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Sample records for human finger joints

  1. Noninvasively measuring oxygen saturation of human finger-joint vessels by multi-transducer functional photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zijian; Li, Changhui

    2016-06-01

    Imaging small blood vessels and measuring their functional information in finger joint are still challenges for clinical imaging modalities. In this study, we developed a multi-transducer functional photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and successfully imaged human finger-joint vessels from ˜1 mm to anatomical and functional information of individual finger-joint vessels with different sizes, which might help the study of finger-joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Soft finger-joint mechanism for human-care service robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Shinya

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a soft finger-joint mechanism that gives a robot mult-directional passive compliance and the ability of the estimation of external torque. In this joint, we utilize silicone gum cushions as elestic elements to transmit motion from an actuator to an output link. The cusion contributes to both the generation of passive compliant motion for external torque and the estimation of the external torque. Based on the proposed mechanism, we developed the metacarpal-phalangeal joint (MP joint) of the finger of a robot for human-care services. In addition, it is confirmed in several experiments that the proposed mechanism exhibits the expected characteristics.

  3. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubin; Wang, Yating

    2016-01-01

    We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT) system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases. PMID:27774453

  4. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases.

  5. Double dislocation of finger interphalangeal joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Saqib Aziz; Mestha, Prabhakar; McNally, Scarlett

    2012-10-22

    A 62-year-old, right-hand-dominant man who had dementia and lived in an Elderly Mentally Infirm (EMI) nursing home was admitted through Accident & Emergency (A&E) department following unwitnessed injury to the left little finger. His examination revealed a swollen and deformed left little finger with a laceration along the middle crease on the volar aspect and head of proximal phalanx visible through this. Distally sensations and capillary refill was normal. X-rays showed a double dislocation of both proximal and distal interphalangeal joints. The finger was reduced under ring block and the laceration was washed with saline in A&E. The patient was taken to the operation theatre next morning for wound exploration and wash-out±stabilistion of the finger under general anaesthesia. The wound was thoroughly washed out and closed with 4/0 interrupted nylon. The finger was immobilised with neighbour strapping and bandaged in flexion.

  6. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artificial joint Damage to vessels, nerves or other structures in the region of the surgery Alternatives Some alternate procedures for treating arthritis include: Joint injections Oral medications such as aspirin or anti-inflammatory medicines Hand therapy exercises and ...

  7. Analysis of Coordinated Motions of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Interphalangeal Joint Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyse the coordinated motions of humanoid robot fingers using an interphalangeal joint coordination. For this purpose, four humanoid robot fingers with different sizes have been considered. A biomimetic interphalangeal joint coordination (IJC formulation based on the grasp configuration of human fingers has been presented for humanoid robot fingers. The usefulness of the specified IJC formulation for human-like finger motion has been verified through comparative demonstrations. As a result, a proper coordination of humanoid robot fingertips can be achieved by applying our IJC formulation. Also the IJC formulation can be used to design of humanoid robot fingers.

  8. Finger-jointed beams in bending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lotte; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1997-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamic and static fatique of finger-jointed beams in bending was carried out. Results were obtained for five different frequencies from static loading to a load cycle period of two minutes. A total of seven series were long-term tested and five series were short-term tested...

  9. [Periarthritis calcarea of the finger joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, M; Goth, D

    1989-11-01

    Calcium deposits close to finger joints are seen very often and are common in systemic diseases. There are also calcium deposits with no relation to other symptoms and therefore diagnosis is difficult. Between 1984-1988 we have analysed twelve such cases and explained the differential diagnosis and therapy. It seems important that these cases with typical clinical and radiologic findings are self-limiting and restitutio ad integrum is common without any therapy.

  10. Experimental and failure analysis of the prosthetic finger joint implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Sanjiv H.

    Small joint replacement arthroplasty of the hand is a well accepted surgical procedure to restore function and cosmesis in an individual with a crippled hand. Silicone elastomers have been used as prosthetic material in various small hand joints for well over three decades. Although the clinical science aspects of silicone elastomer failure are well known, the physical science aspects of prosthetic failure are scant and vague. In the following thesis, using both an animal model, and actual retrieved specimens which have failed in human service, experimental and failure analysis of silicone finger joints are presented. Fractured surfaces of retrieved silicone trapezial implants, and silicone finger joint implants were studied with both FESEM and SEM; the mode of failure for silicone trapezium is by wear polishing, whereas the finger joint implants failed either by fatigue fracture or tearing of the elastomer, or a combination of both. Thermal analysis revealed that the retrieved elastomer implants maintained its viscoelastic properties throughout the service period. In order to provide for a more functional and physiologic arthroplasty a novel finger joint (Rolamite prosthesis) is proposed using more recently developed thermoplastic polymers. The following thesis also addresses the outcome of the experimental studies of the Rolamite prosthesis in a rabbit animal model, in addition to the failure analysis of the thermoplastic polymers while in service in an in vivo synovial environment. Results of retrieved Rolamite specimens suggest that the use for thermoplastic elastomers such as block copolymer based elastomers in a synovial environment such as a mammalian joint may very well be limited.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended... generic type of device includes prostheses that consist of a single flexible across-the-joint...

  12. Effect of Finger Joint on Flexural Strength of Teak Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharatesh A. Danawade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the flexural properties of rectangular Burma teak wood beam without finger joint and with finger joint. Finger joints enable full utilization of wood. Finger jointing technique is also used to eliminate wood defects which weaken the strength of wood. This paper considers finger joint as defined defect and its effect on the flexural strength is determined. Teakwood is hard and heavy, seasons rapidly and has good durability. The specimens were studied under three point bending test. Both edge wise and flat wise tests were carried out. It is observed that Burma teakwood beam without finger joint is stronger than beams with finger joints. Because of finger jointing the flexural strength reduces. It can be concluded that the strength loss can improved upon by selecting suitable geometry of finger joint and a suitable adhesive. It is recognized that further studies are necessary on jointing techniques of wood and type of adhesive so as to equal the flexural strength properties of clear teak wood beams.

  13. The design and development of a finger joint simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Artificial finger joints lack the long-term clinical success seen with hip and knee prostheses. In part, this can be explained by the challenges of rheumatoid arthritis, a progressive disease which attacks surrounding tissues as well as the joint itself. Therefore, the natural finger joints' biomechanics are adversely affected, and consequently, this imbalance due to subluxing forces further challenges any prosthesis. Many different designs of finger prosthesis have been offered over a period of greater than 50 years. Most of these designs have failed, and it is likely that many of these failures could have been identified had the prostheses been appropriately tested prior to implantation into patients. While finger joint simulators have been designed, arguably only those from a single centre have been able to reproduce clinical-type failures of the finger prostheses tested in them. This article describes the design and development of a finger simulator at Durham University, UK. It explains and justifies the engineering decisions made and thus the evolution of the finger simulator. In vitro results and their linkage to clinical-type failures are outlined to help to show the effectiveness of the simulator. Failures of finger implants in vivo continue to occur, and the need for appropriate in vitro testing of finger prostheses remains strong.

  14. Radiosynoviorthesis in osteoarthritis of finger joints; Radiosynoviorthese bei aktivierter Fingerpolyarthrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moedder, G. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, Koeln (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    This is an overview about osteoarthritis of the finger joints. The scientific publications according to the therapy of this disease by means of radiosynoviorthesis are presented, comparing the results in rheumatoid arthritis. Additionally own experience and results are reported. (orig.)

  15. Sagittal laser optical tomography for imaging of rheumatoid finger joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hielscher, Andreas H [Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Klose, Alexander D [Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Scheel, Alexander K [Department of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Georg-August University, Goettingen (Germany); Moa-Anderson, Bryte [Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Backhaus, Marina [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Netz, Uwe [Institute for Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Beuthan, Juergen [Institute for Medical Physics and Laser Medicine, Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-04-07

    We present a novel optical tomographic imaging system that was designed to determine two-dimensional spatial distribution of optical properties in a sagittal plane through finger joints. The system incorporates a single laser diode and a single silicon photodetector into a scanning device that records spatially resolved light intensities as they are transmitted through a finger. These data are input to a model-based iterative image reconstruction (MOBIIR) scheme, which uses the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) as a forward model for light propagation through tissue. We have used this system to obtain tomographic images of six proximal interphalangeal finger joints from two patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The optical images were compared to clinical symptoms and ultrasound images.

  16. Synovial chondromatosis of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the ring finger

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcelik, Ismail Bulent; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Mersa, Berkan; Pilanci, Ozgur

    2010-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, characterized by multinodular cartilagineous proliferation of the joint synovium. There are only a few case reports of synovial chondromatosis involving the hand in the literature. A case of synovial chondromatosis of the ring finger is reported in this paper.

  17. Synovial chondromatosis of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the ring finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Ismail Bülent; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Mersa, Berkan; Pilancı, Ozgür

    2010-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, characterized by multinodular cartilagineous proliferation of the joint synovium. There are only a few case reports of synovial chondromatosis involving the hand in the literature. A case of synovial chondromatosis of the ring finger is reported in this paper.

  18. Heat Resistance of Glued Finger Joints in Spruce Wood Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sviták

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The heat resistance of glued spruce wood was evaluated for different joint types and adhesives. Bending strength, modulus of elasticity, and also fracture evaluation were investigated on glued spruce samples made by the finger-jointed principle. Finger-jointed samples were glued with polyurethane (PUR and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF adhesives. Heat loading was realized at temperatures 60, 80, and 110 °C and compared with wood with 20 °C. A static bending test with four-point flexural test was used. Elevated temperature and adhesive type had an important influence on the bending strength. On the other hand, adhesive type had a significant influence on the modulus of elasticity, but elevated temperature had no substantial influence.

  19. Automatic finger joint synovitis localization in ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurzynska, Karolina; Smolka, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    A long-lasting inflammation of joints results between others in many arthritis diseases. When not cured, it may influence other organs and general patients' health. Therefore, early detection and running proper medical treatment are of big value. The patients' organs are scanned with high frequency acoustic waves, which enable visualization of interior body structures through an ultrasound sonography (USG) image. However, the procedure is standardized, different projections result in a variety of possible data, which should be analyzed in short period of time by a physician, who is using medical atlases as a guidance. This work introduces an efficient framework based on statistical approach to the finger joint USG image, which enables automatic localization of skin and bone regions, which are then used for localization of the finger joint synovitis area. The processing pipeline realizes the task in real-time and proves high accuracy when compared to annotation prepared by the expert.

  20. Finger somatotopy in human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisteiner, R; Windischberger, C; Lanzenberger, R; Edward, V; Cunnington, R; Erdler, M; Gartus, A; Streibl, B; Moser, E; Deecke, L

    2001-06-01

    Although qualitative reports about somatotopic representation of fingers in the human motor cortex exist, up to now no study could provide clear statistical evidence. The goal of the present study was to reinvestigate finger motor somatotopy by means of a thorough investigation of standardized movements of the index and little finger of the right hand. Using high resolution fMRI at 3 Tesla, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses in a group of 26 subjects were repeatedly measured to achieve reliable statistical results. The center of mass of all activated voxels within the primary motor cortex was calculated for each finger and each run. Results of all runs were averaged to yield an individual index and little finger representation for each subject. The mean center of mass localizations for all subjects were then submitted to a paired t test. Results show a highly significant though small scale somatotopy of fingerspecific activation patterns in the order indicated by Penfields motor homunculus. In addition, considerable overlap of finger specific BOLD responses was found. Comparing various methods of analysis, the mean center of mass distance for the two fingers was 2--3 mm with overlapping voxels included and 4--5 mm with overlapping voxels excluded. Our data may be best understood in the context of the work of Schieber (1999) who recently described overlapping somatotopic gradients in lesion studies with humans. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. A cortically-inspired model for inverse kinematics computation of a humanoid finger with mechanically coupled joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Rodolphe J; Oh, Hyuk; Kregling, Alissa V; Reggia, James A

    2016-05-19

    The human hand's versatility allows for robust and flexible grasping. To obtain such efficiency, many robotic hands include human biomechanical features such as fingers having their two last joints mechanically coupled. Although such coupling enables human-like grasping, controlling the inverse kinematics of such mechanical systems is challenging. Here we propose a cortical model for fine motor control of a humanoid finger, having its two last joints coupled, that learns the inverse kinematics of the effector. This neural model functionally mimics the population vector coding as well as sensorimotor prediction processes of the brain's motor/premotor and parietal regions, respectively. After learning, this neural architecture could both overtly (actual execution) and covertly (mental execution or motor imagery) perform accurate, robust and flexible finger movements while reproducing the main human finger kinematic states. This work contributes to developing neuro-mimetic controllers for dexterous humanoid robotic/prosthetic upper-extremities, and has the potential to promote human-robot interactions.

  2. Three-dimensional finger joint angles by hand posture and object properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Sun; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify three-dimensional finger joint angles for various hand postures and object properties. Finger joint angles were measured using a VICON system for 10 participants while they pinched objects with two, three, four and five fingers and grasped them with five fingers. The objects were cylinders and square pillars with diameters of 2, 4, 6 and 8 cm and weights of 400, 800, 1400 and 1800 g. Hand posture and object size more significantly affected the joint flexion angles than did object shape and weight. Object shape affected only the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint angle of the index finger and the flexion angle of the MCP joint of the little finger. Larger flexion angles resulted when the hand posture was grasping with five fingers. The joint angle increased linearly as the object size decreased. This report provides fundamental information about the specific joint angles of the thumb and fingers. Practitioner Summary: Three-dimensional finger joint angles are of special interest in ergonomics because of their importance in handheld devices and musculoskeletal hand disorders. In this study, the finger joint angles corresponding to various hand postures and objects with different properties were determined.

  3. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  4. Failures of the RM finger prosthesis joint replacement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, A; Lakshmipathy, R; Irwin, L R

    2011-09-01

    In our unit a high failure rate of the RM finger prosthesis joint replacement system was noted, prompting a review of cases. A series of patients underwent implantation under the care of one surgeon and the results were monitored. Twenty-one devices were implanted of which 16 were inserted for rheumatoid disease. Patients were reviewed regularly and the implant performance was assessed critically along with survival of the implant to revision, infection or death of the patient. The mean follow-up was 32 months. Unacceptable failure rates at early and medium term stages were identified, with 15 of the implants revised by 2 years. Loosening was the commonest mode of failure. The authors do not recommend the use of this implant, especially in cases of rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Divergent dislocation of the ring and little finger carpometacarpal joints--a rare injury pattern.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, John

    2012-02-03

    Hand injuries due to longitudinal forces in the line of the metacarpals demonstrate unusual dislocation patterns. We describe a case of volar intra-articular fracture dislocation of the ring finger carpometacarpal joint in association with a pure dorsal dislocation of the little finger carpometacarpal joint. Open reduction supplemented with Kirschner wire fixation restored normal carpometacarpal joint anatomical relations and achieved an excellent clinical result.

  6. Resection of the flexor digitorum superficialis for trigger finger with proximal interphalangeal joint positional contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Yann; Kinnen, Louis

    2012-11-01

    Open release of the A1 pulley is a widely known procedure for the treatment of trigger finger. A subset of patients presents with both trigger finger and a positional contracture of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint. These patients usually have a long history of trigger finger or have already undergone a surgical release of the annular pulley. This study is a retrospective review of the outcomes of resection of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) for patients whose trigger finger was associated with a positional contracture of the PIP joint. Thirty-six patients (39 fingers) were treated by resection of the FDS after section of the A1 pulley. The mean age of the patients was 63 years (range, 45-90 y). Seven patients (19 %) had previously undergone an open release of the A1 pulley and had developed a positional contracture of the PIP joint 2 to 5 months afterward. We performed a retrospective review with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12-60 mo). No patient was lost to follow-up. The active range of motion was recorded at the PIP joint before and after surgery. The mean preoperative positional contracture of the PIP joint was 24° (range, 15°-30°). The mean postoperative positional contracture of the PIP joint was 4° (range, 0°-10°). The most commonly affected digit was the middle finger (26 fingers, 67%). In 28 fingers (72%), full extension was achieved following only the surgical procedure. The remaining 11 fingers (28%) had a postoperative residual positional contracture (range, 5°-10°). However, all fingers achieved a full range of motion after physical therapy and an injection of betamethasone. All of the resected tendons had histological damage. This technique is a useful treatment for selected patients whose trigger finger is associated with a positional contracture. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Narender P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In virtual reality (VR systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG together with the actual joint angle measurements were obtained while the subject was performing flexion-extension rotation of the index finger at three speeds. Several neural networks were trained to predict the joint angle from the parameters extracted from the SEMG signals. The best networks were selected to form six committees. The neural network committees were evaluated using data from new subjects. Results There was hysteresis in the measured SMEG signals during the flexion-extension cycle. However, neural network committees were able to predict the joint angle with reasonable accuracy. RMS errors ranged from 0.085 ± 0.036 for fast speed finger-extension to 0.147 ± 0.026 for slow speed finger extension, and from 0.098 ± 0.023 for the fast speed finger flexion to 0.163 ± 0.054 for slow speed finger flexion. Conclusion Although hysteresis was observed in the measured SEMG signals, the committees of neural networks were able to predict the finger joint angle from SEMG signals.

  8. Differences in Activation Area Within Brodmann Area 2 Caused by Pressure Stimuli on Fingers and Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Baek, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jung-Chul; Park, Sung-Jun; Jeong, Ul-Ho; Gim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sung-Phil; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, a constant pressure stimulus was applied on the 3 joints (first [p1], second [p2], and third [p3] joints) of 4 fingers (index, middle, ring, and little fingers), and the activation areas within Brodmann area 2 (BA 2) were compared for these different fingers and joints by using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight healthy male college students (25.4 ± 1.32 years) participated in the study. Each session was composed of 3 blocks, and each block was composed of a Control phase (30 seconds) and a Pressure phase (30 seconds). No pressure stimulus was applied in the Control phase, during which the subjects would simply lay comfortably with their eyes closed. In the Pressure phase, a pressure stimulus was applied onto one of the joints of the selected finger. For each finger and joint, BA 2 areas activated by the pressure stimulus were extracted by the region of interest method. There was a significant difference in the activation areas for the different fingers (P = .042) as well as for the different joints (P = .050). The activation area decreased in the order of the little, index, and middle fingers, as well as in the order of p1, p3, and p2. PMID:26402840

  9. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3210 Section 888.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal (finger)...

  10. Segregation of Eucalyptus Lumbers for Finger-jointed Using Longitudinal Vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The variation in lumber quality within the supply of eucalypt is large. Effective segregation of the lumber according to "fitness for purpose " is fundamental to enabling the capture of greater value for the finger-jointed. This paper deals with the longitudinal vibration technique as a means of assessing modulus of elasticity (MOE) of solid and finger-jointed specimens made with Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla and E. grandis. Dynamic MOE was calculated from resonance frequencies obtained from longitudina...

  11. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in

  12. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in wat

  13. Modeling of Human Joint Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Radial Lateral " epicondyle Olecranon Radius Ulna Figure 3. Lateral aspect of the right elbow joint. -17- Annular Ligament This strong band encircles... elbow joint, knee joint, human joints, shoulder joint, ankle joint, joint models, hip joint, ligaments. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If...ligaments. -A rather extended discussion of the articulations and anatomical descriptions of the elbow , shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints are

  14. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy Narender P; Shrirao Nikhil A; Kosuri Durga R

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In virtual reality (VR) systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG togeth...

  15. Quantification of finger joint loadings using musculoskeletal modelling clarifies mechanical risk factors of hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Bendahan, David; Berton, Eric

    2014-02-01

    Owing to limited quantitative data related to the loadings (forces and pressures) acting upon finger joints, several clinical observations regarding mechanical risk factors of hand osteoarthritis remain misunderstood. To improve the knowledge of this pathology, the present study used musculoskeletal modelling to quantify the forces and pressures acting upon hand joints during two grasping tasks. Kinematic and grip force data were recorded during both a pinch and a power grip tasks. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted to quantify joint contact areas. Using these datasets as input, a musculoskeletal model of the hand and wrist, including twenty-three degrees of freedom and forty-two muscles, has been developed to estimate joint forces and joint pressures. When compared with the power grip task, the pinch grip task resulted in two to eight times higher joint loadings whereas the grip forces exerted on each finger were twice lower. For both tasks, joint forces and pressures increased along a disto-proximal direction for each finger. The quantitative dataset provided by the present hand model clarified two clinical observations about osteoarthritis development which were not fully understood, i.e., the strong risk associated to pinch grip tasks and the high frequency of thumb-base osteoarthritis.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3220 Section 888.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3200 Section 888.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal...

  18. Finger joint motion generated by individual extrinsic muscles: A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zong-Ming

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of finger functionality associated with the specific muscle is mostly based on the functional anatomy, and the exact motion effect associated with an individual muscle is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine phalangeal joints motion of the index finger generated by each extrinsic muscle. Methods Ten (6 female and 4 male fresh-frozen cadaveric hands (age 55.2 ± 5.6 years were minimally dissected to establish baseball sutures at the musculotendinous junctions of the index finger extrinsic muscles. Each tendon was loaded to 10% of its force potential and the motion generated at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP, proximal interphalangeal (PIP, and distal interphalangeal (DIP joints was simultaneously recorded using a marker-based motion capture system. Results The flexor digitorum profundus (FDP generated average flexion of 19.7, 41.8, and 29.4 degrees at the MCP, PIP, and DIP joints, respectively. The flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS generated average flexion of 24.8 and 47.9 degrees at the MCP and PIP joints, respectively, and no motion at the DIP joints. The extensor digitorum communis (EDC and extensor indicis proprius (EIP generated average extension of 18.3, 15.2, 4.0 degrees and 15.4, 13.2, 3.7 degrees at the MCP, PIP and DIP joints, respectively. The FDP generated simultaneous motion at the PIP and DIP joints. However, the motion generated by the FDP and FDS, at the MCP joint lagged the motion generated at the PIP joint. The EDC and EIP generated simultaneous motion at the MCP and PIP joints. Conclusion The results of this study provide novel insights into the kinematic role of individual extrinsic muscles.

  19. Biomechanical Analysis of Force Distribution in Human Finger Extensor Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx’s dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the “Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy” is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo.

  20. Effect of object width on muscle and joint forces during thumb-index finger grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Domalain, Mathieu; Berton, Eric

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the impact of modifying the object width on muscle and joint forces while gripping objects. The experimental protocol consisted to maintain horizontally five objects of different widths (3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5 cm) with a thumb-index finger grip. Subjects were required to grasp spontaneously the object without any instruction regarding the grip force (GF) to apply. A biomechanical model of thumb-index finger pinch was developed to estimate muscle and joint forces. This model included electromyography, fingertip force, and kinematics data as inputs. The finger joint postures and the GF varied across the object widths. The estimated muscle forces also varied significantly according to the object width. Interestingly, we observed that the muscle force/GF ratios of major flexor muscles remain particularly stable with respect to the width whereas other muscle ratios differed largely. This may argue for a control strategy in which the actions of flexors were preserved in spite of change in joint postures. The estimated joint forces tended to increase with object width and increased in the distal-proximal sense. Overall, these results are of importance for the ergonomic design of handheld objects and for clinical applications.

  1. Computer-aided classification of rheumatoid arthritis in finger joints using frequency domain optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, C. D.; Kim, H. K.; Netz, U.; Blaschke, S.; Zwaka, P. A.; Mueller, G. A.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2009-02-01

    Novel methods that can help in the diagnosis and monitoring of joint disease are essential for efficient use of novel arthritis therapies that are currently emerging. Building on previous studies that involved continuous wave imaging systems we present here first clinical data obtained with a new frequency-domain imaging system. Three-dimensional tomographic data sets of absorption and scattering coefficients were generated for 107 fingers. The data were analyzed using ANOVA, MANOVA, Discriminant Analysis DA, and a machine-learning algorithm that is based on self-organizing mapping (SOM) for clustering data in 2-dimensional parameter spaces. Overall we found that the SOM algorithm outperforms the more traditional analysis methods in terms of correctly classifying finger joints. Using SOM, healthy and affected joints can now be separated with a sensitivity of 0.97 and specificity of 0.91. Furthermore, preliminary results suggest that if a combination of multiple image properties is used, statistical significant differences can be found between RA-affected finger joints that show different clinical features (e.g. effusion, synovitis or erosion).

  2. Tomographic x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical imaging of osteoarthritis in the finger joints: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huizhu; Zhang, Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the typical optical findings that can be used to characterize osteoarthritis, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controllers were examined clinically and scanned by a novel hybrid imaging system. The hybrid imaging platform integrated a C-arm based x-ray tomosynthetic system with a multi-channel optic-fiber based diffuse optical imaging system. Optical images were recovered qualitatively and quantitatively based on a regularization-based reconstruction algorithm that can incorporate the fine structural maps obtained from x-ray as a priori spatial information into diffuse optical tomography reconstruction procedures. Our findings suggest statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. X-ray guided diffuse optical imaging may not only detect radiologic features supporting the development of an inflammatory disorder but may also help discriminate specific optical features that differ between osteoarthritic and healthy joints. These quantitative optical features are also potentially important for a better understanding of inflammatory arthritis in humans.

  3. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  4. A Finger Amputation Case Caused by Human Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Hakan Doğan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bite is a type of wound created with animal or human teeth. Bite wounds created by humans are encountered in situations as fighting, rape, murder and child abuse. Bite marks are usually observed on arms, neck, breasts, body, cheeks and legs. The teeth may penetrate to skin on the areas where bone or cartilage tissue lies underneath skin, and tissue loss may occur. Auricles are most frequent regions that occur tissue loss with bites. Finger amputation occurring with human bite is extremely rare. The case presented in this paper is a 28 years old man. In his medical history, the 3rd finger of his left hand was bitten during a fight two months ago. One centimeter shortness at the end point of the distal phalanx of the left 3rd finger because of tissue loss was found in the examination. In his left hand radiograph, bone defect at the middle part of the distal phalanx of 3rd finger was determined. The case has been discussed by comparing similar cases rarely reported in the literature. Keywords: Forensic medicine, human bite, amputation

  5. Ultrasound of the fingers for human identification using biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Fowlkes, J Brian; Kripfgans, Oliver D; Jacobson, Jon A; De Maeseneer, Michel; Schmitt, Rainer M; Carson, Paul L

    2008-03-01

    It was hypothesized that the use of internal finger structure as imaged using commercially available ultrasound (US) scanners could act as a supplement to standard methods of biometric identification, as well as a means of assessing physiological and cardiovascular status. Anatomical structures in the finger including bone contour, tendon and features along the interphalangeal joint were investigated as potential biometric identifiers. Thirty-six pairs of three-dimensional (3D) gray-scale images of second to fourth finger (index, middle and ring) data taken from 20 individuals were spatially registered using MIAMI-Fuse software developed at our institution and also visually matched by four readers. The image-based registration met the criteria for matching successfully in 14 out of 15 image pairs on the same individual and did not meet criteria for matching in any of the 12 image pairs from different subjects, providing a sensitivity and specificity of 0.93 and 1.00, respectively. Visual matching of all image pairs by four readers yielded 96% successful match. Power Doppler imaging was performed to calculate the change in color pixel density due to physical exercise as a surrogate of stress level and to provide basic physiological information. (E-mail: gnarayan@umich.edu).

  6. Finger joint synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: quantitative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Lorenzen, I

    1999-01-01

    -quantitative score for hypertrophic synovial membrane. PATIENTS AND METHODS: MCP joints of the dominant hand of 37 patients and five controls were examined clinically and by MRI. Laboratory assessments were performed. RESULTS: Median synovial membrane volumes were considerably larger in clinically active rheumatoid......OBJECTIVE: To assess quantitatively, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the synovial membrane volume in second to fifth metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls, and to compare the synovial membrane volumes with a more easily obtained semi...... with the synovial volumes (Spearman rho = 0.79; P rheumatoid factor and to laboratory markers of inflammation. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that synovial membrane volumes, as determined by MRI, in finger joints are related...

  7. Applied Joint-Space Torque and Stiffness Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Wampler, Charles W.; Hargrave, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Existing tendon-driven fingers have applied force control through independent tension controllers on each tendon, i.e. in the tendon-space. The coupled kinematics of the tendons, however, cause such controllers to exhibit a transient coupling in their response. This problem can be resolved by alternatively framing the controllers in the joint-space of the manipulator. This work presents a joint-space torque control law that demonstrates both a decoupled and significantly faster response than an equivalent tendon-space formulation. The law also demonstrates greater speed and robustness than comparable PI controllers. In addition, a tension distribution algorithm is presented here to allocate forces from the joints to the tendons. It allocates the tensions so that they satisfy both an upper and lower bound, and it does so without requiring linear programming or open-ended iterations. The control law and tension distribution algorithm are implemented on the robotic hand of Robonaut-2.

  8. Sonographic analyses of pulley and flexor tendon in idiopathic trigger finger with interphalangeal joint contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo; Takeda, Mitsuhiro

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the sonographic appearance of the pulley and flexor tendon in idiopathic trigger finger in correlation with the contracture of the interphalangeal (IP) joint in the thumb or proximal IP (PIP) joint in the other digits. Sonographic measurements using axial images were performed in 177 affected digits including 17 thumbs and 34 other digits judged to have IP or PIP joint contracture and 77 contralateral control digits. The A1 pulley of the contracture group was significantly thicker than that of the non-contracture group in all digits, whereas the flexor tendon was thicker only in digits other than the thumb. In the analysis using calculated cut-off values, A1 pulley thickening in the thumb and A1 pulley and flexor tendon thickening in the other digits showed statistically significant correlations with IP or PIP joint contracture. This study sonographically confirmed previous reports showing that enlargement of the flexor tendons contribute to the pathogenesis of PIP joint contracture. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wear of cross-linked polyethylene against itself: a material suitable for surface replacement of the finger joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibly, T F; Unsworth, A

    1991-05-01

    Cross-linking of polyethylene (XLPE) has dramatically improved its properties in industrial applications, and it may also have some application in the field of human joint replacement. Additionally it has the advantage of permitting a lower molecular weight base material to be used, so that components may be injection moulded rather than machined. This study therefore investigates the wear resistance of medical grade cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), cross-linked by a silane-grafting process, with a molecular weight between cross links of 5430 g mol(-1). This first report investigates the wear resistance of XLPE against itself, because for certain joints, such as the metacarpo-phalangeal joint, the material may have a high enough wear resistance to allow both bearing surfaces to be made from it. Tests were carried out both on a reciprocating pin and plate machine with pins loaded at 10 and 40 N and also on a new finger joint simulator, which simulates the loads applied to and the movements of, the metacarpo-phalangeal joint. An average wear rate of 1.8 x 10(-6) mm3 N-1 m-1 was found (range 0.9-2.75 x 10(-6) mm3 N-1 m-1). This is about six times greater than the wear rate of non-cross-linked ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against stainless steel, but for applications with low loading, such as the metacarpo-phalangeal joint, this material is shown to have adequate wear resistance. The coefficient of friction was 0.1, which is similar to that of UHMWPE on stainless steel.

  10. Computer-aided joint space analysis of the metacarpal-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal finger joint: normative age-related and gender-specific data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeil, Alexander; Boettcher, Joachim; Seidl, Bettina E.; Heyne, Jens-Peter; Petrovitch, Alexander; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Kaiser, Werner A. [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Eidner, Torsten; Wolf, Gunter; Hein, Gert [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Rheumatology and Osteology, Clinic of Internal Medicine III, Jena (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of the study was to provide reference data for computer-aided joint space analysis based on a semi-automated and computer-aided diagnostic system for the measurement of metacarpal-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal finger joint widths; additionally, the determination of sex differences and the investigation of changes in joint width with age were evaluated. Eighty hundred and sixty-nine patients (351 female and 518 male) received radiographs of the hand for trauma and were screened for a host of conditions known to affect the joint spaces. All participants underwent measurements of joint space distances at the metacarpal-phalangeal articulation (JSD-MCP) from the thumb to the small finger and at the proximal-interphalangeal articulation (JSD-PIP) from the index finger to the small finger using computer-aided diagnosis technology with semi-automated edge detection. The study revealed an annual narrowing of the JSD of 0.6% for the JSD-MCP and for the JSD-PIP. Furthermore, the data demonstrated a notable age-related decrease in JSD, including an accentuated age-related joint space narrowing in women for both articulations. Additionally, males showed a significantly wider JSD-MCP (+11.1%) and JSD-PIP (+15.4%) compared with the female cohort in all age groups. Our data presented gender-specific and age-related normative reference values for computer-aided joint space analysis of the JSD-MCP and JSD-PIP that could be used to identify disease-related joint space narrowing, particularly in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis commonly involving the peripheral small hand joints. (orig.)

  11. fMRI assessment of somatotopy in human Brodmann area 3b by electrical finger stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, R; Villringer, K; Mackert, B M; Schwiemann, J; Braun, J; Curio, G; Villringer, A; Wolf, K J

    1998-01-26

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is capable of detecting focal brain activation induced by electrical stimulation of single fingers in human subjects. In eight subjects somatotopic arrangement of the second and fifth finger was found in Brodmann area 3b of the primary somatosensory cortex. In four subjects the representation area of the second finger was located lateral and inferior to the fifth finger; in one subject the somatotopy was reversed. In three subjects representation areas of the two fingers in Brodmann area 3b were found overlapping. Additional activated areas were found on the crown of ipsilateral and contralateral postcentral gyrus (Brodmann areas 1 and 2) and posterior parietal cortex.

  12. X-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography: in vivo study of osteoarthritis in the finger joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by the damage of the articular cartilage, is the most common joint problem worldwide. In the effort of developing new clinical tools with the potential to alter the natural history of OA, near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has received much attention due to its unique advantages. For optical imaging in highly heterogeneous media such as the finger joints, prior information could improve the quality of optical imaging. We report a hybrid imaging system for early detection of OA in the finger joints by imposing the geometry information obtained by X-ray on three-dimensional near-infrared DOT. X-ray tomosynthesis was employed to recover the three-dimensional structure of the two bones based on 16 X-ray projections generated with a mini C-arm system at different directions within a range of 180 degrees. The interface was carefully designed to guarantee an accurate co-registration of the optical and x-ray modalities. The prior structural information of bones was incorporated into our multi-modality imaging reconstruction algorithm to enhance the recovery of the optical properties of joint tissues. Several healthy and OA finger joints were examined. The initial clinical results showed that this hybrid imaging system had the ability to provide much enhanced image resolution and contrast than DOT alone for OA detection.

  13. Comparative study on the effectiveness of corticosteroid injections between trigger fingers with and without proximal interphalangeal joint flexion contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, R; Sunagawa, T; Nakashima, Y; Kawanishi, Y; Masuda, T; Ochi, M

    2016-02-01

    Trigger fingers with proximal interphalangeal joint flexion contracture are suggested to have a poorer response to corticosteroid injection than those without contracture, though this has not been proven scientifically. We compared the clinical response to corticosteroid injection between trigger fingers with and without proximal interphalangeal joint contracture, and investigated the influence of the injection on the A1 pulley and flexor digitorum tendons using ultrasonography. One month after injection, pain was significantly reduced in the no contracture group, and 56% of trigger fingers with proximal interphalangeal joint contracture resolved. Before injection, relative thickening of the A1 pulley and flexor digitorum tendons, and a partial hypoechoic lesion of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were observed in the contracture group. One month after injection, the thickening of the tendons and the A1 pulley was reduced, but the partial hypoechoic lesion was still observed in significant numbers. We have demonstrated that the presence of a proximal interphalangeal joint contracture was associated with a reduced clinical response to corticosteroid injection, and we suggest that the pathologic change in the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon, represented by the partial hypoechoic lesion, contributed to corticosteroid injection resistance. IV. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Differences in Activation Area Within Brodmann Area 2 Caused by Pressure Stimuli on Fingers and Joints: In Case of Male Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Baek, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jung-Chul; Park, Sung-Jun; Jeong, Ul-Ho; Gim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sung-Phil; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a constant pressure stimulus was applied on the 3 joints (first [p1], second [p2], and third [p3] joints) of 4 fingers (index, middle, ring, and little fingers), and the activation areas within Brodmann area 2 (BA 2) were compared for these different fingers and joints by using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight healthy male college students (25.4 ± 1.32 years) participated in the study. Each session was composed of 3 blocks, and each block was composed of a Control phase (30 seconds) and a Pressure phase (30 seconds). No pressure stimulus was applied in the Control phase, during which the subjects would simply lay comfortably with their eyes closed. In the Pressure phase, a pressure stimulus was applied onto one of the joints of the selected finger. For each finger and joint, BA 2 areas activated by the pressure stimulus were extracted by the region of interest method. There was a significant difference in the activation areas for the different fingers (P = .042) as well as for the different joints (P = .050). The activation area decreased in the order of the little, index, and middle fingers, as well as in the order of p1, p3, and p2.

  15. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable tools to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger.

  16. Reference values for the nickel concentration in human finger nails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Peters, K; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    A reference value for the nickel concentration in finger nails from people who are not occupationally exposed to nickel was determined on the basis of nail samples from 95 healthy individuals. The mean +/- standard deviation was 1.19 +/- 1.61 mg/kg and the median was 0.49 mg/kg (range 0.042-7.50 mg...

  17. The prevalence of monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluid from wrist and finger joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galozzi, Paola; Oliviero, Francesca; Frallonardo, Paola; Favero, Marta; Hoxha, Ariela; Scanu, Anna; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in synovial fluids (SFs) aspirated from wrist and finger joints of patients with previously diagnosed joint diseases. We reviewed the results of SF analysis of 1593 samples and identified 126 patients with effusions in the small joints of the hands and wrists. We reported from patients' medical files data about sex, age, diagnosis, disease duration and the microscopic SF results. The prevalence of CPP crystals in SF was 85.71% in CPP-crystals arthritis (CPP-CA), 19.35% in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13.89% in osteoarthritis (OA) and 0% in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), gout and miscellanea. The prevalence of MSU crystals in SF was 83.3% in gout, 10% in PsA, 2.8% in OA and 0% in RA, SpA, miscellanea and CPP-CA. Consistent with previously reported data concerning the big joints, microcrystals can be frequently found also in the small joints of patients with previous diagnosis. The finding underlines the importance of analyzing SF from the hand and wrist joints in the attempt to identify comorbidities associated with the presence of crystals and to develop targeted treatment strategies.

  18. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly considered to determine the phalangeal length parameters. The usefulness of the devised biomimetic optimization method is shown through the design examples of various humanoid robot fingers. In fact, the optimization-based finger design method enables us to determine effectively the proper phalangeal size of humanoid robot fingers for human-like object handling tasks. In addition, we discuss its contribution to the structural configuration and coordinated motion of a humanoid robot finger, and address its practical availability in terms of effective finger design.

  19. Colour Doppler ultrasonography evaluation of vascularization in the wrist and finger joints in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carotti, M. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Salaffi, F., E-mail: fsalaff@tin.it [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy); Morbiducci, J. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Ciapetti, A., E-mail: ciapetti.a@libero.it [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy); Bartolucci, L. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Gasparini, S. [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy); Ferraccioli, G. [Division of Rheumatology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Giuseppetti, G.M. [Department of Radiology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy); Grassi, W. [Department of Rheumatology, Poliytechnic University of Marche, Ospedale A. Murri - Via dei Colli 52, 60035 Jesi, Ancona (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the presence of blood flow by colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS) in the wrist and finger joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthy subjects and to define a cut-off value of CDUS resistive index (RI). Methods: Forty-three patients with RA and 43 healthy controls were examined by CDUS. The wrists, second and third metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints were evaluated in each patient and healthy subject. Spectral Doppler analysis was performed in order to characterize the type of flow and a mean RI was measured to define a cut-off level. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the screening method's performance. Results: Flow was detected in 219 of the 430 total joints (50.9%) of RA patients (111 in the wrists, 49 in the MCP and 30 in the PIP joints). Healthy subjects had a quantifiable flow in 45 of the 430 joints (10.5%) and, in particular, 39 (86.4%) in the wrist, 5 (11.14%) in the MCP and 1 (2.2%) in the PIP joints. The intra- and inter-reader agreements for the detection of Doppler signal were very good (kappa 0.82 and 0.89, respectively). Mean RI values were 0.72 {+-} 0.06 in RA patients and 0.86 {+-} 0.06 in healthy subjects (p < 0.01). At cut-off point of RI < 0.79 the sensitivity was 89.6% and the specificity was 78.8% (positive likelihood ratio 4.22). Conclusion: DUS is a useful tool for the detection of abnormal blood flow in inflammatory joints of RA patients.

  20. Human finger-prick induced pluripotent stem cells facilitate the development of stem cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong-Kee; Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Ma, Dongrui; Yang, Binxia; Liu, Tong Ming; Lu, Jun; Wong, Chee-Wai; Tan, Tze-Kai; Li, Hu; Syn, Christopher; Tan, Eng-Lee; Lim, Bing; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Cook, Stuart A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2014-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients can be a good model for studying human diseases and for future therapeutic regenerative medicine. Current initiatives to establish human iPSC (hiPSC) banking face challenges in recruiting large numbers of donors with diverse diseased, genetic, and phenotypic representations. In this study, we describe the efficient derivation of transgene-free hiPSCs from human finger-prick blood. Finger-prick sample collection can be performed on a "do-it-yourself" basis by donors and sent to the hiPSC facility for reprogramming. We show that single-drop volumes of finger-prick samples are sufficient for performing cellular reprogramming, DNA sequencing, and blood serotyping in parallel. Our novel strategy has the potential to facilitate the development of large-scale hiPSC banking worldwide.

  1. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  2. Optical coherence elastography for human finger-pad skin deformation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuesong; Maiti, Raman; Boadi, Joseph; Li, Wei; Carré, Matt J.; Lewis, Roger; Franklin, Steven E.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    An optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with an A-scan rate of 20 kHz was developed for measuring the biomechanical properties of human finger-pad skin. Such an OCT system operates at a center wavelength of 890 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 150 nm resulting in a very good axial resolution of 2.6 μm. The measured sensitivity and sensitivity roll-off of the system were ~93 dB and ~6 dB mm-1, respectively. Elastographic B-scan images of the human finger-pad skin were constructed by using 1000 A-scans. Deformations of the human finger-pad before and after sliding, while pressed against a transparent optical glass plate under the action of 0.5-2 N force, were examined both at the surface and sub-surface. Biomechanical properties, i.e., deformation of the skin, finger-pad/glass interface contact area were studied.

  3. Engineered Zinc Finger Nuclease–Mediated Homologous Recombination of the Human Rhodopsin Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, David L.; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Methods. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Results. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. Conclusions. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. PMID:20671268

  4. PHD fingers in human diseases: Disorders arising from misinterpreting epigenetic marks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Lindsey A. [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Allis, C. David [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: alliscd@rockefeller.edu; Wang, Gang G. [Rockefeller University, Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, 1230 York Avenue, Box 78, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: gwang@rockefeller.edu

    2008-12-01

    Histone covalent modifications regulate many, if not all, DNA-templated processes, including gene expression and DNA damage response. The biological consequences of histone modifications are mediated partially by evolutionarily conserved 'reader/effector' modules that bind to histone marks in a modification- and context-specific fashion and subsequently enact chromatin changes or recruit other proteins to do so. Recently, the Plant Homeodomain (PHD) finger has emerged as a class of specialized 'reader' modules that, in some instances, recognize the methylation status of histone lysine residues, such as histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4). While mutations in catalytic enzymes that mediate the addition or removal of histone modifications (i.e., 'writers' and 'erasers') are already known to be involved in various human diseases, mutations in the modification-specific 'reader' proteins are only beginning to be recognized as contributing to human diseases. For instance, point mutations, deletions or chromosomal translocations that target PHD fingers encoded by many genes (such as recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2), Inhibitor of Growth (ING), nuclear receptor-binding SET domain-containing 1 (NSD1) and Alpha Thalassaemia and Mental Retardation Syndrome, X-linked (ATRX)) have been associated with a wide range of human pathologies including immunological disorders, cancers, and neurological diseases. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of PHD fingers as well as the diseases for which direct mutation or dysregulation of the PHD finger has been reported. We propose that misinterpretation of the epigenetic marks may serve as a general mechanism for human diseases of this category. Determining the regulatory roles of histone covalent modifications in the context of human disease will allow for a more thorough understanding of normal and pathological development, and may provide innovative therapeutic strategies

  5. End Sequencing and Finger Printing of Human & Mouse BAC Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, C

    2005-09-27

    This project provided for continued end sequencing of existing and new BAC libraries constructed to support human sequencing as well as to initiate BAC end sequencing from the mouse BAC libraries constructed to support mouse sequencing. The clones, the sequences, and the fingerprints are now an available resource for the community at large. Research and development of new metaodologies for BAC end sequencing have reduced costs and increase throughput.

  6. Biophysical properties of the human finger for touch comprehension: influences of ageing and gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaghloul, M.; Thieulin, C.; Vargiolu, R.; Pailler-Mattei, C. ; Zahouani, H.

    2017-01-01

    The human finger plays an extremely important role in tactile perception, but little is known about how age and gender affect its biophysical properties and their role in tactile perception. We combined studies on contact characteristics, mechanical properties and surface topography to understand age and gender effects on the human finger. The values obtained regarding contact characteristics (i.e. adhesive force) were significantly higher for women than for men. As for mechanical properties (i.e. Young's modulus E), a significant and positive correlation with age was observed and found to be higher for women. A positive correlation was observed between age and the arithmetic mean of surface roughness for men. However, an inverse age effect was highlighted for women. The age and gender effects obtained have never been reported previously in the literature. These results open new perspectives for understanding the weakening of tactile perception across ages and how it differs between men and women. PMID:28878982

  7. Design of splints based on the NiTi alloy for the correction of joint deformities in the fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puértolas Sergio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proximal interphalange joint (PIP is fundamental for the functional nature of the hand. The contracture in flexion of the PIP, secondary to traumatisms or illnesses leads to an important functional loss. The use of correcting splints is the common procedure for treating this problem. Its functioning is based on the application of a small load and a prolonged stress which can be dynamic, static progressive or static serial. It is important that the therapist has a splint available which can release a constant and sufficient force to correct the contracture in flexion. Nowadays NiTi is commonly used in bio-engineering, due to its superelastical characteristics. The experience of the authors in the design of other devices based on the NiTi alloy, makes it possible to carry out a new design in this work - the production of a finger splint for the treatment of the contracture in flexion of the PIP joint. Methods Commercial orthosis have been characterized using a universal INSTRON 5565 machine. A computational simulation of the proposed design has been conducted, reproducing its performance and using a model "ad hoc" for the NiTi material. Once the parameters have been adjusted, the design is validated using the same type of test as those carried out on commercial orthosis. Results and Discussion For commercial splint the recovering force falls to excessively low values as the angle increases. Angle curves for different lengths and thicknesses of the proposed design have been obtained, with a practically constant recovering force value over a wide range of angles that vary between 30° and 150° in every case. Then the whole treatment is possible with only one splint, and without the need of progressive replacements as the joint recovers. Conclusions A new model of splint based on NiTi alloy has been designed, simulated and tested comparing its behaviour with two of the most regularly used splints. Its uses is recommended

  8. Lifting techniques for finger marks on human skin previous enhancement by Swedish Black powder--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapecar, Matej

    2009-12-01

    An examination was done to investigate whether certain lifting techniques can lift recovered latent fingerprints on human skin surfaces of living subjects. For recovery Swedish Soot powder mixture (Swedish Black) was used. Donors intentionally placed fingerprints on the skin surface of living subjects. Finger marks were then in all cases recovered with Swedish Black powder. The procedure was repeated after 1 h and 4 h. Treated finger marks were secured and preserved as latent fingerprint evidence by different lifting processes. Having examined skin surfaces and finger marks we observed that the lifters such as white instant lifter, white fingerprint gelatin, black fingerprint gelatin, silicone, transparent adhesive tape, are suitable. Moreover, white fingerprint gelatin and white instant lifter proved to be very good at lifting treated finger marks. Black fingerprint gelatin was very good also, but finger marks were examined by slant light.

  9. Joint action: Neurocognitive mechanisms supporting human interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, H.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de; Cuijpers, R.H.; Newman-Norlund, R.D.; Schie, H.T. van; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Humans are experts in cooperating with each other when trying to accomplish tasks they cannot achieve alone. Recent studies of joint action have shown that when performing tasks together people strongly rely on the neurocognitive mechanisms that they also use when performing actions individually, th

  10. Glycoengineering of Human Cell Lines Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Gene Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography is a powerful technique for isolation of glycoproteins carrying a specific glycan structure of interest. However, the enormous diversity of glycans present on the cell surface, as well as on individual proteins, makes it difficult to isolate an entire glycoproteome...... with one or even a series of lectins. Here we present a technique to generate cell lines with homogenous truncated O-glycans using zinc finger nuclease gene targeting. Because of their simplified O-glycoproteome, the cells have been named SimpleCells. Glycoproteins from SimpleCells can be isolated...... in a single purification step by lectin chromatography performed on a long lectin column. This protocol describes Zinc finger nuclease gene targeting of human cells to simplify the glycoproteome, as well as lectin chromatography and isolation of glycopeptides from total cell lysates of SimpleCells....

  11. Transcripts from a novel human KRAB zinc finger gene contain spliced Alu and endogenous retroviral segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baban, S.; Freeman, J.D.; Mager, D.L. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    During the course of an investigation into the potential effects of endogenous retroviruses on adjacent gene expression, we isolated two cDNA clones containing a small sequence segment belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus family, HERV-H. Characterization of the clones revealed that they represent transcripts from a novel KRAB zinc finger gene termed ZNF177. The two cDNA clones differ at their 5{prime} termini and in the presence of a 559-bp internal exon. The clone containing this internal exon has six imperfect zinc finger motifs followed by seven perfect copies of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} type but has a frame shift between the KRAB domain and the downstream zinc finger region. The smaller clone lacks the six imperfect motifs and has an intact ORF. The 5{prime} putative untranslated regions of both cDNAs contain an 86-bp HERV-H env segment and a segment of an Alu repeat, both in the antisense orientation, that have been incorporated by splicing. RT-PCR experiments show evidence of alternative splicing but the majority of transcripts appear to contain the Alu and env segments. Genomic PCR and hybridization experiments suggest that a partial HERV-H element is integrated within the ZNF177 locus, which Southern analysis has shown to be a single-copy gene. Northern and RT-PCR analyses suggest that ZNF177 is transcribed at a low level in a variety of cell types. 41 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Harnessing Finger Millet to Combat Calcium Deficiency in Humans: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Puranik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans require more than 20 mineral elements for healthy body function. Calcium (Ca, one of the essential macromineral, is required in relatively large quantities in the diet for maintaining a sound overall health. Young children, pregnant and nursing women in marginalized and poorest regions of the world, are at highest risk of Ca malnutrition. Elderly population is another group of people most commonly affected by Ca deficiency mainly in the form of osteoporosis and osteopenia. Improved dietary intake of Ca may be the most cost-effective way to meet such deficiencies. Finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L. Gaertn.], a crop with inherently higher Ca content in its grain, is an excellent candidate for understanding genetic mechanisms associated with Ca accumulation in grain crops. Such knowledge will also contribute toward increasing Ca contents in other staple crops consumed on daily basis using plant-breeding (also known as biofortification methods. However, developing Ca-biofortified finger millet to reach nutritional acceptability faces various challenges. These include identifying and translating the high grain Ca content to an adequately bioavailable form so as to have a positive impact on Ca malnutrition. In this review, we assess some recent advancements and challenges for enrichment of its Ca value and present possible inter-disciplinary prospects for advancing the actual impact of Ca-biofortified finger millet.

  13. Decoding individual finger movements from one hand using human EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Liao

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI is an assistive technology, which decodes neurophysiological signals generated by the human brain and translates them into control signals to control external devices, e.g., wheelchairs. One problem challenging noninvasive BCI technologies is the limited control dimensions from decoding movements of, mainly, large body parts, e.g., upper and lower limbs. It has been reported that complicated dexterous functions, i.e., finger movements, can be decoded in electrocorticography (ECoG signals, while it remains unclear whether noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG signals also have sufficient information to decode the same type of movements. Phenomena of broadband power increase and low-frequency-band power decrease were observed in EEG in the present study, when EEG power spectra were decomposed by a principal component analysis (PCA. These movement-related spectral structures and their changes caused by finger movements in EEG are consistent with observations in previous ECoG study, as well as the results from ECoG data in the present study. The average decoding accuracy of 77.11% over all subjects was obtained in classifying each pair of fingers from one hand using movement-related spectral changes as features to be decoded using a support vector machine (SVM classifier. The average decoding accuracy in three epilepsy patients using ECoG data was 91.28% with the similarly obtained features and same classifier. Both decoding accuracies of EEG and ECoG are significantly higher than the empirical guessing level (51.26% in all subjects (p<0.05. The present study suggests the similar movement-related spectral changes in EEG as in ECoG, and demonstrates the feasibility of discriminating finger movements from one hand using EEG. These findings are promising to facilitate the development of BCIs with rich control signals using noninvasive technologies.

  14. Decoding individual finger movements from one hand using human EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ke; Xiao, Ran; Gonzalez, Jania; Ding, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is an assistive technology, which decodes neurophysiological signals generated by the human brain and translates them into control signals to control external devices, e.g., wheelchairs. One problem challenging noninvasive BCI technologies is the limited control dimensions from decoding movements of, mainly, large body parts, e.g., upper and lower limbs. It has been reported that complicated dexterous functions, i.e., finger movements, can be decoded in electrocorticography (ECoG) signals, while it remains unclear whether noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG) signals also have sufficient information to decode the same type of movements. Phenomena of broadband power increase and low-frequency-band power decrease were observed in EEG in the present study, when EEG power spectra were decomposed by a principal component analysis (PCA). These movement-related spectral structures and their changes caused by finger movements in EEG are consistent with observations in previous ECoG study, as well as the results from ECoG data in the present study. The average decoding accuracy of 77.11% over all subjects was obtained in classifying each pair of fingers from one hand using movement-related spectral changes as features to be decoded using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The average decoding accuracy in three epilepsy patients using ECoG data was 91.28% with the similarly obtained features and same classifier. Both decoding accuracies of EEG and ECoG are significantly higher than the empirical guessing level (51.26%) in all subjects (pmovement-related spectral changes in EEG as in ECoG, and demonstrates the feasibility of discriminating finger movements from one hand using EEG. These findings are promising to facilitate the development of BCIs with rich control signals using noninvasive technologies.

  15. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  16. Robotic Joints Support Horses and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A rehabilitative device first featured in Spinoff 2003 is not only helping human patients regain the ability to walk, but is now helping our four-legged friends as well. The late James Kerley, a prominent Goddard Space Flight Center researcher, developed cable-compliant mechanisms in the 1980s to enable sounding rocket assemblies and robots to grip or join objects. In cable-compliant joints (CCJs), short segments of cable connect structural elements, allowing for six directions of movement, twisting, alignment, and energy damping. Kerley later worked with Goddard s Wayne Eklund and Allen Crane to incorporate the cable-compliant mechanisms into a walker for human patients to support the pelvis and imitate hip joint movement.

  17. Zinc finger protein 278, a potential oncogene in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing Tian; Danfeng Sun; Yanjie Zhang; Shuliang Zhao; Hua Xiong; Jingyuan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 278 (ZNF278) is a novel Krueppel Cys2-His2-type zinc finger protein that is ubiquitously distributed in human tissues. Whether ZNF278 is related to the development of colorectal cancer is still unclear. The transcriptional level of ZNF278 was studied in colorectal cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ZNF278 expression was increased in 53% of colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The transcriptional down-regulation of ZNF278 was detected in only three (6%) human colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancer tissues. No significant difference was detected in 19 (41%) pairs of samples.However, we failed to find a significant association between the up-regulation of ZNF278 transcription and age, sex, the degree of infiltration, or the tumor size of colorectal cancer.To study the function of ZNF278 in colorectal carcinogenesis,the colon cancer cell line SW1116 was stably transfected with a wild-type ZNF278 plasmid to construct an overexpression system, and was transiently transfected with the small interfering RNA of ZNF278 to construct a ZNF278 knockdown system. Cell proliferation was assessed with 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide dye and a cell counter. The results show that ZNF278 promotes cell growth, and its knockdown suppresses cell proliferation. ZNF278 could be a potential proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer.

  18. Research on Human-Robot Joint System for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The lunar exploration in China is in progress. In order to reduce human workload and costs, and conduct researches more effectively and efficiently, human-robot joint systems are necessary for lunar exploration. The concept of human-robot joint system for lunar exploration is studied in this paper. The possible collaborative ways between human and robots and the collaborative activities which can be conducted for lunar exploration are discussed. Moreover, the preliminary configuration of a human-robot joint system is presented.

  19. Gaze and hand position effects on finger-movement-related human brain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Patrick; Sanes, Jerome N

    2009-02-01

    Humans commonly use their hands to move and to interact with their environment by processing visual and proprioceptive information to determine the location of a goal-object and the initial hand position. It remains elusive, however, how the human brain fully uses this sensory information to generate accurate movements. In monkeys, it appears that frontal and parietal areas use and combine gaze and hand signals to generate movements, whereas in humans, prior work has separately assessed how the brain uses these two signals. Here we investigated whether and how the human brain integrates gaze orientation and hand position during simple visually triggered finger tapping. We hypothesized that parietal, frontal, and subcortical regions involved in movement production would also exhibit modulation of movement-related activation as a function of gaze and hand positions. We used functional MRI to measure brain activation while healthy young adults performed a visually cued finger movement and fixed gaze at each of three locations and held the arm in two different configurations. We found several areas that exhibited activation related to a mixture of these hand and gaze positions; these included the sensory-motor cortex, supramarginal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, and left cerebellum. We also found regions within the left insula, left cuneus, left midcingulate gyrus, left putamen, and right tempo-occipital junction with activation driven only by gaze orientation. Finally, clusters with hand position effects were found in the cerebellum bilaterally. Our results indicate that these areas integrate at least two signals to perform visual-motor actions and that these could be used to subserve sensory-motor transformations.

  20. Cross finger flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, W H

    1979-01-01

    Proper fingertip reconstruction requires good skin and soft tissue coverage, preservation of function and as normal an appearance as possible. The cross finger flap results in negligible joint stiffness, minimal morbidity and little work-time loss. An important factor is the conservation of finger length permitted by this technique. This method of repair is underutilized. It is indicated in several types of fingertip amputations where bone shortening would be detrimental.

  1. An evaluation of the spring finger solder joints on SA1358-10 and SA2052-4 connector assemblies (MC3617,W87).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Hlava, Paul Frank; Zender, Gary L.

    2006-08-01

    The SA1358-10 and SA2052-4 circular JT Type plug connectors are used on a number of nuclear weapons and Joint Test Assembly (JTA) systems. Prototype units were evaluated for the following specific defects associated with the 95Sn-5Sb (Sn-Sb, wt.%) solder joint used to attach the beryllium-copper (BeCu) spring fingers to the aluminum (Al) connector shell: (1) extended cracking within the fillet; (2) remelting of the solder joint during the follow-on, soldering step that attached the EMR adapter ring to the connector shell (and/or soldering the EMR shell to the adapter ring) that used the lower melting temperature 63Sn-37Pb (Sn-Pb) alloy; and (3) spalling of the Cd (Cr) layer overplating layer from the fillet surface. Several pedigrees of connectors were evaluated, which represented older fielded units as well as those assemblies that were recently constructed at Kansas City Plant. The solder joints were evaluated that were in place on connectors made with the current soldering process as well as an alternative induction soldering process for attaching the EMR adapter ring to the shell. Very similar observations were made, which crossed the different pedigrees of parts and processes. The extent of cracking in the top side fillets varied between the different connector samples and likely the EMR adapter ring to the shell. Very similar observations were made, which crossed the different pedigrees of parts and processes. The extent of cracking in the top side fillets varied between the different connector samples and likely reflected the different extents to which the connector was mated to its counterpart assembly. In all cases, the spring finger solder joints on the SA1358-10 connectors were remelted as a result of the subsequent EMR adapter ring attachment process. Spalling of the Cd (Cr) overplating layer was also observed for these connectors, which was a consequence of the remelting activity. On the other hand, the SA2052-4 connector did not exhibit evidence of

  2. Finite element analysis of human joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  3. Concise review: putting a finger on stem cell biology: zinc finger nuclease-driven targeted genetic editing in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Joseph; Lako, Majlinda

    2011-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) encompassing human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have a wide appeal for numerous basic biology studies and for therapeutic applications because of their potential to give rise to almost any cell type in the human body and immense ability to self-renew. Much attention in the stem cell field is focused toward the study of gene-based anomalies relating to the causative affects of human disease and their correction with the potential for patient-specific therapies using gene corrected hiPSCs. Therefore, the genetic manipulation of stem cells is clearly important for the development of future medicine. Although successful targeted genetic engineering in hPSCs has been reported, these cases are surprisingly few because of inherent technical limitations with the methods used. The development of more robust and efficient means by which to achieve specific genomic modifications in hPSCs has far reaching implications for stem cell research and its applications. Recent proof-of-principle reports have shown that genetic alterations with minimal toxicity are now possible through the use of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and the inherent DNA repair mechanisms within the cell. In light of recent comprehensive reviews that highlight the applications, methodologies, and prospects of ZFNs, this article focuses on the application of ZFNs to stem cell biology, discussing the published work to date, potential problems, and future uses for this technology both experimentally and therapeutically.

  4. The case of the fickle fingers: how the PRDM9 zinc finger protein specifies meiotic recombination hotspots in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Ségurel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During mammalian meiosis, double-strand breaks are deliberately made throughout the genome and then repaired, leading to the exchange of genetic material between copies of chromosomes. How the locations of breaks are specified was largely unknown until a fortuitous confluence of statistical genetics and molecular biology uncovered the role of PRDM9, a DNA binding protein. Many properties of this protein remain mysterious, however, including how it binds to DNA, how it contributes to male infertility-both in humans, and in hybrid mice-and why, in spite of its fundamental function in meiosis, its binding domain varies extensively among humans and across mammals. We present a brief summary of what has recently been learned about PRDM9 in different fields, focusing on the puzzles yet to be resolved.

  5. Finger pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be a sign of infection or inflammation. Causes Injuries are a common cause of finger pain. Your finger may become injured from: Playing contact sports such as football, baseball, or soccer Doing recreational activities such as ...

  6. Generation and genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells using designed zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sivaprakash; London, Viktoriya; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William; Civin, Curt; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan

    2013-02-15

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have become powerful tools to deliver a targeted double-strand break at a pre-determined chromosomal locus in order to insert an exogenous transgene by homology-directed repair. ZFN-mediated gene targeting was used to generate both single-allele chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5)-modified human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and biallele CCR5-modified hiPSCs from human lung fibroblasts (IMR90 cells) and human primary cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNCs) by site-specific insertion of stem cell transcription factor genes flanked by LoxP sites into the endogenous CCR5 locus. The Oct4 and Sox2 reprogramming factors, in combination with valproic acid, induced reprogramming of human lung fibroblasts to form CCR5-modified hiPSCs, while 5 factors, Oct4/Sox2/Klf4/Lin28/Nanog, induced reprogramming of CBMNCs. Subsequent Cre recombinase treatment of the CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs resulted in the removal of the Oct4 and Sox2 transgenes. Further genetic engineering of the single-allele CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs was achieved by site-specific addition of the large CFTR transcription unit to the remaining CCR5 wild-type allele, using CCR5-specific ZFNs and a donor construct containing tdTomato and CFTR transgenes flanked by CCR5 homology arms. CFTR was expressed efficiently from the endogenous CCR5 locus of the CCR5-modified tdTomato/CFTR hiPSCs. These results suggest that it might be feasible to use ZFN-evoked strategies to (1) generate precisely targeted genetically well-defined patient-specific hiPSCs, and (2) then to reshape their function by targeted addition and expression of therapeutic genes from the CCR5 chromosomal locus for autologous cell-based transgene-correction therapy to treat various recessive monogenic human diseases in the future.

  7. Initial results of finger imaging using Photoacoustic Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    van Es, Peter; Moens, Hein J Bernelot; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2014-01-01

    We present a photoacoustic computed tomography investigation on a healthy human finger, to image blood vessels with a focus on vascularity across the interphalangeal joints. The cross-sectional images were acquired using an imager specifically developed for this purpose. The images show rich detail of the digital blood vessels with diameters between 100 $\\mu$m and 1.5 mm in various orientations and at various depths. Different vascular layers in the skin including the subpapillary plexus could also be visualized. Acoustic reflections on the finger bone of photoacoustic signals from skin were visible in sequential slice images along the finger except at the location of the joint gaps. Not unexpectedly, the healthy synovial membrane at the joint gaps was not detected due to its small size and normal vascularization. Future research will concentrate on studying digits afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis to detect the inflamed synovium with its heightened vascularization, whose characteristics are potential marke...

  8. Structural and functional organization of the HF.10 human zinc finger gene (ZNF35) located on chromosome 3p21-p22

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanfrancone, L; Pengue, G; Pandolfi, P P;

    1992-01-01

    We report the structural and functional characterization of the HF.10 zinc finger gene (ZNF35) in normal human cells, as well as a processed pseudogene. The HF.10 gene spans about 13 kb and it is interrupted by three introns. All 11 zinc finger DNA-binding domains are contiguously encoded within...

  9. Detection of kinematics parameters of index finger movement with high-speed video camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Wensheng; Jiang Yingtao; Wu Xiaoying; Zheng Xiaolin; Zheng Jun; Ye Yihong

    2008-01-01

    Synergic movement of finger's joints provides human hand tremendous dexterities, and the detection of ki-nematics parameters is critical to describe and evaluate the kinesiology functions of the fingers. The present work is the attempt to investigate how the angular velocity and angular acceleration of the joints of index finger vary with re-spect to time during conducting a motor task. A high-speed video camera has been employed to visually record the movement of index finger, and miniaturized (5-mm diameter) reflective markers have affixed to the subject's index finger on the side close to thumb and dorsum of thumb at different joint landmarks. Captured images have been re-viewed frame by frame to get the coordinate values of each joint, and the angular displacements, angular velocities and angular acceleration can be obtained with triangle function. The experiment results show that the methods here can detect the kinematics parameters of index finger joints during moving, and can be a valid route to study the motor function of index finger.

  10. The PHD finger of human UHRF1 reveals a new subgroup of unmethylated histone H3 tail readers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Lallous

    Full Text Available The human UHRF1 protein (ubiquitin-like containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 has emerged as a potential cancer target due to its implication in cell cycle regulation, maintenance of DNA methylation after replication and heterochromatin formation. UHRF1 functions as an adaptor protein that binds to histones and recruits histone modifying enzymes, like HDAC1 or G9a, which exert their action on chromatin. In this work, we show the binding specificity of the PHD finger of human UHRF1 (huUHRF1-PHD towards unmodified histone H3 N-terminal tail using native gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry. We report the molecular basis of this interaction by determining the crystal structure of huUHRF1-PHD in complex with the histone H3 N-terminal tail. The structure reveals a new mode of histone recognition involving an extra conserved zinc finger preceding the conventional PHD finger region. This additional zinc finger forms part of a large surface cavity that accommodates the side chain of the histone H3 lysine K4 (H3K4 regardless of its methylation state. Mutation of Q330, which specifically interacts with H3K4, to alanine has no effect on the binding, suggesting a loose interaction between huUHRF1-PHD and H3K4. On the other hand, the recognition appears to rely on histone H3R2, which fits snugly into a groove on the protein and makes tight interactions with the conserved aspartates D334 and D337. Indeed, a mutation of the former aspartate disrupts the formation of the complex, while mutating the latter decreases the binding affinity nine-fold.

  11. Human-Finger Electronics Based on Opposing Humidity-Resistance Responses in Carbon Nanofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing properties. Here, it is demonstrated that multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)- and reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO)-based conductive films have opposite humidity/electrical resistance responses: MWCNTs increase their electrical resistance (positive response) and rGOs decrease their electrical resistance (negative response). The authors propose a new phenomenology that describes a "net"-like model for MWCNT films and a "scale"-like model for rGO films to explain these behaviors based on contributions from junction resistances (at interparticle junctions) and intrinsic resistances (of the particles). This phenomenology is accordingly validated via a series of experiments, which complement more classical models based on proton conductivity. To explore the practical applications of the converse humidity/resistance responses, a humidity-insensitive MWCNT/rGO hybrid conductive films is developed, which has the potential to greatly improve the stability of carbon-based electrical device to humidity. The authors further investigate the application of such films to human-finger electronics by fabricating transparent flexible devices consisting of a polyethylene terephthalate substrate equipped with an MWCNT/rGO pattern for gesture recognition, and MWCNT/rGO/MWCNT or rGO/MWCNT/rGO patterns for 3D noncontact sensing, which will be complementary to existing 3D touch technology.

  12. Dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Natsuki; Takada, Daisuke; Ohmi, Masato; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2011-03-01

    OCT is highly potential for development of a new field of dynamic skin physiology, as recently reported by the authors. In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by the SS-OCT. Among the vascular system, only the small artery has two physiological functions both for the elastic artery (like main and middle arteries) and for muscle-controlled one (like arterioles). It, therefore, is important for dynamic analysis of blood flow and circulation. In the time-sequential OCT images obtained with 25 frames/s, it is found that the small artery makes a sharp response to sound stress for contraction and expansion while it continues pulsation in synchronization with the heartbeats. This result indicates that the small artery exhibits clearly the two physiological functions for blood flow and circulation. In response to sound stress, blood flow is controlled effectively by thickness change of the tunica media which consists of five to six layers of smooth muscles. It is thus found that the thickness of the tunica media changes remarkably in response to external stress, reflecting activity of the sympathetic nerve. The dynamic OCT of the small artery presented here will allow us not only to understand the mechanism of blood flow control and also to detect abnormal physiological functions in the whole vascular system.

  13. The effect of finger spreading on drag of the hand in human swimming

    CERN Document Server

    van Houwelingen, Josje; Kunnen, Rudie P J; van Heijst, GertJan F; Grift, Ernst Jan; Breugem, Wim Paul; Delfos, Rene; Westerweel, Jerry; Clercx, Herman J H; van de Water, Willem

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finger spreading on hydrodynamic drag in swimming is studied both with a numerical simulation and with laboratory experiments. Both approaches are based on the exact same 3D model of the hand with attached forearm. The virtual version of the hand with forearm was implemented in a numerical code by means of an immersed boundary method and the physical version was studied in a wind tunnel experiment. An enhancement of the drag coefficient of 2 and 5% compared to the case with closed fingers was found for the numerical simulation and experiment, respectively. A 5 and 8% favourable effect on the (dimensionless) force moment at an optimal finger spreading of 10 degrees was found, which indicates that the difference is more outspoken in the force moment. Also an analytical model is proposed, using scaling arguments similar to the Betz actuator disk model, to explain the drag coefficient as a function of finger spacing.

  14. A Finger Exoskeleton Robot for Finger Movement Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Heng Hsu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a finger exoskeleton robot has been designed and presented. The prototype device was designed to be worn on the dorsal side of the hand to assist in the movement and rehabilitation of the fingers. The finger exoskeleton is 3D-printed to be low-cost and has a transmission mechanism consisting of rigid serial links which is actuated by a stepper motor. The actuation of the robotic finger is by a sliding motion and mimics the movement of the human finger. To make it possible for the patient to use the rehabilitation device anywhere and anytime, an Arduino™ control board and a speech recognition board were used to allow voice control. As the robotic finger follows the patients voice commands the actual motion is analyzed by Tracker image analysis software. The finger exoskeleton is designed to flex and extend the fingers, and has a rotation range of motion (ROM of 44.2°.

  15. Dual-EEG of joint finger tapping: what can two interacting brains teach us about social interaction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konvalinka, Ivana

    The underlying neural mechanisms of real-time social interactions remain largely unknown. Only a small number of recent studies have explored what goes on in brains of two people simultaneously as they interact. The question still remains whether such quantification can better reveal the neural...... signatures of social cognition. In our study, we wanted to address this question by quantifying whether we gain more information about the interaction from the two brains. We measured dual-EEG from pairs of participants as they engaged in an interactive finger-tapping task. They were asked to synchronize......-frequency analysis revealed a left-motor and right-frontal suppression at 10 Hz during task execution, when carrying the task out interactively in contrast with the uncoupled computer-driven task. We used machine-learning approaches to identify the brain signals driving the interaction. The raw-power at 10 Hz during...

  16. Dual-EEG of joint finger tapping: what can two interacting brains teach us about social interaction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konvalinka, Ivana

    -frequency analysis revealed a left-motor and right-frontal suppression at 10 Hz during task execution, when carrying the task out interactively in contrast with the uncoupled computer-driven task. We used machine-learning approaches to identify the brain signals driving the interaction. The raw-power at 10 Hz during...... signatures of social cognition. In our study, we wanted to address this question by quantifying whether we gain more information about the interaction from the two brains. We measured dual-EEG from pairs of participants as they engaged in an interactive finger-tapping task. They were asked to synchronize...... with an auditory signal coming from the other member of the pair or the computer. They experienced two conditions: an interactive ‘coupled’ condition, each receiving feedback of the other person’s tapping; and an ‘uncoupled’ computer-control condition, each receiving feedback from a non-responsive computer. Time...

  17. Experimental Research on the Influence of Vibration on Fingers Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Panaitescu-Liess

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In many industrial activities the human body is exposed to vibrations transmitted through the hand-arm system. A long exposure to these vibrations can cause various health problems of blood vessels, nerves, muscles, bones, joints and upper limb [1]. This paper presents some considerations about the influence of vibration on finger joints mobility. I used a MediTouch system which consists of a motion capture device (an ergonomic glove and a dedicated software.

  18. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Kommagani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR, is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC. However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1 transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing

  19. Design of artificial human joints & organs

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    This book covers the design science and methodology of artificial joints and organs.  It presents the mechanical characterization of the hard and soft tissues as well as the viscoelastic properties of the tissue.

  20. Wearable human body joint and posture measuring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunias, P.; Gransier, R.; Jin, A.; Statham, A.; Willems, P.

    2011-01-01

    In many medical applications, especially the orthopaedic setting, ambulatory, monitoring of human joint angles could be of substantial value to improving rehabilitation strategies and unravelling the pathomechanics of many degenerative joint diseases (e.g. knee osteoarthritis). With the ageing of th

  1. Establishment of transgenic mice carrying gene encoding human zinc finger protein 191

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xia; Yang, Hua; Wang, Shui-Liang; Gong, Xue-Lian; Feng, Hao; Guo, Bao-Yu; Yu, Long; Wang, Zhu-Gang; Fu, Ji-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Human zinc finger protein 191 (ZNF191) was cloned and characterized as a Krüppel-like transcription factor, which might be relevant to many diseases such as liver cancer, neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Although progress has been made recently, the biological function of ZNF191 remains largely unidentified. The aim of this study was to establish a ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model, which would promote the functional study of ZNF191. METHODS: Transgene fragments were microinjected into fertilized eggs of mice. The manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudo-pregnant female mice. The offsprings were identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. ZNF 191 gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. Transgenic founder mice were used to establish transgenic mouse lineages. The first generation (F1) and the second generation (F2) mice were identified by PCR analysis. Ten-week transgenic mice were used for pathological examination. RESULTS: Four mice were identified as carrying copies of ZNF191 gene. The results of RT-PCR showed that ZNF 191 gene was expressed in the liver, testis and brain in one of the transgenic mouse lineages. Genetic analysis of transgenic mice demonstrated that ZNF 191 gene was integrated into the chromosome at a single site and could be transmitted stably. Pathological analysis showed that the expression of ZNF 191 did not cause obvious pathological changes in multiple tissues of transgenic mice. CONCLUSION: ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model would facilitate the investigation of biological functions of ZNF191 in vivo. PMID:14716836

  2. Age-related changes in the joint position sense of the human hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisch T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobias Kalisch,1,2,* Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth,2,* Rebecca Kowalewski,2 Martin Tegenthoff,1 Hubert R Dinse21Department of Neurology, BG-Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany; 2Neural Plasticity Lab, Institute for Neuroinformatics, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Age-related changes in lower limb joint position sense and their contributions to postural stability are well documented. In contrast, only a few studies have investigated the effect of age on proprioceptive hand function. Here, we introduce a novel test for measuring joint position sense in the fingers of the human hand. In a concurrent matching task, subjects had to detect volume differences between polystyrene balls grasped with their dominant (seven test stimuli: 126–505 cm3 and their nondominant hand (three reference stimuli: 210, 294, and 505 cm3. A total of 21 comparisons were performed to assess the number of errors, the weight of errors (ie, the volume difference between test and reference stimuli, and the direction of errors (ie, over- or underestimation of test stimulus. The test was applied to 45 healthy subjects aged 21 to 79 years. Our results revealed that all variables changed significantly with age, with the number of errors showing the strongest increase. We also assessed tactile acuity (two-point discrimination thresholds and sensorimotor performance (pegboard performance in a subset of subjects, but these scores did not correlate with joint position sense performance, indicating that the test reveals specific information about joint position sense that is not captured with pure sensory or motor tests. The average test–retest reliability assessed on 3 consecutive days was 0.8 (Cronbach's alpha. Our results demonstrate that this novel test reveals age-related decline in joint position sense acuity that is independent from sensorimotor performance.Keywords: aging, hand

  3. cDNA cloning, characterization and expression analysis of DTX2, a human WWE and RING-finger gene, in human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhengfang; Yi, Tingfang; Wu, Zirong

    2006-06-01

    The WWE domain is a conserved globular domain in several proteins and predicted to mediate specificprotein-protein interactions in ubiquitin and ADP ribose conjugation systems. The RING domain is a conserved and specialized zinc-finger motif with 40-60 residues binding to two zinc atoms, which is also probably involved in mediating protein-protein interactions. Here, from human fetal heart cDNA library, we identified DTX2, a human WWE & RING-finger gene, with high similarity with its homologues. Evaluation of full-length cDNA obtained by RACE indicated it encodes a protein composed of two WWE domains and a RING-finger region. The DTX2 gene located in human chromosome 7q11.23 spanning approximately 44.3 kb on the genome and the deduced protein is 622 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed DTX2 was expressed in the 18-week, 22.5-week human embryo hearts and adult hearts, especially with high levels in the 18-week and adult hearts. Taken together, these results indicate that DTX2 is a gene encoding a WWE-RING-finger protein and involved in regulating heart development and heart functions.

  4. Photoacoustic evaluation of human inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging combined with ultrasonography (US) holds promise to offer a novel and powerful tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis, including early detection and treatment monitoring. As a complement to US, PA imaging can assess additional hemodynamic changes in inflammatory synovium, including hyperemia and hypoxia, both important and early physiological biomarkers of synovitis reflecting the increased metabolic demand and the relatively inadequate oxygen delivery of the inflammatory synovial tissue. In this study on arthritis patients and normal volunteers, the targeted metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were imaged using our real-time US-PA dual-modality imaging system. The blood volume and the blood oxygenation in the segmented synovium were quantified, and the results from the arthritis patients were compared to those from the normal volunteers. This initial study on human subjects demonstrated that PA imaging, by working at the optical wavelengths that are sensitive to oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, is capable of identifying and characterizing inflammation in joints based on the detection of hemodynamic changes.

  5. Human Perception Test of Discontinuous Force and a Trial of Skill Transfer Using a Five-Fingered Haptic Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Endo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the transferring of expert skills, it takes a great deal of time and effort for beginners to obtain new skills, and it is difficult to teach the skills by using only words. For those reasons, a skill transfer system that uses virtual reality (VR and a haptic interface technique is very attractive. In this study, we investigated the human perception of fingertip force with respect to the following changes: (1 the spatial change of the presented force, and (2 the change of the time to present the force. Based on the results of the perception experiments, we considered the skill transfer to a person's five fingers by using a five-fingered haptic interface robot.

  6. INDEX FINGER POSITION AND FORCE OF THE HUMAN FIRST DORSAL INTEROSSEUS AND ITS ULNAR NERVE ANTAGONIST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJDEWIND, Inge; KERNELL, D

    1994-01-01

    In normal subjects, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and electrical ulnar nerve stimulation (UNS; 30-Hz bursts of 0.33 s) were systematically compared with regard to the forces generated in different directions (abduction/adduction and flexion) and at different degrees of index finger abduction.

  7. Expression and RNA-binding of human zinc-finger antiviral protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Mi Suk; Kim, Eun Jung [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Se Bok, E-mail: sbjang@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-04

    Zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is a recently isolated host antiviral factor that inhibits the replication of many viruses such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) by preventing the accumulation of viral mRNA in the cytoplasm. ZAP comprises four CCCH zinc-finger motifs, the second and fourth of which are responsible for protein activity based on their integrity. Thus far, there have been no reports on whether or not ZAP expressed in Escherichia coli is soluble. Therefore, we expressed N-terminal ZAP (NZAP, 254 amino acids) in E. coli as a fusion protein with several different cleavage sites and protein tags. Cleaved ZAP in soluble form strongly bound to RNA through its four CCCH zinc-finger motifs. Here, we provide evidence indicating that ZAP directly interacted with viral RNA. Each conserved zinc-finger motif of ZAP coordinates a zinc ion using three cysteines and one histidine. These findings suggest that ZAP recruits the cellular RNA degradation machinery for the degradation of viral RNA.

  8. INDEX FINGER POSITION AND FORCE OF THE HUMAN FIRST DORSAL INTEROSSEUS AND ITS ULNAR NERVE ANTAGONIST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJDEWIND, Inge; KERNELL, D

    1994-01-01

    In normal subjects, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and electrical ulnar nerve stimulation (UNS; 30-Hz bursts of 0.33 s) were systematically compared with regard to the forces generated in different directions (abduction/adduction and flexion) and at different degrees of index finger abduction.

  9. Mathematically modelling the effects of pacing, finger strategies and urgency on numerical typing performance with queuing network model human processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Jhe; Wu, Changxu

    2012-01-01

    Numerical typing is an important perceptual-motor task whose performance may vary with different pacing, finger strategies and urgency of situations. Queuing network-model human processor (QN-MHP), a computational architecture, allows performance of perceptual-motor tasks to be modelled mathematically. The current study enhanced QN-MHP with a top-down control mechanism, a close-loop movement control and a finger-related motor control mechanism to account for task interference, endpoint reduction, and force deficit, respectively. The model also incorporated neuromotor noise theory to quantify endpoint variability in typing. The model predictions of typing speed and accuracy were validated with Lin and Wu's (2011) experimental results. The resultant root-mean-squared errors were 3.68% with a correlation of 95.55% for response time, and 35.10% with a correlation of 96.52% for typing accuracy. The model can be applied to provide optimal speech rates for voice synthesis and keyboard designs in different numerical typing situations. An enhanced QN-MHP model was proposed in the study to mathematically account for the effects of pacing, finger strategies and internalised urgency on numerical typing performance. The model can be used to provide optimal pacing for voice synthesise systems and suggested optimal numerical keyboard designs under urgency.

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Finger Joints in Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Analysis Based on Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkhus, E.; Bjoernerud, A.; Thoen, J.; Johnston, V.; Dale, K.; Smith, H.J. [Rikshospitalet Univ. Hospital (Norway). Depts. of Radiology and Rheumatology

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate a two-compartment kinetic model applied to the dynamic time course of contrast enhancement as a method to differentiate between finger-joint synovitis in established osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Material and Methods: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of one hand in 19 patients and six healthy volunteers was undertaken. Eight patients had OA of the hand and eleven patients had RA. From the signal intensity curves, the three parameters K{sub ps} (endothelial transfer constant), K{sub ep} (elimination rate constant from extracellular space back to plasma) and K{sub el} (elimination rate constant from plasma by renal excretion) were calculated. Results: The rate constant K{sub ps} showed the best separation between the groups with significantly higher values in the RA group compared to the OA group (P<0.005) and in the OA group compared to the control group (P<0.005). Significantly higher values of K{sub ep} were also found in the RA group compared with the OA group (P<0.005)

  11. Evaluación de la resistencia mecánica de la madera de melina (Gmelina arborea unida con uniones de dedo (finger joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo González

    Full Text Available La industria de la madera en Costa Rica fabrica cada día con mayor frecuencia elementos de madera con uniones de dedo ( finger-jointed. Estos elementos se utilizan tanto para la elaboración de piezas no- estructurales, como para la fabricación de elementos utilizados estructuralmente en la construcción, tales como las vigas laminadas. Atendiendo la solicitud de la industria maderera, se realizaron ensayos delaboratorio para conocer la calidad y la resistencia mecánica de uniones de dedo en piezas de melina (Gmelina arborea. Se ensayaron dos diferentes tipos de adhesivo; una emulsión de polivinilo catalizado de dos componentes (PVA catalizado y un adhesivo de poliuretano de un componente (PU. La resistencia mecánica de las uniones se determinó,siguiendo el estándar ASTM D- 4688. Los resultados mostraron queen condición saturada y hervida, el adhesivo PVA pierde entre un 70 % yun 60 % respecto a su resistencia en condición seca, mientras que el adhesivo PU, pierde entre un 11 y un 24 % de la condición seca a la condición saturada y hervida respectivamente. Con base en los resultados obtenidos, se determinó que el adhesivo PU muestra resultados más prometedores que el PVA para su utilización elementos unidos conuniones de dedo estructurales para la construcción.

  12. Genetic diversity for grain Zn concentration in finger millet genotypes: Potential for improving human Zn nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramegowda Yamunarani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly half of the world population suffers from micronutrient malnutrition, particularly Zn deficiency. It is important to understand genetic variation for uptake and translocation behaviors of Zn in relevant crop species to increase Zn concentration in edible parts. In the present study, genetic variation in grain Zn concentration of 319 finger millet genotypes was assessed. Large genetic variation was found among the genotypes, with concentrations ranging from 10 to 86 μg g− 1 grain. Uptake and translocation studies with Zn/65Zn application in 12 selected low-Zn genotypes showed wide variation in root uptake and shoot translocation, with genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 showing greater uptake and translocation. Genotypes GEC164 and GEC543 showed increased grain Zn concentration. Genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 also showed improved yield under Zn treatment. Appreciable variation in grain Zn concentration among finger millet genotypes found in this study offers opportunities to improve Zn nutrition through breeding.

  13. Decoding Finger Flexion From Band-specific ECoG Signals in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanying eLiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the method that won the BCI competition IV addressed to the pre- diction of the finger flexion from ECoG signals. ECoG-based BCIs have recently drawn the attention from the community. Indeed, ECoG can provide a higher spatial resolution, a higher signal quality and is more suitable for long-term use than classical EEG recordings. These characteristics allow to decode precise brain activities and to realize efficient ECoG-based neu- roprostheses. Signal processing is a very important task in BCIs research for translating brain signals into commands. Here, we present a linear regression method based on the amplitude modulation of band-specific ECoG including a short term memory for individual finger flexion prediction. The effectiveness of the method was proven by achieving the highest value of corre- lation coefficient between the predicted and recorded finger flexion values on data set 4 during the BCI competition IV.

  14. Structure of human Sp140 PHD finger: an atypical fold interacting with Pin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Chiara; Tamburri, Simone; Quilici, Giacomo; Palagano, Eleonora; Berardi, Andrea; Saare, Mario; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Sp140 is a nuclear leukocyte-specific protein involved in primary biliary cirrhosis and a risk factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The presence of several chromatin related modules such as plant homeodomain (PHD), bromodomain and SAND domain suggests a role in chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression; however, its real function is still elusive. Herein we present the solution structure of Sp140-PHD finger and investigate its role as epigenetic reader in vitro. Sp140-PHD presents an atypical PHD finger fold which does not bind to histone H3 tails but is recognized by peptidylprolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 specifically binds to a phosphopeptide corresponding to the L3 loop of Sp140-PHD and catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of a pThr-Pro bond. Moreover co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate FLAG-Sp140 interaction with endogenous Pin1 in vivo. Overall these data include Sp140 in the list of the increasing number of Pin1 binders and expand the regulatory potential of PHD fingers as versatile structural platforms for diversified interactions. © 2013 FEBS.

  15. Finger Motion Decoding Using EMG Signals Corresponding Various Arm Postures

    OpenAIRE

    You, Kyung-Jin; Rhee, Ki-Won; Shin, Hyun-Chool

    2010-01-01

    We provide a novel method to infer finger flexing motions using a four-channel surface electromyogram (EMG). Surface EMG signals can be recorded from the human body non-invasively and easily. Surface EMG signals in this study were obtained from four channel electrodes placed around the forearm. The motions consist of the flexion of five single fingers (thumb, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger) and three multi.finger motions. The maximum likelihood estimation was used...

  16. Engineering HIV-resistant human CD4+ T cells with CXCR4-specific zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Wilen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 entry requires the cell surface expression of CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptors on host cells. Individuals homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 polymorphism do not express CCR5 and are protected from infection by CCR5-tropic (R5 virus strains. As an approach to inactivating CCR5, we introduced CCR5-specific zinc-finger nucleases into human CD4+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer, but the need to protect cells from virus strains that use CXCR4 (X4 in place of or in addition to CCR5 (R5X4 remains. Here we describe engineering a pair of zinc finger nucleases that, when introduced into human T cells, efficiently disrupt cxcr4 by cleavage and error-prone non-homologous DNA end-joining. The resulting cells proliferated normally and were resistant to infection by X4-tropic HIV-1 strains. CXCR4 could also be inactivated in ccr5Δ32 CD4+ T cells, and we show that such cells were resistant to all strains of HIV-1 tested. Loss of CXCR4 also provided protection from X4 HIV-1 in a humanized mouse model, though this protection was lost over time due to the emergence of R5-tropic viral mutants. These data suggest that CXCR4-specific ZFNs may prove useful in establishing resistance to CXCR4-tropic HIV for autologous transplant in HIV-infected individuals.

  17. High-resolution MRI of the wrist and finger joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of 1.5 Tesla and 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieners, Gero [Otto-von-Guericke-University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicin, Magdeburg (Germany); Detert, Jacqueline; Burmester, Gerd; Backhaus, Marina [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Berlin (Germany); Streitparth, Florian; Fischbach, Frank; Bruhn, Harald [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Otto-von-Guericke-University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicin, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The goal of this study was to compare magnetic resonance (MR) image quality at different field strengths for evaluating lesions in wrist and finger joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in order to determine whether the higher field strength provides diagnostic gain. The hand mainly affected in 17 RA patients was examined at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T with comparable MR imaging (MRI) protocols. MR images were reviewed twice by two experienced radiologists using the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS) of the OMERACT (Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials) group. Image quality was rated on a five-point scale using Friedmann's test and Kendall's W-test for statistical analysis. Image comparison revealed better image quality at higher field strength. Image quality of T1-weighted images was rated 14-22% better at 3.0 T compared with 1.5 T by both readers. Moreover, the rating for the T2-weighted-images acquired at 3.0 T was one point better in the five-point scale used. Inter-reader correlation for image quality, bone erosions/defects, edema and synovitis ranged between 0.6 and 0.9 at 3.0 T and between 0.6 and 0.8 at 1.5 T. Intra-reader correlation for these parameters was high at 0.8-1.0. MRI image quality of RA hands is superior at 3.0 T, while an acceptable image quality is achieved at 1.5 T, which improves the evaluation of extent of bone edema, synovitis and identification of small bone erosions. (orig.)

  18. Action and gait recognition from recovered 3-D human joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junxia; Ding, Xiaoqing; Wang, Shengjin; Wu, Youshou

    2010-08-01

    A common viewpoint-free framework that fuses pose recovery and classification for action and gait recognition is presented in this paper. First, a markerless pose recovery method is adopted to automatically capture the 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences from volume data. Second, multiple configuration features (combination of joints) and movement features (position, orientation, and height of the body) are extracted from the recovered 3-D human joint and pose parameter sequences. A hidden Markov model (HMM) and an exemplar-based HMM are then used to model the movement features and configuration features, respectively. Finally, actions are classified by a hierarchical classifier that fuses the movement features and the configuration features, and persons are recognized from their gait sequences with the configuration features. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated with experiments on the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique Xmas Motion Acquisition Sequences data set.

  19. Sustained negative BOLD response in human fMRI finger tapping task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Liu

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the sustained negative blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD response (sNBR using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a finger tapping task. We observed that the sNBR for this task was more extensive than has previously been reported. The cortical regions involved in sNBR are divided into the following three groups: frontal, somatosensory and occipital. By investigating the spatial structure, area, amplitude, and dynamics of the sNBR in comparison with those of its positive BOLD response (PBR counterpart, we made the following observations. First, among the three groups, the somatosensory group contained the greatest number of activated voxels and the fewest deactivated voxels. In addition, the amplitude of the sNBR in this group was the smallest among the three groups. Second, the onset and peak time of the sNBR are both larger than those of the PBR, whereas the falling edge time of the sNBR is less than that of the PBR. Third, the long distance between most sNBR foci and their corresponding PBR foci makes it unlikely that they share the same blood supply artery. Fourth, the couplings between the sNBR and its PBR counterpart are distinct among different regions and thus should be investigated separately. These findings imply that the origin of most sNBR foci in the finger-tapping task is much more likely to be neuronal activity suppression rather than "blood steal."

  20. Chromium Content in the Human Hip Joint Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Brodziak-Dopiera; Jerzy Kwapuliski; Krzysztof Sobczyk; Danuta Wiechua

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chromium has many important functions in the human body. For the osseous tissue, its role has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed at determining chromium content in hip joint tissues. Methods A total of 91 hip joint samples were taken in this study, including 66 from females and 25 from males. The sample tissues were separated according to their anatomical parts. The chromium content was determined by the AAS method. The statistical analysis was performed with U Mann-Whitney's non-parametric test, P≤0.05. Results The overall chromium content in tissues of the hip joint in the study subjects was as follows:5.73 µg/g in the articular cartilage, 5.33 µg/g in the cortical bone, 17.86 µg/g in the cancellous bone, 5.95 µg/g in the fragment of the cancellous bone from the intertrochanteric region, and 1.28 µg/g in the joint capsule. The chromium contents were observed in 2 group patients, it was 7.04 µg/g in people with osteoarthritis and 12.59 µg/g in people with fractures. Conclusion The observed chromium content was highest in the cancellous bone and the lowest in the joint capsule. Chromium content was significantly different between the people with hip joint osteoarthritis and the people with femoral neck fractures.

  1. Mathematical modeling of the human knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricafort, Juliet [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

    1996-05-01

    A model was developed to determine the forces exerted by several flexor and extensor muscles of the human knee under static conditions. The following muscles were studied: the gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and the set of quadricep muscles. The tibia and fibula were each modeled as rigid bodies; muscles were modeled by their functional lines of action in space. Assumptions based on previous data were used to resolve the indeterminacy.

  2. Human hip joint center analysis for biomechanical design of a hip joint exoskeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei YANG; Can-jun YANG‡; Ting XU

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method for the customized design of hip exoskeletons based on the optimization of the human- machine physical interface to improve user comfort. The approach is based on mechanisms designed to follow the natural tra-jectories of the human hip as the flexion angle varies during motion. The motions of the hip joint center with variation of the flexion angle were measured and the resulting trajectory was modeled. An exoskeleton mechanism capable to follow the hip center’s movement was designed to cover the full motion ranges of flexion and abduction angles, and was adopted in a lower extremity assistive exoskeleton. The resulting design can reduce human-machine interaction forces by 24.1% and 76.0% during hip flexion and abduction, respectively, leading to a more ergonomic and comfortable-to-wear exoskeleton system. The human- exoskeleton model was analyzed to further validate the decrease of the hip joint internal force during hip joint flexion or abduction by applying the resulting design.

  3. Zinc-finger directed double-strand breaks within CAG repeat tracts promote repeat instability in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, David; Moye, Christopher; Morton, Jason; Sykoudis, Kristen; Lin, Yunfu; Carroll, Dana; Wilson, John H

    2009-06-16

    Expanded triplet repeats have been identified as the genetic basis for a growing number of neurological and skeletal disorders. To examine the contribution of double-strand break repair to CAG x CTG repeat instability in mammalian systems, we developed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that recognize and cleave CAG repeat sequences. Engineered ZFNs use a tandem array of zinc fingers, fused to the FokI DNA cleavage domain, to direct double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a site-specific manner. We first determined that the ZFNs cleave CAG repeats in vitro. Then, using our previously described tissue culture assay for identifying modifiers of CAG repeat instability, we found that transfection of ZFN-expression vectors induced up to a 15-fold increase in changes to the CAG repeat in human and rodent cell lines, and that longer repeats were much more sensitive to cleavage than shorter ones. Analysis of individual colonies arising after treatment revealed a spectrum of events consistent with ZFN-induced DSBs and dominated by repeat contractions. We also found that expressing a dominant-negative form of RAD51 in combination with a ZFN, dramatically reduced the effect of the nuclease, suggesting that DSB-induced repeat instability is mediated, in part, through homology directed repair. These studies identify a ZFN as a useful reagent for characterizing the effects of DSBs on CAG repeats in cells.

  4. Finger and toenail onycholysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaias, N; Escovar, S X; Zaiac, M N

    2015-05-01

    Onycholysis - the separation of the nail plate from the nail bed occurs in fingers and toenails. It is diagnosed by the whitish appearance of the separated nail plate from the nail bed. In fingers, the majority is caused by trauma, manicuring, occupational or self-induced behavior. The most common disease producing fingernail onycholysis is psoriasis and pustular psoriasis. Phototoxic dermatitis, due to drugs can also produce finger onycholysis. Once the separation occurs, the environmental flora sets up temporary colonization in the available space. Finger onycholysis is most common in women. Candida albicans is often recovered from the onycholytic space. Many reports, want to associate the yeast as cause and effect, but the data are lacking and the treatment of the candida does not improve finger onycholysis. A reasonable explanation for the frequent isolation of Candida and Pseudomonas in fingernail onycholysis in women, is the close proximity the fingers have to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract. Fifty per cent of humans harbour C. albicans in the GI tract and it is frequently carried to the vagina during hygienic practices. Finger onycholysis is best treated by drying the nail 'lytic' area with a hair blower, since all colonizing biota are moisture loving and perish in a dry environment. Toenail onycholysis has a very different etiology. It is mechanical, the result of pressure on the toes from the closed shoes, while walking, because of the ubiquitous uneven flat feet producing an asymmetric gait with more pressure on the foot with the flatter sole. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. An Underactuated Multi-finger Grasping Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Rossi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a mechanical model for an underactuated multi-finger grasping device is presented. The device has single-tendon, three-phalanx fingers, all moved by only one actuator. By means of the model, both the kinematic and dynamical behaviour of the finger itself can be studied. The finger is part of a more complex mechanical system that consists of a four-finger grasping device for robots or a five-finger human hand prosthesis. Some results of both the kinematic and dynamical behaviour are also presented.

  6. Joint Human-Robot Action: Virtual Intentionality and Hybrid Human-Robot Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2009-01-01

    How must we understand joint action between humans and robots? Responding to Knoblich & Sebanz (2008) I ask the question if robots would meet he conditions for joint action prescribed by standard theories. On such accounts, it seems, (present) robots do not have intentions, so it seems only 'assymet

  7. The ancient mammalian KRAB zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 8q24.3 illustrates principles of C2H2 zinc finger evolution associated with unique expression profiles in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Guohui

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of multi-C2H2 domain zinc finger (ZNF genes, including the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB subfamily, paralleled the evolution of tetrapodes, particularly in mammalian lineages. Advances in their cataloging and characterization suggest that the functions of the KRAB-ZNF gene family contributed to mammalian speciation. Results Here, we characterized the human 8q24.3 ZNF cluster on the genomic, the phylogenetic, the structural and the transcriptome level. Six (ZNF7, ZNF34, ZNF250, ZNF251, ZNF252, ZNF517 of the seven locus members contain exons encoding KRAB domains, one (ZNF16 does not. They form a paralog group in which the encoded KRAB and ZNF protein domains generally share more similarities with each other than with other members of the human ZNF superfamily. The closest relatives with respect to their DNA-binding domain were ZNF7 and ZNF251. The analysis of orthologs in therian mammalian species revealed strong conservation and purifying selection of the KRAB-A and zinc finger domains. These findings underscore structural/functional constraints during evolution. Gene losses in the murine lineage (ZNF16, ZNF34, ZNF252, ZNF517 and potential protein truncations in primates (ZNF252 illustrate ongoing speciation processes. Tissue expression profiling by quantitative real-time PCR showed similar but distinct patterns for all tested ZNF genes with the most prominent expression in fetal brain. Based on accompanying expression signatures in twenty-six other human tissues ZNF34 and ZNF250 revealed the closest expression profiles. Together, the 8q24.3 ZNF genes can be assigned to a cerebellum, a testis or a prostate/thyroid subgroup. These results are consistent with potential functions of the ZNF genes in morphogenesis and differentiation. Promoter regions of the seven 8q24.3 ZNF genes display common characteristics like missing TATA-box, CpG island-association and transcription factor binding site (TFBS modules. Common TFBS

  8. Individual finger control of a modular prosthetic limb using high-density electrocorticography in a human subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotson, Guy; McMullen, David P.; Fifer, Matthew S.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Katyal, Kapil D.; Para, Matthew P.; Armiger, Robert; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Wester, Brock A.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. We used native sensorimotor representations of fingers in a brain-machine interface (BMI) to achieve immediate online control of individual prosthetic fingers. Approach. Using high gamma responses recorded with a high-density electrocorticography (ECoG) array, we rapidly mapped the functional anatomy of cued finger movements. We used these cortical maps to select ECoG electrodes for a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis classification scheme to predict: (1) if any finger was moving, and, if so, (2) which digit was moving. To account for sensory feedback, we also mapped the spatiotemporal activation elicited by vibrotactile stimulation. Finally, we used this prediction framework to provide immediate online control over individual fingers of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory modular prosthetic limb. Main results. The balanced classification accuracy for detection of movements during the online control session was 92% (chance: 50%). At the onset of movement, finger classification was 76% (chance: 20%), and 88% (chance: 25%) if the pinky and ring finger movements were coupled. Balanced accuracy of fully flexing the cued finger was 64%, and 77% had we combined pinky and ring commands. Offline decoding yielded a peak finger decoding accuracy of 96.5% (chance: 20%) when using an optimized selection of electrodes. Offline analysis demonstrated significant finger-specific activations throughout sensorimotor cortex. Activations either prior to movement onset or during sensory feedback led to discriminable finger control. Significance. Our results demonstrate the ability of ECoG-based BMIs to leverage the native functional anatomy of sensorimotor cortical populations to immediately control individual finger movements in real time.

  9. Online Joint Trajectory Generation of Human-like Biped Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Wook Kim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biped walking has long been studied in the area of gait analysis and robotic locomotion. The goal of this paper is to establish a systematic methodology for human-like natural walking by fusing the measured human joint data and optimal pattern generation techniques based on a full-body humanoid model. To this end, this paper proposes an adaptive two-stage gait pattern by which the step length and walking velocity can be changed with two scaling factors. In addition, to cope with the situations involving passing over a small obstacle, the joint trajectories of the swing foot can be adjusted with a novel concept of differential angle trajectory using a reliable optimization method, viz. particle swarm optimization. The feasibility of the proposed walking scheme is validated by walking experiments with the robot platform DARwIn-OP.

  10. Skin blood flow changes in anaesthetized humans: comparison between skin thermal clearance and finger pulse amplitude measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumet, J L; Leftheriotis, G; Dittmar, A; Delhomme, G; Degoute, C S

    1986-01-01

    The effect of general anaesthesia on skin blood flow in the left hand, measured by a new non-invasive probe using the thermal clearance method was examined. A mercury silastic gauge was placed around the third left finger and the plethysmographic wave amplitude was recorded to measure changes in finger pulse amplitude. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and skin temperature were also recorded. General anaesthesia was induced by droperidol and phenoperidine injection and propanidid infusion in eight female patients. Skin thermal clearance, plethysmographic wave amplitude, HR, MABP and skin temperature were 0.40 +/- 0.02 w X m-1 degree C-1, 9 +/- 1 mm, 98 +/- 5 beats X min-1, 12.50 +/- 0.93 kPa and 33.3 +/- 3.4 degrees C respectively. The minimal value of MABP was 9.58 +/- 1.06 kPa, whereas skin thermal clearance, plethysmographic wave amplitude, HR and skin temperature increased to 0.45 +/- 0.02 w X m-1 degree C-1, 29 +/- 3 mm, 110 +/- 4 beats X min-1 and 34.4 +/- 0.4 degrees C. Changes in skin thermal clearance correlated well with plethysmographic wave amplitude. Statistically significant changes in these two parameters occurred before significant change in HR, MABP or skin temperature. The results show that the new non-invasive probe using the thermal clearance method appears to be a useful device for measuring cutaneous microcirculation in anaesthetized humans, and responds more quickly than change in skin temperature, which is a delayed effect of skin blood flow change. Our results also show that the intensity of cutaneous vasodilatation induced by general anaesthesia did not relate to the vascular tone before anaesthesia.

  11. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  12. Computed tomography of human joints and radioactive waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, E; Bernardi, R; Hollerbach, K; Logan, C; Martz, H; Roberson, G P

    1999-06-01

    X- and gamma-ray imaging techniques in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and assay (NDA) have been increasing use in an array of industrial, environmental, military, and medical applications. Much of this growth in recent years is attributed to the rapid development of computed tomography (CT) and the use of NDE throughout the life-cycle of a product. Two diverse examples of CT are discussed. (1) The computational approach to normal joint kinematics and prosthetic joint analysis offers an opportunity to evaluate and improve prosthetic human joint replacements before they are manufactured or surgically implanted. Computed tomography data from scanned joints are segmented, resulting in the identification of bone and other tissues of interest, with emphasis on the articular surfaces. (2) They are developing NDE and NDE techniques to analyze closed waste drums accurately and quantitatively. Active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) is a comprehensive and accurate gamma-ray NDA method that can identify all detectable radioisotopes present in a container and measure their radioactivity.

  13. The ZNF75 zinc finger gene subfamily: Isolation and mapping of the four members in humans and great apes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, A.; Strina, D.; Frattini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    We have previously reported the characterization of the human ZNF75 gene located on Xq26, which has only limited homology (less than 65%) to other ZF genes in the databases. Here, we describe three human zinc finger genes with 86 to 95% homology to ZNF75 at the nucleotide level, which represent all the members of the human ZNF75 subfamily. One of these, ZNF75B, is a pseudogene mapped to chromosome 12q13. The other two, ZNF75A and ZNF75C, maintain on ORF in the sequenced region, and at least the latter is expressed in the U937 cell line. They were mapped to chromosomes 16 and 11, respectively. All these genes are conserved in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. The ZNF75B homologue is a pseudogene in all three great apes, and in chimpanzee it is located on chromosome 10 (phylogenetic XII), at p13 (corresponding to the human 12q13). The chimpanzee homologue of ZNF75 is also located on the Xq26 chromosome, in the same region, as detected by in situ hybridization. As expected, nucleotide changes were clearly more abundant between human and organutan than between human and chimpanzee or gorilla homologues. Members of the same class were more similar to each other than to the other homologues within the same species. This suggests that the duplication and/or retrotranscription events occurred in a common ancestor long before great ape speciation. This, together with the existance of at least two genes in cows and horses, suggests a relatively high conservation of this gene family. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Analysis on Image Processing of Human Hip Joints during Lifting Using MAT Lab and ANSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sundaram

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human Joint paints exhibit abnormal motion and vise versa during movements. Most of the patients were suffering from joint paints. This joint paints like Hip joints, Knee joints, Foot joints, Shoulder joints Elbow joints, and Wrist joints. Patients suffering from joint disorders visit a therapist. The therapist must correlate all these information sources regarding joint Problems. Most probable one third of all jobs in industry involve Manual Material Handling (MMH. This Manual Material Handling of human poses risk to many and cause back pain, joint pains and other problems like Knee joints, wrist joints, Shoulder joints, etc. A finite element model is used to study about the stress of human joints. Image processing techniques using soft computing like MAT Lab and ANSYS are used. A Biomedical model has been used for optimizing the lifting posture for minimum efforts. This model is also used to predict the lifting material in every individual human being. This study can be extended for loading of muscles.

  15. Jamming of fingers: an experimental study to determine force and deflection in participants and human cadaver specimens for development of a new bionic test device for validation of power-operated motor vehicle side door windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohendorff, Bernd; Weidermann, Christian; Pollinger, Philipp; Burkhart, Klaus J; Müller, Lars Peter

    2013-02-01

    The deformability of human fingers is central to addressing the real-life hazard of finger jamming between the window and seal entry of a power-operated motor vehicle side door window. The index and little fingers of the left hand of 109 participants and of 20 cadaver specimens were placed in a measurement setup. Participants progressively jammed their fingers at five different dorsal-palmar jam positions up to the maximum tolerable pain threshold, whereas the cadaver specimens were jammed up to the maximum possible deflection. Force-deflection curves were calculated corresponding to increasing deflection of the compressed tissue layers of the fingers. The average maximum force applied by the participants was 42 N to the index finger and 35 N to the little finger. In the cadaver fingers, the average of the maximum force applied was 1886 N for the index finger and 1833 N for the little finger. In 200 jam positions, 25 fractures were observed on radiographs; fractures occurred at an average force of 1485 N. These data assisted the development of a prototype of a bionic test device for more realistic validation of power-operated motor vehicle windows.

  16. Contrast-enhanced photoacoustic tomography of human joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Keswani, Rahul K.; Gandikota, Girish; Rosania, Gus R.; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) provides a unique tool to diagnose inflammatory arthritis. However, the specificity and sensitivity of PAT based on endogenous contrasts is limited. The development of contrast enhanced PAT imaging modalities in combination with small molecule contrast agents could lead to improvements in diagnosis and treatment of joint disease. Accordingly, we adapted and tested a PAT clinical imaging system for imaging the human joints, in combination with a novel PAT contrast agent derived from an FDA-approved small molecule drug. Imaging results based on a photoacoustic and ultrasound (PA/US) dual-modality system revealed that this contrast-enhanced PAT imaging system may offer additional information beyond single-modality PA or US imaging system, for the imaging, diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory arthritis.

  17. American alligator proximal pedal phalanges resemble human finger bones: Diagnostic criteria for forensic investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Joseph V; Binetti, Katie M

    2014-07-01

    A scientific approach to bone and tooth identification requires analysts to pursue the goal of empirical falsification. That is, they may attribute a questioned specimen to element and taxon only after having ruled out all other possible attributions. This requires analysts to possess a thorough understanding of both human and non-human osteology, particularly so for remains that may be morphologically similar across taxa. To date, forensic anthropologists have identified several potential 'mimics' for human skeletal remains, including pig teeth and bear paws. Here we document another possible mimic for isolated human skeletal elements--the proximal pedal phalanges of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) closely resemble the proximal and intermediate hand phalanges of adult humans. We detail morphological similarities and differences between these elements, with the goal of providing sufficient information for investigators to confidently falsify the hypothesis that a questioned phalanx is derived from an American alligator.

  18. Conversion of Human Fibroblasts to Stably Self-Renewing Neural Stem Cells with a Single Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Shahbazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct conversion of somatic cells into neural stem cells (NSCs by defined factors holds great promise for mechanistic studies, drug screening, and potential cell therapies for different neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we report that a single zinc-finger transcription factor, Zfp521, is sufficient for direct conversion of human fibroblasts into long-term self-renewable and multipotent NSCs. In vitro, Zfp521-induced NSCs maintained their characteristics in the absence of exogenous factor expression and exhibited morphological, molecular, developmental, and functional properties that were similar to control NSCs. In addition, the single-seeded induced NSCs were able to form NSC colonies with efficiency comparable with control NSCs and expressed NSC markers. The converted cells were capable of surviving, migrating, and attaining neural phenotypes after transplantation into neonatal mouse and adult rat brains, without forming tumors. Moreover, the Zfp521-induced NSCs predominantly expressed rostral genes. Our results suggest a facilitated approach for establishing human NSCs through Zfp521-driven conversion of fibroblasts.

  19. Targeted gene addition in human epithelial stem cells by zinc-finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccio, Andrea; Miselli, Francesca; Lombardo, Angelo; Marconi, Alessandra; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Pincelli, Carlo; Maruggi, Giulietta; Del Rio, Marcela; Naldini, Luigi; Larcher, Fernando; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies showed that autologous transplantation of epidermis derived from genetically modified epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) leads to long-term correction of inherited skin adhesion defects. These studies were based on potentially genotoxic retroviral vectors. We developed an alternative gene transfer strategy aimed at targeting a "safe harbor" locus, the adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), by zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced homologous recombination (HR). Delivery of AAVS1-specific ZFNs and a GFP-expressing HR cassette by integration-defective lentiviral (LV) vectors (IDLVs) or adenoviral (Ad) vectors resulted in targeted gene addition with an efficiency of > 20% in a human keratinocyte cell line, > 10% in immortalized keratinocytes, and < 1% in primary keratinocytes. Deep sequencing of the AAVS1 locus showed that ZFN-induced double-strand breaks are mostly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in primary cells, indicating that poor induction of the HR-dependent DNA repair pathway may be a significant limitation for targeted gene integration. Skin equivalents derived from unselected keratinocyte cultures coinfected with a GFP-IDLV and a ZFN-Ad vector were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. GFP-positive clones were observed in all grafts up to 18 weeks post-transplantation. By histological and molecular analysis, we were able to demonstrate highly efficient targeting of the AAVS1 locus in human repopulating EpSCs.

  20. Highly efficient gene targeting of expressed and silent genes in human ESCs and iPSCs using zinc finger nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Soldner, Frank; Beard, Caroline; Gao, Qing; Mitalipova, Maisam; DeKelver, Russell C.; Katibah, George E.; Amora, Ranier; Boydston, Elizabeth A.; Zeitler, Bryan; Meng, Xiangdong; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs) are powerful tools for biomedical research. Realizing the full potential of these cells requires efficient genetic modification. However, techniques to generate cell type specific lineage reporters as well as reliable tools to disrupt, repair or overexpress genes by gene targeting are inefficient at best and thus are not routinely used. Here we report the highly efficient targeting of three genes in human pluripotent cells using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) mediated genome editing. First, using ZFNs specific for the OCT4 locus we generated OCT4-eGFP reporter cells to monitor the pluripotent state of hESCs. Secondly, we inserted a transgene into the AAVS1 locus to generate a robust drug-inducible overexpression system in hESCs. Finally, we targeted the PITX3 gene, demonstrating that ZFNs can be used to generate reporter cells by targeting non-expressed genes in hESCs and hiPSCs. PMID:19680244

  1. Efficient targeting of expressed and silent genes in human ESCs and iPSCs using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Soldner, Frank; Beard, Caroline; Gao, Qing; Mitalipova, Maisam; DeKelver, Russell C; Katibah, George E; Amora, Ranier; Boydston, Elizabeth A; Zeitler, Bryan; Meng, Xiangdong; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2009-09-01

    Realizing the full potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) requires efficient methods for genetic modification. However, techniques to generate cell type-specific lineage reporters, as well as reliable tools to disrupt, repair or overexpress genes by gene targeting, are inefficient at best and thus are not routinely used. Here we report the highly efficient targeting of three genes in human pluripotent cells using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated genome editing. First, using ZFNs specific for the OCT4 (POU5F1) locus, we generated OCT4-eGFP reporter cells to monitor the pluripotent state of hESCs. Second, we inserted a transgene into the AAVS1 locus to generate a robust drug-inducible overexpression system in hESCs. Finally, we targeted the PITX3 gene, demonstrating that ZFNs can be used to generate reporter cells by targeting non-expressed genes in hESCs and hiPSCs.

  2. Modelling and Control for Soft Finger Manipulation and Human-Robot Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ficuciello, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of humanoid robotics is to provide a robotic systems with autonomous and dextrous skills. Dextrous manipulation skills, for personal and service robots in unstructured environments, are of fundamental importance, in order to accomplish manipulation tasks in human-like ways and to realize a proper and safe cooperation between humans and robots. The contributions presented in this thesis are aimed at modeling and controlling multifingered robotic hands wit...

  3. Robotic hand and fingers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  4. Trace elements in the human scalp hair and finger nails as affected by infection with Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khatib, A.M. (Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Physics); Bahnassy, A.A. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Medicine); Denton, M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of 13 elements has been determined in finger nail and scalp hair of 4 groups representing normal and infected Schistosoma mansoni subjects. Samples were irradiated by thermal neutrons from a Triga Mark III Reactor, for 10 min. Measurements were made using a HPGe detector coupled with ADC and PDP 11/34 data processing equipment. The results showed significant increases of Al, Cl, I and Br in both finger nails and scalp hair of bilharzial patients above those of normal subjects while Mg, Ca, V, Mn, Cu, Sr, K, S and Na showed significant decreases. Most of the elements showed a higher concentration in finger nails than in hair. (author).

  5. Perseveration Found in a Human Drawing Task: Six-Fingered Hands Drawn by Patients with Right Anterior Insula and Operculum Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiharu Niki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Perseveration has been observed in a number of behavioural contexts, including speaking, writing, and drawing. However, no previous report describes patients who show perseveration only for drawing a human figure. Objective. The present report describes a group of patients who show body awareness-related cognitive impairment during a human figure drawing task, a different presentation from previously described neuropsychological cases. Methods. Participants were 15 patients who had a frontal lobe brain tumour around the insula cortex of the right hemisphere and had subsequently undergone a neurosurgical resective operation. Participants were asked to draw a human figure in both “hands-down” and “hands-up” configurations. Results. Eight of the 15 patients drew a human figure with six fingers during the “hands-up” and the “hands-down” human figure drawing tasks (one patient drew eight fingers. A statistical analysis of potential lesion areas revealed damage to the right anterior frontal insula and operculum in this group of patients relative to the five-finger drawing group. Conclusions. Our findings reveal a newly described neuropsychological phenomenon that could reflect impairment in attention directed towards body representations.

  6. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  8. Finger and face representations in the ipsilateral precentral motor areas in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Parikh, Sachin; Bruno, Michiko K.; Hallett, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Many human neuroimaging studies reported activity in the precentral gyrus (PcG) ipsilateral to the side of hand movements. This activity has been interpreted as the part of the primary motor cortex (M1) that controls bilateral or ipsilateral hand movements. For the better understanding of hand ipsilateral-PcG activity, we performed a functional MRI experiment in 8 healthy right-handed adults. Behavioral tasks involved hand or lower face movements on each side, or motor imagery of the same mov...

  9. Review on mallet finger treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Fung, Boris; Ip, Wing Yuk

    2012-01-01

    Mallet finger is a common injury involving either an extensor tendon rupture at its insertion or an avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the terminal extensor tendon. It is usually caused by a forceful blow to the tip of the finger causing sudden flexion or a hyperextension injury. Fracture at the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanx is commonly associated with palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx. Most mallet finger injuries are recommended to be treated with immobilisation of the distal interphalangeal joint in extension by splints. There is no consensus on the type of splint and the duration of use. Most studies have shown comparable results with different splints. Surgical fixation is still indicated in certain conditions such as open injuries, avulsion fracture involving at least one third of the articular surface with or without palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx and also failed splinting treatment.

  10. Induction of stable drug resistance in human breast cancer cells using a combinatorial zinc finger transcription factor library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongeun Lee

    Full Text Available Combinatorial libraries of artificial zinc-finger transcription factors (ZF-TFs provide a robust tool for inducing and understanding various functional components of the cancer phenotype. Herein, we utilized combinatorial ZF-TF library technology to better understand how breast cancer cells acquire resistance to fulvestrant, a clinically important anti-endocrine therapeutic agent. From a diverse collection of nearly 400,000 different ZF-TFs, we isolated six ZF-TF library members capable of inducing stable, long-term anti-endocrine drug-resistance in two independent estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines. Comparative gene expression profile analysis of the six different ZF-TF-transduced breast cancer cell lines revealed five distinct clusters of differentially expressed genes. One cluster was shared among all 6 ZF-TF-transduced cell lines and therefore constituted a common fulvestrant-resistant gene expression signature. Pathway enrichment-analysis of this common fulvestrant resistant signature also revealed significant overlap with gene sets associated with an estrogen receptor-negative-like state and with gene sets associated with drug resistance to different classes of breast cancer anti-endocrine therapeutic agents. Enrichment-analysis of the four remaining unique gene clusters revealed overlap with myb-regulated genes. Finally, we also demonstrated that the common fulvestrant-resistant signature is associated with poor prognosis by interrogating five independent, publicly available human breast cancer gene expression datasets. Our results demonstrate that artificial ZF-TF libraries can be used successfully to induce stable drug-resistance in human cancer cell lines and to identify a gene expression signature that is associated with a clinically relevant drug-resistance phenotype.

  11. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.C. van den; Beek, N. van; Kraan, T. van der; Veeger, D.H.; Stegeman, D.F.; Veltink, P.H.; Maas, H.

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instr

  12. Variable and asymmetric range of enslaving: fingers can act independently over small range of flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van den Josien C.; Beek, van Nathalie; Kraan, van der Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H.E.J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub; Cymbalyuk, G.

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving movement in non-instru

  13. Variable and asymmetric range of enslaving: fingers can act independently over small range of flexion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Noort, J.C.; Cymbalyuk, G.; van Beek, Nathalie; van der Kraan, Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H.E.J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving movement in

  14. Keys to an open lock : Subject specific biomechanical modelling of luxations of the human temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijt, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, the aims are to: • increase the understanding of the interplay of morphological aspects, such as joint shape and muscle orientation, in open locks of the human temporomandibular joint. • increase the understanding of the biomechanics behind open locks of the temporomandibular joint.

  15. [Development and validation of a finite element model of human knee joint for dynamic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Gu, Yulong; Ruan, Shijie; Cui, Shihai

    2012-02-01

    Based on the biomechanical response of human knee joint to a front impact in occupants accidents, a finite element (FE) model of human knee joint was developed by using computer simulation technique for impacting. The model consists of human anatomical structure, including femoral condyle, tibia condyle, fibular small head, patellar, cartilage, meniscus and primary ligament. By comparing the results of the FE model with experiments of the knee joint in axial load conditions, the validation of the model was verified. Furthermore, this study provides data for the mechanical of human knee joint injury, and is helpful for the design and optimization of the vehicle protective devices.

  16. Individual fMRI maps of all phalanges and digit bases of all fingers in human primary somatosensory cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Frahm, Jens; Schweizer, Renate

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the individual maps of all fingers in Brodmann area 3b of the human primary somatosensory cortex in a single fMRI session by tactile stimulation at 19 sites across all phalanges and digit bases of the 5 right-hand digits. To quantify basic features of the digit maps within and across subjects, we applied standard descriptive measures, but also implemented a novel quantitative analysis. This so-called Direction/Order (DiOr) method tested whether subjects exhibited an ordering of peak fMRI representations along their individual direction of alignment through the set of analyzed phalanges and whether these individual directions were similar across subjects. Across-digit analysis demonstrated that for each set of homologous phalanges, the D5-to-D1 representations were successively represented along a common direction of alignment. Hence, the well-known mediolateral D5-to-D1 somatotopy was not only confirmed for the distal phalanges (p1), but could also be shown for the medial (p2) and proximal phalanges (p3). In contrast, the peak activation for the digit bases (p4) only partly elicited that digit succession. Complementary, intra-digit analysis revealed a divergent picture of map topography for the different digits. Within D5 (and in a trend: D4), an ordered p1-to-p3 succession was found across subjects, pointing to a consistent intra-digit somatotopy for D5, with p3 generally found medial-posterior to p1. In contrast, for D1, D2, and D3, most subjects did not present with ordered p1-to-p3 maps nor were directions of alignment similarly oriented between subjects. These digits therefore exhibited highly diverse representation patterns across subjects. PMID:25228867

  17. Role of the N-Terminal Zinc Finger of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein in Virus Structure and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanchou, Valérie; Decimo, Didier; Péchoux, Christine; Lener, Daniela; Rogemond, Véronique; Berthoux, Lionel; Ottmann, Michèle; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1998-01-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is found covering the genomic RNA in the interior of the viral particle. It is a highly basic protein with two zinc fingers of the form CX2CX4HX4C which exhibit strong affinity for a zinc cation. To study the structure-function relationship of the N-terminal zinc finger of NCp7, this domain was either deleted or changed to CX2CX4CX4C. We examined virus formation and structure as well as proviral DNA synthesis. Our data show that these two NC mutations result in the formation of particles with an abnormal core morphology and impair the end of proviral DNA synthesis, leading to noninfectious viruses. PMID:9557738

  18. Human temporomandibular joint disc: anatomy and measurements in prenatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambartolomei, Luis A; Brunotto, Mabel N; de Ferraris, María E Gómez

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine morphological characteristics and measurements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc in human fetuses between 16 and 20 weeks of intrauterine life, and correlate it with oral-facial neuro-muscular maturing. Scanner images were used to record the length of the disc (D) and the thickness of its anterior middle and posterior bands in TMJ anteroposterior vertical sections from human fetuses of 16, 18 and 20 weeks of intrauterine life (WIL). Mean disc length was 1.98 mm, 2.69 mm and 2.90 mm at 16, 18 and 20 WIL respectively, and measurements differed significantly between those ages. The thicknesses of the anterior, middle and posterior bands also differed significantly. The results give normal morphological data for D between 16 and 20 WIL. TMJ anatomy and measurements appear to be related and agree with the neuro-muscular maturation time at which sucking and swallowing reflexes begin before birth. It is known that these functions, as well as the neuro-muscular capacity to perform prenatal mandibular movements (opening and closing), begin at 14 to 15 weeks of prenatal development and are fully attained at about 20 weeks of development. Knowledge of this reference pattern may be of major importance to future research, for assessing jaw biomechanics and detecting alterations of TMJ and prenatal development of a vital human function - suckling in preterm infants.

  19. Acceleration Workspace of Cooperating Multi-Finger Robot Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyungwon Shim; Jihong Lee

    2008-01-01

    We present a mathematical method for acceleration workspace analysis of cooperating multi-finger robot systems using a model of point-contact with friction. A new unified formulation from dynamic equations of cooperating multi-finger robots is derived considering the force and acceleration relationships between the fingers and the object to be handled. From the dynamic equation, maximum translational and rotational acceleration bounds of an object are calculated under given constraints of contact conditions, configurations of fingers, and bounds on the torques of joint actuators for each finger. Here, the rotational acceleration bounds can be applied as an important manipulability index when the multi-finger robot grasps an object. To verify the proposed method, we used a set of case studies with a simple multi-finger mechanism system. The achievable acceleration boundary in task space can be obtained successfully with the proposed method and the acceleration boundary depends on the configurations of fingers.

  20. Interreader agreement in the assessment of magnetic resonance images of rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints--an international multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Klarlund, Mette; Lassere, M;

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows direct visualization of inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. However, MRI scoring methods have not yet been standardized or appropriately validated. Our aim was to examine interreader agreement for a simple system of scoring RA...... spin-echo, -/+ fat saturation (FS), -/+ iv gadolinium (Gd)] were scored for synovitis (score 0-3) and bone lesions (0-3). In substudy 2, we evaluated 19 sets of 2nd-5th MCP joints [10 sets from UK (Technique A) and 9 sets from the US (Technique B: 1.5 T; coronal T1 spin-echo and T2* gradient-echo + FS......, no Gd)] and 19 wrist joints [9 from the US (Technique B) and 10 from Denmark (Technique C: 1.0 T; coronal and axial T1 spin-echo, no FS, -/+ Gd)]. Synovitis (0-3), bone lesions (0-3), and joint space narrowing (JSN, 0-3) were scored in each MCP joint and in 3 different regions of the wrist. Bone...

  1. Interreader agreement in the assessment of magnetic resonance images of rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints--an international multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Klarlund, Mette; Lassere, M

    2001-01-01

    changes on MRI among 5 centers that had not undertaken intergroup calibration. MRI of RA wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were scored by experienced readers in 5 centers in different countries. In substudy 1, 5 sets of 2nd-5th MCP joints from UK [Technique A: 1.5 T, coronal and axial T1 and T2...... spin-echo, -/+ fat saturation (FS), -/+ iv gadolinium (Gd)] were scored for synovitis (score 0-3) and bone lesions (0-3). In substudy 2, we evaluated 19 sets of 2nd-5th MCP joints [10 sets from UK (Technique A) and 9 sets from the US (Technique B: 1.5 T; coronal T1 spin-echo and T2* gradient-echo + FS...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of wrist and finger joints in healthy subjects occasionally shows changes resembling erosions and synovitis as seen in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, Bo; Narvestad, Eva; Rostrup, Egill

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the presence of changes resembling rheumatoid arthritis erosions and synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints of healthy individuals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the MRI findings with conventional radiographic, clinical, and biochemical.......5%), while only minimal early synovial enhancement was detected by dynamic MRI. Three subjects had elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, and these subjects displayed 44.5% of the synovitis-like changes and 41.7% of the erosion-like changes. Bone marrow edema-like changes were not found in any joints...

  3. 75 FR 82132 - ITS Joint Program Office; Human Factors for IntelliDrive SM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; Human Factors for IntelliDrive \\SM\\ (HFID); Public Meeting; Notice of Public.... ACTION: Notice. The U.S. Department of Transportation ITS Joint Program Office (ITS JPO) and the National... trucks. At this meeting, ITS JPO and NHTSA will provide an overview of the entire Human Factors...

  4. Appraising the Recital of Joints in Human Running Gait through 3D Optical Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Ali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recital costing of Joints in human running is biometrics evaluation technology. It has skillful series of realizations in scientific research in the last decade. In this work, we present a human running joints (hip, knee and ankle valuation recital based on the statistical computation techniques. We use the One-way ANOVA, least significant difference (LSD test and Bartlett's test for equality of variances to determine which joint has more variation with others joints during human running gait. These three joints rotation angle data were computed from the Biovision Hierarchical data (BVH motion file, because these joints provide the richest information of the human lower body joints (hip, knee and ankle. The use of BVH file to estimate the participation and performance of the joints during running gait is a novel feature of our study. The experimental results indicated that, the knee joint has the decisive influence (variation as compared to the other two joints, hip and ankle, during running gait.

  5. The kinematic preshaping of triggered self-adaptive linkage-driven robotic fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Birglen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the issue of the kinematic – as opposed to dynamic – preshaping of self-adaptive robotic fingers driven by linkages is discussed. A method to obtain designs of these fingers capable of various behaviours during their closing motions is presented. The method is based on using triggered passive elements in carefully selected joints of the finger and the selection or optimization of geometric parameters to obtain particular kinematic relationships between the motions of the phalanges. This method is very general and can be applied to any self-adaptive robotic finger in order to obtain many different types of closing motions. Examples given in this paper are focusing on two different preshaping motions, the first one aims at allowing pinch grasps while the second mimics a human finger. The fundamental aim of this paper is to show that various preshapings of self-adaptive fingers are possible, not just one, and to give two step-by-step examples.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and scintigraphy of the finger joints: one year follow up of patients with early arthritis. The TIRA Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, K E;

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate synovial membrane hypertrophy, tenosynovitis, and erosion development of the 2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints by magnetic resonance imaging in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or suspected RA followed up for one...

  7. Myeloid zinc finger 1 mediates sulindac sulfide-induced upregulation of death receptor 5 of human colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mano Horinaka; Tatsushi Yoshida; Mitsuhiro Tomosugi; Shusuke Yasuda; Yoshihiro Sowa; Toshiyuki Sakai

    2014-01-01

    A combined therapy of sulindac sulfide and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Sulindac sulfide had been shown to induce the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a receptor for TRAIL, and sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the upregulation of DR5 has not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) mediates the induction of...

  8. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Regional material properties of the human hip joint capsule ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, J; Guilak, F; Glisson, R; Vail, T P

    2001-05-01

    The hip joint capsule functions to constrain translation between the femur and acetabulum while allowing rotational and planar movements. Despite the crucial role it plays in the pathogenesis of hip instability, little is known about its biomechanical properties. The goal of this study was to determine the regional material properties of the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments of the capsule. Ten human cadaveric specimens of each ligament were tested to failure in tension. The stress at failure, strain at failure, strain energy density at failure, toe- and linear-region elastic moduli, and the Poisson's ratio were measured for each ligament. The strain to failure was greatest in the ischiofemoral ligament, while no significant difference was noted in failure stress by region or ligament. The Young's moduli of elasticity ranged from 76.1 to 285.8 MPa among the different ligaments, and were generally consistent with properties previously reported for the shoulder capsule. The elastic moduli and strain energy density at failure differed by region. No significant differences in Poisson's ratio were found by region or ligament. The average Poisson's ratio was approximately 1.4, consistent with anisotropic behavior of ligamentous tissues. Understanding the material properties of the hip capsule may help the orthopaedic surgeon better understand normal ligament function, and thereby choose a surgical approach or strategy of repair. Furthermore, knowledge of the normal mechanical function of the hip capsule ligaments could assist in the evaluation of the success of a repair.

  10. Design of a novel finger of DLR/HIT dextrous robot hand basedon mechatronic integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-wei; ZHAO Jing-dong; JIN Ming-he; LIU Hong

    2009-01-01

    With the idea of mechatronic integration, a novel finger of the dextrous robot hand has been de-signed. The finger with nice envelop has four joints with three DOFs driven by three brushless DC motors with smaller size and more torque. The use of rigid gear head, bevel gears and linkage in the transmission system makes the finger more rigid. Abundant sensors such as joint angle sensors, joint torque sensors and temperature sensors are located in the finger. Integration and modularization are achieved at most by high integration of fin-ger body, driving system, sensors and electronics.

  11. Localization of the human estrogen-responsive finger protein (EFP) gene (ZNF147) within a YAC contig containing the myeloperoxidase (MPO) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, D.J.; Prasad, M.A. King, S.E. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-20

    The estrogen-responsive finger protein (EFP) gene (ZNF-147) belongs to a family of putative transcription factors that contain RING finger, B-box, and coiled-coil domains. Among this family are three genes, PML, RET, and T18, that play defined roles in carcinogenesis. EFP expression is induced by estrogen via an estrogen-responsive element (ERE) in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the gene. The association between estradiol levels and breast/ovarian cancer risk makes an estrogen-responsive transcription factor such as EFP an attractive candidate for mediating this correlation. The chromosomal localization of EFP is also consistent with such a role. EFP previously was localized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to human 17q21.3-q22 and mouse 11C, consistent with known linkage conservation between these regions. Recently, the human gene localization was refined to 17q23.1. This coincides with a region of chromosomal deletion identified by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis in breast and ovarian tumors. To facilitate analysis of EFP involvement in breast and ovarian tumorigenesis, we isolated yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and bacteriophage P1 clones encompassing the human and mouse EFP loci and developed a series of PCR primer pairs that amplify DNA encoding EFP functional domains. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Overexpression of myeloid zinc finger 1 suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and reduces invasiveness of SiHa human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Su-Ju; Hwang, Jin-Ming; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Ying, Tsung-Ho; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2012-08-24

    Myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) gene belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger transcription factors. MZF1 has been suggested to play an important role in the tumorigenesis, invasion, and apoptosis of various tumor cells. However, the role of MZF1 in human cervical cancer remains unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of MZF1 and its functional role in human cervical cancer cell migration and invasion, we experimented on stable SiHa cells overexpressing MZF1. We found that MZF1 overexpression inhibits the migratory and invasive abilities of SiHa cervical cancer cells. In addition, the overexpression of MZF1 significantly reduces MMP-2 protein and mRNA levels. Luciferase and ChIP assays suggested that MZF1 directly binds to MMP-2 gene regulatory sequences in vivo and suppresses MMP-2 promoter activity in vitro. This study shows that MZF-1 represses MMP-2 transcription and suggests that this repression may be linked to inhibition of human cervical cancer cell migration and metastasis.

  13. PJA1, encoding a RING-H2 finger ubiquitin ligase, is a novel human X chromosome gene abundantly expressed in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Chen, Yiwang; Tagle, Danilo A; Cai, Tao

    2002-06-01

    RING-finger proteins contain cysteine-rich, zinc-binding domains and are involved in the formation of macromolecular scaffolds important for transcriptional repression and ubiquitination. In this study, we have identified a RING-H2 finger gene, PJA1 (for praja-1), from a human brain cDNA library and mapped it to human chromosome Xq12 between markers DXS983 and DXS1216, a region implicated in X-linked mental retardation (MRX). Northern blot analysis indicated a 2.7-kb transcript that was abundantly expressed in the brain, including regions of the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, medulla, occipital pole, frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and putamen. Amino acid sequence analysis of the 71-kDa protein PJA1 showed 52.3% identity to human PJA2 (for praja-2, also known as NEURODAP1/KIAA0438) and also a significant identity to its homologs in rat, mouse, and zebrafish. In vitro binding and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that both PJA1 and PJA2 are able to bind the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH5B. Moreover, the ubiquitination assay indicated that PJA1 and PJA2 have an E2-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Thus our findings demonstrate that PJA1 can be involved in protein ubiquitination in the brain and is a suitable candidate gene for MRX.

  14. Gold Finger: Metal Jewellery as a Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Therapy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hlaing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is a chronic, progressive and disabling auto-immune disease often affecting the small joints of the hands in a symmetrical fashion. The disease can progress rapidly causing joint swelling and damaging cartilage and bone around the joints resulting in severe deformities. We report a very unusual case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with polyarticular psoriatic arthritis affecting all proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of both hands except the left ring finger PIP joint. On clinical examination there was no evidence of arthritis in the left ring finger PIP joint. We confirmed the paucity of joint damage in the PIP joint of the left ring finger using more modern imaging modalities such as musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI scan of the small joints of the hands. All other PIP joints in both hands demonstrated advanced degrees of joint damage secondary to chronic psoriatic inflammatory arthritis. We postulated that wearing a gold wedding ring has helped protecting the PIP joint of the left ring finger from the damaging effect of inflammatory arthritis. The possible mechanisms by which metal jewellery (gold ring confer protection to adjacent joints was discussed.

  15. Measurement of Resistive Torques in Major Human Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    Charlottesville, 299, 1975. 147 13. Engin, A.E., "Mechanics of the Knee Joint: Guidelines for Osteotomy in Osteoarthritis ," Orthopaedic Mechanics, edited by D.N...Conaill, M.A., "Joint Movement," Physiotherapy (50), 359, 1964. 17. Murphy, W.W., Garcia, D.H. and Bird, R.G., "Measurement of Body Motion," ASME

  16. Principles of human joint replacement design and clinical application

    CERN Document Server

    Buechel, Frederick F

    2015-01-01

    This book is written for the users and designers of joint replacements. In its second extended edition it conveys to the reader the knowledge accumulated by the authors during their forty year effort on the development of replacement devices for the lower limb for the purpose of aiding the reader in their design and evaluation of joint replacement devices. The early chapters describe the engineering, scientific and medical principles needed for replacement joint evaluation. One must understand the nature and performance of the materials involved and their characteristics in vivo, i.e. the response of the body to implant materials. It is also essential to understand the response of the implants to applied loading and motion, particularly in the hostile physiological environment. A chapter describes the design methodology now required for joint replacement in the USA and EU countries. The remaining chapters provide a history of joint replacement, an evaluation of earlier and current devices and sample case hist...

  17. Aesthetic Finger Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Complete or partial fingers are the most commonly encountered forms of partial hand losses. Though finger amputations are commonly due to traumatic injuries, digit loss may also be attributed to congenital malformations and disease. Irrespective of the etiology, the loss of a finger has a considerable functional and psychological impact on an individual. In order to alleviate these problems, partial or complete finger prosthesis may be fabricated. This clinical report portrays a method to fab...

  18. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kazemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling.

  19. Recent advances in computational mechanics of the human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, M; Dabiri, Y; Li, L P

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling.

  20. A Parametric Modelling Method for Dexterous Finger Reachable Workspaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The well-known algorithms, such as the graphic method, analytical method or numerical method, have some defects when modelling the dexterous finger workspace, which is a significant kinematical feature of dexterous hands and valuable for grasp planning, motion control and mechanical design. A novel modelling method with convenient and parametric performances is introduced to generate the dexterous-finger reachable workspace. This method constructs the geometric topology of the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, and uses a joint feature recognition algorithm to extract the kinematical parameters of the dexterous finger. Compared with graphic, analytical and numerical methods, this parametric modelling method can automatically and conveniently construct a more vivid workspace’ forms and contours of the dexterous finger. The main contribution of this paper is that a workspace-modelling tool with high interactive efficiency is developed for designers to precisely visualize the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, which is valuable for analysing the flexibility of the dexterous finger.

  1. A Comprehensive Catalog of Human KRAB-associated Zinc Finger Genes: Insights into the Evolutionary History of a Large Family of Transcriptional Repressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D M; Hamilton, A T; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Yang, S; Kim, J; Gordon, L; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-30

    Krueppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotic species. In mammals, most ZNF proteins comprise a single class of transcriptional repressors in which a chromatin interaction domain, called the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB) is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs. KRAB-ZNF loci are specific to tetrapod vertebrates, but have expanded dramatically in numbers through repeated rounds of segmental duplication to create a gene family with hundreds of members in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the human genome for key motifs and used them to construct and manually curate gene models. The resulting KRAB-ZNF gene catalog includes 326 known genes, 243 of which were structurally corrected by manual annotation, and 97 novel KRAB-ZNF genes; this single family therefore comprises 20% of all predicted human transcription factor genes. Many of the genes are alternatively spliced, yielding a total of 743 distinct predicted proteins. Although many human KRAB-ZNF genes are conserved in mammals, at least 136 and potentially more than 200 genes of this type are primate-specific including many recent segmental duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are active in a wide variety of human tissues suggesting roles in many key biological processes, but most member genes remain completely uncharacterized. Because of their sheer numbers, wide-ranging tissue-specific expression patterns, and remarkable evolutionary divergence we predict that KRAB-ZNF transcription factors have played critical roles in crafting many aspects of human biology, including both deeply conserved and primate-specific traits.

  2. Tracking a Subset of Skeleton Joints: An Effective Approach towards Complex Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Latif Anjum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a robust algorithm for complex human activity recognition for natural human-robot interaction. The algorithm is based on tracking the position of selected joints in human skeleton. For any given activity, only a few skeleton joints are involved in performing the activity, so a subset of joints contributing the most towards the activity is selected. Our approach of tracking a subset of skeleton joints (instead of tracking the whole skeleton is computationally efficient and provides better recognition accuracy. We have developed both manual and automatic approaches for the selection of these joints. The position of the selected joints is tracked for the duration of the activity and is used to construct feature vectors for each activity. Once the feature vectors have been constructed, we use a Support Vector Machines (SVM multiclass classifier for training and testing the algorithm. The algorithm has been tested on a purposely built dataset of depth videos recorded using Kinect camera. The dataset consists of 250 videos of 10 different activities being performed by different users. Experimental results show classification accuracy of 83% when tracking all skeleton joints, 95% when using manual selection of subset joints, and 89% when using automatic selection of subset joints.

  3. Extrinsic versus intrinsic hand muscle dominance in finger flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sukaini, A; Singh, H P; Dias, J J

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to identify the patterns of dominance of extrinsic or intrinsic muscles in finger flexion during initiation of finger curl and mid-finger flexion. We recorded 82 hands of healthy individuals (18-74 years) while flexing their fingers and tracked the finger joint angles of the little finger using video motion tracking. A total of 57 hands (69.5%) were classified as extrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. A total of 25 (30.5%) were classified as intrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at the metacarpophalangeal joint. The distribution of age, sex, dominance, handedness and body mass index was similar in the two groups. This knowledge may allow clinicians to develop more efficient rehabilitation regimes, since intrinsic dominant individuals would not initiate extrinsic muscle contraction till later in finger flexion, and might therefore be allowed limited early active motion. For extrinsic dominant individuals, by contrast, initial contraction of extrinsic muscles would place increased stress on the tendon repair site if early motion were permitted. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Aesthetic finger prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, N; Maheswari, M Uma; Anandkumar, V; Padmanabhan, T V; Swarup, Shailee; Jibran, Ahmed Hasan

    2011-12-01

    Complete or partial fingers are the most commonly encountered forms of partial hand losses. Though finger amputations are commonly due to traumatic injuries, digit loss may also be attributed to congenital malformations and disease. Irrespective of the etiology, the loss of a finger has a considerable functional and psychological impact on an individual. In order to alleviate these problems, partial or complete finger prosthesis may be fabricated. This clinical report portrays a method to fabricate silicone rubber prosthesis for a patient who has a partial finger loss caused due to trauma.

  5. Multifaceted Histone H3 Methylation and Phosphorylation Readout by the Plant Homeodomain Finger of Human Nuclear Antigen Sp100C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Dan; Xiong, Xiaozhe; He, Zhimin; Li, Haitao

    2016-06-10

    The decoding of histone post-translational modifications by chromatin-binding modules ("readers") constitutes one major mechanism of epigenetic regulation. Nuclear antigen Sp100 (SPECKLED, 100 kDa), a constitutive component of the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, plays key roles in intrinsic immunity and transcriptional repression. Sp100C, a splicing isoform specifically up-regulated upon interferon stimulation, harbors a unique tandem plant homeodomain (PHD) finger and bromodomain at its C terminus. Combining structural, quantitative binding, and cellular co-localization studies, we characterized Sp100C PHD finger as an unmethylated histone H3 Lys(4) (H3K4me0) reader that tolerates histone H3 Thr(3) phosphorylation (H3T3ph), histone H3 Lys(9) trimethylation (H3K9me3), and histone H3 Ser(10) phosphorylation (H3S10ph), hallmarks associated with the mitotic chromosome. In contrast, whereas H3K4me0 reader activity is conserved in Sp140, an Sp100C paralog, the multivalent tolerance of H3T3ph, H3K9me3, and H3S10ph was lost for Sp140. The complex structure determined at 2.1 Å revealed a highly coordinated lysine ϵ-amine recognition sphere formed by an extended N-terminal motif for H3K4me0 readout. Interestingly, reader pocket rigidification by disulfide bond formation enhanced H3K4me0 binding by Sp100C. An additional complex structure solved at 2.7 Å revealed that H3T3ph is recognized by the arginine residue, Arg(713), that is unique to the PHD finger of Sp100C. Consistent with a restrictive cellular role of Sp100C, these results establish a direct chromatin targeting function of Sp100C that may regulate transcriptional gene silencing and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body-mediated intrinsic immunity in response to interferon stimulation.

  6. Principles of Human Joint Replacement Design and Clinical Application

    CERN Document Server

    Buechel, Frederick F

    2012-01-01

    Drs. Buechel, an orthopaedic surgeon, and Pappas, a professor of Mechanical Engineering, are the designers of several successful joint replacement systems. The most well-known of these is the pioneering LCS knee replacement. They have written this book for the users and designers of joint replacements. It is an attempt to convey to the reader the knowledge accumulated by the authors during their thirty five year effort on the development of replacement devices for the lower limb for the purpose of aiding the reader in their design and evaluation of joint replacement devices. The early chapters describe the engineering, scientific and medical principles needed for replacement joint evaluation. One must understand the nature and performance of the materials involved and their characteristics in vivo, i.e. the response of the body to implant materials. It is also essential to understand the response of the implants to applied loading and motion, particularly in the hostile physiological environment. A chapter de...

  7. Genetic diversity for grain Zn concentration in finger millet genotypes:Potential for improving human Zn nutrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramegowda Yamunarani; Geetha Govind; Venkategowda Ramegowda; Harshavardhan Vokkaliga Thammegowda; Shankar Ambarahalli Guligowda

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of the world population suffers from micronutrient malnutrition,particularly Zn deficiency.It is important to understand genetic variation for uptake and translocation behaviors of Zn in relevant crop species to increase Zn concentration in edible parts.In the present study,genetic variation in grain Zn concentration of 319 finger millet genotypes was assessed.Large genetic variation was found among the genotypes,with concentrations ranging from 10 to 86 μg g-1grain.Uptake and translocation studies with Zn/65 Zn application in 12 selected low-Zn genotypes showed wide variation in root uptake and shoot translocation,with genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 showing greater uptake and translocation.Genotypes GEC164 and GEC543 showed increased grain Zn concentration.Genotypes GEC331 and GEC164 also showed improved yield under Zn treatment.Appreciable variation in grain Zn concentration among finger millet genotypes found in this study offers opportunities to improve Zn nutrition through breeding.

  8. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  9. Improving air traffic control: Proving new tools or approving the joint human-machine system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Irene; Leroux, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    From the description of a field problem (i.e., designing decision aids for air traffic controllers), this paper points out how a cognitive engineering approach provides the milestones for the evaluation of future joint human-machine systems.

  10. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  11. Acute finger injuries: part I. Tendons and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggit, Jeffrey C; Meko, Christian J

    2006-03-01

    Improper diagnosis and treatment of finger injuries can cause deformity and dysfunction over time. A basic understanding of the complex anatomy of the finger and of common tendon and ligament injury mechanisms can help physicians properly diagnose and treat finger injuries. Evaluation includes a general musculoskeletal examination as well as radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views). Splinting and taping are effective treatments for tendon and ligament injuries. Treatment should restrict the motion of injured structures while allowing uninjured joints to remain mobile. Although family physicians are usually the first to evaluate patients with finger injuries, it is important to recognize when a referral is needed to ensure optimal outcomes.

  12. Finger muscle attachments for an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hwa Lee

    Full Text Available We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms. Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5% for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm. Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths. The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements.

  13. Investigation of an alleged mechanism of finger injury in an automobile crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Stephen; Kent, Richard

    2006-07-01

    This investigation centers on the case of an adult male whose finger was allegedly amputated by the steering wheel of his car during a crash. The subject claimed to have been driving with his left index finger inserted through a hole in the spoke of his steering wheel and was subsequently involved in an offset frontal collision with a tree. The finger was found to be cleanly severed at the mid-shaft of the proximal phalanx after the crash. This injury was alleged to have been caused by inertial loading from the rotation of the steering wheel during the crash. To determine whether this injury mechanism was plausible, three laboratory tests representing distinct loading scenarios were carried out with postmortem human surrogates loaded dynamically by the subject's steering wheel. It was found that the inertial loads generated in this loading scenario are insufficient to amputate the finger. Additionally, artificially constraining the finger to force an amputation to occur revealed that a separation at the proximal interphalangeal joint occurs rather than a bony fracture of the proximal phalanx. Based on these biomechanical tests, it can be concluded that the subject's injury did not occur during the automobile crash in question. Furthermore, it can be shown that the injury was self-inflicted to fraudulently claim on an insurance policy.

  14. 'Soft' human resource management in small international joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the value creation aspects of HRM in international joint ventures of a relatively small size and their implications for strategic management. We assume that HRM in this context is rather a process than a function, and a ‘soft’ – humanistic rather than a ‘hard’, instrumentalist...

  15. The human zinc-finger protein-7 gene is located 90 kb 3' of MYC and is not expressed in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Gallego, M I; Lazo, P A

    1994-09-15

    The zinc-finger gene-7 (ZNF7) was located 90 kb 3' of MYC on human chromosome 8 band q24 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). This position lies between the MLV14 and BVR1 loci, 2 variant translocation breakpoints in Burkitt lymphomas. The structure of the ZNF7 gene was not altered by translocations in Burkitt-lymphoma cell lines as shown by its germline-restriction map configuration. The chromosomal region surrounding the ZNF7 gene was extensively methylated. The ZNF7 gene was not expressed in 19 BL cell lines. Expression was detected only in the BL41 and BL47 cell lines and in the SW756 cervical-carcinoma cell line. The RNA in each was of a different size. We postulate that the lack of ZNF7 expression in Burkitt lymphomas might contribute to the tumor phenotype.

  16. Characterization of human constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1, a RING finger ubiquitin ligase that interacts with Jun transcription factors and modulates their transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Elisabetta; Denti, Simona; Catena, Raffaella; Rossetti, Grazisa; Polo, Simona; Gasparian, Sona; Putignano, Stella; Rogge, Lars; Pardi, Ruggero

    2003-05-30

    RING finger proteins have been implicated in many fundamental cellular processes, including the control of gene expression. A key regulator of light-dependent development in Arabidopsis thaliana is the constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1 (atCOP1), a RING finger protein that plays an essential role in translating light/dark signals into specific changes in gene transcription. atCOP1 binds the basic leucine zipper factor HY5 and suppresses its transcriptional activity through a yet undefined mechanism that results in HY5 degradation in response to darkness. Furthermore, the pleiotropic phenotype of atCOP1 mutants indicates that atCOP1 may be a central regulator of several transcriptional pathways. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the human orthologue of atCOP1. Human COP1 (huCOP1) distributes both to the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells and shows a striking degree of sequence conservation with atCOP1, suggesting the possibility of a functional conservation as well. In co-immunoprecipitation assays huCOP1 specifically binds basic leucine zipper factors of the Jun family. As a functional consequence of this interaction, expression of huCOP1 in mammalian cells down-regulates c-Jun-dependent transcription and the expression of the AP-1 target genes, urokinase and matrix metalloproteinase 1. The RING domain of huCOP1 displays ubiquitin ligase activity in an autoubiquitination assay in vitro; however, suppression of AP-1-dependent transcription by huCOP1 occurs in the absence of changes in c-Jun protein levels, suggesting that this inhibitory effect is independent of c-Jun degradation. Our findings indicate that huCOP1 is a novel regulator of AP-1-dependent transcription sharing the important properties of Arabidopsis COP1 in the control of gene expression.

  17. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  18. Inverse Modeling of Human Knee Joint Based on Geometry and Vision Systems for Exoskeleton Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Piña-Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current trends in Robotics aim to close the gap that separates technology and humans, bringing novel robotic devices in order to improve human performance. Although robotic exoskeletons represent a breakthrough in mobility enhancement, there are design challenges related to the forces exerted to the users’ joints that result in severe injuries. This occurs due to the fact that most of the current developments consider the joints as noninvariant rotational axes. This paper proposes the use of commercial vision systems in order to perform biomimetic joint design for robotic exoskeletons. This work proposes a kinematic model based on irregular shaped cams as the joint mechanism that emulates the bone-to-bone joints in the human body. The paper follows a geometric approach for determining the location of the instantaneous center of rotation in order to design the cam contours. Furthermore, the use of a commercial vision system is proposed as the main measurement tool due to its noninvasive feature and for allowing subjects under measurement to move freely. The application of this method resulted in relevant information about the displacements of the instantaneous center of rotation at the human knee joint.

  19. A molecular exploration of human DNA/RNA co-extracted from the palmar surface of the hands and fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerenza, D; Aneli, S; Omedei, M; Gino, S; Pasino, S; Berchialla, P; Robino, C

    2016-05-01

    "Touch DNA" refers to the DNA that is left behind when a person touches or comes into contact with an item. However, the source of touch DNA is still debated and the large variability in DNA yield from casework samples suggests that, besides skin, various body fluids can be transferred through contact. Another important issue concerning touch DNA is the possible occurrence of secondary transfer, but the data published in the literature in relation to the background levels of foreign DNA present on the hand surfaces of the general population are very limited. As the present study aimed at better understanding the nature and characteristics of touch DNA, samples were collected from the palmar surface of the hands and fingers ("PHF" samples) of 30 male and 30 female donors by tape-lifting/swabbing and subjected to DNA/RNA co-extraction. Multiplex mRNA profiling showed that cellular material different from skin could be observed in 15% of the PHF samples. The total amount of DNA recovered from these samples (median 5.1 ng) was significantly higher than that obtained from samples containing skin cells only (median 1.6 ng). The integrity of the DNA isolated from the donors' hands and fingers as well as the prevalence of DNA mixtures were evaluated by STR typing and compared with reference STR profiles from buccal swabs. DNA integrity appeared significantly higher in the male rather than in the female subsample, as the average percentage of the donors' alleles effectively detected in PHF profiles was 75.1% and 60.1%, respectively. The prevalence of mixtures with a foreign DNA contribution ≥20% was 19.2% (30.0% in the female PHF samples and 8.3% in the male PHF samples). The obtained results support the hypothesis that transfer of cellular material different from skin may underlie the occasional recovery of quality STR profiles from handled items. These results also suggest that gender may represent an important factor influencing the propensity of individuals to carry

  20. Human and mouse ZFY genes produce a conserved testis-specific transcript encoding a zinc finger protein with a short acidic domain and modified transactivation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarpentrie, Fanny; Vernet, Nadège; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Longepied, Guy; Streichemberger, Eric; Aknin-Seifer, Isabelle; Ojarikre, Obah A; Burgoyne, Paul S; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Mitchell, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    Mammalian ZFY genes are located on the Y chromosome, and code putative transcription factors with 12-13 zinc fingers preceded by a large acidic (activating) domain. In mice, there are two genes, Zfy1 and Zfy2, which are expressed mainly in the testis. Their transcription increases in germ cells as they enter meiosis, both are silenced by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during pachytene, and Zfy2 is strongly reactivated later in spermatids. Recently, we have shown that mouse Zfy2, but not Zfy1, is involved in triggering the apoptotic elimination of specific types of sex chromosomally aberrant spermatocytes. In humans, there is a single widely transcribed ZFY gene, and there is no evidence for a specific role in the testis. Here, we characterize ZFY transcription during spermatogenesis in mice and humans. In mice, we define a variety of Zfy transcripts, among which is a Zfy2 transcript that predominates in spermatids, and a Zfy1 transcript, lacking an exon encoding approximately half of the acidic domain, which predominates prior to MSCI. In humans, we have identified a major testis-specific ZFY transcript that encodes a protein with the same short acidic domain. This represents the first evidence that ZFY has a conserved function during human spermatogenesis. We further show that, in contrast to the full acidic domain, the short domain does not activate transcription in yeast, and we hypothesize that this explains the functional difference observed between Zfy1 and Zfy2 during mouse meiosis.

  1. Wearable Conductive Fiber Sensors for Multi-Axis Human Joint Angle Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asada H Harry

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion is one that finds many applications, especially in the medical and rehabilitation fields. There is a lack of acceptable devices available to perform such measurements in the field in a reliable and non-intrusive way over a long period of time. The purpose of this study was therefore to develop such a wearable joint monitoring sensor capable of continuous, day-to-day monitoring. Methods A novel technique of incorporating conductive fibers into flexible, skin-tight fabrics surrounding a joint is developed. Resistance changes across these conductive fibers are measured, and directly related to specific single or multi-axis joint angles through the use of a non-linear predictor after an initial, one-time calibration. Because these sensors are intended for multiple uses, an automated registration algorithm has been devised using a sensitivity template matched to an array of sensors spanning the joints of interest. In this way, a sensor array can be taken off and put back on an individual for multiple uses, with the sensors automatically calibrating themselves each time. Results The wearable sensors designed are comfortable, and acceptable for long-term wear in everyday settings. Results have shown the feasibility of this type of sensor, with accurate measurements of joint motion for both a single-axis knee joint and a double axis hip joint when compared to a standard goniometer used to measure joint angles. Self-registration of the sensors was found to be possible with only a few simple motions by the patient. Conclusion After preliminary experiments involving a pants sensing garment for lower body monitoring, it has been seen that this methodology is effective for monitoring joint motion of the hip and knee. This design therefore produces a robust, comfortable, truly wearable joint monitoring device.

  2. Expression of mu-opioid receptors in human chronic inflamed knee joint synovium tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Hong-bin; HE Xing-ying; XU Hai-tao; ZHU Qiu-feng; WANG Ya-hua; SHI Xue-yin

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To examine the changes of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) expression in human chronic inflamed knee joint synovium tissue. Methods:Knee joint synovium tissues were taken from 21 patients with chronic arthritis(inflamed group) and 6 fresh bodies with normal knee joints(control group). And the expression of MORs was detected by using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry (FCM) and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Results: The expression of MORs in the inflamed group was significantly higher than that in the normal group by using the 3 techniques(P<0.05).Conclusion: Chronic inflammation enhances the up-regulation of MORs in human knee joint synovium tissue.

  3. Characterization of sex-based differences in the mechanical properties of human finger glabrous tissue using a fiberoptic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Lalit; Barlow, Steven M

    2014-07-18

    TAC-Cell is a custom-built somatosensory stimulator that delivers pneumatic cutaneous tactile inputs to virtually any skin target on the body and by virtue of its non-ferrous materials is compatible with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain scanners. In this study, we describe the method to measure apparent skin displacement induced by TAC-Cell stimulation of the glabrous surface of the distal phalanx of the index finger. Specifically, we studied the effect of four servo controller input voltages (0.4V-1.0 V) on resultant skin displacement among eighteen, neurotypical adult male and female participants. A fiberoptic displacement sensor, commonly used in industrial applications, was coupled to the TAC-Cell to measure the glabrous skin׳s kinematic response to different stimulus amplitudes. Skin displacement was significantly dependent on stimulus amplitudes and sex (p<0.0001). Power spectrum and kinematic analysis of skin displacement showed that the pneumatic TAC-Cell stimulus consists of a spectrally rich, high velocity signal. In related work, we have shown that this dynamic pneumocutaneous stimulus is highly effective in evoking a cortical brain response for neurodiagnostic applications and somatosensory pathway analysis in health and disease.

  4. Myeloid zinc finger 1 mediates sulindac sulfide-induced upregulation of death receptor 5 of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinaka, Mano; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Yasuda, Shusuke; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2014-08-08

    A combined therapy of sulindac sulfide and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Sulindac sulfide had been shown to induce the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a receptor for TRAIL, and sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the upregulation of DR5 has not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) mediates the induction of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. Sulindac sulfide induced the expression of DR5 at the protein and mRNA levels in colon cancer SW480 cells. Furthermore, sulindac sulfide increased DR5 promoter activity. We showed that sulindac sulfide stimulated DR5 promoter activity via the -301 to -253 region. This region contained a putative MZF1-binding site. Site-directed mutations in the site abrogated the enhancement in DR5 promoter activity by sulindac sulfide. MZF1 directly bound to the putative MZF1-binding site of the DR5 promoter and the binding was increased by sulindac sulfide. The expression of MZF1 was also increased by sulindac sulfide, and MZF1 siRNA attenuated the upregulation of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. These results indicate that sulindac sulfide induces the expression of DR5 by up-regulating MZF1.

  5. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Parameters Estimation for the Spherical Model of the Human Knee Joint Using Vector Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszkiewicz, A.; Knapczyk, J.

    2014-08-01

    Position and displacement analysis of a spherical model of a human knee joint using the vector method was presented. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation were performed using the evolutionary algorithm method. Computer simulations for the mechanism with estimated parameters proved the effectiveness of the prepared software. The method itself can be useful when solving problems concerning the displacement and loads analysis in the knee joint

  7. Parameters Estimation For A Patellofemoral Joint Of A Human Knee Using A Vector Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszkiewicz, A.; Knapczyk, J.

    2015-08-01

    Position and displacement analysis of a spherical model of a human knee joint using the vector method was presented. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation were performed using the evolutionary algorithm method. Computer simulations for the mechanism with estimated parameters proved the effectiveness of the prepared software. The method itself can be useful when solving problems concerning the displacement and loads analysis in the knee joint.

  8. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  9. Joint Scaling Theory of Human Dynamics and Network Science

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Chaoming; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    The increasing availability of large-scale data on human behavior has catalyzed simultaneous advances in network theory, capturing the scaling properties of the interactions between a large number of individuals, and human dynamics, quantifying the temporal characteristics of human activity patterns. These two areas remain disjoint, however, traditionally each pursuing as a separate modeling framework. Here we establish the first formal link between these two areas by showing that the exponents characterizing the degree and link weight distribution in social networks can be expressed in terms of the dynamical exponents characterizing human activity patterns. We test the validity of these theoretical predictions on datasets capturing various facets of human interactions, from mobile calls to tweets. We find evidence of a universal measure, that links networks and human dynamics, but whose value is independent of the means of communication, capturing a fundamental property of human activity.

  10. [Human joint capsule in osteoarthrosis (morpholocical changes) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, N; Barz, B

    1977-07-29

    Morphological investigations of the joint capsules in osteoarthrotic-changed joints have given rise to doubts about the present theory of the causal aetiology of the osteoarthrosis. In every inspected and demonstrated illustration beside the partly normal capsules segments could be found every transition between mild regressive alterations and most massive proliferative changes of the conective tissue and the lining cell layer. It was extraordinary, that the strongly dilated vessels were filled with red blood cells. In another part of the same case was found a massive stricture caused by concentrically deposited substances, which were impregnated with collagenous fibers. Regeneration of the vessels frequently happened adjacent totally obstructed ones. Round-cell infiltrations, granulocytes or other indications of an inflammatory synovitis are found only in a few cases. The intracartilaginous enzymatic reactions, which have been much talked of and which were explained as characteristic of the osteoarthrosis cannot be the cause of the degradation of the cartilage, particularly, because of the normal cell count which is to be found in the synovial fluid. We can answer this problem, if we can prove that the substrates of the chondral metabolism themselves exert a direct or indirect influence on the interstitial connective tissue with induction of the powerful proliferation of the same tissue. The changes in the transit zone would be secondary and their effect on the lining cell layer would increase the progression of the arthrotic events.

  11. BILATERAL VOLLEYBALL-RELATED DEFORMITY OF THE LITTLE FINGERS: MALLET FINGER AND CLINODACTYLY MIMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Uslu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old male high school volleyball player was seen to evaluate right- and left-hand little-finger distal interphalangeal joint deformity and pain. His symptoms began during his second season of competitive play. The distal interphalangeal (DIP joints of the little fingers flexed 20-30°, and a 10-15° valgus deformity was seen at the same joints. Pain was relieved with rest but returned immediately after playing volleyball, so plain radiographs were obtained. The flexion and valgus deformity was obvious on plain radiographs and through a clinical examination. Thus, a bilateral little-finger distal phalanx base epiphysis injury was seen. This injury is characterized by a biplanar Salter Harris physeal injury; type 5 on anteroposterior radiographs and type 2 on lateral plain radiographs. The deformity occurred as a result of competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral biplanar physial injury of the base of distal phalanges of the little fingers. Flexion and valgus deformities of DIP joints are a result of repeated micro traumas around the physis.

  12. Torque control of underactuated tendon-driven fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Abdallah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Given an underactuated tendon-driven finger, the finger posture is underdetermined and can move freely ("flop" in a region of slack tendons. This work shows that such an underactuated finger can be operated in tendon force control (rather than position control with effective performance. The force control eliminates the indeterminate slack while commanding a parameterized space of desired torques. The torque will either push the finger to the joint limits or wrap around an external object with variable torque – behavior that is sufficient for primarily gripping fingers. In addition, introducing asymmetric joint radii to the design allows the finger to command an expanded range of joint torques and to scan an expanded set of external surfaces. This study is motivated by the design and control of the secondary fingers of the NASA-GM R2 humanoid hand.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  13. An EMG Interface for the Control of Motion and Compliance of a Supernumerary Robotic Finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Hussain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an electromyographic (EMG control interface for a supernumerary robotic finger. This novel wearable robot can be used to compensate the missing grasping abilities in chronic stroke patients or to augment human healthy hand so to enhance its grasping capabilities and workspace. The proposed EMG interface controls the motion of the robotic extra finger and its joint compliance. In particular, we use a commercial EMG armband for gesture recognition to be associated with the motion control of the robotic device and surface one channel EMG electrodes interface to regulate the compliance of the robotic device. We also present an updated version of a robotic extra finger where the adduction/abduction motion is realized through ball bearing and spur gears mechanism. We validated the proposed interface with two sets of experiments related to compensation and augmentation. In the first set of experiments, different bi-manual tasks have been performed with the help of the robotic device and simulating a paretic hand. In the second set, the robotic extra finger is used to enlarge the workspace and manipulation capability of healthy hands. In both the sets, the same EMG control interface has been used. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed control interface is intuitive and can successfully be used for both compensation and augmentation purposes. The proposed approach can be exploited also for the control of different wearable devices that has to actively cooperate with the human limbs.

  14. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  15. FINGER-VEIN RECOGNITION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Haritha Deepthi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the Person‟s/Organization‟s Private information‟s are becoming very easy to access, the demand for a Simple, Convenient, Efficient, and a highly Securable Authentication System has been increased. In considering these requirements for data Protection, Biometrics, which uses human physiological or behavioral system for personal Identification has been found as a solution for these difficulties. However most of the biometric systems have high complexity in both time and space. So we are going to use a Real time Finger-Vein recognition System for authentication purposes. In this paper we had implemented the Finger Vein Recognition concept using MATLAB R2013a. The features used are Lacunarity Distance, Blanket Dimension distance. This has more accuracy when compared to conventional methods.

  16. Signs of muscle thixotropy during human ballistic wrist joint movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, H W

    2005-11-01

    A study was conducted on healthy subjects to determine whether voluntary ballistic wrist flexion movements are influenced by immediately preceding conditioning of the forearm muscles. Single rapid wrist flexion movements were made in response to an auditory "Go" signal. Rectified surface EMG was recorded from wrist flexors and extensors, and joint position was measured by a goniometer. The movements were preceded (2-3 s) by four different conditioning routines: 40-s rest (Rest), 10-s voluntary alternating wrist joint flexion and extension movements (Osc), and 10 s of 25 degrees weak isometric wrist extensor (Ext) or flexor contractions (Flex). When subjects made ballistic movements after Osc compared with Rest, peak velocity was higher (P = 0.02) and movement time shorter (P = 0.06), but there was no difference (P = 0.83) in motor reaction time (time between the onset of the first agonist burst and movement onset). If the movements were preceded by Ext compared with Flex, motor reaction time was longer (P = 0.01), indicating a longer electromechanical delay. There were no indications that postconditioning differences in agonist or antagonist muscle activity could explain the results. It was also demonstrated that, after Rest, peak velocity was lower (P < 0.01) for the first than for the second of a series of repetitive ballistic movements. The observations corresponded to results from passive experiments in which the median nerve was electrically stimulated. In conclusion, history-dependent (thixotropic) changes in skeletal muscle resistance seem to have implications for voluntary ballistic wrist movements. The study also provided evidence that muscle conditioning influences the central nervous reaction time preceding ballistic contractions.

  17. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashida Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. Case presentation A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  18. Structural insights into acetylated-histone H4 recognition by the bromodomain-PHD finger module of human transcriptional coactivator CBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Alexander N; Yang, Shuai; Zhou, Thomas Jiachi; Rusinova, Elena; Frasca, Antonio; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Bromodomain functions as the acetyl-lysine binding domains to regulate gene transcription in chromatin. Bromodomains are rapidly emerging as new epigenetic drug targets for human diseases. However, owing to their transient nature and modest affinity, histone-binding selectivity of bromodomains has remained mostly elusive. Here, we report high-resolution crystal structures of the bromodomain-PHD tandem module of human transcriptional coactivator CBP bound to lysine-acetylated histone H4 peptides. The structures reveal that the PHD finger serves a structural role in the tandem module and that the bromodomain prefers lysine-acetylated motifs comprising a hydrophobic or aromatic residue at -2 and a lysine or arginine at -3 or -4 position from the acetylated lysine. Our study further provides structural insights into distinct modes of singly and diacetylated histone H4 recognition by the bromodomains of CBP and BRD4 that function differently as a transcriptional coactivator and chromatin organizer, respectively, explaining their distinct roles in control of gene expression in chromatin.

  19. Structure of the human zinc finger protein HIVEP3: molecular cloning, expression, exon-intron structure, and comparison with paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicar, M D; Liu, Y; Allen, C E; Wu, L C

    2001-01-01

    Here we report the cloning and characterization of HIVEP3, the newest member in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer-binding protein family that encodes large zinc finger proteins and regulates transcription via the kappaB enhancer motif. The largest open reading frame of HIVEP3 contains 2406 aa. and is approximately 80% identical to the mouse counterpart. The HIVEP3 gene is located in the chromosomal region 1p34 and is at least 300 kb with 10 exons. RNA studies show that multiple HIVEP3 transcripts are differentially expressed and regulated. Additionally, transcription termination occurs in the ultimate exon, exon 10, or in exon 6. Therefore, HIVEP3 may produce protein isoforms that contain or exclude the carboxyl DNA binding domain and the leucine zipper by alternative RNA splicing and differential polyadenylation. Sequence homologous to HIVEP3 exon 6 is not found in mouse nor are the paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2. Zoo-blot analysis suggests that sequences homologous to the human exon 6 are present only in primates and cow. Therefore, a foreign DNA harboring a termination exon likely was inserted into the HIVEP3 locus relatively recently in evolution, resulting in the acquisition of novel gene regulatory mechanisms as well as the generation of structural and functional diversity. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Human-machine interaction force control:using a model-referenced adaptive impedance device to control an index finger exoskeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian BI; Can-jun YANG

    2014-01-01

    Exoskeleton robots and their control methods have been extensively developed to aid post-stroke rehabilitation. Most of the existing methods using linear controllers are designed for position control and are not suitable for human-machine interaction (HMI) force control, as the interaction system between the human body and exoskeleton is uncertain and nonlinear. We present an approach for HMI force control via model reference adaptive impedance control (MRAIC) to solve this problem in case of index finger exoskeleton control. First, a dynamic HMI model, which is based on a position control inner loop, is for-mulated. Second, the theoretical MRAC framework is implemented in the control system. Then, the adaptive controllers are designed according to the Lyapunov stability theory. To verify the performance of the proposed method, we compare it with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method in the time domain with real experiments and in the frequency domain with simu-lations. The results illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method in solving the nonlinear HMI force control problem in hand exoskeleton.

  1. A low cost wearable optical-based goniometer for human joint monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chee Kian; Luo, Zhiqiang; Chen, I.-Ming; Yeo, Song Huat

    2011-03-01

    Widely used in the fields of physical and occupational therapy, goniometers are indispensible when it comes to angular measurement of the human joint. In both fields, there is a need to measure the range of motion associated with various joints and muscle groups. For example, a goniometer may be used to help determine the current status of the range of motion in bend the arm at the elbow, bending the knee, or bending at the waist. The device can help to establish the range of motion at the beginning of the treatment series, and also allow the therapist to monitor progress during subsequent sessions. Most commonly found are the mechanical goniometers which are inexpensive but bulky. As the parts are mechanically linked, accuracy and resolution are largely limited. On the other hand, electronic and optical fiberbased goniometers promise better performance over its mechanical counterpart but due to higher cost and setup requirements does not make it an attractive proposition as well. In this paper, we present a reliable and non-intrusive design of an optical-based goniometer for human joint measurement. This device will allow continuous and longterm monitoring of human joint motion in everyday setting. The proposed device was benchmarked against mechanical goniometer and optical based motion capture system to validate its performance. From the empirical results, it has been proven that this design can be use as a robust and effective wearable joint monitoring device.

  2. Electrical Properties of PPy-Coated Conductive Fabrics for Human Joint Motion Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyong Hu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Body motion signals indicate several pathological features of the human body, and a wearable human motion monitoring system can respond to human joint motion signal in real time, thereby enabling the prevention and treatment of some diseases. Because conductive fabrics can be well integrated with the garment, they are ideal as a sensing element of wearable human motion monitoring systems. This study prepared polypyrrole conductive fabric by in situ polymerization, and the anisotropic property of the conductive fabric resistance, resistance–strain relationship, and the relationship between resistance and the human knee and elbow movements are discussed preliminarily.

  3. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  4. In situ genetic correction of the sickle cell anemia mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells using engineered zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiano, Vittorio; Maeder, Morgan L; Angstman, James F; Haddad, Bahareh; Khayter, Cyd; Yeo, Dana T; Goodwin, Mathew J; Hawkins, John S; Ramirez, Cherie L; Batista, Luis F Z; Artandi, Steven E; Wernig, Marius; Joung, J Keith

    2011-11-01

    The combination of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and targeted gene modification by homologous recombination (HR) represents a promising new approach to generate genetically corrected, patient-derived cells that could be used for autologous transplantation therapies. This strategy has several potential advantages over conventional gene therapy including eliminating the need for immunosuppression, avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis by therapeutic vectors, and maintaining expression of the corrected gene by endogenous control elements rather than a constitutive promoter. However, gene targeting in human pluripotent cells has remained challenging and inefficient. Recently, engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been shown to substantially increase HR frequencies in human iPSCs, raising the prospect of using this technology to correct disease causing mutations. Here, we describe the generation of iPSC lines from sickle cell anemia patients and in situ correction of the disease causing mutation using three ZFN pairs made by the publicly available oligomerized pool engineering method (OPEN). Gene-corrected cells retained full pluripotency and a normal karyotype following removal of reprogramming factor and drug-resistance genes. By testing various conditions, we also demonstrated that HR events in human iPSCs can occur as far as 82 bps from a ZFN-induced break. Our approach delineates a roadmap for using ZFNs made by an open-source method to achieve efficient, transgene-free correction of monogenic disease mutations in patient-derived iPSCs. Our results provide an important proof of principle that ZFNs can be used to produce gene-corrected human iPSCs that could be used for therapeutic applications.

  5. Active Finger Recognition from Surface EMG Signal Using Bayesian Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Nozomu; Hoashi, Yuki; Konishi, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Ishigaki, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposed an active finger recognition method using Bayesian filter in order to control a myoelectric hand. We have previously proposed a finger joint angle estimation method based on measured surface electromyography (EMG) signals and a linear model. However, when we estimate 2 or more finger angles by this estimation method, the estimation angle of the inactive finger is not accurate. This is caused by interference of surface EMG signal. To solve this interference problem, we proposed active finger recognition method from the amplitude spectrum of surface EMG signal using Bayesian filter. To confirm the effectiveness of this recognition method, we developed a myoelectric hand simulator that implements proposed recognition algorithm and carried out real-time recognition experiment.

  6. The effects of exercise on finger extension of CVA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, C A; Quintana, L A

    1983-03-01

    The choice of activity to improve finger extension of post-CVA patients is based on untested assumptions and hypotheses. In this study, using electromyography of the extrinsic finger muscles and electrogoniometry of wrist and finger joints, the effects of five types of exercise on the finger extension of post-CVA patients were documented. Results indicated that resisted and rapid exercises recruited high percentages of output of all three muscles. Slow, unresisted extension exercises preferentially recruited the extensor digitorum. No exercise caused significant immediate changes in range of motion (ROM), flexor/extensor balance, time required to open the hand, or level of activity of the extensor digitorum during opening of the hand. Resisted grasp did not limit the patients' ability to extend the fingers. Variability in percent of motor output among the subjects of this study indicates the need to monitor each patient during therapy.

  7. Jointly Learning Multiple Sequential Dynamics for Human Action Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-An Liu

    Full Text Available Discovering visual dynamics during human actions is a challenging task for human action recognition. To deal with this problem, we theoretically propose the multi-task conditional random fields model and explore its application on human action recognition. For visual representation, we propose the part-induced spatiotemporal action unit sequence to represent each action sample with multiple partwise sequential feature subspaces. For model learning, we propose the multi-task conditional random fields (MTCRFs model to discover the sequence-specific structure and the sequence-shared relationship. Specifically, the multi-chain graph structure and the corresponding probabilistic model are designed to represent the interaction among multiple part-induced action unit sequences. Moreover we propose the model learning and inference methods to discover temporal context within individual action unit sequence and the latent correlation among different body parts. Extensive experiments are implemented to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method on two popular RGB human action datasets, KTH & TJU, and the depth dataset in MSR Daily Activity 3D.

  8. Tensile stress patterns predicted in the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolstra, J.H.; Tanaka, E.

    2009-01-01

    The direction of the first principal stress in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint was predicted with a biomechanical model of the human masticatory system. The results were compared with the orientation of its collagen fibers. Furthermore, the effect of an active pull of the superior

  9. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Rainsberger, R. [XYZ Scientific Applications, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  10. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); hide

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  11. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Me...

  12. Dissociation of supplementary motor area and primary motor cortex in human subjects when comparing index and little finger movements with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdler, M; Windischberger, C; Lanzenberger, R; Edward, V; Gartus, A; Deecke, L; Beisteiner, R

    2001-11-02

    This study provides the first investigation of supplementary motor area (SMA) and primary motor cortex (MI) activation with similar movements differing only in subjective difficulty of motor control. Brain activation with simple tapping of the right index finger (well trained during daily life and easy to perform) was compared with tapping of the little finger (less trained and difficult to perform) using functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla. Due to optimised movement standardisation, extrinsic influences on activation levels such as movement complexity, amplitude and frequency were minimised. Fifth finger tapping significantly increased the number of activated SMA voxels by 450% whereas MI activation showed no significant difference between fingers. We conclude that with similar movements the degree of subjective difficulty specifically modifies SMA but not MI activation.

  13. Static hand gesture recognition based on finger root-center-angle and length weighted Mahalanobis distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinghao; Shi, Chenbo; Liu, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Static hand gesture recognition (HGR) has drawn increasing attention in computer vision and human-computer interaction (HCI) recently because of its great potential. However, HGR is a challenging problem due to the variations of gestures. In this paper, we present a new framework for static hand gesture recognition. Firstly, the key joints of the hand, including the palm center, the fingertips and finger roots, are located. Secondly, we propose novel and discriminative features called root-center-angles to alleviate the influence of the variations of gestures. Thirdly, we design a distance metric called finger length weighted Mahalanobis distance (FLWMD) to measure the dissimilarity of the hand gestures. Experiments demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and robustness of our proposed HGR framework.

  14. Development of synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint of the human fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Carvalho de Moraes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities.

  15. Development of synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint of the human fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Moraes, L O; Tedesco, R C; Arraez-Aybar, L A; Klein, O; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Alonso, L G

    2015-11-26

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities.

  16. Convergent evidence from mouse and human studies suggests the involvement of zinc finger protein 326 gene in antidepressant treatment response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Jay Liou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The forced swim test (FST is a commonly used model to predict antidepressant efficacy. Uncovering the genetic basis of the model may unravel the mechanism of antidepressant treatment. METHODS: FVB/NJ (FVB and C57BL/6J (B6 were first identified as the response and non-response strains to fluoxetine (a serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressant treatment in the mouse FST. Simple-interval (SIM and composite-interval (CIM mappings were applied to map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs of the anti-immobility effect of fluoxetine in FST (FST(FLX in 865 male B6×FVB-F2 mice. The brain mRNA expressions of the gene with the maximum QTL-linkage signal for FST(FLX after the FST were compared between B6 and FVB mice and also compared between fluoxetine and saline treatment. The association of the variants in the human homologue of the mouse FST(FLX-QTL gene with major depressive disorder (MDD and antidepressant response were investigated in 1080 human subjects (MDD/control = 582/498. RESULTS: One linkage signal for FST(FLX-QTL was detected at an intronic SNP (rs6215396 of the mouse Zfp326 gene (maximal CIM-LOD = 9.36. The Zfp326 mRNA expression in the FVB thalamus was significantly down-regulated by fluoxetine in the FST, and the higher FVB-to-B6 Zfp326 mRNA expressions in the frontal cortex, striatum and hypothalamus diminished after fluoxetine treatment. Two coding-synonymous SNPs (rs2816881 and rs10922744 in the human homologue of Zfp326, ZNF326, were significantly associated with the 8-week antidepressant treatment response in the MDD patients (Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.004-0.028. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest the involvement of the Zfp326 and ZNF326 genes in antidepressant treatment response.

  17. Comparative immunolocalisation of perlecan with collagen II and aggrecan in human foetal, newborn and adult ovine joint tissues demonstrates perlecan as an early developmental chondrogenic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Shu, Cindy; Melrose, James

    2010-09-01

    We undertook a comparative immunolocalisation study on type II collagen, aggrecan and perlecan in a number of 12- to 14-week-old human foetal and postnatal (7-19 months) ovine joints including finger, toe, knee, elbow, hip and shoulder. This demonstrated that perlecan followed a virtually identical immunolocalisation pattern to that of type II collagen in the foetal tissues, but a slightly divergent localisation pattern in adult tissues. Aggrecan was also localised in the cartilaginous joint tissues, which were clearly delineated by toluidine blue staining and the type II collagen immunolocalisations. It was also present in the capsular joint tissues and in ligaments and tendons in the joint, which stained poorly or not at all with toluidine blue. In higher power microscopic views, antibodies to perlecan also stained small blood vessels in the synovial lining tissues of the joint capsule; however, this was not discernable in low power macroscopic views where the immunolocalisation of perlecan to pericellular regions of cells within the cartilaginous rudiments was a predominant feature. Perlecan was also evident in small blood vessels in stromal connective tissues associated with the cartilage rudiments and with occasional nerves in the vicinity of the joint tissues. Perlecan was expressed by rounded cells in the enthesis attachment points of tendons to bone and in rounded cells in the inner third of the meniscus, which stained prominently with type II collagen and aggrecan identifying the chondrogenic background of these cells and local compressive loads. Flattened cells within the tendon and in the surface laminas of articular cartilages and the meniscus did not express perlecan. Collected evidence presented herein, therefore, indicates that besides being a basement membrane component, perlecan is also a marker of chondrogenic cells in prenatal cartilages. In postnatal cartilages, perlecan displayed a pericellular localisation pattern rather than the territorial

  18. Generation of GFAP::GFP astrocyte reporter lines from human adult fibroblast-derived iPS cells using zinc-finger nuclease technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping-Wu; Haidet-Phillips, Amanda M; Pham, Jacqueline T; Lee, Youngjin; Huo, Yuqing; Tienari, Pentti J; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are instrumental to major brain functions, including metabolic support, extracellular ion regulation, the shaping of excitatory signaling events and maintenance of synaptic glutamate homeostasis. Astrocyte dysfunction contributes to numerous developmental, psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The generation of adult human fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided novel opportunities to study mechanisms of astrocyte dysfunction in human-derived cells. To overcome the difficulties of cell type heterogeneity during the differentiation process from iPSCs to astroglial cells (iPS astrocytes), we generated homogenous populations of iPS astrocytes using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) driven by the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter was inserted into the safe harbor adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus in disease and control-derived iPSCs. Astrocyte populations were enriched using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) and after enrichment more than 99% of iPS astrocytes expressed mature astrocyte markers including GFAP, S100β, NFIA and ALDH1L1. In addition, mature pure GFP-iPS astrocytes exhibited a well-described functional astrocytic activity in vitro characterized by neuron-dependent regulation of glutamate transporters to regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. Engraftment of GFP-iPS astrocytes into rat spinal cord grey matter confirmed in vivo cell survival and continued astrocytic maturation. In conclusion, the generation of GFAP::GFP-iPS astrocytes provides a powerful in vitro and in vivo tool for studying astrocyte biology and astrocyte-driven disease pathogenesis and therapy.

  19. A force feedback master finger in exoskeleton type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Honggen; Liu Hong; Xie Zongwu

    2010-01-01

    In order to eliminate the drawbacks of conventional force feedback gloves,a new type of master finger has been developed.By utilizing three"four-bar mechanism joint"in series and wire coupling mechanism,the master finger transmission ratio is kept exactly 1:1.4:1 in the whole movement range and it can make active motions in both extension and flexion directions.Additionally,to assttre faster data transmission and near zero delay in the master-slave operation,a digital signal processing/field programmable gate array(DSP/FPGA-FPGA)structure with 200μs cycle time is designed.The operating modes of the master finger can be contact or non-contact,which depends on the motion states of a slave finger,free motion or constrained motion.The position control employed in non-contact mode ensures unconstrained motion and the force control adopted in contact mode guarantees natural contact sensation.To evaluate the performances of the master finger,an experiment between the master finger and a DLR/HIT dexterous finger is conducted.The results demonstrate that this new type master finger can augment telepresence.

  20. Fingerübungen in Digitalien: Erfahrungsbericht eines teilnehmenden Beobachters der Digital Humanities aus Anlass eines Lehrexperiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanno Ehrlicher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Das neue interdisziplinäre Methodenfeld der Digital Humanities (DH hat bisher jenseits spezifischer DH-Studiengänge noch kaum Eingang in die Lehre gefunden. Der Essay beschreibt den Versuch, innerhalb der Romanistik im Rahmen einer curricularen Vorlesung eine praxis- und anwendungsnahe Einführung in die Digital Humanities zu vermitteln und will die dabei gewonnenen Erfahrungen mit allgemeineren Reflexionen über den Stand der DH zu verknüpfen. Den Verächtern der DH wird die These entgegengesetzt, dass dieser Bereich die Chance zu fruchtbaren neuen methodologischen Debatten und entsprechenden Innovationen bietet, den Anhängern, dass man zur erfolgreichen Verankerung der DH in der universitären Lehre es mit dem Bemühen um ‚harte‘ normierte Standards im Umgang mit den Daten auch nicht übertreiben sollte und Querköpfe wie Franco Moretti für eine breite interdisziplinäre Akzeptanz der Methoden unverzichtbar sind.

  1. Human knee joint anatomy revisited: morphometry in the light of sex-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargel, Jens; Michael, Joern W P; Feiser, Janna; Ivo, Roland; Koebke, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates differences in the anatomy of male and female knee joints to contribute to the current debate on sex-specific total knee implants. Morphometric data were obtained from 60 human cadaver knees, and sex differences were calculated. All data were corrected for height, and male and female specimens presenting with an identical length of the femur were analyzed as matched pairs. Male linear knee joint dimensions were significantly larger when compared with females. When corrected for differences in height, medial-lateral dimensions of male knees were significantly larger than female; however, matched paired analysis did not prove these differences to be consistent. Although implant design should focus interindividual variations in knee joint anatomy, our data do not support the concept of a female-specific implant design.

  2. Simulation results of the grasping analysis of an underactuated finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niola Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a number of simulations concerning the grasping analysis is presented. The grasping device consist in an under-actuated finger driven by un-extendible tendon that is one of the fingers of a mechanical prosthesis that was principally conceived as human prosthesis. The results, however, are useful for any similar finger to be used in grasping devices for industrial and agricultural applications, Aanalysis maps of the grasping were obtained which show the “robustness” of the socket. The method seems to be a suitable tool for the optimum design of such under-actuated fingers for grasping devices.

  3. Modeling of the incudo-malleolar joint within a biomechanical model of the human ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihrle, Sebastian; Eiber, Albrecht; Eberhard, Peter, E-mail: peter.eberhard@itm.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Engineering and Computational Mechanics (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Under large quasi-static loads, the incudo-malleolar joint (IM joint), connecting the malleus and the incus, is highly mobile. It can be classified as a mechanical filter decoupling large quasi-static motions while transferring small dynamic excitations. To investigate the influence of the behavior of the IM joint, a detailed simulation model of the IM-complex is created. Mathematical modeling of the IM joint behavior under quasi-static excitation requires adequate modeling of the mechanics of the diarthrodial joint. Therefore, the geometry of the articular surfaces, the ligaments, as well as their viscoelastic properties have to be included in the model. The contact of the articular surfaces is implemented using a penalty based contact formulation utilizing the geometric information obtained from micro computer tomography (micro-CT) scans. The ligaments of the joint capsule are modeled by distributing force elements along the joint capsule, with the position and orientation derived from the micro-CT scans. It is shown that the effects which were observed in measurements on human temporal bones are described adequately by the model, if the contact of the articular surfaces and the preload of the viscoelastic fibers are taken into account in the simulation model. In the following, the detailed model is implemented in an elastic multibody system of the entire ear. The model allows the study of different quasi-static load cases of the ossicles, such as it occurs in the reconstruction of the middle ear and form the basis for future simulative studies of sound transmission in natural or reconstructed ears.

  4. Cartilage integrity and proteoglycan turnover are comparable in canine experimentally induced and human joint degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Intema

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA largely depends on the ability to translate observations to human OA. Surprisingly, direct comparison of characteristics of human and experimental OA is scarce. In the present study, cartilage integrity and matrix turnover in a canine model of joint degeneration were compared to human clinical OA. In 23 Beagle dogs, joint degeneration was induced in one knee, the contra-lateral knee served as a control. For comparison, human osteoarthritic and healthy knee cartilage were obtained at arthroplasty (n=14 and post-mortem (n=13. Cartilage was analyzed by histology and biochemistry. Values for cartilage integrity and proteoglycan (PG synthesis showed species specific differences; GAG content of healthy cartilage was 2-fold higher in canine cartilage and PG synthesis even 8-fold. However, the relative decrease in PG content between healthy and OA cartilage was similar for humans and canines (-17% vs. -15%, respectively, as was the histological damage (+7.0 vs. +6.1, respectively and the increase of PG synthesis (+100% vs. +70%, respectively. Remarkably, the percentage release of total and of newly formed PGs in human and canine controls was similar, as was the increase due to degeneration (+65% vs. +81% and +91% vs. +52%, respectively. Despite differences in control conditions, the observed changes in characteristics of cartilage integrity and matrix turnover are similar in a canine model of joint degeneration and human clinical OA. The canine Groove model shows that its characteristics reflect those of human OA which makes the model appropriate for studying human OA.

  5. The contribution of passive-elastic mechanisms to lower extremity joint kinetics during human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Ben; Silder, Amy; Heiderscheit, Bryan; Thelen, Darryl G

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of passive mechanisms to lower extremity joint kinetics in normal walking at slow, comfortable, and fast speeds. Twenty healthy young adults participated in a passive testing protocol in which the relaxed lower limb was manipulated through full sagittal hip, knee, and ankle ranges of motion while kinematics and applied forces were simultaneously measured. The relationship between passive joint moments and angles was modeled by a set of exponential functions that accounted for the stretch of uniarticular structures and biarticular muscles. Subject specific walking kinematics (80%, 100%, and 120% of preferred speed) were input into the passive models to estimate joint moments, power, and work attributable to passive mechanisms. Passive hip flexion moments were substantial from late stance through early swing, absorbing approximately 40% of the net negative work done during hip extension and producing over half of the net positive work done during the hip flexor power burst (H3). Passive ankle plantarflexor moments were also produced during pre-swing, but generated a smaller percentage ( approximately 10%) of the net ankle plantarflexor power burst (A2). The joint work attributed to passive structures increased significantly (pwalking speed. The biarticular rectus femoris and gastrocnemius allowed for net passive energy absorption at the knee and subsequent return at the hip and ankle (ppassive-elastic mechanisms can contribute substantially to normal human walking and that biarticular muscles play a role in passively transferring energy between joints.

  6. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the human temporomandibular joint disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beek, M; Koolstra, J H; van Ruijven, L J; van Eijden, T M

    2000-03-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint has been developed. The geometry of the articular cartilage and articular disc surfaces in the joint was measured using a magnetic tracking device. First, polynomial functions were fitted through the coordinates of these scattered measurements. Next, the polynomial description was transformed into a triangulated description to allow application of an automatic mesher. Finally, a finite element mesh of the articular disc was created by filling the geometry with tetrahedral elements. The articulating surfaces of the mandible and skull were modeled by quadrilateral patches. The finite element mesh and the patches were combined to create a three-dimensional model in which unrestricted sliding of the disc between the articulating surfaces was allowed. Simulation of statical joint loading at the closed jaw position predicted that the stress and strain distributions were located primarily in the intermediate zone of the articular disc with the highest values in the lateral part. Furthermore, it was predicted that considerable deformations occurred for relatively small joint loads and that relatively large variations in the direction of joint loading had little influence on the distribution of the deformations.

  7. Collagenous fibril texture of the human knee joint menisci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, W; Tillmann, B

    1998-04-01

    Anatomical and clinical literature describes the arrangement of collagen fibrils in the human meniscus as being "arcade-like". The "arcade-like" orientation, mainly running in a radial direction in the internal circumference and in a circular direction in the external circumference, was found in polarization light microscopic studies. This, however, does not provide a mechanical explanation for the direction of meniscus tears. In view of this contradiction collagen fibrils in the menisci of adults aged from 18 to 85 years were exposed layer-by-layer to study their arrangement by scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained by this procedure were compared to the path of the split lines. Scanning electron microscopy reveals three distinct layers in the meniscus cross section: (1) The tibial and femoral sides of the meniscus surfaces are covered by a meshwork of thin fibrils with a diameter of approximately 30 nm. (2) Beneath the superficial network there is a layer of lamellalike collagen fibril bundles on the tibial and femoral surface. In the area of the external circumference of the anterior and posterior segments the bundles of collagen fibrils are arranged in a radial direction. In all other parts the collagen fibril bundles intersect at various angles. (3) The main portion of the meniscus collagen fibrils are located in the central region between the femoral and the tibial surface layers. Everywhere in the central main portion of the meniscus the bundles of collagen fibrils are orientated in a circular manner. The split lines in the region of the internal circumference of the menisci are arranged in a circular manner, generally running in a radial direction in the portions adjacent to the base. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the direction of the split lines depends on the orientation of the collagen fibrils in the superficial lamellar layer. The arcade-like path of the collagen fibrils described in the literature can not be confirmed either by

  8. In vivo human gastrocnemius architecture with changing joint angle at rest and during graded isometric contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, M V; Binzoni, T; Hiltbrand, E; Fasel, J; Terrier, F; Cerretelli, P

    1996-10-01

    1. Human gastrocnemius medialis architecture was analysed in vivo, by ultrasonography, as a function of joint angle at rest and during voluntary isometric contractions up to the maximum force (MCV). maximum force (MVC). 2. At rest, as ankle joint angle increased from 90 to 150 deg, pennation increased from 15.8 to 27.7 deg, fibre length decreased from 57.0 to 34.0 mm and the physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) increased from 42.1 to 63.5 cm2. 3. From rest to MVC, at a fixed ankle joint angle of 110 deg, pennation angle increased from 15.5 to 33.6 deg and fibre length decreased from 50.8 to 32.9 mm, with no significant change in the distance between the aponeuroses. As a result of these changes the PCSA increased by 34.8%. 4. Measurements of pennation angle, fibre length and distance between the aponeuroses of the gastrocnemius medialis were also performed by ultrasound on a cadaver leg and found to be in good agreement with direct anatomical measurements. 5. It is concluded that human gastrocnemius medialis architecture is significantly affected both by changes of joint angle at rest and by isometric contraction intensity. The remarkable shortening observed during isometric contraction suggests that, at rest, the gastrocnemius muscle and tendon are considerably slack. The extrapolation of muscle architectural data obtained from cadavers to in vivo conditions should be made only for matching muscle lengths.

  9. Human Activity Recognition in Real-Times Environments using Skeleton Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, we proposed a most effective noble approach for Human activity recognition in real-time environments. We recognize several distinct dynamic human activity actions using kinect. A 3D skeleton data is processed from real-time video gesture to sequence of frames and getter skeleton joints (Energy Joints, orientation, rotations of joint angles from selected setof frames. We are using joint angle and orientations, rotations information from Kinect therefore less computation required. However, after extracting the set of frames we implemented several classification techniques Principal Component Analysis (PCA with several distance based classifiers and Artificial Neural Network (ANN respectively with some variants for classify our all different gesture models. However, we conclude that use very less number of frame (10-15% for train our system efficiently from the entire set of gesture frames. Moreover, after successfully completion of our classification methods we clinch an excellent overall accuracy 94%, 96% and 98% respectively. We finally observe that our proposed system is more useful than comparing to other existing system, therefore our model is best suitable for real-time application such as in video games for player action/gesture recognition.

  10. Computational study of thermal effects of large blood vessels in human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xu; He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to present a comprehensive investigation on the thermal effects of large blood vessels of human knee joint during topical cooling and fomentation treatment. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis by taking full use of the anatomical CAD model of human knee joint was developed to accurately simulate the treatment process. Based on the classical Pennes bio-heat transfer equation, the time evolution of knee joint's temperature distribution and heat flux from large blood vessels was obtained. In addition, we compared several influencing factors and obtained some key conclusions which cannot be easily acquired through clinical experiments. The results indicated that the thermal effects of large blood vessels could remarkably affect the temperature distribution of knee joint during treatment process. Fluctuations of blood flow velocity and metabolic heat production rate affect little on the thermal effects of large blood vessels. Changing the temperature of blood and regimes of treatment could effectively regulate this phenomenon, which is important for many physiological activities. These results provide a guideline to the basic and applied research for the thermally significant large blood vessels in the knee organism.

  11. Experiments and kinematics analysis of a hand rehabilitation exoskeleton with circuitous joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuhai; Fu, Yili; Zhang, Qinchao; Wang, Shuguo

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients, a wearable hand exoskeleton with circuitous joint is proposed. The circuitous joint adopts the symmetric pinion and rack mechanism (SPRM) with the parallel mechanism. The exoskeleton finger is a serial mechanism composed of three closed-chain SPRM joints in series. The kinematic equations of the open chain of the finger and the closed chains of the SPRM joints were built to analyze the kinematics of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton. The experimental setup of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton was built and the continuous passive motion (CPM) rehabilitation experiment and the test of human-robot interaction force measurement were conducted. Experiment results show that the mechanical design of the hand rehabilitation robot is reasonable and that the kinematic analysis is correct, thus the exoskeleton can be used for the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  12. Finger agnosia in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenal, Brian V; Jackson, Melissa D; Crucian, Gregory P; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn if a deficit of finger naming (finger agnosia or anomia) is a sensitive test for Alzheimer disease (AD) and the best means of testing for finger agnosia. The subjects were 38 patients with AD and 10 matched normal controls. All subjects were asked to name the thumb, index, and pinky fingers. No control subject had trouble naming any of these fingers, but 37% of the AD subjects did. When AD patients had difficulty with finger naming, they always had trouble naming the index finger. In the absence of stroke, the inability to name the index finger seems as an indicator of dementia. Although brief, this test is not extremely sensitive test for AD.

  13. Finger cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are indications that subjects with a reduced finger CIVD response are more prone to get local cold injuries, but more epidemiological research is needed to establish a firm relationship. Although it was observed that an early CIVD onset was associated with initially superior manual performance

  14. Time dependent human hip joint lubrication for periodic motion with stochastic asymmetric density function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzcholski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the calculation of the human hip joint parameters for periodic, stochastic unsteady, motion with asymmetric probability density function for gap height. The asymmetric density function indicates that the stochastic probabilities of gap height decreasing are different in comparison with the probabilities of the gap height increasing. The models of asymmetric density functions are considered on the grounds of experimental observations. Some methods are proposed for calculation of pressure distributions and load carrying capacities for unsteady stochastic conditions in a super thin layer of biological synovial fluid inside the slide biobearing gap limited by a spherical bone acetabulum. Numerical calculations are performed in Mathcad 12 Professional Program, by using the method of finite differences. This method assures stability of numerical solutions of partial differential equations and gives proper values of pressure and load carrying capacity forces occurring in human hip joints.

  15. Identification of human factors concerns in Joint Strike Fighter and training recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    KuÌ luÌ nk, BuÌ lent.

    2008-01-01

    Military aviation is the frontier of implementing leading edge technology. The major objectives of advanced technology aircraft are to increase pilot safety and mission efficiency; the Joint Strike Fighter, the most modern fighter aircraft under development, has many technological innovations for just this purpose. A common fact is that technology develops and is used faster than it can be researched thoroughly. This thesis seeks to identify and mitigate potential human factors concerns relat...

  16. "Suture fixation of the fingers": an effective method for positioning burned and contracted fingers using a pulley system as a guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Bakhshaeekia, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Preserving function of the hand is the aim of treatment in burned hands; appropriate splinting is one of the important measures during acute and chronic treatment. We introduce an effective safe method for positioning of fingers without violating the joints; In this method before performing skin graft for palmar finger burn or contracture release we suture tip of finger with silk 2-0 and fix it to dorsum of hand while extending the finger and for preventing slipping we insert some pulley like circles tied with silk 2-0 fixing over dorsum of mid phalanx. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  18. [Palmar and dorsal nail anlage of the small finger. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, P

    1998-07-01

    A congenital malformation of a 18-month-old boy is presented. Palmar and dorsal surface of the small finger presented a complete nail. Active flexion of the PIP and DIP joints was not possible. The small finger displayed typical dorsal skin both dorsally and palmarly. Flexion creases were absent. The palmar nail was removed, and the defect was covered by a cross-finger flap.

  19. A preliminary investigation of the neoprene tube finger extension splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, E N

    1997-01-01

    Neoprene tube finger extension splints were analyzed to determine the production, amounts, and directions of force magnitude on the proximal interphalangeal joint during the flexing of the tube up to angles of 80 degrees. The tubes were examined in their empty form, with a human digit inserted into the tube, and with portions of the tube on the volar and dorsal surfaces removed. Upward forces ranged from less than 100 g to 225 g in the empty tubes. Upon insertion of a human digit into the tubes, forces increased from 125 g at 10 degrees to 650 g at 80 degrees flexion. Removal of a 2-cm square portion on the dorsal surface over the PIP joint did not significantly affect the tube's ability to lift upward demonstrating little or no downward pressure in the device. The tube had little or no upward force following removal of a 2-cm square encompassing the angle of the device on the volar surface. Positive effectiveness of the tubes were examined in case reports.

  20. Development of a CPM Machine for Injured Fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yili; Zhang, Fuxiang; Ma, Xin; Meng, Qinggang

    2005-01-01

    Human fingers are easy to be injured. A CPM machine is a mechanism based on the rehabilitation theory of continuous passive motion (CPM). To develop a CPM machine for the clinic application in the rehabilitation of injured fingers is a significant task. Therefore, based on the theories of evidence based medicine (EBM) and CPM, we've developed a set of biomimetic mechanism after modeling the motions of fingers and analyzing its kinematics and dynamics analysis. We also design an embedded operating system based on ARM (a kind of 32-bit RISC microprocessor). The equipment can achieve the precise control of moving scope of fingers, finger's force and speed. It can serves as a rational checking method and a way of assessment for functional rehabilitation of human hands. Now, the first prototype has been finished and will start the clinical testing in Harbin Medical University shortly.

  1. Diagnosis and reconstruction of the human temporomandibular joint after trauma or internal derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessette, R W; Katzberg, R; Natiella, J R; Rose, M J

    1985-02-01

    This study reviewed the standardized records of 1100 patients with the symptoms of temporomandibular joint syndrome. Of these patients, only 4.5 percent required surgical intervention. The remaining patients were found to have masticatory muscle spasm and were treated by conservative dental methods. Over half the surgical patients had significant macrotrauma to the jaws in their past history. In addition, electromyographic measurement of the masseteric silent period duration in these patients did not reveal muscle spasm. These factors further serve to differentiate the surgical patient from the patient with myofascial pain dysfunction. The patients selected for surgery demonstrated moderate to severe joint disease and required arthroplasty with partial meniscectomy. A surgical technique is presented demonstrating the reconstruction of the meniscus with silicone implant. This same surgical technique is studied in 10 monkeys, and their joints are examined histologically. The results of surgery reveal that 87 percent of the patients reported improvement 1 year after surgery. In all patients complaining of temporomandibular joint clicking or crepitus, surgery produced complete alleviation of these symptoms. The results of surgery were also associated with a 62 percent increase of jaw opening. Histologic evaluation of the human meniscal resections revealed that in addition to an anatomic displacement of the meniscus, there are also significant cellular changes. These changes consisted of calcification, a decrease in cellularity, hyperemia, and a decrease in elastin content.

  2. Intralimb compensation strategy depends on the nature of joint perturbation in human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young-Hui; Roiz, Ronald A; Auyang, Arick G

    2008-01-01

    Due to the well-described spring-mass dynamics of bouncing gaits, human hopping is a tractable model for elucidating basic neuromuscular compensation principles. We tested whether subjects would employ a multi-joint or single-joint response to stabilize leg stiffness while wearing a spring-loaded ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) that applied localized resistive and assistive torques to the ankle. We analyzed kinematics and kinetics data from nine subjects hopping in place on one leg, at three frequencies (2.2, 2.4, and 2.8Hz) and three orthosis conditions (freely articulating AFO, AFO with plantarflexion resistance, and AFO with plantarflexion assistance). Leg stiffness was invariant across AFO conditions, however, compensation strategy depended upon the nature of the applied load. Biological ankle stiffness increased in response to a resistive load at twice the rate that it decreased with an assitive load. Ankle adjustments alone fully compensated for an assistive load with no net change in combined (biological plus applied) total ankle stiffness (p > or =0.133). In contrast, a resistive load resulted in a 7.4-9.0% increase in total ankle stiffness across frequencies and a concomitant 10-15% increase in knee joint stiffness at each frequency (pcompensation strategies that are specific to the nature of the joint loading.

  3. Acromioclavicular joint dislocations: radiological correlation between Rockwood classification system and injury patterns in human cadaver species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschler, Anica; Rösler, Klaus; Rotter, Robert; Gradl, Georg; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gierer, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The classification system of Rockwood and Young is a commonly used classification for acromioclavicular joint separations subdividing types I-VI. This classification hypothesizes specific lesions to anatomical structures (acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments, capsule, attached muscles) leading to the injury. In recent literature, our understanding for anatomical correlates leading to the radiological-based Rockwood classification is questioned. The goal of this experimental-based investigation was to approve the correlation between the anatomical injury pattern and the Rockwood classification. In four human cadavers (seven shoulders), the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were transected stepwise. Radiological correlates were recorded (Zanca view) with 15-kg longitudinal tension applied at the wrist. The resulting acromio- and coracoclavicular distances were measured. Radiographs after acromioclavicular ligament transection showed joint space enlargement (8.6 ± 0.3 vs. 3.1 ± 0.5 mm, p acromioclavicular joint space width increased to 16.7 ± 2.7 vs. 8.6 ± 0.3 mm, p acromioclavicular joint lesions higher than Rockwood type I and II. The clinical consequence for reconstruction of low-grade injuries might be a solely surgical approach for the acromioclavicular ligaments or conservative treatment. High-grade injuries were always based on additional structural damage to the coracoclavicular ligaments. Rockwood type V lesions occurred while muscle attachments were intact.

  4. Use of zinc-finger nucleases to knock out the WAS gene in K562 cells: a human cellular model for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel G. Toscano

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the WAS gene cause Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS, which is characterized by eczema, immunodeficiency and microthrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASP in lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role on megakaryocyte (MK development is poorly understood. In order to develop a human cellular model that mimics the megakaryocytic-derived defects observed in WAS patients we used K562 cells, a well-known model for study of megakaryocytic development. We knocked out the WAS gene in K562 cells using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN pair targeting the WAS intron 1 and a homologous donor DNA that disrupted WASP expression. Knockout of WASP on K562 cells (K562WASKO cells resulted in several megakaryocytic-related defects such as morphological alterations, lower expression of CD41ɑ, lower increments in F-actin polymerization upon stimulation, reduced CD43 expression and increased phosphatidylserine exposure. All these defects have been previously described either in WAS-knockout mice or in WAS patients, validating K562WASKO as a cell model for WAS. However, K562WASPKO cells showed also increased basal F-actin and adhesion, increased expression of CD61 and reduced expression of TGFβ and Factor VIII, defects that have never been described before for WAS-deficient cells. Interestingly, these phenotypic alterations correlate with different roles for WASP in megakaryocytic differentiation. All phenotypic alterations observed in K562WASKO cells were alleviated upon expression of WAS following lentiviral transduction, confirming the role of WASP in these phenotypes. In summary, in this work we have validated a human cellular model, K562WASPKO, that mimics the megakaryocytic-related defects found in WAS-knockout mice and have found evidences for a role of WASP as regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation. We propose the use of K562WASPKO cells as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the megakaryocytic-related defects observed in WAS

  5. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  6. The Power of a Soccer Ball: A Traumatic Open Finger Dislocation—A Rare Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Cihan Dülgeroğlu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal interphalangeal joint dislocations are injuries observed frequently and caused by axial loading on the finger in the extension. In this paper we present a traumatic open finger dislocation due to a ball hitting a wrestler. It was successfully treated with reduction and the volar plate and collateral bond fixation were applied with absorbable sutures.

  7. Investigation of the effects of human body stability on joint angles’ prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasha Zanoosi, A. A., E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@yahoo.com, E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@qiau.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Faculty of Industrial & Mechanical Engineering, Qazvin Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, D.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.; Feri, M. [Bu Ali-Sina University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beheshtiha, A. Sh. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Mechanics and Computational Mechanics (Germany); Fallahnejad, K. [Flinders University, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, School of Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Loosing stability control in elderly or paralyzed has motivated researchers to study how a stability control system works and how to determine its state at every time instant. Studying the stability of a human body is not only an important problem from a scientific viewpoint, but also finally leads to new designs of prostheses and orthoses and rehabilitation methods. Computer modeling enables researchers to study and describe the reactions and propose a suitable and optimized motion pattern to strengthen the neuromuscular system and helps a human body maintain its stability. A perturbation as a tilting is exposed to an underfoot plate of a musculoskeletal model of the body to study the stability. The studied model of a human body included four links and three degrees of freedom with eight muscles in the sagittal plane. Lagrangian dynamics was used for deriving equations of motion and muscles were modeled using Hill’s model. Using experimental data of joint trajectories for a human body under tilting perturbation, forward dynamics has been applied to predict joint trajectories and muscle activation. This study investigated the effects of stability on predicting body joints’ motion. A new stability function for a human body, based on the zero moment point, has been employed in a forward dynamics procedure using a direct collocation method. A multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm has been proposed to employ stability as a robotic objective function along with muscle stresses as a biological objective function. The obtained results for joints’ motion were compared to experimental data. The results show that, for this type of perturbations, muscle stresses are in conflict with body stability. This means that more body stability requires more stresses in muscles and reverse. Results also show the effects of the stability objective function in better prediction of joint trajectories.

  8. Does ankle joint power reflect type of muscle action of soleus and gastrocnemius during walking in cats and humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Neil J; Prilutsky, Boris I; Lichtwark, Glen A; Maas, Huub

    2013-04-26

    The main objective of this paper is to highlight the difficulties of identifying shortening and lengthening contractions based on analysis of power produced by resultant joint moments. For that purpose, we present net ankle joint powers and muscle fascicle/muscle-tendon unit (MTU) velocities for medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (SO) muscles during walking in species of different size (humans and cats). For the cat, patterns of ankle joint power and MTU velocity of MG and SO during stance were similar: negative power (ankle moment×angular velocitypower (generation of mechanical energy) was found during MTU shortening. This was also found for the general fascicle velocity pattern in SO. In contrast, substantial differences between ankle joint power and fascicle velocity patterns were observed for MG muscle. In humans, like cats, the patterns of ankle joint power and MTU velocity of SO and MG were similar. Unlike the cat, there were substantial differences between patterns of fascicle velocity and ankle joint power during stance in both muscles. These results indicate that during walking, only a small fraction of mechanical work of the ankle moment is either generated or absorbed by the muscle fascicles, thus confirming the contribution of in-series elastic structures and/or energy transfer via two-joint muscles. We conclude that ankle joint negative power does not necessarily indicate eccentric action of muscle fibers and that positive power cannot be exclusively attributed to muscle concentric action, especially in humans.

  9. Evaluation of pre-stresses in the menisci of human knee joint using microindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dai Soon; Bae, Ji Yong; Kim, Sung Youb; Jeon, Insu; Lu, Tian Jian

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the pre-stress in the menisci of a human knee joint, the technique of microindentation was adopted. Five specimens each for lateral and medial menisci attached to the tibia were prepared from the knee joints of Korean cadavers to represent the pre-stress state of the meniscus. To create test specimens for the stress-free state of the meniscus, each meniscus was resected from the tibia and cut into three parts, which were subsequently attached to a metal plate. Indentations were carried out in each meniscus in both the pre-stress state and the stress-free state. The pre-stresses in the menisci were evaluated using the load-versus-depth curves. Compressive pre-stresses were found in the menisci. For each indentation region, the pre-stresses in the medial meniscus were higher than in the lateral meniscus. The highest pre-stress in both the lateral and medial meniscus was found in the posterior regions, while the anterior regions experienced the lowest pre-stress. The obtained pre-stresses can be used for the accurate numerical analysis, the fabrication of artificial menisci, and the diagnosis of meniscal disease progression for human knee joints.

  10. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result.

  11. Effect of intercostal muscle and costovertebral joint material properties on human ribcage stiffness and kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindig, Matthew; Li, Zuoping; Kent, Richard; Subit, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Current finite element (FE) models of the human thorax are limited by the lack of local-level validation, especially in the ribcage. This study exercised an existing FE ribcage model for a 50th percentile male under quasi-static point loading and dynamic sternal loading. Both force-displacement and kinematic responses of the ribcage were compared against experimental data. The sensitivity of the model response to changes in the material properties of the costovertebral (CV) joints and intercostal muscles was assessed. The simulations found that adjustments to the CV joints tended to change the amount of rib rotation in the sagittal plane, while changes to the elastic modulus and thickness of the intercostal muscles tended to alter both the stiffness and the direction and magnitude of rib motions. This study can lend insight into the role that the material properties of these two thoracic structures play in the dynamics of the ribcage during a frontal loading condition.

  12. Rhythm patterns interaction--synchronization behavior for human-robot joint action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörtl, Alexander; Lorenz, Tamara; Hirche, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Interactive behavior among humans is governed by the dynamics of movement synchronization in a variety of repetitive tasks. This requires the interaction partners to perform for example rhythmic limb swinging or even goal-directed arm movements. Inspired by that essential feature of human interaction, we present a novel concept and design methodology to synthesize goal-directed synchronization behavior for robotic agents in repetitive joint action tasks. The agents' tasks are described by closed movement trajectories and interpreted as limit cycles, for which instantaneous phase variables are derived based on oscillator theory. Events segmenting the trajectories into multiple primitives are introduced as anchoring points for enhanced synchronization modes. Utilizing both continuous phases and discrete events in a unifying view, we design a continuous dynamical process synchronizing the derived modes. Inverse to the derivation of phases, we also address the generation of goal-directed movements from the behavioral dynamics. The developed concept is implemented to an anthropomorphic robot. For evaluation of the concept an experiment is designed and conducted in which the robot performs a prototypical pick-and-place task jointly with human partners. The effectiveness of the designed behavior is successfully evidenced by objective measures of phase and event synchronization. Feedback gathered from the participants of our exploratory study suggests a subjectively pleasant sense of interaction created by the interactive behavior. The results highlight potential applications of the synchronization concept both in motor coordination among robotic agents and in enhanced social interaction between humanoid agents and humans.

  13. Attribute And-Or Grammar for Joint Parsing of Human Pose, Parts and Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoung; Nie, Xiaohan; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2017-07-25

    This paper presents an attribute and-or grammar (A-AOG) model for jointly inferring human body pose and human attributes in a parse graph with attributes augmented to nodes in the hierarchical representation. In contrast to other popular methods in the current literature that train separate classifiers for poses and individual attributes, our method explicitly represents the decomposition and articulation of body parts, and account for the correlations between poses and attributes. The A-AOG model is an amalgamation of three traditional grammar formulations: (i)Phrase structure grammar representing the hierarchical decomposition of the human body from whole to parts; (ii)Dependency grammar modeling the geometric articulation by a kinematic graph of the body pose; and (iii)Attribute grammar accounting for the compatibility relations between different parts in the hierarchy so that their appearances follow a consistent style. The parse graph outputs human detection, pose estimation, and attribute prediction simultaneously, which are intuitive and interpretable. We conduct experiments on two tasks on two datasets, and experimental results demonstrate the advantage of joint modeling in comparison with computing poses and attributes independently. Furthermore, our model obtains better performance over existing methods for both pose estimation and attribute prediction tasks.

  14. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.; Scholten, J.G.; Kampen, A. van; Veth, R.P.H.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furth

  15. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.; Scholten, J.G.; Kampen, A. van; Veth, R.P.H.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furth

  16. Use of a robotic device to measure age-related decline in finger proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemanson, Morgan L; Rowe, Justin B; Chan, Vicky; Wolbrecht, Eric T; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in proprioception are known to affect postural stability, yet the extent to which such changes affect the finger joints is poorly understood despite the importance of finger proprioception in the control of skilled hand movement. We quantified age-related changes in finger proprioception in 37 healthy young, middle-aged, and older adults using two robot-based tasks wherein participants' index and middle fingers were moved by an exoskeletal robot. The first task assessed finger position sense by asking participants to indicate when their index and middle fingers were directly overlapped during a passive crisscross movement; the second task assessed finger movement detection by asking participants to indicate the onset of passive finger movement. When these tasks were completed without vision, finger position sense errors were 48 % larger in older adults compared to young participants (p proprioceptive reaction time was 78 % longer in older adults compared to young adults (p proprioception, these age-related differences were no longer apparent. No difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance was found for either proprioception task. These findings demonstrate that finger proprioception is impaired in older adults, and visual feedback can be used to compensate for this deficit. The findings also support the feasibility and utility of the FINGER robot as a sensitive tool for detecting age-related decline in proprioception.

  17. Development and Control of Compliant Hybrid Joints for Human-Symbiotic Mobile Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Li

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop a robot with the ability to secure human safety in humanrobot collisions arising in our living and working environments. The humansymbiotic service robot using compliant hybrid joints realizes human safety, absorbs impact force, and fulfills task. In unexpected or expected collisions with human, the arising impulse force is attenuated effectively by the proposed physical model. Owing to the displacement of the links, several recovery controls have been developed for the endeffector to maintain its desired task position after the collision. The force attenuation property has been verified through collision simulations and experiments in that the capability of the proposed passive arm in overcoming the limitations of active compliance control has been demonstrated.

  18. Design and analysis of an underactuated anthropomorphic finger for upper limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarkulov, Nurdos; Telegenov, Kuat; Zeinullin, Maralbek; Begalinova, Ainur; Shintemirov, Almas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a linkage based finger mechanism ensuring extended range of anthropomorphic gripping motions. The finger design is done using a path-point generation method based on geometrical dimensions and motion of a typical index human finger. Following the design description, and its kinematics analysis, the experimental evaluation of the finger gripping performance is presented using the finger 3D printed prototype. The finger underactuation is achieved by utilizing mechanical linkage system, consisting of two crossed four-bar linkage mechanisms. It is shown that the proposed finger design can be used to design a five-fingered anthropomorphic hand and has the potential for upper limb prostheses development.

  19. Generation of mastitis resistance in cows by targeting human lysozyme gene to β-casein locus using zinc-finger nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Yongsheng; Tian, Yuchen; Yu, Yuan; Gao, Mingqing; Hu, Guangdong; Su, Feng; Pan, Shaohui; Luo, Yan; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Mastitis costs the dairy industry billions of dollars annually and is the most consequential disease of dairy cattle. Transgenic cows secreting an antimicrobial peptide demonstrated resistance to mastitis. The combination of somatic cell gene targeting and nuclear transfer provides a powerful method to produce transgenic animals. Recent studies found that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) stimulated the integration of exogenous DNA stret...

  20. Viability of pHEMA Hydrogels as Coating in Human Synovial Joint Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Bavaresco

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available In artificial joints, the bone part is usually substituted by a metallic component with high corrosion and strength resistance while the articular cartilage is replaced by a polymer. Use of thin layer of a compliant material acting as a bearing surface in human replacement joints has recently generated considerable interest. This work analyses the coating of a solid porous substrate of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE with a poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (pHEMA and two sIPN-type blends: pHEMA-cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB and pHEMA-poly (ethyl methacrylate (PEM using 5.0% (w/w of the crosslinking agent and 11.0% (w/w of the linear reinforcing polymer. The wear resistance of the coating materials was evaluated in a TRI PIN ON DISK type equipment and the damage extension was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Preliminary qualitative tests were performed with the goal to identifying the hydrogels show the minimal required properties concerning wear strength. The pHEMA coating was completely destroyed during the first wear cycles, characterizing its low shear strength. By the other hand, after the complete experiment, both pHEMA-CAB and pHEMA-PEM blends showed a slightly improvement of abrasive and adhesive wear. This result indicates that the studied blends are promising materials to be used as compliant surfaces in joint prosthesis.

  1. A joint-space numerical model of metabolic energy expenditure for human multibody dynamic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo H; Roberts, Dustyn

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic energy expenditure (MEE) is a critical performance measure of human motion. In this study, a general joint-space numerical model of MEE is derived by integrating the laws of thermodynamics and principles of multibody system dynamics, which can evaluate MEE without the limitations inherent in experimental measurements (phase delays, steady state and task restrictions, and limited range of motion) or muscle-space models (complexities and indeterminacies from excessive DOFs, contacts and wrapping interactions, and reliance on in vitro parameters). Muscle energetic components are mapped to the joint space, in which the MEE model is formulated. A constrained multi-objective optimization algorithm is established to estimate the model parameters from experimental walking data also used for initial validation. The joint-space parameters estimated directly from active subjects provide reliable MEE estimates with a mean absolute error of 3.6 ± 3.6% relative to validation values, which can be used to evaluate MEE for complex non-periodic tasks that may not be experimentally verifiable. This model also enables real-time calculations of instantaneous MEE rate as a function of time for transient evaluations. Although experimental measurements may not be completely replaced by model evaluations, predicted quantities can be used as strong complements to increase reliability of the results and yield unique insights for various applications.

  2. The results of surgical and nonsurgical treatment of mallet finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starčević Branislav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The injury of the hand tendon classified as mallet finger presents the loss of continuity of the united lateral band of the extensor apparatus above distal interphalangeal joint, which consequently leads to specific deformity of distal interphalangeal joint which is called mallet (hammer finger. Objective Our paper had several research Objectives: presentation of the existing Results of surgical and nonsurgical treatment of mallet finger deformities and comparison of our findings and other authors’ Results. Method: The study was retro-prospective, and analyzed 62 patients treated in the Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade (at the Institute of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, and the Emergency Center in the period 1998 to 2003. The follow up of these patients lasted at least 8 months (from 8.3 months to 71.7 months. An average follow up was 28.7 months. The Objective parameters used in the study were as follows: sex, age, dominating hand, hand injury, finger injury, mode of treatment, complications, distal interphalangeal joint flexion and total movement of the distal interphalangeal joint. Collected data were analyzed by χ2-test and Student’s t-test. The confidence interval was p=0.05. Results: A total range of motion was 51.9±6.6 for nonsurgically treated patients, and 48.2±4.2 degrees for operated patients. Mean extension deficit of the distal interphalangeal joint was 6.5±3.3 for nonsurgical and 10.0±3.2 for operated patients. Conclusion: The Results confirmed that nonsurgical mode of treatment of mallet finger deformity was much more successful than surgical Method of treating the same deformity.

  3. Development of nerve fibres in the temporomandibular joint of the human fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramieri, G; Bonardi, G; Morani, V; Panzica, G C; Del Tetto, F; Arisio, R; Preti, G

    1996-07-01

    The development of nerve fibres in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in relation to the development of bone, muscle and fibre components was investigated in human fetuses ranging from 9 weeks of gestation to birth. Immunohistochemistry for the glia-associated protein S-100 and for the neuro-specific marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) were used; specimens were compared to specimens of adult TMJ capsule and disc. At 9-10 weeks, a small number of neural elements are already present in the connective tissue around the joint and in the mesenchyme between the two articular blastemas from which the disc will differentiate. By 19 weeks many nerve fibres are clearly visible. Immunohistochemical results suggest diffuse disc innervation extending along the entire disc but not in the thin central area. More complex structures, i.e. encapsulated corpuscles, were also seen. The fetal disc appears highly innervated compared to adult tissue; already at this developmental stage morphology and distribution of nerves and corpuscles in the joint capsule are comparable to those in the adult joint. It may be concluded that the innervation of the TMJ is detectable from the end of the second month and that it develops fully between the third and the fifth month of gestation. Nerve endings in the disc are most numerous at 20 weeks, after which a progressive reduction, possibly secondary to the growth of articular tissues, is observed throughout the last trimester of fetal life and into adult life. The innervation of the lateral pterygoid muscle, on the contrary, is much less than that seen in adult muscles, even at full-term.

  4. Finite element analysis of mechanical behavior of human dysplastic hip joints: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaeian, B; Zonoobi, D; Mabee, M; Hareendranathan, A R; El-Rich, M; Adeeb, S; Jaremko, J L

    2016-11-09

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common condition predisposing to osteoarthritis (OA). Especially since DDH is best identified and treated in infancy before bones ossify, there is surprisingly a near-complete absence of literature examining mechanical behavior of infant dysplastic hips. We sought to identify current practice in finite element modeling (FEM) of DDH, to inform future modeling of infant dysplastic hips. We performed multi-database systematic review using PRISMA criteria. Abstracts (n = 126) fulfilling inclusion criteria were screened for methodological quality, and results were analyzed and summarized for eligible articles (n = 12). The majority of the studies modeled human adult dysplastic hips. Two studies focused on etiology of DDH through simulating mechanobiological growth of prenatal hips; we found no FEM-based studies in infants or children. Finite element models used either patient-specific geometry or idealized average geometry. Diversities in choice of material properties, boundary conditions, and loading scenarios were found in the finite-element models. FEM of adult dysplastic hips demonstrated generally smaller cartilage contact area in dysplastic hips than in normal joints. Contact pressure (CP) may be higher or lower in dysplastic hips depending on joint geometry and mechanical contribution of labrum (Lb). FEM of mechanobiological growth of prenatal hip joints revealed evidence for effects of the joint mechanical environment on formation of coxa valga, asymmetrically shallow acetabulum and malformed femoral head associated with DDH. Future modeling informed by the results of this review may yield valuable insights into optimal treatment of DDH, and into how and why OA develops early in DDH.

  5. FAO-OIE-WHO Joint Technical Consultation on Avian Influenza at the Human-Animal Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tara; Capua, Ilaria; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Donis, Ruben; Fouchier, Ron; Mumford, Elizabeth; Peiris, Malik; Swayne, David; Thiermann, Alex

    2010-05-01

    For the past 10 years, animal health experts and human health experts have been gaining experience in the technical aspects of avian influenza in mostly separate fora. More recently, in 2006, in a meeting of the small WHO Working Group on Influenza Research at the Human Animal Interface (Meeting report available from: http://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/influenza/WHO_CDS_EPR_GIP_2006_3/en/index.html) in Geneva allowed influenza experts from the animal and public health sectors to discuss together the most recent avian influenza research. Ad hoc bilateral discussions on specific technical issues as well as formal meetings such as the Technical Meeting on HPAI and Human H5N1 Infection (Rome, June, 2007; information available from: http://www.fao.org/avianflu/en/conferences/june2007/index.html) have increasingly brought the sectors together and broadened the understanding of the topics of concern to each sector. The sectors have also recently come together at the broad global level, and have developed a joint strategy document for working together on zoonotic diseases (Joint strategy available from: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/011/ajl37e/ajl37e00.pdf). The 2008 FAO-OIE-WHO Joint Technical Consultation on Avian Influenza at the Human Animal Interface described here was the first opportunity for a large group of influenza experts from the animal and public health sectors to gather and discuss purely technical topics of joint interest that exist at the human-animal interface. During the consultation, three influenza-specific sessions aimed to (1) identify virological characteristics of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) important for zoonotic and pandemic disease, (2) evaluate the factors affecting evolution and emergence of a pandemic influenza strain and identify existing monitoring systems, and (3) identify modes of transmission and exposure sources for human zoonotic influenza infection (including discussion of specific exposure risks by affected countries). A

  6. Control System Design of the YWZ Multi-fingered Dexterous Hand

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The manipulation abilities of a multi‐fingered dexterous hand, such as motion in real‐time, flexibility, grasp stability etc., are largely dependent on its control system. This paper developed a control system for the YWZ dexterous hand, which had five fingers and twenty degrees of freedom (DOFs). All of the finger joints of the YWZ dexterous handwere active joints driven by twenty micro‐stepper motors respectively. The main contribution of this paper was that we were able to use stepper moto...

  7. Hierarchical Clustering Multi-Task Learning for Joint Human Action Grouping and Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An-An; Su, Yu-Ting; Nie, Wei-Zhi; Kankanhalli, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a hierarchical clustering multi-task learning (HC-MTL) method for joint human action grouping and recognition. Specifically, we formulate the objective function into the group-wise least square loss regularized by low rank and sparsity with respect to two latent variables, model parameters and grouping information, for joint optimization. To handle this non-convex optimization, we decompose it into two sub-tasks, multi-task learning and task relatedness discovery. First, we convert this non-convex objective function into the convex formulation by fixing the latent grouping information. This new objective function focuses on multi-task learning by strengthening the shared-action relationship and action-specific feature learning. Second, we leverage the learned model parameters for the task relatedness measure and clustering. In this way, HC-MTL can attain both optimal action models and group discovery by alternating iteratively. The proposed method is validated on three kinds of challenging datasets, including six realistic action datasets (Hollywood2, YouTube, UCF Sports, UCF50, HMDB51 & UCF101), two constrained datasets (KTH & TJU), and two multi-view datasets (MV-TJU & IXMAS). The extensive experimental results show that: 1) HC-MTL can produce competing performances to the state of the arts for action recognition and grouping; 2) HC-MTL can overcome the difficulty in heuristic action grouping simply based on human knowledge; 3) HC-MTL can avoid the possible inconsistency between the subjective action grouping depending on human knowledge and objective action grouping based on the feature subspace distributions of multiple actions. Comparison with the popular clustered multi-task learning further reveals that the discovered latent relatedness by HC-MTL aids inducing the group-wise multi-task learning and boosts the performance. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first work that breaks the assumption that all actions are either

  8. A Two-Axis Goniometric Sensor for Tracking Finger Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lefan; Meydan, Turgut; Williams, Paul Ieuan

    2017-04-05

    The study of finger kinematics has developed into an important research area. Various hand tracking systems are currently available; however, they all have limited functionality. Generally, the most commonly adopted sensors are limited to measurements with one degree of freedom, i.e., flexion/extension of fingers. More advanced measurements including finger abduction, adduction, and circumduction are much more difficult to achieve. To overcome these limitations, we propose a two-axis 3D printed optical sensor with a compact configuration for tracking finger motion. Based on Malus' law, this sensor detects the angular changes by analyzing the attenuation of light transmitted through polarizing film. The sensor consists of two orthogonal axes each containing two pathways. The two readings from each axis are fused using a weighted average approach, enabling a measurement range up to 180 ∘ and an improvement in sensitivity. The sensor demonstrates high accuracy (±0.3 ∘ ), high repeatability, and low hysteresis error. Attaching the sensor to the index finger's metacarpophalangeal joint, real-time movements consisting of flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and circumduction have been successfully recorded. The proposed two-axis sensor has demonstrated its capability for measuring finger movements with two degrees of freedom and can be potentially used to monitor other types of body motion.

  9. Virtual three-dimensional blackboard: three-dimensional finger tracking with a single camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andrew; Hassan-Shafique, Khurram; Shah, Mubarak; da Vitoria Lobo, N

    2004-01-10

    We present a method for three-dimensional (3D) tracking of a human finger from a monocular sequence of images. To recover the third dimension from the two-dimensional images, we use the fact that the motion of the human arm is highly constrained owing to the dependencies between elbow and forearm and the physical constraints on joint angles. We use these anthropometric constraints to derive a 3D trajectory of a gesticulating arm. The system is fully automated and does not require human intervention. The system presented can be used as a visualization tool, as a user-input interface, or as part of some gesture-analysis system in which 3D information is important.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S. [Oulu Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography.

  11. A personalized 3D-printed prosthetic joint replacement for the human temporomandibular joint: From implant design to implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, David C; Robinson, Dale; Redhead, Michael; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Moskaljuk, Adrian; Dimitroulis, George

    2017-05-01

    Personalized prosthetic joint replacements have important applications in cases of complex bone and joint conditions where the shape and size of off-the-shelf components may not be adequate. The objective of this study was to design, test and fabricate a personalized 3D-printed prosthesis for a patient requiring total joint replacement surgery of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The new 'Melbourne' prosthetic TMJ design featured a condylar component sized specifically to the patient and fixation screw positions that avoid potential intra-operative damage to the mandibular nerve. The Melbourne prosthetic TMJ was developed for a 58-year-old female recipient with end-stage osteoarthritis of the TMJ. The load response of the prosthesis during chewing and a maximum-force bite was quantified using a personalized musculoskeletal model of the patient's masticatory system developed using medical images. The simulations were then repeated after implantation of the Biomet Microfixation prosthetic TMJ, an established stock device. The maximum condylar stresses, screw stress and mandibular stress at the screw-bone interface were lower in the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ (259.6MPa, 312.9MPa and 198.4MPa, respectively) than those in the Biomet Microfixation device (284.0MPa, 416.0MPa and 262.2MPa, respectively) during the maximum-force bite, with similar trends also observed during the chewing bite. After trialing surgical placement and evaluating prosthetic TMJ stability using cadaveric specimens, the prosthesis was fabricated using 3D printing, sterilized, and implanted into the female recipient. Six months post-operatively, the prosthesis recipient had a normal jaw opening distance (40.0 mm), with no complications identified. The new design features and immediate load response of the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ suggests that it may provide improved clinical and biomechanical joint function compared to a commonly used stock device, and reduce risk of intra-operative nerve damage

  12. Asymmetry of the human cricothyroid joint%环甲关节的不对称性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明; 陈胜国; 张铭

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore what may cause the asymmetry of the cricothyroid joint, particularly its cavity. Methods A total of 38 cadaveric specimens (15 males and 5 females from China; 11 males and 7 females from New Zealand) were used for dissection, micro-computed tomography and histology staining. The cadavers were donated for the purposes of teaching and research under the Human Tissues Act. Results The results confirmed that the bilateral cricothyroid joints of a cadaver were asymmetric. The asymmetry existed not only on the articular surfaces, but also the capsules and cavities between the bilateral joints and within the joint. An angle between the inferior corner of the thyroid cartilarge and the lateral surface of the cricoid cartilarge, named as the C-T angle in this study, was measured and compared in this study. None of the C-T angles of the bilateral cricothyroid joints of a specimen was symmetric. Conclusions The asymmetry of the bilateral cricothyroid joint, particularly its cavity, may be determined by the asymmetry of the C-T angles of the bilateral joints. The C-T angle can be detected by the routine medical imaging methods, thus the angle may be used to evaluate the asymmetry of the cricothyroid joint.%目的 探讨环甲关节不对称性形成的原因.方法 38具福尔马林常规固定尸体(中国男性15例,女性5例;新西兰男性11例,女性7例.年龄范围57 ~ 95岁,平均年龄为74岁),采用大体解剖方法进行喉部取材后,去除环甲关节周围软组织,定义环状软骨板正中矢状面和甲状软骨板后缘及下角的长轴之间的角度为环甲角,利用ImageJ软件(NIH,USA)测量,并对喉标本左右侧、不同性别、不同人群的环甲角值差异进行统计学分析;取3例喉标本,利用Micro-CT和三维重建软件实现环甲关节的三维构建;之后将该3例标本脱钙、脱水、石蜡包埋后进行HE和Van-Gieson (VG)染色.结果 双侧环甲关节的关节面形态存在不对称性

  13. A spectroscopic approach to imaging and quantification of cartilage lesions in human knee joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Sundqvist, T.; Kuiper, J.-H.; Öberg, P. Å.

    2011-03-01

    We have previously described a technology based on diffuse reflectance of broadband light for measuring joint articular cartilage thickness, utilizing that optical absorption is different in cartilage and subchondral bone. This study is the first evaluation of the technology in human material. We also investigated the prospects of cartilage lesion imaging, with the specific aim of arthroscopic integration. Cartilage thickness was studied ex vivo in a number of sites (n = 87) on human knee joint condyles, removed from nine patients during total knee replacement surgery. A reflectance spectrum was taken at each site and the cartilage thickness was estimated using the blue, green, red and near-infrared regions of the spectrum, respectively. Estimated values were compared with reference cartilage thickness values (taken after sample slicing) using an exponential model. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were performed in a theoretical analysis of the experimental results. The reference cartilage thickness of the investigated sites was 1.60 ± 1.30 mm (mean ± SD) in the range 0-4.2 mm. Highest correlation coefficients were seen for the calculations based on the near-infrared region after normalization to the red region (r = 0.86) and for the green region (r = 0.80).

  14. Design and characterization of a wearable macrobending fiber optic sensor for human joint angle determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana S.; Catarino, André; Correia, Miguel V.; Frazão, Orlando

    2013-12-01

    The work presented here describes the development and characterization of intensity fiber optic sensor integrated in a specifically designed piece of garment to measure elbow flexion. The sensing head is based on macrobending incorporated in the garment, and the increase of curvature number was studied in order to investigate which scheme provided a good result in terms of sensitivity and repeatability. Results showed the configuration that assured a higher sensitivity (0.644 dBm/deg) and better repeatability was the one with four loops. Ultimately, this sensor can be used for rehabilitation purposes to monitor human joint angles, namely, elbow flexion on stroke survivors while performing the reach functional task, which is the most common upper-limb human gesture.

  15. Three-dimensional dynamic behaviour of the human knee joint under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, E M; Hefzy, M S

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the three-dimensional dynamic response of the human knee joint. A three-dimensional anatomical dynamic model was thus developed and consists of two body segments in contact (the femur and tibia) executing a general three-dimensional dynamic motion within the constraints of the different ligamentous structures. Each of the articular surfaces at the tibio-femoral joint was represented mathematically by a separate mathematical function. The joint ligaments were modelled as nonlinear elastic springs. The six-degrees-of-freedom joint motions were characterized by using six kinematic parameters, and ligamentous forces were expressed in terms of these six parameters. Knee response was studied by considering sudden external forcing pulse loads applied to the tibia. Model equations consist of nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equations coupled with nonlinear algebraic constraint conditions. Constraint equations were written to maintain at least one-point contact throughout motion; one- and two-point contact versions of the model were developed. This Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAE) system was solved by employing a DAE solver: the Differential/Algebraic System Solver (DASSL) developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A solution representing the response of this three-dimensional dynamic system was thus obtained for the first time. Earlier attempts to determine the system's response were unsuccessful owing to the inherent numerical instabilities in the system and the limitations of the solution techniques. Under the conditions tested, evidence of "femoral roll back" on both medial and lateral tibial plateaus was not observed from the model predictions. In the range of 20 degrees to 66 degrees of knee flexion, the lateral tibial contact point moved posteriorly while the medial tibial contact point moved anteriorly. In the range of 66 degrees to 90 degrees of knee flexion, contact was maintained only on the

  16. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  17. Differences in finger localisation performance of patients with finger agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Helen A; Kessels, Roy P C; de Haan, Edward H F; Kappelle, L Jaap; Leijten, Frans S; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2008-09-17

    Several neuropsychological studies have suggested parallel processing of somatosensory input when localising a tactile stimulus on one's own by pointing towards it (body schema) and when localising this touched location by pointing to it on a map of a hand (body image). Usually these reports describe patients with impaired detection, but intact sensorimotor localisation. This study examined three patients with a lesion of the angular gyrus with intact somatosensory processing, but with selectively disturbed finger identification (finger agnosia). These patients performed normally when pointing towards the touched finger on their own hand but failed to indicate this finger on a drawing of a hand or to name it. Similar defects in the perception of other body parts were not observed. The findings provide converging evidence for the dissociation between body image and body schema and, more importantly, reveal for the first time that this distinction is also present in higher-order cognitive processes selectively for the fingers.

  18. Sliding Window-Based Region of Interest Extraction for Finger Vein Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongyang Xiao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Region of Interest (ROI extraction is a crucial step in an automatic finger vein recognition system. The aim of ROI extraction is to decide which part of the image is suitable for finger vein feature extraction. This paper proposes a finger vein ROI extraction method which is robust to finger displacement and rotation. First, we determine the middle line of the finger, which will be used to correct the image skew. Then, a sliding window is used to detect the phalangeal joints and further to ascertain the height of ROI. Last, for the corrective image with certain height, we will obtain the ROI by using the internal tangents of finger edges as the left and right boundary. The experimental results show that the proposed method can extract ROI more accurately and effectively compared with other methods, and thus improve the performance of finger vein identification system. Besides, to acquire the high quality finger vein image during the capture process, we propose eight criteria for finger vein capture from different aspects and these criteria should be helpful to some extent for finger vein capture.

  19. Sliding window-based region of interest extraction for finger vein images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-03-18

    Region of Interest (ROI) extraction is a crucial step in an automatic finger vein recognition system. The aim of ROI extraction is to decide which part of the image is suitable for finger vein feature extraction. This paper proposes a finger vein ROI extraction method which is robust to finger displacement and rotation. First, we determine the middle line of the finger, which will be used to correct the image skew. Then, a sliding window is used to detect the phalangeal joints and further to ascertain the height of ROI. Last, for the corrective image with certain height, we will obtain the ROI by using the internal tangents of finger edges as the left and right boundary. The experimental results show that the proposed method can extract ROI more accurately and effectively compared with other methods, and thus improve the performance of finger vein identification system. Besides, to acquire the high quality finger vein image during the capture process, we propose eight criteria for finger vein capture from different aspects and these criteria should be helpful to some extent for finger vein capture.

  20. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  1. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Felipe Aguilar-Pereyra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user.

  2. Based on the Device's Finger Position%基于kinect的手指定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏来; 王迪; 邢程; 胡珊

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve more natural human-computer interaction, this paper presents a real-time finger positioning meth-od using the Kinect sensor.This method firstly gets a region that contain hand by the joint point information of Kinect, and then acquire the hand area in this region using skin color model, and at the same time ,use the Sobel method to extract the edge infor-mation of the hand, finally using k-curvature method to determine the finger tip. This method can quickly and accurately posi-tioning finger position, and pave the path for the identification of further finger movements.%为了实现更加自然的人机交互方式,利用微软的kinect体感设备提出一种实时手指定位方法。本方法首先利用ki-nect的关节点信息获取包含手部的区域,然后在此区域利用肤色颜色模型来提取出人的手部区域,并利用canny方法提取出手部的边缘信息,最后利用手部边缘曲线的曲率来判断手指的指尖。本方法能快速准确的定位手指位置,为进一步进行手指动作的识别做基础。

  3. Emotional Communication in Finger Braille

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Matsuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe analyses of the features of emotions (neutral, joy, sadness, and anger expressed by Finger Braille interpreters and subsequently examine the effectiveness of emotional expression and emotional communication between people unskilled in Finger Braille. The goal is to develop a Finger Braille system to teach emotional expression and a system to recognize emotion. The results indicate the following features of emotional expression by interpreters. The durations of the code of joy were significantly shorter than the durations of the other emotions, the durations of the code of sadness were significantly longer, and the finger loads of anger were significantly larger. The features of emotional expression by unskilled subjects were very similar to those of the interpreters, and the coincidence ratio of emotional communication was 75.1%. Therefore, it was confirmed that people unskilled in Finger Braille can express and communicate emotions using this communication medium.

  4. Development and morphogenesis of human wrist joint during embryonic and early fetal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Ortiz, Raúl; Caba, Octavio; Alvarez, Pablo; Prados, José C; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Aránega, Antonia; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio; Mérida-Velasco, Juan A

    2012-06-01

    The development of the human wrist joint has been studied widely, with the main focus on carpal chondrogenesis, ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage. However, there are some discrepancies concerning the origin and morphogenetic time-table of these structures, including nerves, muscles and vascular elements. For this study we used serial sections of 57 human embryonic (n = 30) and fetal (n = 27) specimens from O'Rahilly stages 17-23 and 9-14 weeks, respectively. The following phases in carpal morphogenesis have been established: undifferentiated mesenchyme (stage 17), condensated mesenchyme (stages 18 and 19), pre-chondrogenic (stages 19 and 20) and chondrogenic (stages 21 and over). Carpal chondrification and osteogenic processes are similar, starting with capitate and hamate (stage 19) and ending with pisiform (stage 22). In week 14, a vascular bud penetrates into the lunate cartilaginous mold, early sign of the osteogenic process that will be completed after birth. In stage 18, median, ulnar and radial nerves and thenar eminence appear in the hand plate. In stage 21, there are indications of the interosseous muscles, and in stage 22 flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus and lumbrical muscles, transverse carpal ligament and collateral ligaments emerge. In stage 23, the articular disc, radiocarpal and ulnocarpal ligaments and deep palmar arterial arch become visible. Radiate carpal and interosseous ligaments appear in week 9, and in week 10, dorsal radiocarpal ligament and articular capsule are evident. Finally, synovial membrane is observed in week 13. We have performed a complete analysis of the morphogenesis of the structures of the human wrist joint. Our results present new data on nervous and arterial elements and provide the basis for further investigations on anatomical pathology, comparative morphology and evolutionary anthropology. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  5. Best practices and joint calling of the HumanExome BeadChip: the CHARGE Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L Grove

    Full Text Available Genotyping arrays are a cost effective approach when typing previously-identified genetic polymorphisms in large numbers of samples. One limitation of genotyping arrays with rare variants (e.g., minor allele frequency [MAF] <0.01 is the difficulty that automated clustering algorithms have to accurately detect and assign genotype calls. Combining intensity data from large numbers of samples may increase the ability to accurately call the genotypes of rare variants. Approximately 62,000 ethnically diverse samples from eleven Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE Consortium cohorts were genotyped with the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip across seven genotyping centers. The raw data files for the samples were assembled into a single project for joint calling. To assess the quality of the joint calling, concordance of genotypes in a subset of individuals having both exome chip and exome sequence data was analyzed. After exclusion of low performing SNPs on the exome chip and non-overlap of SNPs derived from sequence data, genotypes of 185,119 variants (11,356 were monomorphic were compared in 530 individuals that had whole exome sequence data. A total of 98,113,070 pairs of genotypes were tested and 99.77% were concordant, 0.14% had missing data, and 0.09% were discordant. We report that joint calling allows the ability to accurately genotype rare variation using array technology when large sample sizes are available and best practices are followed. The cluster file from this experiment is available at www.chargeconsortium.com/main/exomechip.

  6. Body Parts Dependent Joint Regressors for Human Pose Estimation in Still Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantone, Matthias; Gall, Juergen; Leistner, Christian; Van Gool, Luc

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we address the problem of estimating 2d human pose from still images. Articulated body pose estimation is challenging due to the large variation in body poses and appearances of the different body parts. Recent methods that rely on the pictorial structure framework have shown to be very successful in solving this task. They model the body part appearances using discriminatively trained, independent part templates and the spatial relations of the body parts using a tree model. Within such a framework, we address the problem of obtaining better part templates which are able to handle a very high variation in appearance. To this end, we introduce parts dependent body joint regressors which are random forests that operate over two layers. While the first layer acts as an independent body part classifier, the second layer takes the estimated class distributions of the first one into account and is thereby able to predict joint locations by modeling the interdependence and co-occurrence of the parts. This helps to overcome typical ambiguities of tree structures, such as self-similarities of legs and arms. In addition, we introduce a novel data set termed FashionPose that contains over 7,000 images with a challenging variation of body part appearances due to a large variation of dressing styles. In the experiments, we demonstrate that the proposed parts dependent joint regressors outperform independent classifiers or regressors. The method also performs better or similar to the state-of-the-art in terms of accuracy, while running with a couple of frames per second.

  7. Design of Shape Memory Alloy-Based and Tendon-Driven Actuated Fingers towards a Hybrid Anthropomorphic Prosthetic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Kaplanoglu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of tendon-driven actuated fingers using a shape memory alloy for a hybrid anthropomorphic prosthetic hand. The ring and little (pinky fingers are selected for shape memory activation due to their lower degree of movement during multiple grasping configurations. The fingers' tendon system is based on shape memory alloy (SMA wires that form artificial muscle pairs for the required flexion/extension of the finger joints. The finger has four degrees of freedom such that three of them are active. An experimental setup was developed to evaluate the performance of the ring and little fingers. An electromyography (EMG controlled Pulse Width Modulated (PWM technique is preferred for the actuation of joint motions using a high speed microcontroller.

  8. Design of Shape Memory Alloy-Based and Tendon-Driven Actuated Fingers Towards a Hybrid Anthropomorphic Prosthetic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Kaplanoglu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of tendon‐driven actuated fingers using a shape memory alloy for a hybrid anthropomorphic prosthetic hand. The ring and little (pinky fingers are selected for shape memory activation due to their lower degree of movement during multiple grasping configurations. The fingersʹ tendon system is based on shape memory alloy (SMA wires that form artificial muscle pairs for the required flexion/extension of the finger joints. The finger has four degrees of freedom such that three of them are active. An experimental setup was developed to evaluate the performance of the ring and little fingers. An electromyography (EMG controlled Pulse Width Modulated (PWM technique is preferred for the actuation of joint motions using a high speed microcontroller.

  9. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienen, T G; Buma, P; Scholten, J G F; van Kampen, A; Veth, R P H; Verdonschot, N

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the influence of tibial torque on the meniscal displacement during knee-joint flexion. Three tantalum beads were inserted in the medial meniscus of six human-cadaver joints. The knee joints were placed and loaded in a loading apparatus, and the movements of the beads were determined by means of RSA during knee-joint flexion and extension with and without internal tibial (IT) and external tibial (ET) torque. During flexion without tibial torque, all menisci moved in posterior and lateral direction. The anterior horn showed significantly greater excursions than the posterior horn in both posterior and lateral direction. Internal tibial torque caused an anterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau. External tibial torque caused a posterior displacement of the pathway. External tibial torque restricted the meniscal displacement during the first 30 degrees of knee-joint flexion. The displacements of the meniscus in this experiment were similar to the displacements described in the in vivo MRI studies. Furthermore, the application of tibial torque confirmed the relative immobility of the posterior horn of the meniscus. During external tibial torque, the posterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau during the first 30 degrees of flexion might be restricted by the attached knee-joint capsule or the femoral condyle. This model revealed representative meniscal displacements during simple knee-joint flexion and also during the outer limits of passive knee-joint motion.

  10. Evaluation of an intact, an ACL-deficient, and a reconstructed human knee joint finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairis, Achilles; Stefanoudakis, George; Petousis, Markos; Vidakis, Nectarios; Tsainis, Andreas-Marios; Kandyla, Betina

    2016-02-01

    The human knee joint has a three-dimensional geometry with multiple body articulations that produce complex mechanical responses under loads that occur in everyday life and sports activities. Understanding the complex mechanical interactions of these load-bearing structures is of use when the treatment of relevant diseases is evaluated and assisting devices are designed. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee is one of four main ligaments that connects the femur to the tibia and is often torn during sudden twisting motions, resulting in knee instability. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical behavior of the human knee joint and evaluate the differences in its response for three different states, i.e., intact, ACL-deficient, and surgically treated (reconstructed) knee. The finite element models corresponding to these states were developed. For the reconstructed model, a novel repair device was developed and patented by the author in previous work. Static load cases were applied, as have already been presented in a previous work, in order to compare the calculated results produced by the two models the ACL-deficient and the surgically reconstructed knee joint, under the exact same loading conditions. Displacements were calculated in different directions for the load cases studied and were found to be very close to those from previous modeling work and were in good agreement with experimental data presented in literature. The developed finite element model for both the intact and the ACL-deficient human knee joint is a reliable tool to study the kinematics of the human knee, as results of this study show. In addition, the reconstructed human knee joint model had kinematic behavior similar to the intact knee joint, showing that such reconstruction devices can restore human knee stability to an adequate extent.

  11. Design Considerations for an Underactuated Robotic Finger Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Shuangji; CECCARELLI Marco; ZHAN Qiang; ARBONE Giuseppe; LU Zhen

    2009-01-01

    A design approach is presented in this paper for underactuation in robotic finger mechanisms. The characters of underactuated finger mechanisms are introduced as based on linkage and spring systems. The feature of self-adaptive enveloping grasp by underactuated finger mechanisms is discussed with feasible in grasping unknown objects. The design problem of robotic fingers is analyzed by looking at many aspects for an optimal functionality. Design problems and requirements for underactuated mechanisms are formulated as related to human-like robotic fingers. In particular, characteristics of finger mechanisms are analyzed and optimality criteria are summarized with the aim to formulate a general design algorithm. A general multi-objective optimization design approach is applied as based on a suitable optimization problem by using suitable expressions of optimality criteria. An example is illustrated as an improvement of finger mechanism in Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics (LARM) Hand. Results of design outputs and grasp simulations are reported with the aim to show the practical feasibility of the proposed concepts and computations.

  12. Estimation of Human Arm Joints Using Two Wireless Sensors in Robotic Rehabilitation Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertomeu-Motos, Arturo; Lledó, Luis D; Díez, Jorge A; Catalan, Jose M; Ezquerro, Santiago; Badesa, Francisco J; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolas

    2015-12-04

    This paper presents a novel kinematic reconstruction of the human arm chain with five degrees of freedom and the estimation of the shoulder location during rehabilitation therapy assisted by end-effector robotic devices. This algorithm is based on the pseudoinverse of the Jacobian through the acceleration of the upper arm, measured using an accelerometer, and the orientation of the shoulder, estimated with a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG) device. The results show a high accuracy in terms of arm joints and shoulder movement with respect to the real arm measured through an optoelectronic system. Furthermore, the range of motion (ROM) of 50 healthy subjects is studied from two different trials, one trying to avoid shoulder movements and the second one forcing them. Moreover, the shoulder movement in the second trial is also estimated accurately. Besides the fact that the posture of the patient can be corrected during the exercise, the therapist could use the presented algorithm as an objective assessment tool. In conclusion, the joints' estimation enables a better adjustment of the therapy, taking into account the needs of the patient, and consequently, the arm motion improves faster.

  13. Immunolocalization and expression of lubricin in the bilaminar zone of the human temporomandibular joint disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Loreto, Federico; Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Lubricin, which is a boundary joint lubricant, was investigated immunohistochemically in the bilaminar zone (BZ) of the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ), without any degenerative changes. Immunohistochemistry for lubricin detection was carried out on 33 TMJ discs obtained from 17 cadavers. Sections were incubated with diluted rabbit polyclonal anti-lubricin antibody and scored according to the percentage of lubricin immunopositive cells. Three different TMJ disc tissue compartments were analyzed, namely: the upper lamina, the inferior lamina and the loose connective tissue in the space between the laminae. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare protein expression (lubricin) among disc specimens' regions. Staining was noted within the TMJ disc cell populations in every disc tissue sample, with almost every cell immunolabeled by the lubricin antibody. The number of disc cells immunolabeled was almost the same in the 3 bilaminar zone regions. Positive extracellular matrix staining was also seen. The results of the present study suggest that lubricin is expressed in the TMJ disc bilaminar zone. Lubricin may have a role in normal disc posterior attachment physiology through the prevention of cellular adhesion as well as providing lubrication during normal bilaminar zone function.

  14. [Validation of the Tekscan system for statistic and dynamic pressure measurements of the human femorotibial joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, D; Becker, R; Li, S Feng; Friederich, N F; Müller, W

    2002-01-01

    In vitro dynamic pressure measurements in the healthy and pathologically altered knee joint help to improve our understanding of the loading pattern on femorotibial surfaces. The aim of the study was to evaluate a piezoresistive pressure measuring system. A human cadaveric knee was mounted in a material-testing machine (Bionix 858) using a specially designed knee-holding device. Axial loading of the knee, flexed at 20o, at 500 N, 1000N and 1500 N was then carried out. For the static investigations, the piezoresistive measuring system (Tekscan), was compared with the FUJI measuring system. In addition, dynamic measurements were also performed with the Tekscan System. With the exception of the lateral compartment at a load of 1500 N, no differences in maximum pressures were observed between the two systems. Nor were there any differences with regard to contact surfaces, either in the medial or lateral compartment (p > 0.05). However, the reproducibility of the data was significantly higher with the Tekscan System (p Tekscan System proved to be more reliable than the FUJI System, and permits simultaneous measurements in both compartments. The Tekscan System is suitable for dynamic measurement of the femorotibial joint, and permits measurements to be made under more physiological conditions.

  15. Computational stability of human knee joint at early stance in Gait: Effects of muscle coactivity and anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2017-08-20

    As one of the most complex and vulnerable structures of body, the human knee joint should maintain dynamic equilibrium and stability in occupational and recreational activities. The evaluation of its stability and factors affecting it is vital in performance evaluation/enhancement, injury prevention and treatment managements. Knee stability often manifests itself by pain, hypermobility and giving-way sensations and is usually assessed by the passive joint laxity tests. Mechanical stability of both the human knee joint and the lower extremity at early stance periods of gait (0% and 5%) were quantified here for the first time using a hybrid musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. The roles of muscle coactivity, simulated by setting minimum muscle activation at 0-10% levels and ACL deficiency, simulated by reducing ACL resistance by up to 85%, on the stability margin as well as joint biomechanics (contact/muscle/ligament forces) were investigated. Dynamic stability was analyzed using both linear buckling and perturbation approaches at the final deformed configurations in gait. The knee joint was much more stable at 0% stance than at 5% due to smaller ground reaction and contact forces. Muscle coactivity, when at lower intensities (knee joint at the heel strike. It also markedly diminishes forces in lateral hamstrings (by up to 39%) and contact forces on the lateral plateau (by up to 17%). Current work emphasizes the need for quantification of the lower extremity stability margin in gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Covering the Dorsal Finger Defect with Reverse Cross Finger Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Gurbuz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of finger extensor zone defects with or without tendon gaps still remains a challenge for surgeons. Although surgical treatments may differ, and range from the use of local, regional, to free flaps, the outcomes for all cases are not satisfactory. In this case report, we present a case of a 3rd finger extensor side crush injury including a defect of Dd (Digit Dorsal 1, Dd2 and Dd3 defects of extensor zones with tendon gap. Tendon gap was reconstructed using m. palmaris longus tendon graft and the defect was covered with reversed cross-finger flap (random pattern with good cosmetic and excellent functional results.

  17. Real-time visualization of joint cavitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory N Kawchuk

    Full Text Available Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking.

  18. [Boomerang flap. A true single-stage pedicled cross finger flap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaillard, P; Grangier, Y; Casoli, V; Martin, D; Baudet, J

    1996-06-01

    The indications for cover of long fingers have been considerably modified over recent years as a result of the concept of retrograde flow flaps. However, in some cases in which the dorsal digital networks cannot be used, cross-finger flaps are still indicated for cover of long fingers beyond the PIP joint. The authors present a new flap eliminating the need for this rather complicated procedure. The donor site takes advantage of the rich dorsal collateral arterial network of P1 of an adjacent healthy finger. The flap can be raised due to the constant existence of a bifurcation between the collateral dorsal digital arterial networks and the anastomoses situated at various levels between the dorsal and palmar collateral networks of the long fingers, which are constant as far as the PIP joint. A dorsolateral flap can therefore be raised from a healthy finger and transferred to the injured finger by raising the fatty connective tissue, including the dorsal collateral pedicles, in the shape of a boomerang. This flap covers distal defects from the PIP joint to the fingertip. The authors describe the anatomical basis for raising of the flap, the operative technique and report six clinical cases with a mean follow-up of 11 months.

  19. Secondary tensor and supinator muscles of the human proximal radio-ulnar joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hast, M H; Perkins, R E

    1986-01-01

    A gross anatomical study was made of the human elbow. Three very small muscles were found that are not described in contemporary anatomical publications. A lateral tensor muscle of the annular ligament was observed in seven of every ten cadavers; its action is to tense or pull the annular ligament laterally during supination. A medial tensor muscle of the annular ligament was found in two of every ten cadavers; its action is to tense the annular ligament, pulling it medially and distally, and to assist in supination. An accessory supinator muscle was found in four of ten cadavers; its action is to assist in supination. These muscles would be synergistic to the primary supinator muscles of the radio-ulnar joint. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3693061

  20. Steadily translating parabolic dissolution fingers

    CERN Document Server

    Kondratiuk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Dissolution fingers (or wormholes) are formed during the dissolution of a porous rock as a result of nonlinear feedbacks between the flow, transport and chemical reactions at pore surfaces. We analyze the shapes and growth velocities of such fingers within the thin-front approximation, in which the reaction is assumed to take place instantaneously with the reactants fully consumed at the dissolution front. We concentrate on the case when the main flow is driven by the constant pressure gradient far from the finger, and the permeability contrast between the inside and the outside of the finger is finite. Using Ivantsov ansatz and conformal transformations we find the family of steadily translating fingers characterized by a parabolic shape. We derive the reactant concentration field and the pressure field inside and outside of the fingers and show that the flow within them is uniform. The advancement velocity of the finger is shown to be inversely proportional to its radius of curvature in the small P\\'{e}clet...

  1. A new approach to depict bone surfaces in finger imaging using photoacoustic tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; van Es, Peter; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the vasculature close around the finger joints is of interest in the field of rheumatology. Locally increased vasculature in the synovial membrane of these joints can be a marker for rheumatoid arthritis. In previous work we showed that part of the photoacoustically induced ultrasound from t

  2. UWB micro-doppler radar for human gait analysis using joint range-time-frequency representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Fathy, Aly E.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel, standalone ultra wideband (UWB) micro-Doppler radar sensor that goes beyond simple range or micro-Doppler detection to combined range-time-Doppler frequency analysis. Moreover, it can monitor more than one human object in both line-of-sight (LOS) and through wall scenarios, thus have full human objects tracking capabilities. The unique radar design is based on narrow pulse transceiver, high speed data acquisition module, and wideband antenna array. For advanced radar post-data processing, joint range-time-frequency representation has been performed. Characteristics of human walking activity have been analyzed using the radar sensor by precisely tracking the radar object and acquiring range-time-Doppler information simultaneously. The UWB micro-Doppler radar prototype is capable of detecting Doppler frequency range from -180 Hz to +180 Hz, which allows a maximum target velocity of 9 m/s. The developed radar sensor can also be extended for many other applications, such as respiration and heartbeat detection of trapped survivors under building debris.

  3. Modeling 4D Human-Object Interactions for Joint Event Segmentation, Recognition, and Object Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ping; Zhao, Yibiao; Zheng, Nanning; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a 4D human-object interaction (4DHOI) model for solving three vision tasks jointly: i) event segmentation from a video sequence, ii) event recognition and parsing, and iii) contextual object localization. The 4DHOI model represents the geometric, temporal, and semantic relations in daily events involving human-object interactions. In 3D space, the interactions of human poses and contextual objects are modeled by semantic co-occurrence and geometric compatibility. On the time axis, the interactions are represented as a sequence of atomic event transitions with coherent objects. The 4DHOI model is a hierarchical spatial-temporal graph representation which can be used for inferring scene functionality and object affordance. The graph structures and parameters are learned using an ordered expectation maximization algorithm which mines the spatial-temporal structures of events from RGB-D video samples. Given an input RGB-D video, the inference is performed by a dynamic programming beam search algorithm which simultaneously carries out event segmentation, recognition, and object localization. We collected and released a large multiview RGB-D event dataset which contains 3,815 video sequences and 383,036 RGB-D frames captured by three RGB-D cameras. The experimental results on three challenging datasets demonstrate the strength of the proposed method.

  4. Optimised, low cost, low field dedicated extremity MRI is highly specific and sensitive for synovitis and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints: comparison with conventional high field MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B.J; Narvestad, E; Jacobsen, S;

    2005-01-01

    of the wrist and 2nd-5th MCP joints was performed on a low field MRI unit (0.2 T Esaote Artoscan) and a high field MRI unit (1.0 T Siemens Impact) on 2 subsequent days. MRI was performed and evaluated according to OMERACT recommendations. Additionally, conventional x ray, clinical, and biochemical examinations......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a low field dedicated extremity MRI unit for detection of bone erosions, synovitis, and bone marrow oedema in wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, with a high field MRI unit as the standard reference. METHODS: In 37 patients with RA and 28 healthy controls MRI...... were performed. In an initial low field MRI 'sequence selection phase', based on a subset of 10 patients and 10 controls, sequences for comparison with high field MRI were selected. RESULTS: With high field, spin echo MRI considered as the reference method, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy...

  5. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hofmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17 and professional clarinettists (N = 6 were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 x 2 x 2 design (register: low--high; tempo: slow--fast, dynamics: soft--loud. There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low--high of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions. The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean and peak force (Fmax were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g. guitar. Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N.For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N. Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  6. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  7. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  8. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMacRitchie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterisation of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  9. Review of Acute Traumatic Closed Mallet Finger Injuries in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Salazar Botero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In adults, mallet finger is a traumatic zone I lesion of the extensor tendon with either tendon rupture or bony avulsion at the base of the distal phalanx. High-energy mechanisms of injury generally occur in young men, whereas lower energy mechanisms are observed in elderly women. The mechanism of injury is an axial load applied to a straight digit tip, which is then followed by passive extreme distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ hyperextension or hyperflexion. Mallet finger is diagnosed clinically, but an X-ray should always be performed. Tubiana's classification takes into account the size of the bony articular fragment and DIPJ subluxation. We propose to stage subluxated fractures as stage III if the subluxation is reducible with a splint and as stage IV if not. Left untreated, mallet finger becomes chronic and leads to a swan-neck deformity and DIPJ osteoarthritis. The goal of treatment is to restore active DIPJ extension. The results of a six- to eight-week conservative course of treatment with a DIPJ splint in slight hyperextension for tendon lesions or straight for bony avulsions depends on patient compliance. Surgical treatments vary in terms of the approach, the reduction technique, and the means of fixation. The risks involved are stiffness, septic arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Given the lack of consensus regarding indications for treatment, we propose to treat all cases of mallet finger with a dorsal glued splint except for stage IV mallet finger, which we treat with extra-articular pinning.

  10. Universal Robot Hand Equipped with Tactile and Joint Torque Sensors: Development and Experiments on Stiffness Control and Object Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki NAKAMOTO

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Various humanoid robots have been developed and multifunction robot hands which are able to attach those robots like human hand is needed. But a useful robot hand has not been depeveloped, because there are a lot of problems such as control method of many degrees of freedom and processing method of enormous sensor outputs. Realizing such robot hand, we have developed five-finger robot hand. In this paper, the detailed structure of developed robot hand is described. The robot hand we developed has five fingers of multi-joint that is equipped with joint torque sensors and tactile sensors. We report experimental results of a stiffness control with the developed robot hand. Those results show that it is possible to change the stiffness of joints. Moreover we propose an object recognition method with the tactile sensor. The validity of that method is assured by experimental results.

  11. Principal component analysis in construction of 3D human knee joint models using a statistical shape model method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Jing-Sheng; Wang, Shaobai; Li, Pingyue; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    The statistical shape model (SSM) method that uses 2D images of the knee joint to predict the three-dimensional (3D) joint surface model has been reported in the literature. In this study, we constructed a SSM database using 152 human computed tomography (CT) knee joint models, including the femur, tibia and patella and analysed the characteristics of each principal component of the SSM. The surface models of two in vivo knees were predicted using the SSM and their 2D bi-plane fluoroscopic images. The predicted models were compared to their CT joint models. The differences between the predicted 3D knee joint surfaces and the CT image-based surfaces were 0.30 ± 0.81 mm, 0.34 ± 0.79 mm and 0.36 ± 0.59 mm for the femur, tibia and patella, respectively (average ± standard deviation). The computational time for each bone of the knee joint was within 30 s using a personal computer. The analysis of this study indicated that the SSM method could be a useful tool to construct 3D surface models of the knee with sub-millimeter accuracy in real time. Thus, it may have a broad application in computer-assisted knee surgeries that require 3D surface models of the knee.

  12. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewallen, E.A.; Bonin, C.A.; Li, Xin; Smith, J.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Larson, A.N.; Lewallen, D.G.; Cool, S.M.; Westendorf, J.J.; Krych, A.J.; Leontovich, A.A.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Wijnen, van A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options.To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed

  13. Acute finger injuries: part II. Fractures, dislocations, and thumb injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggit, Jeffrey C; Meko, Christian J

    2006-03-01

    Family physicians can treat most finger fractures and dislocations, but when necessary, prompt referral to an orthopedic or hand surgeon is important to maximize future function. Examination includes radiography (oblique, anteroposterior, and true lateral views) and physical examination to detect fractures. Dislocation reduction is accomplished with careful traction. If successful, further treatment focuses on the concomitant soft tissue injury. Referral is needed for irreducible dislocations. Distal phalanx fractures are treated conservatively, and middle phalanx fractures can be treated if reduction is stable. Physicians usually can reduce metacarpal bone fractures, even if there is a large degree of angulation. An orthopedic or hand surgeon should treat finger injuries that are unstable or that have rotation. Collateral ligament injuries of the thumb should be examine with radiography before physical examination. Stable joint injuries can be treated with splinting or casting, although an orthopedic or hand surgeon should treat unstable joints.

  14. Replantation (Finger, Hand, or Arm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... per month. The number of inches from the injury to the tip of a finger gives the minimum number of months after which ... Replantation refers to the surgical reattachment of a finger, hand, or arm that has been completely cut from a person’s ... 2017 by American Society for Surgery of the Hand × Search Tips Tip 1: Start with the basics like "carpal ...

  15. Position sense at the human elbow joint measured by arm matching or pointing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Anthony; Allen, Trevor J; Proske, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    Position sense at the human elbow joint has traditionally been measured in blindfolded subjects using a forearm matching task. Here we compare position errors in a matching task with errors generated when the subject uses a pointer to indicate the position of a hidden arm. Evidence from muscle vibration during forearm matching supports a role for muscle spindles in position sense. We have recently shown using vibration, as well as muscle conditioning, which takes advantage of muscle's thixotropic property, that position errors generated in a forearm pointing task were not consistent with a role by muscle spindles. In the present study we have used a form of muscle conditioning, where elbow muscles are co-contracted at the test angle, to further explore differences in position sense measured by matching and pointing. For fourteen subjects, in a matching task where the reference arm had elbow flexor and extensor muscles contracted at the test angle and the indicator arm had its flexors conditioned at 90°, matching errors lay in the direction of flexion by 6.2°. After the same conditioning of the reference arm and extension conditioning of the indicator at 0°, matching errors lay in the direction of extension (5.7°). These errors were consistent with predictions based on a role by muscle spindles in determining forearm matching outcomes. In the pointing task subjects moved a pointer to align it with the perceived position of the hidden arm. After conditioning of the reference arm as before, pointing errors all lay in a more extended direction than the actual position of the arm by 2.9°-7.3°, a distribution not consistent with a role by muscle spindles. We propose that in pointing muscle spindles do not play the major role in signalling limb position that they do in matching, but that other sources of sensory input should be given consideration, including afferents from skin and joint.

  16. Viscous fingering of miscible slices

    CERN Document Server

    De Wit, A; Martin, M; Wit, Anne De; Bertho, Yann; Martin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Viscous fingering of a miscible high viscosity slice of fluid displaced by a lower viscosity fluid is studied in porous media by direct numerical simulations of Darcy's law coupled to the evolution equation for the concentration of a solute controlling the viscosity of miscible solutions. In contrast with fingering between two semi-infinite regions, fingering of finite slices is a transient phenomenon due to the decrease in time of the viscosity ratio across the interface induced by fingering and dispersion processes. We show that fingering contributes transiently to the broadening of the peak in time by increasing its variance. A quantitative analysis of the asymptotic contribution of fingering to this variance is conducted as a function of the four relevant parameters of the problem i.e. the log-mobility ratio R, the length of the slice l, the Peclet number Pe and the ratio between transverse and axial dispersion coefficients $\\epsilon$. Relevance of the results is discussed in relation with transport of vi...

  17. The stem cell zinc finger 1 (SZF1)/ZNF589 protein has a human-specific evolutionary nucleotide DNA change and acts as a regulator of cell viability in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Letizia; Stadler, Michael; Manukjan, Georgi; Scherr, Michaela; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Steinemann, Doris; Ganser, Arnold

    2016-04-01

    The stem cell zinc finger 1 (SZF1)/ZNF589 protein belongs to the large family of Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) transcription factors, which are present only in higher vertebrates and epigenetically repress transcription by recruiting chromatin-modifying complexes to the promoter regions of their respective target genes. Although the distinct biological functions of most KRAB-ZNF proteins remain unknown, recent publications indicate their implication in fundamental processes, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, development, and tumorigenesis. SZF1/ZNF589 was first identified as a gene with SZF1-1 isoform specifically expressed in CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, strongly suggesting a role in epigenetic control of gene expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, the function of SZF1/ZNF589 in hematopoiesis has not yet been elucidated. Our study reveals SZF1/ZNF589 as a gene with a human-specific nucleotide DNA-change, conferring potential species-specific functional properties. Through shRNA-mediated loss-of-function experiments, we found that changes in expression of fundamental apoptosis-controlling genes are induced on SZF1/ZNF589 knockdown, resulting in inhibited growth of hematopoietic cell lines and decreased progenitor potential of primary human bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Moreover, we found that the SZF1/ZNF589 gene is differentially regulated during hypoxia in CD34(+) HSPCs in a cytokine-dependent manner, implicating its possible involvement in the maintenance of the hypoxic physiologic status of hematopoietic stem cells. Our results establish the role of SZF1/ZNF589 as a new functional regulator of the hematopoietic system.

  18. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A; Stapanian, Adrienne M P; Staley, Keith E

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  19. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  20. A three-dimensional analysis of finger and bow string movements during the release in archery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsak, Brian; Heller, Mario

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine finger and bow string movements during archery by investigating a top Austrian athlete (FITA score = 1233) under laboratory conditions. Maximum lateral bow string deflection and angular displacements for index, third, and ring fingers between the full draw position and the end of the release were quantified using a motion tracking system. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether bow string deflection and finger movements are predictive for scoring. Joint ranges of motion during the shot itself were large in the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and much smaller in the metacarpophalangeal joints. Contrary to our expectations, greater deflection leads to higher scores (R2 = .18, p < .001) and the distal interphalangeal joint of the third finger weakly predicts the deflection (R2 = .11, p < .014). More variability in the joint angles of the third finger was found in bad shots than in good shots. Findings in this study let presume that maximum lateral bow string deflection does not adversely affect the archer's performance.

  1. Analysis of suitable geometrical parameters for designing a tendon-driven under-actuated mechanical finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penta, Francesco; Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to optimize the geometrical parameters of an under-actuated mechanical finger by conducting a theoretical analysis of these parameters. The finger is actuated by a flexion tendon and an extension tendon. The considered parameters are the tendon guide positions with respect to the hinges. By applying such an optimization, the correct kinematical and dynamical behavior of the closing cycle of the finger can be obtained. The results of this study are useful for avoiding the snapthrough and the single joint hyperflexion, which are the two breakdowns most frequently observed during experimentation on prototypes. Diagrams are established to identify the optimum values for the tendon guides position of a finger with specified dimensions. The findings of this study can serve as guide for future finger design.

  2. Hand reconstruction using heterotopic replantation of amputated index and little fingers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gong-lin; CHEN Ke-ming; ZHANG Jun-hua; WANG Shi-yong

    2011-01-01

    In cases of severe segmental injury across the hand and wrist, but one or other fingers are still in peak condition, the fingers can be selected for replantation at the forearm bones to restore pinch function. Here we reported an unusual case with a severe crush-avulsion amputated injury to the right hand caused by a machine accident. We conducted hand reconstruction using heterotopic replantation of the amputated index and little fingers.During 19 months follow-up, the bone union healed well with satisfactory outcome. The interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joint of the fingers after the heterotopic replantation had a good holding activity. This is a worthwhile procedure and the patient is satisfied with the result. The major disadvantage of this method is the poor appearance of the reconstructed fingers.

  3. Integration of tactile input across fingers in a patient with finger agnosia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anema, H.A.; Overvliet, K.E.; Smeets, J.B.J.; Brenner, E.; Dijkerman, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Finger agnosia has been described as an inability to explicitly individuate between the fingers, which is possibly due to fused neural representations of these fingers. Hence, are patients with finger agnosia unable to keep tactile information perceived over several fingers separate? Here, we tested

  4. The function of the disco-muscular apparatus in the human temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, H

    1999-01-01

    The morphology and function of the disco-muscular apparatus of the human TMJ is a controversial subject. Connections between the muscles which move the mandible and the "disco-capsular complex" have been described in a contradictory way. The disco-muscular apparatus is also described as being more extensive than that of the M. pterygoideus alone to include to the Mm. temporalis and masseter. However, the involvement of the latter is considered to be a peripheral variation of the normal anatomy and of little, if any, functional significance. The existence of independent relationships between the deep portions of the masseter and temporal muscles and the disco-capsular apparatus of the human TMJ is rarely discussed or explained. The morphologic findings were derived from fixed and unfixed human temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of varying ages and both sexes, whereby the functional maturity of the masticatory apparatus was taken into consideration. The results of the study show that aside from fibers originating from the superior venter of the M. pterygoideus lateralis, additional muscle or connective tissue fibers from the perimysium of the M. masseter are inserted to varying extents into the disc. The same is true for the M. temporalis, which is also directly connected to the disc via muscular or fibrous elements, or indirectly via fibers from the M. masseter. The insertion of the M. pterygoideus lateralis is always in the medial portion of the Discus articularis and those of the Mm. temporalis and masseter in the middle and lateral portions of the disc respectively. It is highly probable that a direct force transfer through the Mm. temporalis and masseter to the articular disc takes place, and that these muscles contribute to the movement of the disc during jaw movement, whereas the size and form of the muscle insertions are subject to a great deal of individual variation.

  5. HUMAN HAND STUDY FOR ROBOTIC EXOSKELETON DELVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIROUAS Flaviu Ionut

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper will be presenting research with application in the rehabilitation of hand motor functions by the aid of robotics. The focus will be on the dimensional parameters of the biological human hand from which the robotic system will be developed. The term used for such measurements is known as anthropometrics. The anthropometric parameters studied and presented in this paper are mainly related to the angular limitations of the finger joints of the human hand.

  6. Estimation of Human Arm Joints Using Two Wireless Sensors in Robotic Rehabilitation Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Bertomeu-Motos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel kinematic reconstruction of the human arm chain with five degrees of freedom and the estimation of the shoulder location during rehabilitation therapy assisted by end-effector robotic devices. This algorithm is based on the pseudoinverse of the Jacobian through the acceleration of the upper arm, measured using an accelerometer, and the orientation of the shoulder, estimated with a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG device. The results show a high accuracy in terms of arm joints and shoulder movement with respect to the real arm measured through an optoelectronic system. Furthermore, the range of motion (ROM of 50 healthy subjects is studied from two different trials, one trying to avoid shoulder movements and the second one forcing them. Moreover, the shoulder movement in the second trial is also estimated accurately. Besides the fact that the posture of the patient can be corrected during the exercise, the therapist could use the presented algorithm as an objective assessment tool. In conclusion, the joints’ estimation enables a better adjustment of the therapy, taking into account the needs of the patient, and consequently, the arm motion improves faster.

  7. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of cartilaginous tissues in human temporomandibular joint during prolonged clenching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mori, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nikawa, H.; Murayama, T.; Ueda, K.; Ogawa, D.; Kuroda, S.; Naito, H.; Tanaka, M.; Koolstra, J.H.; Tanaka, E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Bruxism, the parafunctional habit of nocturnal grinding of the teeth and clenching, is associated with the onset of joint degeneration. Especially prolonged clenching is suggested to cause functional overloading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, the distributions of str

  8. Estimation of Human Hip and Knee Multi-Joint Dynamics Using the LOPES Gait Trainer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present and evaluate a novel method to estimate multi-joint leg impedance, using a robotic gait training device. The method is based on multi-input–multi-output system identification techniques and is designed for continuous torque perturbations at the hip and knee joint

  9. Multiple toe transplantations to reconstruct three amputated neighbouring distal fingers by heat press injury--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumiaki, Shimizu; Wei, Fu-Chan; Sassu, Paolo; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Yu-Te

    2009-09-01

    Heat press injury to the finger results in severe damage. When it is difficult to recover the function in the damaged finger, amputation may be unavoidable. We present a case of three heat press-injured neighbouring fingers reconstructed by multiple toe transplantations. All transplanted toes survived successfully. Two-point discrimination was 9, 10 and 7 mm in the index, middle and ring finger, respectively. The overall motion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint was as follows: 30/130 degrees, 30/75 degrees and 30/105 degrees at the index, middle and ring finger. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint presented a claw deformity of 110 degrees, 65 degrees and 65 degrees. The ability to perform different kinds of pinches was judged fully satisfactory. We have found that toe transplantation is a good option for reconstruction of multiple amputated fingers by heat press injury. In our case, it was difficult to decide on the degree of debridement. Indeed, the reconstructed middle finger unfortunately developed secondary osteoarthritis as a result of the original heat press injury to the bone. Some may have preferred to sacrifice the joint, however, since the patient is young and highly motivated towards rehabilitation, we opted to preserve the PIP joint in the hope of providing superior function. Our principle is that great efforts should be afforded to preserve viable tissues during initial debridement if we plan to perform toe transplantation.

  10. A New Approach for Human Forearm Motion Assist by Actuated Artificial Joint-An Inner Skeleton Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Subrata Kumar; Kiguchi, Kazuo; Teramoto, Kenbu

    In order to help the physical activities of the elderly or physically disabled persons, we propose a new concept of a power-assist inner skeleton robot (i.e., actuated artificial joint) that is supposed to assist the human daily life motion from inside of the human body. This paper presents an implantable 2 degree of freedom (DOF) inner skeleton robot that is designed to assist human elbow flexion-extension motion and forearm supination-pronation motion for daily life activities. We have developed a prototype of the inner skeleton robot that is supposed to assist the motion from inside of the body and act as an actuated artificial joint. The proposed system is controlled based on the activation patterns of the electromyogram (EMG) signals of the user's muscles by applying fuzzy-neuro control method. A joint actuator with angular position sensor is designed for the inner skeleton robot and a T-Mechanism is proposed to keep the bone arrangement similar to the normal human articulation after the elbow arthroplasty. The effectiveness of the proposed system has been evaluated by experiment.

  11. Geometric Optimization of Three-Phalanx Prosthesis Underactuated Fingers using Particles Swarm Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somar M. Nacy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One are now interested to investigate the optimum design procedure for a finger driving mechanism to have a good configuration of the finger for its utilization in hand prosthesis. A Geometric Optimization of Three-Phalanx Prosthesis Underactuated Fingers (TPPUF based on a Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO was presented. Approach: Firstly, a numerical evaluation of the human-like motion was obtained by using an anthropomorphic finger mechanism. Secondly, the dimensional design of a finger driving mechanism had been formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem by using evaluation criteria for fundamental characteristics that were associated with finger motion, grasping equilibrium and force transmission. Results: Testing results indicated that the proposed PSO gives high-quality result and shorter computation time compared with genetic algorithm. Conclusion: Using the PSO Algorithm with the Matlab-software, it is possible to identify all the necessary parameters of the mathematical models.

  12. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  13. Learning dictionaries of sparse codes of 3D movements of body joints for real-time human activity understanding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Qi

    Full Text Available Real-time human activity recognition is essential for human-robot interactions for assisted healthy independent living. Most previous work in this area is performed on traditional two-dimensional (2D videos and both global and local methods have been used. Since 2D videos are sensitive to changes of lighting condition, view angle, and scale, researchers begun to explore applications of 3D information in human activity understanding in recently years. Unfortunately, features that work well on 2D videos usually don't perform well on 3D videos and there is no consensus on what 3D features should be used. Here we propose a model of human activity recognition based on 3D movements of body joints. Our method has three steps, learning dictionaries of sparse codes of 3D movements of joints, sparse coding, and classification. In the first step, space-time volumes of 3D movements of body joints are obtained via dense sampling and independent component analysis is then performed to construct a dictionary of sparse codes for each activity. In the second step, the space-time volumes are projected to the dictionaries and a set of sparse histograms of the projection coefficients are constructed as feature representations of the activities. Finally, the sparse histograms are used as inputs to a support vector machine to recognize human activities. We tested this model on three databases of human activities and found that it outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms. Thus, this model can be used for real-time human activity recognition in many applications.

  14. Advantages of using volar vein repair in finger replantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersa, Berkan; Kabakas, Fatih; Pürisa, Hüsrev; Özçelik, Ismail Bülent; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Sezer, Ilker; Tunçer, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Providing adequate venous outflow is essential in finger replantation surgeries. For a successful result, the quality and quantity of venous repairs should be adequate to drain arterial inflow. The digital dorsal venous plexus is a reliable source of material for venous repairs. Classically, volar digital veins have been used only when no other alternative was available. However, repairing volar veins to augment venous outflow has a number of technical advantages and gives a greater chance of survival. Increasing the repaired vein:artery ratio also increases the success of replantation. The volar skin, covering the volar vein, is less likely to be avulsed during injury and is also less likely to turn necrotic, than dorsal skin, after the replantation surgery. Primary repair of dorsal veins can be difficult due to tightness ensuing from arthrodesis of the underlying joint in flexion. In multiple finger replantations, repairing the volar veins after arterial repair and continuing to do so for each finger in the same way without changing the position of the hand and surgeon save time. In amputations with tissue loss, the size discrepancy is less for volar veins than for dorsal veins. We present the results of 366 finger replantations after volar vein repairs.

  15. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess ultrasonography (US) for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in finger and toe joints, tendons, and entheses in patients with psoriasis-associated arthritis (PsA) by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), projection radiography...... (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... in fingers and toes of patients with PsA. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  16. Singing Greeting Card Beeper as a Finger Pulse Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belusic, Gregor; Zupancic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a robust and low-priced finger pulse sensor from a singing greeting card beeper. The beeper outputs the plethysmographic signal, which is indistinguishable from that of commercial grade sensors. The sensor can be used in school for a number of experiments in human cardiovascular physiology.

  17. Singing Greeting Card Beeper as a Finger Pulse Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belusic, Gregor; Zupancic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a robust and low-priced finger pulse sensor from a singing greeting card beeper. The beeper outputs the plethysmographic signal, which is indistinguishable from that of commercial grade sensors. The sensor can be used in school for a number of experiments in human cardiovascular physiology.

  18. Real-Time Hand Gesture Recognition Using Finger Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand gesture recognition is very significant for human-computer interaction. In this work, we present a novel real-time method for hand gesture recognition. In our framework, the hand region is extracted from the background with the background subtraction method. Then, the palm and fingers are segmented so as to detect and recognize the fingers. Finally, a rule classifier is applied to predict the labels of hand gestures. The experiments on the data set of 1300 images show that our method performs well and is highly efficient. Moreover, our method shows better performance than a state-of-art method on another data set of hand gestures.

  19. Real-time hand gesture recognition using finger segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-hua; Kim, Jung-Tae; Liang, Jianning; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yu-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Hand gesture recognition is very significant for human-computer interaction. In this work, we present a novel real-time method for hand gesture recognition. In our framework, the hand region is extracted from the background with the background subtraction method. Then, the palm and fingers are segmented so as to detect and recognize the fingers. Finally, a rule classifier is applied to predict the labels of hand gestures. The experiments on the data set of 1300 images show that our method performs well and is highly efficient. Moreover, our method shows better performance than a state-of-art method on another data set of hand gestures.

  20. Finger Vein Recognition Using Local Line Binary Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiar Affendi Rosdi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a personal verification method using finger vein is presented. Finger vein can be considered more secured compared to other hands based biometric traits such as fingerprint and palm print because the features are inside the human body. In the proposed method, a new texture descriptor called local line binary pattern (LLBP is utilized as feature extraction technique. The neighbourhood shape in LLBP is a straight line, unlike in local binary pattern (LBP which is a square shape. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LLBP has better performance than the previous methods using LBP and local derivative pattern (LDP.

  1. Functional integrative analysis of the human hip joint: the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum and its relation with the orientation of the femoral neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Noémie; Baylac, Michel; Gagey, Olivier; Tardieu, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.

  2. Acute and prolonged reduction in joint stiffness in humans after exhausting stretch-shortening cycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitunen, S; Avela, J; Kyröläinen, H; Nicol, C; Komi, P V

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute and long-term fatigue effects of exhausting stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise on the stiffness of ankle and knee joints. Five subjects were fatigued on a sledge apparatus by 100 maximal rebound jumps followed by continuous submaximal jumping until complete exhaustion. Neuromuscular fatigue effects were examined in submaximal hopping (HOP) and in maximal drop jumps (DJ) from 35 (DJ35) and 55 cm (DJ55) heights on a force plate. Additional force and reflex measurements were made using an ankle ergometer. Jumping tests and ankle ergometer tests were carried out before, immediately after, 2 h (2H), 2 days and 7 days (7D) after the SSC exercise. Kinematics, force and electromyography (EMG) recordings were complemented with inverse dynamics, which was used to calculate joint moments. The quotient of changes in joint moment divided by changes in joint angle was used as a value of joint stiffness (JS). In addition, blood lactate concentrations and serum creatine kinase activities were determined. The exercise induced a clear decrease in knee joint stiffness by [mean (SD)] 29 (13)% (P < 0.05) in HOP, 31 (6)% (P < 0.05) in DJ35 and 34 (14)% (P < 0.05) in DJ55. A similar trend was observed in the ankle joint stiffness with significant post-exercise reductions of 22 (8)% (P < 0.05) in DJ35 and of 27 (19)% (P < 0.05) at 2H in DJ55. The subsequent recovery of JS was slow and in some cases incomplete still at 7D. Generally, all the EMG parameters were fully recovered by 2H, whereas the force recovery was still incomplete at this time. These data indicate that the immediate reduction in JS was probably related to the effects of both central (neural) and peripheral (metabolic) fatigue, whereas the prolonged impairment was probably due to peripheral fatigue (muscle damage).

  3. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yee Low

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA wire. A customized test rig has been developed to measure the force and stroke produced by the SMA wire. In parallel with the actuator development, experimental investigations have been conducted on Quantum Tunnelling Composite (QTC and Pressure Conductive Rubber (PCR towards the development of a tactile sensor for the finger. The viability of using these materials for tactile sensing has been determined. Such a hybrid actuation approach aided with tactile sensing capability enables a finger design as an integral part of a prosthetic hand for applications up to the transradial amputation level.

  4. Development and retranslational validation of an in vitro model to characterize acute infections in large human joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Ingo H; Mehlhorn, Alexander; Dovi-Akue, David

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections can destroy cartilage integrity, resulting in osteoarthritis. Goal was to develop an in vitro model with in vivo validation of acute joint inflammation. Inflammation in cocultivated human synovial fibroblasts (SFB), chondrocytes (CHDR), and mononuclear cells (MNC) was success...... was significantly elevated in vitro on day 10 following maximum inflammation. Our in vitro model enables us to validate early inflammation of in vivo cell- and cytokine-specific regulatory patterns. This trial is registered with MISSinG, DRKS 00003536.......Bacterial infections can destroy cartilage integrity, resulting in osteoarthritis. Goal was to develop an in vitro model with in vivo validation of acute joint inflammation. Inflammation in cocultivated human synovial fibroblasts (SFB), chondrocytes (CHDR), and mononuclear cells (MNC......) was successively relieved for 10 days. Articular effusions from patients with (n = 7) and without (n = 5) postoperative joint infection in healthy patients (ASA 1-2) were used as model validation. Inflammation in vitro resulted in an enormous increase in IL-1 and a successive reduction in SFB numbers. CHDR however...

  5. Explanations pertaining to the hip joint flexor moment during the stance phase of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Cappelen, Katrine L; Skorini, Ragnhild ί; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2012-11-01

    A hip joint flexor moment in the last half of the stance phase during walking has repeatedly been reported. However, the purpose of this moment remains uncertain and it is unknown how it is generated. Nine male subjects were instructed to walk at 4.5 km/h with their upper body in three different positions: normal, inclined and reclined. Net joint moments were calculated about the hip, knee and ankle joint. The peak hip joint flexor moment during late stance was significantly lower during inclined walking than in the two other conditions. During normal walking the iliacus muscle showed no or very weak activity and first at the transition from stance to swing. When walking reclined, a clear but rather low activity level of the iliacus muscle was seen in the first half of the stance phase, which could contribute to the hip moment. In the inclined condition the iliacus showed much increased activity but only in the swing phase. It is concluded that the hip flexor moment in question is largely generated by passive structures in the form of ligaments resisting hip joint extension.

  6. Neuromuscular interfacing: establishing an EMG-driven model for the human elbow joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, James W L; Xie, Shane S Q; Pullan, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    Assistive devices aim to mitigate the effects of physical disability by aiding users to move their limbs or by rehabilitating through therapy. These devices are commonly embodied by robotic or exoskeletal systems that are still in development and use the electromyographic (EMG) signal to determine user intent. Not much focus has been placed on developing a neuromuscular interface (NI) that solely relies on the EMG signal, and does not require modifications to the end user's state to enhance the signal (such as adding weights). This paper presents the development of a flexible, physiological model for the elbow joint that is leading toward the implementation of an NI, which predicts joint motion from EMG signals for both able-bodied and less-abled users. The approach uses musculotendon models to determine muscle contraction forces, a proposed musculoskeletal model to determine total joint torque, and a kinematic model to determine joint rotational kinematics. After a sensitivity analysis and tuning using genetic algorithms, subject trials yielded an average root-mean-square error of 6.53° and 22.4° for a single cycle and random cycles of movement of the elbow joint, respectively. This helps us to validate the elbow model and paves the way toward the development of an NI.

  7. Patient-Specific Prosthetic Fingers by Remote Collaboration - A Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John

    2011-01-01

    The concealment of amputation through prosthesis usage can shield an amputee from social stigma and help improve the emotional healing process especially at the early stages of hand or finger loss. However, the traditional techniques in prosthesis fabrication defy this as the patients need numerous visits to the clinics for measurements, fitting and follow-ups. This paper presents a method for constructing a prosthetic finger through online collaboration with the designer. The main input from the amputee comes from the Computer Tomography (CT) data in the region of the affected and the non-affected fingers. These data are sent over the internet and the prosthesis is constructed using visualization, computer-aided design and manufacturing tools. The finished product is then shipped to the patient. A case study with a single patient having an amputated ring finger at the proximal interphalangeal joint shows that the proposed method has a potential to address the patient's psychosocial concerns and minimize the ...

  8. Sensing human hand motions for controlling dexterous robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Beth A.; Churchill, Philip J.; Little, Arthur D.

    1988-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM) system is designed to control dexterous robot hands such as the UTAH/MIT and Stanford/JPL hands. It is the first commercially available device which makes it possible to accurately and confortably track the complex motion of the human finger joints. The DHM is adaptable to a wide variety of human hand sizes and shapes, throughout their full range of motion.

  9. Integration of tactile input across fingers in a patient with finger agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Helen A; Overvliet, Krista E; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Brenner, Eli; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2011-01-01

    Finger agnosia has been described as an inability to explicitly individuate between the fingers, which is possibly due to fused neural representations of these fingers. Hence, are patients with finger agnosia unable to keep tactile information perceived over several fingers separate? Here, we tested a finger agnosic patient (GO) on two tasks that measured the ability to keep tactile information simultaneously perceived by individual fingers separate. In experiment 1 GO performed a haptic search task, in which a target (the absence of a protruded line) needed to be identified among distracters (protruded lines). The lines were presented simultaneously to the fingertips of both hands. Similarly to the controls, her reaction time decreased when her fingers were aligned as compared to when her fingers were stretched and in an unaligned position. This suggests that she can keep tactile input from different fingers separate. In experiment two, GO was required to judge the position of a target tactile stimulus to the index finger, relatively to a reference tactile stimulus to the middle finger, both in fingers uncrossed and crossed position. GO was able to indicate the relative position of the target stimulus as well as healthy controls, which indicates that she was able to keep tactile information perceived by two neighbouring fingers separate. Interestingly, GO performed better as compared to the healthy controls in the finger crossed condition. Together, these results suggest the GO is able to implicitly distinguish between tactile information perceived by multiple fingers. We therefore conclude that finger agnosia is not caused by minor disruptions of low-level somatosensory processing. These findings further underpin the idea of a selective impaired higher order body representation restricted to the fingers as underlying cause of finger agnosia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Disc displacement within the human temporomandibular joint: a systematic review of a 'noisy annoyance'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Naeije; A.H. te Veldhuis; E.C. te Veldhuis; C.M. Visscher; F. Lobbezoo

    2013-01-01

    To describe the scientific literature about the diagnosis, prevalence, aetiology, natural course and possible treatment modalities of disc displacements within the temporomandibular (TM) joint. PubMed was searched for specific indexing terms. The search yielded 1211 papers. After screening according

  11. Passive Muscle-Tendon Unit Gearing is Joint Dependent in Human Medial Gastrocnemius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F Hodson-Tole

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscles change length and develop force both passively and actively. Gearing allows muscle fibre length changes to be uncoupled from those of the whole muscle-tendon unit. During active contractions this process allows muscles to operate at mechanically favorable conditions for power or economical force production. Here we ask whether gearing is constant in passive muscle; determining the relationship between fascicle and muscle-tendon unit length change in the bi-articular medial gastrocnemius and investigating the influence of whether motion occurs at the knee or ankle joint. Specifically, the same muscle-tendon unit length changes were elicited by rotating either the ankle or knee joint whilst simultaneously measuring fascicle lengths in proximal and distal muscle regions using B-mode ultrasound. In both the proximal and distal muscle region, passive gearing values differed depending on whether ankle or knee motion occurred. Fascicle length changes were greater with ankle motion, likely reflecting anatomical differences in proximal and distal passive tendinous tissues, as well as shape changes of the adjacent mono-articular soleus. This suggests that there is joint-dependent dissociation between the mechanical behaviour of muscle fibres and the muscle-tendon unit during passive joint motions that may be important to consider when developing accurate models of bi-articular muscles.

  12. Explanations pertaining to the Hip Joint Flexor Moment During the Stance Phase of Human Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Cappelen, Katrine L; Skorini, Ragnhild;

    2012-01-01

    A hip joint flexor moment in the last half of the stance phase during walking has repeatedly been reported. However, the purpose of this moment remains uncertain and it is unknown how it is generated. Nine male subjects were instructed to walk at 4.5 km/h with their upper body in three different...

  13. Multi-finger prehension: control of a redundant mechanical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2009-01-01

    The human hand has been a fascinating object of study for researchers in both biomechanics and motor control. Studies of human prehension have contributed significantly to the progress in addressing the famous problem of motor redundancy. After a brief review of the hand mechanics, we present results of recent studies that support a general view that the apparently redundant design of the hand is not a source of computational problems but a rich apparatus that allows performing a variety of tasks in a reliable and flexible way (the principle of abundance). Multi-digit synergies have been analyzed at two levels of a hypothetical hierarchy involved in the control of prehensile actions. At the upper level, forces and moments produced by the thumb and virtual finger (an imagined finger with a mechanical action equal to the combined mechanical action of all four fingers of the hand) co-vary to stabilize the gripping action and the orientation of the hand-held object. These results support the principle of superposition suggested earlier in robotics with respect to the control of artificial grippers. At the lower level of the hierarchy, forces and moments produced by individual fingers co-vary to stabilize the magnitude and direction of the force vector and the moment of force produced by the virtual finger. Adjustments to changes in task constraints (such as, for example, friction under individual digits) may be local and synergic. The latter reflect multi-digit prehension synergies and may be analyzed with the so-called chain effects: Sequences of relatively straightforward cause-effect links directly related to mechanical constraints leading to non-trivial strong co-variation between pairs of elemental variables. Analysis of grip force adjustments during motion of hand-held objects suggests that the central nervous system adjusts to gravitational and inertial loads differently. The human hand is a gold mine for researchers interested in the control of natural human

  14. Virtual Robot Teaching Based on Motion Analysis and Hand Manipulability for Multi-Fingered Robot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KAWASAKI, Haruhisa; FURUKAWA, Tomohir; UEKI, Satoshi; MOURI, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    A virtual robot teaching system, consisting of human demonstration and motion-intention analysis in a virtual reality environment, is an advanced form of automatic programming for multi-fingered robots...

  15. DNA methylation patterns in human tissues of uniparental origin using a zinc-Finger gene (ZNF127) from the Angelman/Prader-Willi region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Locker, J. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    In order to further our understanding of the epigenetic modification of DNA and its role in imprinting, we examined DNA methylation patterns of human tissues of uniparental origin. We used complete hydatidiform moles (CHM), which are totally androgenetic conceptions, to examine the paternal methylation pattern in the absence of a maternal contribution and we used ovarian teratomas to represent the maternal counterpart. We carried out an analysis of DNA methylation of a gene which has been shown to contain sites which are differentially methylated in a parent-specific fashion. The gene, ZNF127, is located on chromosome 15q11-q13 in the region associated with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The parent-of-origin DNA methylation has been postulated to reflect the presence of an imprint and recent studies have confirmed that ZNF127 is differentially expressed only from the paternal chromosome. We identified a unique pattern of hyper- and hypomethylated sites in androgenetic conceptions which was nearly identical to the paternal pattern found in sperm. This may represent the paternal germ-line methylation imprint. We also studied partial hydatidiform moles, non-molar triploid conceptions, normal chorionic villi, and somatic tissue. These all demonstrated a modified DNA methylation pattern characteristic of normal chorionic villi with only limited findings of the imprint. Our results suggest that human androgenetic conceptions may provide an excellent model to analyze epigenetic DNA modifications, such as methylation, in imprinted genes. The paternal allele-specific methylation imprint will also be useful clinically to confirm the androgenetic nature of suspected molar conceptions in which parental blood samples may not be available. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beck, Thomas J [Quantum Medical Metrics, 1450 South Rolling Road, Baltimore, MD 21227 (United States); Carrino, John A [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Bingham, Clifton O, E-mail: stutman@pha.jhu.edu [Divisions of Rheumatology and Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 {mu}m resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 {mu}m period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at {approx}25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a {approx}2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  17. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, Dan; Beck, Thomas J.; Carrino, John A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2011-09-01

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 µm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 µm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ~25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ~2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  18. Wrist and finger joint MR imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P;

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To elaborate the best MR imaging protocol for studies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the sensitivity and interobserver agreement with respect to detection of bone erosions (MR and radiography) and grading of synovial membrane hypertrophy (MR imaging only). MATERIAL...

  19. Global changes in Staphylococcus aureus gene expression during human prosthetic joint infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    2016-01-01

    sequencing (RNA-seq) was used for transcriptome profile of joint fluid obtained from a patient undergoing surgery due to acute S. aureus prosthetic joint infection. The S. aureus gene expression in the infection was compared with exponential culture of a S. aureus isolate obtained from the same sample using...... of known resistant genes. The patient showed no signs of improvement during 2-days treatment with antibiotics (different β-lactams and gentamicin) prior to the surgery. The RNA-seq data indicated that the strategy employed by S. aureus to survive and proliferate in the host during antibiotic treatment......, hemolysins, and immune evasion proteins. A number of chaperones and stress related genes were overexpressed indicating a stress response. Furthermore, the RNA-seq data provided clues of the potential major nutrient sources for the pathogen in vivo. Several amino acid degradation pathways were highly...

  20. Improving human ankle joint position sense using an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, N; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    Proprioception is comprised of sensory input from several sources including muscle spindles, joint capsule, ligaments and skin. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether the central nervous system was able to integrate an artificial biofeedback delivered through electrotactile stimulation of the tongue to improve proprioceptive acuity at the ankle joint. To address this objective, nine young healthy adults were asked to perform an active ankle-matching task with and without biofeedback. The underlying principle of the biofeedback consisted of supplying subjects with supplementary information about the position of their matching ankle position relative to their reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device (Tongue Display Unit). Measures of the overall accuracy and the variability of the positioning were determined using the absolute error and the variable error, respectively. Results showed more accurate and more consistent matching performances with than withou...

  1. Mechanics of finger-tip electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yewang; Li, Rui; Cheng, Huanyu; Ying, Ming; Bonifas, Andrew P; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang

    2013-10-28

    Tactile sensors and electrotactile stimulators can provide important links between humans and virtual environments, through the sensation of touch. Soft materials, such as low modulus silicones, are attractive as platforms and support matrices for arrays sensors and actuators that laminate directly onto the fingertips. Analytic models for the mechanics of three dimensional, form-fitting finger cuffs based on such designs are presented here, along with quantitative validation using the finite element method. The results indicate that the maximum strains in the silicone and the embedded devices are inversely proportional to the square root of radius of curvature of the cuff. These and other findings can be useful in formulating designs for these and related classes of body-worn, three dimensional devices.

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of IL-17A-Treated Synovial Fibroblasts from the Human Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Hattori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial fibroblasts contribute to the inflammatory temporomandibular joint under pathogenic stimuli. Synovial fibroblasts and T cells participate in the perpetuation of joint inflammation in a mutual activation feedback, via secretion of cytokines and chemokines that stimulate each other. IL-17 is an inflammatory cytokine produced primarily by Th17 cells which plays critical role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the roles of IL-17A in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD using genome-wide analysis of synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with TMD. IL-17 receptors were expressed in synovial fibroblasts as assessed using real-time PCR. Microarray analysis indicated that IL-17A treatment of synovial fibroblasts upregulated the expression of IL-6 and chemokines. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of IL-6, CXCL1, IL-8, and CCL20 was significantly higher in IL-17A-treated synovial fibroblasts compared to nontreated controls. IL-6 protein production was increased by IL-17A in a time- and a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, IL-17A simulated IL-6 protein production in synovial fibroblasts samples isolated from three patients. Furthermore, signal inhibitor experiments indicated that IL-17-mediated induction of IL-6 was transduced via activation of NFκB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. These results suggest that IL-17A is associated with the inflammatory progression of TMD.

  3. Analysing the Hydraulic Actuator-based Knee Unit Kinematics and Correlating the Numerical Results and Walking Human Knee Joint Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Trukhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art machinery development enables people with lost lower limb to continue their previous life despite a loss. International companies dealing with this area pursue a minimization of human behaviour problems because of amputation. Researches to create an optimal design of the artificial knee joint are under way.The work task was to define analytical relationships of changing kinematic parameters of the human walking on the flat surface such as an angle of the knee joint, knee point (moment, definition of reduced knee actuator (A load, as well as to compare obtained results with experimental data.As an A in created design, the article proposes to use a controlled shock absorber based on the hydraulic cylinder.A knee unit is a kinematic two-tier mechanism. One of the mechanism links performs rotational motion, and the other is rotation-translational to provide a rotation of the first one.When studying the hydraulic actuator device dynamics, as a generalized coordinate a coordinate of the piston x (or ρ position is chosen while in the study of link movements an angle β is preferable.Experimental data are obtained for a human with the body weight of 57.6 kg walking on the flat surface to estimate a value of the knee joint angle, speed, acceleration, torque, and capacity in the knee joint and are taken from the published works of foreign authors.A trigonometric approximation was used for fitting the experimental data. The resulting dependence of the reduced load on the stock of A is necessary to perform the synthesis of A. The criterion for linear mechanisms mentioned in the D.N. Popov’s work is advisable to use as a possible criterion for optimization of A.The results obtained are as follows:1. Kinematics linkage mechanism is described using relationships for dependencies of its geometrical parameters, namely a cylinder piston stroke x (or ρ and a links angle β.2. Obtained polynomials of kinematic relationships allow a synthesis of

  4. Reconstruction of finger pulp defect with reversed fasciocutaneous island flap from same finger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yao-jun; HONG Guang-xiang; XU Nan-wei; HU Zhi-yong; SHAO Lei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical curative effect of reconstruction of finger pulp defect by anastomosis of reversed fasciocutaneous island flap with dorsal branch of the digital nerve of the same finger. Methods: The restoration of finger pulp defect with fasciocutaneous island flap from the same finger was conducted in 25 cases (30 fingers) from January 2002 to June 2003. Nine patients (11 fingers) whose flaps with dorsal branch of the digital nerve anastomosed with the digital inherent nerve around the surface of the wound were Group A and the others were Group B. The follow-up was carried out at 3 and 9 months after the operation to observe the shape of finger pulp and the sense restoration between two groups.Results: All flaps of 25 cases (30 fingers) survived. Three months after operation, the patients had fully grown finger pulps and recovered the superficial sensation and tactile sense of finger pulps. The two point discrimination on average was 5.00 mm ± 0.23 mm in Group A and 6.00 mm ± 0.30 mm in Group B. The difference between two groups was highly significant. Nine months later, their senses of finger pulps between two groups were recovered basically. Conclusions:The reversed fasciocutaneous island flap from the same finger is the first choice to reconstruct the finger pulp defect, and the anastomosis of dorsal branch of the digital nerve shall be determined according to the specific condition.

  5. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seun Ah Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect; flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect; gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect; and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists.

  6. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seun Ah; Kim, Baek Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Na [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hee [Incheon Baek Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists.

  7. Equilibrium-point control of human elbow-joint movement under isometric environment by using multichannel functional electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro eMatsui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional electrical stimulation (FES is considered an effective technique for aiding quadriplegic persons. However, the human musculoskeletal system has highly nonlinearity and redundancy. It is thus difficult to stably and accurately control limbs using FES. In this paper, we propose a simple FES method that is consistent with the motion-control mechanism observed in humans. We focus on joint motion by a pair of agonist-antagonist muscles of the musculoskeletal system, and define theelectrical agonist-antagonist muscle ratio (EAA ratio and electrical agonist-antagonist muscle activity (EAA activity in light of the agonist-antagonist muscle ratio and agonist-antagonist muscle activity, respectively, to extract the equilibrium point and joint stiffness from electromyography (EMG signals. These notions, the agonist-antagonist muscle ratio and agonist-antagonist muscle activity, are based on the hypothesis that the equilibrium point and stiffness of the agonist-antagonist motion system are controlled by the central nervous system. We derived the transfer function between the input EAA ratio and force output of the end-point. We performed some experiments in an isometric environment using six subjects. This transfer-function model is expressed as a cascade-coupled dead time element and a second-order system. High-speed, high-precision, smooth control of the hand force were achieved through the agonist-antagonist muscle stimulation pattern determined by this transfer function model.

  8. Intelligent self-tuning of PID control for the robotic testing system for human musculoskeletal joints test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lianfang

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, an intelligent proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control method is introduced to the robotic testing system for the biomechanical study of human musculoskeletal joints. For the testing system, the robot is a highly nonlinear and heavily coupled complicated system, and the human spinal specimen also demonstrates nonlinear property when undergoing testing. Although the conventional PID control approach is extensively used in most industrial control systems, it will break down for nonlinear systems, particularly for complicated systems that have no precise mathematical models. To overcome those difficulties, an intelligent fuzzy PID controller is proposed replacing the widely used conventional PID controllers. The fuzzy PID algorithm is outlined using the fuzzy set theory. The design techniques are developed based on the linguistic phase plane approach. The heuristic rules of syntheses are summarized into a rule-based expert system. Experiments are carried out and the results demonstrate the good performance of the robotic testing system using the proposed control method.

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O.C. de Moraes

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks.

  10. Nodular fasciitis of the finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijima, Hiroaki; Okada, Kyoji; Ito, Hiroki; Shimada, Yoichi; Itoi, Eiji [Akita University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akita (Japan); Nanjo, Hiroshi [Akita University Hospital, Department of Clinical Pathology, Akita (Japan)

    2005-02-01

    Nodular fasciitis is a benign reactive lesion, often mistaken for a soft tissue sarcoma in clinical practice. Involvement of the finger is very rare and, as a result, in this location the lesion has sometimes been treated by ray amputation because of misdiagnosis. We report on the clinical and histological features of nodular fasciitis in a 30-year-old man who was treated by excisional biopsy. There has been no evidence of local recurrence at the recent follow-up 8 years after surgery. The importance of careful histological examination to avoid radical surgery should be emphasized because marginal excision can provide good results in the treatment of nodular fasciitis. (orig.)

  11. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  12. In vivo measurement of fascicle length and pennation of the human anconeus muscle at several elbow joint angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Daniel E; Smith, Cameron B; Harwood, Brad; Rice, Charles L

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound imaging has facilitated the reliable measure of the architectural variables fascicle length (LF ) and pennation angle (PA), at rest and during static and dynamic contractions in many human skeletal muscles in vivo. Despite its small size and very modest contribution to elbow extension torque, the anconeus muscle has proven a useful model for the study of neuromuscular function in health and disease. Recent single motor unit (MU) studies in the anconeus have reported discrete and identifiable individual trains of MU potentials from intramuscular electromyography (EMG) recordings during dynamic elbow extensions. It is unknown whether the anconeus has unique architectural features related to alterations in LF and PA throughout the elbow joint range of motion that may help explain these high-quality recordings. Previous anatomical studies have investigated this muscle in cadavers and at mainly one elbow joint angle. The purpose of this study was to measure in vivo PA and LF of the anconeus muscle in a relaxed state at different degrees of elbow flexion using ultrasonography. Ultrasound images were collected from 10 healthy males (25 ± 3 years) at 135°, 120°, 90°, 45°, and 0° of elbow flexion. Average values of LF decreased by 6 mm (10%), 6 mm (12%), and 4 mm (9%) from 135-120°, 120-90°, and 90-45° of elbow flexion, respectively, whereas average PA values increased by 1° (9%), 1° (8%), and 2° (14%) from 135-120°, 120-90°, and 45-0°, respectively. The results indicate that anconeus muscle architecture is dynamic, undergoing moderate changes with elbow joint excursion that are similar to other limb muscles reported elsewhere. The data obtained here are more comprehensive and representative of architectural changes at various elbow joint positions than those data reported in cadaveric studies. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that despite experiencing similar relative changes in muscle architecture to other skeletal muscles

  13. In vivo measurement of fascicle length and pennation of the human anconeus muscle at several elbow joint angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Daniel E; Smith, Cameron B; Harwood, Brad; Rice, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has facilitated the reliable measure of the architectural variables fascicle length (LF) and pennation angle (PA), at rest and during static and dynamic contractions in many human skeletal muscles in vivo. Despite its small size and very modest contribution to elbow extension torque, the anconeus muscle has proven a useful model for the study of neuromuscular function in health and disease. Recent single motor unit (MU) studies in the anconeus have reported discrete and identifiable individual trains of MU potentials from intramuscular electromyography (EMG) recordings during dynamic elbow extensions. It is unknown whether the anconeus has unique architectural features related to alterations in LF and PA throughout the elbow joint range of motion that may help explain these high-quality recordings. Previous anatomical studies have investigated this muscle in cadavers and at mainly one elbow joint angle. The purpose of this study was to measure in vivo PA and LF of the anconeus muscle in a relaxed state at different degrees of elbow flexion using ultrasonography. Ultrasound images were collected from 10 healthy males (25 ± 3 years) at 135°, 120°, 90°, 45°, and 0° of elbow flexion. Average values of LF decreased by 6 mm (10%), 6 mm (12%), and 4 mm (9%) from 135–120°, 120–90°, and 90–45° of elbow flexion, respectively, whereas average PA values increased by 1° (9%), 1° (8%), and 2° (14%) from 135–120°, 120–90°, and 45–0°, respectively. The results indicate that anconeus muscle architecture is dynamic, undergoing moderate changes with elbow joint excursion that are similar to other limb muscles reported elsewhere. The data obtained here are more comprehensive and representative of architectural changes at various elbow joint positions than those data reported in cadaveric studies. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that despite experiencing similar relative changes in muscle architecture to other skeletal

  14. Novel joint TOA/RSSI-based WCE location tracking method without prior knowledge of biological human body tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takahiro; Anzai, Daisuke; Jianqing Wang

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel joint time of arrival (TOA)/received signal strength indicator (RSSI)-based wireless capsule endoscope (WCE) location tracking method without prior knowledge of biological human tissues. Generally, TOA-based localization can achieve much higher localization accuracy than other radio frequency-based localization techniques, whereas wireless signals transmitted from a WCE pass through various kinds of human body tissues, as a result, the propagation velocity inside a human body should be different from one in free space. Because the variation of propagation velocity is mainly affected by the relative permittivity of human body tissues, instead of pre-measurement for the relative permittivity in advance, we simultaneously estimate not only the WCE location but also the relative permittivity information. For this purpose, this paper first derives the relative permittivity estimation model with measured RSSI information. Then, we pay attention to a particle filter algorithm with the TOA-based localization and the RSSI-based relative permittivity estimation. Our computer simulation results demonstrates that the proposed tracking methods with the particle filter can accomplish an excellent localization accuracy of around 2 mm without prior information of the relative permittivity of the human body tissues.

  15. Pain sensation in human osteoarthritic knee joints is strongly enhanced by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitner, Annett; Pester, Julia; Vogel, Franziska; Marintschev, Ivan; Lehmann, Thomas; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2017-09-01

    The major burden of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is pain. Since in elder patients diabetes mellitus is an important comorbidity of OA, we explored whether the presence of diabetes mellitus has a significant influence on pain intensity at the end stage of knee OA, and we aimed to identify factors possibly related to changes of pain intensity in diabetic patients. In 23 diabetic and 47 nondiabetic patients with OA undergoing total knee arthroplasty, we assessed the pain intensity before the operation using the "Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score". Furthermore, synovial tissue, synovial fluid (SF), cartilage, and blood were obtained. We determined the synovitis score, the concentrations of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the SF and serum, and of C-reactive protein and HbA1c and other metabolic parameters in the serum. We performed multivariate regression analyses to study the association of pain with several parameters. Diabetic patients had on average a higher Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score pain score than nondiabetic patients (P < 0.001). Knee joints from diabetic patients exhibited on average higher synovitis scores (P = 0.024) and higher concentrations of IL-6 in the SF (P = 0.003) than knee joints from nondiabetic patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that patients with higher synovitis scores had more intense pain independent of all investigated confounders, and that the positive association between pain intensities and IL-6 levels was dependent on diabetes mellitus and/or synovitis. These data suggest that diabetes mellitus significantly increases pain intensity of knee OA, and that in diabetic patients higher pain intensities were determined by stronger synovitis.

  16. Use of preputial skin for coverage of post-burn contractures of fingers in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed I Zaroo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hand burns are common injuries. Children frequently sustain burn injuries, especially to their hands. Contractures are a common sequel of severe burns around joints. The prepuce, or foreskin, has been used as a skin graft for a number of indications. We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of utilising the preputial skin for the management of post-burn contractures of fingers in uncircumcised male children. Materials and Methods: Preputial skin was used for the coverage of released contractures of fingers in 12 patients aged 2-6 years. The aetiology of burns was "Kangri" burn in eight patients and scalding in four patients. Six patients had contracture in two fingers, four patients in one finger, and two patients had contractures in three fingers. Results: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents. Conclusions: Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity.

  17. Finger crease pattern recognition using Legendre moments and principal component analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongfang Luo; Tusheng Lin

    2007-01-01

    The finger joint lines defined as finger creases and its distribution can identify a person. In this paper,we propose a new finger crease pattern recognition method based on Legendre moments and principal component analysis (PCA). After obtaining the region of interest (ROI) for each finger image in the preprocessing stage, Legendre moments under Radon transform are applied to construct a moment feature matrix from the ROI, which greatly decreases the dimensionality of ROI and can represent principal components of the finger creases quite well. Then, an approach to finger crease pattern recognition is designed based on Karhunen-Loeve (K-L) transform. The method applies PCA to a moment feature matrix rather than the original image matrix to achieve the feature vector. The proposed method has been tested on a database of 824 images from 103 individuals using the nearest neighbor classifier. The accuracy up to 98.584% has been obtained when using 4 samples per class for training. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed approach is feasible and effective in biometrics.

  18. The anthropomorphic design and experiments of HIT/DLR five-fingered dexterous hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Shaowei; Liu Yiwei; Jin Minghe; Lan Tian; Liu Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new developed anthropomorphic robot dexterous hand: HIT/DLR Hand II. The hand is composed of an independent palm and five identical modular fingers, and each finger has three degree of freedom (DOFs) and four joints. All the actuators and electronics are integrated in the finger body and the palm. Owing to using a new actuator, drivers and a novel arrangement, both the length and width of the finger is about two third of its former version. By using the wire coupling mechanism, the distal phalanx transmission ratio is kept exactly 1:1 in the whole movement range. The packing mechanism which is implemented directly in the finger body and palm not only reduces the size of whole hand but also make it more anthropomorphic. Additionally, the new designed force/torque and position sensors are integrated in the hand for increasing multisensory capability. To evaluate the performances of the finger mechanism, the position and impedance control experiments are conducted.

  19. Usefulness of Ultrasound Imaging in Detecting Psoriatic Arthritis of Fingers and Toes in Patients with Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara De simone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Given that clinical evaluation may underestimate the joint damage and that early treatment can slow down psoriatic arthritis (PsA progression, screening psoriasis patients with imaging tools that can depict early PsA changes would entail clear benefits. Objective. To compare the ability of X-ray and ultrasound (US examination in detecting morphological abnormalities consistent with early PsA in patients with psoriasis, using rheumatological evaluation as the gold standard for diagnosis. Methods. Patients with chronic plaque psoriasis and no previous PsA diagnosis attending our outpatient dermatology clinic and reporting finger/toe joint and/or tendon pain underwent X-ray and US evaluation; they were subsequently referred to a rheumatologist for clinical examination and review of imaging findings. Results. Abnormal US and/or X-ray findings involving at least one finger and/or toe (joints and/or tendons were seen in 36/52 patients: 11 had one or more X-ray abnormalities, including erosion, joint space narrowing, new bone formation, periarticular soft tissue swelling, and periarticular osteoporosis; 36 had suspicious changes on US. Conclusion. US proved valuable in detecting joint and/or tendon abnormalities in the fingers and toes of patients with suspicious changes. The dermatologist should consider US to obtain an accurate assessment of suspicious findings.

  20. Pseudotumoral ganglion cyst of a finger with unexpected remote origin: multimodality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilleau, Loic; Malghem, Jacques; Omoumi, Patrick; Simoni, Paolo; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Barbier, Olivier [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-04-15

    The case of a ganglion cyst in the pulp of a fifth finger in an elderly woman initially mimicking a soft tissue tumor is described. Most typical sites of ganglion cysts are well documented at the wrist and in the vicinity of inter-phalangeal and metacarpo-phalangeal joints. In this case, ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a cystic lesion within the pulp of the fifth finger and indicated carpal osteoarthritis as the distant - and unexpected - origin of the lesion. The suggested diagnosis of ganglion cyst was confirmed by computed tomography arthrography (CT arthrography) of the wrist, which showed opacification of the cyst on delayed acquisitions after intra-articular injection into the mid-carpal joint, through the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath. The communications between the degenerative carpal joint, the radio-ulnar bursa, the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath and the pedicle of the cyst were well demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. A Soft Sensor-Based Three-Dimensional (3-D) Finger Motion Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wookeun; Ro, Kyongkwan; Kim, Suin; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a soft sensor-based three-dimensional (3-D) finger motion measurement system is proposed. The sensors, made of the soft material Ecoflex, comprise embedded microchannels filled with a conductive liquid metal (EGaln). The superior elasticity, light weight, and sensitivity of soft sensors allows them to be embedded in environments in which conventional sensors cannot. Complicated finger joints, such as the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint of the thumb are modeled to specify the location of the sensors. Algorithms to decouple the signals from soft sensors are proposed to extract the pure flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction joint angles. The performance of the proposed system and algorithms are verified by comparison with a camera-based motion capture system. PMID:28241414

  2. Serial variation in histological character of articular soft tissue in young human adult temporomandibular joint condyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibb, C A; Pullinger, A G; Baldioceda, F

    1993-04-01

    Histological variation was studied in serial sections, in contrast to previous studies which have generalized from representative sections. The sample consisted of consecutive serial sagittal sections from the central third of nine condyles, plus an accompanying stone cast showing the intact articular surface before sectioning. The thickness of the articular soft tissue and its fibrous connective tissue and cartilage components was measured, and the presence of undifferentiated mesenchymal (UM) cells was assessed by low-power light microscopy. Components of variance analysis showed that section-to-section variation in thickness was of the same order as differences between joints, each explaining approx. 50% of the variance in both connective tissue and cartilage thickness. The fibrous connective tissue contributed as much to the overall variation in soft tissue thickness as did the cartilage component (SD 0.0946 versus 0.0909 mm for the superior sector). Serial UM cell variability was common, and the UM cells were often distributed in islands rather than uniformly across the articular tissue. Condyles with the greatest surface irregularity were characterized by greater serial variability in fibrous connective tissue thickness, more frequent absence of cartilage, and more areas of UM cell depletion. These results suggest that serial variation in histological character may be more important than mean values in the description of surface contours and articular tissue relations in the temporomandibular joint. This should influence the design of future investigations.

  3. A technique to investigate the three-dimensional kinesiology of the human temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, S; Hayes, R; Nicolella, D; Fielding, A

    1991-06-01

    Previous kinesiological studies of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were based on the motion of only one or two selected points on the mandible (such as the lower central incisor, the mandibular condyle). In the present study, a technique was developed to measure, analyze, and describe the full three-dimensional kinematic characteristics of the TMJ during any mandibular activity. The technique was based on determination of the relative position between the mandible and the temporal bone from measurement of the location of points on light-weight frames rigidly attached through splints to the maxillary and mandibular teeth. An optoelectric kinematic data acquisition system has been used to record the location of these points. The results of the study indicate the following major advantages of this technique over previously reported kinesiological methods: (1) the technique provides a full description of the motion of the mandible with respect to the temporal bone, including all the six degrees of freedom associated with this motion; (2) the description of motion in terms of joint parameters enhances interpretation of the data by clinicians; (3) the motion of any point of interest on the mandible can be easily derived from the data and; (4) the system provides only negligible interference with the natural jaw motion of the subject. It does not require head fixation, does not alter or interfere with the natural occlusion, and its light weight causes only minimal (and negligible) loading of the mandible.

  4. Lubricin immunohistochemical expression in human temporomandibular joint disc with internal derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Loreto, Carla

    2011-08-01

    Lubricin is a chondroprotective, mucinous glycoprotein which contribute to joint lubrication, especially to boundary lubrication and maintains joint integrity. The present investigation aimed to study the immunolocalization of lubricin in TMJ discs from patients affected by anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) ADDwoR. Eighteen TMJ displaced disc affected by ADDwoR were processed immunohistochemically, with a polyclonal anti-lubricin antibody, used at 1:50 working dilution. The percentage of lubricin immunopositive cells (extent score = ES) and the extent of lubricin staining of the disc extracellular matrix (ECM), were evaluated. Each sample was scored for histopathological changes. Percentage of immunostained surface disc cells was the same (ES = 4) in both control and ADDwOR cells, being this data not statistically significant (P  0.05). The extracellular matrix (ECM) of discs at the disc surfaces of both pathological and normal specimens was very heavily stained (++++). Both the ES and ECM staining were not statistically correlated to the TMJ degeneration score according to the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. According to our findings, a longstanding TMJ disc injury, affects lubricin expression in the TMJ disc tissue and not its surfaces, moreover, lubricin immunostaining is not correlated to TMJ disc histopathological changes.

  5. [Establishment of 3-dimensional finite element model of human knee joint and its biomechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ping; Wang, Wanchun

    2010-01-01

    To establish a 3-dimensional (3-D) finite element knee model in healthy Chinese males, to verify the validity of the model, and to analyze the biomechanics of this model under axial load, flexion moment, varus/valgus torque, and internal/external axial torque. A set of consecutive transectional computerized tomography images of normal male knee joints in upright weight-bearing position was selected. With image processing and inversion technology, the 3-D finite element model of the normal knee joint was established through the software ABAQOUS/STANDARD Version-6.5.Biomechanical analysis of this model was processed under axial load, flexion moment, varus/valgus torque, and internal/external axial torque. A 3-D finite element model of healthy Chinese males was successfully established. The ranges of motion of varus and valgus were both small and the difference between them has no statistical significance (P>0.05). The motion of internal and external rotation of the knee took place only in flexion situation.The range of motion of external rotation was larger than that of internal rotation in the same knee (Pknee resembles the actual knee segments. It can imitate the knee response to different loads. This model could be used for further study on knee biomechanics.

  6. Management of intra-articular fracture of the fingers via mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-jun; TIAN Wen; TIAN Guang-lei; CHEN Shan-lin; ZHANG Chang-qing; XUE Yun-hao; LI Zhong-zhe; ZHU Yin

    2009-01-01

    Background Intra-articular fractures of the fingers are common problems to emergency physicians and hand surgeons.Inappropriate management of these injuries may result in chronic pain,stiffness,deformity,or post traumatic arthritis.Ideal treatment necessitates the restoration of a stable and congruent joint that will allow early mobilization.The purpose of this study was to investigate the results of intra-articular fracture of the fingers by mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation.Methods From May 2005 to May 2007,a total of 26 patients with intra-articular fracture of the fingers were treated by mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation.Of the 26 cases,11 involved in metacarpophalangeal joint,and 15 interphalangeal joint in proximal interphalangeal.Kirschner wire,mini wire and absorbable suture were used for limited internal fixation.All patients were followed up and patients were accomplished with total active motion(TAM)of fingers.Results All patients were reviewed by an independent observer.The mean follow up was 13 months(range 9 to 24 months).Subjective,objective and radiographic results were evaluated.X-ray films revealed fracture union and the average radiographic union time was 7 weeks with a range of 5-12 weeks and the phalange shortening or rotation in 2 cases,joint incongruity(less than 1 mm)and joint space narrowing in 3 cases respectively.Phalangeal shortening or rotation was observed in 2 cases and joint incongruity or joint space narrowing was observed in 3 cases.An artificial implant was performed on one case for traumatic arthritis 1.5 years after surgery.Based on TAM the overall good-excellent rate of joint motion function was 80.8%.Conclusion Mini external fixator combined with limited internal fixation is a reliable and effective method for treatment of intra-articular fracture of the fingers.

  7. Expression of lumican related to CD34 and VEGF in the articular disc of the human temporomandibular joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kiga

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Lumican belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan (SLRP gene family and has been reported to exist in the cornea, intervertebral disc and tendon. Lumican plays a significant role in the assembly and regulation of collagen fibres. The human temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc is made up of fibrocartilage with an extracellular matrix (ECM composed of collagen and proteoglycans. The existence and behaviour of lumican have not been studied in the human TMJ disc. Therefore, we used immunohistochemical methods to detect lumican, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and histochemical staining with toluidine blue in 13 human TMJ specimens (10 surgically removed and 3 obtained from autopsy. In both normal and deformed discs we observed staining with toluidine blue. We found that the area of metachromasia inside the deformed disc was uneven and expression of lumican was strong in the areas negative for metachromasia. Staining of VEGF and CD34 inside the deformed disc was seen. We confirmed the expression of lumican in the human TMJ disc and showed that a large number of fibroblastlike cells existed in the area of strong lumican expression. These new findings about the behaviour of lumican suggest that it may play a key role in the generation of a new collagen network by fibroblast-like cells.

  8. Reorganization of finger coordination patterns through motor exploration in individuals after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Rajiv

    2017-09-11

    Impairment of hand and finger function after stroke is common and affects the ability to perform activities of daily living. Even though many of these coordination deficits such as finger individuation have been well characterized, it is critical to understand how stroke survivors learn to explore and reorganize their finger coordination patterns for optimizing rehabilitation. In this study, I examine the use of a body-machine interface to assess how participants explore their movement repertoire, and how this changes with continued practice. Ten participants with chronic stroke wore a data glove and the finger joint angles were mapped on to the position of a cursor on a screen. The task of the participants was to move the cursor back and forth between two specified targets on a screen. Critically, the map between the finger movements and cursor motion was altered so that participants sometimes had to generate coordination patterns that required finger individuation. There were two phases to the experiment - an initial assessment phase on day 1, followed by a learning phase (days 2-5) where participants trained to reorganize their coordination patterns. Participants showed difficulty in performing tasks which had maps that required finger individuation, and the degree to which they explored their movement repertoire was directly related to clinical tests of hand function. However, over four sessions of practice, participants were able to learn to reorganize their finger movement coordination pattern and improve their performance. Moreover, training also resulted in improvements in movement repertoire outside of the context of the specific task during free exploration. Stroke survivors show deficits in movement repertoire in their paretic hand, but facilitating movement exploration during training can increase the movement repertoire. This suggests that exploration may be an important element of rehabilitation to regain optimal function.

  9. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  10. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase.

  11. Prevalence of self-reported finger deformations and occupational risk factors among professional cooks: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Shigeru

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have pointed out that the school lunch workers in Japan are suffering from work-related disorders including finger deformations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported finger deformations and the association with job-related risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study of 5,719 subjects (response rate: 81%, 982 men and 4,737 women was undertaken during September 2003 to February 2004. Results Finger deformations were found among 11.7% of the men and 35.6% of the women studied, with significant differences among sex, age and sex-age groups. For both men and women the pattern of finger deformations across the hand was similar for the right and the left hand. For women, the deformations were found in about 10% of the distal interphalangeal joints of all fingers. Based on multiple logistic regression analyses, the factors female sex, age, the number of cooked lunches per cook and cooking activities were independently associated with the prevalence of finger deformations. High prevalence odds ratios were found for those frequently carrying or using tools by hands such as delivering containers, distributing meals, preparing dishes, washing equipment, cutting and stirring foods. Conclusions Among the school lunch workers studied, women had a higher prevalence of finger deformations on all joints of both hands. Various cooking tasks were associated with the prevalence of finger deformations. The results suggest that improvements in working conditions are important for preventing work-related disorders such as finger deformations.

  12. Generating and analyzing synthetic finger vein images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillerström, Fieke; Kumar, Ajay; Veldhuis, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The finger-vein biometric offers higher degree of security, personal privacy and strong anti-spoofing capabilities than most other biometric modalities employed today. Emerging privacy concerns with the database acquisition and lack of availability of large scale finger-vein database have

  13. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  14. Correcting Finger Counting to Snellen Acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanjia, Rustum; Hwang, Tiffany Jean; Chen, Alexander Francis; Pouw, Andrew; Tian, Jack J; Chu, Edward R; Wang, Michelle Y; Tran, Jeffrey Show; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an online tool with which to convert and thus quantify count finger measurements of visual acuity into Snellen equivalents. It is hoped that this tool allows for the re-interpretation of retrospectively collected data that provide visual acuity in terms of qualitative count finger measurements.

  15. Finger Search in the Implicit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Nielsen, Jesper Asbjørn Sindahl; Truelsen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of creating a dictionary with the finger search property in the strict implicit model, where no information is stored between operations, except the array of elements. We show that for any implicit dictionary supporting finger searches in q(t) = Ω(logt) time, the time to mo...... returned by the last query...

  16. Corticosteroid injection for trigger finger in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Winters, Jan C.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Background Trigger finger is a disease of the tendons of the hand leading to triggering (locking) of affected fingers, dysfunction and pain. Available treatments include local injection with corticosteroids, surgery, or splinting. Objectives To summarize the evidence on the efficacy and safety of

  17. 15-zinc finger protein Bloody Fingers is required for zebrafish morphogenetic movements during neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanas, Saulius; Zhang, Bo; Dai, Rujuan; Lin, Shuo

    2005-07-01

    A novel zebrafish gene bloody fingers (blf) encoding a 478 amino acid protein containing fifteen C(2)H(2) type zinc fingers was identified by expression screening. As determined by in situ hybridization, blf RNA displays strong ubiquitous early zygotic expression, while during late gastrulation and early somitogenesis, blf expression becomes transiently restricted to the posterior dorsal and lateral mesoderm. During later somitogenesis, blf expression appears only in hematopoietic cells. It is completely eliminated in cloche, moonshine but not in vlad tepes (gata1) mutant embryos. Morpholino (MO) knockdown of the Blf protein results in the defects of morphogenetic movements. Blf-MO-injected embryos (morphants) display shortened and widened axial tissues due to defective convergent extension. Unlike other convergent extension mutants, blf morphants display a split neural tube, resulting in a phenotype similar to the human open neural tube defect spina bifida. In addition, dorsal ectodermal cells delaminate in blf morphants during late somitogenesis. We propose a model explaining the role of blf in convergent extension and neurulation. We conclude that blf plays an important role in regulating morphogenetic movements during gastrulation and neurulation while its role in hematopoiesis may be redundant.

  18. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  19. Use of twin dorsal middle phalangeal finger flaps for thumb or index finger reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W; Chen, K J

    2013-05-01

    Amputation or degloving injuries of the thumb or index finger are highly disabling. We describe the use of twin dorsal middle finger flaps harvested from the dorsal aspects of the middle and ring fingers, and based on one palmar proper digital artery, its venae comitantes, and the dorsal branches of the palmar digital nerves of the middle and ring fingers, respectively. These flaps offer advantages when large soft tissue defects of the thumb or index finger are present. In this study, twin dorsal middle finger flaps were used in nine patients (six thumbs, three index fingers). All flaps completely survived. At the mean follow-up of 20 months, the appearance of the reconstructed thumbs or index fingers was acceptable, the length was maintained, and the mean static 2-point discrimination values were 10 mm in the palmar flap and 13 mm in the dorsal flap of the reconstructed digit. All patients were satisfied with the appearance and mobility of the donor fingers. All but one donor finger showed normal finger pulp sensibility, with a static 2-point discrimination between 3 and 6 mm.

  20. 人体膝关节的力矩参数%Torque parameters of human knee joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宏垚; 徐秀林

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parameters of knee joint are not directly measured due to complex body motion. Therefore, the parameters are obtained by simulation or reverse dynamics.OBJECTIVE: To conclude and compare the method of determining torque parameters, and to find a reasonable, responsible,practical method.METHODS: A computer-based online search of CNKI, Wanfang, and Science Direct databases, articles related to measurements of torque parameters were searched with key words "knee joint, torque, isokinetic dynamometer, lagrangian modeling, neural network modeling" in Chinese and English. Correlated and newly-published articles were included.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION : A total of 123 articles were collected, and 75 were firstly selected following exclusion of repetitive articles. Finally, 35 articles were included according to title and abstract. Results show that isokinetic dynamometer has been extensively used, but reliability is low, and the price of dynamometer is expensive. Lagrangian modeling and neural network modeling can be modified to obtain reliability and practicality.%背景:由于人体运动过程复杂,难以用直接的方法来测量膝关节各项力学参数,所以,通常使用模拟或根据逆向动力学推算的方式来求得所需参数值.目的:总结和比较膝关节力矩参数的测定方法,找出一种合理、可靠性高、实用性广的方法.方法:应用计算机检索CNKI,万方数据库,Elsevier公司的Science Direct电子期刊关于膝关节力矩参数测试方法的文献,以"膝关节,力矩,等速测力法,拉格朗日建模,神经网络建模"及"knee joint,torque,isokinetic dynamometer,lagrangian modeling,neural network modeling"为检索词进行检索.纳入文章内容与人体膝关节力矩参数相关,同一领域文献则选择近期发表或发表在权威杂志文章.结果与结论:检索文献量总计123篇,排除重复性研究,初检得到75篇文献,阅读标题和摘要进行初筛,共保留其中的35篇归纳

  1. An effective preprocessing method for finger vein recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, JiaLiang; Li, Qiong; Wang, Ning; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2013-07-01

    The image preprocessing plays an important role in finger vein recognition system. However, previous preprocessing schemes remind weakness to be resolved for the high finger vein recongtion performance. In this paper, we propose a new finger vein preprocessing that includes finger region localization, alignment, finger vein ROI segmentation and enhancement. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme is capable of enhancing the quality of finger vein image effectively and reliably.

  2. Modeling of contact mechanics and friction limit surfaces for soft fingers in robotics, with experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xydas, N.; Kao, I.

    1999-09-01

    A new theory in contact mechanics for modeling of soft fingers is proposed to define the relationship between the normal force and the radius of contact for soft fingers by considering general soft-finger materials, including linearly and nonlinearly elastic materials. The results show that the radius of contact is proportional to the normal force raised to the power of {gamma}, which ranges from 0 to 1/3. This new theory subsumes the Hertzian contact model for linear elastic materials, where {gamma} = 1/3. Experiments are conducted to validate the theory using artificial soft fingers made of various materials such as rubber and silicone. Results for human fingers are also compared. This theory provides a basis for numerically constructing friction limit surfaces. The numerical friction limit surface can be approximated by an ellipse, with the major and minor axes as the maximum friction force and the maximum moment with respect to the normal axis of contact, respectively. Combining the results of the contact-mechanics model with the contact-pressure distribution, the normalized friction limit surface can be derived for anthropomorphic soft fingers. The results of the contact-mechanics model and the pressure distribution for soft fingers facilitate the construction of numerical friction limit surfaces, and will enable us to analyze and simulate contact behaviors of grasping and manipulation in robotics.

  3. Balkan Endemic Nephropathy - Still continuing enigma, risk assessment and underestimated hazard of joint mycotoxin exposure of animals or humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoev, Stoycho D

    2017-01-05

    The spreading of mycotoxic nephropathy in animals/humans was studied. The possible etiological causes provoking this nephropathy were carefully reviewed and analyzed. The natural content of the most frequent nephrotoxic mycotoxins in target feedstuffs/foods were investigated, in addition to their significance for development of renal damages in endemic areas. An estimation of the level of exposure of humans to the nephrotoxic mycotoxin, ochratoxin A (OTA), is made. The possible synergism or additive effects between some target mycotoxins in the development of nephropathy is also covered. The significance of joint mycotoxin interaction and masked mycotoxins, in addition to some newly isolated fungal toxic agents in the complicated etiology of mycotoxic nephropathy ranged in Balkan countries is discussed. The importance of some target fungal species which can induce kidney damages was evaluated. The morphological/ultrastructural, functional and toxicological similarities between human and animal nephropathy are studied. The possible hazard of low content of combinations of some target mycotoxins in food or feedstuff ingested by pigs, chickens or humans under natural conditions is evaluated and a risk assessment was made. Some different but more effective manners of prophylaxis and/or prevention against OTA contamination of feedstuffs/foods are suggested. A survey was made in regard to the best possible ways of veterinary hygiene control of OTA-exposed animals at slaughter time for preventing the entrance of OTA in commercial feedstuffs/food channels with a view to reduce the possible health hazard for humans. The economic efficacy and applicability of such preventive measures is additionally discussed and some practical suggestions are made.

  4. Stress analysis in human temporomandibular joint affected by anterior disc displacement during prolonged clenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S; Kawano, F; Kohge, K; Kawaoka, T; Ueda, K; Hattori-Hara, E; Mori, H; Kuroda, S; Tanaka, E

    2013-04-01

    Parafunctional habits, such as prolonged clenching and bruxism, have been associated with dysfunctional overloading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, stress distributions in the TMJ were analysed during prolonged clenching, using three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of the TMJ with and without disc displacement. The aim of this study was to investigate stress distribution of the cartilaginous tissues in the TMJ with and without disc displacement. Finite element models were developed on the basis of magnetic resonance images from two subjects with and without anterior disc displacement. Condylar movements recorded during a 5-min clenching were used as the loading condition for stress analysis. In the asymptomatic model, the highest von Mises stresses were located in the lateral area (4·91 MPa) of the disc surfaces, and after 5-min clenching, the higher stresses were still located at the lateral area (3·65 MPa). In all the cartilaginous tissues, 30-50% of stress reduction occurred during 5-min clenching. In contrast, the von Mises stress in the cartilaginous tissues of the symptomatic model with disc displacement was markedly lower, compared with the asymptomatic model. However, in the condylar cartilage, stress relaxation during clenching was not recognised. Furthermore, relatively high stresses were observed in the retrodiscal tissues throughout clenching. The present results indicate that disc position could be involved in the stress distribution of the TMJ components during prolonged clenching.

  5. Relationship between costovertebral joint kinematics and lung volume in supine humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Benoît; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Chèze, Laurence; Sholukha, Victor; Feipel, Véronique

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the motion of the first ten costovertebral joints (CVJ) and lung volume over the inspiratory capacity (IC) using detailed kinematic analysis in a sample of 12 asymptomatic subjects. Retrospective codified spiral-CT data obtained at total lung capacity (TLC), middle of inspiratory capacity (MIC) and at functional residual capacity (FRC) were analysed. CVJ 3D kinematics were processed using previously-published methods. We tested the influence of the side, CVJ level and lung volume on CVJ kinematics. In addition, the correlations between anthropologic/pulmonary variables and CVJ kinematics were analysed. No linear correlation was found between lung volumes and CVJ kinematics. Major findings concerning 3D kinematics can be summarized as follows: 1) Ranges-of-motion decrease gradually with increasing CVJ level; 2) rib displacements are significantly reduced at lung volumes above the MIC and do not differ between CVJ levels; 3) the axes of rotation of the ribs are similarly oriented for all CVJ levels.

  6. Free digital artery flap: an ideal flap for large finger defects in situations where local flaps are precluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin-Ho; Teoh, Lam-Chuan; Lee, Jonathan Y-L; Yam, Andrew K-T; Khoo, David B-A; Yong, Fok-Chuan

    2008-03-01

    The heterodigital arterialized flap is increasingly accepted as a flap of choice for reconstruction of large finger wounds. However, in situations where the adjacent fingers sustained concomitant injuries, the use of this flap as a local flap is precluded. This paper describes our experience with the free digital artery flap as an evolution of the heterodigital arterialized flap. Four patients with large finger wounds were reconstructed with free digital artery flap. Our indications for digital artery free flap were concomitant injuries to adjacent fingers that precluded their use as donor sites. The arterial supply of the flap was from the digital artery and the venous drainage was from the dominant dorsal vein of the finger. The flap was harvested from the ulnar side of the finger. The digital nerve was left in situ to minimize donor morbidity. The donor site was covered with a full-thickness skin graft and secured with bolster dressings. Early intensive mobilization was implemented for all patients. All flaps survived. No venous congestion was noted and primary healing was achieved in all flaps. In addition to providing well-vascularized tissue for coverage of vital structures, the digital artery was also used as a flow-through flap for finger revascularization in one patient. Donor-site morbidity was minimal, with all fingers retaining protective pulp sensation and the distal and proximal interphalangeal joints retaining full ranges of motion. In conclusion, the free digital artery flap is a versatile flap that is ideal for coverage of large-sized finger defects in situations where local flaps are unavailable. Donor-site morbidity can be minimized by preservation of the digital nerve, firmly securing the skin graft with bolster dressings, and early mobilization of the donor finger.

  7. Effect of object width on precision grip force and finger posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domalain, M; Vigouroux, L; Danion, F; Sevrez, V; Berton, E

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to define the effect of object width on spontaneous grasp. Participants held objects of various masses (0.75 to 2.25 kg) and widths (3.5 to 9.5 cm) between thumb and index finger. Grip force, maximal grip force and corresponding finger postures were recorded using an embedded force sensor and an optoelectronic system, respectively. Results showed that index finger joints varied to accommodate the object width, whereas thumb posture remained constant across conditions. For a given object mass, grip force increased as a function of object width, although this result is not dictated by the laws of mechanics. Because maximal grip force also increased with object width, we hypothesise that participants maintain a constant ratio between grip force and their maximal grip force at each given width. Altogether we conclude that when the task consists in manipulating objects/tools, the optimal width is different than when maximal force exertions are required.

  8. Trigger Finger Appearing as Gradually Increasing Digital Nerve Disorder after Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tsuchie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigger finger is a common disease, and operative treatments are often applied for it. Digital nerve injury is one of the complications of this surgical treatment, and paresthesia and sensory disturbance occur early after the operation. This paper presents a case of trigger finger appearing gradually as increasing digital nerve disorder after surgical treatment. In the second surgery, scar tissue covered the palmar MP joint where the A1 pulley had existed before, and palmar digital neurovascular tissue of the ulnar side was found on the inside of the scar. The ulnar digital nerve showed swelling like a neuroma, and bilateral digital nerves existed nearer to the center of the flexor pollicis longus tendon than normal digital nerves. Even when we operate on trigger finger by open release, we should create an appropriate surgical space for observation and be careful of digital nerve injury.

  9. Design of a wearable hand exoskeleton for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Inseong; Lee, Jeongsoo; Park, Yeongyu; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, design of a wearable hand exoskeleton system for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers, is proposed. The exoskeleton was designed with a simple and wearable structure to aid finger motions in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). A hand grasping experiment by fully-abled people was performed to investigate general hand flexion/extension motions and the polynomial curve of general hand motions was obtained. To customize the hand exoskeleton for the user, the polynomial curve was adjusted to the joint range of motion (ROM) of the user and the optimal design of the exoskeleton structure was obtained using the optimization algorithm. A prototype divided into two parts (one part for the thumb, the other for rest fingers) was actuated by only two linear motors for compact size and light weight.

  10. A biomimetic approach to inverse kinematics for flexible pneumatic finger%仿生学的气动柔性手指逆运动学算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵铁锋

    2012-01-01

    针对手指逆运动学问题,采用了基于贝叶斯网理论的仿生学研究方法.首先对人类手指进行了运动学建模,并通过多组实验,采样记录人手在抓取时,食指各关节在不同时刻的角度;其次,以采样数据为样本,进行贝叶斯网络学习,获得各关节角度之间的内在关系模型;最后将该模型应用于气动柔性手指控制系统.实验表明,该模型解决了多自由度机器人逆运动学冗余度的同时,使得气动柔性手指的运动更接近人类.%A biomimetic approach based on Bayesian network was proposed for solving the redundancy problem of flexible pneumatic finger. First, the kinematics of finger was investigated and modeled. With multiple sets of experiments, the finger's joint angle was recorded during the procedure of grabbing. Then, with Bayesian network, the dependency model of joint angle was described. At last, the model was used in flexible pneumatic finger's control system. Through experiment, it is proved that the proposed model results in human-like configurations while solving inverse kinematics algorithms.

  11. Joint Estimation of Contamination, Error and Demography for Nuclear DNA from Ancient Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Racimo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available When sequencing an ancient DNA sample from a hominin fossil, DNA from present-day humans involved in excavation and extraction will be sequenced along with the endogenous material. This type of contamination is problematic for downstream analyses as it will introduce a bias towards the population of the contaminating individual(s. Quantifying the extent of contamination is a crucial step as it allows researchers to account for possible biases that may arise in downstream genetic analyses. Here, we present an MCMC algorithm to co-estimate the contamination rate, sequencing error rate and demographic parameters-including drift times and admixture rates-for an ancient nuclear genome obtained from human remains, when the putative contaminating DNA comes from present-day humans. We assume we have a large panel representing the putative contaminant population (e.g. European, East Asian or African. The method is implemented in a C++ program called 'Demographic Inference with Contamination and Error' (DICE. We applied it to simulations and genome data from ancient Neanderthals and modern humans. With reasonable levels of genome sequence coverage (>3X, we find we can recover accurate estimates of all these parameters, even when the contamination rate is as high as 50%.

  12. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Emerging roles of zinc finger proteins in regulating adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shengjuan; Zhang, Lifan; Zhou, Xiang; Du, Min; Jiang, Zhihua; Hausman, Gary J; Bergen, Werner G; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V

    2013-12-01

    Proteins containing the zinc finger domain(s) are named zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), one of the largest classes of transcription factors in eukaryotic genomes. A large number of ZFPs have been studied and many of them were found to be involved in regulating normal growth and development of cells and tissues through diverse signal transduction pathways. Recent studies revealed that a small but increasing number of ZFPs could function as key transcriptional regulators involved in adipogenesis. Due to the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders, the investigation of molecular regulatory mechanisms of adipocyte development must be more completely understood in order to develop novel and long-term impact strategies for ameliorating obesity. In this review, we discuss recent work that has documented that ZFPs are important functional contributors to the regulation of adipogenesis. Taken together, these data lead to the conclusion that ZFPs may become promising targets to combat human obesity.

  14. Finger tips detection for two handed gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, M. K.; Kar, Mithun Kumar; Neog, Debanga Raj

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed for fingertips detection in view of two-handed static hand pose recognition. In our method, finger tips of both hands are detected after detecting hand regions by skin color-based segmentation. At first, the face is removed in the image by using Haar classifier and subsequently, the regions corresponding to the gesturing hands are isolated by a region labeling technique. Next, the key geometric features characterizing gesturing hands are extracted for two hands. Finally, for all possible/allowable finger movements, a probabilistic model is developed for pose recognition. Proposed method can be employed in a variety of applications like sign language recognition and human-robot-interactions etc.

  15. Generation and functional analysis of zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathomen, Toni; Segal, David J; Brondani, Vincent; Müller-Lerch, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The recent development of artificial endonucleases with tailored specificities has opened the door for a wide range of new applications, including the correction of mutated genes directly in the chromosome. This kind of gene therapy is based on homologous recombination, which can be stimulated by the creation of a targeted DNA double-strand break (DSB) near the site of the desired recombination event. Artificial nucleases containing zinc finger DNA-binding domains have provided important proofs of concept, showing that inserting a DSB in the target locus leads to gene correction frequencies of 1-18% in human cells. In this paper, we describe how zinc finger nucleases are assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and present two methods to assess these custom nucleases quickly in vitro and in a cell-based recombination assay.

  16. The influence of Dupuytren's disease fingers contracture degree on surgical treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepić Nenad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Dupuytren’s disease is a progressive disease of the palmar and digital fascial structures, with functional limitations. There are no clear recommendations about the optimal time of surgical repair, concerning the hand impairment. The aim of our study was to investigate the relation between finger’s contracture degree and success of surgical treatment of the Dupuytren's disease. Methods. This prospective analysis included 60 patients operated on due to Dupuytren’s contracture. According to preoperative contracture degree of proximal interphalangeal (PIP and metacarpophalangeal (MCP joint, patients were divided into three groups: the group 1: 30°. All the patients underwent operation of partial palmar fasciectomy. Postoperative improvement was expressed with contracture reduction INDEX. Results. There were 60 patients with 85 fingers affected. The groups 1, 2 and 3 had 22 (37%, 37 (62% and 26 (43% fingers with MCP contracture and 32 (37.4%, 24 (28.2% and 29 (34.1% fingers with PIP contracture, respectively. Postoperative contractures of MCP joint in these groups were 0, 0.135° and 5°, and of PIP joint 0, 2.08 ° and 16.89°, respectively. After six months all MCP contractures resolved, while PIP joint contracture in the group 3 remained 13.62°. The reduction INDEX was 98.85%, 97.62% and 75.52% in the groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in the INDEX value between the groups (p = 0.0001. Conclusion. The degree of PIP joint contracture is related to the outcome of surgical treatment of Dupuytren’s disease. Optimal results are achieved when contracture degree is between 15° and 30°. Surgical treatment of MCP joint contracture is successful regardless of the preoperative joint contracture degree.

  17. THE RELATIVE PREVALENCE OF HUMAN AND BOVINE TYPES OF TUBERCLE BACILLI IN BONE AND JOINT TUBERCULOSIS OCCURRING IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J

    1912-10-01

    The all important point revealed by the investigation is the fact that a large proportion of bone and joint tuberculosis occurring in children in Edinburgh owes its origin to infection by the bovine bacillus. The bovine bacillus is introduced into the system practically by one route only, that of ingestion, and the medium with which it is ingested is cow's milk. It is not my intention to criticize in any way the existing conditions of milk supply. I have furnished proof of what is actually occurring and no one will deny that the evil is a remediable one. In those cases in which the human bacillus was present, a considerable proportion showed a definite history of pulmonary tuberculosis affecting a co-resident, and every fact went to prove that the infection had been a direct one from patient to child. A complete distinction can be drawn between human and bovine bacilli, and the distinction is best secured by subjecting the organism to a series of tests such as I have detailed. The subject is one which ought to be investigated in a series of different localities. It is possible that the locus may be a factor in the explanation of the difference between the above results and those of other observers.

  18. Joint bleeds increase the inhibitor response to human factor VIII in a rat model of severe haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, K M; Søndergaard, H; Skov, S; Wiinberg, B

    2016-09-01

    The most serious complication in haemophilia A (HA) replacement therapy with coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is neutralizing antibodies, i.e. inhibitors. It has been hypothesized that danger signals generated during a bleed might have an adjuvant effect on the immune response to FVIII in on-demand treatment, increasing the inhibitor risk. To compare the antibody response to treatment with recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) in relation to induced knee joint bleeds and treatment without concurrent bleeds in a HA rat model. HA rats were divided into two groups: one group (n = 10) receiving three needle induced knee joint bleeds 14 days apart and a control group (n = 9) receiving three sham procedures. Three hours after each injury/sham 50 IU kg(-1) rhFVIII was administrated intravenously. Subsequently, both groups continued rhFVIII treatment for another 9 weeks. Binding antibodies were analysed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralizing antibodies using a Bethesda-like assay. Rats in the knee-bleed group developed a significantly faster inhibitor response and reached significantly higher inhibitor levels. In the knee-bleed group, 80% developed inhibitors vs. 33% in the control group, demonstrating a 2.4 times higher inhibitor risk when treating concurrent with bleeds. FVIII treatment in relation to a bleed potentiates inhibitor development compared to FVIII treatment alone in this HA rat, indicating that bleeding is a potential danger signal. Our results support the theory that FVIII replacement therapy concurrent with a bleeding episode increases the inhibitor risk, which to the best of our knowledge, has not been confirmed in an animal model before. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The senses of force and heaviness at the human elbow joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jack; Allen, Trevor J; Proske, Uwe

    2013-05-01

    The present-day view of the neural basis for the senses of muscle force and heaviness is that they are generated centrally, within the brain, from copies of motor commands. A corollary of the motor discharge generates a sense of effort which underlies these sensations. In recent experiments on force and heaviness sensations using thumb flexor muscles, a rather different explanation has been invoked: Subjects were proposed to rely predominantly on inputs of a peripheral origin, in particular, the signals of muscle spindles. The present experiments have been carried out at the elbow joint to determine whether these new ideas apply more widely. The effects of fatigue of elbow flexor muscles have been studied in force and heaviness matching tasks using three exercise regimes, a sustained maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), a maintained contraction of 35 % MVC, and a maintained contraction of 35 % MVC combined with muscle vibration at 80 Hz. In force-matching experiments, subjects were required to contract both arms and while the reference arm generated the target force under visual control, it was matched by the indicator arm without visual feedback. During the 100 % MVC exercise, force in the exercising reference arm fell rapidly to almost a half of its original value over 90 s while force in the indicator did not fall, leading to a significant overestimation of the reference force. During the 35 % MVC exercise, subjects also overestimated the reference force and this persisted at 5 and 10 min after the exercise. When 35 % MVC was combined with vibration, the amount by which the indicator arm overestimated the reference force was significantly reduced. In heaviness matching experiments, subjects could move their arms through a small range. The reference arm was loaded with a weight, and weights were added or removed from the indicator until heaviness felt the same in the two arms. There was a small, but significant fall in the matching weight used after 100 % MVC

  20. [Treatment of fractures of proximal phalanx of fingers by Eiffel Tower percutaneous pinning method. A review of 45 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chbani, B; Amar, M F; Loudyi, D; Boutayeb, F

    2010-04-01

    The authors report in the treatment of fractures of the proximal phalanx of the fingers, the use of Eiffel Tower pinning, a relatively simple method, fast and stable, associated to a protection and early rehabilitation. The objective of this method is to offer to the patient a pollici-digital grip. Our study is a retrospective study of 45 patients treated for fractures of the proximal phalanx of the fingers by percutaneous pinning according to Eiffel Tower method. We detail this simple and economic technique and examine the functional and radiological results of this series of patients. The amplitude of the active total motion of the proximal interphalangeal joint is on average 94.16 degrees (78.5 % of the normal active mobility of the proximal interphalangeal joint), and the amplitude of the active total motion of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint is on average 90.05 degrees (75 % of the normal active mobility of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint).

  1. Mobilidade articular dos dedos não lesados pós-reparo em lesão dos tendões flexores da mão Joint range of motion of uninjured fingers after repairs to flexor tendon injuries of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB Rabelo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a amplitude de movimento (ADM em mãos que sofreram reparo tendinoso dos músculos flexores superficial e profundo dos dedos, comparando os dados de cada dedo na mão lesada e entre mãos lesadas e não lesadas. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada a goniometria ativa em 15 pacientes e 120 dedos, 60 dedos de mãos lesadas e 60 de mãos controle não lesadas. Os sujeitos foram avaliados no momento da retirada da tala gessada, tendo sido realizada a movimentação precoce pelo método de Duran modificado. A partir dos dados goniométricos, foram registrados os valores do índice TAM (Total Active Motion dos dedos nas mãos lesadas e controle. Para análise dos dados, foi acessada a fórmula de índices funcionais proposta pela American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH e para cálculo estatístico, foi escolhido o Modelo de Efeitos Mistos. RESULTADOS: A fórmula da ASSH para os dedos lesados mostrou que 18,33% tiveram a classificação do movimento "bom", 18,33%, "regular" e 63,34%, "pobre". Foram comparadas as médias das medidas em graus de todos os dedos entre si dentro de cada grupo, controle ou lesado, e as médias das medidas entre os grupos, encontrando-se um p-valor significante apenas entre os grupos controle e lesado. Não houve diferença estatística entre o TAM de cada dedo na mão lesada. CONCLUSÃO: Independente de quantos dedos tenham sofrido lesão tendinosa em uma mão, os dedos não lesados também terão suas ADMs ativas diminuídas no período logo após a retirada da imobilização.OBJECTIVE: To assess the range of motion (ROM in hands that underwent tendon repair in the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus muscles of the fingers, comparing the data between the fingers on the injured hand, and between the injured and uninjured hands. METHOD: Active goniometry was performed on 15 patients, making a total of 120 fingers (60 on injured hands and 60 on noninjured control hands. The patients

  2. Control System Design of the YWZ Multi-fingered Dexterous Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation abilities of a multi‐fingered dexterous hand, such as motion in real‐time, flexibility, grasp stability etc., are largely dependent on its control system. This paper developed a control system for the YWZ dexterous hand, which had five fingers and twenty degrees of freedom (DOFs. All of the finger joints of the YWZ dexterous handwere active joints driven by twenty micro‐stepper motors respectively. The main contribution of this paper was that we were able to use stepper motor control to actuate the handʹs fingers, thus, increasing the hands feasibility. Based the actuators of the YWZ dexterous hand, we firstly developed an integrated circuit board (ICB, which was the communication hardware between the personal computer (PC and the YWZ dexterous hand. The ICB included a centre controller, twenty driver chips, a USB port and other electrical parts. Then, a communication procedure between the PC and the ICB was developed to send the control commands to actuate the YWZ dexterous hand. Experiment results showed that under this control system, the motion of the YWZ dexterous hand was real‐time; both the motion accuracy and the motion stability of the YWZ dexterous hand were reliable. Compared with other types of actuators related to dexterous hands, such as pneumatic servo cylinder, DC servo motor, shape memory alloy etc., experiment results verified that the stepper motors as actuatorsfor the dexterous handswere effective, economical, controllable and stable.

  3. Aesthetic life-like finger and hand prostheses: prosthetic prescription and factors influencing choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, M E; Pereira, B P; Kour, A K; Pho, R W

    1997-11-01

    This paper reviews the authors' experience with fitting life-like finger and hand prosthesis. The methodology and technical considerations in producing these prostheses, the prosthetic prescription according to the level of amputation and the challenges faced with each level are discussed. In cases where the amputation is sufficiently distal, a thimble prosthesis has been used. This is compared to fitting a full-length finger prosthesis. Besides allowing free range of motion of the proximal finger joints which would otherwise be covered and restricted with fitting a finger prosthesis, a thimble prosthesis minimises skin coverage for optimal sensibility and is easier to don and doff. In cases of amputations where a digital fitting is precluded, a partial or a total hand is prescribed. A comparison between fitting a finger, a partial hand prosthesis and a total hand prosthesis is also discussed. Cases of a digital, transcarpal and a more proximal transmetacarpal amputations are relatively easy to fit with a prosthesis. An incomplete transmetacarpal amputation where much of the breadth of the hand is preserved presents a difficult challenge as it necessitates fitting with a partial hand prosthesis. Besides the need to cover a large area of the intact skin and the associated problems with reduced sensibility and stump perspiration, a partial hand prosthesis is difficult to don and doff.

  4. Patient-specific prosthetic fingers by remote collaboration--a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-John Cabibihan

    Full Text Available The concealment of amputation through prosthesis usage can shield an amputee from social stigma and help improve the emotional healing process especially at the early stages of hand or finger loss. However, the traditional techniques in prosthesis fabrication defy this as the patients need numerous visits to the clinics for measurements, fitting and follow-ups. This paper presents a method for constructing a prosthetic finger through online collaboration with the designer. The main input from the amputee comes from the Computer Tomography (CT data in the region of the affected and the non-affected fingers. These data are sent over the internet and the prosthesis is constructed using visualization, computer-aided design and manufacturing tools. The finished product is then shipped to the patient. A case study with a single patient having an amputated ring finger at the proximal interphalangeal joint shows that the proposed method has a potential to address the patient's psychosocial concerns and minimize the exposure of the finger loss to the public.

  5. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  6. Parallel Wire Driven System for Joint Torque Estimation of Human Leg in Passive Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Hitoshi; Saisho, Kenichi; Miyazoe, Tsutomu; Kawamura, Sadao

    This paper presents a leg torque estimation system for a passive motion that uses an incompletely restrained parallel wire driven mechanism. After comparing completely and incompletely restrained parallel wire driven systems, we organize the characteristics of both systems for human torque estimation. Defining the work spaces of four kinds for the incompletely restrained mechanism, we analyze the realization of passive tracking for a leg. Then we demonstrate that the walking motion can be achieved using low-power actuators. A case example of design is introduced to manufacture a prototype for the leg torque estimation. Finally, the result of the leg torque estimation is presented through experiments conducted using a prototype system.

  7. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  8. Layer Formation in Sedimentary Fingering Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Reali, J F; Alsinan, A; Meiburg, E

    2016-01-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at l...

  9. Fingering Convection in Red Giants Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wachlin, F C; Althaus, L G

    2014-01-01

    Fingering (thermohaline) convection has been invoked for several years as a possible extra-mixing which could occur in Red Giant stars due to the modification of the chemical composition induced by nuclear reactions in the hydrogen burning zone. Recent studies show however that this mixing is not sufficient to account for the needed surface abundances. A new prescription for fingering convection, based on 3D numerical simulations has recently been proposed (BGS). The resulting mixing coefficient is larger than the ones previously given in the literature. We compute models using this new coefficient and compare them to previous studies. We use the LPCODE stellar evolution code with the GNA generalized version of the mixing length theory to compute Red Giant models and we introduce fingering convection using the BGS prescription. The results show that, although the fingering zone now reaches the outer dynamical convective zone, the efficiency of the mixing is not enough to account for the observations. The fing...

  10. Aesthetic finger prosthesis with silicone biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, K M; Gururaju, C R; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication of finger prosthesis is as much an art as it is science. The ideally constructed prosthesis must duplicate the missing structures so precisely that patients can appear in public without fear of attracting unwanted attraction. A 65-years-old patient reported with loss of his right index finger up to the second phalanx and wanted to get it replaced. An impression of the amputated finger and donor were made. A wax pattern of the prosthesis was fabricated using the donor impression; a trial was performed and flasked. Medical grade silicone was intrinsically stained to match the skin tone, following which it was packed, processed and finished. This clinical report describes a method of attaining retention by selective scoring of the master cast of partially amputated finger to enhance the vacuum effect at par with the proportional distribution of the positive forces on the tissues exerted by the prosthesis. PMID:23975917

  11. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-08-29

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis.

  12. Characterization of Staphylococcus caprae Clinical Isolates Involved in Human Bone and Joint Infections, Compared with Goat Mastitis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ersu, J; Aubin, G G; Mercier, P; Nicollet, P; Bémer, P; Corvec, S

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus caprae is an emerging microorganism in human bone and joint infections (BJI). The aim of this study is to describe the features of S. caprae isolates involved in BJI (H for human) compared with those of isolates recovered in goat mastitis (A for animal). Fourteen isolates of each origin were included. Identifications were performed using a Vitek 2 GP ID card, tuf gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) Vitek MS. Molecular typing was carried out using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DiversiLab technology. The crystal violet method was used to determine biofilm-forming ability. Virulence factors were searched by PCR. Vitek MS technology provides an accurate identification for the two types of isolates compared to that of gold-standard sequencing (sensitivity, 96.4%), whereas the Vitek 2 GP ID card was more effective for H isolates. Molecular typing methods revealed two distinct lineages corresponding to the origin despite few overlaps: H and A. In our experimental conditions, no significant difference was observed in biofilm production ability between H and A isolates. Nine isolates (5 H isolates and 4 A isolates) behaved as weak producers while one A isolate was a strong producer. Concerning virulence factors, the autolysin atlC and the serine aspartate adhesin (sdrZ) genes were detected in 24 isolates (86%), whereas the lipase gene was always detected, except in one H isolate (96%). The ica operon was present in 23 isolates (82%). Fibrinogen-binding (fbe) or collagen-binding (cna) genes were not detected by using primers designed for Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis, even in low stringency conditions. Although S. caprae probably remains underestimated in human infections, further studies are needed to better understand the evolution and the adaptation of this species to its host.

  13. Tendon transfer or tendon graft for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, U S; Kim, J H; Seo, W S; Lee, K H

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical outcome of tendon reconstruction using tendon graft or tendon transfer and the parameters related to clinical outcome in 51 wrists of 46 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with finger extensor tendon ruptures. At a mean follow-up of 5.6 years, the mean metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint extension lag was 8 degrees (range, 0-45) and the mean visual analogue satisfaction scale was 74 (range, 10-100). Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between tendon grafting and tendon transfer. The MP joint extension lag correlated with the patient's satisfaction score, but the pulp-to-palm distance did not correlate with patient satisfaction. We conclude that both tendon grafting and tendon transfer are reliable reconstruction methods for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

  14. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A mechanism to compensate undesired stiffness in joints of prosthetic hands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Plettenbrug, D.H.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cosmetic gloves that cover a prosthetic hand have a parasitic positive stiffness that counteracts the flexion of a finger joint. Objectives: Reducing the required input torque to move a finger of a prosthetic hand by compensating the parasitic stiffness of the cosmetic glove. Study des

  16. Case Reports: Thumb Reconstruction Using Amputated Fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Nguyen T.; Staudenmaier, R.; Hoehnke, C.

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and ...

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome after surgery of complex metacarpophalangeal dislocation of the little finger:case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN De-an; SONG Jie-fu; WEI Jie; SU Yun-xing

    2009-01-01

    @@ Post-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) is uncommon and can cause the disability of patients. Complex dislocation of the metacarpophalangeal joint on the little finger due to interposition of the sesamoid bone is rare and was firstly reported by Pribyl.

  18. [Research of joint-robotics-based design of biomechanics testing device on human spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guoyong; Tian, Lianfang; Mao, Zongyuan

    2009-12-01

    This paper introduces the hardware and software of a biomechanical robot-based testing device. The bottom control orders, posture and torque data transmission, and the control algorithms are integrated in a unified visual control platform by Visual C+ +, with easy control and management. By using hybrid force-displacement control method to load the human spine, we can test the organizational structure and the force state of the FSU (Functional spinal unit) well, which overcomes the shortcomings due to the separation of the force and displacement measurement, thus greatly improves the measurement accuracy. Also it is esay to identify the spinal degeneration and the load-bearing impact on the organizational structure of the FSU after various types of surgery.

  19. The Australian joint inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrot, David

    2003-04-01

    The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) and the Australian Health Ethics Committee are currently engaged in an inquiry into the Protection of Human Genetic Information. In particular, the Attorney-General and the Minister for Health and Ageing have asked us to focus, in relation to human genetic information and tissue samples, on how best to ensure world's best practice in relation to: privacy protection; protection against unlawful discrimination; and the maintenance of high ethical standards in medical research and clinical practice. While initial concerns and controversies have related mainly to aspects of medical research (e.g. consent; re-use of samples) and access to private insurance coverage, relevant issues arise in a wide variety of contexts, including: employment; medical practice; tissue banks and genetic databases; health administration; superannuation; access to government services (e.g. schools, nursing homes); law enforcement; and use by government authorities (e.g. for immigration purposes) or other bodies (e.g. by sports associations). Under the Australian federal system, it is also the case that laws and practices may vary across states and territories. For example, neonatal genetic testing is standard, but storage and retention policies for the resulting 'Guthrie cards' differ markedly. Similarly, some states have developed highly linked health information systems (e.g. incorporating hospitals, doctors' offices and public records), while others discourage such linkages owing to concerns about privacy. The challenge for Australia is to develop policies, standards and practices that promote the intelligent use of genetic information, while providing a level of security with which the community feels comfortable. The inquiry is presently reviewing the adequacy of existing laws and regulatory mechanisms, but recognizes that it will be even more important to develop a broad mix of strategies, such as community and professional education, and the

  20. Locking of metacarpophalangeal joints in a patient with acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Y.; Tanaka, N.; Isoya, Eiji [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Soseikai General Hospital, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    A 39-year-old man with acromegaly exhibited locking of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of both index fingers. Large osteophytes were found at the metacarpal heads by radiography and computerized tomography (CT). Magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed hypertrophy of volar plates. We suggest that these characteristic acromegalic features caused locking of MCP joints. Surgery was required on one of the joints to release the locking. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of treatment for camptodactyly: retrospective analysis on 40 fingers,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Fontes Almeida

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to retrospectively assess the results from cases treated in the hand surgery service, starting from a preestablished protocol; and to conduct a critical analysis on the results achieved, with separation of the cases into their respective subgroups.METHODS: twenty-three patients and a total of 40 fingers were evaluated between January 2004 and December 2011. We correlated the altered anatomical structures found in the cases that underwent the surgical procedure and its results, with regard to both conservative and surgical treatment, emphasizing the main indications.RESULTS: the results were analyzed using the Sierget method of the Mayo Clinic.CONCLUSION: we observed that the cases of camptodactyly of the little finger alone in the flex-ible form (>60◦ that underwent surgical treatment uniformly presented excellent results. In the rigid forms, our observations indicated that there were benefits comprising gains of extension and correction of the deformity. However, the range of motion with active flexion in the proximal interphalangeal joint was always partial. With evolution over time, some cases presented some loss of the gain previously achieved, which corroborates the need for continual vigilance during the follow-up, with systematic use of braces until the final phase of skeletal growth.

  2. A Simple Dressing Technique Following Dermofasciectomy and Full Thickness Skin Grafting of the Fingers in the Treatment of Severe Dupuytren's Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanagho, Andy; Beaumont, Jan; Thomas, Roshin

    2015-12-01

    Dupuytren's disease with severe finger contractures and recurrent contractures following previous surgery often have extensive skin involvement. In these severe cases, excision of the diseased chord along with the involved skin is a good option to reduce the risk of recurrance. The resulting skin defect can be covered with a full thickness skin graft (FTSG) or a cross finger flap. Cross finger flaps have donor finger morbidity and hence a full thickness graft is usually preferred. The FTSG extending to the midlateral margins on both sides of the finger reduces the risk of joint contracture due to graft shrinkage. Once the FTSG is sutured in place, the standard practice is to compress and secure the graft to its recipient bed with a tie-over dressing and this can be time consuming. We present a simple dressing technique to secure the FTSG without the need for a tie-over dressing.

  3. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy.

  4. 人体膝关节三维有限元模型的建立%The Establishment of Three-dimension Model of Human Knee Joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘子越; 王辅忠

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To discuss a method to establish a three-dimension model of healthy human knee joint,which can be used for further knee joint biomechanics analysis and simulation.Methods:CT scan and medical image three-dimension reconstruction software Mimics were used to obtain the knee joint three-dimension finite element model (FEM) according to reverse project theory.Results:FEM of knee joint with complete bone structure was established by Mimics.Conclusion:Three-dimension FEM established according to CT images exports as IGES file.The model can be used for knee joint biomechanics finite element analysis to provide reference and proposal for the clinical diagnoses of knee joint illness,and the design of artificial knee joint prosthesis.%目的:介绍一种建立健康人体膝关节三维有限元模型的方法,为后续进行膝关节生物力学仿真模拟做准备.方法:根据逆向工程理论,结合膝关节CT图像和Mimics医学影像三维重建软件建立膝关节三维模型.结果:使用Mimics医学影像三维重建软件创建骨性结构完整的人体膝关节三维有限元模型.结论:根据CT图像建立的三维有限元模型以IGES文件输出,可以用作膝关节生物力学有限元分析,为膝关节疾病临床诊断治疗,膝关节假体设计提供参考和帮助.

  5. Algorithmic surgical enhancement of function after finger revascularisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Landin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary surgical procedures can improve the function of revascularised and replanted digits. We describe the case of a patient who underwent multidigit revascularisation and replantation following a saw injury at flexor tendon Zone II. To achieve maximal functional improvement after finger revascularisation, we performed secondary surgical procedures in an order that was determined by following a reconstructive decision procedure that covered late revascularisation, nerve reconstruction, pedicled vascularised joint transfer, staged flexor tendon reconstruction and skin revision. Performing the procedures in this manner ensured overall safety. The patient's disabilities of the arm, hand and shoulder questionnaire score improved by 45 points, and the patient was able to return to work with an almost complete range of motion.

  6. Extraskeletal Chondroma of the Index Finger: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Saito

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal chondroma is defined as a rare, benign, cartilaginous tumor arising from soft tissues such as tendons, tendon sheath synovia, and joint capsules with no continuity to the periosteum or bone cortex. In histopathologic findings, the tumor exhibits many lobular structures and some parts similar to hyaline cartilage. Therefore, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate this tumor from low-grade chondrosarcoma because of their similar histopathologic findings. In order to prevent recurrence, it is necessary to remove the tumor as a whole, including the capsule, so as not to leave any remnants of the tumor. In this article, we report our treatment experience with a case of extraskeletal chondroma in the index finger of a 63-year-old patient.

  7. HIT anthropomorphic robotic hand and finger motion control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays many anthropomorphic robotic hands have been put forward. These hands emphasize different aspects according to their applications. HIT Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand (ARhand) is a simple,lightweight and dexterous design per the requirements of anthropomorphic robots. Underactuated self-adaptive theory is adopted to decrease the number of motors and weight. The fingers of HIT ARhand with multi phalanges have the same size as those of an adult hand. Force control is realized with the position sensor, joint torque sensor and fingertip torque sensor. From the 3D model, the whole hand, with the low power consumption DSP control board integrated in it, will weigh only 500 g. It will be assembled on a BIT-Anthropomorphic Robot.

  8. A morphological study on femoral heads in human hip joint osteoarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, S; Pannarale, L; Braidotti, P; Marinozzi, A; Gaudio, E

    1996-01-01

    Several pathogenetical and clinical interpretation of osteoarthritic modifications are given in the literature. In this work we tried to compare in humans macroscopic, structural and ultrastructural observations on eight osteoarthritic with four femural heads from control patients. The sample for Light Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy observations came from selected regions of the femural head, which included both cartilage and bone tissue of loaded and unloaded regions. The cartilage showed superficial lesions, such as erosions and fissures, and deep lesions that included matrix alterations and chondrocyte proliferation. In relation to the thickening of the subchondral bone we noticed an irregular bone-cartilage surface with signs of bone tissue proliferation. The trabeculae appeared thickened in loaded zones and rarefied in unloaded ones. Cavities were sometimes present at different depths in cancellous bone. Our observations allow us to conclude that cartilage lesions are precocious, diffusely located and relatively independent of the considered zone of the femural head, while bone tissue alterations seem evenly sited and chronologically subsequent. The cavities in the cancellous bone could produce load modifications and consequent bone deformity.

  9. Scattering Removal for Finger-Vein Image Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Jinfeng Yang; Ben Zhang; Yihua Shi

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of f...

  10. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  11. Reliability of functional and predictive methods to estimate the hip joint centre in human motion analysis in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Hans; Hajek, Martin; Modenese, Luca; Saxby, David J; Lloyd, David G; Carty, Christopher P

    2017-03-01

    In human motion analysis predictive or functional methods are used to estimate the location of the hip joint centre (HJC). It has been shown that the Harrington regression equations (HRE) and geometric sphere fit (GSF) method are the most accurate predictive and functional methods, respectively. To date, the comparative reliability of both approaches has not been assessed. The aims of this study were to (1) compare the reliability of the HRE and the GSF methods, (2) analyse the impact of the number of thigh markers used in the GSF method on the reliability, (3) evaluate how alterations to the movements that comprise the functional trials impact HJC estimations using the GSF method, and (4) assess the influence of the initial guess in the GSF method on the HJC estimation. Fourteen healthy adults were tested on two occasions using a three-dimensional motion capturing system. Skin surface marker positions were acquired while participants performed quite stance, perturbed and non-perturbed functional trials, and walking trials. Results showed that the HRE were more reliable in locating the HJC than the GSF method. However, comparison of inter-session hip kinematics during gait did not show any significant difference between the approaches. Different initial guesses in the GSF method did not result in significant differences in the final HJC location. The GSF method was sensitive to the functional trial performance and therefore it is important to standardize the functional trial performance to ensure a repeatable estimate of the HJC when using the GSF method.

  12. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.1186/1743-0003-8-16

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG) signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with th...

  13. Limb position sense, proprioceptive drift and muscle thixotropy at the human elbow joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, A; Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2014-06-15

    These experiments on the human forearm are based on the hypothesis that drift in the perceived position of a limb over time can be explained by receptor adaptation. Limb position sense was measured in 39 blindfolded subjects using a forearm-matching task. A property of muscle, its thixotropy, a contraction history-dependent passive stiffness, was exploited to place muscle receptors of elbow muscles in a defined state. After the arm had been held flexed and elbow flexors contracted, we observed time-dependent changes in the perceived position of the reference arm by an average of 2.8° in the direction of elbow flexion over 30 s (Experiment 1). The direction of the drift reversed after the arm had been extended and elbow extensors contracted, with a mean shift of 3.5° over 30 s in the direction of elbow extension (Experiment 2). The time-dependent changes could be abolished by conditioning elbow flexors and extensors in the reference arm at the test angle, although this led to large position errors during matching (±10°), depending on how the indicator arm had been conditioned (Experiments 3 and 4). When slack was introduced in the elbow muscles of both arms, by shortening muscles after the conditioning contraction, matching errors became small and there was no drift in position sense (Experiments 5 and 6). These experiments argue for a receptor-based mechanism for proprioceptive drift and suggest that to align the two forearms, the brain monitors the difference between the afferent signals from the two arms.

  14. Muscle fibre types of the lumbrical, interossei, flexor, and extensor muscles moving the index finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the fibre types of the muscles moving the index fingers in humans. Fifteen forearms of eight adult cadavers were used. The sampled muscles were the first lumbrical (LM), first volar interosseous (VI), first dorsal interosseus (DI), second flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), second flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), and extensor digitorum (ED). Six micrometer thick sections were stained for fast muscle fibres. The procedure was performed by applying mouse monoclonal anti-skeletal myosin antibody (fast) and avidin-biotin peroxidase complex staining. Rectangular areas (0.38 mm × 0.38 mm) were photographed and the boundaries of the muscle areas were marked on the translucent film. The numbers and sizes of the muscle fibres in each part were evaluated by the image analyser program and calculated per unit area (1 mm(2)). The proportion of the fast fibres was significantly (p = 0.012) greater in the intrinsic muscles (55.7 ± 17.1%) than in the extrinsic muscles (45.9 ± 17.1%). Among the six muscles, the VI had a significantly higher portion (59.3%) of fast fibres than the FDS (40.6%) (p = 0.005) or the FDP (45.1%) (p = 0.023). The density of the non-fast fibres was significantly (p = 0.015) greater in the extrinsic muscles (539.2 ± 336.8/mm(2)) than in the intrinsic muscles (383.4 ± 230.4/mm2). Since the non-fast fibres represent less fatigable fibres, it is thought that the extrinsic muscles have higher durability against fatigue, and the intrinsic muscles, including the LM, should move faster than the FDS or FDP because the MP joint should be flexed before the IP joint to grip an object.

  15. ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 expression in human temporomandibular joint discs with internal derangement, correlates with degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Crimi, Salvatore; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Pannone, Giuseppe; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castorina, Sergio; Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Loreto, Carla

    2015-11-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement (ID) is one of the most common form of temporomandibular disorders. There is evidence showing the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the cells from degenerated TMJ disc. ADAMTS are a large family of metalloproteases which are responsible for proteoglycans degradation. The present study aimed to evaluate ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 immunohistochemical expression in human TMJ discs from patients affected by ID, and to find out if there is any correlation with the degree of histopathological changes. Eighteen temporomandibular displaced disc specimens and sixteen TMJ disc control were used for the present study. Specimens were immunohistochemically processed and ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 expression were obtained respectively for the anterior (AB), intermediate (IB) and posterior (PB) bands and compared to the histopathological degeneration score (HDS). Immunoreactivity for ADAMTS-4 and -5, was observed in both not degenerated and degenerated human TMJ discs. Both the percentage of ADAMTS-4 and -5 immunostained cells (ES) and the intensity of staining (IS) were significantly greater in affected specimens compared with those in control discs. The ADAMTS-5 ES and IS of the 3 bands of the disc correlated to the TMJ disc HDS (0.001 < P < 0.05), on the other hand only AB and IB, ADAMTS-4 immunostaining scores correlated to HDS. According to these findings it can be assumed in that the more histopathological changes in the disc are detected, the higher levels of ADAMTS are produced. This in turn can lead to ECM breakdown and in turn to a more advanced disc displacement. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A description of a contemporary human skull material in respect of age, gender, temporomandibular joint changes, and some dental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Cecilia; Ernberg, Malin; Magnusson, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists concerning the etiological factors behind degenerative changes in the temporomandibularjoints (TMJs). Occlusal factors, ageing, gender and genetics are some factors that have been discussed. The aim of the present study was to examine a contemporary human skull material in respect of gender, age, occlusal variables and form and surface changes in the temporomandibular joints. The material consisted of 259 human skulls, 170 males and 89 females, with an age range of 18-100 years. The over all dental status was poor, and 22% were edentulous. Both medio-lateral and antero-posterior dimensions as well as anterior and superior shape of the condyles were in good agreement with previous results. Form and surface changes of both the condyles and the temporal components were, however, more common in the present material compared to most previous studies. Men had on average more degenerative changes in the TMJs compared to women. In agreement with many previous studies, there was an increase of such changes with increasing age. Severe tooth attrition was a common finding, especially in men, but no correlation was found between this variable and the severity of degenerative changes in the TMJs. Abfractions were found in only 3 cases. Considering the common finding of severe tooth attrition,the rare occurrence of abfractions does not lend support to the hypothesis that abfractions are mainly caused by occlusal loading. Condylar dimensions and shape of the condyles were in good agreement with previously presented results. Severe tooth attrition and pronounced degenerative changes in the TMJs were common findings but no statistically significant association was found between these two variables.

  17. Interventions for control of Salmonella: clearance of microbial growth from rubber picker fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J W; Yates, I E

    2009-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine if a surface material with antimicrobial properties combined with an effective disinfectant could achieve total clearance of bacterial contamination. Before beginning the project, new rubber picker fingers collected from 3 processing facilities were tested for endogenous microflora. Five species of bacteria common to soil and human handling were present: Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus cereus/thuringiensis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis ssp. novobiosepticus, and Staphylococcus intermedius. In separate experiments, new (unused) rubber picker fingers from 3 manufacturers were exposed to broiler carcass rinses, and the kinetics of bacterial attachment to finger material was determined. Turbidity of the bacterial suspensions at varying dilutions containing picker finger sections was compared hourly with controls to evaluate inhibition. New rubber finger material from the 3 manufacturers significantly inhibited bacterial growth (P growth of pathogens and determined the activity of 5 disinfectant compounds. Two of the compounds were most effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Escherichia coli, and one of the compounds was selected for further study with Salmonella Enteritidis. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the levels of Salmonella Enteritidis before and after treatment. The most effective compound was nontoxic and completely cleared Salmonella Enteritidis contamination from the rubber picker finger surface.

  18. Finger vein identification using fuzzy-based k-nearest centroid neighbor classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosdi, Bakhtiar Affendi; Jaafar, Haryati; Ramli, Dzati Athiar

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a new approach for personal identification using finger vein image is presented. Finger vein is an emerging type of biometrics that attracts attention of researchers in biometrics area. As compared to other biometric traits such as face, fingerprint and iris, finger vein is more secured and hard to counterfeit since the features are inside the human body. So far, most of the researchers focus on how to extract robust features from the captured vein images. Not much research was conducted on the classification of the extracted features. In this paper, a new classifier called fuzzy-based k-nearest centroid neighbor (FkNCN) is applied to classify the finger vein image. The proposed FkNCN employs a surrounding rule to obtain the k-nearest centroid neighbors based on the spatial distributions of the training images and their distance to the test image. Then, the fuzzy membership function is utilized to assign the test image to the class which is frequently represented by the k-nearest centroid neighbors. Experimental evaluation using our own database which was collected from 492 fingers shows that the proposed FkNCN has better performance than the k-nearest neighbor, k-nearest-centroid neighbor and fuzzy-based-k-nearest neighbor classifiers. This shows that the proposed classifier is able to identify the finger vein image effectively.

  19. Finger millet (Ragi, Eleusine coracana L.): a review of its nutritional properties, processing, and plausible health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, S; Krishnaswamy, K; Sudha, V; Malleshi, N G; Anjana, R M; Palaniappan, L; Mohan, V

    2013-01-01

    Finger millet or ragi is one of the ancient millets in India (2300 BC), and this review focuses on its antiquity, consumption, nutrient composition, processing, and health benefits. Of all the cereals and millets, finger millet has the highest amount of calcium (344mg%) and potassium (408mg%). It has higher dietary fiber, minerals, and sulfur containing amino acids compared to white rice, the current major staple in India. Despite finger millet's rich nutrient profile, recent studies indicate lower consumption of millets in general by urban Indians. Finger millet is processed by milling, malting, fermentation, popping, and decortication. Noodles, vermicilli, pasta, Indian sweet (halwa) mixes, papads, soups, and bakery products from finger millet are also emerging. In vitro and in vivo (animal) studies indicated the blood glucose lowering, cholesterol lowering, antiulcerative, wound healing properties, etc., of finger millet. However, appropriate intervention or randomized clinical trials are lacking on these health effects. Glycemic index (GI) studies on finger millet preparations indicate low to high values, but most of the studies were conducted with outdated methodology. Hence, appropriate GI testing of finger millet preparations and short- and long-term human intervention trials may be helpful to establish evidence-based health benefits.

  20. Human bones obtained from routine joint replacement surgery as a tool for studies of plutonium, americium and {sup 90}Sr body-burden in general public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mietelski, Jerzy W., E-mail: jerzy.mietelski@ifj.edu.pl [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Golec, Edward B. [Traumatology and Orthopaedic Clinic, 5th Military Clinical Hospital and Polyclinic, Independent Public Healthcare Facility, Wroclawska 1-3, 30-901 Cracow (Poland); Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Department of Physical Therapy Basics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Administration College, Bielsko-Biala (Poland); Tomankiewicz, Ewa [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Golec, Joanna [Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Heath Science, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Cracow (Poland); Nowak, Sebastian [Traumatology and Orthopaedic Clinic, 5th Military Clinical Hospital and Polyclinic, Independent Public Healthcare Facility, Wroclawska 1-3, 30-901 Cracow (Poland); Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Szczygiel, Elzbieta [Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Heath Science, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Cracow (Poland); Brudecki, Kamil [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2011-06-15

    The paper presents a new sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination by bone-seeking radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241}Am and selected gamma-emitters, in human bones. The presented results were obtained for samples retrieved from routine surgeries, namely knee or hip joints replacements with implants, performed on individuals from Southern Poland. This allowed to collect representative sets of general public samples. The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. Due to low concentrations of {sup 238}Pu the ratio of Pu isotopes which might be used for Pu source identification is obtained only as upper limits other then global fallout (for example Chernobyl) origin of Pu. Calculated concentrations of radioisotopes are comparable to the existing data from post-mortem studies on human bones retrieved from autopsy or exhumations. Human bones removed during knee or hip joint surgery provide a simple and ethical way for obtaining samples for plutonium, americium and {sup 90}Sr in-body contamination studies in general public. - Highlights: > Surgery for joint replacement as novel sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination. > Proposed way of sampling is not causing ethic doubts. > It is a convenient way of collecting human bone samples from global population. > The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. > The opposite patient age correlations trends were found for 90Sr (negative) and Pu, Am (positive).

  1. 基于ADAMS的人体膝关节运动力学研究%ADAMS-BASED HUMAN KNEE JOINT KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘健; 郑建荣; 吴青

    2012-01-01

    Baaed on the research on human body structure which analyzes knee joint's kinematics and dynamics characteristics, the authors applies LifeMOD, a human biochemical mechanics software, to building up a human body model. A bushing constraint is applied creatively to knee joint. Dynamics simulation analysis is performed inside ADAMS to obtain the curves of the acting force and movement on human knee joint. Therefore the accuracy and practicability of the knee bushing model is verified, all of those efforts provide theoretical basis for researches on biped robots, artificial limbs and rehabilitation training robots.%在对人体结构进行研究的基础上,分析膝关节的运动学和动力学特性.应用人体生物力学软件LifeMOD创建人体模型,创新性地对膝关节施以轴套力约束,并在ADAMS中进行动力学仿真分析,得到人体膝关节的作用力和作用力矩曲线,验证膝关节轴套力模型的准确性和实用性,为双足步行机器人、人工假肢和康复训练机器人的研究提供理论基础.

  2. Reach Envelope of Human Extremities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jingzhou(杨景周); ZHANG Yunqing(张云清); CHEN Liping(陈立平); ABDEL-MALEK Karim

    2004-01-01

    Significant attention in recent years has been given to obtain a better understanding of human joint ranges, measurement, and functionality, especially in conjunction with commands issued by the central nervous system. While researchers have studied motor commands needed to drive a limb to follow a path trajectory, various computer algorithms have been reported that provide adequate analysis of limb modeling and motion. This paper uses a rigorous mathematical formulation to model human limbs, understand their reach envelope, delineate barriers therein where a trajectory becomes difficult to control, and help visualize these barriers. Workspaces of a typical forearm with 9 degrees of freedom, a typical finger modeled as a 4- degree-of-freedom system, and a lower extremity with 4 degrees of freedom are discussed. The results show that using the proposed formulation, joint limits play an important role in distinguishing the barriers.

  3. The immediate effects of therapeutic keyboard music playing for finger training in adults undergoing hand rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Songhuai; Yang, Degang; Du, Liangjie; Wang, Ziyuan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of therapeutic keyboard music playing on the finger function of subjects’ hands through measurements of the joint position error test, surface electromyography, probe reaction time, and writing time. [Subjects and Methods] Ten subjects were divided randomly into experimental and control groups. The experimental group used therapeutic keyboard music playing and the control group used grip training. All subjects were assessed and evaluated by the joint position error test, surface electromyography, probe reaction time, and writing time. [Results] After accomplishing therapeutic keyboard music playing and grip training, surface electromyography of the two groups showed no significant change, but joint position error test, probe reaction time, and writing time obviously improved. [Conclusion] These results suggest that therapeutic keyboard music playing is an effective and novel treatment for improving joint position error test scores, probe reaction time, and writing time, and it should be promoted widely in clinics. PMID:27630419

  4. The immediate effects of therapeutic keyboard music playing for finger training in adults undergoing hand rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Songhuai; Yang, Degang; Du, Liangjie; Wang, Ziyuan

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of therapeutic keyboard music playing on the finger function of subjects' hands through measurements of the joint position error test, surface electromyography, probe reaction time, and writing time. [Subjects and Methods] Ten subjects were divided randomly into experimental and control groups. The experimental group used therapeutic keyboard music playing and the control group used grip training. All subjects were assessed and evaluated by the joint position error test, surface electromyography, probe reaction time, and writing time. [Results] After accomplishing therapeutic keyboard music playing and grip training, surface electromyography of the two groups showed no significant change, but joint position error test, probe reaction time, and writing time obviously improved. [Conclusion] These results suggest that therapeutic keyboard music playing is an effective and novel treatment for improving joint position error test scores, probe reaction time, and writing time, and it should be promoted widely in clinics.

  5. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    KAUST Repository

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.

    2015-02-23

    © 2015 American Physical Society. The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this "selection" of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  6. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  7. Kinematic analysis of the finger exoskeleton using MATLAB/Simulink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiłowski, Krzysztof; Awrejcewicz, Jan; Lewandowski, Donat

    2014-01-01

    A paralyzed and not fully functional part of human body can be supported by the properly designed exoskeleton system with motoric abilities. It can help in rehabilitation, or movement of a disabled/paralyzed limb. Both suitably selected geometry and specialized software are studied applying the MATLAB environment. A finger exoskeleton was the base for MATLAB/Simulink model. Specialized software, such as MATLAB/Simulink give us an opportunity to optimize calculation reaching precise results, which help in next steps of design process. The calculations carried out yield information regarding movement relation between three functionally connected actuators and showed distance and velocity changes during the whole simulation time.

  8. Kalman smoothing improves the estimation of joint kinematics and kinetics in marker-based human gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, F; De Laet, T; Jonkers, I; De Schutter, J

    2008-12-05

    We developed a Kalman smoothing algorithm to improve estimates of joint kinematics from measured marker trajectories during motion analysis. Kalman smoothing estimates are based on complete marker trajectories. This is an improvement over other techniques, such as the global optimisation method (GOM), Kalman filtering, and local marker estimation (LME), where the estimate at each time instant is only based on part of the marker trajectories. We applied GOM, Kalman filtering, LME, and Kalman smoothing to marker trajectories from both simulated and experimental gait motion, to estimate the joint kinematics of a ten segment biomechanical model, with 21 degrees of freedom. Three simulated marker trajectories were studied: without errors, with instrumental errors, and with soft tissue artefacts (STA). Two modelling errors were studied: increased thigh length and hip centre dislocation. We calculated estimation errors from the known joint kinematics in the simulation study. Compared with other techniques, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint positions, by more than 50% for the simulated marker trajectories without errors and with instrumental errors. Compared with GOM, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint moments by more than 35%. Compared with Kalman filtering and LME, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint accelerations by at least 50%. Our simulation results show that the use of Kalman smoothing substantially improves the estimates of joint kinematics and kinetics compared with previously proposed techniques (GOM, Kalman filtering, and LME) for both simulated, with and without modelling errors, and experimentally measured gait motion.

  9. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria eBerteletti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense.

  10. Reduction of interleukin-6 expression in human synoviocytes and rheumatoid arthritis rat joints by linear polarized near infrared light (Superlizer) irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Hidefumi; Imaoka, Asayo; Kuboyama, Noboru; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disorder that involves inflammation and pain of joints. Low-level laser irradiation is being evaluated for treating RA, however, the effectiveness of linear polarized near infrared light (SuperLizer; SL) irradiation is unclear. It has been reported that interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a key role in the progression of RA. In our previous study, using DNA microarray analysis, we examined the gene expression profiling of human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A in response to IL-1ß administration and SL irradiation. As a result, IL-6 was listed in altered gene as increased by IL-1ß and decreased by SL irradiation. The reduction of IL-6 gene expression in MH7A by SL irradiation was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Effect of SL irradiation on the RA inflammation in the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) rats was also studied by measuring temperature. IL-6 production in knee joint of rats was analyzed by immunohisto-chemistry. Scatter plot analysis demonstrated that an increase in IL-6 gene expression by IL-1ß was reduced by SL irradiation. The reduction of IL-6 mRNA level by SL irradiation was successfully confirmed by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. SL irradiation treated CIA rat decreased the temperature of knee joints. The immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a strong IL-6 staining in synovial membrane tissue of CIA rat joint, and SL irradiation significantly reduced the staining. Since IL-6 has been identified to be an important proinflarnmatory cytokine in the pathogenesis of RA, the reduction of IL-6 expression is one of mechanisms in reduction of inflammation in RA joints by SL irradiation suggesting that SL irradiation may be useful for RA therapy. SL irradiation reduced IL-6 gene expression in MH7A, and reduced inflammation and IL-6 protein expression in knee joint of CIA rats.

  11. Effects of hip joint position and intra-capsular volume on hip joint intra-capsular pressure: a human cadaveric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse Paul

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in hip intra-capsular pressure has been implicated in various hip pathologies, such as avascular necrosis complicating undisplaced femoral neck fracture. Our study aimed at documenting the relationship between intra-capsular volume and pressure in various hip positions. Methods Fifty-two cadaveric hips were studied. An electronic pressure-monitoring catheter recorded the intra-capsular hip pressure after each instillation of 2 ml of normal saline and in six hip positions. Results In neutral hip position, the control position for investigation, intra-capsular pressure remained unchanged when its content was below 10 ml. Thereafter, it increased exponentially. When the intra-capsular volume was 12 ml, full abduction produced a 2.1-fold increase (p = 0.028 of the intra-capsular hip joint pressure; full external rotation and full internal rotation increased the pressure by at least 4-fold (p Conclusion Intra-capsular pressure increases with its volume, but with a wide variation with different positions. It would be appropriate to recommend that hips with haemarthrosis or effusion should be positioned in 45-degree flexion.

  12. Automated FingerPrint Background removal: FPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgante Michele

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of a whole-genome physical map has been an essential component of numerous genome projects initiated since the inception of the Human Genome Project. Its usefulness has been proved for whole-genome shotgun projects as a post-assembly validation and recently it has also been used in the assembly step to constrain on BACs positions. Fingerprinting is usually the method of choice for construction of physical maps. A clone fingerprint is composed of true peaks representing real fragments and background peaks, mainly composed of E. coli genomic DNA, partial digestions, star activity by-products, and machine background. High-throughput fingerprinting leads to the production of thousands of BAC clone fingerprints per day. That is why background peaks removal has become an important issue and needs to be automatized, especially in capillary electrophoresis based fingerprints. Results At the moment, the only tools available for such a task are GenoProfiler and its descendant FPMiner. The large variation in the quality of fingerprints that is usually present in large fingerprinting projects represents a major difficulty in the correct removal of background peaks that has only been partially addressed by the methods so far adopted that all require a long manual optimization of parameters. Thus, we implemented a new data-independent tool, FPB (FingerPrint Background removal, suitable for large scale projects as well as mapping of few clones. Conclusion FPB is freely available at http://www.appliedgenomics.org/tools.php. FPB was used to remove the background from all fingerprints of three grapevine physical map projects. The first project consists of about 50,000 fingerprints, the second one consists of about 70,000 fingerprints, and the third one consists of about 45,000 fingerprints. In all cases a successful assembly was built.

  13. Joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret......Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret...

  14. Joint swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 275. Raftery AT, Lim E, Ostor AJK. Joint disorders. In: Raftery AT, Lim E, Ostor AJK, eds. ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Joint Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  15. Analysis by Light, Scanning, and Transmission Microscopy of the Intima Synovial of the Temporomandibular Joint of Human Fetuses during the Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvez, Carlos Sabu; Carvalho de Moraes, Luis Otavio; Marques, Sergio R.; Tedesco, Roberto C.; Harb, Leandro J. C.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose F.; Mérida-Velasco, Jose R.; Alonso, Luis Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To characterize morphologically and ultrastructurally using light microscopy, the scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy the intima synovial of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses between the 10th and the 38th week of development. Materials and Methods. The TMJ was dissected bilaterally in 37 human fetuses belonging to the Institute of Embryology of the University Complutense of Madrid and of the Federal University of São Paulo. Results. The outcome by light microscopy showed the morphology of the TMJ and that the formation of inferior joint cavity precedes the superior joint cavity and the presence of blood vessels in the synovial. Conclusion. By scanning and transmission electron microscopy we observed the presence of two well-defined cell types in the intima layer of synovial of the TMJ of human fetuses, macrophage-like type A cell and fibroblast-like type B cell, and the presence of the a third cell type, defined by the name of intermediate lining cell in the intima layer of the synovial. PMID:24527214

  16. Joint ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Hoogendoorn (Martin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractEen veel voorkomende wijze van samenwerking tussen ondernemingen is het uitvoeren van activiteiten in de vorm van een joint venture. Een joint venture is bijna altijd een afzonderlijke juridische entiteit. De partners in de joint venture voeren gezamenlijk de zeggenschap uit. In internat

  17. Joint ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Hoogendoorn (Martin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractEen veel voorkomende wijze van samenwerking tussen ondernemingen is het uitvoeren van activiteiten in de vorm van een joint venture. Een joint venture is bijna altijd een afzonderlijke juridische entiteit. De partners in de joint venture voeren gezamenlijk de zeggenschap uit. In internat

  18. Finger recognition and gesture imitation in Gerstmann's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, V; Pernigo, S; Urgesi, C; Zapparoli, P; Aglioti, S M

    2008-01-01

    We report the association between finger agnosia and gesture imitation deficits in a right-handed, right-hemisphere damaged patient with Gerstmann's syndrome (GS), a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by finger and toe agnosia, left-right disorientation and dyscalculia. No language deficits were found. The patient showed a gestural imitation deficit that specifically involved finger movements and postures. The association between finger recognition and imitation deficits suggests that both static and dynamic aspects of finger representations are impaired in GS. We suggest that GS is a disorder of body representation that involves hands and fingers, that is, the non-facial body parts most involved in social interactions.

  19. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  20. Autonomous control of multi-fingered hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li; LIU Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand based on a modular control system of dexterous manipulation. A simple proportional-integral-derivative(PID) position control with friction compensation, which requires few friction parameters, is used to realize accurate and smooth trajectory tracking in pregrasp phase. In grasp and manipulation phases, an event-driven switcher is adopted to determine the switching between unconstrained position control and constrained torque control, and an improved explicit integral force control strategy is implemented to realize simultaneously stable contact transition and accurate force tracking. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness of the proposed autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand.