methotrexate. A 38-year-old man presented myalgia of the right gastrocnemius in May 2005. Magnetic resonance imaging showed very high signal intensity in the right gastrocnemius on short-tau inversion recovery images. A muscle biopsy revealed inflammatory CD4+ cell-dominant myogenic change. Focal myositis was diagnosed. The first steroid treatment was effective. Tapering of prednisolone, however, repeatedly induced myositis relapse, which progressed to multiple muscle lesions of both lower limbs. Initiation of methotrexate finally allowed successful tapering of prednisolone, with no relapse in the past 4 years.

  19. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  20. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of epilepsy patients (28 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 15 patients with primary generalized epilepsy) entered a study of personality traits related to epilepsy, based on a modification of Bellak's semistructured interview for assessment of ego strength. Two groups of subjects...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...... served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and...

  1. De novo 12q22.q23.3 duplication associated with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Maria Stella; Traverso, Monica; Bellini, Tommaso; Madia, Francesca; Pinto, Francesca; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2017-08-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of focal epilepsy and may be associated with acquired central nervous system lesions or could be genetic. Various susceptibility genes and environmental factors are believed to be involved in the aetiology of TLE, which is considered to be a heterogeneous, polygenic, and complex disorder. Rare point mutations in LGI1, DEPDC5, and RELN as well as some copy number variations (CNVs) have been reported in families with TLE patients. We perform a genetic analysis by Array-CGH in a patient with dysmorphic features and temporal lobe epilepsy. We report a de novo duplication of the long arm of chromosome 12. We confirm that 12q22-q23.3 is a candidate locus for familial temporal lobe epilepsy with febrile seizures and highlight the role of chromosomal rearrangements in patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ILAE Classification of the Epilepsies Position Paper of the ILAE Commission for Classification and Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Connolly, Mary B; French, Jacqueline; Guilhoto, Laura; Hirsch, Edouard; Jain, Satish; Mathern, Gary W.; Moshé, Solomon L; Nordli, Douglas R; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; Wiebe, Samuel; Zhang, Yue-Hua; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-01-01

    Summary The ILAE Classification of the Epilepsies has been updated to reflect our gain in understanding of the epilepsies and their underlying mechanisms following the major scientific advances which have taken place since the last ratified classification in 1989. As a critical tool for the practising clinician, epilepsy classification must be relevant and dynamic to changes in thinking, yet robust and translatable to all areas of the globe. Its primary purpose is for diagnosis of patients, but it is also critical for epilepsy research, development of antiepileptic therapies and communication around the world. The new classification originates from a draft document submitted for public comments in 2013 which was revised to incorporate extensive feedback from the international epilepsy community over several rounds of consultation. It presents three levels, starting with seizure type where it assumes that the patient is having epileptic seizures as defined by the new 2017 ILAE Seizure Classification. After diagnosis of the seizure type, the next step is diagnosis of epilepsy type, including focal epilepsy, generalized epilepsy, combined generalized and focal epilepsy, and also an unknown epilepsy group. The third level is that of epilepsy syndrome where a specific syndromic diagnosis can be made. The new classification incorporates etiology along each stage, emphasizing the need to consider etiology at each step of diagnosis as it often carries significant treatment implications. Etiology is broken into six subgroups, selected because of their potential therapeutic consequences. New terminology is introduced such as developmental and epileptic encephalopathy. The term benign is replaced by the terms self-limited and pharmacoresponsive, to be used where appropriate. It is hoped that this new framework will assist in improving epilepsy care and research in the 21st century. PMID:28276062

  3. Reflex epilepsy: triggers and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okudan ZV

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zeynep Vildan Okudan,1 Çiğdem Özkara2 1Department of Neurology, Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, 2Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Reflex epilepsies (REs are identified as epileptic seizures that are consistently induced by identifiable and objective-specific triggers, which may be an afferent stimulus or by the patient’s own activity. RE may have different subtypes depending on the stimulus characteristic. There are significant clinical and electrophysiologic differences between different RE types. Visual stimuli-sensitive or photosensitive epilepsies constitute a large proportion of the RE and are mainly related to genetic causes. Reflex epilepsies may present with focal or generalized seizures due to specific triggers, and sometimes seizures may occur spontaneously. The stimuli can be external (light flashes, hot water, internal (emotion, thinking, or both and should be distinguished from triggering precipitants, which most epileptic patients could report such as emotional stress, sleep deprivation, alcohol, and menstrual cycle. Different genetic and acquired factors may play a role in etiology of RE. This review will provide a current overview of the triggering factors and management of reflex seizures. Keywords: seizure, reflex epilepsy, photosensitivity, hot water, reading, thinking

  4. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  5. Epilepsy: Is there hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a highly prevalent chronic neurologic disorder and leads to social, behavioural, health and economic consequences. 'Treatment gap' varies from 10 per cent in developed countries to 75 per cent in low-income countries. Stigma and discrimination related to epilepsy are prevalent worldwide. Electroencephalography (EEG is considered the most important tool for evaluating the patient with epilepsy. Video-EEG monitoring is an important tool for confirming the seizure type and estimating the epileptogenic zone in the brain. Neuroimaging evaluation is important to determine the aetiology of the epilepsies. Genetic testing has increased the probability of identifying the causes of some types of epilepsies. Epilepsy can be treated in an affordable way with low-cost medications. Refractory epilepsies occur in approximately one-third of recently diagnosed patients with epilepsy. For this group of patients, there are options of surgical treatment, diets and neurostimulation to improve seizure control and quality of life. In poorly organized societies, there is a lack of prioritization of epilepsy in national health policies, limited resources for trained personnel and a shortage of basic antiepileptic medications. There is evidence of improvement in the understanding of epilepsy and a clear progress in the management of epileptic seizures in recent times.

  6. [Current management of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Global neurological knowledge is essential for differential diagnosis of epileptic syndromes due to the diversity of ictal semiology, causes and syndromes. Neurologists play an important role in planning the medical care for patients with epilepsy, as medication is the most fundamental therapeutic strategy. Some patients with early-onset epilepsy require joint care by pediatric neurologists, those with intractable epilepsy by neurosurgeons, and those with psychological comorbidity by psychiatrists, and neurologists should play a coordinating role. While there is a great need for neurologists to participate in epilepsy care, neurologists in Japan currently do not participate substantially in the epilepsy management system. It is necessary to train more neurologists who can provide epilepsy care and conduct basic and clinical research on epilepsy by providing continuous education on epilepsy for general neurologists as well as pre- and post-graduate medical students. Most of the patients who require long-term treatment experience many medical problems and social handicaps, such as adverse effects of medication, social stigma, educational disadvantages and difficulties in obtaining driver's license. To improve the quality of life of patients with epilepsy, it is desirable to build broad medical-social networks participated by patients, doctors, neurological nurses, psychologists, social workers, school teachers, managers of employment support facilities and care givers.

  7. Serial SPECT in children with partial epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Machiko; Ushiku, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    We performed serial single-photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-( 123 I)-Iodoamphetamine to measure the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 15 children with partial epilepsy. SPECT showed focal changes in 14 cases. Ten cases had abnormalities in the initial SPECT and another four cases in the second test. The cases with normal rCBF in initial SPECT had been tested in an early phase after the onset, and then decreased rCBF were observed in the second SPECT. The cases with both abnormal rCBF in the initial SPECT and improved rCBF in the second SPECT showed good prognosis in clinico-electrophysiological evolutions. In cases with abnormal changes of rCBF in the second SPECT, clinical prognosis was found to be not so good. These findings suggest that serial SPECT may be used to follow the course of epilepsy. (author)

  8. Epilepsy in Adults with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy in Adults with TSC Individuals with tuberous sclerosis ... being well controlled for long periods of time. Epilepsy and Seizures Epilepsy is any brain disorder that ...

  9. Positron emission CT on post-traumatic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Takashi; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Doi, Nobuyasu; Sato, Kohten; Iio, Masaaki.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients suffering from post-traumatic epilepsy were checked by encephalography (EEG), X-ray CT and cerebral positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 11 C-carbon dioxide ( 11 CO 2 ) and 11 C-glucoses as indicators of the local cerebral circulation and local cerebral glucose utilization, in order to assess the diagnostic value of PECT in post-traumatic epilepsy. In those patients (4 cases) who had focal electrical abnormalities or X-ray CT lesions, PECT clearly revealed localized regions of decreased cerebral circulation and glucose utilization. A focal hypometabolic zone also appeared in the post-traumatic epilepsy (1 case) which had a normal X-ray CT. One case, who had been treated for several years by medication but showed no EEG change and no abnormality on X-ray CT, revealed a normal circulation and metabolism by RECT. This case did not require any further medication for epilepsy. It is concluded that positron emission CT represents a useful diagnostic method for post-traumatic epilepsy which does not demonstrate any abnormality on X-ray CT. (author)

  10. Changes in the frequency of benign focal spikes accompany changes in central information processing speed : a prospective 2-year follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebus, S.C.M.; IJff, D.M.; den Boer, J.T.; Debeij-van Hall, M.H.J.A.; Klinkenberg, S.; van der Does, A.; Boon, P.J.; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    We prospectively examined whether changes in the frequency of benign focal spikes accompany changes in cognition. Twenty-six children with benign focal spikes (19 with Rolandic epilepsy) and learning difficulties were examined with repeated 24-hour EEG recordings, three cognitive tests on central

  11. Detection of small human cerebral cortical lesions with MRI under different levels of Gaussian smoothing: applications in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor-Rivera, Diego; Goubran, Maged; Kraguljac, Alan; Bartha, Robert; Peters, Terry

    2010-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of smoothing filter selection in Voxel-Based Morphometry studies on structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Gaussian filters of 4 mm, 8 mm or 10 mm Full Width at High Maximum are commonly used, based on the assumption that the filter size should be at least twice the voxel size to obtain robust statistical results. The hypothesis of the presented work was that the selection of the smoothing filter influenced the detectability of small lesions in the brain. Mesial Temporal Sclerosis associated to Epilepsy was used as the case to demonstrate this effect. Twenty T1-weighted MRIs from the BrainWeb database were selected. A small phantom lesion was placed in the amygdala, hippocampus, or parahippocampal gyrus of ten of the images. Subsequently the images were registered to the ICBM/MNI space. After grey matter segmentation, a T-test was carried out to compare each image containing a phantom lesion with the rest of the images in the set. For each lesion the T-test was repeated with different Gaussian filter sizes. Voxel-Based Morphometry detected some of the phantom lesions. Of the three parameters considered: location,size, and intensity; it was shown that location is the dominant factor for the detection of the lesions.

  12. Guidelines for imaging infants and children with recent-onset epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, W.D.; Chiron, C.; Cross, H.; Harvey, S.; Kuzniecky, R.; Hertz-Pannier, L.

    2009-01-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Subcommittee for Pediatric Neuroimaging examined the usefulness of, and indications for, neuroimaging in the evaluation of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The retrospective and prospective published series with n ≥ 30 utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (1.5 T) that evaluated children with new-onset seizure(s) were reviewed. Nearly 50% of individual imaging studies in children with localization-related new-onset seizure(s) were reported to be abnormal; 15-20% of imaging studies provided useful information on etiology or and seizure focus, and 2-4% provided information that potentially altered immediate medical management. A significant imaging abnormality in the absence of a history of a localization-related seizure, abnormal neurologic examination, or focal electro-encephalography (EEG) is rare. Imaging studies in childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS) do not identify significant structural abnormalities. Imaging provides important contributions to establishing etiology, providing prognostic information, and directing treatment in children with recently diagnosed epilepsy. Imaging is recommended when localization-related epilepsy is known or suspected, when the epilepsy classification is in doubt, or when an epilepsy syndrome with remote symptomatic cause is suspected. When available, MRI is preferred to CT because of its superior resolution, versatility, and lack of radiation. (authors)

  13. Guidelines for imaging infants and children with recent-onset epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, W.D. [Department of Neuroscience, Children' s National Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington DC (United States); Chiron, C. [Inserm, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Universite Rene Descartes, Paris (France); Cross, H. [Neurosciences Unit, Institute of Child Health, and GreatOrmondStreet Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Harvey, S. [Department of Neurology, Royal Children' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Kuzniecky, R. [Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (US); Hertz-Pannier, L. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Universite Descartes, Paris (FR); CEA-DSV-I2BM-Neurospin, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (FR)

    2009-07-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Subcommittee for Pediatric Neuroimaging examined the usefulness of, and indications for, neuroimaging in the evaluation of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. The retrospective and prospective published series with n {>=} 30 utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (1.5 T) that evaluated children with new-onset seizure(s) were reviewed. Nearly 50% of individual imaging studies in children with localization-related new-onset seizure(s) were reported to be abnormal; 15-20% of imaging studies provided useful information on etiology or and seizure focus, and 2-4% provided information that potentially altered immediate medical management. A significant imaging abnormality in the absence of a history of a localization-related seizure, abnormal neurologic examination, or focal electro-encephalography (EEG) is rare. Imaging studies in childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS) do not identify significant structural abnormalities. Imaging provides important contributions to establishing etiology, providing prognostic information, and directing treatment in children with recently diagnosed epilepsy. Imaging is recommended when localization-related epilepsy is known or suspected, when the epilepsy classification is in doubt, or when an epilepsy syndrome with remote symptomatic cause is suspected. When available, MRI is preferred to CT because of its superior resolution, versatility, and lack of radiation. (authors)

  14. Neurological autoantibodies in drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecellioglu, Mehmet; Kamisli, Ozden; Kamisli, Suat; Yucel, Fatma Ebru; Ozcan, Cemal

    2018-03-09

    Autoimmune epilepsy is a rarely diagnosed condition. Recognition of the underlying autoimmune condition is important, as these patients can be resistant to antiepileptic drugs. To determine the autoimmune and oncological antibodies in adult drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause and identify the clinical, radiological, and EEG findings associated with these antibodies according to data in the literature. Eighty-two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause were prospectively identified. Clinical features were recorded. The levels of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex (anti-VGKCc), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), anti-phospholipid IgG and IgM, anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, and onconeural antibodies were determined. Serum antibody positivity suggesting the potential role of autoimmunity in the aetiology was present in 17 patients with resistant epilepsy (22.0%). Multiple antibodies were found in two patients (2.6%). One of these patients (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and ANA, whereas another (1.3%) had anti-VGKCc and anti-TPO. A single antibody was present in 15 patients (19.5%). Of the 77 patients finally included in the study, 4 had anti-TPO (5.2%), 1 had anti-GAD (1.3%), 4 had anti-VGKCc (5.2%) 8 had ANA (10.3%), and 2 had onconeural antibodies (2.6%) (1 patient had anti-Yo and 1 had anti-MA2/TA). The other antibodies investigated were not detected. EEG abnormality (focal), focal seizure incidence, and frequent seizures were more common in antibody-positive patients. Autoimmune factors may be aetiologically relevant in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy of unknown cause, especially if focal seizures are present together with focal EEG abnormality and frequent seizures.

  15. Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy: Part 3--The Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    In many respects epilepsy is as much a social disorder as it is a physical one. With epilepsy's long human history, many misconceptions have grown around the disorder. Those misconceptions have taken on a life of their own. Mistaken ideas that epilepsy is some form of evil possession, that it is a form of mental illness, that people with epilepsy…

  16. Focal CT abnormality and epileptogenic focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Kazuichi; Mihara, Tadahiro; Tottori, Takayasu; Matsuda, Kazumi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Seino, Masakazu

    1989-01-01

    In 31 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, the precise site of epileptogenic focus was determined by means of a depth EEG recording as one of the presurgical evaluations. In 13 patients, a CT scan revealed focal lesions; 7 in the left temporal lobe and 6 in the right temporal lobe. In 5 of the 7 patients and in 5 of the 6 patients the epileptogenic foci were determined in the temporal lobe on the side of a CT lesion. However, in 2 of the patients with a CT lesion in the left temporal lobe, independent epileptogenic foci were found in both the temporal lobes, and in the other patient with a CT lesion in the right temporal lobe, they were found in the right frontal and left temporal lobes. Thus, the CT lesions agreed in lateralization and focality with the epileptogenic foci in 10 of the 13 patients (77%), but they disagreed in 3 (23%). A CT lesion disclosed in the temporal lobe does not necessarily indicate the side and/or site where the epileptogenic focus may be localized. Although exceptions may be made, spatial disagreement was exemplified between the CT lesion and epileptogenic focus. Therefore, extreme caution has to be taken on the side and/or site of the epileptogenic focus when functional surgical indication is to be made. (author)

  17. Christianity and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarek, K; Jędrzejczak, J

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures have been known from time immemorial. Throughout the ages, however, ideas concerning the aetiology and treatment of epilepsy have changed considerably. Epilepsy is mentioned many times in the Pentateuch, where it is portrayed as a mysterious condition, whose symptoms, course and contingencies evade rational laws and explanations. In the Middle Ages, the accepted view which prevailed in social consciousness was that patients with epilepsy were possessed by Satan and other impure spirits. One common method of treatment of epileptic seizures was to submit the patient to cruel exorcisms. Patients were frequently injured in the process and some of them even died. Our understanding of epilepsy and its social consequences has improved considerably within the last century. The most significant progress as far as diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is concerned took place in the last four decades of the twentieth century. Although we now know much more about epilepsy than we used to, this knowledge is still insufficiently popularized.

  18. Dual Pathology in Rasmussen's Encephalitis: A Report of Coexistent Focal Cortical Dysplasia and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Prayson, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Rasmussen’s encephalitis is a well-established, albeit rare cause of medically intractable epilepsy. In a small number of Rasmussen's cases, a second pathology is identified, which independently can cause medically intractable seizures (dual pathology). This paper documents a case of a 13-year-old male who presented with medically intractable epilepsy. The patient underwent a series of surgical resections, early on resulting in a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia and later yielding a diag...

  19. Photoacoustic Imaging of Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    using simulation and phantom experiments; (4) To test and validate the PAT system using a well established animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy ...and evaluation (3) Software Development (4) Animal experiments (5) Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (6) Analysis of the images from the in vivo...details please see the progress report of the third year of the project. 5. Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (Task 6) During months 37-48 of this

  20. Focal myositis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devic, P; Gallay, L; Streichenberger, N; Petiot, P

    2016-11-01

    Amongst the heterogeneous group of inflammatory myopathies, focal myositis stands as a rare and benign dysimmune disease. Although it can be associated with root and/or nerve lesions, traumatic muscle lesions and autoimmune diseases, its triggering factors remain poorly understood. Defined as an isolated inflammatory pseudotumour usually restricted to one skeletal muscle, clinical presentation of focal myositis is that of a rapidly growing solitary mass within a single muscle, usually in the lower limbs. Electromyography shows spontaneous activity associated with a myopathic pattern. MRI reveals a contrast enhanced enlarged muscle appearing hyper-intense on FAT-SAT T2 weighted images. Adjacent structures are spared and there are no calcifications. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels are usually moderately augmented and biological markers of systemic inflammation are absent in most cases. Pathological histological features include marked variation in fibre size, inflammatory infiltrates mostly composed of T CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages, degenerating/regenerating fibres and interstitial fibrosis. Differential diagnoses are numerous and include myositis of other origin with focal onset. Steroid treatment should be reserved for patients who present with major pain, nerve lesions, associated autoimmune disease, or elevated C reactive protein or CK. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanavana Subbareddy Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  2. Pharmacogenomics in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2018-02-22

    There is high variability in the response to antiepileptic treatment across people with epilepsy. Genetic factors significantly contribute to such variability. Recent advances in the genetics and neurobiology of the epilepsies are establishing the basis for a new era in the treatment of epilepsy, focused on each individual and their specific epilepsy. Variation in response to antiepileptic drug treatment may arise from genetic variation in a range of gene categories, including genes affecting drug pharmacokinetics, and drug pharmacodynamics, but also genes held to actually cause the epilepsy itself. From a purely pharmacogenetic perspective, there are few robust genetic findings with established evidence in epilepsy. Many findings are still controversial with anecdotal or less secure evidence and need further validation, e.g. variation in genes for transporter systems and antiepileptic drug targets. The increasing use of genetic sequencing and the results of large-scale collaborative projects may soon expand the established evidence. Precision medicine treatments represent a growing area of interest, focussing on reversing or circumventing the pathophysiological effects of specific gene mutations. This could lead to a dramatic improvement of the effectiveness and safety of epilepsy treatments, by targeting the biological mechanisms responsible for epilepsy in each specific individual. Whilst much has been written about epilepsy pharmacogenetics, there does now seem to be building momentum that promises to deliver results of use in clinic. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3......Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... dysfunction in the epilepsy group, the mere presence of a chronic disorder with potential social stigmatization influences personality....

  4. Stigma of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandstra, Nancy F; Camfield, Carol S; Camfield, Peter R

    2008-09-01

    Epilepsy directly affects 50 million people worldwide. Most can achieve excellent seizure control; however, people living with epilepsy continue to suffer from enacted or perceived stigma that is based on myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings that have persisted for thousands of years. This paper reviews the frequency and nature of stigma toward epilepsy. Significant negative attitudes prevail in the adolescent and adult public worldwide leading to loneliness and social avoidance both in school and in the workplace. People with epilepsy are often wrongly viewed as having mental health and antisocial issues and as being potentially violent toward others. Twenty-five percent of adults having epilepsy describe social stigma as a result of their epilepsy. They fear rejection and often feel shame or loneliness from this diagnosis. The psychosocial and social impact of epilepsy is significant. Yet few specific interventions have been demonstrated to alter this perception. The effect on public education is primarily short-term, while change over the long-term in attitudes and inaccurate beliefs have not presently been proven effective. School education programming demonstrates improved knowledge and attitude a month after a classroom intervention, but persisting change over a longer period of time has not been evaluated. In-depth adult psycho-educational programs for adults with epilepsy improves knowledge, coping skills and level of felt stigma. However these gains have not demonstrated persistence over time. Myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings about epilepsy continue and programs aimed at increasing knowledge and reducing negative public attitudes should be enhanced.

  5. [Sleep disorders in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, O V; Akarachkova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review of the literature on sleep disorders in epilepsy over the last two decades is presented. Paroxysmal phenomena of epileptic origin, nonepileptic paroxysms, antiepileptic drugs, polypragmasia and comorbid depression may affect sleep in epilepsy.Shortening of sleep time may cause seizures, hallucinations and depression because sleep plays an important role in the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory processes in the brain both in healthy people and in patients with epilepsy. According to the literature data, drugs (short treatment courses of hypnotics) or nonpharmacological methods should be used for treatment insomnia inpatients with epilepsy.

  6. Approaches to refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Engel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions, and 30 to 40% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are not controlled by medication. Patients are considered to have refractory epilepsy if disabling seizures continue despite appropriate trials of two antiseizure drugs, either alone or in combination. At this point, patients should be referred to multidisciplinary epilepsy centers that perform specialized diagnostic testing to first determine whether they are, in fact, pharmacoresistant, and then, if so, offer alternative treatments. Apparent pharmacoresistance can result from a variety of situations, including noncompliance, seizures that are not epileptic, misdiagnosis of the seizure type or epilepsy syndrome, inappropriate use of medication, and lifestyle issues. For patients who are pharmacoresistant, surgical treatment offers the best opportunity for complete freedom from seizures. Surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes have been identified, but patients with more complicated epilepsy can also benefit from surgical treatment and require more specialized evaluation, including intracranial EEG monitoring. For patients who are not surgical candidates, or who are unwilling to consider surgery, a variety of other alternative treatments can be considered, including peripheral or central neurostimulation, ketogenic diet, and complementary and alternative approaches. When such alternative treatments are not appropriate or effective, quality of life can still be greatly improved by the psychological and social support services offered by multidisciplinary epilepsy centers. A major obstacle remains the fact that only a small proportion of patients with refractory epilepsy are referred for expert evaluation and treatment.

  7. Protein expression profiling of inflammatory mediators in human temporal lobe epilepsy reveals co-activation of multiple chemokines and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Anne A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE is a chronic and often treatment-refractory brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures originating from the hippocampus. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying mTLE remain largely unknown. Recent clinical and experimental evidence supports a role of various inflammatory mediators in mTLE. Here, we performed protein expression profiling of 40 inflammatory mediators in surgical resection material from mTLE patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis, and autopsy controls using a multiplex bead-based immunoassay. In mTLE patients we identified 21 upregulated inflammatory mediators, including 10 cytokines and 7 chemokines. Many of these upregulated mediators have not previously been implicated in mTLE (for example, CCL22, IL-7 and IL-25. Comparing the three patient groups, two main hippocampal expression patterns could be distinguished, pattern I (for example, IL-10 and IL-25 showing increased expression in mTLE + HS patients compared to mTLE-HS and controls, and pattern II (for example, CCL4 and IL-7 showing increased expression in both mTLE groups compared to controls. Upregulation of a subset of inflammatory mediators (for example, IL-25 and IL-7 could not only be detected in the hippocampus of mTLE patients, but also in the neocortex. Principle component analysis was used to cluster the inflammatory mediators into several components. Follow-up analyses of the identified components revealed that the three patient groups could be discriminated based on their unique expression profiles. Immunocytochemistry showed that IL-25 IR (pattern I and CCL4 IR (pattern II were localized in astrocytes and microglia, whereas IL-25 IR was also detected in neurons. Our data shows co-activation of multiple inflammatory mediators in hippocampus and neocortex of mTLE patients, indicating activation of multiple pro- and anti-epileptogenic immune pathways in this disease.

  8. Prevalance and characteristics of epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd variants Groenendael and Tervueren born in Denmark 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Gulløv, Christina Hedal; Christensen, Stine Louise Krogh

    2008-01-01

    1995 and 2004. Furthermore, it was the intention to describe the clinical manifestation (seizure types and phenomenology) of epilepsy and to identify risk factors for euthanasia once the dog was diagnosed as having epilepsy. METHODS: All owners of Groenendael and Tervueren dogs born between January...... seizures. In four percent seizures were unclassifiable. The most commonly reported focal seizure phenomenology included ataxia, crawling, swaying, fearful behavior, salivation, excessive attention seeking and disorientation. In 16% of the cases, epilepsy led to euthanasia. Intact dogs with epilepsy had...

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of seizure clusters in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Wong, Rebecca A; Jiang, Alfred; Kato, Kenneth; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-07-01

    In the current study, we explored the prevalence of physician-confirmed seizure clusters. We also investigated potential clinical factors associated with the occurrence of seizure clusters overall and by epilepsy type. We reviewed medical records of 4116 adult (≥16years old) outpatients with epilepsy at our centers for documentation of seizure clusters. Variables including patient demographics, epilepsy details, medical and psychiatric history, AED history, and epilepsy risk factors were then tested against history of seizure clusters. Patients were then divided into focal epilepsy, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), or symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), and the same analysis was run. Overall, seizure clusters were independently associated with earlier age of seizure onset, symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), central nervous system (CNS) infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, absence of 1-year seizure freedom, and having failed 2 or more AEDs (Pepilepsy (16.3%) and IGE (7.4%; all Pepilepsy type showed that absence of 1-year seizure freedom since starting treatment at one of our centers was associated with seizure clustering in patients across all 3 epilepsy types. In patients with SGE, clusters were associated with perinatal/congenital brain injury. In patients with focal epilepsy, clusters were associated with younger age of seizure onset, complex partial seizures, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, CNS infection, and having failed 2 or more AEDs. In patients with IGE, clusters were associated with presence of an aura. Only 43.5% of patients with seizure clusters were prescribed rescue medications. Patients with intractable epilepsy are at a higher risk of developing seizure clusters. Factors such as having SGE, CNS infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus or an early seizure onset, can also independently increase one's chance of having seizure clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. How predictive are photosensitive epilepsy models as proof of principle trials for epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Eunice S M; Sims, John R

    2014-06-01

    Human photosensitive epilepsy models have been used as proof of principle (POP) trials for epilepsy. Photosensitive patients are exposed to intermittent photic stimulation and the reduction in sensitivity to the number of standard visual stimulation frequencies is used as an endpoint. The aim of this research was to quantify the predictive capabilities of photosensitive POP trials, through a survey of current literature. A literature search was undertaken to identify articles describing photosensitive POP trials. Minimally efficacious doses (MEDs) in epilepsy were compared to doses in the POP trials that produced 50-100% response (ED50-100). Ratios of these doses were calculated and summarised statistically. The search identified ten articles describing a total of 17 anti-epileptic drugs. Of these, data for both MED and ED50-100 were available for 13 anti-epileptic drugs. The average ratio of MED to ED50-100 was 0.95 (95% CI 0.60-1.30). The difference in MED to ED50-100 ratios between partial epilepsy (0.82) was not significantly different from that of generalised epilepsy (1.08) (p=0.51). Photosensitive POP trials are a useful tool to quantitatively predict efficacy in epilepsy, and can be useful as early and informative indicators in anti-epileptic drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pannexin-1 channels in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Mark S; Whyte-Fagundes, Paige; Zoidl, Georg; Carlen, Peter L

    2017-09-05

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) expression is raised in several animal seizure models and in resected human epileptic brain tissue, suggesting relevance to epilepsy. Multiple factors that are characteristic of seizures are thought to regulate Panx1 channel opening, including elevated levels of extracellular K + . Panx1, when open, 1) releases ATP, glutamate, and other metabolites into the extracellular medium, and 2) may depolarize the membrane due to a channel reversal potential around 0mV. Resultant ATP release from stimulated Panx1 can activate purinergic receptors, including P2X7 receptors. Glutamate and other signaling molecules released by Panx1 opening may have both excitatory and inhibitory actions on seizure generation. This review examines the critical and complex roles of Panx1 channels in epilepsy, which could provide a basis for future therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Extensive Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Zahra; Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Noormohamadi, Robab

    2015-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck's disease is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma virus especially subtypes 13 or 32. The frequency of this disease varies widely from one geographic region and ethnic groups to another. This paper reports an Iranian case of extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia. A 35-year-old man with FEH is described, in whom the lesions had persisted for more than 25 years. The lesion was diagnosed according to both clinical and histopathological features. Dental practitioner should be aware of these types of lesions and histopathological examination together and a careful clinical observation should be carried out for a definitive diagnosis.

  13. Epilepsy: A Disruptive Force in History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rohaid; Connolly, Ian D; Feroze, Abdullah H; Awad, Ahmed J; Choudhri, Omar A; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-06-01

    Since it was first described in a Mesopotamian text in 2000 bc, countless individuals have offered their perspectives on epilepsy's cause, treatment, and even deeper spiritual significance. However, despite the attention the disease has received through the millennia, it has only been within the past half-century that truly effective treatment options have been available. As a result, for the vast majority of recorded history, individuals with epilepsy have not only had to deal with the uncertainty of their next epileptic seizure but also the concomitant stigma and ostracization. Interestingly, these individuals have included several prominent historical figures, including Julius Caesar, Vladimir Lenin, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The fact that epilepsy has appeared in the lives of influential historical people means that the disease has played some role in affecting the progress of human civilization. Epilepsy has cut short the lives of key political leaders, affected the output of talented cultural icons, and, especially within the past half century, influenced the collective understanding of neuroscience and the human nervous system. In this article, the authors review how epilepsy throughout history has manifested itself in the lives of prominent figures and how the disease has helped shape the course of humanity's political, cultural, and scientific evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical treatment of polymicrogyria-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Massimo; Pelliccia, Veronica; Gozzo, Francesca; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Francione, Stefano; Nobili, Lino; Mai, Roberto; Castana, Laura; Sartori, Ivana; Cardinale, Francesco; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Tassi, Laura

    2016-12-01

    The role of resective surgery in the treatment of polymicrogyria (PMG)-related focal epilepsy is uncertain. Our aim was to retrospectively evaluate the seizure outcome in a consecutive series of patients with PMG-related epilepsy who received, or did not receive, surgical treatment, and to outline the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent surgery. We evaluated 64 patients with epilepsy associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented PMG. After presurgical evaluation, 32 patients were excluded from surgical treatment and 32 were offered surgery, which was declined by 8 patients. Seizure outcome was assessed in the 40 nonsurgical and 24 surgical patients. Of 40 nonsurgical patients, 8 (20%) were seizure-free after a mean follow-up of 91.7 ± (standard deviation) 59.5 months. None of the eight patients who declined surgical treatment was seizure-free (mean follow-up: 74.3 ± 60.6 months). These seizure outcomes differ significantly (p = 0.000005 and p = 0.0003, respectively) from that of the 24 surgical patients, 18 of whom (66.7%) were Engel's class I postoperatively (mean follow-up: 66.5 ± 54.0 months). Of the eight patients excluded from surgery for seizure control at first visit, two had seizure recurrence at last contact. At last contact, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) had been withdrawn in 6 of 24 surgical and in one of 40 nonsurgical cases (p = 0.0092). The present study indicates that, at least in a subset of adequately selected patients with PMG-related epilepsy, surgery may provide excellent seizure outcomes. Furthermore, it suggests that surgery is superior to AEDs for achieving seizure freedom in these cases. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Epilepsy: Asia versus Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Tan, Chong Tin; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-09-01

    Is epilepsy truly an "African ailment"? We aimed to determine this, since international health agencies often refer to epilepsy as an African disease and the scientific literature has spoken the same tone. Various published materials, mainly reports, articles, were used to gather Asian and African evidence on various aspects of epilepsy and many of its risk and associated factors. Our results suggest that in no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment and such characterization is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. In comparison to Africa, Asia has a 5.0% greater burden from all diseases, and is 17.0% more affected from neuropsychiatric disorders (that include epilepsy). Given that more countries in Asia are transitioning, there may be large demographic and lifestyle changes in the near future. However these changes are nowhere close to those expected in Africa. Moreover, 23 million Asians have epilepsy in comparison to 3.3 million Africans and 1.2 million sub-Saharan Africans. In comparison to Africa, Asia has more untreated patients, 55.0% more additional epilepsy cases every year, because of its larger population, with greater treatment cost and possibly higher premature mortality. Of several associated factors discussed herein, many have more importance for Asia than Africa. The current state of epilepsy in Asia is far less than ideal and there is an urgent need to recognize and accept the importance of epilepsy in Asia. In no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment. This is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Clinical characteristics and treatment responses in new-onset epilepsy in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akihiro; Akamatsu, Naoki; Shouzaki, Taisaku; Toyota, Tomoko; Yamano, Mitsuhiko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2013-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that the incidence of epilepsy is the highest in the elderly population. Because the elderly constitutes the most rapidly growing population, epilepsy in this group is an important health issue worldwide. To identify the characteristics of epilepsy in the elderly, we reviewed our experience at a tertiary referral center in Japan. We searched all electronic medical records of the past 6 years at the epilepsy clinic of the hospital affiliated to our University-affiliated hospital. We defined an elderly person as an individual aged 65 years and above. All patients underwent history and physical examinations, 3T magnetic resonance imaging and/or computer tomography, and electroencephalogram (EEG). The diagnosis of epilepsy, age of onset, etiology, and antiepileptic medication were recorded. We identified 70 patients who developed epilepsy after the age of 65 years. The mean age of seizure onset was 73.1 years and 52.9% patients were males. Complex partial seizures (CPS) without secondarily generalization (n=33, 47.1%) were most frequent. The most frequent diagnosis was temporal lobe epilepsy (n=50, 71.4%). Etiological diagnosis was possible in nearly 50% patients, including those with cerebrovascular disease. A clear cause of epilepsy was not found (i.e., non-lesional epilepsy) in 52.8% patients. Interictal EEG revealed focal epileptiform discharges in 72.9% (n=51) patients. Of the 54 patients who were followed more than 1 year, 42 patients (77.8%) were on antiepileptic monotherapy and 52 patients (96.3%) had been seizure-free for more than 1 year. The most frequent diagnosis in our cohort of elderly persons with new-onset epilepsy was temporal lobe epilepsy. Non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy was not uncommon. Epileptogenecity was relatively low in elderly patients and they responded well to antiepileptic medication. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrocardiographic features of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyou, Janice Y; Friedman, Daniel; Cerrone, Marina; Slater, William; Guo, Yu; Taupin, Daniel; O'Rourke, Sean; Priori, Silvia G; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-07-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common cause of epilepsy-related mortality. We hypothesized that electrocardiography (ECG) features may distinguish SUDEP cases from living subjects with epilepsy. Using a matched case-control design, we compared ECG studies of 12 consecutive cases of SUDEP over 10 years and 22 epilepsy controls matched for age, sex, epilepsy type (focal, generalized, or unknown/mixed type), concomitant antiepileptic, and psychotropic drug classes. Conduction intervals and prevalence of abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis (QRS ≥110 msec), abnormal ventricular conduction pattern (QRS <110 msec, morphology of incomplete right or left bundle branch block or intraventricular conduction delay), early repolarization, and features of inherited cardiac channelopathies were assessed. Abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis and pattern distinguished SUDEP cases from matched controls. Abnormal ventricular conduction diagnosis was present in two cases and no controls. Abnormal ventricular conduction pattern was more common in cases than controls (58% vs. 18%, p = 0.04). Early repolarization was similarly prevalent in cases and controls, but the overall prevalence exceeded that of published community-based cohorts. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. [Epilepsy and epileptic syndromes during the first year of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durá-Travé, T; Yoldi-Petri, M E; Hualde-Olascoaga, J; Etayo-Etayo, V

    To analyse the epidemiological characteristics and the relative distribution of the different types of epilepsy and epileptic syndromes during the first year of life. An analysis was performed of the patient records of all patients with epilepsy diagnosed during their first year of life who were submitted to a developmental check-up in the year 2007. The sample consisted of 60 patients (27 boys and 33 girls). Epidemiological and clinical data were collected, together with the findings from complementary examinations. The diagnostic criteria applied were those of the International League Against Epilepsy. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 6.3 months. The mean follow-up time was 7.6 years. The aetiology was symptomatic in 40 cases (66.7%), cryptogenic in 16 (26.7%) and idiopathic in four cases (6.7%). Neuroimaging tests detected abnormalities in 34 patients (56.7%). West's syndrome (30%), symptomatic focal epilepsies (23.3%) and epilepsies linked to specific syndromes (16.7%) were the epileptic syndromes with the highest prevalence. Learning disabilities were observed in 82.5% of the children. Most epilepsies that present during the first year of life are symptomatic and/or cryptogenic, and are accompanied by psychoneurological impairment and/or resistance to therapy, which condition cognitive disorders that are eligible for specialised psycho-pedagogical intervention.

  19. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsoo Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p=0.0284, Fisher’s exact test. Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children.

  20. Epilepsy and violence: case series concerning physical trauma in children of persons with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauffin H

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Helena Gauffin1,2 Anne-Marie Landtblom1–4 1Department of Neurology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 3Neurology Unit, Department of Medical Specialist, General Hospital, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, IMM, County Council, Linköping University, Motala, Sweden; 4Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Abstract: Historically, epilepsy has been associated with violence, but more recent studies have emphasized genetic and psychosocial factors as more important. The case series presented here aim to highlight the difficult situation the affected children are in. We report on three cases when children have been traumatized and, in one case, even been killed by their parent who was diagnosed with epilepsy. In the first case, we describe a woman with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy who was sentenced to forensic psychiatry care for killing her child. She lived under difficult psychosocial circumstances and a suicide attempt contributed to what happened. The second case describes a man with post-traumatic seizures who was sentenced for child abuse. Ictal or postictal violence was considered in these two cases but a causal link between the violence and epilepsy has not been established. In the third case, we describe a woman with focal epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNESs. Her child was hurt and frightened in relation to violent seizures, which were regarded as PNESs. This case series demonstrates that children of parents with epilepsy can be in a vulnerable situation. No causality has been established between the seizures and these events, so consequently other factors such as psychosocial stress, low cognitive function, and a suicide attempt must also be considered as important. When a child is hurt by a parent with epilepsy the patient must be closely examined to determine the role of the seizures

  1. Epilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Jarlath; Delanty, Norman; Normand, Charles; Coyne, Imelda; McQuaid, Louise; Collins, Claire; Boland, Michael; Grimson, Jane; Fitzsimons, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease affecting people of every age, gender, race and socio-economic background. The diagnosis and optimal management relies on contribution from a number of healthcare disciplines in a variety of healthcare settings. To explore the interface between primary care and specialist epilepsy services in Ireland. Using appreciative inquiry, focus groups were held with healthcare professionals (n=33) from both primary and tertiary epilepsy specialist services in Ireland. There are significant challenges to delivering a consistent high standard of epilepsy care in Ireland. The barriers that were identified are: the stigma of epilepsy, unequal access to care services, insufficient human resources, unclear communication between primary-tertiary services and lack of knowledge. Improving the management of people with epilepsy requires reconfiguration of the primary-tertiary interface and establishing clearly defined roles and formalised clinical pathways. Such initiatives require resources in the form of further education and training and increased usage of information communication technology (ICT). Epilepsy services across the primary-tertiary interface can be significantly enhanced through the implementation of a shared model of care underpinned by an electronic patient record (EPR) system and information communication technology (ICT). Better chronic disease management has the potential to halt the progression of epilepsy with ensuing benefits for patients and the healthcare system. Copyright 2009 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute termination of human atrial fibrillation by identification and catheter ablation of localized rotors and sources: first multicenter experience of focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Hummel, John D; Miller, John M; Steinberg, Jonathan S

    2012-12-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) currently relies on eliminating triggers, and no reliable method exists to map the arrhythmia itself to identify ablation targets. The aim of this multicenter study was to define the use of Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation (FIRM) for identifying ablation targets. We prospectively enrolled the first (n = 14, 11 males) consecutive patients undergoing FIRM-guided ablation for persistent (n = 11) and paroxysmal AF at 5 centers. A 64-pole basket catheter was used for panoramic right and left atrial mapping during AF. AF electrograms were analyzed using a novel system to identify sustained rotors (spiral waves), or focal beats (centrifugal activation to surrounding atrium). Ablation was performed first at identified sources. The primary endpoints were acute AF termination or organization (>10% cycle length prolongation). Conventional ablation was performed only after FIRM-guided ablation. Twelve out of 14 cases were mapped. AF sources were demonstrated in all patients (average of 1.9 ± 0.8 per patient). Sources were left atrial in 18 cases, and right atrial in 5 cases, and 21/23 were rotors. FIRM-guided ablation achieved the acute endpoint in all patients, consisting of AF termination in n = 8 (4.9 ± 3.9 minutes at the primary source), and organization in n = 4. Total FIRM time for all patients was 12.3 ± 8.6 minutes. FIRM-guided ablation revealed localized AF rotors/focal sources in patients with paroxysmal, persistent and longstanding persistent AF. Brief targeted FIRM-guided ablation at a priori identified sites terminated or substantially organized AF in all cases prior to any other ablation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of Human Papillomavirus (HPV testing for cervical cancer screening: trial design and preliminary results (HPV FOCAL Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Laurie W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the HPV FOCAL trial, we will establish the efficacy of hr-HPV DNA testing as a stand-alone screening test followed by liquid based cytology (LBC triage of hr-HPV-positive women compared to LBC followed by hr-HPV triage with ≥ CIN3 as the outcome. Methods/Design HPV-FOCAL is a randomized, controlled, three-armed study over a four year period conducted in British Columbia. It will recruit 33,000 women aged 25-65 through the province's population based cervical cancer screening program. Control arm: LBC at entry and two years, and combined LBC and hr-HPV at four years among those with initial negative results and hr-HPV triage of ASCUS cases; Two Year Safety Check arm: hr-HPV at entry and LBC at two years in those with initial negative results with LBC triage of hr-HPV positives; Four Year Intervention Arm: hr-HPV at entry and combined hr-HPV and LBC at four years among those with initial negative results with LBC triage of hr-HPV positive cases Discussion To date, 6150 participants have a completed sample and epidemiologic questionnaire. Of the 2019 women enrolled in the control arm, 1908 (94.5% were cytology negative. Women aged 25-29 had the highest rates of HSIL (1.4%. In the safety arm 92.2% of women were hr-HPV negative, with the highest rate of hr-HPV positivity found in 25-29 year old women (23.5%. Similar results were obtained in the intervention arm HPV FOCAL is the first randomized trial in North America to examine hr-HPV testing as the primary screen for cervical cancer within a population-based cervical cancer screening program. Trial Registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register, ISRCTN79347302

  4. A randomized controlled trial of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) testing for cervical cancer screening: trial design and preliminary results (HPV FOCAL Trial)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogilvie, Gina S; Cook, Darrel A; Mei, Wendy; Stuart, Gavin CE; Franco, Eduardo L; Coldman, Andrew J; Niekerk, Dirk J van; Krajden, Mel; Martin, Ruth E; Ehlen, Thomas G; Ceballos, Kathy; Peacock, Stuart J; Smith, Laurie W; Kan, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    In the HPV FOCAL trial, we will establish the efficacy of hr-HPV DNA testing as a stand-alone screening test followed by liquid based cytology (LBC) triage of hr-HPV-positive women compared to LBC followed by hr-HPV triage with ≥ CIN3 as the outcome. HPV-FOCAL is a randomized, controlled, three-armed study over a four year period conducted in British Columbia. It will recruit 33,000 women aged 25-65 through the province's population based cervical cancer screening program. Control arm: LBC at entry and two years, and combined LBC and hr-HPV at four years among those with initial negative results and hr-HPV triage of ASCUS cases; Two Year Safety Check arm: hr-HPV at entry and LBC at two years in those with initial negative results with LBC triage of hr-HPV positives; Four Year Intervention Arm: hr-HPV at entry and combined hr-HPV and LBC at four years among those with initial negative results with LBC triage of hr-HPV positive cases To date, 6150 participants have a completed sample and epidemiologic questionnaire. Of the 2019 women enrolled in the control arm, 1908 (94.5%) were cytology negative. Women aged 25-29 had the highest rates of HSIL (1.4%). In the safety arm 92.2% of women were hr-HPV negative, with the highest rate of hr-HPV positivity found in 25-29 year old women (23.5%). Similar results were obtained in the intervention arm HPV FOCAL is the first randomized trial in North America to examine hr-HPV testing as the primary screen for cervical cancer within a population-based cervical cancer screening program. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register, ISRCTN79347302

  5. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue: A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blümcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Miyata, Hajime; Sarnat, Harvey B.; Thom, Maria; Roessler, Karl; Rydenhag, Bertil; Jehi, Lara; Krsek, Pavel; Wiebe, Samuel; Spreafico, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the

  6. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue : A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blümcke, I.; Aronica, E.; Miyata, H.; Sarnat, H.B.; Thom, M.; Roessler, K.; Rydenhag, B.; Jehi, L.; Krsek, P.; Wiebe, S.; Spreafico, R.

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the

  7. Mortality in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitiris, Nikolas; Mohanraj, Rajiv; Norrie, John; Brodie, Martin J

    2007-05-01

    All studies report an increased mortality risk for people with epilepsy compared with the general population. Population-based studies have demonstrated that the increased mortality is often related to the cause of the epilepsy. Common etiologies include neoplasia, cerebrovascular disease, and pneumonia. Deaths in selected cohorts, such as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), status epilepticus (SE), suicides, and accidents are more frequently epilepsy-related. SUDEP is a particular cause for concern in younger people, and whether and when SUDEP should be discussed with patients with epilepsy remain problematic issues. Risk factors for SUDEP include generalized tonic-clonic seizures, increased seizure frequency, concomitant learning disability, and antiepileptic drug polypharmacy. The overall incidence of SE may be increasing, although case fatality rates remain constant. Mortality is frequently secondary to acute symptomatic disorders. Poor compliance with treatment in patients with epilepsy accounts for a small proportion of deaths from SE. The incidence of suicide is increased, particularly for individuals with epilepsy and comorbid psychiatric conditions. Late mortality figures in patients undergoing epilepsy surgery vary and are likely to reflect differences in case selection. Future studies of mortality should be prospective and follow agreed guidelines to better quantify risk and causation in individual populations.

  8. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Mavrič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy poses a risk for all participants in road traffic; therefore people with epilepsy do not meet the criteria for an unlimited driving license. Their driving is affected not only by epileptic seizures causing impaired consciousness and involuntary movements, but also by antiepileptic drugs with their many unwanted affects. The experts have not yet agreed on whether people with epilepsy have an increased risk of experiencing a road traffic accident. However, recent data suggests that the overall risk is lower compared to other medical conditions. Scientific evidence forms the basis of legislation, which by limiting people with epilepsy, enables all participants in road traffic to drive in the safest possible environment. The legislation that governs epilepsy and driving in Slovenia has been recently thoroughly reformed and thus allows a less discriminatory management of people with epilepsy. Although people with epilepsy experience many issues in their daily life, including their personal relationships and employment, they often list the need for driving as a top concern in surveys. General physicians play an important role in managing the issues of people with epilepsy.

  9. Epilepsi og orale manifestationer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Endrup; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John Rosendahl

    2016-01-01

    Risiko for sygdom I mundhulen hos patienter med epilepsy Epilepsi er en kronisk neurologisk lidelse, der ofte vil kræve medicinsk behandling for at holde patienterne fri for anfald. Lidelsen kan have betydning for patientens psykosociale og kognitive udvikling, der indirekte kan have betydning...

  10. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, Wilhelmina Adriana Maria

    2006-01-01

    Het proefschrift beschrijft de relatie tussen epilepsie en psychiatrische stoornissen. Voor het onderzoek werden zowel klinische als poliklinische patiënten met epilepsie onderzocht op het voorkomen van DSM as I klinische stoornissen en as II persoonlijkheidsstoornissen. De resultaten werden

  11. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...

  12. Behandling af rolandisk epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Maria Jose; Ahmad, Banoo Bakir

    2017-01-01

    Recent literature indicates, that rolandic epilepsy/epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes may not be as benign as previously assumed. This study investigates the existing evidence, which describes the treatment effects on seizure frequency as well as improvement of cognition in childre...

  13. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological

  14. Behavior Disorders and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1993-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 127 children with epilepsy aged 8-12 years and their mothers, designed to identify factors contributing to behavior problems, is reported from the Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis; the Minnesota Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Minneapolis; and the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston.

  15. Managing Epilepsy in Pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Dwyer, V

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest medical conditions affecting women of childbearing age1. In the most recent triennial report into maternal deaths in Ireland and the UK, two thirds of women who died had a medical condition. In this report, 14 maternal deaths during pregnancy and up to 42 days postpartum were attributable to epilepsy or seizures; a rate of 0.4 per 100,000 maternities. In 12 of these women’ the cause was sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. Thus, epilepsy remains a high-risk condition in pregnancy. The gold standard of care is a multidisciplinary approach involving obstetricians, a neurologist and an epilepsy nurse specialist2. Like other units in Ireland this multidisciplinary service is currently provided in the National Maternity Hospital’s maternal medicine clinic, in conjunction with neurology services in Beaumont Hospital.

  16. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyung Ah

    2007-01-01

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization

  17. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization.

  18. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rational management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkataraman

    2014-09-01

    Management of epilepsies in children has improved considerably over the last decade, all over the world due to the advances seen in the understanding of the patho-physiology of epileptogenesis, availability of both structural and functional imaging studies along with better quality EEG/video-EEG recordings and the availability of a plethora of newer anti-epileptic drugs which are tailormade to act on specific pathways. In spite of this, there is still a long way to go before one is able to be absolutely rational about which drug to use for which type of epilepsy. There have been a lot of advances in the area of epilepsy surgery and is certainly gaining ground for specific cases. Better understanding of the genetic basis of epilepsies will hopefully lead to a more rational treatment plan in the future. Also, a lot of work needs to be done to dispel various misunderstandings and myths about epilepsy which still exists in our country.

  20. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos H. C. Duran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners’ Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%, seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  1. Epilepsy and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P. Saneto DO, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. In a large cohort of children and adolescents with mitochondrial disease (n = 180, over 48% of patients developed seizures. The majority (68% of patients were younger than 3 years and medically intractable (90%. The electroencephalographic pattern of multiregional epileptiform discharges over the left and right hemisphere with background slowing occurred in 62%. The epilepsy syndrome, infantile spasms, was seen in 17%. Polymerase γ mutations were the most common genetic etiology of seizures, representing Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (14%. The severity of disease in those patients with epilepsy was significant, as 13% of patients experienced early death. Simply the loss of energy production cannot explain the development of seizures or all patients with mitochondrial dysfunction would have epilepsy. Until the various aspects of mitochondrial physiology that are involved in proper brain development are understood, epilepsy and its treatment will remain unsatisfactory.

  2. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  3. Genetics of Severe Early Onset Epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-24

    Epilepsy; Epileptic Encephalopathy; Ohtahara Syndrome; Infantile Spasms; Dravet Syndrome; Malignant Migrating Partial Epilepsy of Infancy; Early Myoclonic Epileptic Encephalopathy; PCDH19-related Epilepsy and Related Conditions

  4. Infections, inflammation and epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Fujinami, Robert S.; White, H. Steve; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Blümcke, Ingmar; Sander, Josemir W.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the tendency to have unprovoked epileptic seizures. Anything causing structural or functional derangement of brain physiology may lead to seizures, and different conditions may express themselves solely by recurrent seizures and thus be labelled “epilepsy.” Worldwide, epilepsy is the most common serious neurological condition. The range of risk factors for the development of epilepsy varies with age and geographic location. Congenital, developmental and genetic conditions are mostly associated with the development of epilepsy in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Head trauma, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and tumours may occur at any age and may lead to the development of epilepsy. Infections of the CNS are a major risk factor for epilepsy. The reported risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of survivors of CNS infections from developed countries is between 6.8 and 8.3 %, and is much higher in resource-poor countries. In this review, the various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infectious diseases of the CNS which result in seizures and epilepsy are discussed. The pathogenesis of epilepsy due to brain infections, as well as the role of experimental models to study mechanisms of epileptogenesis induced by infectious agents, is reviewed. The sterile (non-infectious) inflammatory response that occurs following brain insults is also discussed, as well as its overlap with inflammation due to infections, and the potential role in epileptogenesis. Furthermore, autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of seizures is reviewed. Potential strategies to prevent epilepsy resulting from brain infections and non-infectious inflammation are also considered. PMID:26423537

  5. Reversed Procrastination by Focal Disruption of Medial Frontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ashwani; Diehl, Beate; Scott, Catherine; McEvoy, Andrew W; Nachev, Parashkev

    2016-11-07

    An enduring puzzle in the neuroscience of voluntary action is the origin of the remarkably wide dispersion of the reaction time distribution, an interval far greater than is explained by synaptic or signal transductive noise [1, 2]. That we are able to change our planned actions-a key criterion of volition [3]-so close to the time of their onset implies decision-making must reach deep into the execution of action itself [4-6]. It has been influentially suggested the reaction time distribution therefore reflects deliberate neural procrastination [7], giving alternative response tendencies sufficient time for fair competition in pursuing a decision threshold that determines which one is behaviorally manifest: a race model, where action selection and execution are closely interrelated [8-11]. Although the medial frontal cortex exhibits a sensitivity to reaction time on functional imaging that is consistent with such a mechanism [12-14], direct evidence from disruptive studies has hitherto been lacking. If movement-generating and movement-delaying neural substrates are closely co-localized here, a large-scale lesion will inevitably mask any acceleration, for the movement itself could be disrupted. Circumventing this problem, here we observed focal intracranial electrical disruption of the medial frontal wall in the context of the pre-surgical evaluation of two patients with epilepsy temporarily reversing such hypothesized procrastination. Effector-specific behavioral acceleration, time-locked to the period of electrical disruption, occurred exclusively at a specific locus at the ventral border of the pre-supplementary motor area. A cardinal prediction of race models of voluntary action is thereby substantiated in the human brain. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. [Epilepsy: incidens, prevalens and causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Lars; Sundelin, Heléne; Sveinsson, Olafur

    2018-05-21

    Epilepsy affects people in all ages with the highest incidence in small children, particularly before age one year, and in elderly aged 65 years and older. In Sweden, between 4500-5000 persons develop epilepsy annually. Based on studies from North America and Europe, including the Nordic countries, the number of people with active epilepsy in Sweden is between 60000-70000. The lifetime risk for epilepsy up to age 85 years is 4-5 %, i.e. approximately every 25th person. The new epilepsy classification divides etiology into the following groups: structural, genetic, infectious, metabolic, immune and unknown. The majority (70%) of people with epilepsy eventually become seizure free. Epilepsy increases the risk of psychosocial problems and accidents. People with epilepsy have up to a 3-fold increase in mortality, mainly due to the underlying causes and epilepsy related deaths, e.g. status epilepticus, SUDEP and accidents. Somatic, psychiatric and neuropsychiatric comorbidities are common in epilepsy.

  7. Usefulness of a simple sleep-deprived EEG protocol for epilepsy diagnosis in de novo subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Filippo S; Perini, Daria; Maestri, Michelangelo; Guida, Melania; Pizzanelli, Chiara; Caserta, Anna; Iudice, Alfonso; Bonanni, Enrica

    2013-11-01

    In case series concerning the role of EEG after sleep deprivation (SD-EEG) in epilepsy, patients' features and protocols vary dramatically from one report to another. In this study, we assessed the usefulness of a simple SD-EEG method in well characterized patients. Among the 963 adult subjects submitted to SD-EEG at our Center, in the period 2003-2010, we retrospectively selected for analysis only those: (1) evaluated for suspected epileptic seizures; (2) with a normal/non-specific baseline EEG; (3) still drug-free at the time of SD-EEG; (4) with an MRI analysis; (5) with at least 1 year follow-up. SD-EEG consisted in SD from 2:00 AM and laboratory EEG from 8:00 AM to 10:30 AM. We analyzed epileptic interictal abnormalities (IIAs) and their correlations with patients' features. Epilepsy was confirmed in 131 patients. SD-EEG showed IIAs in 41.2% of all patients with epilepsy, and a 91.1% specificity for epilepsy diagnosis; IIAs types observed during SD-EEG are different in generalized versus focal epilepsies; for focal epilepsies, the IIAs yield in SD-EEG is higher than in second routine EEG. This simple SD-EEG protocol is very useful in de novo patients with suspected seizures. This study sheds new light on the role of SD-EEG in specific epilepsy populations. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of Life and Fitness in Children and Adolescents with Epilepsy (EpiFit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Hagn, Claudia; Walch, Romana; Baumann, Matthias; Haberlandt, Edda; Frühwirth, Martin; Rostasy, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with idiopathic epilepsy compared with a healthy matched control group. Methods  In this study, 107 children conducted a 6-minute walk test, anthropometric parameters were measured, and HRQoL was assessed using a standardized questionnaire (KINDL-R). Children were divided into two groups: (1) the patient group ( n  = 48) and (2) the healthy control group ( n  = 59). Results  HRQoL of children with focal epilepsy was greater when compared with healthy children and children with generalized epilepsy. A significant association could be demonstrated for the 6-minute walk distance and mental wellbeing in children with epilepsy but not in healthy children. Furthermore, a negative correlation between the HRQoL and the amount of time spent in front of TV and computer in children with epilepsy and healthy children was seen. In children with focal epilepsy, a significant negative correlation could be shown between school sport and mental wellbeing as well as between school sport and self-esteem. Conclusion  HRQoL in children with idiopathic epilepsy is significantly associated with physical fitness and might be positively influenced by an adequate education of patients and parents, a reduction of consumption of computer and TV in combination with age- and disease-adapted physical activity and sports. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Epilepsy in adults with mitochondrial disease: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Roger G; Devine, Helen E; Gorman, Grainne S; Schaefer, Andrew M; Horvath, Rita; Ng, Yi; Nesbitt, Victoria; Lax, Nichola Z; McFarland, Robert; Cunningham, Mark O; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the prevalence and progression of epilepsy in adult patients with mitochondrial disease. We prospectively recruited a cohort of 182 consecutive adult patients attending a specialized mitochondrial disease clinic in Newcastle upon Tyne between January 1, 2005 and January 1, 2008. We then followed this cohort over a 7-year period, recording primary outcome measures of occurrence of first seizure, status epilepticus, stroke-like episode, and death. Overall prevalence of epilepsy in the cohort was 23.1%. Mean age of epilepsy onset was 29.4 years. Prevalence varied widely between genotypes, with several genotypes having no cases of epilepsy, a prevalence of 34.9% in the most common genotype (m.3243A>G mutation), and 92.3% in the m.8344A>G mutation. Among the cohort as a whole, focal seizures, with or without progression to bilateral convulsive seizures, was the most common seizure type. Conversely, all of the patients with the m.8344A>G mutation and epilepsy experienced myoclonic seizures. Patients with the m.3243A>G mutation remain at high risk of developing stroke-like episodes (1.16% per year). However, although the standardized mortality ratio for the entire cohort was high (2.86), this ratio did not differ significantly between patients with epilepsy (2.96) and those without (2.83). Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. It develops early in the disease and, in the case of the m.3243A>G mutation, often presents in the context of a stroke-like episode or status epilepticus. However, epilepsy does not itself appear to contribute to the increased mortality in mitochondrial disease. © 2015 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  10. Seizure outcomes in non-resective epilepsy surgery: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Birk, Harjus; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    In approximately 30% of patients with epilepsy, seizures are refractory to medical therapy, leading to significant morbidity and increased mortality. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the benefit of surgical resection in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy, and in the present journal, we recently reviewed seizure outcomes in resective epilepsy surgery. However, not all patients are candidates for or amenable to open surgical resection for epilepsy. Fortunately, several non-resective surgical options are now available at various epilepsy centers, including novel therapies which have been pioneered in recent years. Ablative procedures such as stereotactic laser ablation and stereotactic radiosurgery offer minimally invasive alternatives to open surgery with relatively favorable seizure outcomes, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For certain individuals who are not candidates for ablation or resection, palliative neuromodulation procedures such as vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, or responsive neurostimulation may result in a significant decrease in seizure frequency and improved quality of life. Finally, disconnection procedures such as multiple subpial transections and corpus callosotomy continue to play a role in select patients with an eloquent epileptogenic zone or intractable atonic seizures, respectively. Overall, open surgical resection remains the gold standard treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy, although it is significantly under-utilized. While non-resective epilepsy procedures have not replaced the need for resection, there is hope that these additional surgical options will increase the number of patients who receive treatment for this devastating disorder - particularly individuals who are not candidates for or who have failed resection. PMID:27206422

  11. Lateralizing value of unilateral relative ictal immobility in patients with refractory focal seizures--Looking beyond unilateral automatisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Priya; Kaul, Bhavna; Shukla, Garima; Srivastava, Achal; Singh, Mamta Bhushan; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri; Suri, Ashish; Gupta, Aditya; Garg, Ajay; Gaikwad, Shailesh; Bal, C S

    2015-12-01

    Ictal motor phenomena play a crucial role in the localization of seizure focus in the management of refractory focal epilepsy. While the importance of unilateral automatisms is well established, little attention is paid to the contralateral relatively immobile limb. In cases where automatisms mimic clonic or dystonic movements and in the absence of previously well-established signs, unilateral relative ictal immobility (RII) is potentially useful as a lateralizing sign. This study was carried out to examine the lateralizing value of this sign and to define its characteristics among patients of refractory focal epilepsy. VEEGs of 69 consecutive patients of refractory focal epilepsy who had undergone epilepsy surgery at our center over last four years were reviewed and analyzed for the presence of RII. Unilateral RII was defined as a paucity of movement in one limb lasting for at least 10s while the contralateral limb showed purposive or semi-purposive movements (in the absence of tonic or dystonic posturing or clonic movements in the involved limb). The findings were seen in the light of VEEG, radiological and nuclear imaging data, and with post-surgical outcome. Unilateral RII as a lateralizing sign was found in 24 of 69 patients (34.78%), consisting of both temporal and extra temporal epilepsy, with 100% concordance with VEEG and MRI data. All patients demonstrating this sign had a good post-surgical outcome. RII, when well characterized is a frequent and reliable lateralizing sign in patients of refractory focal epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Etiologic features and utilization of antiepileptic drugs in people with chronic epilepsy in China: Report from the Epilepsy Cohort of Huashan Hospital (ECoH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yan; Yu, Peimin; Ding, Ding; Wang, Ping; Shi, Yunbo; Zhao, Ting; Tang, Xinghua; Hong, Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic epilepsy is estimated to affect more than 2 million people in China. However, data of its clinical characteristics was rarely reported in China. In the present study, we summarized the etiologic features and utilization patterns of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in people with chronic epilepsy in a tertiary medical center in China. We prospectively recruited people with chronic epilepsy treated at the Epilepsy Outpatient Clinic of Huashan Hospital during October 2009 to August 2013. Demographic data, clinical characteristics, AED treatment, epilepsy-associated risk factors and medical history, and results of supplementary examinations of each participant were collected retrospectively via an interviewer-administered questionnaire and confirmed by the medical records. Among 554 people with chronic epilepsy, 58.0% of them were male, 66.8% had focal seizure, and 29.2% had symptomatic cause. Developmental anomalies of cerebral structure (16.7%) and cerebral trauma (16.7%) shared the leading cause of symptomatic epilepsy among children with epilepsy. While cerebral trauma (29.1%) and cerebrovascular disorder (36.4%) were the most common causes in groups of adults and elderly. Fifty percent of participants were taking AED monotherapy. Proportions of people with idiopathic, cryptogenic and symptomatic epilepsy treated by multitherapy were 35%, 46% and 45.6%, respectively. Valproic acid (VPA) was the most frequently utilized AED as monotherapy (32.7%) and within multitherapy (62.5%). This hospital-based study reported that etiologic features were diverse in different age groups of people with chronic epilepsy. VPA was widely utilized to treat chronic epilepsy in mainland China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The molecular and phenotypic spectrum of IQSEC2-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerem, Ayelet; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Lev, Dorit; Blumkin, Lubov; Kivity, Sara; Linder, Ilan; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Palmer, Elizabeth Emma; Field, Michael; Boyle, Jackie; Chitayat, David; Gaillard, William D; Kossoff, Eric H; Willems, Marjolaine; Geneviève, David; Tran-Mau-Them, Frederic; Epstein, Orna; Heyman, Eli; Dugan, Sarah; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Piton, Ame'lie; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Pfundt, Rolph; Sato, Ryo; Tzschach, Andreas; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2016-11-01

    IQSEC2 is an X-linked gene associated with intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy. Herein we characterize the epilepsy/epileptic encephalopathy of patients with IQSEC2 pathogenic variants. Forty-eight patients with IQSEC2 variants were identified worldwide through Medline search. Two patients were recruited from our early onset epileptic encephalopathy cohort and one patient from personal communication. The 18 patients who have epilepsy in addition to ID are the subject of this study. Information regarding the 18 patients was ascertained by questionnaire provided to the treating clinicians. Six affected individuals had an inherited IQSEC2 variant and 12 had a de novo one (male-to-female ratio, 12:6). The pathogenic variant types were as follows: missense (8), nonsense (5), frameshift (1), intragenic duplications (2), translocation (1), and insertion (1). An epileptic encephalopathy was diagnosed in 9 (50%) of 18 patients. Seizure onset ranged from 8 months to 4 years; seizure types included spasms, atonic, myoclonic, tonic, absence, focal seizures, and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures. The electroclinical syndromes could be defined in five patients: late-onset epileptic spasms (three) and Lennox-Gastaut or Lennox-Gastaut-like syndrome (two). Seizures were pharmacoresistant in all affected individuals with epileptic encephalopathy. The epilepsy in the other nine patients had a variable age at onset from infancy to 18 years; seizure types included GTC and absence seizures in the hereditary cases and GTC and focal seizures in de novo cases. Seizures were responsive to medical treatment in most cases. All 18 patients had moderate to profound intellectual disability. Developmental regression, autistic features, hypotonia, strabismus, and white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were prominent features. The phenotypic spectrum of IQSEC2 disorders includes epilepsy and epileptic encephalopathy. Epileptic encephalopathy is a main clinical

  14. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process. © 2013.

  15. Epilepsy is Dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-10-01

    In "Epilepsy is Dancing", in Antony and the Johnsons' album "The Crying Light"(2009), the lyrics and accompanying music video depicts an epileptic seizure in which the person is transferred to another beautiful and magical world. This may be called "enchanted epilepsy"; i.e., the experience of epilepsy as deeply nourishing and (positively) transforming, is conveyed not only in the lyrics but also the visual and auditory qualities of the video. The seizure in the video gives associations to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's dream". If epilepsy appears in music lyrics, the focus is mostly on negative aspects of the illness, such as horror, fear and repulsive sexuality associated with the fits [1,2]. Contradictory to these lyrics, Anthony and the Johnsons' song is an example of a positive portrayal of epilepsy. It is open to a multitude of meanings, emotional valence and appraisal of epilepsy. By widening the experiential range associated with epileptic seizures, these lyrics highlight the inherently construed nature of epileptic experience. The song stands out in several ways. First, it describes epilepsy in positive terms, prioritising the euphoric, ecstatic, potentially empowering and enhancing aspects of epileptic seizures. Second, the lyrics and accompanying video point to divine experiences associated with epileptic seizures. Through the lyrics and the music video we are, as an audience, able to sense a snicket of an epileptic seizure, but also the universal experience of loosing control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Systemic focal epileptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remler, M.P.; Marcussen, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Rats that receive radiation to 0.25 cc of one cerebral hemisphere are clinically and electroencephalographically normal until there is a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) at 3 to 6 months postradiation. This BBB lesion can be detected by transient focal seizure activity produced by the BBB-excluded systemic convulsant bicuculline methiodide. In two rats the seizure activity induced by this one injection was self-sustaining. In seven of 15 other rats tested, the subsequent administration of repeated 2 mg/kg injections created a chronic focus that continued to spike with great frequency for 3 weeks or more without further administration of any convulsant. In three of eight other rats, implanted minipumps delivering 180 micrograms/h of bicuculline methiodide produced self-sustaining epileptic activity.

  17. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate genetic associations of different febrile seizure subtypes. Results Histories of febrile seizures were validated in 1051 twins in 900 pairs. The febrile seizure type was classified as simple, complex, or febrile status epilepticus. There were 61% simple, 12% complex, and 7% febrile status...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...

  18. Role of Neuroinflammation in Evolution of Childhood Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sookyong

    2018-01-01

    Until a decade ago, epilepsy research had focused mainly on alterations of neuronal activities and excitability. Such neurocentric emphasis has neglected the role of glia and involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. It is becoming clear that immune and inflammatory reactions do occur in the brain despite the brain's lack of conventional lymphatic drainage and graft acceptance and the presence of vascular brain barrier that tightly regulates infiltration of blood monocytes and lymphocytes. The critical roles of brain-resident immune mediators and of brain-infiltrating peripheral leukocytes are increasingly recognized. Inflammatory processes, including activation of microglia and astrocytes and production of proinflammatory cytokines and related molecules, occur in human epilepsy as well as in experimental models of epilepsy. Immune mechanism that underlies evolution of drug-resistant epilepsy and epileptic encephalopathy represents a new target and will aid in development of novel immunotherapeutic drugs and therapies against the key constituents in immune pathways.

  19. Insomnia in people with epilepsy: A review of insomnia prevalence, risk factors and associations with epilepsy-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, Philippe Joaquim Oliveira Menezes; Oliveira, Pedro Sudbrack de; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Gomes, Marleide da Mota

    2017-09-01

    Insomnia is a common sleep complaint in the general population, and sleep loss may be a trigger for epileptic seizures. To conduct a comprehensive review of the literature of insomnia symptoms and insomnia disorder, their prevalence and epilepsy-related risk factors in people with epilepsy (PWE). A PUBMED search was performed for articles indexed to June 2016 involving human subjects, excluding papers in languages other than English, Spanish and Portuguese and case reports. Eligible studies were those using a clear definition of insomnia and reporting quantitative data on prevalence rates and risk factors. The search included the following terms: insomnia, sleep disorder(s), sleep disturbance(s) and sleep-wake in the title and abstract; and epilep* in the title. 425 papers were reviewed and 31 were selected for the final analysis (21 adult and 10 paediatric). Twenty-one studies used a control group. Two reviewer authors independently extracted all data and a third author resolved disagreements. Most studies were hospital-based, cross-sectional and evaluated convenience samples representing highly select populations. Various insomnia inventories were used. Fourteen assessed insomnia (10 in adults, four, children), but only five as primary outcome (none in children). Four evaluated insomnia disorder based on international classification criteria (International Classification of Sleep Disorders - ICSD-2-in 3, and DSM-IV-TR, in 1). In adults, insomnia prevalence was 28.9-51% based on the Insomnia Severity Index ≥15 and 36-74.4% based on DSM-IV-TR or ICSD-2. The prevalence of insomnia in children was 13.1-31.5% using the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children and 11% based on ICSD-2 diagnostic criteria. Compared to control groups, PWE usually had higher frequencies of insomnia symptoms and disorder. Insomnia was associated with greater impairment in quality of life and higher degree of depressive symptoms in several studies, and was inconsistently related to female

  20. [Participation of People with Epilepsy in Sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2017-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) have been discouraged from participating in exercise and sports because of the fear of inducing seizures or increasing seizure frequency, risks associated with such activities, stigma, and overprotection. Recently, there has been a shift in the medical recommendations toward encouraging, rather than restricting, participation. Cases of exercise-induced seizures are rare. Physical activity can exert beneficial actions, such as a reduction in seizure susceptibility and the number of seizures, improvement in quality of life (QOL), and better social integration. The antiepileptogenic and neuroprotective effects of exercise in epilepsy have been shown. The majority of sports are safe for PWE to participate in when special attention is paid to seizure control, direct supervision, etc. Human and animal studies have supported the use of exercise as a therapy for epilepsy, complementary to standard treatments. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy offers general guidelines concerning the participation of PWE in sports activities. Sports are divided into three categories based on the potential risk of injury or death. Engaging in physical exercise and sports activities has positive effects for PWE. The ILAE propose to use the regulations governing the issuance of fitness certificates for driving as a possible guide. The decision to participate in sports is based on whether the benefit outweighs the risk.

  1. Memory Functioning in Children with Epilepsy: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Childhood Absence Epilepsy, and Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Filipa Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE, childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children, aged 6–15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  2. PSEUDOSEIZURES AND EPILEPSY IN NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibañez-Valdés L de F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied 32 rural patients from the poorest regions in South Africa, diagnosed as epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis presenting pseudoseizures. We found that the common clinical characteristics of this series and its psychological profile such as: duration of events, history of sexual abuse in females, absent of focal neurological signs, vocalization in the middle of the seizures, and lack of post-ictal symptoms were very useful for its differential diagnosis, and the possible difference between the clinical features and psychological profile of those patients and others without PS. Finally, some advices for the management of this condition by family doctors are suggested. ______________ RESUMEN: Estudiamos 32 pacientes provenientes de las áreas rurales mas pobres de Sudáfrica en los cuales se diagnosticó una epilepsia secundaria a neurocisticercosis cerebral y que además presentaban seudo crisis epilépticas. Encontramos un número de características clínicas y psicológicas comunes en este grupo tales como la duracion de las crisis, historia de abuso sexual en las hembras, ausencia de signos neurológicos focales, vocalización en el intervalo entre las crisis y la falta de signos postictales que resultó ser muy útil en el diagnóstico diferencial. Se encontraron además diferencias en las características clínicas y psicológicas estos pacientes con relación a otros que no presentaban pseudocrisis.

  3. The neurobiology of cognitive disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian; Lin, Jack J.; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and especially memory disruption is a major complicating feature of the epilepsies. In this review we begin with a focus on the problem of memory impairment in temporal lobe epilepsy. We start with a brief overview of the early development of knowledge regarding the anatomic substrates of memory disorder in temporal lobe epilepsy, followed by discussion of the refinement of that knowledge over time as informed by the outcomes of epilepsy surgery (anterior temporal lobectomy) and the clinical efforts to predict those patients at greatest risk of adverse cognitive outcomes following epilepsy surgery. These efforts also yielded new theoretical insights regarding the function of the human hippocampus and a few examples of these insights are touched on briefly. Finally, the vastly changing view of temporal lobe epilepsy is examined including findings demonstrating that anatomic abnormalities extend far outside the temporal lobe, cognitive impairments extend beyond memory function, with linkage of these distributed cognitive and anatomic abnormalities pointing to a new understanding of the anatomic architecture of cognitive impairment in epilepsy. Challenges remain in understanding the origin of these cognitive and anatomic abnormalities, their progression over time, and most importantly, how to intervene to protect cognitive and brain health in epilepsy. PMID:21304484

  4. Early vision and focal attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Bela

    1991-07-01

    At the thirty-year anniversary of the introduction of the technique of computer-generated random-dot stereograms and random-dot cinematograms into psychology, the impact of the technique on brain research and on the study of artificial intelligence is reviewed. The main finding-that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis), motion perception, and preattentive texture discrimination are basically bottom-up processes, which occur without the help of the top-down processes of cognition and semantic memory-greatly simplifies the study of these processes of early vision and permits the linking of human perception with monkey neurophysiology. Particularly interesting are the unexpected findings that stereopsis (assumed to be local) is a global process, while texture discrimination (assumed to be a global process, governed by statistics) is local, based on some conspicuous local features (textons). It is shown that the top-down process of "shape (depth) from shading" does not affect stereopsis, and some of the models of machine vision are evaluated. The asymmetry effect of human texture discrimination is discussed, together with recent nonlinear spatial filter models and a novel extension of the texton theory that can cope with the asymmetry problem. This didactic review attempts to introduce the physicist to the field of psychobiology and its problems-including metascientific problems of brain research, problems of scientific creativity, the state of artificial intelligence research (including connectionist neural networks) aimed at modeling brain activity, and the fundamental role of focal attention in mental events.

  5. Surgical management of epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in epilepsy surgery and working in conjunction with an experienced epileptologist ... memory and the psychological impairment, and prepare the family ... ning that allows visualisation of abnormal activity or active lesions in cases of multiple ...

  6. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the people you work with about your seizure disorder. Driving your own car is generally safe and ... References Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy ...

  7. Toxoplasma gondii and Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Erol; Türkoğlu, Şule Aydın; Orallar, Hayriye

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic parasite can be seen in all the vital organ; in the acute phase, it can be found in the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, semen, tears, saliva, urine, and in almost all body fluids. Transplasental infection can lead to fetal damage and miscarriage. Its last hosts are felines and intermediate hosts are all mammals, including humans. People infected by the ingestion of meat containing cysts in undercooked or raw, are thrown oocysts with cat felines By taking in water and food, from mother to fetus transplacental way, the infected organ transplantation, blood transfusion, laboratory accidents and kaprofaj transmitted by mechanical vectors of the invertebrates. Suppression of the immune system is being transformed to the shape and texture of the cysts with bradyzoite. The parasite settles in the cells of the tissue cysts and causes change in the cellular mechanisms, such as cytokinin task. Depending on changes and type of neurotransmitter (GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine) levels in CSF in ions (Ca, K, Cl, Mg), it is believed that there is a change in their concentration. In this review, literature about the relationship between T. gondii and epilepsy and epileptiform activity the importance of parasites, which settle in the brain, will be highlighted.

  8. Examining Teacher Knowledge and Attitudes about School Issues for Children with Epilepsy: A Mixed-Method Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Amy Loomis

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common diseases to affect the human nervous system, affecting approximately 0.5% of school-age children (Leppik, 2001; Kaleyias et al., 2005). Epilepsy has the potential to profoundly impact a child's adjustment to school. A large body of literature documents that children with epilepsy are at an increased risk for…

  9. Focal midbrain tumors in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandertop, W. P.; Hoffman, H. J.; Drake, J. M.; Humphreys, R. P.; Rutka, J. T.; Amstrong, D. C.; Becker, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical and neuroradiological features of focal midbrain tumors in 12 children are described, and the results of their surgical management are presented. Patients with a focal midbrain tumor usually exhibit either symptoms and signs of raised intracranial pressure caused by an obstructive

  10. Pediatric epilepsy: The Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Pradnya; Udani, Vrajesh

    2011-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common clinical entity in neurology clinics. The understanding of the genetics of epilepsy has undergone a sea change prompting re-classification by the International league against epilepsy recently. The prevalence rates of epilepsy in India are similar to those of developed nations. However, the large treatment gap is a major challenge to our public health system. Perinatal injuries are a major causative factor in pediatric group. We have discussed a few common etiologies such as neurocysticercosis and newer genetic epilepsy syndromes. We have also briefly touched upon the Indian experience in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

  11. New Classification of Focal Cortical Dysplasia: Application to Practical Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yoon-Sung; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Kim, Heung Dong; Kim, Se Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a well-known cause of drug-resistant epilepsy and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is the most common neuropathological finding in surgical specimens from drug-resistant epilepsy patients. Palmini’s classification proposed in 2004 is now widely used to categorize FCD. Recently, however, Blumcke et al. recommended a new system for classifying FCD in 2011. Methods: We applied the new classification system in practical diagnosis of a sample of 117 patients who underwent neurosurgical operations due to drug-resistant epilepsy at Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea. Results: Among 117 cases, a total of 16 cases were shifted to other FCD subtypes under the new classification system. Five cases were reclassified to type IIIa and five cases were categorized as dual pathology. The other six cases were changed within the type I category. Conclusions: The most remarkable changes in the new classification system are the advent of dual pathology and FCD type III. Thus, it will be very important for pathologists and clinicians to discriminate between these new categories. More large-scale research needs to be conducted to elucidate the clinical influence of the alterations within the classification of type I disease. Although the new FCD classification system has several advantages compared to the former, the correlation with clinical characteristics is not yet clear. PMID:24649461

  12. Behavioral problems in children with epilepsy in rural Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Symon M.; Abubakar, Amina; Holding, Penny A.; Mung'ala-Odera, Victor; Chengo, Eddie; Kihara, Michael; Neville, Brian G.; Newton, Charles R.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to record behavioral problems in children with epilepsy (CWE), compare the prevalence with that reported among healthy children without epilepsy, and investigate the risk factors. A child behavioral questionnaire for parents comprising 15 items was administered to the main caregiver of 108 CWE and 108 controls matched for age in Kilifi, Kenya. CWE had a higher mean score for reported behavioral problems than controls (6.9 vs 4.9, t = 4.7, P epilepsy also recorded more behavioral problems than those with inactive epilepsy (8.2 vs 6.2, t = − 2.9, P = 0.005). A significantly greater proportion of CWE (49% vs 26% of controls) were reported to have behavioral problems. Active epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and focal seizures were the most significant independent covariates of behavioral problems. Behavioral problems in African CWE are common and need to be taken into consideration in planning comprehensive clinical services in this region. PMID:22119107

  13. Dilemmas in diagnostics and therapy of rolandic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrijelj Fadil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is considered that around 20%-30% of patients of all ages and in all continents have wrong epilepsy diagnoses. Diagnostic and consequential therapeutic errors appear, most often, when an adequate diagnostics is not applied. Benign focal epilepsy of childhoods with centrotemporal spikes-rolandic epilepsy, brings very often to diagnostic and therapeutic problems because of persistence of epilepticforms changes in an electroencephalography (EEG recording, several years after establishment of good control over seizures. Case report. We presented 8.5 years-old girl, with the first and the only epileptic seizure at the age of 5, during her sleep. With a clear correlation of EEG record, benign rolandic epilepsy was diagnosed, so the therapy with valproate was introduced. There were no seizures after three years of its implementation. Because of epileptic-forms changes that still persisted in EEG record during her sleep, it was suggested to further use valproate. However, after reconsidering all circumstances it was concluded that the AED should bee slowly reduced up to its exclusion. After a complete stoppage of the therapy, the patient did not have any epileptic seizure for nine months, although EEG still remained pathologically changed during her sleep. Conclusion. A changed EEG record in a patient with rolandic epilepsy must not be a predictor of continuation of antiepileptic drugs therapy, after 2-3 years of successful seizures remission.

  14. [Economic aspects of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argumosa, A; Herranz, J L

    2000-06-01

    The economic magnitude of epilepsy is determined by its effect on the employment status of the patients, the cost of drug treatment for them and the healthcare system and the repercussion worldwide. Studies of the cost of the disease show that it has economic importance due to the sum of the direct and indirect costs caused by it. In the case of epilepsy, the results of studies in various countries led to the creation of a Commission on Economic Aspects of Epilepsy. The lack of epidemiological studies regarding epilepsy in Spain may explain the lack of publications on this subject in our country. The percentage of the total cost due to antiepileptic drugs is considerable and will probably increase in the future. The pharmaco-economic evaluation made by cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, cost-usefulness analysis and studies to minimize costs should serve to use healthcare resources in the most effective manner and justify the rational use of the new antiepileptic drugs. The economic impact of epilepsy is added to the repercussion of the disease itself on the patient and his family. The different distribution of costs in children and adults with epilepsy suggest the need for intervention at an early age to try to reduce the long term economic and personal repercussions. The pharmaco-economic evaluation of the new antiepileptic drugs will make it clear whether their considerable cost is worth paying for their greater effectivity.

  15. Prevalence of epilepsy in children from a Brazilian area of high deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Letícia P B; Caboclo, Luis Otávio S F; Kuramoto, Karina; Reche, Angela; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T; Manreza, Maria Luiza G

    2010-02-01

    This study assessed the prevalence rate of epilepsy and its causes in children and adolescents in one area of high deprivation in São Paulo, São Paulo, in Southeast Brazil. Between July 2005 and June 2006, 4947 families from a population of 22,013 inhabitants (including 10,405 children and adolescents between the ages of 0 and 16 years) living in the shantytown of Paraisópolis, were interviewed. In the first phase, a validated questionnaire was administered, to identify the occurrence of seizures. In the second phase, clinical history, neurologic examination, electroencephalography, and structural neuroimaging were performed. The diagnosis of epilepsy, including etiology, seizure types, and epileptic syndrome classification, was according to criteria of the International League Against Epilepsy. The screening phase identified 353 presumptive cases. In the second phase, 101 of these cases (33.8%) received the diagnosis of epilepsy. Crude prevalence of epilepsy was 9.7/1000 and prevalence of active epilepsy was 8.7/1000. Partial seizures were the most frequent seizure type (62/101). Symptomatic focal epilepsy was the most common form, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy the most common etiology, reflecting the socioeconomic conditions of this specific population. Adequate public policies regarding perinatal assistance could help reduce the prevalence of epilepsy.

  16. Sleep disturbances in children with epilepsy compared with their nearest-aged siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine; Blackman, Marlene; Barlow, Karen; Mah, Jean; Hamiwka, Lorie

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare sleep patterns in children with epilepsy with those of their non-epileptic siblings and to determine which epilepsy-specific factors predict greater sleep disturbance. We conducted a case-control study of 55 children with epilepsy (mean age 10y, range 4 to 16y; 27 males, 28 females) and their nearest-aged non-epileptic sibling (mean age 10y, range 4 to 18y; 26 males, 29 females). Epilepsy was idiopathic generalized in eight children (15%), symptomatic generalized in seven (13%), and focal in 40 (73%); the mean duration was 5 years 8 months. Parents or caregivers completed the Sleep Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) for patients and controls, and the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) for patients. Patients had a higher (more adverse) Total Sleep score (p<0.001) and scored worse than controls on nearly all subscales of the SBQ. In patients, higher Total Sleep scores were correlated with higher scores on the Withdrawn, Somatic complaints, Social problems, and Attention subscales of the CBCL, and significantly lower Total Quality of Life Scores. Refractory epilepsy, mental retardation, and remote symptomatic etiology predicted greater sleep problems in those with epilepsy. We conclude that children with epilepsy in this current study had significantly greater sleep problems than their non-epileptic siblings.

  17. Factors affecting the employability in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wo, Monica Chen Mun; Lim, Kheng Seang; Choo, Wan Yuen; Tan, Chong Tin

    2016-12-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) are negatively prejudiced in their ability to work. This study aimed to examine demographic, clinical and psychological factors associated with employability in PWE. This study recruited epilepsy patients from a neurology clinic in Malaysia. Employability was measured using employment ratio, with a ratio ≥90% (ER90) classified as high employability. Basic demographic data such as age, gender, marital status, religion, education level and household income was collected. Clinical measures consisted of age of seizure onset, seizure frequency, type of epilepsy, aura, polytherapy, nocturnal seizures and seizure control. Psychological measures included Work Self-Determination Index (WSDI), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Of 146 PWE, 64.4% had high employability. The participants were predominantly female (52%), Chinese (50.7%), single (50%), having tertiary education (55.5%) and focal epilepsy (72.6%). Clinically, only type of epilepsy was significantly correlated to employability of PWE. Employability of PWE was associated with ability to work (indicated by education level, work performance affected by seizures, ability to travel independently and ability to cope with stress at work) and family overprotection. The high employability group was found to have lower self-perceived stigma (ESS), higher self-determined motivation (WSDI), self-esteem (SES) and perceived social support (MSPSS), than the low employability group. Logistic regression analysis showed that tertiary education level (AOR 3.42, CI: 1.46-8.00), higher self-determination (WSDI, AOR 1.09, CI: 1.012-1.17), lower family overprotection (AOR 0.76, CI: 0.61-0.95), and generalised epilepsy (AOR 4.17, CI: 1.37-12.70) were significant predictors for higher employability in PWE. Ability to work (education level), clinical factor (type of epilepsy) and psychological factor (self-determined motivation and family

  18. Temporal anteroinferior encephalocele: An underrecognized etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavalainen, Taavi; Jutila, Leena; Mervaala, Esa; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Vanninen, Ritva; Immonen, Arto

    2015-10-27

    To report the increasing frequency with which temporal anteroinferior encephalocele is a cause of adult temporal lobe epilepsy, to illustrate the clinical and imaging characteristics of this condition, and to report its surgical treatment in a series of 23 adult patients. Epilepsy patients diagnosed with temporal anteroinferior encephalocele from January 2006 to December 2013 in a national epilepsy reference center were included in this noninterventional study. Twenty-three epilepsy patients (14 female, mean age 43.8 years) were diagnosed with temporal anteroinferior encephalocele in our institute. Thirteen patients had ≥2 encephaloceles; 7 cases presented bilaterally. The estimated frequency of this condition was 0.3% among MRI examinations performed due to newly diagnosed epilepsy (n = 6) and 1.9% among drug-resistant patients referred to our center (n = 17). Nine patients with local encephalocele disconnection (n = 4) or anterior temporal lobectomy and amygdalohippocampectomy (n = 5) have become seizure-free (Engel 1) for a mean 2.8 years (range 3 months-6.2 years) of follow-up. Three patients with local encephalocele disconnection were almost seizure-free or exhibited worthwhile improvement. Histologically, all 12 surgical patients had gliosis at the base of the encephalocele; some had cortical laminar disorganization (n = 5) or mild hippocampal degeneration (n = 1). The possibility of a temporal encephalocele should be considered when interpreting MRI examinations of patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. These patients can significantly benefit from unitemporal epilepsy surgery, even in cases with bilateral encephaloceles. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Initial Treatment for Nonsyndromic Early-Life Epilepsy: An Unexpected Consensus.

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    Shellhaas, Renée A; Berg, Anne T; Grinspan, Zachary M; Wusthoff, Courtney J; Millichap, John J; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Coryell, Jason; Saneto, Russell P; Chu, Catherine J; Joshi, Sucheta M; Sullivan, Joseph E; Knupp, Kelly G; Kossoff, Eric H; Keator, Cynthia; Wirrell, Elaine C; Mytinger, John R; Valencia, Ignacio; Massey, Shavonne; Gaillard, William D

    2017-10-01

    There are no evidence-based guidelines on the preferred approach to treating early-life epilepsy. We examined initial therapy selection in a contemporary US cohort of children with newly diagnosed, nonsyndromic, early-life epilepsy (onset before age three years). Seventeen pediatric epilepsy centers participated in a prospective cohort study of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy with onset under 36 months of age. Details regarding demographics, seizure types, and initial medication selections were obtained from medical records. About half of the 495 enrolled children with new-onset, nonsyndromic epilepsy were less than 12 months old at the time of diagnosis (n = 263, 53%) and about half (n = 260, 52%) had epilepsy with focal features. Of 464 who were treated with monotherapy, 95% received one of five drugs: levetiracetam (n = 291, 63%), oxcarbazepine (n = 67, 14%), phenobarbital (n = 57, 12%), topiramate (n = 16, 3.4%), and zonisamide (n = 13, 2.8%). Phenobarbital was prescribed first for 50 of 163 (31%) infants less than six months old versus seven of 300 (2.3%) of children six months or older (P epilepsy presentation (focal, generalized, mixed/uncertain). Between the first and second treatment choices, 367 (74%) of children received levetiracetam within the first year after diagnosis. Without any specific effort, the pediatric epilepsy community has developed an unexpectedly consistent approach to initial treatment selection for early-life epilepsy. This suggests that a standard practice is emerging and could be utilized as a widely acceptable basis of comparison in future drug studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Incidence and Classification of New-Onset Epilepsy and Epilepsy Syndromes in Children in Olmsted County, Minnesota from 1980–2004: A population-based study

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    Wirrell, Elaine C.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.-L.; Nickels, Katherine C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and classification of new-onset epilepsy, as well as the distribution of epilepsy syndromes in a population-based group of children, using the newly proposed Report of the ILAE Commission on Classification and Terminology 2005–2009. Methods We identified all children residing in Olmsted County, MN, 1 month through 17 years with newly diagnosed epilepsy from 1980–2004. For each patient, epilepsy was classified into mode of onset, etiology, and syndrome or constellation (if present). Incidence rates were calculated overall and also separately for categories of mode of onset and etiology. Results The adjusted incidence rate of new-onset epilepsy in children was 44.5 cases per 100,000 persons per year. Incidence rates were highest in the first year of life and diminished with age. Mode of onset was focal in 68%, generalized/bilateral in 23%, spasms in 3% and unknown in 5%. Approximately half of children had an unknown etiology for their epilepsy, and of the remainder, 78 (22%) were genetic and 101 (28%) were structural/metabolic. A specific epilepsy syndrome could be defined at initial diagnosis in 99/359 (28%) children, but only 9/359 (3%) had a defined constellation. Conclusion Nearly half of childhood epilepsy is of “unknown” etiology. While a small proportion of this group met criteria for a known epilepsy syndrome, 41% of all childhood epilepsy is of “unknown” cause with no clear syndrome identified. Further work is needed to define more specific etiologies for this group. PMID:21482075

  1. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy Among Patients With Benign Childhood Epilepsy With Centrotemporal Spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumlele, Kyra; Friedman, Daniel; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Donner, Elizabeth J; Louik, Jay; Devinsky, Orrin

    2017-06-01

    Children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) have traditionally been considered to have a uniformly good prognosis. However, benign may be a misnomer because BECTS is linked to cognitive deficits, a more severe phenotype with intractable seizures, and the potential for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). To determine if cases of BECTS are present in the North American SUDEP Registry (NASR). The NASR is a clinical and biospecimen repository established in 2011 to promote SUDEP research. The NASR database, which includes medical records, results of electroencephalographic tests, and interviews with family members of patients with epilepsy who died suddenly without other identifiable causes of death, was queried from June 3, 2011, to June 3, 2016, for cases of BECTS. The patients with epilepsy had died suddenly without other identifiable causes of death (eg, drowning, trauma, exposure to toxic substances, or suicide); SUDEP classification was determined by the consensus of 2 epileptologists. Cases of SUDEP among children who received a diagnosis of BECTS among patients reported in the NASR. Three boys (median age at death, 12 years; range, 9-13 years) who received a diagnosis of BECTS by their pediatric epileptologist or neurologists were identified among 189 cases reported in the NASR. The median age of epilepsy onset was 5 years (range, 3-11 years), and the median duration of epilepsy was 4 years (range, 1-10 years). Two deaths were definite SUDEP, and 1 was probable SUDEP. Independent review of clinical and electroencephalographic data supported the diagnosis of BECTS in all 3 patients. None of the patients was prescribed antiseizure drugs, either owing to physician recommendation or mutual decision by the physician and parents. All 3 patients were found dead in circumstances typical of SUDEP. The 3 patients spanned the spectrum of BECTS severity: 1 had only a few seizures, 1 had more than 30 focal motor seizures, and 1 had 4 witnessed

  2. Epilepsy with onset at over 50 years of age: clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics

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    Glória Maria Almeida Souza Tedrus

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy in older individuals has an elevated incidence. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the clinical, EEG and brain imaging aspects in patients showing late-onset epilepsy. Fifty-five patients with late-onset epilepsy (older than 50 years were evaluated. They were composed of two groups according to the onset age of the epilepsy seizure (ES: 51-60 (G51-60 and over 60 (G60+ years. Focal ES predominated although they were less frequent in G60+. The occurrence of status epilepticus was high and more frequent in G60+ whereas seizures in series predominated in G51-60. Symptomatic epilepsy was more frequent and the vascular etiology predominated. Epileptiform activity was associated with a greater number of ES, and background activity abnormalities were more frequent in G60+. In conclusion, epilepsy with onset at over 50 was predominantly focal and symptomatic, with a high occurrence of status epilepticus and of seizures in series.

  3. The dispersion-focalization theory of sound systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jean-Luc; Abry, Christian; Boë, Louis-Jean; Vallée, Nathalie; Ménard, Lucie

    2005-04-01

    The Dispersion-Focalization Theory states that sound systems in human languages are shaped by two major perceptual constraints: dispersion driving auditory contrast towards maximal or sufficient values [B. Lindblom, J. Phonetics 18, 135-152 (1990)] and focalization driving auditory spectra towards patterns with close neighboring formants. Dispersion is computed from the sum of the inverse squared inter-spectra distances in the (F1, F2, F3, F4) space, using a non-linear process based on the 3.5 Bark critical distance to estimate F2'. Focalization is based on the idea that close neighboring formants produce vowel spectra with marked peaks, easier to process and memorize in the auditory system. Evidence for increased stability of focal vowels in short-term memory was provided in a discrimination experiment on adult French subjects [J. L. Schwartz and P. Escudier, Speech Comm. 8, 235-259 (1989)]. A reanalysis of infant discrimination data shows that focalization could well be the responsible for recurrent discrimination asymmetries [J. L. Schwartz et al., Speech Comm. (in press)]. Recent data about children vowel production indicate that focalization seems to be part of the perceptual templates driving speech development. The Dispersion-Focalization Theory produces valid predictions for both vowel and consonant systems, in relation with available databases of human languages inventories.

  4. Epilepsy and homicide

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    Pandya NS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neil S Pandya,1 Mirna Vrbancic,2 Lady Diana Ladino,3,4 José F Téllez-Zenteno31Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellin, ColombiaPurpose: We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy.Patients and methods: We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides.Results: We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility.Conclusion: The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse.Keywords: aggression, crime, epilepsy

  5. Definition and classification of epilepsy. Classification of epileptic seizures 2016

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    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, especially in childhood and adolescence. The incidence varies from 15 to 113 cases per 100 000 population with the maximum among children under 1 year old. The prevalence of epilepsy is high, ranging from 5 to 8 cases (in some regions – 10 cases per 1000 children under 15 years old. Classification of the disease has great importance for diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The article presents a novel strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, developed in 2016. It contains a number of brand new concepts, including a very important one, saying that some seizures, previously considered as generalized or focal only, can be, in fact, both focal and generalized. They include tonic, atonic, myoclonic seizures and epileptic spasms. The term “secondarily generalized seizure” is replace by the term “bilateral tonic-clonic seizure” (as soon as it is not a separate type of epileptic seizures, and the term reflects the spread of discharge from any area of cerebral cortex and evolution of any types of focal seizures. International League Against Epilepsy recommends to abandon the term “pseudo-epileptic seizures” and replace it by the term “psychogenic non-epileptic seizures”. If a doctor is not sure that seizures have epileptic nature, the term “paroxysmal event” should be used without specifying the disease. The conception of childhood epileptic encephalopathies, developed within this novel classification project, is one of the most significant achievements, since in this case not only the seizures, but even epileptiform activity can induce severe disorders of higher mental functions. In addition to detailed description of the new strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, the article contains a comprehensive review of the existing principles of epilepsy and epileptic seizures classification.

  6. FOCAL EPILEPTIC MYOCLONUS IN KOZHEVNIKOV–RASMUSSEN SYNDROME

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    N. E. Kvaskova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the clinical, electroencephalographic (EEG and neuroimaging features, as well as the results of treatment of patients with focal epileptic myoclonus (FEM with the Kozhevnikov–Rasmussen syndrome (KRS. FEM in KRS-patients was identified in 11 cases, accounting for 0.9 % of all the cases of epilepsy with the onset of seizures up to 18 years (n = 1261. The age at onset of KRS ranged from 3 to 21 years (average – 9.2 ± 5.7 years. In the active period of the disease of all patients in the clinical picture the active FEM appeared and increasing frequency of the secondary generalized seizures (SGS. In addition SGS and FEM, the clinical picture of the disease in most patients (91 % the focal motor (clonic and the somatosensory focal seizures were observed. As the disease progressed, the FEM became more pronounced in frequency and intensity, seized more muscle groups, localizing mainly in the muscles of the trunk and limbs. The typical EEG pattern of FEM patients with KRS was regional epileptiform activity that occurs in the structure of the continued regional slowing localizing maximum of the fronto-central-temporal region. During the magnetic resonance tomography of the brain in dynamics all the patients observed the increase in total cortical hemiatrophy. In all the cases, the appointment of antiepileptic therapy resulted in a slowing of the FEM, however, a complete remission was reached at none of the patients. Two patients were made surgical treatment of epilepsy. In one case remission of epileptic seizures was observed after right-side hemispherotomy. Our study showed that FEM is very resistant type of epileptic seizures. This fact calls for the identification of the FEM at the early stages of the disease with the purpose to improve the prognosis, as well as for an earlier surgical treatment.

  7. Dual Pathology in Rasmussen's Encephalitis: A Report of Coexistent Focal Cortical Dysplasia and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a well-established, albeit rare cause of medically intractable epilepsy. In a small number of Rasmussen's cases, a second pathology is identified, which independently can cause medically intractable seizures (dual pathology). This paper documents a case of a 13-year-old male who presented with medically intractable epilepsy. The patient underwent a series of surgical resections, early on resulting in a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia and later yielding a diagnosis of coexistent Rasmussen's encephalitis, marked by chronic inflammation, microglial nodules, and focal cortical atrophy, combined with focal cortical dysplasia (Palmini et al. type IIA, ILAE type IIA). The literature on dual pathology in the setting of Rasmussen's encephalitis is reviewed.

  8. Dual Pathology in Rasmussen’s Encephalitis: A Report of Coexistent Focal Cortical Dysplasia and Review of the Literature

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    Richard A. Prayson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen’s encephalitis is a well-established, albeit rare cause of medically intractable epilepsy. In a small number of Rasmussen's cases, a second pathology is identified, which independently can cause medically intractable seizures (dual pathology. This paper documents a case of a 13-year-old male who presented with medically intractable epilepsy. The patient underwent a series of surgical resections, early on resulting in a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia and later yielding a diagnosis of coexistent Rasmussen’s encephalitis, marked by chronic inflammation, microglial nodules, and focal cortical atrophy, combined with focal cortical dysplasia (Palmini et al. type IIA, ILAE type IIA. The literature on dual pathology in the setting of Rasmussen’s encephalitis is reviewed.

  9. Membership Functions for Fuzzy Focal Elements

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    Porębski Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on data-driven diagnostic rules, which are easy to interpret by human experts. To this end, the Dempster-Shafer theory extended for fuzzy focal elements is used. Premises of the rules (fuzzy focal elements are provided by membership functions which shapes are changing according to input symptoms. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate common membership function shapes and to introduce a rule elimination algorithm. Proposed methods are first illustrated with the popular Iris data set. Next experiments with five medical benchmark databases are performed. Results of the experiments show that various membership function shapes provide different inference efficiency but the extracted rule sets are close to each other. Thus indications for determining rules with possible heuristic interpretation can be formulated.

  10. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor M. Dostoevsky (Moscow, 1821-Saint Petersburg, 1881) suffered epilepsy throughout his whole literary career. The aim here is to understand his condition in light of his novels, correspondence, and his contemporaries' accounts as well as through the eyes of later generations of neurologists. From Murin (The landlady, 1847) to Smerdyakov (The brothers Karamazov, 1880), Dostoevsky portrayed up to six characters with epilepsy in his literature. The first symptoms of the disease presented in early adulthood, but he was only diagnosed with epilepsy a decade later. In 1863 he went abroad seeking expert advice from the famous neurologists Romberg and Trousseau. Dostoevsky made an intelligent use of epilepsy in his literature (of his experiential auras or dreamy states particularly) and through it found a way to freedom from perpetual military servitude. His case offers an insight into the natural history of epilepsy (a cryptogenic localization related one of either fronto-medial or temporal lobe origin using contemporary medical terms), thus inspiring later generations of writers and neurologists. Furthermore, it illustrates the good use of an ordinary neurological disorder by an extraordinary writer who transformed adversity into opportunity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical characteristics in focal cortical dysplasia: a retrospective evaluation in a series of 120 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, Susanne; Huppertz, Hans-Juergen; Bast, Thomas; Strobl, Karl; Pantazis, Georgios; Altenmueller, Dirk-Matthias; Feil, Bertram; Rona, Sabine; Kurth, Christoph; Rating, Dietz; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Volk, Benedikt; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2006-07-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are increasingly diagnosed as a cause of symptomatic focal epilepsy in paediatric and adult patients. However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of epilepsy in these patients. In order to elucidate the clinical characteristics of their epilepsy, 120 pharmacoresistant patients including children and adults with histologically proven FCD were studied retrospectively. Age at seizure onset was analysed in the total group and compared between subgroups with different localization and different histological subtypes of FCD. The role of febrile seizures with respect to dual pathology was investigated. Seizure semiology was analysed focusing on initial seizure type and change of seizure semiology during the course of disease. Finally, transient responsiveness to antiepileptic drug therapy was studied. In the majority of patients, epilepsy began in the first 5 years of life. However, onset of epilepsy could also occur in the second or third decade until the age of 60. Age at epilepsy onset was not significantly different between temporal, extratemporal and multilobar localization of FCD. Patients without cytoarchitectural abnormalities (mild malformations of cortical development, FCD 1a according to Palmini) had significantly later epilepsy onset (P= 0.001) compared with patients with cytoarchitectural abnormalities (FCD 1b, 2a and 2b according to Palmini). In patients with additional hippocampal sclerosis (dual pathology) febrile seizures were significantly more frequently reported (P = 0.02) than in patients without dual pathology. Moreover, patients with dual pathology and febrile seizures significantly more frequently presented with severe hippocampal sclerosis (Wyler Grade 3-4) as compared with patients with dual pathology in the absence of febrile seizures (P = 0.03). First observed seizures were mainly tonic or generalized tonic-clonic. A change of seizure semiology seemed to be age-dependent and occurred between the

  12. [Sleep disorders and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ryo; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    It has been reported that patients with epilepsy often have insomnia and/or daytime sleepiness; the symptomatologic features differ in seizure types. Not only the administration of anti-epileptics, but also inappropriate sleep hygiene cause daytime sleepiness. In subjective assessment of sleepiness, we need to pay attention if it can correctly assess or not. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with epilepsy is approximately 10-30%. Sleep apnea deteriorates the seizure control because of worsen sleep condition by sleep apnea, especially in elderly patients. Some researchers report that continuous positive airway pressure was effective for seizure control. Patients with epilepsy occasionally have REM sleep behavior disorder as comorbidity. Examination using polysomnography is required for differential diagnosis.

  13. Vitamin D for the Treatment of Epilepsy: Basic Mechanisms, Animal Models and Clinical Trials

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    Kevin Pendo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence supporting dietary and alternative therapies for epilepsy, including the ketogenic diet, modified Atkins diet, and omega-3 fatty acids. Vitamin D is actively under investigation as a potential intervention for epilepsy. Vitamin D is fat soluble steroid which shows promise in animal models of epilepsy. Basic research has shed light on the possible mechanisms by which Vitamin D may reduce seizures, and animal data support the efficacy of Vitamin D in rat and mouse models of epilepsy. Very little clinical data exists to support the treatment of human epilepsy with Vitamin D, but positive findings from preliminary clinical trials warrant larger Phase I and II clinical trials in order to more rigorously determine the potential therapeutic value of Vitamin D as a treatment for human epilepsy.

  14. CONCEPTUALIZING SPECIALIZED PSYCHOSOCIAL CONSULTING FOR PERSONS WITH EPILEPSY

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    Polina Šedienė

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is to describe and to reason conception of specialized psychosocial consulting, revealing definition of epilepsy as disease in classical sociological and existential theories and from rights of disabled person’s perspectives. Restriction of social life and possibilities for disabled, person’s with epilepsy and social worker’s interactions, which have importance for development of disabled people participation in social life, are analysed in the article. In order to achieve the goal various methods are used: scientific literature review, reflection of social worker who works with persons with epilepsy, interviews with the clients of Psychosocial consulting centre for persons with epilepsy in 2015, groups discussions (2013, 2016, analysis of conception of Psychosocial consulting centre for persons with epilepsy. 139SPECIALIZUOTO PSICHOSOCIALINIO KONSULTAVIMO EPILEPSIJA S ERGANTIEMS ASMENIMS KONCEPCIJOS PAGRINDIMAS Based on classical sociological theories, people with disease and society members attach such meanings to the illness, which support and enforce stigmatized attitude and behaviour toward person with disease, strengthens negative social aspects of epilepsy, which restricts present and new developed social interactions, full engagement into society. Historical cultural context of epilepsy presupposes attitude that epileptic seizure is “an awful” event, encounter with death, which reminds finality of human, event which causes fear, panic, rejection of surrenders and which restrains social life of person with epilepsy, his or her selfperception. Therefore people with epilepsy very often confine themselves in sick person role, isolate themselves from society, and become dependent on others. Positive interaction between social worker and person with epilepsy during epileptic seizure strengthens understanding of possibilities of person with epilepsy. Specialised psychosocial consulting services for people with

  15. Computer tomographic examinations in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Villiers, J.F.K.

    1984-01-01

    Epileptic patients that was examined at the Universitas Hospital (Bloemfontein) by means of computerized tomography for the period July 1978 - December 1980, are divided into two groups: a) Patients with general epilepsy of convulsions - 507; b) Patients with vocal or partial epilepsy - 111. The method of examination and the results for both general and vocal epilepsy are discussed. A degenerative state was found in 35% of the positive computer tomographic examinations in general epilepsy and 22% of the positive examinations for vocal epilepsy. The purpose of the article was to explain the circumstances that can be expected when a epileptic patient is examined by means of computerized tomography

  16. PECULIARITIES OF TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY AT GIRLS AND WOMEN

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    O. A. Pylaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epilepsy treatment is to be based on existing general principles and standards of therapy with differential approach to each patient. Besides peculiarities of treatment of different types of seizures and forms of epilepsy there are also differential approaches to special groups of patients. To one of such groups are referred to women of reproductive age. These patients are referred to special group of risk due to the development of certain side effects of antiepileptic drugs (АED. This article focuses in details on peculiarities of treatment of women of reproductive age with epilepsy with accent made on tolerability and safety of the antiepileptic therapy. It is necessary to take into consideration, that at women neuroendocrinal disorders can be caused both by the disease itself – epilepsy (in such case disorders depend on the starting age, form of epilepsy, focal localization, duration of disorder and other factors, referred to the disease, as well as by the undertaken therapy. The articlehereunder considers only issues, referred to the treatment, i. e. AED side effects and its input in the decrease of life quality of women with epilepsy. As women’s reproductive function starts forming long ago before childbearing age, it is necessary for this category to comprise not only women and adolescents, but girls as well. Notwithstanding the fact that so called benign forms of epilepsy pass before the pubescence period (idiopathic focal epilepsies, several forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, in many cases the epilepsy, which has started in childhood, continues in the adult age as well. In the same time there can be possible remote negative consequences of the antiepileptic therapy, which can show at a woman of a reproductive age. The data, given in the article, witnesses the need of the right AED selection at women of reproductive age, suffering from epilepsy. The AED should be selected not only depending on the form of the

  17. Cognitive impairments in epilepsy

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    Aleksandr Anatolyevich Kostylev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairments in epilepsy are a current problem in neurology. The basis of the idea on the pathogenesis of higher nervous system dysfunctions is the interaction of a few factors that include the form and duration of the disease, gender differences, and the impact of antiepileptic therapy. The role of interattack epileptiform changes in the development of cognitive deficit in adults and epileptic encephalopathies in children is discussed. Up-to-date neurophysiological and neuroimaging diagnostic methods allow the detection of new features in the course and progression of higher nervous system dysfunctions in epilepsy.

  18. Epilepsy: A Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirven, Joseph I.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy, a disorder of unprovoked seizures is a multifaceted disease affecting individuals of all ages with a particular predilection for the very young and old. In addition to seizures, many patients often report cognitive and psychiatric problems associated with both the seizures themselves and its therapy. Epilepsy has numerous etiologies both idiopathic and acquired with a wide range of therapeutic responses. Despite numerous treatments available to control repetitive seizures including medications, diets, immunotherapy, surgery, and neuromodulatory devices, a large percentage of patients continue to suffer the consequences of uncontrolled seizures, which include psychosocial stigma and death. PMID:26328931

  19. Corpus callosotomy in a patient with startle epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Nicolás Garófalo; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Tavares, Igor M; Carrete, Henrique; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Centeno, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    Startle epilepsy is a syndrome of reflex epilepsy in which the seizures are precipitated by a sudden and surprising, usually auditory, stimulus. We describe herein a girl who had been suffering with startle-induced seizures since 2 years of age. She had focal, tonic and tonic-clonic seizures, refractory to antiepileptic treatment. Daily tonic seizures led to very frequent falls and morbidity. Neurologically, she had no deficit. Interictal EEG showed slow waves and epileptiform discharges in central and fronto-central regions. Video-polygraphic recordings of seizures, triggered by stimuli, showed generalised symmetric tonic posturing with ictal EEG, characterised by an abrupt and diffuse electrodecremental pattern of fast activity, followed by alpha-theta rhythm superimposed by epileptic discharges predominantly over the vertex and anterior regions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities. Corpus callosotomy was performed when the patient was 17. Since surgery, the patient (one year follow-up) has remained seizure-free. Corpus callosotomy may be considered in patients with startle epilepsy and tonic seizures, in the absence of focal lesions amenable to surgery. [Published with video sequences].

  20. Ictal cerebral perfusion patterns in partial epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sang Eun; Seo, Dae Won; Jeong, Seung Cheol; Yi, Ji Young; Hong, Seung Chyul

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the various ictal perfusion patterns and find the relationships between clinical factors and different perfusion patterns. Interictal and ictal SPECT and SPECT subtraction were performed in 61 patients with partial epilepsy. Both positive images showing ictal hyperperfusion and negative images revealing ictal hypoperfusion were obtained by SPECT subtraction. The ictal perfusion patterns of subtracted SPECT were classified into focal hyperperfusion, hyperperfusion-plus, combined hyperperfusion-hypoperfusion, and focal hypoperfusion only. The concordance rates with epileptic focus were 91.8% in combined analysis of ictal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion images of subtracted SPECT, 85.2% in hyperperfusion images only of subtracted SPECT, and 68.9% in conventional ictal SPECT analysis. Ictal hypoperfusion occurred less frequently in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) than extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Mesial temporal hyperperfusion alone was seen only in mesial TLE while lateral temporal hyperperfusion alone was observed only in neocortical TLE. Hippocampal sclerosis had much lower incidence of ictal hypoperfusion than any other pathology. Some patients showed ictal hypoperfusion at epileptic focus with ictal hyperperfusion in the neighboring brain regions where ictal discharges propagated. Hypoperfusion as well as hyperperfusion in ictal SPECT should be considered for localizing epileptic focus. Although the mechanism of ictal hypoperfusion could be an intra-ictal early exhaustion of seizure focus or a steal phenomenon by the propagation of ictal discharges to adjacent brain areas, further study is needed to elucidate it.=20

  1. Ictal cerebral perfusion patterns in partial epilepsy: SPECT subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Hong, Seung Bong; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sang Eun; Seo, Dae Won; Jeong, Seung Cheol; Yi, Ji Young; Hong, Seung Chyul [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the various ictal perfusion patterns and find the relationships between clinical factors and different perfusion patterns. Interictal and ictal SPECT and SPECT subtraction were performed in 61 patients with partial epilepsy. Both positive images showing ictal hyperperfusion and negative images revealing ictal hypoperfusion were obtained by SPECT subtraction. The ictal perfusion patterns of subtracted SPECT were classified into focal hyperperfusion, hyperperfusion-plus, combined hyperperfusion-hypoperfusion, and focal hypoperfusion only. The concordance rates with epileptic focus were 91.8% in combined analysis of ictal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion images of subtracted SPECT, 85.2% in hyperperfusion images only of subtracted SPECT, and 68.9% in conventional ictal SPECT analysis. Ictal hypoperfusion occurred less frequently in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) than extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Mesial temporal hyperperfusion alone was seen only in mesial TLE while lateral temporal hyperperfusion alone was observed only in neocortical TLE. Hippocampal sclerosis had much lower incidence of ictal hypoperfusion than any other pathology. Some patients showed ictal hypoperfusion at epileptic focus with ictal hyperperfusion in the neighboring brain regions where ictal discharges propagated. Hypoperfusion as well as hyperperfusion in ictal SPECT should be considered for localizing epileptic focus. Although the mechanism of ictal hypoperfusion could be an intra-ictal early exhaustion of seizure focus or a steal phenomenon by the propagation of ictal discharges to adjacent brain areas, further study is needed to elucidate it.

  2. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome lowers seizure threshold in adult patients without epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wither, Robert G; Borlot, Felippe; MacDonald, Alex; Butcher, Nancy J; Chow, Eva W C; Bassett, Anne S; Andrade, Danielle M

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies examining seizures in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have focused primarily on children and adolescents. In this study we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of seizures and epilepsy in an adult 22q11.2DS population. The medical records of 202 adult patients with 22q11.2DS were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG) reports, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Epilepsy status was assigned in accordance with 2010 International League Against Epilepsy Classification. Of 202 patients, 32 (15.8%) had a documented history of seizure. Of these 32, 23 (71.8%) had acute symptomatic seizures, usually associated with hypocalcemia and/or antipsychotic or antidepressant use. Nine patients (9/32, 28%; 9/202, 4%) met diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. Two patients had genetic generalized epilepsy; two patients had focal seizures of unknown etiology; two had epilepsy due to malformations of cortical development; in two the epilepsy was due to acquired structural changes; and in one patient the epilepsy could not be further classified. Similarly to children, the prevalence of epilepsy and acute symptomatic seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is higher than in the general population. Hypocalcemia continues to be a risk factor for adults, but differently from kids, the main cause of seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is exposure to antipsychotics and antidepressants. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate how 22q11.2 microdeletion leads to an overall decreased seizure threshold. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Recent advances in epilepsy genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Alessandro; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale

    2018-02-22

    In last few years there has been rapid increase in the knowledge of epilepsy genetics. Nowadays, it is estimated that genetic epilepsies include over than 30% of all epilepsy syndromes. Several genetic tests are now available for diagnostic purposes in clinical practice. In particular, next-generation sequencing has proven to be effective in revealing gene mutations causing epilepsies in up to a third of the patients. This has lead also to functional studies that have given insight into disease pathophysiology and consequently to the identification of potential therapeutic targets opening the way of precision medicine for epilepsy patients. This minireview is focused on the most recent advances in genetics of epilepsies. We will also overview the modern genomic technologies and illustrate the diagnostic pathways in patients with genetic epilepsies. Finally, the potential implications for a personalized treatment (precision medicine) are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fobben, E.S.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Sperling, M.R.; Kohn, M.I.; Atlas, S.W.; Hackney, D.B.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging examinations of 31 patients undergoing temporal lobe resection for refractory partial epilepsy were reviewed retrospectively for the presence of signal abnormalities as well as atrophy. High-signal abnormalities were present in only two of the described 31 patients (6.5%). Pathologically, these represented mesial temporal sclerosis and a hamartoma. Of the remaining 29 cases, 13 showed pathologically varying degrees of mesial temporal sclerosis and gliosis and 16 were pathologically normal. Atrophy, as determined by gross asymmetry, sulcal and temporal horn enlargement, and computer volume measurements, was observed in 23 of 31 patients, correlating with the clinically affected side in 20 and the contralateral side in three. In this series, in contrast to others reported, focal MR signal abnormalities were not detected in the vast majority of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

  5. Validation of rapid suicidality screening in epilepsy using the NDDIE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco; McGonigal, Aileen; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; May, Theodor W; Labudda, Kirsten; Brandt, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Standard mortality ratio for suicide in patients with epilepsy is three times higher than in the general population, and such a risk remains high even after adjusting for clinical and socioeconomic factors. It is thus important to have suitable screening instruments and to implement care pathways for suicide prevention in every epilepsy center. The aim of this study is to validate the use of the Neurological Disorder Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDIE) as a suicidality-screening instrument. The study sample included adult patients with epilepsy assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and the NDDIE. A high suicidality risk according to the Suicidality Module of the MINI was considered the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for NDDIE total and individual item scores were computed and subsequently compared using a nonparametric approach. The best possible cutoff was identified with the highest Youden index (J). Likelihood ratios were then computed, and specificity, sensitivity, positive, and negative predictive values calculated. The study sample consisted of 380 adult patients with epilepsy: 46.3% male; mean age was 39.4 ± 14.6; 76.7% had a diagnosis of focal epilepsy; mean age at onset of the epilepsy was 23.3 ± 17.5. According to the MINI, 74 patients (19.5%) fulfilled criteria for a major depressive episode and 19 (5%) presented a high suicidality risk. A score >2 (J = 0.751) for item 4 "I'd be better off dead" of the NDDIE displayed excellent psychometric properties with a good to excellent validity (area under the curve [AUC] 0.906; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.820-0.992; p < 0.001), sensitivity 84.21% (95% CI 60.4-96.6), specificity 90.86% (95% CI 87.4-93.6), likelihood ratio+ 9.21 (95% CI 6.3-13.5), likelihood ratio- 0.17 (95% CI 0.06-0.50). Item 4 of the NDDIE has shown to be an excellent suicidality screening instrument allowing the development of further care pathways for suicide prevention in

  6. Deep Brain Electrical Stimulation in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa L.

    2008-11-01

    The deep brain electrical stimulation has been used for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, depression and epilepsy. Studies carried out in human brain indicate that the application of high frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) at 130 Hz in limbic structures of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy abolished clinical seizures and significantly decreased the number of interictal spikes at focus. The anticonvulsant effects of HFS seem to be more effective in patients with less severe epilepsy, an effect associated with a high GABA tissue content and a low rate of cell loss. In addition, experiments using models of epilepsy indicate that HFS (pulses of 60 μs width at 130 Hz at subthreshold current intensity) of specific brain areas avoids the acquisition of generalized seizures and enhances the postictal seizure suppression. HFS is also able to modify the status epilepticus. It is concluded that the effects of HFS may be a good strategy to reduce or avoid the epileptic activity.

  7. Benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms: neuropsychological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanò, Eva; Gagliano, Antonella; Magazù, Angela; Sferro, Caterina; Calarese, Tiziana; Mannarino, Erminia; Calamoneri, Filippo

    2005-05-01

    Benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms is classified among childhood benign partial epilepsies. The absence of neurological and neuropsychological deficits has long been considered as a prerequisite for a diagnosis of benign childhood partial epilepsy. Much evidence has been reported in literature in the latest years suggesting a neuropsychological impairment in this type of epilepsy, particularly in the type with Rolandic paroxysms. The present work examines the neuropsychological profiles of a sample of subjects affected by the early-onset benign childhood occipital seizures (EBOS) described by Panayotopulos. The patient group included 22 children (14 males and 8 females; mean age 10.1+/-3.3 years) diagnosed as having EBOS. The patients were examined with a set of tests investigating neuropsychological functions: memory, attention, perceptive, motor, linguistic and academic (reading, writing, arithmetic) abilities. The same instruments have been given to a homogeneous control group as regards sex, age, level of education and socio-economic background. None of the subjects affected by EBOS showed intellectual deficit (mean IQ in Wechsler Full Scale 91.7; S.D. 8.9). Results show a widespread cognitive dysfunction in the context of a focal epileptogenic process in EBOS. In particular, children with EBOS show a significant occurrence of specific learning disabilities (SLD) and other subtle neuropsychological deficits. We found selective dysfunctions relating to perceptive-visual attentional ability (pmemory abilities (psupports the hypothesis that epilepsy itself plays a role in the development of neuropsychological impairment. Supported by other studies that have documented subtle neuropsychological deficits in benign partial epilepsy, we stress the importance of reconsidering its supposed "cognitive benignity", particularly in occipital types.

  8. Epileptiform discharges in EEG and seizure risk in adolescent children of women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Joseph; Jose, Manna; Nandini, V S; Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to study the epileptiform discharges (ED) and seizure risk in EEG of 12-18-year-old children of women with epilepsy (WWE). Children of WWE who were prospectively followed up in the Kerala registry of epilepsy and pregnancy (KREP), aged 12-16years (n=92; males 48, females 44) underwent clinical evaluation and a 30-min digital 18-channel EEG. The EEG showed epileptiform discharges in 13 children (5 males and 8 females). The EDs were generalized in 9 and focal in 4 (occipital 2, frontal 1, and centroparietal 1). They had significantly higher risk of ED (odds ratio 4.02, 95% CI 1.04-15.51) when compared to published prevalence of ED in healthy children. There were 2 children with epilepsy (one with localization-related epilepsy and the other generalized epilepsy). The children under study had a trend towards higher prevalence of epilepsy (odds ratio 3.39, 95% CI 0.82-13.77) when compared to age specific prevalence of epilepsy from community surveys in same region. Children of WWE showed increased risk of ED in EEG and trend towards increased seizure risk when compared to healthy children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Epilepsy after cerebral infection: review of the literature and the potential for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramantani, Georgia; Holthausen, Hans

    2017-06-01

    The risk of unprovoked seizures in population-based cohorts of cerebral infection survivors is 7-8% in developed countries, rising to considerably higher rates in resource-poor countries. The main risk factors for epilepsy after cerebral infection, besides acute seizures, are infection-associated brain lesions and status epilepticus during the acute phase. Despite the high prevalence of pharmacoresistant epilepsies after cerebral infections, especially in patients with MRI-identifiable lesions, only a small minority undergoes epilepsy surgery. However, excellent surgical candidates are particularly those with a history of meningitis or encephalitis in early childhood, hippocampal sclerosis on MRI, as well as a history, seizure semiology, and EEG-findings compatible with the diagnosis of a mesial temporal lobe epilepsy syndrome. More challenging are patients with neocortical/extratemporal lobe epilepsies post cerebral infection. Finally, patients with a severe hemispheric injury with contralateral hemiparesis are candidates for hemispherectomy/hemispherotomy. This review attempts to shed some light on this frequent cause of symptomatic focal epilepsy, with an emphasis on the chances offered by epilepsy surgery.

  10. Autistic spectrum disorder: evaluating a possible contributing or causal role of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonna, Thierry; Roulet, Eliane

    2006-01-01

    The onset of epilepsy in brain systems involved in social communication and/or recognition of emotions can occasionally be the cause of autistic symptoms or may aggravate preexisting autistic symptoms. Knowing that cognitive and/or behavioral abnormalities can be the presenting and sometimes the only symptom of an epileptic disorder or can even be caused by paroxysmal EEG abnormalities without recognized seizures, the possibility that this may apply to autism has given rise to much debate. Epilepsy and/or epileptic EEG abnormalities are frequently associated with autistic disorders in children but this does not necessarily imply that they are the cause; great caution needs to be exercised before drawing any such conclusions. So far, there is no evidence that typical autism can be attributed to an epileptic disorder, even in those children with a history of regression after normal early development. Nevertheless, there are several early epilepsies (late infantile spasms, partial complex epilepsies, epilepsies with CSWS, early forms of Landau-Kleffner syndrome) and with different etiologies (tuberous sclerosis is an important model of these situations) in which a direct relationship between epilepsy and some features of autism may be suspected. In young children who primarily have language regression (and who may have autistic features) without evident cause, and in whom paroxysmal focal EEG abnormalities are also found, the possible direct role of epilepsy can only be evaluated in longitudinal studies.

  11. Quality of life after surgery for intractable partial epilepsy in children: a cohort study with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Mohamad A; Ataya, Nour; Ferzli, Jessica; Kurdi, Rana; El-Banna, Diana; Rahi, Amal; Shamseddine, Alhan; Sinno, Durriyah; Comair, Youssef

    2010-08-01

    Investigate if quality of life (QOL) normalizes on long-term follow-up after surgery for partial epilepsy in children. This is a cohort study with controls in which a consecutive cohort of nineteen 2-14-year-old children who underwent focal resections for intractable partial seizures between 1996 and 2006, were matched with 19 non-surgery intractable partial epilepsy patients, and with 19 healthy subjects. The two epilepsy groups were matched for age, sex, socio-economic status (SES), cognitive level, seizure type, and seizure frequency. The healthy group was matched with the two epilepsy groups for age, sex, SES, and cognitive level. QOL was assessed using the QOLCE (Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire). In the surgery group (follow-up 3.84+/-2.26 years), 78.9% had Engel class-I versus 21.1% in non-surgery (p=0.01) (follow-up 3.44+/-2.95 years). Surgery patients were similar to healthy subjects in the social, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and overall QOL (p>0.05) but had lower scores in the total QOL, physical, and health domains (p0.05, power>0.8). Our data indicate that epilepsy surgery for partial seizures in children is associated with better QOL as compared to children with intractable epilepsy who are not operated on, and suggest that in those who achieve seizure freedom normal QOL may at least potentially be possible.

  12. Early life stress as an influence on limbic epilepsy: an hypothesis whose time has come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia S Koe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, the most prevalent form of refractory focal epilepsy in adults, is thought to begin in early life, even though seizures may not commence until adolescence or adulthood. Amongst the range of early life factors implicated in MTLE causation (febrile seizures, traumatic brain injury, etc., stress may be one important contributor. Early life stress is an a priori agent deserving study because of the large amount of neuroscientific data showing enduring effects on structure and function in hippocampus and amygdala, the key structures involved in MTLE. An emerging body of evidence directly tests hypotheses concerning early life stress and limbic epilepsy: early life stressors, such as maternal separation, have been shown to aggravate epileptogenesis in both status epilepticus and kindling models of limbic epilepsy. In addition to elucidating its influence on limbic epileptogenesis itself, the study of early life stress has the potential to shed light on the psychiatric disorder that accompanies MTLE. For many years, psychiatric comorbidity was viewed as an effect of epilepsy, mediated psychologically and/or neurobiologically. An alternative – or complementary – perspective is that of shared causation. Early life stress, implicated in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, may be one such causal factor. This paper aims to critically review the body of experimental evidence linking early life stress and epilepsy; to discuss the direct studies examining early life stress effects in current models of limbic seizures/epilepsy; and to suggest priorities for future research.

  13. Psychiatric comorbidity in children and youth with epilepsy: An association with executive dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfstad, Kristin Å; Torgersen, Halvor; Van Roy, Betty; Hessen, Erik; Hansen, Berit Hjelde; Henning, Oliver; Clench-Aas, Jocelyne; Mowinckel, Petter; Gjerstad, Leif; Lossius, Morten I

    2016-03-01

    Psychopathology in children and youth with epilepsy has previously been related to executive dysfunction, but the nature of the association is uncertain. We sought to explore risk factors for psychiatric disorders in children and youth with epilepsy, with emphasis on executive dysfunction, along with seizure-related and psychosocial factors. The cohort consisted of one hundred and one consecutive patients aged 10-19 years with focal (n=52) or genetic generalized (n=49) epilepsy. All were screened for psychiatric symptoms, using part of an extensive questionnaire, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) for both patients and their parents. Participants scoring in the borderline or abnormal range on the SDQ received a psychiatric interview (Kiddie-SADS-PL). All participants underwent a neuropsychological examination, and those with general cognitive abilities (IQ)epilepsy-related or psychosocial factors were not significantly associated with psychiatric disorders. Multiple factors are associated with psychiatric problems in children and youth with epilepsy. In this study, executive dysfunction, male gender, and early epilepsy onset were independent risk factors for having a psychiatric disorder. An evaluation of psychiatric and cognitive problems is important to enable a positive long-term outcome in childhood epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of exclusive breastfeeding in prevention of childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kurniadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Epilepsy affects 1% of children worldwide. The highest incidence is in the first year of life, and perinatal factors, such as hypoxic-ischemic injury, infection, and cortical malformation may play etiologic roles. Breast milk contains optimal nutrients for human brain in early life. Breastfeeding has been associated with lower risk of infections, better cognitive and psychomotor development. However, the role of breastfeeding in preventing childhood epilepsy remains unclear. Objective To evaluate an association between exclusive breastfeeding and childhood epilepsy. Methods A case-control study conducted from 1 May to 3 July 2013 involving children with epilepsy aged 6 months to 18 years who were attending pediatric outpatient clinic of Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta. Neurologically normal children, individually matched by age and sex, visiting the same clinic were considered as controls. Exclusion criteria were children with structural brain abnormality, history of epilepsy in family, and who had history of neonatal seizure, intracranial infection, febrile seizure, and head trauma before onset of epilepsy. History of breastfeeding was obtained by interviewing the parents. The difference of exclusively breastfeeding proportion between cases and controls was analyzed by McNemar test. Results The total number of participants was 68 cases and controls each. Subjects with epilepsy had lower proportion of exclusively breastfed (48.5% compared with controls (54.4%, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.541. Exclusively breastfeeding showed no statistical significance in decreasing risk of epilepsy (OR=0.71; 95%CI 0.32 to 1.61. Conclusions Exclusive breastfeeding for 4-6 months has no effect against childhood epilepsy.

  15. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Morales-Quezada, León; Orozco Garduño, Adolfo Josué; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; González-Aragón, Maricarmen Fernández; Espinoza López, Dulce Anabel; Vázquez Gregorio, Rafael; Anschel, David J; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging non-invasive neuromodulation therapy in epilepsy with conflicting results in terms of efficacy and safety. Review the literature about the efficacy and safety of tDCS in epilepsy in humans and animals. We searched studies in PubMed, MedLine, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar (January 1969 to October 2013) using the keywords 'transcranial direct current stimulation' or 'tDCS' or 'brain polarization' or 'galvanic stimulation' and 'epilepsy' in animals and humans. Original articles that reported tDCS safety and efficacy in epileptic animals or humans were included. Four review authors independently selected the studies, extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the studies using the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, PRISMA guidelines and Jadad Scale. A meta-analysis was not possible due to methodological, clinical and statistical heterogeneity of included studies. We analyzed 9 articles with different methodologies (3 animals/6 humans) with a total of 174 stimulated individuals; 109 animals and 65 humans. In vivo and in vitro animal studies showed that direct current stimulation can successfully induce suppression of epileptiform activity without neurological injury and 4/6 (67%) clinical studies showed an effective decrease in epileptic seizures and 5/6 (83%) reduction of inter-ictal epileptiform activity. All patients tolerated tDCS well. tDCS trials have demonstrated preliminary safety and efficacy in animals and patients with epilepsy. Further larger studies are needed to define the best stimulation protocols and long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-Neuronal Autoantibodies in Both Drug Responsive and Resistant Focal Seizures with Unknown Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozubatik-Celik, Gokcen; Ozkara, Cigdem; Ulusoy, Canan; Gunduz, Aysegul; Delil, Sakir; Yeni, Naz; Tuzun, Erdem

    2017-09-01

    and Objective Autoimmunity is an emerging field of research in the etiology of different neurological disorders including epilepsy. We aimed to investigate the presence of neuronal autoantibodies in focal epilepsy with unknown cause and their clinical correlates in both drug-responsive and resistant patients. Between 2009 and 2010 94 patients were prospectively enrolled, had their antibodies tested and clinically followed." An additional 50 age- and gender-matched controls were also tested for antibodies. Age at examination, gender, age at onset, seizure frequency, risk factors, seizure precipitants, and type of seizures were noted. Plasma obtained from patients was frozen at -80°C and analysed for autoantibodies against VGKC-complex, VGCC, GAD, LGI1, CASPR2, NMDA, AMPA and GABAB receptors with immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay as required. Thirteen (13.8%) patients, but none of the controls, had antibodies (p=0.003). Antibodies were directed against the uncharacterized components of VGKC-complex in 5 patients (5.3%), GAD in 4 patients (4.2%), NMDA-R in 1 patient (1%), AMPA-R in 1 patient (1%) and both GAD and VGKC-complex in 2 patients (2.1%). Prognosis of epilepsy, in subsequent follow-up, did not correlate to general presence of anti-neuronal antibodies with slightly more patients with antibodies epilepsy control than without (76.9% vs. 69.1%, not-statistically significant. Three patients with suspected active autoimmunity and epilepsy who were treated, showed a response to treatment with a reduction in the seizure frequency. Although most clinical features were identical between seropositive and seronegative patient groups, seropositive patients were more likely to have inflammatory/autoimmune disorders in their medical history. In keeping with previous studies, we have shown anti-neuronal antibodies in a proportion of focal epilepsy patients. Although autoimmunity might merely occur as a bystander effect in many chronic neurological disorders

  17. Advancing the management of childhood epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J Helen; Kluger, Gerhard; Lagae, Lieven

    2013-07-01

    Childhood epilepsies comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders and syndromes that vary in terms of severity, prognosis and treatment requirements. Effective management requires early, accurate recognition and diagnosis, and a holistic approach that addresses each individual's medical and psychosocial needs within the context of their overall health status and quality of life. With increasing understanding of underlying aetiologies, new approaches to management and treatment are emerging. For example, genetic testing is beginning to provide a tool to aid differential diagnosis and a means of predicting predisposition to particular types of epilepsy. Despite the availability of an increasing number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)--due not only to the development of new AEDs, but also to changes in regulatory requirements that have facilitated clinical development--seizure control and tolerability continue to be suboptimal in many patients, and there is therefore a continuing need for new treatment strategies. Surgery and other non-pharmacological treatments (e.g. vagus nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet) are already relatively well established in paediatric epilepsy. New pharmacological treatments include generational advances on existing AEDs and AEDs with novel modes of action, and non-AED pharmacological interventions, such as immunomodulation. Emerging technologies include novel approaches allowing the delivery of medicinal agents to specific areas of the brain, and 'closed-loop' experimental devices employing algorithms that allow treatment (e.g., electrical stimulation) to be targeted both spatially and temporally. Although in early stages of development, cell-based approaches (e.g., focal targeting of adenosine augmentation) and gene therapy may also provide new treatment choices in the future. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A computed tomographic study on epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hoon Sik

    1980-01-01

    140 patients with epileptic seizure were studied by computed tomography during the period from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1979 in the Department or Radiology, College of Medicine, Hangyang University. Those findings on CT and clinical records including EEG findings were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution of the total 140 patients was broad ranging from 1 month to 63 years. 73.5% of patients was below the age of 30. The patient population was comprised of 93 males and 47 females, and its male to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The type of epileptic seizure were classified according to the International League against Epilepsy. 42.9% of patients had primary generalized seizure, 47.1% with partial seizure, and 10% with non classifiable seizure. 3. As additional symptoms and signs except seizure, headache was most common, and the next was nausea and vomiting. Uncommonly, there were also insomnia, personality change, and memory disturbance. 4. 37.1% of patients had less than 1 month of seizure history, 19.3% between 1 year and 5 years. 5. EEG findings were available in 41 patients, and normal in 15 cases. 26 patients revealed abnormal findings. Among those abnormal findings focal slowing was appeared in 19.5% and generalized slowing in 17.1%. 6. 52% of patients showed abnormal findings on CT. The most common abnormal findings was focal low density (30%), and the next was diffuse hydrocephalus (7.1%). After contrast infusion, contrast enhancement was occurred in cases with focal low density, focal high or isodense mass density. In patients with focal low density, ring or nodular enhancement were common, and diffuse or serpentime enhancement in focal high or isodence mass density. 7. The frequency of structural abnormalities on CT was more common in patients below the age of 10 and over 30 than other age groups. The epilepsy starting below 10 and over 30 years of age showed structural abnormalities in 63.6-100%. 8. The patients who had less than 6 months of

  19. A computed tomographic study on epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hoon Sik [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    140 patients with epileptic seizure were studied by computed tomography during the period from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1979 in the Department or Radiology, College of Medicine, Hangyang University. Those findings on CT and clinical records including EEG findings were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution of the total 140 patients was broad ranging from 1 month to 63 years. 73.5% of patients was below the age of 30. The patient population was comprised of 93 males and 47 females, and its male to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The type of epileptic seizure were classified according to the International League against Epilepsy. 42.9% of patients had primary generalized seizure, 47.1% with partial seizure, and 10% with non classifiable seizure. 3. As additional symptoms and signs except seizure, headache was most common, and the next was nausea and vomiting. Uncommonly, there were also insomnia, personality change, and memory disturbance. 4. 37.1% of patients had less than 1 month of seizure history, 19.3% between 1 year and 5 years. 5. EEG findings were available in 41 patients, and normal in 15 cases. 26 patients revealed abnormal findings. Among those abnormal findings focal slowing was appeared in 19.5% and generalized slowing in 17.1%. 6. 52% of patients showed abnormal findings on CT. The most common abnormal findings was focal low density (30%), and the next was diffuse hydrocephalus (7.1%). After contrast infusion, contrast enhancement was occurred in cases with focal low density, focal high or isodense mass density. In patients with focal low density, ring or nodular enhancement were common, and diffuse or serpentime enhancement in focal high or isodence mass density. 7. The frequency of structural abnormalities on CT was more common in patients below the age of 10 and over 30 than other age groups. The epilepsy starting below 10 and over 30 years of age showed structural abnormalities in 63.6-100%. 8. The patients who had less than 6 months of

  20. Marijuana for epilepsy?

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana has been used for centuries for medical reasons. In the early 20th century it was first linked to treatment for epilepsy. Over the last few decades researchers have been unravelling the truth behind the drug. Prof. Giuseppe Di Giovanni tells us more about using marijuana for medical research and his own research on this controversial drug.

  1. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  2. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Tolmacheva, E.A.; Budziszewska, B.; Stein, J.

    2017-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime,

  3. Epilepsy in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-An Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly people are the largest and continuously fastest growing population among patients with epilepsy. Elderly patients with epilepsy are very different from other age groups in many respects and clinicians shouldn’t treat them in the same way as younger adults. Accurate diagnosis of epilepsy in the elderly is much more difficult and atypical manifestations and misdiagnoses are certainly not the exception. Syncope is probably the most important differential diagnosis. High clinical suspicion and proper investigation are the best tools for prompt diagnosis. Etiologies of late-onset epilepsy are mainly symptomatic and cerebrovascular diseases are the most common causes in this age group, followed by degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. It is appropriate to consider starting antiepileptic drug (AED treatment at the first-ever seizure in elderly patients who have remote symptomatic causes such as stroke and dementia. According to the high recurrence rate of seizure and the good response to AEDs in elderly patients, the proper choice from various AEDs for seizure control is very important. Decision-making for AED choice depends on many different factors, including pharmacological properties, efficacy, tolerability from side effects, drug interactions, and medical comorbidities. The newer AEDs with lesser adverse effects and fewer drug interactions appear to be reasonable treatment options for elderly patients. However, more evidence from clinical trials in this specific age group is warranted.

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kunz, W.S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 35-40 ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR GA309/08/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epilepsy * mitochondrial dysfunction * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.025, year: 2012

  5. exercise and epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    UK, Epilepsy Society

    2018-01-01

    Exercise improves fitness, energy and mood and relieves stress. Improving overall health and wellbeing in this way can help reduce seizures and the impact of epilepsy for some people. It can also help people feel more in control of their health.

  6. Use and impact of positron computed tomography scanning in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Through the effective combination of instrumentation, tracer kinetic principles, and radiopharmaceuticals, positron computed tomography (PET) allows for the analytic, noninvasive measurement of local tissue physiology in humans. A large number of studies have already been performed in patients with epilepsy using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to measure local cerebral glucose utilization. In patients with complex partial epilepsy who are candidates for surgery, hypometabolic zones have been seen consistently (70%) in the interictal state. The complex anatomical and pathophysiological investigation of these hypometabolic zones is discussed. Ictal studies of patients with partial seizures have demonstrated a much more variable metabolic pattern which usually consists of hypermetabolism relative to baseline or interictal studies. Generalized epilepsy produced by electroconvulsive shock and petit mal epilepsy have been studied using FDG to estimate glucose metabolism.

  7. Clinical characteristics of children and young adults with co-occurring autism spectrum disorder and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Achkar, Christelle M; Spence, Sarah J

    2015-06-01

    The association between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and epilepsy has been described for decades, and yet we still lack the full understanding of this relationship both clinically and at the pathophysiologic level. This review evaluates the available data in the literature pertaining to the clinical characteristics of patients with autism spectrum disorder who develop epilepsy and, conversely, patients with epilepsy who develop autism spectrum disorder. Many studies demonstrate an increased risk of epilepsy in individuals with ASD, but rates vary widely. This variability is likely secondary to the different study methods employed, including the study population and definitions of the disorders. Established risk factors for an increased risk of epilepsy in patients with ASD include intellectual disability and female gender. There is some evidence of an increased risk of epilepsy associated with other factors such as ASD etiology (syndromic), severity of autistic features, developmental regression, and family history. No one epilepsy syndrome or seizure type has been associated, although focal or localization-related seizures are often reported. The age at seizure onset can vary from infancy to adulthood with some evidence of a bimodal age distribution. The severity and intractability of epilepsy in populations with ASD have not been well studied, and there is very little investigation of the role that epilepsy plays in the autism behavioral phenotype. There is evidence of abnormal EEGs (especially epileptiform abnormalities) in children with ASD even in the absence of clinical seizures, but very little is known about this phenomenon and what it means. The development of autism spectrum disorder in patients with epilepsy is less well studied, but there is evidence that the ASD risk is greater in those with epilepsy than in the general population. One of the risk factors is intellectual disability, and there is some evidence that the presence of a particular seizure

  8. Epilepsy beyond seizures: a review of the impact of epilepsy and its comorbidities on health-related quality of life in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rowena M A; Volk, Holger A

    2015-09-26

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological conditions in the dog, estimated to affect 0.6 to 0.75 per cent of dogs. Owners of dogs with epilepsy have previously indicated that their dog's quality of life (QoL) is of greatest importance to them above seizure frequency; however, much of the research into canine epilepsy to date has focussed on seizure frequency, and how to reduce it via antiepileptic drug treatment. In people, the impact of epilepsy upon QoL has been widely studied, exploring not only its impact on physical health, but also the psychological health and cognitive capabilities of affected individuals. This paper reviews the existing literature on canine epilepsy, identifies potential threats to QoL, and draws parallels from human epilepsy research. We suggest that canine epilepsy poses threats to both quality and quantity of life, with treatment interventions posing a fine balance of potential benefits and harms to the patient. At present, little is known about the neurobehavioural, emotional and cognitive effects of epilepsy upon affected dogs. Further studies are needed to establish the extent to which unknown QoL-inhibiting comorbidities exist in the dog, in order to avoid their undertreatment, and to objectively quantify the effects of epilepsy on canine QoL. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Interictal epileptiform discharges have an independent association with cognitive impairment in children with lesional epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, Jennifer M; Weiss-Croft, Louise; Harrison, Sue; Cross, J Helen; Boyd, Stewart G; Baldeweg, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    The relative contribution of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) to cognitive dysfunction in comparison with the underlying brain pathology is not yet understood in children with lesional focal epilepsy. The current study investigated the association of IEDs with intellectual functioning in 103 children with medication-resistant focal epilepsy. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to determine the independent contribution of IED features on intellectual functioning, after controlling for effects of lesional pathology, epilepsy duration, and medication. Exploratory analyses were conducted for language and memory scores as well as academic skills available in a subset of participants. The results reveal that IEDs have a negative association with IQ with independent, additive effects documented for frequent and bilaterally distributed IEDs as well as discharge enhancement in sleep. Left-lateralized IEDs had a prominent effect on verbal intelligence, in excess of the influence of left-sided brain pathology. These effects extended to other cognitive functions, most prominently for sleep-enhanced IEDs to be associated with deficits in expressive and receptive language, reading, spelling and numerical skills. Overall, IED effects on cognition were of a magnitude similar to lesional influences or drug effects (topiramate use). This study demonstrates an association between IEDs and cognitive dysfunction, independent of the underlying focal brain pathology. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Presence of Cognitive Deterioration and Anatomical-Clinical Topography in Patients with Epilepsy in Cienfuegos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Lázaro Rivera López

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: epilepsy is a pathological condition characterized by a recurrent non-provoked crisis, however, the presence of the crisis is a fraction of the global problem, patients with epilepsy develop a variety of neuropsychiatry problems, as cognitive affection, most of all, in the space of memory. Objective: evaluating the behavior of the cognitive deterioration and focalization according to anatomical- clinical topography in patients with epilepsy. Methods: a descriptive, correlational, cross-section and follow-up study of cases. The techniques used were: structured interview, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment's evaluation, and Luria´s neuropsychological exam. It was used SPDD statical parcel, version 1.5 to process the information that made possible the study of the obtained data, with the aim of expressing the results in chart of frequency and relation of variables in number and percent. Results: the 71.4 % of evaluated patients presented cognitive deterioration in any of its of measurement scales and they focalized according to neuropsychological exam. Conclusions: as the time of evolution of the disease increases, the frequency and duration of the crises, the grade of the cognitive deterioration in patients with epilepsy increases, focalizing with dysfunction majority fronto-temporary level according to anatomical-clinical topography.

  11. Widespread EEG changes precede focal seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Perucca

    Full Text Available The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal, and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline. Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples. At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development, but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures.

  12. Seizure ending signs in patients with dyscognitive focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvala, Jay R; Gerard, Elizabeth E; Macken, Mícheál; Schuele, Stephan U

    2015-09-01

    Signs indicating the end of a focal seizure with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness but without progression to focal or generalized motor symptoms are poorly defined and can be difficult to determine. Not recognizing the transition from ictal to postictal behaviour can affect seizure reporting accuracy by family members and may lead to delayed or a lack of examination during EEG monitoring, erroneous seizure localization and inadequate medical intervention for prolonged seizure duration. Our epilepsy monitoring unit database was searched for focal seizures without secondary generalization for the period from 2007 to 2011. The first focal seizure in a patient with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness and/or behavioural arrest, with or without automatisms, was included. Seizures without objective symptoms or inadequate video-EEG quality were excluded. A total of 67 patients were included, with an average age of 41.7 years. Thirty-six of the patients had seizures from the left hemisphere and 29 from the right. All patients showed an abrupt change in motor activity and resumed contact with the environment as a sign of clinical seizure ending. Specific ending signs (nose wiping, coughing, sighing, throat clearing, or laughter) were seen in 23 of 47 of temporal lobe seizures and 7 of 20 extra-temporal seizures. Seizure ending signs are often subtle and the most common finding is a sudden change in motor activity and resumption of contact with the environment. More distinct signs, such as nose wiping, coughing or throat clearing, are not specific to temporal lobe onset. A higher proportion of seizures during sleep went unexamined, compared to those during wakefulness. This demonstrates that seizure semiology can be very subtle and arousals from sleep during monitoring should alert staff. Patient accounts of seizure frequency appear to be unreliable and witness reports need to be taken into account. [Published with video sequences].

  13. Continuously variable focal length lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  14. Music and epilepsy: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Melissa Jane

    2012-06-01

    The effect of music on patients with epileptic seizures is complex and at present poorly understood. Clinical studies suggest that the processing of music within the human brain involves numerous cortical areas, extending beyond Heschl's gyrus and working within connected networks. These networks could be recruited during a seizure manifesting as musical phenomena. Similarly, if certain areas within the network are hyperexcitable, then there is a potential that particular sounds or certain music could act as epileptogenic triggers. This occurs in the case of musicogenic epilepsy, whereby seizures are triggered by music. Although it appears that this condition is rare, the exact prevalence is unknown, as often patients do not implicate music as an epileptogenic trigger and routine electroencephalography does not use sound in seizure provocation. Music therapy for refractory epilepsy remains controversial, and further research is needed to explore the potential anticonvulsant role of music. Dopaminergic system modulation and the ambivalent action of cognitive and sensory input in ictogenesis may provide possible theories for the dichotomous proconvulsant and anticonvulsant role of music in epilepsy. The effect of antiepileptic drugs and surgery on musicality should not be underestimated. Altered pitch perception in relation to carbamazepine is rare, but health care professionals should discuss this risk or consider alternative medication particularly if the patient is a professional musician or native-born Japanese. Studies observing the effect of epilepsy surgery on musicality suggest a risk with right temporal lobectomy, although the extent of this risk and correlation to size and area of resection need further delineation. This potential risk may bring into question whether tests on musical perception and memory should form part of the preoperative neuropsychological workup for patients embarking on surgery, particularly that of the right temporal lobe. Wiley

  15. Altered cortical anatomical networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bin; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Li, Wenjing; Dai, Dai; Li, Meng; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common epilepsy syndromes with focal seizures generated in the left or right temporal lobes. With the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), many evidences have demonstrated that the abnormalities in hippocampal volume and the distributed atrophies in cortical cortex. However, few studies have investigated if TLE patients have the alternation in the structural networks. In the present study, we used the cortical thickness to establish the morphological connectivity networks, and investigated the network properties using the graph theoretical methods. We found that all the morphological networks exhibited the small-world efficiency in left TLE, right TLE and normal groups. And the betweenness centrality analysis revealed that there were statistical inter-group differences in the right uncus region. Since the right uncus located at the right temporal lobe, these preliminary evidences may suggest that there are topological alternations of the cortical anatomical networks in TLE, especially for the right TLE.

  16. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning in ...

  18. Epilepsy Surgery for Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy Surgery for Individuals with TSC In this video ... Aria Fallah, MD, discusses the surgical treatment of epilepsy in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. Epilepsy is ...

  19. Testing of focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  20. High glycogen levels in the hippocampus of patients with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Madsen, Flemming F; Secher, Niels H

    2006-01-01

    During intense cerebral activation approximately half of the glucose plus lactate taken up by the human brain is not oxidized and could replenish glycogen deposits, but the human brain glycogen concentration is unknown. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, undergoing curative surgery, brain......, glycogen was similarly higher than in grey and white matter. Consequently, in human grey and white matter and, particularly, in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lope epilepsy, glycogen constitutes a large, active energy reserve, which may be of importance for energy provision during sustained...

  1. Development of a human head FE model for the impact analysis using VOXEL approach and simulation for the assessment on the focal brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Dai; Yuge, Kohei; Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Murakami, Shigeyuki; Takao, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional digital human-head model was developed and several dynamic analyses on the head trauma were conducted. This model was built up by the VOXEL approach using 433 slice CT images (512 x 512 pixels) and made of 1.22 million parallelepiped finite elements with 10 anatomical tissue properties such as scalp, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), skull, brain, dura mater and so on. The numerical analyses were conducted using a finite element code the authors have developed. The main features of the code are it is based on the explicit time integration method and it uses the one point integration method to evaluate the equivalent nodal forces with the hourglass control proposed by Flanagan and Belythcko and it utilizes the parallel computation with the Massage Passing Interface (MPI). In order to verify the developed model, the head impact experiment for a cadaver by Nahum et al. was simulated. The calculated results showed good agreement with experimental ones. A front and rear impact analyses were also performed investigate the relation between the impact direction and the positions of the high measurement of pressure and stresses in brain. The obtained results represent that brain injury has a closer relation with the Mises equivalent stress rather than the pressure. At this time, the large deformation of a frontal cranial base was observed in both frontal and occipital impact analyses. We expect that it induces the brain injury in a frontal lobe regardless of the impact positions. (author)

  2. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination.

  3. Familial benign nonprogressive myoclonic epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; de Falco, Fabrizio A; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Work on the classification of epileptic syndromes is ongoing, and many syndromes are still under discussion. In particular, special difficulty still persists in correctly classifying epilepsies with myoclonic seizures. The existence of special familial epileptic syndromes primarily showing myoclonic features has been recently suggested on the basis of a clear pattern of inheritance or on the identification of new chromosomal genetic loci linked to the disease. These forms in development include familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME), benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME), or autosomal dominant cortical myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME), and, maybe, adult-onset myoclonic epilepsy (AME). In the future, the identification of responsible genes and the protein products will contribute to our understanding of the molecular pathways of epileptogenesis and provide neurobiologic criteria for the classification of epilepsies, beyond the different phenotypic expression.

  4. Management of epilepsy in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsono Harsono

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of epilepsy in elderly requires understanding the unique biochemical and pharmacological characteristics of these patients. Management decisions must be based on accurate classification of seizures or epilepsy syndromes, a thorough neurological assessment to define etiology, and a comprehensive assessment of the patient’s health and living situation. Concomitant illnesses such as neurological, psychiatric, metabolic, or cardiac disorders will require individualization of plans and instructions. Specific problems of treatment of epilepsy in the elderly compared to childhood patients are as follows: distinctive range of causes of epilepsy, distinctive differential diagnosis, concurrent pathologies unrelated to epilepsy, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, and distinctive psychosocial effects. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 40-7 Keywords:  epilepsy, elderly, management, concomitant illness, pharmacokinetic

  5. The Protective Effect of Human Umbilical Cord Blood CD34+ Cells and Estradiol against Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Female Ovariectomized Rat: Cerebral MR Imaging and Immunohistochemical Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Liang

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord blood derived CD34+ stem cells are reported to mediate therapeutic effects in stroke animal models. Estrogen was known to protect against ischemic injury. The present study wished to investigate whether the protective effect of CD34+ cells against ischemic injury can be reinforced with complemental estradiol treatment in female ovariectomized rat and its possible mechanism. Experiment 1 was to determine the best optimal timing of CD34+ cell treatment for the neuroprotective effect after 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Experiment 2 was to evaluate the adjuvant effect of 17β-estradiol on CD34+ cell neuroprotection after MCAO. Experiment 1 showed intravenous infusion with CD34+ cells before MCAO (pre-treatment caused less infarction size than those infused after MCAO (post-treatment on 7T magnetic resonance T2-weighted images. Experiment 2 revealed infarction size was most significantly reduced after CD34+ + estradiol pre-treatment. When compared with no treatment group, CD34+ + estradiol pre-treatment showed significantly less ADC reduction at 2 h and 2 d, less CBF reduction at 2 h and less hyperperfusion at 2 d. The immunoreactivity of c-Fos, c-Jun and GFAP was attenuated, and BDNF showed significant recovery from 2 h to 2 d after MCAO, especially after CD34+ + estradiol pre-treatment. The present study suggests pre-treatment with CD34+ cells with complemental estradiol can be most protective against ischemic injury, which may act through stabilization of cerebral hemodynamics and normalization of the expressions of immediate early genes and BDNF.

  6. Antiepileptic drug behavioral side effects and baseline hyperactivity in children and adolescents with new onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Follansbee-Junger, Katherine; Smith, Aimee W; Combs, Angela; Ollier, Shannon; Hater, Brooke; Modi, Avani C

    2018-01-01

    To examine baseline psychological functioning and antiepileptic drug (AED) behavioral side effects in new onset epilepsy and determine, by age, whether baseline psychological functioning predicts AED behavioral side effects 1 month following AED initiation. A retrospective chart review was conducted between July 2011 and December 2014 that included youths with new onset epilepsy. As part of routine interdisciplinary care, caregivers completed the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition: Parent Rating Scale to report on baseline psychological functioning at the diagnostic visit and the Pediatric Epilepsy Side Effects Questionnaire to identify AED behavioral side effects at the 1-month follow-up clinic visit following AED initiation. Children (age = 2-11 years) and adolescents (age = 12-18 years) were examined separately. A total of 380 youths with new onset epilepsy (M age  = 8.9 ± 4.3 years; 83.4% Caucasian; 34.8% focal epilepsy, 41.1% generalized epilepsy, 23.7% unclassified epilepsy) were included. Seventy percent of youths had at-risk or clinically elevated baseline psychological symptoms. Children had significantly greater AED behavioral side effects (M = 25.08 ± 26.36) compared to adolescents (M = 12.36 ± 17.73), regardless of AED. Valproic acid demonstrated significantly greater behavioral side effects compared to all other AEDs, with the exception of levetiracetam. Higher hyperactivity/impulsivity at baseline significantly predicted higher AED behavioral side effects 1 month after AED initiation in both age groups. Younger children seem to be more prone to experience behavioral side effects, and these are likely to be higher if youths with epilepsy have baseline hyperactivity/impulsivity. Baseline psychological screening, specifically hyperactivity, can be used as a precision medicine tool for AED selection. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Deep PATTANAYAK; Rajesh SAGAR

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Pattanayak RD, Sagar R. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012;6(2):9-18.Childhood epilepsy is a chronic, recurrent disorder of unprovoked seizures. Theonset of epilepsy in childhood has significant implications for brain growth anddevelopment. Seizures may impair the ongoing neurodevelopmental processes and compromise the child’s intellectual and cognitive functioning, leading totremendous cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial consequen...

  8. Epileptic Networks in Focal Cortical Dysplasia Revealed Using Electroencephalography–Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Rachel; Vulliemoz, Serge; Rodionov, Roman; Carmichael, David W; Chaudhary, Umair J; Diehl, Beate; Laufs, Helmut; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W; Walker, Matthew C; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Guye, Maxime; Chauvel, Patrick; Duncan, John S; Lemieux, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Objective Surgical treatment of focal epilepsy in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is most successful if all epileptogenic tissue is resected. This may not be evident on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), so intracranial electroencephalography (icEEG) is needed to delineate the seizure onset zone (SOZ). EEG-functional MRI (fMRI) can reveal interictal discharge (IED)-related hemodynamic changes in the irritative zone (IZ). We assessed the value of EEG-fMRI in patients with FCD-associated focal epilepsy by examining the relationship between IED-related hemodynamic changes, icEEG findings, and postoperative outcome. Methods Twenty-three patients with FCD-associated focal epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation including icEEG underwent simultaneous EEG-fMRI at 3T. IED-related hemodynamic changes were modeled, and results were overlaid on coregistered T1-weighted MRI scans fused with computed tomography scans showing the intracranial electrodes. IED-related hemodynamic changes were compared with the SOZ on icEEG and postoperative outcome at 1 year. Results Twelve of 23 patients had IEDs during recording, and 11 of 12 had significant IED-related hemodynamic changes. The fMRI results were concordant with the SOZ in 5 of 11 patients, all of whom had a solitary SOZ on icEEG. Four of 5 had >50% reduction in seizure frequency following resective surgery. The remaining 6 of 11 patients had widespread or discordant regions of IED-related fMRI signal change. Five of 6 had either a poor surgical outcome (<50% reduction in seizure frequency) or widespread SOZ precluding surgery. Interpretation Comparison of EEG-fMRI with icEEG suggests that EEG-fMRI may provide useful additional information about the SOZ in FCD. Widely distributed discordant regions of IED-related hemodynamic change appear to be associated with a widespread SOZ and poor postsurgical outcome. ANN NEUROL 2011 PMID:22162063

  9. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, W.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the

  10. Gallbladder adenoma with focal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurea, S; Matei, E; Petrisor, P; Luca, L; Boros, Mirela; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2008-01-01

    The majority of polypoid lesions of the gallbladder are cholesterolosis pseudopolyps. True neoplastic GB polyps are represented mainly by adenomas. The case of a 52-year old male patient with an adenomatous polyp of the GB with focal adenocarcinoma is presented.

  11. Charging as a Focal Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads

    This position paper reflects on Borgmann’s notion of ‘focal things’ and its applicability in the discourse about interaction with technologies in nature. Using the example of a combined cooking burner and thermoelectric 5W smartphone charger (a BioLite cook stove), this position paper gives...

  12. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Association of ABCB1 C3435T polymorphism with phenobarbital resistance in Thai patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keangpraphun, T; Towanabut, S; Chinvarun, Y; Kijsanayotin, P

    2015-06-01

    One-third of patients with epilepsy are resistant to anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Drug-resistant epilepsy is believed to be multifactorial involving both genetic and non-genetic factors. Genetic variations in the ABCB1 gene encoding the drug efflux transporter, p-glycoprotein (p-gp), may influence the interindividual variability in AED response by limiting drugs from reaching their target. Phenobarbital (PB), one of the most cost-effective and widely used AEDs in developing countries, has been reported to be transported by p-gp. This study aimed to investigate the association of a genetic variant, ABCB1 3435C>T, and non-genetic factors with phenobarbital response in Thai patients with epilepsy. One hundred and ten Thai patients with epilepsy who were treated with PB maintenance doses were enrolled in this study. Two phenotypic groups, PB-responsive epilepsy and PB-resistant epilepsy, were defined according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria. Subjects were genotyped for ABCB1 3435C>T (rs1045642). Multiple logistic regression analysis was tested for the association of ABCB1 3435C>T polymorphism and non-genetic factors with PB response. Sixty-two PB-responsive epilepsy subjects and 48 PB-resistant epilepsy subjects were identified. All genotype frequencies of the ABCB1 3435C>T SNP were consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0·05). The ABCB1 3435C>T polymorphism and type of epilepsy were associated with response to PB. Patients with PB-resistant epilepsy had a significantly higher frequency of ABCB1 3435CC genotype and had focal epilepsy more often than patients with PB-responsive epilepsy (adjusted OR = 3·962, 95% CI = 1·075-14·610, P-value = 0·039; adjusted OR = 5·936, 95% CI = 2·272-15·513, P-value phenobarbital. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. De novo interstitial deletion of 9q32-34.1 with mental retardation, developmental delay, epilepsy, and cortical dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, T; Alp, M Y; Karacan, C D

    2014-01-01

    In this report we describe a 10 year-old female patient with interstitial deletion of 9q32-q34.1 associated with mental retardation, developmental delay, short stature, mild facial dysmorphism, epilepsy, abnormal EEG and brain MRI findings consistent with focal cortical dysplasia. Interstitial...

  15. Neuropharmacological imaging in epilepsy with PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, T.R.; Pennell, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging with positron and single photon emitter-labeling has added considerably to the understanding of epileptic seizure activity and of the postictal and interictal cerebral dysfunctions that accompany many epilepsies. Some of these functional alterations cannot be studied in humans by any other technique, and in other instances the information is complementary to that provided by other techniques, some of which are invasive or even require tissue destruction. Available radiotracer imaging techniques have yet to be fully applied to several important epileptic syndromes (including the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and other secondary generalized epilepsies), to physiological aspects of the natural history of temporal lobe epilepsy or any other commonly occurring epilepsy, and to the assessment of mechanism of action and adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs and other epilepsy therapies. New radiotracers should be developed to permit study of specific excitatory amino acid receptors and other receptor sites that are known to be relevant to the development of epilepsy, to the onset of individual seizures, and to interical dysfunctions

  16. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecila P. Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Method Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A and 31 paired children (group B underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment performed with several standardized protocols. Our findings were categorized as: a dyslexia; b other difficulties; c without difficulties. Our results were compared and statistically analyzed. Results Our data showed that dyslexia occurred in 19.4% and other difficulties in 74.2% of our patients. This was highly significant when compared with the control group (p<0.001. Phonological awareness, writing, reading, arithmetic, and memory tests showed a statistically significant difference when comparing both groups. Conclusion Our findings show significant evidence of the occurrence of dyslexia in patients with BECTS.

  17. Epilepsy and videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Michelle; Hirsch, Edouard; Vigevano, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Since the first case of videogame (VG) epilepsy was reported in 1981, many cases of seizures triggered by VGs were reported, not only in photosensitive, but also in non-photosensitive children and adolescents with epilepsy. We provide an overview of the literature with overall conclusions and recommendations regarding VG playing. Specific preventive measures concerning the physical characteristics of images included in commercially available VGs (flash rate, choice of colors, patterns, and contrast) can lead in the future to a clear decrease of this problem. In addition to the positive effect of such measures, the collaborative studies performed in France and in the rest of Europe have stressed the importance of a safe distance to the screen of > or = 2 m, and the less provocative role of 100-Hz screens.

  18. Imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Raju; Sarma, Dipanka

    2000-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common problem in the paediatric age group. Imaging plays a vital role in identifying the seizure focus. Cross-sectional imaging modalities like CT and MRI have had a major impact on the management of seizure disorders. MRI, because of its high contrast resolution and multiplanar capability is the ideal imaging modality but its use is restricted due to high cost. Computed tomography is cheaper and is the first, and often, the only modality used, especially in the under privileged areas of the world. In the tropical countries inflammatory granuloma are a common cause of epilepsy and CT is adequate to detect these lesions. Other causes include congenital abnormalities, neoplastic and vascular causes. (author)

  19. [Epilepsy and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmis, J; Drazancić, A; Tkalcević, T; Ivanisević, M

    1991-01-01

    A total of 132 women with epilepsy were confined in the period from 1978-1989. Their pregnancies and outcomes were analysed. The special aim was to find out if the anticonvulsive therapy has any correlation with the occurrence of fetal malformations in the studied group of women. In 43.9% of pregnant women with epilepsy, methyl-phenobarbitone as an anticonvulsive drug was administered, while carbamazepine was applied in 13.6% cases. A combination of phenytoin and phenobarbitone was prescribed in 18.9% of cases. Primidone was the drug of choice in 8% cases and 5.3% of patients were treated with various combinations of anticonvulsive drugs. Hyperemesis, threatened spontaneous abortion and premature labor complicated significantly more pregnancies in patients with epilepsy than on controls. Pregnancies from the studied group were terminated by the cesarean section in significantly more cases (11.2%) than in the control group (5.4%). Newborns from mothers with epilepsy had a statistically lower birthweight (3173 +/- 575 g) than those born from healthy mothers (3376 +/- 510g). Fifteen newborns or 11.2% were born with congenital malformations, while among the control group of newborns only two were malformed. It is noticed that the newborns from mothers treated with phenitoin and phenobarbitone had dysmorphic anomalies of the face more frequently. The drugs mentioned above interfere with the metabolism of K vitamin and as a result of this interreaction, mothers and newborns can suffer from coagulation disorders. In conclusion it is important to mention that no anticonvulsant drug seems to be absolutely safe when used during pregnancy since each of them has a teratogenic effect on the fetus.

  20. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  1. Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy includes surgery, vagal nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet, and other alternative/complementary therapies, e.g., yoga, Ayurveda, electroencephalography (EEG biofeedback technique, aerobic exercise, music therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, acupuncture, and herbal remedies (traditional Chinese medicine. Alternative therapies, despite the term, should not be considered as an alternative to antiepileptic medication; they complement accepted drug treatment. Alternative therapies like yoga, through techniques that relax the body and mind, reduce stress, improve seizure control, and also improve quality of life. Ketogenic diet is a safe and effective treatment for intractable epilepsies; it has been recommended since 1921. The diet induces ketosis, which may control seizures. The most successful treatment of epilepsy is with modern antiepileptic drugs, which can achieve control of seizures in 70-80% cases. Patients opt for alternative therapies because they may be dissatisfied with antiepileptic drugs due to their unpleasant side effects, the long duration of treatment, failure to achieve control of seizures, cultural beliefs and, in the case of women, because they wish to get pregnant Surgical treatment may lead to physical and psychological sequelae and is an option only for a minority of patients. This article presents supportive evidence from randomized controlled trials done to assess the benefit of non-pharmacological treatment.

  2. Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Kossoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  3. Progressive myoclonic epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelucci, Roberto; Canafoglia, Laura; Striano, Pasquale; Gambardella, Antonio; Magaudda, Adriana; Tinuper, Paolo; La Neve, Angela; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Visani, Elisa; Panzica, Ferruccio; Avanzini, Giuliano; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Bianchi, Amedeo; Zara, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To define the clinical spectrum and etiology of progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) in Italy using a database developed by the Genetics Commission of the Italian League against Epilepsy. Methods: We collected clinical and laboratory data from patients referred to 25 Italian epilepsy centers regardless of whether a positive causative factor was identified. PMEs of undetermined origins were grouped using 2-step cluster analysis. Results: We collected clinical data from 204 patients, including 77 with a diagnosis of Unverricht-Lundborg disease and 37 with a diagnosis of Lafora body disease; 31 patients had PMEs due to rarer genetic causes, mainly neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. Two more patients had celiac disease. Despite extensive investigation, we found no definitive etiology for 57 patients. Cluster analysis indicated that these patients could be grouped into 2 clusters defined by age at disease onset, age at myoclonus onset, previous psychomotor delay, seizure characteristics, photosensitivity, associated signs other than those included in the cardinal definition of PM