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Sample records for human factors involved

  1. Factors Involved in Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Human Derived Cardiomyocytes

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    Gregori Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular mechanisms by which myocardial ischemia translates into ventricular remodeling remain unclear. Methods: We investigated whether hypoxia and proinflammatory cytokines are specific inducers of remodeling signals in an in vitro model of cultured adult human ventricular myocytes (AC16 cells. Results:Hypoxia modified the ratio of matrix remodeling factors by increasing the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP and reducing tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1 secretion in AC16 cells. These effects, however, were not associated with either modifications in expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2, collagen-I or metalloproteinase activity. Hypoxia does, actually increase the production of the cardiac antifibrogenic growth factors, Apelin and VEGF, through an Hypoxia Inducible Factor type 1-dependent mechanism. Concerning proinflammatory signaling pathways, IL1β emerged as a powerful inducer of matrix turnover, since it significantly enhanced PIIINP, TIMP-1 and hyaluronic acid production and increased metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, TNFα did not modify matrix turnover but markedly induced the production of Apelin and VEGF. Conclusion: Hypoxia and increased TNFα activity likely exert cardioprotective actions by activating the cardiac antifibrogenic factors Apelin and VEGF. In contrast, IL1β is a strong promoter of interstitial collagen remodeling that may contribute to ventricular dilation and heart failure in the ischemic myocardium.

  2. Fusion of Cytothrophoblast with Syncytiotrophoblast in the Human Placenta: Factors Involved in Syncytialization

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    Gauster M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human placental villi are covered by a characteristic epithelial-like layer. It consists of mononucleated cytotrophoblasts and an overlyingsyncytiotrophoblast layer both in contact to the trophoblastic basement membrane. The syncytiotrophoblast mostly lacks DNA replication andseems to transcribe only barely mRNA. Therefore, the syncytiotrophoblast depends on cell compounds delivered by fusing cytotrophoblasts. Delivery of fresh cytoplasmic contents into the syncytiotrophoblast is achieved by continuous fusion with cytotrophoblasts throughout gesta-tion. Fusion between cytotrophoblasts and the syncytiotrophoblast is driven by multiple factors, including environmental growth factors andcytokines, which turn on a specific cascade of fusogenic proteins in cytotrophoblasts destined for fusion. The cascade includes protein kinasesand transcription factors, as well as induced expression of fusion-promoting proteins associated with the cell membrane. Additionally, specificproteases are activated, which cleave and remodel structural proteins to prepare the cell for fusion. However, not only fusogenic proteins, butalso plasma membrane architecture and physicochemical factors such as calcium and oxygen affect intertrophoblastic fusion. Coordinatedaction of all factors involved is crucial for proper cytotrophoblast – syncytiotrophoblast fusion. Deregulation of a single factor might cause aninadequate fusion rate and could lead to pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia or even spontaneous abortion.

  3. Human factors involvement in bringing the power of AI to a heterogeneous user population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Mary; Nguyen, Trung

    1994-01-01

    The Human Factors involvement in developing COMPAQ QuickSolve, an electronic problem-solving and information system for Compaq's line of networked printers, is described. Empowering customers with expert system technology so they could solve advanced networked printer problems on their own was a major goal in designing this system. This process would minimize customer down-time, reduce the number of phone calls to the Compaq Customer Support Center, improve customer satisfaction, and, most importantly, differentiate Compaq printers in the marketplace by providing the best, and most technologically advanced, customer support. This represents a re-engineering of Compaq's customer support strategy and implementation. In its first generation system, SMART, the objective was to provide expert knowledge to Compaq's help desk operation to more quickly and correctly answer customer questions and problems. QuickSolve is a second generation system in that customer support is put directly in the hands of the consumers. As a result, the design of QuickSolve presented a number of challenging issues. Because the produce would be used by a diverse and heterogeneous set of users, a significant amount of human factors research and analysis was required while designing and implementing the system. Research that shaped the organization and design of the expert system component as well.

  4. Factors involved in the inflammatory events of cervical ripening in humans

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    Wang Hong

    2004-10-01

    decrease in GR levels in human cervix at parturition. Concomitantly there is an increase of factors such as NFkappaB, PAF-R, COX-1 and COX-2, suggesting that they may participate in the sequence of events leading to the final cervical ripening.

  5. How to Cope with the Rare Human Error Events Involved with organizational Factors in Nuclear Power Plants

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    Kim, Sa Kil; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The current human error guidelines (e.g. US DOD handbooks, US NRC Guidelines) are representative tools to prevent human errors. These tools, however, have limits that they do not adapt all operating situations and circumstances such as design base events. In other words, these tools are only adapted foreseeable standardized operating situations and circumstances. In this study, our research team proposed an evidence-based approach such as UK's safety case to coping with the rare human error events such as TMI, Chernobyl, Fukushima accidents. These accidents are representative events involved with rare human errors. Our research team defined the 'rare human errors' as the follow three characterized events; Extremely low frequency Extremely high complicated structure Extremely serious damage of human life and property A safety case is a structured argument, supported by evidence, intended to justify that a system is acceptably safe. The definition by UK defense standard 00-56 issue 4 states that such an evidence-based approach can be contrast with a prescriptive approach to safety certification, which require safety to be justified using a prescribed process. Safety managements and safety regulatory activities based on safety case are effective to control organizational factors in terms of integrated safety management. Especially safety issues relevant with public acceptance are useful to provide practical evidences to the public reasonably. European Union including UK has developed the concept of engineered safety management system to deal with public acceptance using the safety case. In Korea nuclear industry, the Korean Atomic Research Institute has firstly performed a basic research to adapt the safety case in the field of radioactive waste according to the IAEA SSG-23(KAERI/TR-4497, 4531). Excepting the radioactive waste, there is no try to adapt the safety case yet. Most incidents and accidents involved human during operating NPPs have a tendency

  6. Human rhinovirus 2 2Apro recognition of eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI. Involvement of an exosite.

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    Foeger, Nicole; Schmid, Eva M; Skern, Tim

    2003-08-29

    The 2A proteinase (2Apro) of human rhinovirus 2 is a cysteine proteinase with a unique chymotrypsin-like fold. During viral replication, 2Apro performs self-processing by cleaving between its own N terminus and the C terminus of the preceding protein, VP1. Subsequently, 2Apro cleaves the two isoforms of the cellular protein, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G. We have previously shown that HRV2 2Apro can directly bind to eIF4G isoforms. Here we demonstrate using deletion mutants of eIF4GI that HRV2 2Apro requires eIF4GI amino acids 600-674 for binding; however, the amino acids at the cleavage site, Arg681 downward arrow Gly, are not required. The HRV2 2Apro binding domain for eIF4GI was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Specifically, mutations Leu17 --> Arg and Asp35 --> Glu severely impaired HRV2 2Apro binding and thus processing of eIF4GI in rabbit reticulocyte lysates; self-processing, however, was not affected. Alanine scanning analysis further identified the loop containing residues Tyr32, Ser33, and Ser34 as important for eIF4GI binding. Although Asp35 is part of the catalytic triad, most of the eIF4GI binding domain lies in a unique exosite structure absent from other chymotrypsin-like enzymes and is distinct from the substrate binding cleft. The exosite represents a novel virulence determinant that may allow the development of specific inhibitors for HRV2 2Apro.

  7. Relevant Etiological Factors Involved in Human Trafficking in order to Practice Prostitution

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    Alexandru Boroi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Human trafficking (especially women and young girls, though men count equally among the victims are recently developed worldwide. The situation in certain regions of Central and Eastern Europe (with the opening of borders, increasing unemployment and poverty, dislocations and reducing state control structures tend to favour the development of all forms of trafficking, especially of human trafficking forsexual exploitation. To adopt appropriate measures to prevent and combat we have to know first the causes and conditions that generate human beings trafficking. Analysis of case studies and police statistics allowed the structuring of categories of causes and conditions that generate and sustain the phenomenon of traffickingin order to practice prostitution.

  8. Relevant Etiological Factors Involved in Human Trafficking in order to Practice Prostitution

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru Boroi

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking (especially women and young girls, though men count equally among the victims) are recently developed worldwide. The situation in certain regions of Central and Eastern Europe (with the opening of borders, increasing unemployment and poverty, dislocations and reducing state control structures) tend to favour the development of all forms of trafficking, especially of human trafficking forsexual exploitation. To adopt appropriate measures to prevent and combat we have to know ...

  9. Transcription factor 7-like 1 is involved in hypothalamo–pituitary axis development in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston-Massuet, Carles; McCabe, Mark J.; Scagliotti, Valeria; Young, Rodrigo M.; Carreno, Gabriela; Gregory, Louise C.; Jayakody, Sujatha A.; Pozzi, Sara; Gualtieri, Angelica; Basu, Basudha; Koniordou, Markela; Wu, Chun-I; Bancalari, Rodrigo E.; Rahikkala, Elisa; Veijola, Riitta; Lopponen, Tuija; Graziola, Federica; Turton, James; Signore, Massimo; Mousavy Gharavy, Seyedeh Neda; Charolidi, Nicoletta; Sokol, Sergei Y.; Merrill, Bradley J.; Dattani, Mehul T.; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant embryonic development of the hypothalamus and/or pituitary gland in humans results in congenital hypopituitarism (CH). Transcription factor 7-like 1 (TCF7L1), an important regulator of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, is expressed in the developing forebrain and pituitary gland, but its role during hypothalamo–pituitary (HP) axis formation or involvement in human CH remains elusive. Using a conditional genetic approach in the mouse, we first demonstrate that TCF7L1 is required in the prospective hypothalamus to maintain normal expression of the hypothalamic signals involved in the induction and subsequent expansion of Rathke’s pouch progenitors. Next, we reveal that the function of TCF7L1 during HP axis development depends exclusively on the repressing activity of TCF7L1 and does not require its interaction with β-catenin. Finally, we report the identification of two independent missense variants in human TCF7L1, p.R92P and p.R400Q, in a cohort of patients with forebrain and/or pituitary defects. We demonstrate that these variants exhibit reduced repressing activity in vitro and in vivo relative to wild-type TCF7L1. Together, our data provide support for a conserved molecular function of TCF7L1 as a transcriptional repressor during HP axis development in mammals and identify variants in this transcription factor that are likely to contribute to the etiology of CH. PMID:26764381

  10. How Much Should We Involve Genetic and Environmental Factors in the Risk Assessment of Mycotoxins in Humans?

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    Maria Rosaria Carratu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite consented efforts in prevention, mycotoxins remain a problem of human health concern in several parts of the world including developed countries. Within the same range of toxins concentrations in the blood some people develop a disease while others do not. Could this inequality in front of mycotoxins effects be explained by environment factors and/or genetic predisposition? Among recent advances in environmental health research Correlation between chronic diseases and mycotoxins in humans deserves attention through several questions: Are genetic factors involved in disease causation of mycotoxins? How much are these factors currently taken into account for mycotoxins risk assessment and how much should we involve them? Answers are still to come. Genetic and environment factors deserve therefore more attention when dealing with regulatory limits, since among the general population, those who are at risk and will develop specific diseases are likely those bearing genetic predispositions. We have addressed these questions for the specific case of ochratoxin A in humans by investigating in Tunisia, county of Jelma, in four rural families forming a household of 21 persons all exposed to ochratoxin A in diet. Our results confirm that ochratoxin A induces chronic tubular nephropathy in humans and mainly point at those having the HLA haplotype A3, B27/35, DR7 to be more sensitive to the disease for quantitatively similar or lower exposure. Persons with such haplotype were found to bear chronic interstitial nephropathy with tubular karyomegalic cells while others were apparently healthy. Godin et al. (1996 in France have also found in sibling (a sister and her brother from urban area that have similar HLA haplotype B35-patern, OTA-related renal tubulopathy with mild proteinuria including β2-microglobulinuria. Several mechanisms are discussed that could be put ahead to explain how the HLA haplotype could lead to tubular cells lyses and

  11. Preferential response of acute myeloid leukemias with translocation involving chromosome 17 to human recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

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    Pébusque, M J; Lafage, M; Lopez, M; Mannoni, P

    1988-07-01

    Induction of proliferation and differentiation in response to the addition of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was studied by both suspension and semisolid cultures in a series of acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Induction of proliferation by G-CSF alone was observed in six of 27 cases of AML. All acute promyelocytic leukemias with the specific chromosomal translocation t(15;17) and one case of myelomonocytic leukemia with balanced chromosomal translocation involving chromosome 17 at band q12q21 were induced to proliferate strongly by the G-CSF. However, contrary to the long-term proliferative effect observed with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), G-CSF activity can be characterized by its capability to initiate and promote the growth of responding AML cells but not to sustain long-term proliferation. Finally, no terminal differentiation was found, as assessed by morphology, cytochemistry, and cell surface marker analysis. These results indicate that G-CSF may be sufficient to provide a specific signal for induction of a transient proliferation in AML without induction of terminal differentiation. The cells with the highest response are clonal leukemia cells, all bearing a translocation involving the chromosome region 17q12q21 in which the G-CSF gene has been recently located.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of Neisseria meningitidis in human whole blood and mutagenesis studies identify virulence factors involved in blood survival.

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    Hebert Echenique-Rivera

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During infection Neisseria meningitidis (Nm encounters multiple environments within the host, which makes rapid adaptation a crucial factor for meningococcal survival. Despite the importance of invasion into the bloodstream in the meningococcal disease process, little is known about how Nm adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. To address this, we performed a time-course transcriptome analysis using an ex vivo model of human whole blood infection. We observed that Nm alters the expression of ≈30% of ORFs of the genome and major dynamic changes were observed in the expression of transcriptional regulators, transport and binding proteins, energy metabolism, and surface-exposed virulence factors. In particular, we found that the gene encoding the regulator Fur, as well as all genes encoding iron uptake systems, were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of regulated genes encoding for surface-exposed proteins involved in Nm pathogenesis allowed us to better understand mechanisms used to circumvent host defenses. During blood infection, Nm activates genes encoding for the factor H binding proteins, fHbp and NspA, genes encoding for detoxifying enzymes such as SodC, Kat and AniA, as well as several less characterized surface-exposed proteins that might have a role in blood survival. Through mutagenesis studies of a subset of up-regulated genes we were able to identify new proteins important for survival in human blood and also to identify additional roles of previously known virulence factors in aiding survival in blood. Nm mutant strains lacking the genes encoding the hypothetical protein NMB1483 and the surface-exposed proteins NalP, Mip and NspA, the Fur regulator, the transferrin binding protein TbpB, and the L-lactate permease LctP were sensitive to killing by human blood. This increased knowledge of how Nm responds to adaptation in blood could also be helpful to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to control the devastating

  13. Enhancement of pulmonary tumour seeding by human coagulation factors II, IX, X--an investigation into the possible mechanisms involved.

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    Purushotham, A D; McCulloch, P; George, W D

    1991-09-01

    Warfarin inhibits metastasis in the animal model and injection of the Warfarin-dependent coagulation factor complex II, IX, X enhances pulmonary metastasis in the same model. We have studied two possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effect. Mtln3, rat mammary carcinoma cells, radiolabelled with 5-(125) Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUDR) were injected intravenously in female Fisher 344 rats either alone or in combination with factor complex II, IX, X or bovine serum albumin. Following sacrifice at various intervals, measured lung radioactivity was significantly higher (20%) in animals administered cells with the factor complex than in the other two groups (P less than 0.001, ANOVA and Student's t-test). These results indicate increased entrapment of tumour cells in the pulmonary microcirculation. In a second experiment, rat factor complex II, IX, X was prepared, and Mtln3 cells were then injected in female Fisher 344 rats alone or in combination with either human factor complex or rat factor complex. Following sacrifice, the number of pulmonary nodules in animals receiving cells with rat factor complex was similar to that in animals receiving human factor complex, and significantly higher than that in the control (P less than 0.001, ANOVA and Mann-Whitney), indicating that the observed enhancement of pulmonary seeding is unrelated to the xenogeneic properties of the human factor complex.

  14. Involvement of retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F transcription factors during photodynamic therapy of human epidermoid carcinoma cells A431.

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    Ahmad, N; Gupta, S; Mukhtar, H

    1999-03-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a promising new therapeutic modality for the management of a variety of solid malignancies and many non-malignant diseases, is a bimodal therapy using a porphyrin based photosensitizing chemical and visible light. The proper understanding of the mechanism of PDT-mediated cancer cell-kill may result in improving the efficacy of this treatment modality. Earlier we have shown (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA; 95: 6977-6982, 1998) that silicon phthalocyanine (Pc4)-PDT results in an induction of the cyclin kinase inhibitor WAF1/CIP1/p21 which, by inhibiting cyclins (E and D1) and cyclin dependent kinases (cdk2 and cdk6), results in a G0/G1-phase arrest followed by apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma cells A431. We have also demonstrated the generation of nitric oxide during PDT-mediated apoptosis (Cancer Res.; 58: 1785-1788, 1998). Retinoblastoma (pRb) and E2F family transcription factors are important proteins, which regulate the G1-->S transition in the cell cycle. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of pRb-E2F/DP machinery as an important contributor of PDT-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Western blot analysis demonstrated a decrease in the hyper-phosphorylated form of pRb at 3, 6 and 12 h post-PDT with a relative increase in hypo-phosphorylated pRb. Western blot analysis also revealed that PDT-caused decrease in phosphorylation of pRb occurs at serine-780. The ELISA data demonstrated a time dependent accumulation of hypo-phosphorylated pRb by PDT. This response was accompanied with down-regulation in the protein expression of all five E2F (1-5) family transcription factors, and their heterodimeric partners DP1 and DP2. These results suggest that Pc4-PDT of A431 cells results in a down regulation of hyper-phosphorylated pRb protein with a relative increase in hypo-phosphorylated pRb that, in turn, compromises with the availability of free E2F. We suggest that these events result in a stoppage of the cell cycle

  15. Epidermal growth factor potentiates in vitro metastatic behaviour of human prostate cancer PC-3M cells: involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel

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    Uysal-Onganer Pinar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a high level of functional voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC expression has been found in strongly metastatic human and rat prostate cancer (PCa cells, the mechanism(s responsible for the upregulation is unknown. The concentration of epidermal growth factor (EGF, a modulator of ion channels, in the body is highest in prostatic fluid. Thus, EGF could be involved in the VGSC upregulation in PCa. The effects of EGF on VGSC expression in the highly metastatic human PCa PC-3M cell line, which was shown previously to express both functional VGSCs and EGF receptors, were investigated. A quantitative approach, from gene level to cell behaviour, was used. mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. Protein expression was studied by Western blots and immunocytochemistry and digital image analysis. Functional assays involved measurements of transverse migration, endocytic membrane activity and Matrigel invasion. Results Exogenous EGF enhanced the cells' in vitro metastatic behaviours (migration, endocytosis and invasion. Endogenous EGF had a similar involvement. EGF increased VGSC Nav1.7 (predominant isoform in PCa mRNA and protein expressions. Co-application of the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX suppressed the effect of EGF on all three metastatic cell behaviours studied. Conclusion 1 EGF has a major involvement in the upregulation of functional VGSC expression in human PCa PC-3M cells. (2 VGSC activity has a significant intermediary role in potentiating effect of EGF in human PCa.

  16. Interaction of human mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria: its involvement in the dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids.

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    Kasashima, Katsumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is a key regulator of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). TFAM interacts with itself and forms dimers; however, the precise interaction domain in vivo has not yet been determined. We herein showed that human TFAM formed oligomers in mitochondria by in situ chemical cross-linking. We used the separated fluorescent protein, monomeric Kusabira-Green, as a reporter to monitor their self-association in mitochondria. This reporter successfully detected the TFAM-TFAM interaction in cells as fluorescent signals on mitochondria. We also found that the N-terminal high-mobility group box domain was sufficient for this interaction. The expression of the dimer-defective mutant induced enlarged mtDNA nucleoids, suggesting the importance of dimerization in the distribution of mtDNA. The reporter system also supported the association and mixture between independent nucleoids through TFAM by a cell fusion assay using hemagglutinating virus of Japan. We here, for the first time, visualized the interaction of TFAM molecules in mitochondria and proposed its implications for the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids.

  17. Induction of tumor necrosis factor by bryostatin 1 is involved in synergistic interactions with paclitaxel in human myeloid leukemia cells.

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    Wang, Shujie; Wang, Zhiliang; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2003-05-01

    Interactions between the protein kinase C (PKC) activator/down-regulator bryostatin 1 and paclitaxel have been examined in human myeloid leukemia cells (U937) and in highly paclitaxel-resistant cells ectopically expressing a Bcl-2 phosphorylation loop-deleted protein (Delta Bcl-2). Treatment (24 hours) of wild-type cells with paclitaxel (eg, 5 to 20 nM) in combination with 10 nM bryostatin 1 induced a marked increase in mitochondrial damage (eg, cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO [second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases/direct IAP binding protein with low pI] release), caspase activation, Bid cleavage, and apoptosis; moreover, bryostatin 1 circumvented the block to paclitaxel-induced mitochondrial injury and apoptosis conferred by ectopic expression of the loop-deleted protein. Coadministration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) soluble receptors, or ectopic expression of CrmA or dominant-negative caspase-8, abrogated potentiation of paclitaxel-induced mitochondrial injury and apoptosis by bryostatin 1, implicating the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this process. Similar events occurred in HL-60 leukemia cells. Potentiation of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in wild-type and mutant cells by bryostatin 1 was associated with increases in TNF-alpha mRNA and protein and was mimicked by exogenous TNF-alpha. Coadministration of the selective PKC inhibitor GFX (1 microM) blocked the increase in TNF-alpha mRNA levels and apoptosis in bryostatin 1/paclitaxel-treated cells. Lastly, synchronization of cells in G(2)M increased their sensitivity to TNF-alpha-associated lethality. Collectively, these findings indicate that in U937 cells, bryostatin 1 promotes paclitaxel-mediated mitochondrial injury and apoptosis, and circumvents resistance to cell death conferred by loss of the Bcl-2 phosphorylation domain, through the PKC-dependent induction of TNF-alpha. They further suggest that this process is amplified by paclitaxel-mediated arrest of cells in G(2)M, where they are more

  18. Enhancement of pulmonary tumour seeding by human coagulation factors II, IX, X--an investigation into the possible mechanisms involved.

    OpenAIRE

    Purushotham, A D; McCulloch, P.; George, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Warfarin inhibits metastasis in the animal model and injection of the Warfarin-dependent coagulation factor complex II, IX, X enhances pulmonary metastasis in the same model. We have studied two possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effect. Mtln3, rat mammary carcinoma cells, radiolabelled with 5-(125) Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUDR) were injected intravenously in female Fisher 344 rats either alone or in combination with factor complex II, IX, X or bovine serum albumin. Following sacr...

  19. Human Factors Review Plan

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    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  20. Notch1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells : involvement of nuclear factor kappa B inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, J.; Duan, L.; Fan, M.; Yuan, J.; Wu, X.

    2007-01-01

    Notch signaling can serve as a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter in the same kind of cancer, such as human papillomavirus-positive cervical cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Our studies demonstrated that constitutively overexpressed active Notch1 via stable tr

  1. Notch1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells : involvement of nuclear factor kappa B inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, J.; Duan, L.; Fan, M.; Yuan, J.; Wu, X.

    2007-01-01

    Notch signaling can serve as a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter in the same kind of cancer, such as human papillomavirus-positive cervical cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Our studies demonstrated that constitutively overexpressed active Notch1 via stable tr

  2. ISS Payload Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  3. Iron as a catalyst of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation: Critical factors involved in its oxidant properties.

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    Lapenna, Domenico; Ciofani, Giuliano; Obletter, Gabriele

    2017-05-01

    Iron-induced human LDL oxidation, which is relevant to atherosclerosis, has not yet been properly investigated. We addressed such issue using iron(II) and (III) basically in the presence of phosphates, which are present in vivo and influence iron oxidative properties, at pH 4.5 and 7.4, representative, respectively, of the lysosomal and plasma environment. In 10mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS), iron(II) induces substantial LDL oxidation at pH 4.5 at low micromolar concentrations, while at pH 7.4 has low oxidative effects; iron(III) promotes small LDL oxidation only at pH 4.5. In 10mM sodium acetate/NaCl buffer, pH 4.5, iron-induced LDL oxidation is far higher than in PBS, highlighting the relevance of phosphates in the inhibitory modulation of iron-induced LDL oxidation. LDL oxidation is related to iron binding to the protein and lipid moiety of LDL, and requires the presence of iron(II) bound to LDL together with iron(III). Chemical modification of LDL carboxyl groups, which could bind iron especially at pH 4.5, decreases significantly iron binding to LDL and iron-induced LDL oxidation. Hydroxyl radical scavengers are ineffective on iron-induced LDL oxidation, which is inhibited by metal chelation, scavengers of alkoxyl/peroxyl radicals, or removal of LDL lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH). Overall, substantial human LDL oxidation is induced LOOH-dependently by iron(II) at pH 4.5 even in the presence of phosphates, suggesting the occurrence of iron(II)-induced LDL oxidation in vivo within lysosomes, where pH is about 4.5, iron(II) and phosphates coexist, plasma with its antioxidants is absent, and glutathione peroxidase is poorly expressed resulting in LOOH accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 is involved in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-enhanced cell motility and matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression in human chondrosarcoma cells.

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    Lin, Chih-Yang; Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-07-25

    Chondrosarcoma is the primary malignancy of bone that is characterized by a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis, and is therefore associated with poor prognoses. Chondrosarcoma further shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a small molecule in the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcome of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on cell motility in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma cell lines had significantly higher cell motility and BDNF expression compared to normal chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased cell motility and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in human chondrosarcoma cells. BDNF-mediated cell motility and MMP-1 up-regulation were attenuated by Trk inhibitor (K252a), ASK1 inhibitor (thioredoxin), JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and p38 inhibitor (SB203580). Furthermore, BDNF also promoted Sp1 activation. Our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration and invasion activity of chondrosarcoma cells by increasing MMP-1 expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, ASK1, JNK/p38, and Sp1. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis.

  5. Drosophila CheB proteins involved in gustatory detection of pheromones are related to a human neurodegeneration factor.

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    Pikielny, Claudio W

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila CheBs proteins are expressed in a variety of sexually dimorphic subsets of taste hairs, some of which have been directly implicated in pheromone detection. Their remarkable collection of expression patterns suggests that CheBs have specialized roles in gustatory detection of pheromones. Indeed, mutations in the CheB42a gene specifically alter male response to female-specific cuticular hydrocarbons. Furthermore, CheBs belong to the large ML (MD-2-like) superfamily of lipid-binding proteins and share amino acids with an essential role in the function of human GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP), a protein whose absence results in neurodegeneration and death. As GM2-AP binds specifically to the GM2 ganglioside, we have proposed that CheB42a and other CheBs function by interacting directly with the lipid-like cuticular hydrocarbons of Drosophila melanogaster and modulating their detection by transmembrane receptors. Here I review the current knowledge of the CheB family and discuss possible models for their function.

  6. Induction of an inflammatory loop by interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factorinvolves NF-kB and STAT-1 in differentiated human neuroprogenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbiah Pugazhenthi

    Full Text Available Proinflammatory cytokines secreted from microglia are known to induce a secondary immune response in astrocytes leading to an inflammatory loop. Cytokines also interfere with neurogenesis during aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study examined the mechanism of induction of inflammatory mediators at the transcriptional level in human differentiated neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α induced the expression of cytokines and chemokines in differentiated human NPCs as shown by an immune pathway-specific array. Network motif (NM analysis of these genes revealed 118 three-node NMs, suggesting complex interactions between inflammatory mediators and transcription factors. Immunofluorescent staining showed increases in the levels of IL-8 and CXCL10 proteins in neurons and glial cells. Findings from Taqman low density array suggested the synergistic actions of IL-1β and TNF-α in the induction of a majority of inflammatory genes by a mechanism involving NF-kB and STAT-1. Nuclear localization of these transcription factors in differentiated NPCs was observed following exposure to IL-1α and TNF-α. Further studies on CXCL10, a chemokine known to be elevated in the Alzheimer's brain, showed that TNF-α is a stronger inducer of CXCL10 promoter when compared to IL-1β. The synergy between these cytokines was lost when ISRE or kB elements in CXCL10 promoter were mutated. Our findings suggest that the activation of inflammatory pathways in neurons and astrocytes through transcription factors including NF-kB and STAT-1 play important roles in neuroglial interactions and in sustaining the vicious cycle of inflammatory response.

  7. [GASTROINTESTINAL INVOLVEMENT IN HUMAN BARTONELLOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguiña, Ciro; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Carcelén, Amador; Salinas, César; Cok, Jaime; Recavarren, Sixto; Bussalleu, Alejandro

    1997-01-01

    We present a prospective study of 68 patients with the acute phase of human bartonellosis, admitted to Cayetano Heredia National Hospital.Gastrointestinal symptoms were reported as follows: abdominal pain 46,3%, coluria 44,4%, vomiting 40,3%, jaundice 38,5%, diarrhea 29,9%, constipation 8,9%. The more common signs were pallor 97%, hepatomegaly 82%, fever 79,1%, malnutrition 75,2%, systolic heart murmur 77,9%, jaundice 71,6%, lymph node enlargement 70,1%.Signs observed during the hospital course were 29,4% lower extremities edema, 22,6% myalgia, 16,4% pericardial effusion, 16,4% generalized edema. The more common gastrointestinal signs were hepatomegaly 82%(52/68), jaundice 71,6% (48/68) and splenomegaly 29,4%(20/68).The -lower liver border was found between 1 to 4 below the lower rib border in 71,6%(48/67) and below 5 cm b. l. r. b. in 11,9%(8/67).60% had abnormal liver function tests, 54,6% had mainly direct bilirrubin elevationand 45,4% mainly indirect.SGOT was elevated in 28,5% and SGPT in 25%, 28,3% had elevated alkaline phosphatase. The bilirrubin media was 3,5 mg/dI (range 0,6-21), the indirect bilirrubin media was 1,6 mg/dI (range 0,5-11,5), the direct bilirrubin media was 1,9 mg/dI (range 0,3-18), The SGOT media 73,9 U/L (range 9-1250), SGPT media 65,5U/L (range 6-1596). Alkaline phosphatase 5,9 mui/ml (range 3-497). Albumin media 3,09 (range 2-4,2).Patients with bacterial coinfection (salmonella, staphilococcus, enterobacter, shigella) had a higher increase in bilirrubin and transaminases.Three patients had liver biopsies, two revealed Küpffer cells hyperplasia (moderate to severe), one revealed intracellular hyperplasia, one patient coinfected with diseminated hystoplasmosis had granulomas in the liver.Mortality(8,8%) was associated to hepatocellular involvement (SGOT media 330U/L, SGPT media 207 U/L, alkaline phosphatase media 183 mui/ml), hypoalbuminemia media = 2,4 gr/1) and generalized edema.

  8. Cis and trans acting factors involved in human cytomegalovirus experimental and natural latent infection of CD14 (+ monocytes and CD34 (+ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian C Rossetto

    Full Text Available The parameters involved in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV latent infection in CD14 (+ and CD34 (+ cells remain poorly identified. Using next generation sequencing we deduced the transcriptome of HCMV latently infected CD14 (+ and CD34 (+ cells in experimental as well as natural latency settings. The gene expression profile from natural infection in HCMV seropositive donors closely matched experimental latency models, and included two long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, RNA4.9 and RNA2.7 as well as the mRNAs encoding replication factors UL84 and UL44. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on experimentally infected CD14 (+ monocytes followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq were employed to demonstrate both UL84 and UL44 proteins interacted with the latent viral genome and overlapped at 5 of the 8 loci identified. RNA4.9 interacts with components of the polycomb repression complex (PRC as well as with the MIE promoter region where the enrichment of the repressive H3K27me3 mark suggests that this lncRNA represses transcription. Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE, which identifies nucleosome-depleted viral DNA, was used to confirm that latent mRNAs were associated with actively transcribed, FAIRE analysis also showed that the terminal repeat (TR region of the latent viral genome is depleted of nucleosomes suggesting that this region may contain an element mediating viral genome maintenance. ChIP assays show that the viral TR region interacts with factors associated with the pre replication complex and a plasmid subclone containing the HCMV TR element persisted in latently infected CD14 (+ monocytes, strongly suggesting that the TR region mediates viral chromosome maintenance.

  9. The growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells by a novel synthetic progestin involves the induction of transforming growth factor beta.

    OpenAIRE

    Colletta, A. A.; Wakefield, L M; Howell, F. V.; Danielpour, D; Baum, M.; Sporn, M B

    1991-01-01

    Recent experimental work has identified a novel intracellular binding site for the synthetic progestin, Gestodene, that appears to be uniquely expressed in human breast cancer cells. Gestodene is shown here to inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent fashion, but has no effect on endocrine-responsive human endometrial cancer cells. Gestodene induced a 90-fold increase in the secretion of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) by T47D human breast cancer cells. O...

  10. Human factors involved in perception and action in a natural stereoscopic world: an up-to-date review with guidelines for stereoscopic displays and stereoscopic virtual reality (VR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bayas, Luis

    2001-06-01

    In stereoscopic perception of a three-dimensional world, binocular disparity might be thought of as the most important cue to 3D depth perception. Nevertheless, in reality there are many other factors involved before the 'final' conscious and subconscious stereoscopic perception, such as luminance, contrast, orientation, color, motion, and figure-ground extraction (pop-out phenomenon). In addition, more complex perceptual factors exist, such as attention and its duration (an equivalent of 'brain zooming') in relation to physiological central vision, In opposition to attention to peripheral vision and the brain 'top-down' information in relation to psychological factors like memory of previous experiences and present emotions. The brain's internal mapping of a pure perceptual world might be different from the internal mapping of a visual-motor space, which represents an 'action-directed perceptual world.' In addition, psychological factors (emotions and fine adjustments) are much more involved in a stereoscopic world than in a flat 2D-world, as well as in a world using peripheral vision (like VR, using a curved perspective representation, and displays, as natural vision does) as opposed to presenting only central vision (bi-macular stereoscopic vision) as in the majority of typical stereoscopic displays. Here is presented the most recent and precise information available about the psycho-neuro- physiological factors involved in the perception of stereoscopic three-dimensional world, with an attempt to give practical, functional, and pertinent guidelines for building more 'natural' stereoscopic displays.

  11. Human Factors Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The purpose of the Human Factors Laboratory is to further the understanding of highway user needs so that those needs can be incorporated in roadway design,...

  12. Introduction to human factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  13. EXPLORE SIGNIFICANT FACTORS TO AFFECT CUSTOMER INVOLVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although literature review supported the concept that customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk are significant factors to affect customer involvement, very limited studies have extensively examined the relationship among those variables. This research applied quantitative study to comprehensively explore the relationship between customer loyalty, brand equity, perceived risk and customer involvement for consumers. The population for this research was identified as consumers having the shopping experience for digital camera. The findings supported the hypothesis that customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk have significant and positive relationship to customer involvement. The findings identified the predictors of customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk on the customer involvement and generated the recommendations for corporate operations and future scholar studies.

  14. Human labour is associated with nuclear factor-kappaB activity which mediates cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression and is involved with the 'functional progesterone withdrawal'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allport, V C; Pieber, D; Slater, D M; Newton, R; White, J O; Bennett, P R

    2001-06-01

    Human labour is associated with the up-regulation of prostaglandins within the uterus, synthesized via the type-2 cyclo-oxygenase enzyme (COX-2). These lead to remodelling of the fetal membranes and cervix and to stimulation of myometrial contractions. In the human, the principal source of prostaglandins is the amnion. Progesterone acts to promote myometrial quiescence, and in many species the onset of labour is preceded by withdrawal of progesterone. Humans show no systemic progesterone withdrawal, although biochemical changes within the uterus are similar to those in other species. A mutual negative interaction between the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and the progesterone receptor (PR) has been reported. Using transient transfections and assays for transcriptional activation and promoter binding, we have shown that there is constitutive activity of NF-kappaB in amnion cells at the time of labour, and that COX-2 expression depends upon NF-kappaB. In cells obtained before labour, in which NF-kappaB activity is low, increasing the concentration of PR represses NF-kappaB dependent transcription, while stimulation with IL-1beta both increases NF-kappaB activity and represses PR activity. Our data suggest that human labour is associated with constitutive NF-kappaB activity within the amnion, which functions to increase the expression of COX-2 and appears to contribute to the 'functional progesterone withdrawal'.

  15. Overexpression of transcription factor AP-2 stimulates the PA promoter of the human uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) gene through a mechanism involving derepression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aas, Per Arne; Pena Diaz, Javier; Liabakk, Nina Beate

    2009-01-01

    within the region of DNA marked by PA. Footprinting analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays of PA and putative AP-2 binding regions with HeLa cell nuclear extract and recombinant AP-2alpha protein indicate that AP-2 transcription factors are central in the regulated expression of UNG2 m......alpha, lacking the activation domain but retaining the DNA binding and dimerization domains, stimulated PA to a level approaching that of full-length AP-2, suggesting that AP-2 overexpression stimulates PA activity by a mechanism involving derepression rather than activation, possibly by neutralizing...

  16. Helicopter human factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  17. Changes in the Expression of Transcription Factors Involved in Modulating the Expression of EPO-R in Activated Human CD4-Positive Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Frackowiak, Joanna E; Mikosik, Anna; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2013-01-01

    We have recently described the presence of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R) on CD4(+) lymphocytes and demonstrated that its expression increases during their activation, reaching a level reported to be typical for erythroid progenitors. This observation suggests that EPO-R expression is modulated during lymphocyte activation, which may be important for the cells' function. Here we investigated whether the expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors is correlated with the expression of EPO-R in human CD4(+) lymphocytes stimulated with monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody. The expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors in CD4(+) cells was estimated before and after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody by Western Blot and flow cytometry. The expression of EPO-R was measured using real-time PCR and flow cytometry. There was no change in the expression of GATA1 and GATA3 in CD4(+) lymphocytes after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody. However, stimulation resulted in the significantly increased expression of the Sp1 factor. CD4(+) lymphocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody exhibited an increase in both the expression level of EPOR gene and the number of EPO-R molecules on the cells' surface, the latter being significantly correlated with the increased expression of Sp1. Sp1 is noted to be the single transcription factor among the ones studied whose level changes as a result of CD4(+) lymphocyte stimulation. It seems that Sp1 may significantly affect the number of EPO-R molecules present on the surface of activated CD4(+) lymphocytes.

  18. Human Factors Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  19. Human factors in network security

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Francis B.

    1991-01-01

    Human factors, such as ethics and education, are important factors in network information security. This thesis determines which human factors have significant influence on network security. Those factors are examined in relation to current security devices and procedures. Methods are introduced to evaluate security effectiveness by incorporating the appropriate human factors into network security controls

  20. The involvement of hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition of human spinal glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deliang; Wang, Li; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Xinjun; Xiong, Hui

    2016-05-01

    To date, hematopoietic pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor-interacting protein (HPIP), a co-repressor for the transcription factor PBX, has been involved into the initiation and onset in a wide variety of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HPIP-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the spinal glioblastoma have been under investigation. In the present study, spinal glioblastoma tissues, U87, and U251 cell lines were used and subjected to in vitro assays, such as RT-PCR, and Western blot. Here, in vitro assays revealed that HPIP mRNA and protein were highly expressed in five cases of spinal glioblastoma tissues, compared with non-tumor tissues. Subsequently, in vitro experiments demonstrated HPIP promoted the U87 and U251 cell growth and regulated the G1/S phase transitions in U87 and U251 cell cycle, respectively, accompanied by the increased expression of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin D1. Furthermore, HPIP increased the expression of N-cadherin, Slug, and MMP2, and decreased the expression of E-cadherin. By contrast, knockdown of HPIP reversed HPIP-induced EMT biomarkers, migration, and invasion in U87 and U251 cells. In conclusion, our findings identified HPIP plays an important role in the progression and EMT of spinal glioblastoma, by which cell growth is improved. Thus, HPIP gene or protein could act as a useful target in the clinical practice.

  1. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor 2-induced apoptosis involves survivin expression, protein kinase Cα activation and subcellular translocation of Smac in human small cell lung cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng Xiao; Kuansong Wang; Jianhua Zhou; Huiqiu Cao; Zhenghao Deng; Yongbin Hu; Xiahui Qu; Jifang Wen

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) inhibits apoptosis in the human small cell lung cancer cell line H446 subjected to serum starvation,apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining, caspase-3 activity, and DNA fragmentation.Survivin expression induced by FGF-2 and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) translocation was detected by subcellular fractionation and Western blot analysis. In addition, FGF-2-induced release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm was analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence.FGF-2 reduced apoptosis induced by serum starvation and up-regulated survivin expression in H446 cells in a dosedependent and time-dependent manner, and inhibited caspase-3 activity. FGF-2 also inhibited the release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm induced by serum starvation and increased PKCα translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane. In addition, PKC inhibitor inhibited the expression of survivin. FGF-2 up-regulates the expression of survivin protein in H446 cells and blocks the release of Smac from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. PKCα regulated FGF-2-induced survivin expression. Thus, survivin, Smac,and PKCα might play important roles in the inhibition of apoptosis by FGF-2 in human small cell lung cancer cells.

  2. Human Factors Simulation in Construction Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, M.; Adair, D.

    2010-01-01

    Successful construction management depends primarily on the representatives of the involved construction project parties. In addition to effective application of construction management tools and concepts, human factors impact significantly on the processes of any construction management endeavour. How can human factors in construction management…

  3. Helicopter Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  4. Helicopter Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  5. Human transcription factor genes involved in neuronal development tend to have high GC content and CpG elements in the proximal promoter region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Sheng Long; Jia-Ming Qin; Tao Su; Qi-Hua Zhao; Yong-Hong Yi; Wei-Ping Liao

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play critical roles in the development of the nervous system, but the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of these genes are poorly understood. Here we analyzed 5-kb of the 5' flanking genomic DNA sequences of 41 TF genes involved in neuronal development. The results showed that the TF genes tend to have higher GC contents in the proximal region and most of the TF genes have at least one proximal GC-rich (GC content > 60%) promoter with a CpG island. The promoter distribution analysis showed that the GC-poor promoters were sporadically distributed within the 5-kb flanking genomic sequence (FGS); however, more than half (37 of 70) of the GC-rich promoters were located in the proximal region between nucleotides -1 and -500. Luciferase assays showed that partial GC-rich promoters increased gene expression in SH-SY5Y cells and that CpG methylation repressed the promoter activity. This study suggests a potential general mechanism for regulation of TF expression.

  6. Involving human forecasters in numerical prediction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Homar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human forecasters routinely improve upon the output from numerical weather prediction models and often have keen insight to model biases and shortcomings. This wealth of knowledge about model performance is largely untapped, however, as it is used only at the end point in the forecast process to interpret the model-predicted fields. Yet there is no reason why human forecasters cannot intervene at other earlier times in the numerical weather prediction process, especially when an ensemble forecasting system is in use. Human intervention in ensemble creation may be particularly helpful for rare events, such as severe weather events, that are not predicted well by numerical models. The USA/NOAA SPC/NSSL Spring Program 2003 tested an ensemble generation method in which human forecasters were involved in the ensemble creation process. The forecaster highlighted structures of interest and, using an adjoint model, a set of perturbations were obtained and used to generate a 32-member ensemble. The results show that this experimental ensemble improves upon the operational numerical forecasts of severe weather. The human-generated ensemble is able to provide improved guidance on high-impact weather events, but lacks global dispersion and produces unreliable forecasts for non-hazardous weather events. Further results from an ensemble constructed by combining the operational ensemble perturbations with the human-generated perturbations shows promising skill for the forecast of severe weather while avoiding the problem of limited global dispersion. The value of human beings in the creation of ensembles designed to target specific high- impact weather events is potentially large. Further investigation of the value of forecasters being part of the ensemble creation process is strongly recommended. There remains a lot to learn about how to create ensembles for short-range forecasts of severe weather, and we need to make better use of the skill and experience of

  7. Involvement of CD11b integrin in the alteration of metabolic factors after phorbol ester stimulation of human myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandel Katharina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous work has demonstrated that phorbol ester (TPA-induced adherence of human U937 myeloid leukemia cells can be blocked upon down-modulation of the β2-integrin CD11b after stable transfection of U937 cells with a pMTH1 vector-containing the CD11b gene in antisense orientation (asCD11b-U937 [Otte et al., (2011]. In the present study, alterations in metabolism-associated factors, particularly intra- and extracellular proteases were investigated. A measurement of telomerase activity in the leukemic cells revealed continuously decreasing telomere adducts within 72 h of TPA treatment in pMTH1-U937 cells. In contrast, telomerase activity sustained in asCD11b-U937 upon TPA-induced differentiation. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed unchanged CD11b levels in TPA-induced asCD11b-U937 in contrast to elevated levels in pMTH1-U937 whereby the expression of other β2-integrins including CD11a, CD11c and CD18 was increased in both populations after TPA treatment. Moreover, adherent pMTH1-U937 demonstrated the expression of monocytic differentiation markers including F4-80 and CD14 and an increased MIP-1α production which remained at low or undetectable in TPA-induced asCD11b-U937. These effects indicated an altered response of the different cell populations to the TPA-induced differentiation process. Indeed, Western blot analysis revealed differences in the expression levels of intracellular metabolic factors including MnSOD and p97/VCP and after measurement of 20 S proteasomal proteolytic activity. In addition, increased levels of extracellular metabolic factors including the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1, MMP-7 and MMP-9 were observed in pMTH1-U937 cells in contrast to unaltered levels in asCD11b-U937 cells.

  8. Involvement of ubiquitous and tale transcription factors, as well as liganded RXRα, in the regulation of human SOX2 gene expression in the NT2/D1 embryonal carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milivojević Milena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available SOX2 is a key transcription factor in embryonic development representing a universal marker of pluripotent stem cells. Based on the functional redundancy and overlapping expression patterns of SOXB1 subgroup members during development, the goal of this study has been to analyze if some aspects of regulation of expression are preserved between human SOX2 and SOX3 genes. Thus, we have tested several transcription factors previously demonstrated to play roles in controlling SOX3 gene activity for potential participation in the regulation of SOX2 gene expression in NT2/D1 cells. Here we report on the activation of SOX2 expression by ubiquitous transcription factors (NF-Y, Sp1 and MAZ, TALE family members (Pbx1 and Meis1, as well as liganded RXRα. Elucidating components involved in the regulation of SOX gene expression represent a valuable contribution in unraveling the regulatory networks operating in pluripotent embryonic cells.

  9. A proteome study of secreted prostatic factors affecting osteoblastic activity: galectin-1 is involved in differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Jensen, Ole N; Moiseeva, Elena P

    2003-01-01

    to be proteins with molecular weights between 20 and 30 kDa, but the identity of the osteoblastic mitogenic factor or factors produced by prostate cancer cells is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the protein profile of conditioned medium (CM) from PC3 cells in the molecular......, by affecting the matrix mineralization....

  10. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Anne E; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-05-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design.

  11. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  12. Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Lis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  13. Chromosomal localization of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), and endonuclease G (ENDOG), three human housekeeping genes involving in mitochondrial biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiranti, V.; Rossi, G.; DiDonato, S. [Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Carlo Besta (Italy)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    By using a PCR-based screening of a somatic cell hybrid panel and FISH, we have assigned the loci of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), and mitochondrial endonuclease G (ENDOG) genes to human chromosomes 7q34, 10q21, and 9q34.1, respectively. The products of these three genes are involved in fundamental aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as replication and transcription of the mitochondrial genome. The chromosomal localization of these genes is important to testing whether the corresponding proteins may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of human disorders associated with qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of mitochondrial DNA. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Human Factors in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Byrne, Vicky; Arsintescu, Lucia; Connell, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Future space missions will be significantly longer than current shuttle missions and new systems will be more complex than current systems. Increasing communication delays between crews and Earth-based support means that astronauts need to be prepared to handle the unexpected on their own. As crews become more autonomous, their potential span of control and required expertise must grow to match their autonomy. It is not possible to train for every eventuality ahead of time on the ground, or to maintain trained skills across long intervals of disuse. To adequately prepare NASA personnel for these challenges, new training approaches, methodologies, and tools are required. This research project aims at developing these training capabilities. By researching established training principles, examining future needs, and by using current practices in space flight training as test beds, both in Flight Controller and Crew Medical domains, this research project is mitigating program risks and generating templates and requirements to meet future training needs. Training efforts in Fiscal Year 09 (FY09) strongly focused on crew medical training, but also began exploring how Space Flight Resource Management training for Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) Flight Controllers could be integrated with systems training for optimal Mission Control Center (MCC) operations. The Training Task addresses Program risks that lie at the intersection of the following three risks identified by the Project: 1) Risk associated with poor task design; 2) Risk of error due to inadequate information; and 3) Risk associated with reduced safety and efficiency due to poor human factors design.

  15. Human Factors in Marine Casualties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelenko Švetak

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Human factors play an important role in the origin of accidents,and it is commonly claimed that between seventy andninety-five percent of industrial and transport accidents involvehuman factors, see Figure 1.Some authorities, however, claim that ultimately, all accidentsinvolve human factors.

  16. Oleifolioside A mediates caspase-independent human cervical carcinoma HeLa cell apoptosis involving nuclear relocation of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors AIF and EndoG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai Yang; Jin, Cheng-Yun; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Young-Choon; Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Hyung-In; Choi, Yung Hyun; Lee, Jai-Heon

    2012-05-30

    Apoptosis, the main type of programmed cell death, plays an essential role in a variety of biological events. Whereas "classical" apoptosis is dependent on caspase activation, caspase-independent death is increasingly recognized as an alternative pathway. To develop new anticancer agents, oleifolioside A was isolated from Dendropanax morbifera Leveille and the biochemical mechanisms of oleifolioside A-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells were investigated. Exposure to oleifolioside A resulted in caspase activation and typical features of apoptosis, although cell death was not prevented by caspase inhibition. Oleifolioside A treatment induced up-regulation of Bad, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear relocation of mitochondrial factors, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), endonuclease G (EndoG), and apoptosis induction. This is the first report of anticancer activity of oleifolioside A, and nuclear translocation of AIF and EndoG in oleifolioside A-treated HeLa cells might represent an alternative death signaling pathway in the absence of caspase activity.

  17. Fundamentals of systems ergonomics/human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John R

    2014-01-01

    Ergonomics/human factors is, above anything else, a systems discipline and profession, applying a systems philosophy and systems approaches. Many things are labelled as system in today's world, and this paper specifies just what attributes and notions define ergonomics/human factors in systems terms. These are obviously a systems focus, but also concern for context, acknowledgement of interactions and complexity, a holistic approach, recognition of emergence and embedding of the professional effort involved within organization system. These six notions are illustrated with examples from a large body of work on rail human factors.

  18. Handbook of Human Factors in Web Design

    CERN Document Server

    Vu, Kim-Phuong L

    2011-01-01

    The Handbook of Human Factors in Web Design covers basic human factors issues relating to screen design, input devices, and information organization and processing, as well as addresses newer features which will become prominent in the next generation of Web technologies. These include multimodal interfaces, wireless capabilities, and agents that can improve convenience and usability. Written by leading researchers and/or practitioners in the field, this volume reflects the varied backgrounds and interests of individuals involved in all aspects of human factors and Web design and includes chap

  19. Involvement of Nurr-1/Nur77 in corticotropin-releasing factor/urocortin1-induced tyrosinase-related protein 1 gene transcription in human melanoma HMV-II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Yutaka; Takayasu, Shinobu; Kageyama, Kazunori; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Sakihara, Satoru; Terui, Ken; Nigawara, Takeshi; Suda, Toshihiro

    2013-05-06

    Recent molecular and biochemical analyses have revealed the presence of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and urocortin (Ucn), together with their corresponding receptors in mammalian skin. The melanosomal enzyme tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1) is involved in modulation of pigment production in response to stressors. Although CRF and Ucn are thought to have potent effects on the skin system, their possible roles and regulation have yet to be fully determined. This study aimed to explore the effects of CRF and Ucn on TRP1 gene expression using human melanoma HMV-II cells. The mRNA of CRF, Ucn1, Ucn2, and CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1 receptor) was detected in HMV-II cells. CRF and Ucn1 stimulated TRP1 gene transcription via the CRF1 receptor, and increased both Nurr-1 and Nur77 mRNA expression levels. Both CRF- and Ucn1-induced Nurr-1/Nur77 acted via a NGFI-B response element on the TRP1 promoter. The combination of Nurr-1/Nur77 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, a melanocyte-specific transcription factor gene induced by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, had additive effects on activation of TRP1 gene transcription. The findings suggest that in human melanoma HMV-II cells both CRF and Ucn1 regulate TRP1 gene expression via Nurr-1/Nur77 production, independent of pro-opiomelanocortin or α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone stimulation.

  20. Involvement of cysteine-rich protein 61 in the epidermal growth factor-induced migration of human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Li-Han; Hsu, Sung-Po; Zhong, Wen-Bin; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most aggressive types of malignant cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ATC, and patients with thyroid carcinoma typically exhibit increased cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61). In this study, we found that EGF treatment induced cell migration, stress fiber formation, Cyr61 mRNA and protein expressions, and Cyr61 protein secretion in ATC cells. The recombinant Cyr61 protein significantly induced cell migration; however, inhibition of Cyr61 activity by a Cyr61-specific antibody abrogated EGF-induced cell migration. EGF treatment also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker protein expression, as evidenced by an increase in vimentin and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of Cyr61 expression by Cyr61 siRNA decreased cell migration and reversed the EMT-related marker protein expression. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and finally activated Cyr61 promoter plasmid activity. Our results suggest that Cyr61 is induced by EGF through the ERK/CREB signal pathway and that it plays a crucial role in the migration and invasion of ATC cells; moreover, Cyr61 might be a therapeutic target for metastatic ATC.

  1. Signaling through P2X7 receptor in human T cells involves p56lck, MAP kinases, and transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappa B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Brovko, Luba; Orinska, Zane; Fayad, Raja; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-01-17

    multiple downstream signaling events in a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line.

  2. NASA Space Human Factors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This booklet briefly and succinctly treats 23 topics of particular interest to the NASA Space Human Factors Program. Most articles are by different authors who are mainly NASA Johnson or NASA Ames personnel. Representative topics covered include mental workload and performance in space, light effects on Circadian rhythms, human sleep, human reasoning, microgravity effects and automation and crew performance.

  3. Involved Knowing: On the Poetic Epistemology of the Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Franke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The humanities represent a type of knowledge distinct from, and yet encompassing, scientific knowledge. Drawing on philosophical hermeneutics in the tradition of the Geisteswissenschaften, as well as on the Latin rhetorical tradition and on Greek paideia, this essay presents humanities knowledge as “involved knowing”. Science, in principle, abstracts from the subjective, psychological conditions of knowing, including its emotional and willful determinants, as introducing personal biases, and it attempts also to neutralize historical and cultural contingencies. Humanities knowledge, in contrast, focuses attention on precisely these subjective and historical factors as intrinsic to any knowledge in its full human purport. In particular, poetry, which historically is the matrix of knowledge in all fields, including science, deliberately explores and amply expresses these specifically human registers of significance. The poetic underpinnings of knowledge actually remain crucial to human knowing and key to interpreting its significance in all domains, including the whole range of scientific fields, throughout the course of its development and not least in the modern age so dominated by science and technology.

  4. Human Factors Evaluation Mentor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To obtain valid and reliable data, Human Factors Engineering (HFE) evaluations are currently conducted by people with specialized training and experience in HF. HFE...

  5. Human factors in resuscitation teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Elizabeth M; Lockey, Andrew S

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in human factors within the healthcare environment reflecting the understanding of their impact on safety. The aim of this paper is to explore how human factors might be taught on resuscitation courses, and improve course outcomes in terms of improved mortality and morbidity for patients. The delivery of human factors training is important and this review explores the work that has been delivered already and areas for future research and teaching. Medline was searched using MESH terms Resuscitation as a Major concept and Patient or Leadership as core terms. The abstracts were read and 25 full length articles reviewed. Critical incident reporting has shown four recurring problems: lack of organisation at an arrest, lack of equipment, non functioning equipment, and obstructions preventing good care. Of these, the first relates directly to the concept of human factors. Team dynamics for both team membership and leadership, management of stress, conflict and the role of debriefing are highlighted. Possible strategies for teaching them are discussed. Four strategies for improving human factors training are discussed: team dynamics (including team membership and leadership behaviour), the influence of stress, debriefing, and conflict within teams. This review illustrates how human factor training might be integrated further into life support training without jeopardising the core content and lengthening the courses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling human operator involvement in robotic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    A modeling approach is presented to describe complex manned robotic systems. The robotic system is modeled as a (highly) nonlinear, possibly time-varying dynamic system including any time delays in terms of optimal estimation, control and decision theory. The role of the human operator(s) is modeled

  7. 13 Factors Limiting Women's Involvement in Development: Lesson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    the persistent and increasing burdens of poverty, malnutrition, poor health ... This paper investigates factors limiting an active involvement of rural women in .... and children, but decisions on economic and political issues are solely undertaken ...

  8. Involvement of human endogenous retroviral syncytin-1 in human osteoclast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Hobolt-Pedersen, Anne-Sofie

    2011-01-01

    fusion of the lipid bilayers of their cell membranes are still unknown. Syncytin-1 is a protein encoded by a human endogenous retroviral gene which was stably integrated into the human ancestor genome more than 24 million years ago. Upon activation, syncytin-1 is able to destabilize the lipid bilayer......Generation of osteoclasts through fusion of mono-nucleated precursors is a key event of bone physiology and bone resorption is inefficient without osteoclast fusion. Several factors playing a critical role in the fusion process have already been recognized, but the factors involved in the actual....... This was documented through Q-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. These in vitro findings were confirmed by immunohistochemical stainings in human iliac crest biopsies. A syncytin-1 inhibitory peptide reduced the number of nuclei per osteoclast by 30%, as well as TRACP activity. From a mechanistic...

  9. Human Factors in Financial Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver, Meghan; Reader, Tom W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study tests the reliability of a system (FINANS) to collect and analyze incident reports in the financial trading domain and is guided by a human factors taxonomy used to describe error in the trading domain. Background Research indicates the utility of applying human factors theory to understand error in finance, yet empirical research is lacking. We report on the development of the first system for capturing and analyzing human factors–related issues in operational trading incidents. Method In the first study, 20 incidents are analyzed by an expert user group against a referent standard to establish the reliability of FINANS. In the second study, 750 incidents are analyzed using distribution, mean, pathway, and associative analysis to describe the data. Results Kappa scores indicate that categories within FINANS can be reliably used to identify and extract data on human factors–related problems underlying trading incidents. Approximately 1% of trades (n = 750) lead to an incident. Slip/lapse (61%), situation awareness (51%), and teamwork (40%) were found to be the most common problems underlying incidents. For the most serious incidents, problems in situation awareness and teamwork were most common. Conclusion We show that (a) experts in the trading domain can reliably and accurately code human factors in incidents, (b) 1% of trades incur error, and (c) poor teamwork skills and situation awareness underpin the most critical incidents. Application This research provides data crucial for ameliorating risk within financial trading organizations, with implications for regulation and policy. PMID:27142394

  10. Human factors by descent energy management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes some of the results of a human factors study of energy management during descent using standard aircraft displays. Discussions with pilots highlighted the practical constraints involved and the techniques (algorithms) used to accomplish the descent. The advantages and disadvantages of these algorithms are examined with respect to workload and their sensitivity to disturbances. Vertical navigation and flight performance computers are discussed in terms of the information needed for effective pilot monitoring and takeover

  11. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  12. Human Factors in Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of space is one of the most fascinating domains to study from a human factors perspective. Like other complex work domains such as aviation (Pritchett and Kim, 2008), air traffic management (Durso and Manning, 2008), health care (Morrow, North, and Wickens, 2006), homeland security (Cooke and Winner, 2008), and vehicle control (Lee, 2006), space exploration is a large-scale sociotechnical work domain characterized by complexity, dynamism, uncertainty, and risk in real-time operational contexts (Perrow, 1999; Woods et ai, 1994). Nearly the entire gamut of human factors issues - for example, human-automation interaction (Sheridan and Parasuraman, 2006), telerobotics, display and control design (Smith, Bennett, and Stone, 2006), usability, anthropometry (Chaffin, 2008), biomechanics (Marras and Radwin, 2006), safety engineering, emergency operations, maintenance human factors, situation awareness (Tenney and Pew, 2006), crew resource management (Salas et aI., 2006), methods for cognitive work analysis (Bisantz and Roth, 2008) and the like -- are applicable to astronauts, mission control, operational medicine, Space Shuttle manufacturing and assembly operations, and space suit designers as they are in other work domains (e.g., Bloomberg, 2003; Bos et al, 2006; Brooks and Ince, 1992; Casler and Cook, 1999; Jones, 1994; McCurdy et ai, 2006; Neerincx et aI., 2006; Olofinboba and Dorneich, 2005; Patterson, Watts-Perotti and Woods, 1999; Patterson and Woods, 2001; Seagull et ai, 2007; Sierhuis, Clancey and Sims, 2002). The human exploration of space also has unique challenges of particular interest to human factors research and practice. This chapter provides an overview of those issues and reports on sorne of the latest research results as well as the latest challenges still facing the field.

  13. The Society's Involvement in the Defense of Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerjuoy, Edward

    2015-04-01

    The history of the Society's involvement in the defense of human rights, a history of which the Society can be proud, will be summarized; the summary will include illustrative specific APS human rights defense actions in illustrative specific cases. As will be emphasized, the aforesaid involvement has been primarily through the activities of the APS Committee on International Freedom of Scientists (CIFS). It is noteworthy-and one of the reasons the Society can be proud-that CIFS is charged with ``monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists,'' not solely for physicists, and that CIFS indeed has sought to protect the human rights of nonphysicists.

  14. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Simanski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17, a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections.

  15. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanski, Maren; Rademacher, Franziska; Schröder, Lena; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD) whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17), a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections.

  16. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1997-03-14

    The authors have examined the role of integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Increased {beta}{sub 1} integrin and fibronectin (FN) gene expression was observed in PMA-treated HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treated monocytes, even at a time preceding the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} (PKC{beta}) and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, failed to express FN after PMA treatment. Restoration of PKC{beta} resulted in PMA-induced FN gene expression and macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells or monocytes was attenuated by anti-{beta}{sub 1} integrin or anti-FN MAbs. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation involves activation of PKC and expression of specific integrins and ECM proteins. The stimulated cells, through their integrins, attach and spread on these substrates by binding to the deposited ECM proteins. This attachment and spreading in turn, through integrin signaling, leads to the macrophage phenotype.

  17. Human Factors Analysis in Software Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ren-zuo; Ma Ruo-feng; Liu Li-na; Xiong Zhong-wei

    2004-01-01

    The general human factors analysis analyzes human functions, effects and influence in a system. But in a narrow sense, it analyzes human influence upon the reliability of a system, it includes traditional human reliability analysis, human error analysis, man-machine interface analysis, human character analysis, and others. A software development project in software engineering is successful or not to be completely determined by human factors. In this paper, we discuss the human factors intensions, declare the importance of human factors analysis for software engineering by listed some instances. At last, we probe preliminarily into the mentality that a practitioner in software engineering should possess.

  18. Lymphvascular space involvement : an independent prognostic factor in endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briet, JM; Hollema, H; Reesink, N; Aalders, Jan; Mourits, MJE; ten Hoor, KA; Pras, Elisabeth; Boezen, HM; van der Zee, AGJ; Nijman, HW

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of investigation. To evaluate whether lymphvascular space involvement (LVSI) is a risk factor for relapse of disease and lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer. Methods. From 1978 till 2003, 609 patients with epithelial endometrial cancer were treated at the Groningen University Medical

  19. Factors Affecting Teen Involvement in Pennsylvania 4-H Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Bart E.; Ewing, John C.; Bruce, Jacklyn A.

    2010-01-01

    The study reported here determined the factors that affect teen involvement in 4-H programming. The design of the study was descriptive and correlational in nature. Using a purposive sampling procedure, a survey questionnaire was distributed to all (N=214) 4-H members attending the 4-H State Leadership Conference. The major findings of the study…

  20. Participatory Evaluation: Factors to Consider when Involving Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Janet; Cater, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a critical perspective on the increasing involvement of young people in participatory evaluation as well as identifies the factors to consider when designing a youth-led evaluation project. Through this avenue, young people will increase their participation in organizational development and community change. Youth-led…

  1. Comparative proteomics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli during growth in human urine identify UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae as an adherence factor involved in biofilm formation and binding to uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurpel, Daniël J; Totsika, Makrina; Allsopp, Luke P; Webb, Richard I; Moriel, Danilo G; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-01-10

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in humans. For the successful colonisation of the human urinary tract, UPEC employ a diverse collection of secreted or surface-exposed virulence factors including toxins, iron acquisition systems and adhesins. In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was utilised to define the UPEC pan and core surface proteome following growth in pooled human urine. Identified proteins were investigated for subcellular origin, prevalence and homology to characterised virulence factors. Fourteen core surface proteins were identified, as well as eleven iron uptake receptor proteins and four distinct fimbrial types, including type 1, P, F1C/S and a previously uncharacterised fimbrial type, designated UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae in this study. These pathogenicity island (PAI)-associated fimbriae are related to UCA fimbriae of Proteus mirabilis, associated with UPEC and exclusively found in members of the E. coli B2 and D phylogroup. We further demonstrated that UCL fimbriae promote significant biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and mediate specific attachment to exfoliated human uroepithelial cells. Combined, this study has defined the surface proteomic profiles and core surface proteome of UPEC during growth in human urine and identified a new type of fimbriae that may contribute to UTI.

  2. MARINE ACCIDENTS RESEARCHED THROUGH HUMAN FACTOR PRISMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav M Ćorović

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We are aware of a large number of marine accidents that result in numerous casualties and even deaths and substantial negative environmental effects. The objective of this paper is to indicate factors that contribute to human errors which is identified as the most frequent cause to marine accidents. Despite rapid technological development and safety legislation, this paper identifies the human factor as the waekest link in maritime safety system. This analysis could lead to decrease of vessel accidents. In addition, starting from the European Maritime Safety Agency data and by linear regression model application, we have obtained the trend of number of ships involved in marine accidents as well as the trend of lives lost in marine accidents  in and around European Union waters.

  3. Human Factors Considerations in System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M. (Editor); Vanbalen, P. M. (Editor); Moe, K. L. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Human factors considerations in systems design was examined. Human factors in automated command and control, in the efficiency of the human computer interface and system effectiveness are outlined. The following topics are discussed: human factors aspects of control room design; design of interactive systems; human computer dialogue, interaction tasks and techniques; guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms and highly automated environments; system engineering for control by humans; conceptual models of information processing; information display and interaction in real time environments.

  4. Trefoil factors in human milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Else Marie; Nexø, Ebba; Wendt, A

    2008-01-01

    We measured concentrations of the gastrointestinal protective peptides Trefoil factors in human milk. By the use of in-house ELISA we detected high amounts of TFF3, less TFF1 and virtually no TFF2 in human breast milk obtained from 46 mothers with infants born extremely preterm (24-27 wk gestation......), preterm (28-37 wk gestation), and full term (38-42 wk gestation). Samples were collected during the first, second, third to fourth weeks and more than 4 wks postpartum. Median (range) TFF1 [TFF3] concentrations in human milk were 320 (30-34000) [1500 (150-27,000)] pmol/L in wk 1, 120 (30-720) [310 (50......-7100)] pmol/L in wk 2, 70 (20-670) [120 (20-650)] pmol/L in wks 3 to 4, and 60 (30-2500) [80 (20-540)] pmol/L in > 4 wks after delivery. The lowest concentrations of TFF1 and TFF3 were found later than 2 wks after birth. In conclusion, TFF was present in term and preterm human milk with rapidly declining...

  5. IDENTIFYING MOTIVATION FACTOR INVOLVEMENT OF SARAWAK MALAY WOMEN ENTREPRENEUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masyantie Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarawak multilayered cake among Sarawak product signature famous among the local as well as international tourist visiting Sarawak. In fact, Sarawak Malay women entrepreneurs have become very necessary players in the entrepreneurial field specifically in this cottage industries from the early introduction of this business, they have facing various problem in this businesses. Thus, this research aims to build an understanding of motivational factor that encourage Sarawak Malay women entrepreneurial experiences especially in multilayered cake businesses. Using qualitative methods, this research aims to identify the entrepreneurial motivations factors; with regards to start-up motivation by Sarawak Malay women. The finding shows that the motivations that influence Malay women within Kuching, Sarawak areas to start and grow their business are involve self-driven and context driven that motivate them involve in multilayered cakes businesses.

  6. Mechanisms, Cofactors, and Augmenting Factors Involved in Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Muñoz-Cano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is an acute and life-threatening systemic reaction. Many triggers have been described, including food, drug, and hymenoptera allergens, which are the most frequently involved. The mechanisms described in anaphylactic reactions are complex and implicate a diversity of pathways. Some of these mechanisms may be key to the development of the anaphylactic reaction, while others may only modify its severity. Although specific IgE, mast cells, and basophils are considered the principal players in anaphylaxis, alternative mechanisms have been proposed in non-IgE anaphylactic reactions. Neutrophils, macrophages, as well as basophils, have been involved, as have IgG-dependent, complement and contact system activation. A range of cationic substances can induce antibody-independent mast cells activation through MRGPRX2 receptor. Cofactors and augmenting factors may explain why, in some patients, food allergen exposure can cause anaphylaxis, while in other clinical scenario it can be tolerated or elicits a mild reaction. With the influence of these factors, food allergic reactions may be induced at lower doses of allergen and/or become more severe. Exercise, alcohol, estrogens, and some drugs such as Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, and lipid-lowering drugs are the main factors described, though their mechanisms and signaling pathways are poorly understood.

  7. Factors Associated with Involvement in Bullying: A Study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M. Romera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available School bullying is one of the main problems affecting the quality of peer relationships in schools and in general the coexistence. At European level, there are scientific findings that indicate its nature, characteristics and factors related to its involvement. However, in poor and developing countries, where the problem is more serious, there is a high degree of awareness on this matter. The present study aimed to identify what factors may be influencing the occurrence of bullying in a representative sample of primary schools in the Nicaraguan capital. For this propose, 3042 students from Managua and its metropolitan area were explored with instruments comparable to those used in Europe. A multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that being a boy, to show antisocial behaviors and attitudes and contact with drugs were the three factors most related with the role of aggressor, as well as negative relationships had a significant influence on involvement in this phenomenon, either as a victim, aggressor or victimized aggressor. Results are discussed in relation to the profiles of aggressor and victim of bullying in international studies focusing on differences in developed countries.

  8. Development of an Integrated Human Factors Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Marc L.

    2003-01-01

    An effective integration of human abilities and limitations is crucial to the success of all NASA missions. The Integrated Human Factors Toolkit facilitates this integration by assisting system designers and analysts to select the human factors tools that are most appropriate for the needs of each project. The HF Toolkit contains information about a broad variety of human factors tools addressing human requirements in the physical, information processing and human reliability domains. Analysis of each tool includes consideration of the most appropriate design stage, the amount of expertise in human factors that is required, the amount of experience with the tool and the target job tasks that are needed, and other factors that are critical for successful use of the tool. The benefits of the Toolkit include improved safety, reliability and effectiveness of NASA systems throughout the agency. This report outlines the initial stages of development for the Integrated Human Factors Toolkit.

  9. Factors involved in mechanical fatigue degradation of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, U; Belli, R; Ferracane, J L

    2013-07-01

    The design of clinical trials allows for limited insights into the fatigue processes occurring in resin composites and the factors involved therein. In vitro studies, in contrast, can fundamentally narrow study interests to focus on particular degradation mechanisms and, to date, represent the major contributors to the state of knowledge on the subject. These studies show that microstructural features are important in determining strength and fracture toughness, whereas fatigue resistance is mainly related to the susceptibility of the matrix and the filler/matrix interface to mechanical and chemical degradation. In this review, we focus on fracture mechanisms occurring during fatigue, on the methods used to assess them, and on additional phenomena involved in the degradation of initial mechanical properties of resin composites.

  10. Factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H Logie

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Findings reveal high HIV infection rates among transgender women in Jamaica. Sex work-involved participants experience social and structural drivers of HIV, including violence, stigma, and unemployment. Transgender women involved in transactional sex also experience high rates of incarceration, forced sex and homelessness in comparison with non-sex workers. Taken together, these findings suggest that social ecological factors elevate HIV exposure among sex work-involved transgender women in Jamaica. Findings can inform interventions to advance human rights and HIV prevention and care cascades with transgender women in Jamaica.

  11. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  12. Factors associated with male involvement in reproductive care in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishwajit, Ghose; Tang, Shangfeng; Yaya, Sanni; Ide, Seydou; Fu, Hang; Wang, Manli; He, Zhifei; Da, Feng; Feng, Zhanchun

    2017-01-03

    Men's active involvement in reproductive healthcare has shown to be positively associated with maternal and child health outcomes. Bangladesh has made appreciable progress in its pursuance of maternal mortality related goals in the framework of the MDGs. However, there remains a lot to be accomplished to realise the long-term goals for which active participation of male counterparts in reproductive care is crucial. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate factors associated with male involvement in reproductive health among Bangladeshi men. We used data from Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) conducted in 2011. Study participants were 1196 married men, aged between 15 and 69 years and living in both urban and rural households. Level of male involvement (outcome variable) was measured based on the responses on knowledge, awareness and practice regarding reproductive health. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression models were performed for data analysis. Out of 1196 participants, only 40% were found to be active about partners' reproductive healthcare. Chi-square test showed significant association between active involvement and ever hearing about family planning (FP) in television, learning about FP through community health events, community health workers and poster/billboard. Results from logistic regression analysis revealed that type of residency [p = 0.004, AOR = 0.666, 95% CI = 0.504-0.879], literacy [secondary/higher education- p = 0.006. AOR = 0.579, 95% CI = 0.165-0.509], learning about family planning from Newspaper [p < 0.001. AOR = 1.952, 95% CI = 1.429-2.664], and television [p = 0.017. AOR = 1.514 95% CI = 1.298-1.886], and having been communicated about family planning by community health workers [p = 0.017. AOR = 1.946, 95% CI = 1.129-3.356] were significantly associated with active involvement of men in reproductive health issues. Level

  13. Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones: analysis of the factors involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca-López, N; Ariza, A; Doña, I; Mayorga, C; Montañez, M I; Garcia-Campos, J; Gomez, F; Rondón, C; Blanca, M; Torres, M J

    2013-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones seem to be on the increase, especially immediate type reactions. The aim of this study was to determine whether several conditions, including gender, age, type of reaction, time interval between the reaction and the study, type of symptoms, the specific fluoroquinolone involved in the reaction and previous confirmed hypersensitivity to betalactams or to other drugs were factors contributing to the development of hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones. We analysed retrospectively all patients attending our allergy department between January 2005 and December 2010 because of a reaction associated with fluoroquinolone administration. The diagnosis was confirmed by basophil activation test or drug provocation tests. In accordance with the results, patients were then classified as having hypersensitivity or non-hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones. A group of 218 patients was evaluated; 69 were confirmed as having hypersensitivity, 146 as non-hypersensitivity and 3 were excluded. Comparisons between groups showed that the allergic patients more often had a previous confirmed hypersensitivity to betalactams (P = 0.029), immediate reactions (P = 0.001) and anaphylaxis (P = 0.000), and moxifloxacin was the fluoroquinolone most frequently involved (P = 0.027). The logistic regression analysis showed three factors associated with the diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones: previous hypersensitivity to betalactams (OR: 4.571; 95% CI: 0.987-21.171; adjusted OR: 23.654; 95% CI: 1.529-365.853), immediate reactions (OR: 17.333; 95% CI: 4.374-68.691; adjusted OR: 52.493; 95% CI: 6.621-416.200) and reactions induced by moxifloxacin (OR: 3.091; 95% CI: 1.160-8.239; adjusted OR: 13.610; 95% CI: 2.419-76.565). In patients who develop reactions to fluoroquinolones, hypersensitivity is more often confirmed in those with immediate reactions and when moxifloxacin is involved. Moreover, patients with hypersensitivity to

  14. The involvement of the human cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwig, M; Kolb, F P; Timmann, D

    2007-01-01

    Besides its known importance for motor coordination, the cerebellum plays a major role in associative learning. The form of cerebellum-dependent associative learning, which has been examined in greatest detail, is classical conditioning of eyeblink responses. The much advanced knowledge of anatomical correlates, as well as cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in eyeblink conditioning in animal models are of particular importance because there is general acceptance that findings in humans parallel the animal data. The aim of the present review is to give an update of findings in humans. Emphasis is put on human lesion studies, which take advantage of the advances of high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, findings of functional brain imaging in healthy human subjects are reviewed. The former helped to localize areas involved in eyeblink conditioning within the cerebellum, the latter was in particular helpful in delineating extracerebellar neural substrates, which may contribute to eyeblink conditioning. Human lesion studies support the importance of cortical areas of the ipsilateral superior cerebellum both in the acquisition and timing of conditioned eyeblink responses (CR). Furthermore, the ipsilateral cerebellar cortex seems to be also important in extinction of CRs. Cortical areas, which are important for CR acquisition, overlap with areas related to the control of the unconditioned eyeblink response. Likewise, cortical lesions are followed by increased amplitudes of unconditioned eyeblinks. These findings are in good accordance with the animal literature. Knowledge about contributions of the cerebellar nuclei in humans, however, is sparse. Due to methodological limitations both of human lesion and functional MRI studies, at present no clear conclusions can be drawn on the relative contributions of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei.

  15. Human factors in agile manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, C.

    1995-03-01

    As industries position themselves for the competitive markets of today, and the increasingly competitive global markets of the 21st century, agility, or the ability to rapidly develop and produce new products, represents a common trend. Agility manifests itself in many different forms, with the agile manufacturing paradigm proposed by the Iacocca Institute offering a generally accepted, long-term vision. In its many forms, common elements of agility or agile manufacturing include: changes in business, engineering and production practices, seamless information flow from design through production, integration of computer and information technologies into all facets of the product development and production process, application of communications technologies to enable collaborative work between geographically dispersed product development team members and introduction of flexible automation of production processes. Industry has rarely experienced as dramatic an infusion of new technologies or as extensive a change in culture and work practices. Human factors will not only play a vital role in accomplishing the technical and social objectives of agile manufacturing. but has an opportunity to participate in shaping the evolution of industry paradigms for the 21st century.

  16. Delayed onset muscle soreness: Involvement of neurotrophic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumura, Kazue; Taguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is quite a common consequence of unaccustomed strenuous exercise, especially exercise containing eccentric contraction (lengthening contraction, LC). Its typical sign is mechanical hyperalgesia (tenderness and movement related pain). Its cause has been commonly believed to be micro-damage of the muscle and subsequent inflammation. Here we present a brief historical overview of the damage-inflammation theory followed by a discussion of our new findings. Different from previous observations, we have observed mechanical hyperalgesia in rats 1-3 days after LC without any apparent microscopic damage of the muscle or signs of inflammation. With our model we have found that two pathways are involved in inducing mechanical hyperalgesia after LC: activation of the B2 bradykinin receptor-nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway and activation of the COX-2-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway. These neurotrophic factors were produced by muscle fibers and/or satellite cells. This means that muscle fiber damage is not essential, although it is sufficient, for induction of DOMS, instead, NGF and GDNF produced by muscle fibers/satellite cells play crucial roles in DOMS.

  17. Human Factors Plan for Maritime Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    HUMAN FACTORS ISSUES IN THE MARITIME ENVIRONMENT .............. 13 2. 1 DEFINITION OF HUMAN FACTORS ISSUES ........................ 13 2.2 CONTENT...The dotted line around the human factors technical basis in Figure 1 signifies that it needs to be developed. Safety data Accidents ) Definition of...and activity surveys, but met with some resistance from the ship personnel, and so little quntitative data was available from this study. Subjective

  18. NASA information sciences and human factors program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Lee; Hood, Ray; Montemerlo, Melvin; Jenkins, James; Smith, Paul; Dibattista, John; Depaula, Ramon; Hunter, Paul; Lavery, David

    1991-01-01

    The FY-90 descriptions of technical accomplishments are contained in seven sections: Automation and Robotics, Communications, Computer Sciences, Controls and Guidance, Data Systems, Human Factors, and Sensor Technology.

  19. Hsp10: anatomic distribution, functions, and involvement in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sabrina; Bucchieri, Fabio; Corrao, Simona; Czarnecka, Anna M; Campanella, Claudia; Farina, Felicia; Peri, Giovanni; Tomasello, Giovanni; Sciumè, Carmelo; Modica, Giuseppe; La Rocca, Giampiero; Anzalone, Rita; Giuffrè, Mario; Conway De Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco; Zummo, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that molecular chaperones/heat shock proteins are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, known as chaperonopathies. A better molecular understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms is essential for addressing new strategies in diagnostics, therapeutics and clinical management of chaperonopathies, including those in which Hsp10 is involved. This chaperonin has been studied for a long time as a member of the mitochondrial protein-folding machine. However, although in normal cells Hsp10 is mainly localized in the mitochondrial matrix, it has also been found during and after stress in other subcellular compartments, such as cytosol, vesicles and secretory granules, alone or in combination with other proteins. In these extramitochondrial locales, Hsp10 plays an active role in cell signalling. For example, cancer cells often show altered levels of Hsp10, compared to normal cells. Hsp10 may also be found in the extracellular space and in the bloodstream, with a possible immunomodulatory activity. This minireview focuses on some studies to date on the involvement of Hsp10 in human disease pathogenesis.

  20. Factors and Strategies That Influence Faculty Involvement in Public Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Data from several national research and evaluation projects involving 32 diverse institutions offer insights into what motivates college-faculty involvement in public service and outreach efforts, what faculty find to be obstacles to involvement, and what institutions can do to facilitate involvement. One salient policy supporting faculty…

  1. Relevant Factors in the Process of Socialization, Involvement and Belonging of Descendants in Family Businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melquicedec Lozano-Posso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research works toward the identification of the factors that comprise the process of socialization, involvement and initial belonging of descendants in family businesses and the key relationships between them. By means of a qualitative detailed study of four cases, complemented by a quantitative survey of 274 Colombian family businesses, the authors generate a new model that takes into account both factors explored in previous research as well as others identified in this study. Findings confirm the specific dependency of each stage on the subsequent ones; socialization influences involvement, which in turn influences the belonging of the descendants to the family business, with a strong presence of factors such as knowledge, leadership, mode, timing, and motivation. Those responsible for the orientation of potential successors may examine these findings in order to optimize their preparation efforts and support of family human resources for the continuity of the business.

  2. Familial and social factors of involving teenagers into alcohol use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva, Tatiana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many authors discuss factors which influence involving adolescence into alcohol use. This study was aimed to assess contribution of factors related to alcohol use in the family, getting into situations of alcohol use as well as preventive work in teenage establishments.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Survey of 373 adolescents attending teenage clubs was conducted in Kazan, Russia, with questions related to alcohol use in the family and among peers, age and circumstances of first alcohol use. The outcome measure was whether respondents were current alcohol users. Associations were explored through logistic regression models.RESULTS: Alcohol use by teenagers did not differ by gender. Odds of using alcohol increased with age (OR=1.46 95%CI 1.19-1.80 per year. Risk of alcohol use was lower if no family members used alcohol (OR=0.3 95%CI 0.2-0.5 compared to those teenagers who have any family members who used alcohol. After adding to the model variables related to the first alcohol use, most significant was association with the response that no one has ever proposed to drink alcohol (OR=0.014 95%CI 0.005-0.041 compared to any situations of alcohol use, while the association with familial factors was attenuated. This shows that impact of familial factors could be mediated through the occasions of alcohol use. Teenagers whose parents do not use alcohol less likely get into situations where they are proposed to drink in a peer group (12% vs. 24% or at a party (18% vs. 25%.Adolescents who expressed negative attitude to alcohol-related work in youth clubs more likely were alcohol users themselves (OR=21.1 95%CI 2.6-170.3, which is better applicable for diagnostics than for program evaluation.CONCLUSION: Absence of alcohol in the family predetermines alcohol use by adolescents. Teenagers whose parents do not use alcohol less likely get into situations where they are suggested to drink alcohol.

  3. Human Factors Research and Nuclear Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, Neville P., Ed.; Huey, Beverly M., Ed.

    The Panel on Human Factors Research Needs in Nuclear Regulatory Research was formed by the National Research Council in response to a request from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC asked the research council to conduct an 18-month study of human factors research needs for the safe operation of nuclear power plants. This report…

  4. Human factors in healthcare level one

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenorn-Lanng, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    The majority of errors, litigation, and complaints in the health service are due to 'human factors', yet the term is still not widely understood and is sometimes used interchangeably to refer to team training or communication skills. Although including these, the subject of 'human factors' goes far beyond this to look at systems, environmental influences, and interactions with equipment, in addition to self-awareness and human interaction. All of these aspects are captured inHuman Factors in Healthcare and are built into a new framework: the SHEEP model, which breaks down into five key areas:

  5. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  6. MicroRNAs: potential regulators involved in human anencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Chang, Huibo; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Ting; Zou, Jizhen; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Jianxin

    2010-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital anomalies that substantially impact an infant's morbidity and mortality. The miRNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neurodevelopment; their role in human NTDs, however, is still unknown. In this study, we show the presence of a specific miRNA expression profile from tissues of fetuses with anencephaly, one of the most severe forms of NTDs. Furthermore, we map the target genes of these miRNAs in the human genome. In comparison to healthy human fetal brain tissues, tissues from fetuses with anencephaly exhibited 97 down-regulated and 116 up-regulated miRNAs. The microarray findings were extended using real-time qRT-PCR for nine miRNAs. Specifically, of these validated miRNAs, miR-126, miR-198, and miR-451 were up-regulated, while miR-9, miR-212, miR-124, miR-138, and miR-103/107 were down-regulated in the tissues of fetuses with anencephaly. A bioinformatic analysis showed 881 potential target genes that are regulated by the validated miRNAs. Seventy-nine of these potential genes are involved in a protein interaction network. There were 6 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim process and 7 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim function found by GeneCodis 2.0. Our results suggest that miRNA dysregulation is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of anencephaly.

  7. Human factors in safety and business management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Joachim; Leonhardt, Jorg; Koper, Birgit; Pennig, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    Human factors in safety is concerned with all those factors that influence people and their behaviour in safety-critical situations. In aviation these are, for example, environmental factors in the cockpit, organisational factors such as shift work, human characteristics such as ability and motivation of staff. Careful consideration of human factors is necessary to improve health and safety at work by optimising the interaction of humans with their technical and social (team, supervisor) work environment. This provides considerable benefits for business by increasing efficiency and by preventing incidents/accidents. The aim of this paper is to suggest management tools for this purpose. Management tools such as balanced scorecards (BSC) are widespread instruments and also well known in aviation organisations. Only a few aviation organisations utilise management tools for human factors although they are the most important conditions in the safety management systems of aviation organisations. One reason for this is that human factors are difficult to measure and therefore also difficult to manage. Studies in other domains, such as workplace health promotion, indicate that BSC-based tools are useful for human factor management. Their mission is to develop a set of indicators that are sensitive to organisational performance and help identify driving forces as well as bottlenecks. Another tool presented in this paper is the Human Resources Performance Model (HPM). HPM facilitates the integrative assessment of human factors programmes on the basis of a systematic performance analysis of the whole system. Cause-effect relationships between system elements are defined in process models in a first step and validated empirically in a second step. Thus, a specific representation of the performance processes is developed, which ranges from individual behaviour to system performance. HPM is more analytic than BSC-based tools because HPM also asks why a certain factor is

  8. Human factors and simulation in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Emily M; Wong, Ambrose H; Ackerman, Jeremy; Sande, Margaret K; Lei, Charles; Kobayashi, Leo; Cassara, Michael; Cooper, Dylan D; Perry, Kimberly; Lewandowski, William E; Scerbo, Mark W

    2017-09-19

    This consensus group from the 2017 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference "Catalyzing System Change through Health Care Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes" held in Orlando, Florida on May 16, 2017 focused on the use of human factors and simulation in the field of emergency medicine. The human factors discipline is often underutilized within emergency medicine but has significant potential in improving the interface between technologies and individuals in the field. The discussion explored the domain of human factors, its benefits in medicine, how simulation can be a catalyst for human factors work in emergency medicine, and how emergency medicine can collaborate with human factors professionals to affect change. Implementing human factors in emergency medicine through healthcare simulation will require a demonstration of clinical and safety outcomes, advocacy to stakeholders and administrators, and establishment of structured collaborations between human factors professionals and emergency medicine, such as in this breakout group. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Selecting measures for human factors research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantowitz, B H

    1992-08-01

    Selecting measures is a necessary component of human factors research. Proper selection must take into account the representation problem (how is the assignment of numbers to objects or phenomena justified?) and the uniqueness problem (to what degree is this assignment unique?). Other key human factors measurement issues include subject representativeness, variable representativeness, and setting representativeness. It is difficult to create a single measure that captures essential characteristics of complex systems. Several examples illustrate how theory can guide measurement selection in such diverse human factors research as vigilance, turning off warning alarms, information requirements for military command centers, subjective workload, heart-rate signal analysis, and heat stress in nuclear power plants.

  10. Study on Angiogenesis Factor of Human Osteosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Angiogenesis factor of human osteosarcoma was partially purified and its biological features were studied. The active peptide with 8000 to 10 000 u molecular weight in the conditioned medium obtained from the cultivation of human osteosarcoma cells were partially purified by ultrafiltration, chromatography and dialysis. The angiogenic effects of the fractions were assessed by proliferation assay of human umbilical vein and pig aorta thoracic endothelial cells. The results showed that the chromatography fractions of 4 to 6 could significantly promote the proliferation of the endothelial cells. It was suggested that the human osteosarcoma cells could synthesize and secrete angiogenesis factor with a molecular weight of 8000 to 10 000 u.

  11. Motor unit involvement in human acute Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Benavente

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available Thirty five patients with acute Chagas' disease who demonstrated parasitaemia at the time of the investigation were submitted to a detailed electromyographical study. With their muscles at rest, 12 patients showed fibrillation potentials and/or positive sharp waves. On volitional contraction, 7 had short duration motor unit potentials (MUPs and low polyphasic MUPs. On motor and sensory nerve fibers conduction studies, 20 disclosed values below the lower control limit within one or more nerves. Finally, 12 patients produced a muscle, decremental response on nerve supramaximal repetitive stimulation. The findings signal that primary muscle involvement, neuropathy and impairement of the neuromuscular transmission, either isolated or combined, may be found in the acute stage of human Chagas' disease.

  12. Verification and validation of human factors issues in control room design and upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.; Collier, S. [Inst. for Energiteknikk, Halden (Norway). OECD Halden Reactor Project

    1999-12-01

    Systems, facilities and equipment are periodically updated during a power plant's lifetime. This has human factors implications, especially if the central control room is involved. Human factors work may therefore be required. There is an extensive literature on human factors itself, but not so much on how it is verified and validated. Therefore, HRP and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate commissioned a study. The objective was to review the literature and establish a knowledge base on verification and validation (V and V) of human factors issues. The report first discusses verification and validation as applied to human factors work. It describes a design process and the typical human factors topics involved. It then presents a generic method for V and V of human factors. This is built on a review of standards, guidelines and other references given in an annotated bibliography. The method is illustrated by application to some human factors topics.

  13. Human factors in resuscitation: Lessons learned from simulator studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunziker S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical algorithms, technical skills, and repeated training are the classical cornerstones for successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Increasing evidence suggests that human factors, including team interaction, communication, and leadership, also influence the performance of CPR. Guidelines, however, do not yet include these human factors, partly because of the difficulties of their measurement in real-life cardiac arrest. Recently, clinical studies of cardiac arrest scenarios with high-fidelity video-assisted simulations have provided opportunities to better delineate the influence of human factors on resuscitation team performance. This review focuses on evidence from simulator studies that focus on human factors and their influence on the performance of resuscitation teams. Similar to studies in real patients, simulated cardiac arrest scenarios revealed many unnecessary interruptions of CPR as well as significant delays in defibrillation. These studies also showed that human factors play a major role in these shortcomings and that the medical performance depends on the quality of leadership and team-structuring. Moreover, simulated video-taped medical emergencies revealed that a substantial part of information transfer during communication is erroneous. Understanding the impact of human factors on the performance of a complex medical intervention like resuscitation requires detailed, second-by-second, analysis of factors involving the patient, resuscitative equipment such as the defibrillator, and all team members. Thus, high-fidelity simulator studies provide an important research method in this challenging field.

  14. Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Human Beings In Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Maria Rita Garbi; Guilhem, Dirce; Lolas, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective Diagnose ethical conduct in research involving human beings in Brazil and the last 10 years of activity by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Health Department - Federal District - CEP/SES/DF. Methods This work was based on a documentary research, descriptive and retrospective. It examined the database containing records of cases brought before the CEP/SES/DF, corresponding the period of June 1997 to December 2007. Results were generated in Excel program, version 2007. Results CEP/SES/DF has presented increasing number of research projects submitted to appreciation (n = 1129), composing: 90.4% approved 1.7% disapproved, 7.4% removed/filed and 0.5% excluded. Of these projects, 83% belonged to Group III, 18% multi-centered projects and 10% protocols with foreign participation. Time for approval has decreased over the years (30 to 60 days). Frequent pendencies: End of Free and Informed Consent (30%), Cover Sheet (25%), Methodology (20%), Curriculum vitae (12%), Budget (9%), and Others (4%). Conclusion The assessment of the CEP/SES/DF activities, during a ten-year period has shown its commitment to the legitimacy of research ethics review and scientific production SES/DF. There were some weaknesses such as difficulty in monitoring the accompaniment of the research; interruption of works due to adverse drug reaction; gaps or errors in the protocol submitted by the researcher. These situations are the achieving targets for the elaboration of specific criteria. PMID:20981277

  15. Human factors and information transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    Key problem areas in the management and transfer of information in the National Airspace System, contributing to human errors are identified. Information-management aspects supporting the user's ability to assess prevailing situations accurately with adequate time to make an informed decision are considered. The relationship between judgment biases and requirements for managing weather information is illustrated by examining such hazardous weather phenomena as microbursts and windshears. The system of air-ground communication relying almost exclusively on voice transmissions is discussed, and recommendations in the areas of communications procedures and technology development are provided.

  16. Involvement of the kynurenine pathway in human glioma pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seray Adams

    Full Text Available The kynurenine pathway (KP is the principal route of L-tryptophan (TRP catabolism leading to the production of kynurenine (KYN, the neuroprotectants, kynurenic acid (KYNA and picolinic acid (PIC, the excitotoxin, quinolinic acid (QUIN and the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+. The enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO-2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO-2 initiate the first step of the KP. IDO-1 and TDO-2 induction in tumors are crucial mechanisms implicated to play pivotal roles in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. Here, we report the first comprehensive characterisation of the KP in 1 cultured human glioma cells and 2 plasma from patients with glioblastoma (GBM. Our data revealed that interferon-gamma (IFN-γ stimulation significantly potentiated the expression of the KP enzymes, IDO-1 IDO-2, kynureninase (KYNU, kynurenine hydroxylase (KMO and significantly down-regulated 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD and kynurenine aminotransferase-I (KAT-I expression in cultured human glioma cells. This significantly increased KP activity but significantly lowered the KYNA/KYN neuroprotective ratio in human cultured glioma cells. KP activation (KYN/TRP was significantly higher, whereas the concentrations of the neuroreactive KP metabolites TRP, KYNA, QUIN and PIC and the KYNA/KYN ratio were significantly lower in GBM patient plasma (n = 18 compared to controls. These results provide further evidence for the involvement of the KP in glioma pathophysiology and highlight a potential role of KP products as novel and highly attractive therapeutic targets to evaluate for the treatment of brain tumors, aimed at restoring anti-tumor immunity and reducing the capacity for malignant cells to produce NAD(+, which is necessary for energy production and DNA repair.

  17. Trends in research involving human beings in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ricardo Eccard da; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho; Pastor, Elza Martínez; Barragan, Elena; Amato, Angélica Amorim

    2015-02-01

    Developing countries have experienced a dramatic increase in the number of clinical studies in the last decades. The aim of this study was to describe 1) the number of clinical trials submitted to the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária, Anvisa) from 2007 to 2012 and the number of human-subject research projects approved by research ethics committees (RECs) and the National Research Ethics Committee (Comissão Nacional de Ética em Pesquisa, CONEP) in Brazil from 2007 to 2011 and 2) the diseases most frequently studied in Brazilian states in clinical trials approved in the country from 2009 to 2012, based on information from an Anvisa databank. Two databases were used: 1) the National Information System on Research Ethics Involving Human Beings (Sistema Nacional de Informação Sobre Ética em Pesquisa envolvendo Seres Humanos, SISNEP) and 2) Anvisa's Clinical Research Control System (Sistema de Controle de Pesquisa Clínica, SCPC). Data from the SCPC indicated an increase of 32.7% in the number of clinical trials submitted to Anvisa, and data from the SISNEP showed an increase of 69.9% in those approved by RECs and CONEP (from 18 160 in 2007 to 30 860 in 2011). Type 2 diabetes (26.0%) and breast cancer (20.5%)-related to the main causes of mortality in Brazil-were the two most frequently studied diseases. The so-called “neglected diseases,” such as dengue fever, were among the least studied diseases in approved clinical trials, despite their significant impact on social, economic, and health indicators in Brazil. Overall, the data indicated 1) a clear trend toward more research involving human beings in Brazil, 2) good correspondence between diseases most studied in clinical trials approved by Anvisa and the main causes of death in Brazil, and 3) a low level of attention to neglected diseases, an issue that should be considered in setting future research priorities, given their socioeconomic and health effects.

  18. Human factors issues for interstellar spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc M.; Brody, Adam R.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in research on space human factors are reviewed in the context of a self-sustaining interstellar spacecraft based on the notion of traveling space settlements. Assumptions about interstellar travel are set forth addressing costs, mission durations, and the need for multigenerational space colonies. The model of human motivation by Maslow (1970) is examined and directly related to the design of space habitat architecture. Human-factors technology issues encompass the human-machine interface, crew selection and training, and the development of spaceship infrastructure during transtellar flight. A scenario for feasible instellar travel is based on a speed of 0.5c, a timeframe of about 100 yr, and an expandable multigenerational crew of about 100 members. Crew training is identified as a critical human-factors issue requiring the development of perceptual and cognitive aids such as expert systems and virtual reality.

  19. Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    user’s location and then per- forming the (cognitive) task of Mark A. Livingston Naval Research Laboratory Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality ...00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...the basis for situation awareness or—in combina- tion with visual cues—a navigation task. Tactile tasks. Via haptic devices, we can apply vir- tual

  20. Development of human factors design review guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Suk; Suh, Sang Moon; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this study is to develop human factors engineering program review guidelines and alarm system review guidelines in order to resolve the two major technical issues: 25. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model and 26. Review Criteria for Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Controls and Instrumentation, which are related to the development of human factors safety regulation guides being performed by KINS. For the development of human factors program review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG-0711 and added our comments by considering Korean regulatory situation and reviewing the reference documents of NUREG-0711. We also computerized the Korean version of NUREG-0711, additional comments, and selected portion of the reference documents for the developer of safety regulation guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG/CR-6105, which was published by NRC in 1994 as a guideline document for the human factors review of alarm systems. Then we will update the guidelines by reviewing the literature related to alarm design published after 1994. (author). 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Space Human Factors: Research to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Human Factors has been instrumental in preventing potential on-orbit hazards and increasing overall crew safety. Poor performance & operational learning curves on-orbit are mitigated. Human-centered design is applied to optimize design and minimize potentially hazardous conditions, especially with larger crew sizes and habitat constraints. Lunar and Mars requirements and design developments are enhanced, based on ISS Lessons Learned.

  2. Research on disaster prevention by human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bok Youn; Kang, Chang Hee; Kang, Sun Duck; Jo, Young Do [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Mining, by its very nature, requires workers and technology to function in an unpredictable environment that can not easily be engineered to accommodate human factors. Miners' physical and cognitive capabilities are sometimes stretched to the point that 'human error' in performance result. Mine safety researchers estimate that 50-85% of all mining injuries are due, in large part, to human error. Further research suggests that the primary causes of these errors in performance lie outside the individual and can be minimized by improvements in equipment design, work environments, work procedures and training. The human factors research is providing the science needed to determine which aspects of the mining environment can be made more worker-friendly and how miners can work more safely in environments that can not be improved. Underground mines have long been recognized as an innately hazardous and physically demanding work environment. Recently, mining is becoming a more complicated process as more sophisticated technologies are introduced. The more complicated or difficult the tasks to be performed, the more critical it is to have a systematic understanding of the humans, the technology, the environments, and how they interact. Human factors is a key component in solving most of today's mine safety and health problems. Human factors research primarily centered around solving problems in the following four areas: 1) How mining methods and equipment affect safety, 2) Evaluating the fit between miner's physical capabilities and the demands of their job, 3) Improving miner's ability to perceive and react to hazards, 4) Understanding how organizational and managerial variables influence safety. Human factor research was begun during the World war II. National Coal Board (British Coal) of Great Britain commenced ergonomics in 1969, and Bureau of Mine of United States started human factor researches in same year. Japan has very short history

  3. Factors that Influence Male Involvement in Sexual and Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    a local nongovernmental organization, Kisumu Medical and Education Trust ... status of male involvement in reproductive health services in western Kenya and ..... vulnerabilities and expose any reproductive health secrets, exposures that ...

  4. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring.......OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...... there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...

  5. A Multidimensional Study of School-Family-Community Partnership Involvement: School, School Counselor, and Training Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Julia A.; Griffin, Dana

    2010-01-01

    A multidimensional study examines both the dimensions of school counselors' involvement in school-family-community partnerships and the factors related to their involvement in partnerships. The School Counselor Involvement in Partnerships Survey was revised and its factor structure examined. Principal factor analyses revealed three dimensions of…

  6. Surgical checklists: the human factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Connor, Paul

    2013-05-14

    BACKGROUND: Surgical checklists has been shown to improve patient safety and teamwork in the operating theatre. However, despite the known benefits of the use of checklists in surgery, in some cases the practical implementation has been found to be less than universal. A questionnaire methodology was used to quantitatively evaluate the attitudes of theatre staff towards a modified version of the World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical checklist with relation to: beliefs about levels of compliance and support, impact on patient safety and teamwork, and barriers to the use of the checklist. METHODS: Using the theory of planned behaviour as a framework, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with theatre personnel regarding their attitudes towards, and levels of compliance with, a checklist. Based upon the interviews, a 27-item questionnaire was developed and distribute to all theatre personnel in an Irish hospital. RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 107 theatre staff (42.6% response rate). Particularly for nurses, the overall attitudes towards the effect of the checklist on safety and teamworking were positive. However, there was a lack of rigour with which the checklist was being applied. Nurses were significantly more sensitive to the barriers to the use of the checklist than anaesthetists or surgeons. Moreover, anaesthetists were not as positively disposed to the surgical checklist as surgeons and nurse. This finding was attributed to the tendency for the checklist to be completed during a period of high workload for the anaesthetists, resulting in a lack of engagement with the process. CONCLUSION: In order to improve the rigour with which the surgical checklist is applied, there is a need for: the involvement of all members of the theatre team in the checklist process, demonstrated support for the checklist from senior personnel, on-going education and training, and barriers to the implementation of the checklist to be addressed.

  7. Human factors and safety in emergency medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, H. G.; Helmreich, R. L.; Scheidegger, D.

    1994-01-01

    A model based on an input process and outcome conceptualisation is suggested to address safety-relevant factors in emergency medicine. As shown in other dynamic and demanding environments, human factors play a decisive role in attaining high quality service. Attitudes held by health-care providers, organisational shells and work-cultural parameters determine communication, conflict resolution and workload distribution within and between teams. These factors should be taken into account to improve outcomes such as operational integrity, job satisfaction and morale.

  8. Involvement of NANOG upregulation in malignant progression of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Shimakage, Misuzu; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Yutsudo, Masuo; Watari, Akihiro

    2013-03-01

    Previously, we isolated cell lines that display various degrees of transformed phenotypes from a single-cell population of human diploid fibroblasts (RB) containing a large deletion (13q14-22) in one copy of chromosome 13. They included a cell line transfected with SV40 early genes (RBSV), an immortalized cell line (RBI), an anchorage-independent cell line (RBS), and a tumorigenic cell line (RBT). Here, we analyzed gene expression profiles in these cell lines and showed that expression of some fibroblast-specified or mesenchyme-specified genes were downregulated, and those of stem cell-specified genes, including NANOG, were upregulated during malignant progression. When NANOG expression was knocked down with a short hairpin NANOG expression vector (shNANOG vector) in the RBS and RBT cells, the anchorage independency and tumorigenicity were repressed. We next examined various cancer cell lines for NANOG expression and showed that some cancer cell lines expressed a high level of normal and/or variant NANOG proteins. Overexpression of NANOG mRNA in lung adenocarcinoma was also shown by in situ hybridization. All these data indicate the involvement of NANOG in tumorigenesis.

  9. Genetic factors involves in intracranial aneurysms--actualities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan, D; Munteanu, V; Coman, T; Ciurea, A V

    2015-01-01

    ...% of all IAs in the population. Cerebral aneurysm disease is related to hemodynamic and genetic factors, associated with structural weakness in the arterial wall, which was acquired by a specific, often unknown, event...

  10. Factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Wang, Ying; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Jones, Nicolette; Ahmed, Uzma; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2017-04-06

    no sex work involvement. Findings reveal high HIV infection rates among transgender women in Jamaica. Sex work-involved participants experience social and structural drivers of HIV, including violence, stigma, and unemployment. Transgender women involved in transactional sex also experience high rates of incarceration, forced sex and homelessness in comparison with non-sex workers. Taken together, these findings suggest that social ecological factors elevate HIV exposure among sex work-involved transgender women in Jamaica. Findings can inform interventions to advance human rights and HIV prevention and care cascades with transgender women in Jamaica.

  11. Option Pricing Method in a Market Involving Interval Number Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The method for pricing the option in a market with interval number factors is proposed. The no-arbitrage principle in the interval number valued market and the rule to judge the reasonability of a price interval are given. Using the method, the price interval where the riskless interest and the volatility under B-S setting is given. The price interval from binomial tree model when the key factors u, d, R are all interval numbers is also discussed.

  12. Some factors involved in microprojectile-mediated indica rice transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUERui; QIUXiaohui; YANMeixian; HUANGDanian; CAOShouyun; TIANWenzhong

    1997-01-01

    Immature embryos and calli derived from immature or mature embryos of the 16 indica rice varieties have been transformed by using particle bombardment. To improve growth state of subcultured calli, we set up a variety of parameters to optimize the important tactors involved in Biolistic system, and added various hormones, mannitol, and MES to CC or NB medium.

  13. Involvement of inflammatory factors in pancreatic carcinogenesis and preventive effects of anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mami; Mutoh, Michihiro; Ishigamori, Rikako; Fujii, Gen; Imai, Toshio

    2013-03-01

    Chronic inflammation is known to be a risk for many cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Heavy alcohol drinking and cigarette smoking are major causes of pancreatitis, and epidemiological studies have shown that smoking and chronic pancreatitis are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Meanwhile, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are elevated in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer tissues in humans and in animal models. Selective inhibitors of iNOS and COX-2 suppress pancreatic cancer development in a chemical carcinogenesis model of hamsters treated with N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP). In addition, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and type II diabetes are also suggested to be associated with chronic inflammation in the pancreas and involved in pancreatic cancer development. We have shown that a high-fat diet increased pancreatic cancer development in BOP-treated hamsters, along with aggravation of hyperlipidemia, severe fatty infiltration, and increased expression of adipokines and inflammatory factors in the pancreas. Of note, fatty pancreas has been observed in obese and/or diabetic cases in humans. Preventive effects of anti-hyperlipidemic/anti-diabetic agents on pancreatic cancer have also been shown in humans and animals. Taking this evidence into consideration, modulation of inflammatory factors by anti-inflammatory agents will provide useful data for prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  14. 16 CFR 1028.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1028.118 Section 1028.118 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... subjects remain to be selected; and projects in which human subjects' involvement will depend...

  15. Munchausen Syndrome by proxy: Definition, context, and psychological factors involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gomes Gonçalves

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Munchausen syndrome by proxy refers to a pathology characterized by physical and emotional abuse in which the simulation or production of symptoms is directed towards a child, which involves taking him or her to health treatments and unnecessary surgeries. The difficulties in the diagnosis of this form of abuse and the emotional aspects involved highlight the destructive effects in the infancy subjectivity due to the lack of loving capacity protecting and prioritizing the child demands. Psychoanalysis offers a differentiated view, comprehending that the mother attempts to elaborate her own psychic conflicts by the repetition of traumatic experience. There is a necessity of comprehension of the instinct destructivity presented in the maternal unconscious dynamics revealed in the modality of caring which is reflected in violence.

  16. The productivity from a human perspective: Dimensions and factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Marvel Cequea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature, for both theoretical foundations and empirical research, in order to establish relationships between the variables related to human factors and their impact on productivity.Design/methodology/approach: The strategy employed corresponds to a descriptive non-experimental design, which is the establishment of three criteria for the literature review, in order to narrow down the topic to research works relating productivity with the human factor. This was investigated in databases and journals dealing with related topics, in addition to consulting doctoral theses and published books concerning the influence of human factors on productivity. About 250 papers which were considered the most relevant for the research were selected.Findings:  As a result of this exploration the classification of the factors in two dimensions that are manifested in people when they act in organizations was highlighted: the psychological and the psychosocial dimension. Human factors included in these dimensions are: individual factors (motivation, skills, job satisfaction, identification, commitment and involvement with the organization, group factors (participation, cohesion and management conflict and organizational factors (organizational culture, organizational climate and leadership. All these factors have an impact on the productivity of the organization and are addressed in this research.Originality/value: The selected variables were used to formulate a model that incorporates the human factors identified and considers the phenomenon in a comprehensive manner. It will be addressed through multivariate analysis, with the possible application of structural equations in order to assess the causal relationships that may exist between factors and productivity.

  17. Exosomes: A Promising Factor Involved in Cancer Hypoxic Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Yang, X; Yang, Y; Zhu, H; Chen, X; Zhang, H; Wang, F; Qin, Q; Cheng, H; Sun, X

    2015-01-01

    As a significant tumor feature, hypoxia can trigger cancer adaptive processes, induce malignant phenotype development, and promote drug resistance. Previous studies demonstrated that exosomes are critical during these procedures. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies in the endosomal network. These small vesicles are mainly involved in the transport of bioactive molecules between cells. Exosomes are also involved in the mediation of some cellular communications depending on derived donor cells; thus, recipient cells undergo phenotypic changes. Furthermore, hypoxia can remarkably stimulate exosomal secretion; for instance, nucleic acids and proteins as transmission signals in exosomes in a tumor microenvironment are involved in various functions, such as inducing intratumoral heterogeneity, altering immunological responses, producing cancer-associated fibroblasts, and promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Moreover, exosome contents resemble those of a donor cell; this finding indicates that exosomes may also be regarded as suitable biomarkers of hypoxia status. Therefore, exosomes can be used to facilitate diagnosis and prognosis with minimal invasive procedures. Further studies on exosomes in cancer may provide new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Possible Anandamide and Palmitoylethanolamide involvement in human stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzolato Gilberto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endocannabinoids (eCBs are ubiquitous lipid mediators that act on specific (CB1, CB2 and non-specific (TRPV1, PPAR receptors. Despite many experimental animal studies proved eCB involvement in the pathogenesis of stroke, such evidence is still lacking in human patients. Our aim was to determine eCB peripheral levels in acute stroke patients and evaluate their relationship with clinical disability and stroke volume. Methods A cohort of ten patients with a first acute (within six hours since symptoms onset ischemic stroke and a group of eight age- and sex-matched normal subjects were included. Groups were also matched for metabolic profile. All subjects underwent a blood sample collection for anandamide (AEA, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA measurement; blood sampling was repeated in patients on admission (T0, at 6 (T1 and 18 hours (T2 thereafter. Patients neurological impairment was assessed using NIHSS and Fugl-Meyer Scale arm subitem (FMSa; stroke volume was determined on 48 h follow-up brain CT scans. Blood samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Results 1T0 AEA levels were significantly higher in stroke patients compared to controls. 2A significant inverse correlation between T0 AEA levels and FMSa score was found. Moreover a positive correlation between T0 AEA levels and stroke volume were found in stroke patients. T0 PEA levels in stroke patients were not significantly different from the control group, but showed a significant correlation with the NIHSS scores. T0 2-AG levels were lower in stroke patients compared to controls, but such difference did not reach the significance threshold. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of elevated peripheral AEA levels in acute stroke patients. In agreement with previous murine studies, we found a significant relationship between AEA or PEA levels and neurological involvement, such

  19. Human factors engineering plan for reviewing nuclear plant modernization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, John; Higgins, James [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear power plants (NPPs) involved in the modernization of the plant systems and control rooms. The purpose of a HFE review is to help ensure personnel and public safety by verifying that accepted HFE practices and guidelines are incorporated into the program and nuclear power plant design. Such a review helps to ensure the HFE aspects of an NPP are developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The review addresses eleven HFE elements: HFE Program Management, Operating Experience Review, Functional Requirements Analysis and Allocation, Task Analysis, Staffing, Human Reliability Analysis, Human-System Interface Design, Procedure Development, Training Program Development, Human Factors Verification and Validation, and Design Implementation.

  20. Zagreb and Tenerife: Airline Accidents Involving Linguistic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is currently implementing a program to improve the language proficiency of pilots and air traffic controllers worldwide. In justifying the program, ICAO has cited a number of airline accidents that were at least partly caused by language factors. Two accidents cited by ICAO are analysed in this…

  1. Zagreb and Tenerife: Airline Accidents Involving Linguistic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is currently implementing a program to improve the language proficiency of pilots and air traffic controllers worldwide. In justifying the program, ICAO has cited a number of airline accidents that were at least partly caused by language factors. Two accidents cited by ICAO are analysed in this…

  2. Human Factors and IT Competitive Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Vargas

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the system of relationships that may explain the impact of information technology (IT on competitive advantage. In this social and economic system, the study focuses on the human factors that play a key role in IT effectiveness. This is a first step to empirically specifying which human resources can complement the effect of IT on organizations. The paper revisits the main theoretical frameworks that can explain the research issue and proposes an empirical model to test the hypotheses. The results, obtained from a Data Envelopment Analysis, show that there are some human factors that positively affect the influence of IT utilization on competitive advantage. Nevertheless, other structural, industrial and internal factors may play an important role in the relationship.

  3. Human Factors Interface with Systems Engineering for NASA Human Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past and present successes of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (HHFB) at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) in including the Human-As-A-System (HAAS) model in many NASA programs and what steps to be taken to integrate the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into NASA s Systems Engineering (SE) process. The HAAS model stresses systems are ultimately designed for the humans; the humans should therefore be considered as a system within the systems. Therefore, the model places strong emphasis on human factors engineering. Since 1987, the HHFB has been engaging with many major NASA programs with much success. The HHFB helped create the NASA Standard 3000 (a human factors engineering practice guide) and the Human Systems Integration Requirements document. These efforts resulted in the HAAS model being included in many NASA programs. As an example, the HAAS model has been successfully introduced into the programmatic and systems engineering structures of the International Space Station Program (ISSP). Success in the ISSP caused other NASA programs to recognize the importance of the HAAS concept. Also due to this success, the HHFB helped update NASA s Systems Engineering Handbook in December 2007 to include HAAS as a recommended practice. Nonetheless, the HAAS model has yet to become an integral part of the NASA SE process. Besides continuing in integrating HAAS into current and future NASA programs, the HHFB will investigate incorporating the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into the NASA SE Handbook. The HCDP goes further than the HAAS model by emphasizing a holistic and iterative human-centered systems design concept.

  4. Information sciences and human factors overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Lee B.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of program objectives of the Information Sciences and Human Factors Division of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on the organizational structure, goals, the research and technology base, telerobotics, systems autonomy in space operations, space sensors, humans in space, space communications, space data systems, transportation vehicle guidance and control, spacecraft control, and major program directions in space.

  5. Path-factors involving paths of order seven and nine

    OpenAIRE

    EGAWA, Yoshimi; Furuya, Michitaka

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we show the following two theorems (here $c_{i}(G-X)$ is the number of components $C$ of $G-X$ with $|V(C)|=i$): (i)~If a graph $G$ satisfies $c_{1}(G-X)+\\frac{1}{3}c_{3}(G-X)+\\frac{1}{3}c_{5}(G-X)\\leq \\frac{2}{3}|X|$ for all $X\\subseteq V(G)$, then $G$ has a $\\{P_{2},P_{7}\\}$-factor. (ii)~If a graph $G$ satisfies $c_{1}(G-X)+c_{3}(G-X)+\\frac{2}{3}c_{5}(G-X)+\\frac{1}{3}c_{7}(G-X)\\leq \\frac{2}{3}|X|$ for all $X\\subseteq V(G)$, then $G$ has a $\\{P_{2},P_{9}\\}$-factor.

  6. Multiple Factors Involved in the Pathogenesis of White Matter Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Dilong; Lan, Linfang

    2017-01-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs), also known as leukoaraiosis (LA) or white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), are characterized mainly by hyperintensities on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. With the aging of the population and the development of imaging technology, the morbidity and diagnostic rates of WMLs are increasing annually. WMLs are not a benign process. They clinically manifest as cognitive decline and the subsequent development of dementia. Although WMLs are important, their pathogenesis is still unclear. This review elaborates on the advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of WMLs, focusing on anatomy, cerebral blood flow autoregulation, venous collagenosis, blood brain barrier disruption, and genetic factors. In particular, the attribution of WMLs to chronic ischemia secondary to venous collagenosis and cerebral blood flow autoregulation disruption seems reasonable. With the development of gene technology, the effect of genetic factors on the pathogenesis of WMLs is gaining gradual attention. PMID:28316994

  7. Annotated bibliography of human factors applications literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCafferty, D.B.

    1984-09-30

    This bibliography was prepared as part of the Human Factors Technology Project, FY 1984, sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Safety, US Department of Energy. The project was conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with Essex Corporation as a subcontractor. The material presented here is a revision and expansion of the bibliographic material developed in FY 1982 as part of a previous Human Factors Technology Project. The previous bibliography was published September 30, 1982, as Attachment 1 to the FY 1982 Project Status Report.

  8. Vitis vinifera seeds extract for the modulation of cytosolic factors BAX-α and NF-kB involved in UVB-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis of human skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    DECEAN, HANA; FISCHER-FODOR, EVA; TATOMIR, CORINA; PERDE-SCHREPLER, MARIA; SOMFELEAN, LIDIA; BURZ, CLAUDIA; HODOR, TUDOR; ORASAN, REMUS; VIRAG, PIROSKA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The depletion of the ozone layer allows overexposure of the skin to UV radiation, which is prolonged due to the increasing life expectancy, together with inappropriate life habits contribute to the increasing incidence of cutaneous malignancies. Plant extracts with antioxidant capacities are frequently employed as a means to protect skin against ultraviolet (UV) radiations, thus preventing skin cancers. In the present study we assessed a red grape seed extract (GSE) potential capacities to reduce ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent apoptosis in a human keratinocytes cell line (HaCaT). We identified molecules and pathways modulated by the GSE through which this may exert its photoprotective effect. Methods The GSE was standardized according to its polyphenolic content and the most important biologically active compounds, such as epigallocatechin and epicatechin, catechin hydrate, procyanidin B and gallic acid were evidenced by high-performance liquid chromatography. According to the plant extract cytotoxicity on the HaCaT cell line, two concentrations were selected for testing from the non-toxic range: GSE1 (37.5 μgEqGA/ml) and GSE2 (75 μgEqGA/ml). The level of ROS was evaluated with CM-H2DCFDA assay, while apoptosis, Bax-α and NF-kβ p65 proteins with ELISA and confirmed by western-blot. Results Both concentrations of the extract decreased the level of ROS in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes (p<0.001), whereas apoptosis and Bax-α pro-apoptotic protein were only reduced by the higher concentration (GSE2). The NF-kB p65 protein level registered increasing values in time after UVB exposure of the cells, while the tested plant extract re-established its level when its smaller concentration was used (GSE1). Conclusion These results encourage further studies on this extract in order to identify other molecules and pathways through which this extract might exert its beneficial effects and also recommend

  9. Human genetic factors in tuberculosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tong, Hoang; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Thye, Thorsten; Meyer, Christian G

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major threat to human health, especially in many developing countries. Human genetic variability has been recognised to be of great relevance in host responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and in regulating both the establishment and the progression of the disease. An increasing number of candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have focused on human genetic factors contributing to susceptibility or resistance to TB. To update previous reviews on human genetic factors in TB we searched the MEDLINE database and PubMed for articles from 1 January 2014 through 31 March 2017 and reviewed the role of human genetic variability in TB. Search terms applied in various combinations were 'tuberculosis', 'human genetics', 'candidate gene studies', 'genome-wide association studies' and 'Mycobacterium tuberculosis'. Articles in English retrieved and relevant references cited in these articles were reviewed. Abstracts and reports from meetings were also included. This review provides a recent summary of associations of polymorphisms of human genes with susceptibility/resistance to TB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Factors Involved in Tactile Texture Perception through Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Takashi; Zhou, Julia

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of texture perception by robotic systems can be developed by examining human texture perception through a probe. Like texture perception through direct touch with the finger, texture perception by indirect means of a probe is multi-dimensional, comprising rough, hard, and sticky texture continua. In this study, we describe the individual subject variability in probe-mediated texture perception, and compare similarities and differences of texture perception between direct touch and indirect touch. The results show variability among subjects, as individual subjects may choose to rely on different degrees of three texture dimensions and do so at different scanning velocities. Despite this variability between scanning conditions within each subject, the subjects make consistently reliable discriminations of textures and subjective magnitude estimates along texture continua when indirectly exploring texture surfaces with a probe. These data contribute information that is valuable to the design of robotic sensory systems, and to the understanding of sensory feedback, which is essential in teleoperations. PMID:19617927

  11. Psychological factors involved in prurigo nodularis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Carla; Erma, Daniela; Piccinno, Roberta; Veraldi, Stefano; Caccialanza, Massimo

    2011-08-01

    Emotional stresses and psychological disorders seem to be concurrent factors in some cases of prurigo nodularis (PN), a chronic skin condition with a difficult therapeutic approach. In order to improve the therapeutic strategies, we performed a psychometric study on 20 patients affected by generalized and histological proven PN. Specific questionnaires were employed to examine the hypotheses (General Health Questionnaire, State Trait Anxiety Inventory - form Y, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire). The results show that symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with PN are more severe than in the control group and that some specific traits of personality are more frequently represented in such subjects. The results of our study represent a first attempt to analyze the psychological problems and the personality dimensions which seem to characterize PN patients. Such evidence supports the importance of a psychological approach in the clinical management of PN, which should always include psychological assessment and treatment together with the other therapeutic options.

  12. Underlying causal factors associated with construction worker fatalities involving stepladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneurin Thomas James Grant

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stepladders are frequently utilized on construction projects as a means of access to elevation. Stepladder heights commonly range from 4 feet (1.2 m to 14 feet (4.3 m. Since these heights are not extreme, there is a common misperception that stepladder use presents a low risk. On the contrary, extreme care must be exercised to ensure that work on stepladders is performed safely, as described in the conspicuously located recommendations and brightly-colored warnings that adorn virtually all newly-purchased equipment. Despite this, accidents involving stepladders occur on a regular basis.  This study was conducted to better understand the underlying causes of these accidents. The narrative descriptions of 180 stepladder-related fatalities were obtained from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and were analyzed to identify the at-risk behaviors that preceded the fatality incidents. The results showed that most of the incidents should have been anticipated and could have been avoided. Unsafe practices such as improper lockout-tagout of electrical equipment, loss of balance, working on a folded stepladder, over-reaching, straddling the ladder, “walking” the ladder, poor footing, and unstable/shifting ladders, among others were identified. Virtually all of these fatalities could have been avoided by adhering to the guidelines posted on the stepladders and by complying with basic safe construction practices.

  13. Underlying causal factors associated with construction worker fatalities involving stepladders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneurin Thomas James Grant

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stepladders are frequently utilized on construction projects as a means of access to elevation. Stepladder heights commonly range from 4 feet (1.2 m to 14 feet (4.3 m. Since these heights are not extreme, there is a common misperception that stepladder use presents a low risk. On the contrary, extreme care must be exercised to ensure that work on stepladders is performed safely, as described in the conspicuously located recommendations and brightly-colored warnings that adorn virtually all newly-purchased equipment. Despite this, accidents involving stepladders occur on a regular basis.  This study was conducted to better understand the underlying causes of these accidents. The narrative descriptions of 180 stepladder-related fatalities were obtained from the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and were analyzed to identify the at-risk behaviors that preceded the fatality incidents. The results showed that most of the incidents should have been anticipated and could have been avoided. Unsafe practices such as improper lockout-tagout of electrical equipment, loss of balance, working on a folded stepladder, over-reaching, straddling the ladder, “walking” the ladder, poor footing, and unstable/shifting ladders, among others were identified. Virtually all of these fatalities could have been avoided by adhering to the guidelines posted on the stepladders and by complying with basic safe construction practices. 

  14. Runway Incursion: Human Factors In Runway Incursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    R. S., & Harbeson, M. M. (1981). Effects of Extended Practice on Dual-Task Tracking Performance. Human Factors, 23(5), 627- 631. David , H. (1997...investigated, and test results obtained from the installation at Long Beach airport. Edwards, V., Daskalakis, A. C., Oswald, L. J., Brading , J

  15. Environmental Health Research Involving Human Subjects: Ethical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Resnik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the ethical issues that arise in environmental health research with human subjects, such as minimizing risks to subjects, balancing benefits and risks in research, intentional exposure studies with human subjects, protecting third parties in research, informing subjects about environmental hazards, communicating health information to subjects, and protecting privacy and confidentiality.

  16. INVOLVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim ULUSU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “Involvement” is based on social psychology and specially attitude and attitude change subjects in the area of persuasive communication. The conceptualization of the “involvement” as a phe- nomenon was started to construct especially during the years between 1965-1980 when “involvement” was discussed in many areas of social sciences related to human behavior such as marketing, consumer behavior and advertising with its different dimensions.

  17. INVOLVEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    ULUSU, Yeşim

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “Involvement” is based on social psychology and specially attitude and attitude change subjects in the area of persuasive communication. The conceptualization of the “involvement” as a phe- nomenon was started to construct especially during the years between 1965-1980 when “involvement” was discussed in many areas of social sciences related to human behavior such as marketing, consumer behavior and advertising with its different dimensions.

  18. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  19. Nerve growth factor involvement in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To define NGF (nerve growth factor) and its highaffinity receptor trkANGF presence and distribution in fibrotic liver and in HCC, and to verify if NGF might have a role in fibrosis and HCC.METHODS: Intracellular distribution of NGF and trkANGF were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy in liver specimens from HCC,cirrhosis or both. ELISA was used to measure circulating NGF levels.RESULTS: NGF and trkANGF were highly expressed in HCC tissue, mainly localized in hepatocytes, endothelial and some Kupffer cells. In the cirrhotic part of the liver they were also markedly expressed in bile ducts epithelial and spindle-shaped cells. Surprisingly, in cirrhotic tissue from patients without HCC, both NGF and trkANGF were negative. NGF serum levels in cirrhotic and/or HCC patient were up to 25-fold higher than in controls.CONCLUSION: NGF was only detected in liver tissue with HCC present. Intracellular distribution suggests paracrine and autocrine mechanisms of action. Better definition of mechanisms may allow for therapeutic and diagnostic/prognostic use of NGF.

  20. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... knowledge that subjects may be involved within the period of support, but definite plans would not...

  1. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... agencies with the knowledge that subjects may be involved within the period of support, but definite...

  2. Human Factors Principles in Information Dashboard Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques V.; St. Germain, Shawn

    2016-06-01

    When planning for control room upgrades, nuclear power plants have to deal with a multitude of engineering and operational impacts. This will inevitably include several human factors considerations, including physical ergonomics of workstations, viewing angles, lighting, seating, new communication requirements, and new concepts of operation. In helping nuclear power utilities to deal with these challenges, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed effective methods to manage the various phases of the upgrade life cycle. These methods focus on integrating human factors engineering processes with the plant’s systems engineering process, a large part of which is the development of end-state concepts for control room modernization. Such an end-state concept is a description of a set of required conditions that define the achievement of the plant’s objectives for the upgrade. Typically, the end-state concept describes the transition of a conventional control room, over time, to a facility that employs advanced digital automation technologies in a way that significantly improves system reliability, reduces human and control room-related hazards, reduces system and component obsolescence, and significantly improves operator performance. To make the various upgrade phases as concrete and as visible as possible, an end-state concept would include a set of visual representations of the control room before and after various upgrade phases to provide the context and a framework within which to consider the various options in the upgrade. This includes the various control systems, human-system interfaces to be replaced, and possible changes to operator workstations. This paper describes how this framework helps to ensure an integrated and cohesive outcome that is consistent with human factors engineering principles and also provide substantial improvement in operator performance. The paper further describes the application of this integrated approach in the

  3. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 225.118 Section 225.118 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 225.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  4. 15 CFR 27.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 27.118 Section 27.118 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 27.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  5. 28 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  6. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects... plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  7. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human...

  8. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for...

  9. Human factors for the Moon: the gap in anthropometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lia Schlacht, Irene; Foing, Bernard H.; Rittweger, Joern; Masali, Melchiorre; Stevenin, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Since the space era began, we learned first to survive and then to live in space. In the state of the art, we know how important human factors research and development is to guarantee maximum safety and performance for human missions. With the extension of the duration of space missions, we also need to learn how habitability and comfort factors are closely related to safety and performance. Humanities disciplines such as design, architecture, anthropometry, and anthropology are now involved in mission design from the start. Actual plans for building a simulated Moon village in order to simulate and test Moon missions are now being carried out using a holistic approach, involving multidisciplinary experts cooperating concurrently with regard to the interactions among humans, technology, and the environment. However, in order to implement such plans, we need basic anthropometrical data, which is still missing. In other words: to optimize performance, we need to create doors and ceilings with dimensions that support a natural human movement in the reduced gravity environment of the Moon, but we are lacking detailed anthropometrical data on human movement on the Moon. In the Apollo missions more than 50 years ago, no anthropometrical studies were carried in hypogravity out as far as we know. The necessity to collect data is very consistent with state-of-the-art research. We still have little knowledge of how people will interact with the Moon environment. Specifically, it is not known exactly which posture, which kind of walking and running motions astronauts will use both inside and outside a Moon station. Considering recent plans for a Moon mission where humans will spend extensive time in reduced gravity conditions, the need for anthropometric, biomechanics and kinematics field data is a priority in order to be able to design the right architecture, infrastructure, and interfaces. Objective of this paper: Bring knowledge on the relevance of anthropometrical and

  10. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Group E and Its Involvement in Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Le Dantec

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retrovirus group E (HERV-E elements are stably integrated into the human genome, transmitted vertically in a Mendelian manner, and are endowed with transcriptional activity as alternative promoters or enhancers. Such effects are under the control of the proviral long terminal repeats (LTR that are organized into three HERV-E phylogenetic subgroups, namely LTR2, LTR2B, and LTR2C. Moreover, HERV-E expression is tissue-specific, and silenced by epigenetic constraints that may be disrupted in cancer, autoimmunity, and human placentation. Interest in HERV-E with regard to these conditions has been stimulated further by concerns regarding the capacity of HERV-E elements to modify the expression of neighboring genes and/or to produce retroviral proteins, including immunosuppressive env peptides, which in turn may induce (auto-antibody (Ab production. Finally, better understanding of HERV-E elements may have clinical applications for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy.

  11. Effect of platelet lysate on human cells involved in different phases of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Maria Chiara; Chiara Barsotti, Maria; Losi, Paola; Briganti, Enrica; Sanguinetti, Elena; Magera, Angela; Al Kayal, Tamer; Feriani, Roberto; Di Stefano, Rossella; Soldani, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are rich in mediators able to positively affect cell activity in wound healing. Aim of this study was to characterize the effect of different concentrations of human pooled allogeneic platelet lysate on human cells involved in the different phases of wound healing (inflammatory phase, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix secretion and epithelialization). Platelet lysate effect was studied on endothelial cells, monocytes, fibroblasts and keratinocytes, in terms of viability and proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, tissue repair pathway activation (ERK1/2) and inflammatory response evaluation (NFκB). Results were compared both with basal medium and with a positive control containing serum and growth factors. Platelet lysate induced viability and proliferation at the highest concentrations tested (10% and 20% v/v). Whereas both platelet lysate concentrations increased cell migration, only 20% platelet lysate was able to significantly promote angiogenic activity (pwound healing.

  12. The development of human factors technologies -The development of human factors experimental evaluation techniques-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Bong Sik; Oh, In Suk; Cha, Kyung Hoh; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    In this year, we studied the followings: (1) Development of operator mental workload evaluation techniques, (2) Development of a prototype for preliminary human factors experiment, (3) Suitability test of information display on a large scale display panel, (4) Development of guidelines for VDU-based control room design, (5) Development of integrated test facility (ITF). (6) Establishment of an eye tracking system, and we got the following results: (1) Mental workload evaluation techniques for MMI evaluation, (2) PROTOPEX (PROTOtype for preliminary human factors experiment) for preliminary human factors experiments, (3) Usage methods of APTEA (Analysis-Prototyping-Training-Experiment-Analysis) experiment design, (4) Design guidelines for human factors verification, (5) Detail design requirements and development plan of ITF, (6) Eye movement measurement system. 38 figs, 20 tabs, 54 refs. (Author).

  13. Human factors in aircraft maintenance and inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, William T.

    1992-01-01

    The events which have led to the intensive study of aircraft structural problems have contributed in no less measure to the study of human factors which influence aircraft maintenance and inspection. Initial research emphasis on aging aircraft maintenance and inspection has since broadened to include all aircraft types. Technicians must be equally adept at repairing old and new aircraft. Their skills must include the ability to repair sheet metal and composite materials; control cable and fly-by-wire systems; round dials and glass cockpits. Their work performance is heavily influenced by others such as designers, technical writers, job card authors, schedulers, and trainers. This paper describes the activities concerning aircraft and maintenance human factors.

  14. Canadian Ranger Rifle: Human Factors Requirements Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    nation building through programs such as the Junior Canadian Rangers ( JCR )6. Other tasks of the CR include providing local expertise, guidance, and...Requirements FN Fabrique Nationale HF Human Factors HSI Humansystems® Incorporated JCR Junior Canadian Rangers MOTS Military off the Shelf NATO...support the Junior Canadian Rangers ( JCR ) Program, which helps to achieve national and territorial goals through nation building. DEFICIENCY

  15. HSE management excellence: a Human Factors approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Theobald

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Present work discusses the integration of Human Factors in Health, Safety and Enviroment(HSE Management System allowing it as a way of checking the progress obtained, therebyminimizing the efforts and maximizing the result. A bibliographical research was carried outon the theoretical elements of the theme. As a result of this work, a proposal “conceptualstructure” for the integration of “Humais Factors” with the HSE management system ofAssociation of Oil & Gas Produces was presented.

  16. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    AA NUREG -0711,Rev. 2 Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model 20081009191 I i m To] Bi U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of...Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG -series publications and other NRC records at NRC’s Public Electronic Reading Room at...http://www.nrc.qov/readinq-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG -series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant

  17. Addressing Human Factors Gaps in Cyber Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    network attack graphs. Paper presented at the IEEE Workshop on Visualization for Computer Security , Minneapolis, MN. Roberts, J.C. (2007). State of...Cyber security is a high-ranking national priority that is only likely to grow as we become more dependent on cyber systems. From a research perspective...Cyber security , cyber operations, human factors 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 5 19a

  18. Principles for ethical research involving humans: ethical professional practice in impact assessment Part I

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanclay, Frank; Baines, James T; Taylor, C. Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    ... methods textbooks, this paper identifies current principles for ethical research involving humans and discusses their implications for impact assessment practice generally and social impact assessment specifically...

  19. Building Social, Human, and Cultural Capital through Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Lars G.; Lewis, Wayne D.; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Donkor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between schools and society in the United States and uses human, social, and cultural capital theories to reframe the discussion of the role of schools in nurturing parent engagement. We argue that the ramifications of parent engagement in schools transcend functionalist ideas of complying with state and…

  20. Molecular Genetic Approaches to Human Diseases Involving Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, Samuel A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques provide new approaches to the diagnosis and analysis of inherited human diseases associated with mental retardation, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, phenylketonauria, the Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, and those associated with deletions or duplications of subchromosomal regions. (Author/CL)

  1. Predicting involvement in prison gang activity: street gang membership, social and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jane L; Alleyne, Emma; Mozova, Katarina; James, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether street gang membership, psychological factors, and social factors such as preprison experiences could predict young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Data were collected via individual interviews with 188 young offenders held in a Young Offenders Institution in the United Kingdom. Results showed that psychological factors such as the value individuals attached to social status, a social dominance orientation, and antiauthority attitudes were important in predicting young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Further important predictors included preimprisonment events such as levels of threat, levels of individual delinquency, and levels of involvement in group crime. Longer current sentences also predicted involvement in prison gang activity. However, street gang membership was not an important predictor of involvement in prison gang activity. These findings have implications for identifying prisoners involved in prison gang activity and for considering the role of psychological factors and group processes in gang research.

  2. Human factors for a sustainable future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Andrew; Yeow, Paul H P

    2016-11-01

    Current human activities are seriously eroding the ability of natural and social systems to cope. Clearly we cannot continue along our current path without seriously damaging our own ability to survive as a species. This problem is usually framed as one of sustainability. As concerned professionals, citizens, and humans there is a strong collective will to address what we see as a failure to protect the natural and social environments that supports us. While acknowledging that we cannot do this alone, human factors and ergonomics needs to apply its relevant skills and knowledge to assist where it can in addressing the commonly identified problem areas. These problems include pollution, climate change, renewable energy, land transformation, and social unrest amongst numerous other emerging global problems. The issue of sustainability raises two fundamental questions for human factors and ergonomics: which system requires sustaining and what length of time is considered sustainable? In this paper we apply Wilson (2014) parent-sibling-child model to understanding what is required of an HFE sustainability response. This model is used to frame the papers that appear in this Special Issue.

  3. Space Station crew safety - Human factors model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. M.; Junge, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the various human factors issues and interactions that might affect crew safety is developed. The first step addressed systematically the central question: How is this Space Station different from all other spacecraft? A wide range of possible issue was identified and researched. Five major topics of human factors issues that interacted with crew safety resulted: Protocols, Critical Habitability, Work Related Issues, Crew Incapacitation and Personal Choice. Second, an interaction model was developed that would show some degree of cause and effect between objective environmental or operational conditions and the creation of potential safety hazards. The intermediary steps between these two extremes of causality were the effects on human performance and the results of degraded performance. The model contains three milestones: stressor, human performance (degraded) and safety hazard threshold. Between these milestones are two countermeasure intervention points. The first opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against stress. If this countermeasure fails, performance degrades. The second opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against error. If this second countermeasure fails, the threshold of a potential safety hazard may be crossed.

  4. SOX7 is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Shu-Yan Huang; Jing-Xin Feng; Yan-Yan Gao; Li Zhao; Jun Lu; Bai-Qu Huang; Yu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To confirm the role of sex-determining region Y-box 7 (Sox7) in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of COX-independent human colorectal cancer cells.METHODS: The cell survival percentage was examined by MTT (Moto-nuclear cell direc cytotoxicity) assay.SOX7 expression was assessed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. SB203580 was used to inhibit the p38MAPK signal pathway. SOX7 promoter activity was detected by Luciferase reporter assay.RESULTS: SOX7 was upregulated by aspirin and was involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of SW480 human colorectal cancer cells. The p38MAPK pathway played a role in aspirin-induced SOX7 expression, during which the AP1 transcription factors c-Jun and c-Fos upregulated SOX7 promoter activities.RESULTS: SOX7 is upregulated by aspirin and is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer SW480 cells.

  5. 78 FR 10538 - Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 26 RIN 2070-AJ76 Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides... human subjects and to persons who submit the results of human research with pesticides to EPA. The amendments broaden the applicability of the rules to cover human testing with pesticides submitted to EPA...

  6. Human epidermal growth factor and the proliferation of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, G; Cohen, S

    1976-06-01

    The effect of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), a 5,400 molecular weight polypeptide isolated from human urine, on the growth of human foreskin fibroblasts (HF cells) was studied by measuring cell numbers and the incorporation of labeled thymidine. The addition of hEGF to HF cells growing in a medium containing 10% calf serum resulted in a 4-fold increase in the final density. The presence of hEGF also promoted the growth of HF cells in media containing either 1% calf serum or 10% gamma globulin-free serum. The addition of hEGF to quiescent confluent monolayers of HF cells, maintained in a medium with 1% calf serum for 48 hours, resulted in a 10- to 20-fold increase in the amount of 3H-thymidine incorporation after 20-24 hours. The stimulation of thymidine incorporation was maximal at an hEGF concentration of 2 ng/ml, was dependent on the presence of serum, and was enhanced by the addition of ascorbic acid. In confluent cultures of HF cells, subject to density dependent inhibition of growth, hEGF was able to stimulate DNA synthesis more effectively than fresh calf serum. Human EGF stimulated DNA synthesis in quiescent cultures, however, regardless of cell density. The addition of rabbit anti-hEGF inhibited all effects of this growth factor on HF cells.

  7. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  8. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  9. Human reliability, error, and human factors in power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Dhillon, B S

    2014-01-01

    Human reliability, error, and human factors in the area of power generation have been receiving increasing attention in recent years. Each year billions of dollars are spent in the area of power generation to design, construct/manufacture, operate, and maintain various types of power systems around the globe, and such systems often fail due to human error. This book compiles various recent results and data into one volume, and eliminates the need to consult many diverse sources to obtain vital information.  It enables potential readers to delve deeper into a specific area, providing the source of most of the material presented in references at the end of each chapter. Examples along with solutions are also provided at appropriate places, and there are numerous problems for testing the reader’s comprehension.  Chapters cover a broad range of topics, including general methods for performing human reliability and error analysis in power plants, specific human reliability analysis methods for nuclear power pl...

  10. Adiponectin stimulates Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression through epigenetic regulations involving the transcription factor specificity protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lam, Janice B B; Chow, Kim H M; Xu, Aimin; Lam, Karen S L; Moon, Randall T; Wang, Yu

    2008-11-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine possessing growth inhibitory activities against various types of cancer cells. Our previous results demonstrated that ADN could impede Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells [Wang,Y. et al. (2006) Adiponectin modulates the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway and attenuates mammary tumorigenesis of MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Cancer Res., 66, 11462-11470]. Here, we extended our studies to elucidate the effects of ADN on regulating the expressions of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1), a Wnt antagonist frequently silenced in human breast tumors. Our results showed that ADN time dependently stimulated WIF1 gene and protein expressions in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression of WIF1 exerted similar inhibitory effects to those of ADN on cell proliferations, nuclear beta-catenin activities, cyclin D1 expressions and serum-induced phosphorylations of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta. Blockage of WIF1 activities significantly attenuated the suppressive effects of ADN on MDA-MB-231 cell growth. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that both supplementation of recombinant ADN and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of this adipokine substantially enhanced WIF1 expressions in MDA-MB-231 tumors implanted in nude mice. More interestingly, we found that ADN could alleviate methylation of CpG islands located within the proximal promoter region of WIF1, possibly involving the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor and its downstream target DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Upon ADN treatment, the protein levels of both Sp1 and DNMT1 were significantly decreased. Using silencing RNA approaches, we confirmed that downregulation of Sp1 resulted in an increased expression of WIF1 and decreased methylation of WIF1 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that ADN might elicit its antitumor activities at least partially through promoting WIF1 expressions.

  11. Human factors engineering program review model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  12. Pedigree models for complex human traits involving the mitochrondrial genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schork, N.J.; Guo, S.W. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Recent biochemical and molecular-genetic discoveries concerning variations in human mtDNA have suggested a role for mtDNA mutations in a number of human traits and disorders. Although the importance of these discoveries cannot be emphasized enough, the complex natures of mitochondrial biogenesis, mutant mtDNA phenotype expression, and the maternal inheritance pattern exhibited by mtDNA transmission make it difficult to develop models that can be used routinely in pedigree analyses to quantify and test hypotheses about the role of mtDNA in the expression of a trait. In the present paper, the authors describe complexities inherent in mitochondrial biogenesis and genetic transmission and show how these complexities can be incorporated into appropriate mathematical models. The authors offer a variety of likelihood-based models which account for the complexities discussed. The derivation of the models is meant to stimulate the construction of statistical tests for putative mtDNA contribution to a trait. Results of simulation studies which make use of the proposed models are described. The results of the simulation studies suggest that, although pedigree models of mtDNA effects can be reliable, success in mapping chromosomal determinants of a trait does not preclude the possibility that mtDNA determinants exist for the trait as well. Shortcomings inherent in the proposed models are described in an effort to expose areas in need of additional research. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Li-Hong [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Ma, Qin [Department of Oncology, The General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Shi, Ye-Hui [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Li, Shu-Fen [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Tong, Zhong-Sheng, E-mail: 83352162@qq.com [Medical Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  14. Epo is involved in angiogenesis in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Beatrice; Annese, Tiziana; Guidolin, Diego; Finato, Nicoletta; Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the extent of angiogenesis, evaluated as microvascular density, and the immunoreactivity of tumor cells to erythropoietin (Epo) and of endothelial cells to Epo receptor (EpoR) have been correlated in human glioma specimens, and the effect of anti-Epo antibody on glioma-induced angiogenesis in vivo in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has been investigated. Results show that: (1) Epo/EpoR expression correlates with angiogenesis, (2) in the CAM assay, tumor bioptic specimens induce a strong angiogenic response, comparable to that induced by VEGF, and (3) an anti-Epo antibody co-administered with tumor bioptic specimens significantly inhibits the angiogenic response. These findings suggest the presence of a loop in the Epo/EpoR system, i.e. Epo is secreted by glioma tumor cells and it affects glioma vascular endothelial cells via its receptor and promotes angiogenesis in a paracrine manner. Moreover, as demonstrated by in vivo experiments, Epo is responsible for the strong angiogenic response induced by human glioma bioptic specimens, because an anti-Epo antibody is able to significantly inhibit this response.

  15. Architecture of human translation initiation factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol-Audi, Jordi; Sun, Chaomin; Vogan, Jacob M; Smith, M Duane; Gu, Yu; Cate, Jamie H D; Nogales, Eva

    2013-06-04

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) plays a central role in protein synthesis by organizing the formation of the 43S preinitiation complex. Using genetic tag visualization by electron microscopy, we reveal the molecular organization of ten human eIF3 subunits, including an octameric core. The structure of eIF3 bears a close resemblance to that of the proteasome lid, with a conserved spatial organization of eight core subunits containing PCI and MPN domains that coordinate functional interactions in both complexes. We further show that eIF3 subunits a and c interact with initiation factors eIF1 and eIF1A, which control the stringency of start codon selection. Finally, we find that subunit j, which modulates messenger RNA interactions with the small ribosomal subunit, makes multiple independent interactions with the eIF3 octameric core. These results highlight the conserved architecture of eIF3 and how it scaffolds key factors that control translation initiation in higher eukaryotes, including humans.

  16. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement...

  17. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  18. Epidermal growth factor (urogastrone) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Y; Orth, D N

    1979-04-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), which stimulates the growth of a variety of tissues, was first isolated from mouse submandibular glands, but is also excreted in large amounts (about 50 micrograms/day) in human urine and is probably identical to human beta-urogastrone (hUG), a potent inhibitor of stimulated gastric acid secretion. However, the primary tissue source of hEGF/hUG is as yet unknown. The hEGF/hUG in homogenates of human salivary glands and a wide variety of other endocrine and nonendocrine tissues was extracted by Amberlite CG-50 cation exchange chromatography and immune affinity chromatography using the immunoglobulin fraction of rabbit anti-hEGF serum covalently bound to agarose. The extracts were subjected to homologous hEGF RIA. Immunoreactive hEGF was found in extracts of adult submandibular gland, thyroid gland, duodenum, jejunum, and kidney, but not in several fetal tissues. The tissue immunoreactive hEGF was similar to standard hEGF in terms of immunoreactivity and elution from Sephadex G-50 Fine resin, but its concentrations were very low (1.3-5.5 ng/g wet tissue). Thus, it is not certain that these tissues represent the only source of the large amounts of hEGF/hUG that appear to be filtered by the kidneys each day.

  19. Humanism as a common factor in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2012-12-01

    There are many forms of psychotherapies, each distinctive in its own way. From the origins of psychotherapy, it has been suggested that psychotherapy is effective through factors that are common to all therapies. In this article, I suggest that the commonalities that are at the core of psychotherapy are related to evolved human characteristics, which include (a) making sense of the world, (b) influencing through social means, and (c) connectedness, expectation, and mastery. In this way, all psychotherapies are humanistic. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Review of EPRI Nuclear Human Factors Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanes, L.F.; O`Brien, J.F. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Human Factors Program, which is part of the EPRI Nuclear Power Group, was established in 1975. Over the years, the Program has changed emphasis based on the shifting priorities and needs of the commercial nuclear power industry. The Program has produced many important products that provide significant safety and economic benefits for EPRI member utilities. This presentation will provide a brief history of the Program and products. Current projects and products that have been released recently will be mentioned.

  1. Active stream segregation specifically involves the left human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deike, Susann; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2010-06-14

    An important aspect of auditory scene analysis is the sequential grouping of similar sounds into one "auditory stream" while keeping competing streams separate. In the present low-noise fMRI study we presented sequences of alternating high-pitch (A) and low-pitch (B) complex harmonic tones using acoustic parameters that allow the perception of either two separate streams or one alternating stream. However, the subjects were instructed to actively and continuously segregate the A from the B stream. This was controlled by the additional instruction to listen for rare level deviants only in the low-pitch stream. Compared to the control condition in which only one non-separable stream was presented the active segregation of the A from the B stream led to a selective increase of activation in the left auditory cortex (AC). Together with a similar finding from a previous study using a different acoustic cue for streaming, namely timbre, this suggests that the left auditory cortex plays a dominant role in active sequential stream segregation. However, we found cue differences within the left AC: Whereas in the posterior areas, including the planum temporale, activation increased for both acoustic cues, the anterior areas, including Heschl's gyrus, are only involved in stream segregation based on pitch.

  2. Genes involved in immortalization of human mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2001-09-27

    Breast cancer progression is characterized by inappropriate cell growth. Normal cells cease growth after a limited number of cell divisions--a process called cellular senescence-while tumor cells may acquire the ability to proliferate indefinitely (immortality). Inappropriate expression of specific oncogenes in a key cellular signaling pathway (Ras, Raf) can promote tumorigenicity in immortal cells, while causing finite lifespan cells to undergo a rapid senescence-like arrest. We have studied when in the course of transformation of cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), the response to overexpressed oncogenic Raf changes from being tumor-suppressive to tumor enhancing, and what are the molecular underpinnings of this response. Our data indicate: (1) HMEC acquire the ability to maintain growth in the presence of oncogenic Raf not simply as a consequence of overcoming senescence, but as a result of a newly discovered step in the process of immortal transformation uncovered by our lab, termed conversion. Immortal cells that have not undergone conversion (e.g., cells immortalized by exogenous introduction of the immortalizing enzyme, telomerase) remain growth inhibited. (2) Finite lifespan HMEC growth arrest in response to oncogenic Raf using mediators of growth inhibition that are very different from those used in response to oncogenic Raf by rodent cells and certain other human cell types, including the connective tissue cells from the same breast tissue. While many diverse cell types appear to have in common a tumor-suppressive response to this oncogenic signal, they also have developed multiple mechanisms to elicit this response. Understanding how cancer cells acquire the crucial capacity to be immortal and to abrogate normal tumor-suppressive mechanisms may serve both to increase our understanding of breast cancer progression, and to provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. Our results indicate that normal HMEC have novel means of enforcing a Raf

  3. Multibiological life support system experiments with humans partially involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Dawei; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu

    To establish bioregenerative life support system in lunar or mars bases in the future, manned stimulation experiments including several kinds of creatures are needed to be conducted first. Gas exchange relation, element transfer and transformation principles, etc. between human beings and the multibiological system composed of plants, animals, Chlorella vulgaris and so on must be investigated in order to place different organisms with appropriate numbers and proportions. This research cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) in the Closed Integrative Cultivating System (CICS) of the Integrative Experimental Sys-tem (IES) with Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in the Plate Photo Bioreactor (PPB) of the IES. Gas exchange between testers and the IES were conducted periodically. The automotive control system of the PPB changed the illumination intensity of the photo bioreactor according to the CO2 concentration in the IES to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels by regu-lating the photosynthesis of alga. The conveyor-type cultivation method which was harvesting the biggest batch of lettuce and silkworms through the mass exchange chamber of IES every four days and transferring the smallest batch of lettuce and silkworms into the system; carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with nutrient liquid replenished into the system was implemented in the experiments. In terms of gas circulation, CO2 /O2 concentration changes in the system with trace gas contaminants (CH4 , NH3 and C2 H4 ) were measured. As to the mass transfer and transformation, element (C, H, O, N) contents, height, crown width and biomasses of lettuce in different developing stages, silkworms' bioconversion rates, alga's biomass changes, the amount and community change trends of the microorganism in different positions of the system, the quality of condensates gained under different running conditions and so on were studied. Results showed

  4. Involvement of the mitochondrial compartment in human NCL fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzini, Francesco; Gismondi, Floriana [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Tessa, Alessandra [IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris-Molecular Medicine Unit, Pisa (Italy); Tonin, Paola [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy); Carrozzo, Rosalba [IRCCS Bambino Gesu Hospital-Molecular Medicine Unit, Roma (Italy); Mole, Sara E. [MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, Molecular Medicines Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health and Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London (United Kingdom); Santorelli, Filippo M. [IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris-Molecular Medicine Unit, Pisa (Italy); Simonati, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.simonati@univr.it [Department of Neurological, Psychological, Morphological and Motor Sciences, Divisions of Neurology (Child Neurology) and Neuropathology, University of Verona Medical School, Verona (Italy)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial reticulum fragmentation occurs in human CLN1 and CLN6 fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Likewise mitochondrial shift-to periphery and decreased mitochondrial density are seen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced caspase-mediated apoptosis occurs following STS treatment in CLN1 fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders of childhood, characterized by the endo-lysosomal storage of autofluorescent material. Impaired mitochondrial function is often associated with neurodegeneration, possibly related to the apoptotic cascade. In this study we investigated the possible effects of lysosomal accumulation on the mitochondrial compartment in the fibroblasts of two NCL forms, CLN1 and CLN6. Fragmented mitochondrial reticulum was observed in all cells by using the intravital fluorescent marker Mitotracker, mainly in the perinuclear region. This was also associated with intense signal from the lysosomal markers Lysotracker and LAMP2. Likewise, mitochondria appeared to be reduced in number and shifted to the cell periphery by electron microscopy; moreover the mitochondrial markers VDCA and COX IV were reduced following quantitative Western blot analysis. Whilst there was no evidence of increased cell death under basal condition, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic nuclei following Staurosporine treatment in CLN1 cells only. In conclusion, the mitochondrial compartment is affected in NCL fibroblasts invitro, and CLN1 cells seem to be more vulnerable to the negative effects of stressed mitochondrial membrane than CLN6 cells.

  5. Functional involvement of cerebral cortex in human narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, A; Della Marca, G; Tonali, P A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Versace, V; Mennuni, G; Di Lazzaro, V

    2005-01-01

    The pathophysiology of human narcolepsy is still poorly understood. The hypoactivity of some neurotransmitter systems has been hypothesised on the basis of the canine model. To determine whether narcolepsy is associated with changes in excitability of the cerebral cortex, we assessed the excitability of the motor cortex with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 13 patients with narcolepsy and in 12 control subjects. We used several TMS paradigms that can provide information on the excitability of the motor cortex. Resting and active motor thresholds were higher in narcoleptic patients than in controls and intracortical inhibition was more pronounced in narcoleptic patients. No changes in the other evaluated measures were detected. These results are consistent with an impaired balance between excitatory and inhibitory intracortical circuits in narcolepsy that leads to cortical hypoexcitability. We hypothesise that the deficiency of the excitatory hypocretin/orexin-neurotransmitter-system in narcolepsy is reflected in changes of cortical excitability since circuits originating in the lateral hypothalamus and in the basal forebrain project widely to the neocortex, including motor cortex. This abnormal excitability of cortical networks could be the physiological correlate of excessive daytime sleepiness and it could be the substrate for allowing dissociated states of wakefulness and sleep to emerge suddenly while patients are awake, which constitute the symptoms of narcolepsy.

  6. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems: Human factors design methodology and integration plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, S. M.

    1980-06-01

    The nuclear waste retrieval system intended to be used for the removal of storage canisters (each canister containing a spent fuel rod assembly) located in an underground salt bed depository is discussed. The implementation of human factors engineering principles during the design and construction of the retrieval system facilities and equipment is reported. The methodology is structured around a basic system development effort involving preliminary development, equipment development, personnel subsystem development, and operational test and evaluation. Examples of application of the techniques in the analysis of human tasks, and equipment required in the removal of spent fuel canisters is provided. The framework for integrating human engineering with the rest of the system development effort is documented.

  7. To be involved or not: factors that influence nurses' involvement in providing treatment decisional support in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthow, Christine; Moss, Cheryle; McKinlay, Eileen; McCullough, Leslie; Wise, Debbie

    2009-02-01

    Decisional support is a multifaceted process of facilitating patients' decision making regarding treatment choices. Effective decisional support practices of nurses in relation to the use of anticancer therapies in patients with advanced disease are central to quality cancer care. A recent qualitative descriptive study (n=21) exploring the decision making practices of doctors and nurses in one tertiary cancer centre in New Zealand identified many complexities associated with nurses and their participation in decisional support. The study revealed that cancer nurses had varied opinions about the meaning and importance of their roles in treatment related decision making. This variation was significant and led the researchers to undertake a detailed secondary exploration of factors that impacted on the nurses' involvement in the provision of decisional support. Four key groups of factors were identified. These were factors relating to degree of knowledge, level of experience, beliefs and understandings about nursing roles and cancer therapies, and structural interfaces in the work setting. Understanding these factors is important because it allows modification of the conditions which impact on the ability to provide effective decisional care. It also provides some understanding of clinical drivers associated with nurses' decisional support work with patients who have advanced cancer.

  8. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R; Horvath, Anelia D; Azevedo, Monalisa F; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R; Wit, Jan M; Bernard, Daniel J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-02-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in the sections of GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia, and in normal pituitary. We identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function, in two male patients and one female with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increased IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared with a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and with normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation.

  9. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Horvath, Anelia D.; Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D.; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Wit, Jan M.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in sections from GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia and in normal pituitary. In two male patients, and in one female, with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family, we identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant, and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increase IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared to a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and to normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. PMID:25527509

  10. Identifying Human Factors Issues in Aircraft Maintenance Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinott, Elizabeth S.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Maintenance operations incidents submitted to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) between 1986-1992 were systematically analyzed in order to identify issues relevant to human factors and crew coordination. This exploratory analysis involved 95 ASRS reports which represented a wide range of maintenance incidents. The reports were coded and analyzed according to the type of error (e.g, wrong part, procedural error, non-procedural error), contributing factors (e.g., individual, within-team, cross-team, procedure, tools), result of the error (e.g., aircraft damage or not) as well as the operational impact (e.g., aircraft flown to destination, air return, delay at gate). The main findings indicate that procedural errors were most common (48.4%) and that individual and team actions contributed to the errors in more than 50% of the cases. As for operational results, most errors were either corrected after landing at the destination (51.6%) or required the flight crew to stop enroute (29.5%). Interactions among these variables are also discussed. This analysis is a first step toward developing a taxonomy of crew coordination problems in maintenance. By understanding what variables are important and how they are interrelated, we may develop intervention strategies that are better tailored to the human factor issues involved.

  11. THE EXTERNAL FACTORS OF STUDENTS’ INVOLVEMENT IN SPEAKING ACTIVITY AT SMP PROGRESIF BUMI SHALAWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Nurul Haikal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is conducted to know what factors that influence the students’ involvement in speaking activity in order to practice their speaking skill and what strategies that the teacher used to encourage those external factors. This research uses descriptive qualitative method. There are two instruments used for this research, namely, class observation and interview. Based on the results of class observation and interview, the researcher concludes that teacher factor gives the greatest impact on students’ involvement and the appropriate strategies can support those external factors.

  12. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  13. Advances in human factors and ergonomics in healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Vincent G

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent research, this book discusses how to improve quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness in patient care through the application of human factors and ergonomics principles. It provides guidance for those involved with the design and application of systems and devices for effective and safe healthcare delivery from both a patient and staff perspective. Its huge range of chapters covers everything from the proper design of bed rails to the most efficient design of operating rooms, from the development of quality products to the rating of staff patient interaction. It considers

  14. Human factors quantification via boundary identification of flight performance margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Changpeng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A systematic methodology including a computational pilot model and a pattern recognition method is presented to identify the boundary of the flight performance margin for quantifying the human factors. The pilot model is proposed to correlate a set of quantitative human factors which represent the attributes and characteristics of a group of pilots. Three information processing components which are influenced by human factors are modeled: information perception, decision making, and action execution. By treating the human factors as stochastic variables that follow appropriate probability density functions, the effects of human factors on flight performance can be investigated through Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Kernel density estimation algorithm is selected to find and rank the influential human factors. Subsequently, human factors are quantified through identifying the boundary of the flight performance margin by the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN classifier. Simulation-based analysis shows that flight performance can be dramatically improved with the quantitative human factors.

  15. Generalized Identities Involving Common Factors of Generalized Fibonacci, Jacobsthal and Jacobsthal-Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant K. Panwar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present generalized identities involving common factors of generalized Fibonacci, Jacobsthal and jacobsthal-Lucas numbers. Binet’s formula will employ to obtain the identities.

  16. Effect of platelet lysate on human cells involved in different phases of wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Barsotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are rich in mediators able to positively affect cell activity in wound healing. Aim of this study was to characterize the effect of different concentrations of human pooled allogeneic platelet lysate on human cells involved in the different phases of wound healing (inflammatory phase, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix secretion and epithelialization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Platelet lysate effect was studied on endothelial cells, monocytes, fibroblasts and keratinocytes, in terms of viability and proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, tissue repair pathway activation (ERK1/2 and inflammatory response evaluation (NFκB. Results were compared both with basal medium and with a positive control containing serum and growth factors. Platelet lysate induced viability and proliferation at the highest concentrations tested (10% and 20% v/v. Whereas both platelet lysate concentrations increased cell migration, only 20% platelet lysate was able to significantly promote angiogenic activity (p<0.05 vs. control, comparably to the positive control. Both platelet lysate concentrations activated important inflammatory pathways such as ERK1/2 and NFκB with the same early kinetics, whereas the effect was different for later time-points. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest the possibility of using allogeneic platelet lysate as both an alternative to growth factors commonly used for cell culture and as a tool for clinical regenerative application for wound healing.

  17. School, Neighborhood, and Family Factors Are Associated with Children's Bullying Involvement: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Lucy; Arseneault, Louise; Maughan, Barbara; Taylor, Alan; Caspi, Ashalom; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2009-01-01

    School size and problems with neighbors is associated with a greater risk of being a bullying victim while family factors such as maltreatment and domestic violence are associated with involvement in bullying. The findings are based on the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study that involves 2,232 children.

  18. Perceptions of Risk Factors for Female Gang Involvement among African American and Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Barnes, Chanequa J.; Mason, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    Female minority students at an urban alternative high school completed interviews regarding perceptions of risk factors for female gang involvement. Peer pressure was the largest influence on female gang involvement. Respondents believed girls might turn to gangs for protection from neighborhood crime, abusive families, and other gangs. Lack of…

  19. Factors involved in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders - a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHISNOIU, ANDREA MARIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; POPA, SEVER; CHISNOIU, PETRE DANIEL; LASCU, LIANA; PICOS, ANDREI; CHISNOIU, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim This review aims at presenting a current view on the most frequent factors involved in the mechanisms causing temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Method We conducted a critical review of the literature for the period January 2000 to December 2014 to identify factors related to TMD development and persistence. Results The etiology of TMD is multidimensional: biomechanical, neuromuscular, bio-psychosocial and biological factors may contribute to the disorder. Occlusal overloading and parafunctions (bruxism) are frequently involved as biomechanical factors; increased levels of estrogen hormones are considered biological factors affecting the temporo-mandibular-joint. Among bio-psychosocial factors, stress, anxiety or depression, were frequently encountered. Conclusions The etiopathogenesis of this condition is poorly understood, therefore TMDs are difficult to diagnose and manage. Early and correct identification of the possible etiologic factors will enable the appropriate treatment scheme application in order to reduce or eliminate TMDs debilitating signs and symptoms. PMID:26732121

  20. RecQL4 helicase amplification is involved in human breast tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Fang

    Full Text Available Breast cancer occur both in hereditary and sporadic forms, and the later one comprises an overwhelming majority of breast cancer cases among women. Numerical and structural alterations involving chromosome 8, with loss of short arm (8p and gain of long arm (8q, are frequently observed in breast cancer cells and tissues. In this study, we show that most of the human breast tumor cell lines examined display an over representation of 8q24, a chromosomal locus RecQL4 is regionally mapped to, and consequently, a markedly elevated level of RecQL4 expression. An increased RecQL4 mRNA level was also observed in a majority of clinical breast tumor samples (38/43 examined. shRNA-mediated RecQL4 suppression in MDA-MB453 breast cancer cells not only significantly inhibit the in vitro clonogenic survival and in vivo tumorigenicity. Further studies demonstrate that RecQL4 physically interacts with a major survival factor-survivin and its protein level affects survivin expression. Although loss of RecQL4 function due to gene mutations causally linked to occurrence of human RTS with features of premature aging and cancer predisposition, our studies provide the evidence that overexpression of RecQL4 due to gene amplification play a critical role in human breast tumor progression.

  1. Connectivity analysis of suggestive brain areas involved in middle ear pressure regulation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SA, Sami; Gaihede, Michael

    2010-01-01

    , MEP counter-regulation presented as Eustachian tube openings with steep and fast pressure changes toward 0 Pa, whereas in others, gradual and slow pressure changes presented related to the mastoid; these changes sometimes crossed 0 Pa into opposite pressures. In many cases, combinations......HYPOTHESIS:: Middle ear pressure (MEP) is actively regulated by both the Eustachian tube and the mastoid air cell system. BACKGROUND:: MEP is a highly significant factor involved in many clinical conditions related to otitis media. Basic knowledge on its overall regulation remains insufficient...... of these distinct mechanisms were found. CONCLUSION:: The human mastoid as well as the Eustachian tube was capable of active counter-regulation of the MEP in short-term experimental pressure changes in healthy ears. Thus, these 2 systems seemed to function in a complementary way, where the mastoid was related...

  2. Humanism Factors and Islam Viewpoint from Motahri's Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Zargham; Yousefy, Alireza; Keshtiaray, Narges

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to criticize liberal humanism based on Islam viewpoint emphasizing Motahri's point of view. In this paper, the researchers tried to identify liberalism humanism factors with analytical look in order to present a new categorization called "main factor of liberal humanism". Then, each factor was studied and…

  3. Humanism Factors and Islam Viewpoint from Motahri's Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Zargham; Yousefy, Alireza; Keshtiaray, Narges

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to criticize liberal humanism based on Islam viewpoint emphasizing Motahri's point of view. In this paper, the researchers tried to identify liberalism humanism factors with analytical look in order to present a new categorization called "main factor of liberal humanism". Then, each factor was studied and…

  4. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-. alpha. in human milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Masaki; Wakai, Kae; Shizume, Kazuo (Research Institute for Growth Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)); Iwashita, Mitsutoshi (Tokyo Women' s Medical College (Japan)); Ohmura, Eiji; Kamiya, Yoshinobu; Murakami, Hitomi; Onoda, Noritaka; Tsushima, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{alpha} and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were measured in human milk by means of homologous radioimmunoassay. As previously reported, EGF concentration in the colostrum was approximately 200 ng/ml and decreased to 50 ng/ml by day 7 postpartum. The value of immunoreactive (IR)-TGF-{alpha} was 2.2-7.2 ng/ml, much lower than that of EGF. In contrast to EGF, the concentration of IR-TGF-{alpha} was fairly stable during the 7 postpartum days. There was no relationship between the concentrations of IR-TGF-{alpha} and IR-EGF, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism in the release of the two growth factors is different. On gel-chromatography using a Sephadex G-50 column, IR-EGF appeared in the fraction corresponding to that of authentic human EGF, while 70%-80% of the IR-TGF-{alpha} was eluted as a species with a molecular weight greater than that of authentic human TGF-{alpha}. Although the physiological role of TGF-{alpha} in milk is not known, it is possible that it is involved in the development of the mammary gland and/or the growth of newborn infants.

  5. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Human factors design methodology and integration plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, S.M.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the recommended activities and methods to be employed by a team of human factors engineers during the development of a nuclear waste retrieval system. This system, as it is presently conceptualized, is intended to be used for the removal of storage canisters (each canister containing a spent fuel rod assembly) located in an underground salt bed depository. This document, and the others in this series, have been developed for the purpose of implementing human factors engineering principles during the design and construction of the retrieval system facilities and equipment. The methodology presented has been structured around a basic systems development effort involving preliminary development, equipment development, personnel subsystem development, and operational test and evaluation. Within each of these phases, the recommended activities of the human engineering team have been stated, along with descriptions of the human factors engineering design techniques applicable to the specific design issues. Explicit examples of how the techniques might be used in the analysis of human tasks and equipment required in the removal of spent fuel canisters have been provided. Only those techniques having possible relevance to the design of the waste retrieval system have been reviewed. This document is intended to provide the framework for integrating human engineering with the rest of the system development effort. The activities and methodologies reviewed in this document have been discussed in the general order in which they will occur, although the time frame (the total duration of the development program in years and months) in which they should be performed has not been discussed.

  6. Factors influencing the degree and pattern of parental involvement in play therapy for sexually abused children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been written about the role of therapists in children's recovery from child sexual abuse, relatively little attention has been paid to the role of nonoffending parents. This study investigated the work of a team of therapists who sometimes included such parents in therapy sessions with children. The study sought to understand what factors were influencing the degree and pattern of parental involvement and to understand what effect these patterns of parental involvement were having on the process and outcomes of therapy. The study successfully identified a range of factors influencing the patterns of parental involvement, but more research will be needed to understand the effect on outcomes.

  7. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Human-system interfaces and procedures. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. In addition, a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists served as subject matter experts. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present report focuses on an evaluation of the human-system interfaces in relation to the treatment machines and supporting equipment (e.g., simulators, treatment planning computers, control consoles, patient charts) found in the teletherapy environment. The report also evaluates operating, maintenance and emergency procedures and practices involved in teletherapy. The evaluations are based on the function and task analysis and established human engineering guidelines, where applicable.

  8. Qualitative analysis of factors that increase and reduce involvement in gambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidijus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the rapid development of gambling business, the number of pathological gamblers is increasing as well. The problem of pathological gambling is just as important as alcoholism or drug addiction. However, there is a lack of information and research of this topicin Lithuania. The aim of work: to investigate and analyse the factors that increase or reduce involvement in gambling. Research questions: 1 What factors increase involvement in gambling? 2 What factors reduce involvement in gambling? Critical case sampling was used for selection of the participants. Subjects were required to a have experience of involvement in gambling for at least one year; b have experience of negative impact of gambling on quality of life; c have at least 6 months of gambling abstinence. Five individuals participated in the research; all of them were males who live in Vilnius. Age of the participants varied from 19 to 45. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The matic analysis of the data led to the identification of four major the matic categories: psychological factors; social relations; material well being; quality of life. There search results show that negatyve childhood experience, gambling friends, escaping from various troubles, disputes in family and high financial needs can increase involvement in gambling. Factors that reduce involvement in gambling are: feeling support of social environment, proper evaluation of financial position, awareness of one‘s own addiction to gambling and desire to change life.

  9. Human factors and ergonomics for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Paul; Jeffcott, Shelly

    2016-03-01

    In the second paper of this series, we provide a brief overview of the scientific discipline of human factors and ergonomics (HFE). Traditionally the HFE focus in healthcare has been in acute hospital settings which are perceived to exhibit characteristics more similar to other high-risk industries already applying related principles and methods. This paper argues that primary care is an area which could benefit extensively from an HFE approach, specifically in improving the performance and well-being of people and organisations. To this end, we define the purpose of HFE, outline its three specialist sub-domains (physical, cognitive and organisational HFE) and provide examples of guiding HFE principles and practices. Additionally, we describe HFE issues of significance to primary care education, improvement and research and outline early plans for building capacity and capability in this setting.

  10. Organizational crisis management: the human factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    While many professionals are quite competent when dealing with operational aspects of organizational continuity, often the "human factor" does not receive adequate attention. This article provides a brief overview of a soon to be published book by the same title. It provides a comprehensive understanding of the ubiquitous yet complex reactions of the workforce to a wide array of organizational disruptions. It goes beyond the short term intervention of debriefings to describe the more extensive pre and post incident strategies required to mitigate the impact of crises on the workforce. It is important to remember: "An organization can get its phone lines back up and have its computers backed up...but its workers may still be messed up."

  11. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazière, Cécile, E-mail: maziere.cecile@chu-amiens.fr [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France); Salle, Valéry [Internal Medicine, North Hospital University, Place Victor Pauchet, Amiens 80000 (France); INSERM U1088 (EA 4292), SFR CAP-Santé (FED 4231), University of Picardie – Jules Verne (France); Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  12. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations: Proximity? Generativity? Minority stress? Social location?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paceley, Megan S; Oswald, Ramona Faith; Hardesty, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about involvement in LGBTQ organizations. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations were examined using logistic regression and survey data from 426 LGBTQ individuals residing in a nonmetropolitan region. Involvement was examined in five types of organizations (professional, social/recreational, religious, political, and community center/charity). The same model testing proximity, generativity, minority stress, and social location hypotheses was repeated for each organization type. Results demonstrate that the generativity hypothesis is most strongly supported. Indeed, emotional attachment to the LGBTQ community significantly increased the odds of involvement in every type of organization. However, the factors associated with involvement otherwise differed by organization type. Implications for organizational leaders are discussed.

  13. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household's Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household's health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women's personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions.

  14. Human factors programs for high-level radioactive waste handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pond, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Human Factors is the discipline concerned with the acquisition of knowledge about human capabilities and limitations, and the application of such knowledge to the design of systems. This paper discusses the range of human factors issues relevant to high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) management systems and, based on examples from other organizations, presents mechanisms through which to assure application of such expertise in the safe, efficient, and effective management and disposal of high-level waste. Additionally, specific attention is directed toward consideration of who might be classified as a human factors specialist, why human factors expertise is critical to the success of the HLRW management system, and determining when human factors specialists should become involved in the design and development process.

  15. Factors involved in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders - a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    CHISNOIU, ANDREA MARIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; POPA, SEVER; CHISNOIU, PETRE DANIEL; LASCU, LIANA; PICOS, ANDREI; CHISNOIU, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim This review aims at presenting a current view on the most frequent factors involved in the mechanisms causing temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Method We conducted a critical review of the literature for the period January 2000 to December 2014 to identify factors related to TMD development and persistence. Results The etiology of TMD is multidimensional: biomechanical, neuromuscular, bio-psychosocial and biological factors may contribute to the disorder. Occlusal overload...

  16. Attribution of human characteristics and bullying involvement in childhood: Distinguishing between targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noorden, Tirza H J; Haselager, Gerbert J T; Lansu, Tessa A M; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Bukowski, William M

    2016-07-01

    This investigation researched the association between the attribution of human characteristics and bullying involvement in children by distinguishing between targets. Study 1 focused on the attribution of human characteristics by bullies, victims, bully/victims, and non-involved children toward friends and non-friends. The data from 405 children (M = 10.7 years old) showed that they attributed fewer prosocial and more antisocial human characteristics to non-friends than to friends. Moreover, boy victims attributed fewer prosocial human characteristics to non-friends than boy bullies and non-involved boys did. In addition, victims attributed more antisocial human characteristics to non-friends than non-involved children did. Study 2 addressed bullies', victims', bully/victims', and non-involved children's attribution of human characteristics to each other. The data of 264 children (M = 10.0 years old) showed that bullies, victims, and bully/victims attributed fewer prosocial and more antisocial human characteristics to each other than to non-involved children. Non-involved children attributed fewer prosocial human characteristics to bully/victims than to bullies and victims, and more antisocial human characteristics to bully/victims than to victims. In addition, girls attributed more prosocial and fewer antisocial human characteristics to girls than to boys, whereas boys did not distinguish between girls and boys. Based on these findings, suggestions for future research are provided and implications for bullying prevention and intervention are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:394-403, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Involvement of FGF and BMP family proteins and VEGF in early human kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carev, Dominko; Saraga, Marijan; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2008-07-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of the appearance of the fibroblast growth factor proteins (FGF-8 and FGF-10), the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2/4 subfamily and BMP-7) and the vascular endothelial growth factor protein (VEGF) was investigated in the human mesonephros and metanephros of the 5-9 week-old conceptuses. In the mesonephros, both FGF's and BMP's were found in all structures and their expression slightly decreased in the early fetal period. VEGF positivity appeared in all mesonephric structures, and increased in the fetal period coincidently with formation of the mesonephric blood vessel network. In the metanephros, FGF-8 first appeared only in the metanephric mesenchyme, but from the 7th week on, its reactivity increased and spread to other metanephric structures. FGF-10 positive cells appeared in all metanephric structures already in the 5th week, and slightly intensified with progression of development. Cell survival and nephrogenesis in the permanent kidney might be associated with the appearance of both growth factors. Both BMP-2/4 and BMP-7 displayed a similar pattern of reactivity in all metanephric structures, and their reactivity intensified with advancing development. Alterations in their pattern of appearance might lead to the formation of small and dysplastic kidneys. Already in the earliest developmental stages, VEGF protein appeared in all metanephric structures. At later stages, VEGF showed more intense reaction in the collecting system than in the differentiating nephrons and interstitium. Due to VEGF involvement in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, abnormal VEGF appearance might lead to impaired formation of the blood vessel network in the human permanent kidney.

  18. Dimeric ligands for GPCRs involved in human reproduction : synthesis and biological evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonger, Kimberly Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Dimeric ligands for G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in human reproduction, namely the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor, the luteinizing hormone receptor and the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, were synthesized and biologically evaluated.

  19. Risk factors for human brucellosis in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Shehada, M N; Abu-Halaweh, M

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the risk factors of human brucellosis in Jordan. A case-control study was conducted involving 56 Jordanians who had been treated for brucellosis and at least 3 matched controls for each case (n = 247). Matching was for sex, age, locality (the same village) and socioeconomic standard. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. In all, 17 risk factors were examined related to: contact with various livestock, milk and milk product consumption, drinking-water treatment and disease awareness. Most variables were associated with brucellosis in the univariate analysis but the final logistic model included only 4: milking sheep and goats (OR 3.5), consumption of raw feta cheese made from sheep and goat milk (OR 2.8) and consumption of cows' milk (OR 0.4) and boiled feta cheese (OR 0.4). Small ruminant farmers need to be trained in safer milking practices and feta cheese making procedures.

  20. TGF-beta1 regulates human brain pericyte inflammatory processes involved in neurovasculature function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Aalderink, Miranda; Scotter, Emma L; Oldfield, Robyn L; Bergin, Peter S; Mee, Edward W; Graham, E Scott; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Park, Thomas I-H; Dragunow, Mike

    2016-02-11

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) is strongly induced following brain injury and polarises microglia to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Augmentation of TGFβ1 responses may therefore be beneficial in preventing inflammation in neurological disorders including stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. However, several other cell types display immunogenic potential and identifying the effect of TGFβ1 on these cells is required to more fully understand its effects on brain inflammation. Pericytes are multifunctional cells which ensheath the brain vasculature and have garnered recent attention with respect to their immunomodulatory potential. Here, we sought to investigate the inflammatory phenotype adopted by TGFβ1-stimulated human brain pericytes. Microarray analysis was performed to examine transcriptome-wide changes in TGFβ1-stimulated pericytes, and results were validated by qRT-PCR and cytometric bead arrays. Flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and LDH/Alamar Blue® viability assays were utilised to examine phagocytic capacity of human brain pericytes, transcription factor modulation and pericyte health. TGFβ1 treatment of primary human brain pericytes induced the expression of several inflammatory-related genes (NOX4, COX2, IL6 and MMP2) and attenuated others (IL8, CX3CL1, MCP1 and VCAM1). A synergistic induction of IL-6 was seen with IL-1β/TGFβ1 treatment whilst TGFβ1 attenuated the IL-1β-induced expression of CX3CL1, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1. TGFβ1 was found to signal through SMAD2/3 transcription factors but did not modify nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) translocation. Furthermore, TGFβ1 attenuated the phagocytic ability of pericytes, possibly through downregulation of the scavenger receptors CD36, CD47 and CD68. Whilst TGFβ did decrease pericyte number, this was due to a reduction in proliferation, not apoptotic death or compromised cell viability. TGFβ1 attenuated pericyte expression of key chemokines and

  1. Clusters of Factors Identify A High Prevalence of Pregnancy Involvement Among US Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, May; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2015-08-01

    The study purpose was to use recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) to identify factors that, when clustered, are associated with a high prevalence of pregnancy involvement among US adolescent males. The National Survey of Family Growth is a nationally representative survey of individuals 15-44 years old. RPA was done for the 2002 and 2006-2010 cycles to identify factors which, when combined, identify adolescent males with the highest prevalence of pregnancy involvement. Pregnancy-involvement prevalence among adolescent males was 6 %. Two clusters of adolescent males have the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence, at 84-87 %. In RPA, the highest pregnancy-involvement prevalence (87 %) was seen in adolescent males who ever HIV tested, had >4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment of 4 lifetime sexual partners, reported less than an almost certain chance of feeling less physical pleasure with condom use, had an educational attainment ≥11th grade, were >17 years old, and had their first contraceptive education ≥10th grade, had a pregnancy-involvement prevalence of 84 %. Pregnancy-prevention efforts among adolescent males who have been involved in a pregnancy may need to target risk factors identified in clusters with the highest pregnancy prevalence to prevent subsequent pregnancies in these adolescent males and improve their future outcomes.

  2. Rapid Prototyping and the Human Factors Engineering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Rapid prototyping and the human factors • • engineering process David Beevis* and Gaetan St Denist *Senior Human Factors Engineer , Defence and...factors engineering analyses. Therefore, an investigation of the use of the V APS virtual prototyping system was carried out in five organizations. The...factors engineering (HFE) process re- commended for the development of human-machine systems is based on a series of increasin¥ly detailed analyses of

  3. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... knowledge that subjects may be involved within the period of support, but definite plans would not normally... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite...

  4. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 11.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans...

  5. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department...

  6. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  7. Analysis of factors associated with injury severity in crashes involving young New Zealand drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Harold B.; Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Young people are a risk to themselves and other road users, as motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of their death. A thorough understanding of the most important factors associated with injury severity in crashes involving young drivers is important for designing well-targeted restrictive...... measures within youth-oriented road safety programs. The current study estimates discrete choice models of injury severity of crashes involving young drivers conditional on these crashes having occurred. The analysis examined a comprehensive set of single-vehicle and two-vehicle crashes involving at least...... fit than a binary and a generalized ordered logit. Results show that the young drivers’ behavior, the presence of passengers and the involvement of vulnerable road users were the most relevant factors associated with higher injury severity in both single-vehicle and two-vehicle crashes. Seatbelt non...

  8. Global Variation of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Selected Genes Involved in Cervical Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, R S Akram; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of the cervix is ranked second among the top 5 cancers affecting women globally. Parallel to other cancers, it is also a complex disease involving numerous factors such as human papillomavirus (HPV) infection followed by the activity of oncogenes and environmental factors. The incidence rate of the disease remains high in developing countries due to lack of awareness, followed by mass screening programs, various socioeconomic issues, and low usage of preventive vaccines. Over the past 3 decades, extensive research has taken place in cervical malignancy to elucidate the role of host genes in the pathogenesis of the disease, yet it remains one of the most prevalent diseases. It is imperative that recent genome-wide techniques be used to determine whether carcinogenesis of oncogenes is associated with cervical cancer at the molecular level and to translate that knowledge into developing diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The aim of this study was to discuss HPV predominance with their genotype distribution worldwide, and in India, as well as to discuss the newly identified oncogenes related to cervical cancer in current scenario. Using data from various databases and robust technologies, oncogenes associated with cervical malignancies were identified and are explained in concise manner. Due to the advent of recent technologies, new candidate genes are explored and can be used as precise biomarkers for screening and developing drug targets. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Factors and Robotics: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, H. McIlvaine; Kearsley, Greg P.

    The principal human factors engineering issue in robotics is the division of labor between automation (robots) and human beings. This issue reflects a prime human factors engineering consideration in systems design--what equipment should do and what operators and maintainers should do. Understanding of capabilities and limitations of robots and…

  10. Information Presentation: Human Research Program - Space Human Factors and Habitability, Space Human Factors Engineering Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kristina L.; Sandor, Aniko; Thompson, Shelby G.; Kaiser, Mary K.; McCann, Robert S.; Begault, D. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Beutter, B. R.; Wenzel, E. M.; Godfroy, M.; Stone, L. S.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers atJohnson Space Center and Ames Research Center. T

  11. Molecular cloning of a human gene that is a member of the nerve growth factor family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.R.; Reichardt, L.F. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Cell death within the developing vertebrate nervous system is regulated in part by interactions between neurons and their innervation targets that are mediated by neurotrophic factors. These factors also appear to have a role in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Two neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, share substantial amino acid sequence identity. The authors have used a screen that combines polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA and low-stringency hybridization with degenerate oligonucleotides to isolate human BDNF and a human gene, neurotrophin-3, that is closely related to both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. mRNA products of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 genes were detected in the adult human brain, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the maintenance of the adult nervous system. Neurotrophin-3 is also expected to function in embryonic neural development.

  12. Previous experience in manned space flight: A survey of human factors lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandlee, George O.; Woolford, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    Previous experience in manned space flight programs can be used to compile a data base of human factors lessons learned for the purpose of developing aids in the future design of inhabited spacecraft. The objectives are to gather information available from relevant sources, to develop a taxonomy of human factors data, and to produce a data base that can be used in the future for those people involved in the design of manned spacecraft operations. A study is currently underway at the Johnson Space Center with the objective of compiling, classifying, and summarizing relevant human factors data bearing on the lessons learned from previous manned space flights. The research reported defines sources of data, methods for collection, and proposes a classification for human factors data that may be a model for other human factors disciplines.

  13. Grandmother Involvement as a Protective Factor for Early Childhood Social Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Melissa A.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Ontai, Lenna L.; Conger, Rand D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite high rates of grandmother involvement with young grandchildren, very little research has examined the associations between non-residential grandmother involvement and grandchild social adjustment. The present study draws 127 families enrolled in the Family Transitions Project to consider the degree to which mother-reported maternal grandmother involvement buffers 3- and 4-year old grandchildren from economic, parenting, and child temperamental risks for reduced social competence and elevated externalizing behaviors. Findings indicate that higher levels of mother-reported grandmother involvement reduced the negative association between observed grandchild negative emotional reactivity and social competence. Further, high levels of mother-reported grandmother involvement protected grandchildren from the positive association between observed harsh mother parenting and grandchild externalizing behaviors. These findings underscore the relevance of moving beyond the nuclear family to understand factors linked to social adjustment during early childhood. PMID:20954774

  14. Inhalation devices and patient interface: human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Stefan; Parkins, David; Lastow, Orest

    2015-03-01

    The development of any inhalation product that does not consider the patient needs will fail. The needs of the patients must be identified and aligned with engineering options and physical laws to achieve a robust and intuitive-to-use inhaler. A close interaction between development disciplines and real-use evaluations in clinical studies or in human factor studies is suggested. The same holds true when a marketed product needs to be changed. Caution is warranted if an inhaler change leads to a change in the way the patient handles the device. Finally, the article points out potential problems if many inhaler designs are available. Do they confuse the patients? Can patients recall the correct handling of each inhaler they use? How large is the risk that different inhaler designs pose to the public health? The presentations were given at the Orlando Inhalation Conference: Approaches in International Regulation co-organised by the University of Florida and the International Pharmaceutical Aerosol Consortium on Regulation & Science (IPAC-RS) in March 2014.

  15. Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R. (BNL); Xing, J.; DAgostino, A. (NRC)

    2010-11-07

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

  16. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachem, Ahmed [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Yacoub, Daniel [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Zaid, Younes [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Mourad, Walid [Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada); Centre Hospitalier Universite de Montreal, 264 boul. Rene-Levesque est, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 1P1 (Canada); Merhi, Yahye, E-mail: yahye.merhi@icm-mhi.org [Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis, Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 1C8 (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, 2900 boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  17. Temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive clinical prognostic factor in necrotising external otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeheskeli, E; Eta, R Abu; Gavriel, H; Kleid, S; Eviatar, E

    2016-05-01

    Necrotising otitis externa is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This study investigated whether temporomandibular joint involvement had any prognostic effect on the course of necrotising otitis externa in patients who had undergone hyperbaric oxygen therapy after failed medical and sometimes surgical therapy. A retrospective case series was conducted of patients in whom antibiotic treatment and surgery had failed, who had been hospitalised for further treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Twenty-three patients with necrotising otitis externa were identified. The temporomandibular joint was involved in four patients (17 per cent); these patients showed a constant gradual improvement in C-reactive protein and were eventually discharged free of disease, except one patient who was lost to follow up. Four patients (16 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement died within 90 days of discharge, while all patients with temporomandibular joint involvement were alive. Three patients (13 per cent) without temporomandibular joint involvement needed recurrent hospitalisation including further hyperbaric oxygen therapy; no patients with temporomandibular joint involvement required such treatment. Patients with temporomandibular joint involvement had lower rates of recurrent disease and no mortality. Therefore, we suggest considering temporomandibular joint involvement as a positive prognostic factor in necrotising otitis externa management.

  18. Discussing the Effective Factors on Maintenance of Human Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Bahare Shahriari

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the author has elaborated on detection of effective factors on maintenance and retention of human resources. Since human resources are the most resources for obtaining competitive advantage, it is essential to pay attention to different dimensions of human resources management. One of these dimensions is retention of human resources. Factors such as providing correct and valid information at the time of recruitment, assigning tasks based on competence, existence of a clear c...

  19. Human milk composition: nutrients and bioactive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Olivia; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2013-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the composition of human milk, its variation, and its clinical relevance. The composition of human milk is the biological norm for infant nutrition. Human milk also contains many hundreds to thousands of distinct bioactive molecules that protect against infection and inflammation and contribute to immune maturation, organ development, and healthy microbial colonization. Some of these molecules (eg, lactoferrin) are being investigated as novel therapeutic agents. Human milk changes in composition from colostrum to late lactation, within feeds, by gestational age, diurnally, and between mothers. Feeding infants with expressed human milk is increasing.

  20. socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 88 No. 8 August ... Objective: To investigate socio-cultural factors that influence male involvement in ... 59.7% of the respondents had not received formal training on home-based care. Those.

  1. Socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based care for people living with HIV and ... East African Medical Journal ... of close relatives and 59.7% of the respondents had not received formal training on home-based care.

  2. School, neighborhood, and family factors are associated with children's bullying involvement: a nationally representative longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Lucy; Arseneault, Louise; Maughan, Barbara; Taylor, Alan; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2009-05-01

    To test whether school, neighborhood, and family factors are independently associated with children's involvement in bullying, over and above their own behaviors that may increase their risk for becoming involved in bullying. We examined bullying in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative 1994-1995 birth cohort of 2,232 children. We used mother and teacher reports to identify children who experienced bullying between the ages of 5 and 7 years either as victims, bullies, or bully-victims. We collected information about school characteristics from the Department for Children, Schools and Families. We collected reports from mothers about children's neighborhood and home environments and reports from mothers and teachers about children's internalizing and externalizing problems when they were 5 years old. Multinomial logistic regressions showed that over and above other socioenvironmental factors and children's behavior problems, school size was associated with an increased risk for being a victim of bullying, problems with neighbors was associated with an increased risk for being a bully-victim, and family factors (e.g., child maltreatment, domestic violence) were associated with all groups of children involved in bullying. Socioenvironmental factors are associated with children's risk for becoming involved in bullying over and above their own behaviors. Intervention programs aimed at reducing bullying should extend their focus beyond schools to include local communities and families.

  3. Factors Affecting the Involvement of Teachers in Guidance and Counselling as a Whole-School Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sarah K. Y.; Hui, Eadaoin K. P.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores factors affecting the involvement of regular secondary school teachers in the whole-school approach to guidance and counselling by interviewing 12 secondary school teachers in Hong Kong. Emerging themes include teachers' ownership of their role in student guidance and counselling, the alignment of their disposition with…

  4. Molecular characterization of Candida in the oral cavity and factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraneveld, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis addresses current issues related to oral Candida infections. Interactions of Candida with the oral microbiome were characterized and factors involved in biofilm formation and virulence were studied. All in all, the work described in this thesis contributes

  5. Analysis of the Internal and External Factors Involved in Second Language Acquisition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲艳春

    2009-01-01

    Materialist dialectics holds that internal causes are the basis of change and the external causes are the condition of change, and that external causes become operative through internal causes. This law can be applied into SLA. The internal causes and external causes influence SLA gready. This paper mainly discusses the factors involved in SLA process.

  6. Personal and Situational Factors Affecting Exercise Involvement: The Importance of Enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, Leonard M.

    1985-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with participants and dropouts of a male employee fitness program in order to investigate factors affecting involvement. A combination of items pertaining to reactions to the program, initial goals for joining, and social support for the program could effectively discriminate between participants and dropouts. (Author/MT)

  7. Cellular intrinsic factors involved in the resistance of squamous cell carcinoma to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaberte, Yolanda; Milla, Laura; Salazar, Nerea; Vera-Alvarez, Jesús; Kourani, Omar; Damian, Alejandra; Rivarola, Viviana; Roca, Maria José; Espada, Jesús; González, Salvador; Juarranz, Angeles

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is widely used to treat non-melanoma skin cancer. However, some patients affected with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) do not respond adequately to PDT with methyl-δ-aminolevulinic acid (MAL-PDT) and the tumors acquire an infiltrative phenotype and became histologically more aggressive, less differentiated, and more fibroblastic. To search for potential factors implicated in SCC resistance to PDT, we have used the SCC-13 cell line (parental) and resistant SCC-13 cells obtained by repeated MAL-PDT treatments (5th and 10th PDT-resistant generations). Xenografts assays in immunodeficient mice showed that the tumors generated by resistant cells were bigger than those induced by parental cells. Comparative genomic hybridization array (aCGH) showed that the three cell types presented amplicons in 3p12.1 CADM2, 7p11.2 EFGR, and 11q13.3 CCND1 genes. The 5th and 10th PDT-resistant cells showed an amplicon in 5q11.2 MAP3K1, which was not present in parental cells. The changes detected by aCGH on CCND1, EFGR, and MAP3K1 were confirmed in extracts of SCC-13 cells by reverse-transcriptase PCR and by western blot, and by immunohistochemistry in human biopsies from persistent tumors after MAL-PDT. Our data suggest that genomic imbalances related to CCND1, EFGR, and particularly MAP3K1 seem to be involved in the development of the resistance of SCC to PDT.

  8. Determining success factors for effective strategic change: Role of middle managers' strategic involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhajul Islam Ukil

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Middle managers are believed to play most crucial part in strategic change that in consequence leads to organizational success. The present study seeks to identify the underlying success factors for effective strategic change and, to investigate the relationship between middle management strategic involvement and effective strategic change. Data were collected following a survey administered among a group of mid-level managers (N=144 serving in twenty different private commercial banks in Bangladesh, and analyzed using various statistical tests including descriptive analysis, Pearson correlation, and simple and multiple regressions in STATA. Results uncovers that factors like relation with top management, strategy, role and skills are essential for effective strategic change. This study also reveals significant relationship between middle management strategic involvement and effective strategic change. Findings of this research suggest that organizations shall involve mid-level managers to formulate and implement strategy since middle mangers work as a bridge between top management and ground level workers.

  9. Pattern of hormone receptors and human epidermal growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-05

    Feb 5, 2015 ... Key words: Breast cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu, immunohistochemistry, ... therapy.[6‑8] Of all these prognostic and predictive factors, ... one of the biggest private medical laboratories in Nigeria.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and

  11. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and

  12. Human Factors in Fire Safety Management and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Othuman Mydin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire protection is the study and practice of mitigating the unwanted effects of potentially destructive fires. It involves the study of the behavior, compartmentalization, and investigation of fire and its related emergencies, as well as the research and development, production, testing and application of mitigating systems. Problems still occurred despite of the adequate fire safety systems installed. For most people in high-risk buildings, not all accidents were caused by them. They were more likely to be the victims of a fire that occurred. Besides damaging their properties and belongings, some people were burned to death for not knowing what to do if fire happens in their place. This paper will present the human factors in fire safety management and prevention system.

  13. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain). Simulation and Control Rooms Div.

    2015-07-15

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  14. AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway is critically involved in human pluripotent stem cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romorini, Leonardo; Garate, Ximena; Neiman, Gabriel; Luzzani, Carlos; Furmento, Verónica Alejandra; Guberman, Alejandra Sonia; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Scassa, María Elida; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent stem cells (PSC) that can differentiate into a wide range of specialized cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor is essential for PSC survival, stemness and self-renewal. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates cell viability and apoptosis in many cell types. Although it has been demonstrated that PI3K/AKT activation by bFGF is relevant for PSC stemness maintenance its role on PSC survival remains elusive. In this study we explored the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PSC survival by AKT. We found that inhibition of AKT with three non-structurally related inhibitors (GSK690693, AKT inhibitor VIII and AKT inhibitor IV) decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. We observed a rapid increase in phosphatidylserine translocation and in the extent of DNA fragmentation after inhibitors addition. Moreover, abrogation of AKT activity led to Caspase-9, Caspase-3, and PARP cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated by pharmacological inhibition and siRNA knockdown that GSK3β signaling is responsible, at least in part, of the apoptosis triggered by AKT inhibition. Moreover, GSK3β inhibition decreases basal apoptosis rate and promotes PSC proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AKT activation prevents apoptosis, partly through inhibition of GSK3β, and thus results relevant for PSC survival. PMID:27762303

  15. Involvement of the modifier gene of a human Mendelian disorder in a negative selection process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jéru

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of modifier genes and characterization of their effects represent major challenges in human genetics. SAA1 is one of the few modifiers identified in humans: this gene influences the risk of renal amyloidosis (RA in patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, a Mendelian autoinflammatory disorder associated with mutations in MEFV. Indeed, the SAA1 alpha homozygous genotype and the p.Met694Val homozygous genotype at the MEFV locus are two main risk factors for RA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HERE, WE INVESTIGATED ARMENIAN FMF PATIENTS AND CONTROLS FROM TWO NEIGHBORING COUNTRIES: Armenia, where RA is frequent (24%, and Karabakh, where RA is rare (2.5%. Sequencing of MEFV revealed similar frequencies of p.Met694Val homozygotes in the two groups of patients. However, a major deficit of SAA1 alpha homozygotes was found among Karabakhian patients (4% as compared to Armenian patients (24% (p = 5.10(-5. Most importantly, we observed deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE in the two groups of patients, and unexpectedly, in opposite directions, whereas, in the two control populations, genotype distributions at this locus were similar and complied with (HWE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The excess of SAA1alpha homozygotes among Armenian patients could be explained by the recruitment of patients with severe phenotypes. In contrast, a population-based study revealed that the deficit of alpha/alpha among Karabakhian patients would result from a negative selection against carriers of this genotype. This study, which provides new insights into the role of SAA1 in the pathophysiology of FMF, represents the first example of deviations from HWE and selection involving the modifier gene of a Mendelian disorder.

  16. Genes Involved in Human Ribosome Biogenesis areTranscriptionally Upregulated in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Lamy, Philippe; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p<10-3) when compared to normal mucosa. Overexpression was independent of microsate......Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p... of rRNA processing genes points towards a coordinated process enabling the overproduction of matured ribosomal structures....

  17. An improvement of the applicability of human factors guidelines for coping with human factors issues in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lee, J. Y. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Human factors have been well known as one of the key factors to the system effectiveness as well as the efficiency and safety of nuclear power plants(NPPs). Human factors engineering(HFE) are included in periodic safety review(PSR) on the existing NPPs and the formal safety assessment for the new ones. However, HFE for NPPs is still neither popular in practice nor concrete in methodology. Especially, the human factors guidelines, which are the most frequent form of human factors engineering in practice, reveal the limitations in their applications. We discuss the limitations and their casual factors found in human factors guidelines in order to lesson the workload of HFE practitioners and to improve the applicability of human factors guidelines. According to the purposes and the phases of HFE for NPPs, more selective items and specified criteria should be prepared carefully in the human factors guidelines for the each HFE applications in practice. These finding on the human factors guidelines can be transferred to the other HFE application field, such as military, aviation, telecommunication, HCI, and product safety.

  18. Human needs as predictors for organizational commitment and job involvement: An exploratory empirical study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yang-Kyu; Lee, Chul-in; Kabst, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    While the literature on the determinants of organizational commitment (OC) and job involvement (JI) is vast, little has been studied about the impact of human needs. In search for the institutional stars, this study examines whether human needs can serve a predictor for both high OC and high JI. Exploratory empirical results based on quantile regressions suggest that the needs for achievement, belonging, and power are more important than others in predicting OC and JI. In addition, the basic ...

  19. Factors governing risk of cougar attacks on humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, David; Logan, Kenneth; Sweanor, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1980s wildlife managers in the United States and Canada have expressed increasing concern about the physical threat posed by cougars (Puma concolor) to humans. We developed a conceptual framework and analyzed 386 human–cougar encounters (29 fatal attacks, 171 instances of nonfatal contact, and 186 close-threatening encounters) to provide information relevant to public safety. We conceived of human injury and death as the outcome of 4 transitions affected by different suites of factors: (1) a human encountering a cougar: (2) given an encounter, odds that the cougar would be aggressive; (3) given aggression, odds that the cougar would attack; and (4) given an attack, odds that the human would die. We developed multivariable logistic regression models to explain variation in odds at transitions three and four using variables pertaining to characteristics of involved people and cougars. Young (≤ 2.5 years) or unhealthy (by weight, condition, or disease) cougars were more likely than any others to be involved in close (typically females were more likely than males to attack, and of attacking animals, adults were more likely than juveniles to kill the victim (32% versus 9% fatality, respectively). During close encounters, victims who used a weapon killed the involved cougar in 82% of cases. Other mitigating behaviors (e.g., yelling, backing away, throwing objects, increasing stature) also substantially lessened odds of attack. People who were moving quickly or erratically when an encounter happened (running, playing, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, ATV-riding) were more likely to be attacked and killed compared to people who were less active (25% versus 8% fatality). Children (≤ 10 years) were more likely than single adults to be attacked, but intervention by people of any age reduced odds of a child’s death by 4.6×. Overall, cougar attacks on people in Canada and the United States were rare (currently 4 to 6/year) compared to attacks by large felids and

  20. Human factors/ergonomics as a systems discipline? "The human use of human beings" revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the possible future of Human factors/ergonomics (HFE) usually take the past for granted in the sense that the future of HFE is assumed to be more of the same. This paper argues that the nature of work in the early 2010s is so different from the nature of work when HFE was formulated...

  1. Effects of (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate on some protein factors involved in the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinjiu Huang; Ruiqing Xu; Baoan Song; Song Yang; Li Zhao; Shouwei Wua

    2009-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenolic constituent of green tea, can inhibit activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream signal transduction pathways, resulting in the control of unwanted cell proliferation. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway is one of the most important pathways that regulates growth, survival, proliferation and differentiation in mammalian cells. This review addresses the effects of EGCG on some protein factors involved in the EGFR signaling pathway in a direct or indirect manner. Based on our understanding of the interaction between EGCG and these factors, and based on their structures, EGCG could be used as a lead compound for designing and synthesizing novel drugs with significant biological activity.

  2. WHO DOES WHAT IN HUMAN FACTORS/ERGONOMICS IN MALAYSIA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahasan, Rabiul

    2014-12-01

    Individuals' expertise in human factors and ergonomics in Malaysia was studied with a view to aiding in gauging the confusion and conjectures of the expertise in this area. The choices and preferences of individuals in dealing with the current issues of human factors and ergonomics were examined. The authors suggest the ways to meet ethical challenges in their work and professions.

  3. NAS Human Factors Safety Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts an integrated program of research on the relationship of factors concerning individuals, work groups, and organizations as employees perform...

  4. Factors Affecting Adolescents' Involvement in Cyberbullying: What Divides the 20% from the 80%?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Namin; Ahn, Hwasil

    2015-07-01

    Despite some variations among cyberbullying studies, about 20% of the youth population surveyed appears to be involved in cyberbullying. Coincidentally, the current study found that exactly 20% of the students surveyed were involved in cyberbullying as bullies (7.8%), victims (7.5%), and bully/victims (4.7%). What divides those 20% from the 80% of noninvolved students? This study aimed to produce a parsimonious and accurate model that can predict the occurrence of involvement in cyberbullying among youth. Data were collected from a questionnaire survey administered to 1,036 students enrolled in secondary schools in South Korea. Stepwise logistic regression (SLR) was carried out to predict the dichotomous dependent variable (involved/noninvolved) with 10 independent variables grouped into three categories: (a) demographic, (b) media-related, and (c) school and psychology factors. The result of the SLR analysis yielded a four-step model including the variables of cyber-confidence, weekday game time, mobile activities, and age as being significant in explaining the 20/80 division (model χ(2)=34.306, df=4, pcyberbullying than other students. In particular, the construct of cyber-confidence calls for further elaboration and research, given its controversial function with respect to adolescents' involvement in cyberbullying. Also, this study may bring about insights into practical considerations needed for concerned researchers, teachers, and parents to identify who is inside the group involved in cyberbullying so as to help the participating adolescents escape from the circle of cyberbullying.

  5. An evolutionary genomic approach to identify genes involved in human birth timing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevon Plunkett

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have remained elusive, due to divergence in physiological mechanisms between humans and model organisms typically studied. Because of relatively large human head size and narrow birth canal cross-sectional area compared to other primates, we hypothesized that genes involved in parturition would display accelerated evolution along the human and/or higher primate phylogenetic lineages to decrease the length of gestation and promote delivery of a smaller fetus that transits the birth canal more readily. Further, we tested whether current variation in such accelerated genes contributes to preterm birth risk. Evidence from allometric scaling of gestational age suggests human gestation has been shortened relative to other primates. Consistent with our hypothesis, many genes involved in reproduction show human acceleration in their coding or adjacent noncoding regions. We screened >8,400 SNPs in 150 human accelerated genes in 165 Finnish preterm and 163 control mothers for association with preterm birth. In this cohort, the most significant association was in FSHR, and 8 of the 10 most significant SNPs were in this gene. Further evidence for association of a linkage disequilibrium block of SNPs in FSHR, rs11686474, rs11680730, rs12473870, and rs1247381 was found in African Americans. By considering human acceleration, we identified a novel gene that may be associated with preterm birth, FSHR. We anticipate other human accelerated genes will similarly be associated with preterm birth risk and elucidate essential pathways for human parturition.

  6. Human Reliability Analysis for Design: Using Reliability Methods for Human Factors Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Laurids Boring

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews the application of human reliability analysis methods to human factors design issues. An application framework is sketched in which aspects of modeling typically found in human reliability analysis are used in a complementary fashion to the existing human factors phases of design and testing. The paper provides best achievable practices for design, testing, and modeling. Such best achievable practices may be used to evaluate and human system interface in the context of design safety certifications.

  7. Influence of independent risk factors on health status of persons involved in the process of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guriev A.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to increase efficiency of health education for subjects involved in the process of education. Materials: 498 questionnaires have been worked out for respondents. Methods: They have included supervision, questioning, free interviewing and methods for statistical processing of results of research. Results: The following factors have been revealed: peculiarity of leisure-time; bad quality of interaction between subjects of educational system and health care system. The characteristic of extra-curriculum risk factors has been done. Conclusion: It is stressed that the survey has determined the basic directions of training for teachers and adults to form healthy way of life.

  8. NAC Transcription Factors of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and their Involvement in Leaf Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    yielding cereal crops are generated. In cereals, the process of leaf senescence is of utmost relevance when discussing yield. It is during the senescence process that all nutrients are transported from the withering leaf to the developing grains. Furthermore, the timing of senescence determines...... parts of the senescence process. The specific aims of this study were therefore (1) to establish and characterise the NAC transcription factors of the model cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (2) to identify and study putative barley NAC transcription factors involved in the regulation of leaf...

  9. Human factors aspects of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in regards to the use of advanced instrumentation in the nuclear industry is the interface between the instrumentation system and the human. A survey, oriented towards identifying the human factors aspects of digital instrumentation, was conducted at a number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities. Human factors issues, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays, controls, organizational support, training, and related topics were identified. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. p44 and p34 subunits of the BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor have homologies with SSL1, a yeast protein involved in DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Humbert; H. van Vuuren; Y. Lutz; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); V. Moncollin

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 (TFIIH) transcription factor is a multisubunit protein involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (B) as well as in DNA repair. In addition to the previously characterized p62 and p89/ERCC3 subunits, we have cloned two other subunits of BTF2, p44 and p34. Th

  11. A HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING PROCESS TO SUPPORT HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE DESIGN IN CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, C.; Joe, J.; Boring, R.

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is to sustain operation of the existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through a multi-pathway approach in conducting research and development (R&D). The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) System Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and other information systems in existing U.S. NPPs. Control room modernization is an important part following this pathway, and human factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been involved in conducting R&D to support migration of new digital main control room (MCR) technologies from legacy analog and legacy digital I&C. This paper describes a human factors engineering (HFE) process that supports human-system interface (HSI) design in MCR modernization activities, particularly with migration of old digital to new digital I&C. The process described in this work is an expansion from the LWRS Report INL/EXT-16-38576, and is a requirements-driven approach that aligns with NUREG-0711 requirements. The work described builds upon the existing literature by adding more detail around key tasks and decisions to make when transitioning from HSI Design into Verification and Validation (V&V). The overall objective of this process is to inform HSI design and elicit specific, measurable, and achievable human factors criteria for new digital technologies. Upon following this process, utilities should have greater confidence with transitioning from HSI design into V&V.

  12. Human neurocysticercosis: immunological features involved in the host's susceptibility to become infected and to develop disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Edda; Cárdenas, Graciela; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Fleury, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. Herein, the immunological and endocrinological features involved in resistance to infection and severe forms of the disease are reviewed, and their clinical relevance is discussed.

  13. Identifying contributing factors to fatal and serious injury motorcycle collisions involving children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Jennifer; Ravi, Mano Deepa; Yuen, Jeremy; Hoareau, Effie; Hashim, Hizal Hanis

    2013-01-01

    In Malaysia, motorcycle crashes constitute approximately 60 percent of all road trauma, and a substantial proportion involve children 16 years and younger. There are, however, many gaps in our knowledge on contributing factors to crashes and injury patterns amongst children killed and seriously injured in motorcycle crashes. The aim of this study was to examine fatal and serious injury motorcycle-related collisions to identify contributing factors and injury patterns amongst child motorcyclists. All identified motorcyclist fatal crashes between 2007 and 2011 (inclusive) were extracted from the national Police-reported crash database (M-ROADS) and a range of variables were selected for examination. A total of 17,677 crashes were extracted where a rider or pillion was killed and of these crashes 2,038 involved children, equating to 12 percent. Examination of crashes involving children revealed that some crashes involved more than two children on the motorcycle, therefore, overall children constituted 9.5% of fatal and 18.4% of serious injury collisions. A high proportion of child fatal or serious injury collisions involved the child as the rider (62%), and this was most common for children aged between 10 and 16 years. The majority of collisions occurred on rural roads, in speed limit zones of 50-70km/h, and approximately one-third occurred at an intersection. Collisions involving another motorcycle or a passenger vehicle contributed to 41% and 53% of the total fatalities and severe injuries, respectively. A high proportion (43.9%) of the children (25.5% riders and 18.8% pillion) sustained head injuries with 37.7% being in the 10-16 age group. Furthermore, 52.4% of the children sustaining head injuries did not wear a helmet. The implications of these findings for countermeasures within a Safe System framework, particularly interventions aimed at reducing the rate of unlicensed riding and helmet wearing, and infrastructure countermeasures are discussed.

  14. Incidence and risk factors of bone marrow involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittivorapart, Janejira; Chinthammitr, Yingyong

    2011-02-01

    Since trephine bone marrow biopsy is an invasive procedure, the identification of a subgroup of patients with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who have a minimal risk of bone marrow involvement would be helpful. This study is aimed to determine the incidence of bone marrow involvement (BMI) by NHL and the predictors of no BMI to not only avoid this invasive procedure but also decrease the cost of investigation. Data from 320 patients with NHL at division of hematology between January 2008 and June 2009 were reviewed and analyzed. The cell types of NHL were classified as B-cell in 283 patients (88.4%), T-cell in 37 patients (11.6%) and incidence of BMI is 24.4% and 18.9% in B- and T-cell, respectively. Factors significantly associated with BMI in univariate analysis were the hepatic and splenic involvement (p = 0.03 and low percent of blood neutrophil (p high percent of blood lymphocyte (p low absolute neutrophil count (p = 0.002), high absolute lymphocyte count (p = 0.045), low platelet count (p high LDH (p = 0.026), and high alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.020). On the multivariate analysis, factors associated with BMI included LN below diaphragm, anemia, low percent of blood neutrophil and low platelet count. Excluding Burkitt lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma, NHL patients with no LN below diaphragm, no hepatic & splenic involvement, no significant weight loss, hemoglobin (Hb) >11 g/dL and platelet > 150,000/uL had BMI in 3/78 (3.8%). The incidence of bone marrow involvement in NHL is 23.8%. Excluding Burkitt lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma, NHL patients with no LN below diaphragm, no hepatic & splenic involvement, no significant weight loss, Hb > 11 g/dL and platelet > 150,000/uL had low risk of BMI.

  15. Diurnal rhythmicity in biological processes involved in bioavailability of functional food factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Takashi; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Aoshima, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Sakono, Masanobu; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2013-05-01

    In the past few decades, many types of functional factors have been identified in dietary foods; for example, flavonoids are major groups widely distributed in the plant kingdom. However, the absorption rates of the functional food factors are usually low, and many of these are difficult to be absorbed in the intact forms because of metabolization by biological processes during absorption. To gain adequate beneficial effects, it is therefore mandatory to know whether functional food factors are absorbed in sufficient quantity, and then reach target organs while maintaining beneficial effects. These are the reasons why the bioavailability of functional food factors has been well investigated using rodent models. Recently, many of the biological processes have been reported to follow diurnal rhythms recurring every 24 h. Therefore, absorption and metabolism of functional food factors influenced by the biological processes may vary with time of day. Consequently, the evaluation of the bioavailability of functional food factors using rodent models should take into consideration the timing of consumption. In this review, we provide a perspective overview of the diurnal rhythm of biological processes involved in the bioavailability of functional food factors, particularly flavonoids.

  16. Influencing Factors of Rural Human Consumption in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun LI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper combines the social capital theory, the ordered choice model, and the case study in order to analyze the influence factors of the rural human consumption. The results show the presence of inverted U shape curve relation between human consumption amount and age. Human communication range, income, the highest single human consumption amount and the minimum amount, occupation, family population, the existing of human consumption capacity and the scope of the existing relationships between interpersonal relationship satisfaction and other factors on human consumption level has positive influence on human consumption level. Domestic researches on human behaviour are wide, but most of the studies are focused on the social, human, and psychological disciplines. For the origin of human consumption, scholars focus on four aspects like novelty, human or mutual needs. This research is based on field investigation conducted in Niuxintai village, Liaoning Province, in order to understand the current situation of the rural human consumption in China, and to explain the function and influencing factors of human consumption.

  17. Suggestion: Human Factor Based User Interface Design Tool

    OpenAIRE

    S.Q. Abbas,; Rizwan Beg; Shahnaz Fatima

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce HFBUIT, Human Factor based user interface tool that enables designers and engineers to create human factor based user interface. This tool will help the designer to utilize the knowledge about the user to configure the interface for different users, i.e. each user may have different skills, level of experience, or cognitive and physical disabilities. The tool makes it easy to knowhuman factors & to reduce the number of usability problems. HFBUIT can be used in real...

  18. Extrinsic Factors Involved in the Differentiation of Stem Cells into Insulin-Producing Cells: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Y. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with many debilitating complications. Treatment of diabetes mellitus mainly revolves around conventional oral hypoglycaemic agents and insulin replacement therapy. Recently, scientists have turned their attention to the generation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs from stem cells of various sources. To date, many types of stem cells of human and animal origins have been successfully turned into IPCs in vitro and have been shown to exert glucose-lowering effect in vivo. However, scientists are still faced with the challenge of producing a sufficient number of IPCs that can in turn produce sufficient insulin for clinical use. A careful choice of stem cells, methods, and extrinsic factors for induction may all be contributing factors to successful production of functional beta-islet like IPCs. It is also important that the mechanism of differentiation and mechanism by which IPCs correct hyperglycaemia are carefully studied before they are used in human subjects.

  19. The impact of human factor on labor productivity at the mining enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinigina Galina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the term “human factor” which implies a person involved in the organizational process in the diversity of his natural and socio-psychological characteristics. The necessity to identify the impact of human factor on labour productivity at the mining enterprises is proved. It is assumed that considering human factor can be one of the ways to increase labour productivity. A research technique of the complex – mechanized team in order to identify the impact of human factor on its productivity is described. Definite research results and analysis which strongly support the assumption are given. The stages at which the human factor should be considered are analyzed. Based on the fact that person's mood determines all his vital functions, the following interpretation of the human factor was propose: to consider the human factor means to take into account everything that might spoil the mood of a person starting from his coming to the place of work till the work is finished. If it is necessary to provide high productivity, take care of the human mind. This thesis does not require proof and justification, it is obvious.

  20. Analysis of molecular markers as predictive factors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Luciana Marques; De Moraes, Luis Henrique Ferreira; Do Canto, Abaeté Leite; Dos Santos, Laurita; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; De Azevedo Canevari, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Nodal status is the most significant independent prognostic factor in breast cancer. Identification of molecular markers would allow stratification of patients who require surgical assessment of lymph nodes from the large numbers of patients for whom this surgical procedure is unnecessary, thus leading to a more accurate prognosis. However, up to now, the reported studies are preliminary and controversial, and although hundreds of markers have been assessed, few of them have been used in clinical practice for treatment or prognosis in breast cancer. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+ dependent 1D, β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 9, prohibitin, phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 5 (PIK3R5), phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type IIα, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase 2, BCL2 associated agonist of cell death, G2 and S-phase expressed 1 and PAX interacting protein 1 genes, described as prognostic markers in breast cancer in a previous microarray study, are also predictors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed on primary breast tumor tissues from women with negative lymph node involvement (n=27) compared with primary tumor tissues from women with positive lymph node involvement (n=23), and was also performed on primary tumors and paired lymph node metastases (n=11). For all genes analyzed, only the PIK3R5 gene exhibited differential expression in samples of primary tumors with positive lymph node involvement compared with primary tumors with negative lymph node involvement (P=0.0347). These results demonstrate that the PIK3R5 gene may be considered predictive of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma. Although the other genes evaluated in the present study have been previously characterized to be involved with

  1. Analysis of molecular markers as predictive factors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Luciana Marques; De Moraes, Luis Henrique Ferreira; Do Canto, Abaeté Leite; Dos Santos, Laurita; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; De Azevedo Canevari, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Nodal status is the most significant independent prognostic factor in breast cancer. Identification of molecular markers would allow stratification of patients who require surgical assessment of lymph nodes from the large numbers of patients for whom this surgical procedure is unnecessary, thus leading to a more accurate prognosis. However, up to now, the reported studies are preliminary and controversial, and although hundreds of markers have been assessed, few of them have been used in clinical practice for treatment or prognosis in breast cancer. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+ dependent 1D, β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 9, prohibitin, phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 5 (PIK3R5), phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type IIα, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase 2, BCL2 associated agonist of cell death, G2 and S-phase expressed 1 and PAX interacting protein 1 genes, described as prognostic markers in breast cancer in a previous microarray study, are also predictors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed on primary breast tumor tissues from women with negative lymph node involvement (n=27) compared with primary tumor tissues from women with positive lymph node involvement (n=23), and was also performed on primary tumors and paired lymph node metastases (n=11). For all genes analyzed, only the PIK3R5 gene exhibited differential expression in samples of primary tumors with positive lymph node involvement compared with primary tumors with negative lymph node involvement (P=0.0347). These results demonstrate that the PIK3R5 gene may be considered predictive of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma. Although the other genes evaluated in the present study have been previously characterized to be involved with

  2. Assessment factors for human health risk assessment: A discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeire, T.; Stevenson, H.; Pieters, M.N.; Rennen, M.; Slob, W.; Hakkert, B.C.

    1999-01-01

    The general goal of this discussion paper is to contribute toward the further harmonization of human health risk assessment. It first discusses the development of a formal, harmonized set of assessment factors. The status quo with regard to assessment factors is reviewed, that is, the type of factor

  3. Human factors process failure modes and effects analysis (HF PFMEA) software tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Faith T. (Inventor); Valentino, William D. (Inventor); Philippart, Monica F. (Inventor); Relvini, Kristine M. (Inventor); Bessette, Colette I. (Inventor); Shedd, Nathaneal P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods, computer-readable media, and systems for automatically performing Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis for a process are provided. At least one task involved in a process is identified, where the task includes at least one human activity. The human activity is described using at least one verb. A human error potentially resulting from the human activity is automatically identified, the human error is related to the verb used in describing the task. A likelihood of occurrence, detection, and correction of the human error is identified. The severity of the effect of the human error is identified. The likelihood of occurrence, and the severity of the risk of potential harm is identified. The risk of potential harm is compared with a risk threshold to identify the appropriateness of corrective measures.

  4. Mycobacterium biofilms: factors involved in development, dispersal, and therapeutic strategies against biofilm-relevant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaohong; Deng, Wanyan; Liu, Minqiang; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria can develop biofilm (BF), a multicellular structure largely combining bacteria and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The formation of biofilm results in an alternative existence in which microbes ensure their survival in adverse environments. Biofilm-relevant infections are more persistent, resistant to most antibiotics, and more recalcitrant to host immunity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, can develop biofilm, though whether M. tuberculosis can form biofilm within tuberculosis patients has yet to be determined. Here, we summarize the factors involved in the development and dispersal of mycobacterial biofilms, as well as underlying regulatory factors and inhibitors against biofilm to deepen our understanding of their development and to elucidate potential novel modes of action for future antibiotics. Key factors in biofilm formation identified as drug targets represent a novel and promising avenue for developing better antibiotics.

  5. Model correction factor method for reliability problems involving integrals of non-Gaussian random fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchin, P.; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Kiureghian, Armen Der

    2002-01-01

    The model correction factor method (MCFM) is used in conjunction with the first-order reliability method (FORM) to solve structural reliability problems involving integrals of non-Gaussian random fields. The approach replaces the limit-state function with an idealized one, in which the integrals...... are considered to be Gaussian. Conventional FORM analysis yields the linearization point of the idealized limit-state surface. A model correction factor is then introduced to push the idealized limit-state surface onto the actual limit-state surface. A few iterations yield a good approximation of the reliability...... reliability method; Model correction factor method; Nataf field integration; Non-Gaussion random field; Random field integration; Structural reliability; Pile foundation reliability...

  6. Use of Computers in Human Factors Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    SENSES (PHYSIOLOGY), THERMOPLASTIC RESINS, VISUAL ACUITY (U)R RESEARCH CONCERNS DETERMINATION OF THE INFORMATION PRESENTATION REQUIREMENTS OF HUMAN DATA...THE GEOMETRY OF THE wORK STATION, IS CURRENTLY BEING DEVELOPED. IT IS CALLED COMBIMAN, AN ACRONYM FOR COMPUTERIZED BIOMECHANICAL MAN- MODELo COMBIMAN

  7. Factors affecting transmission of mucosal human papillomavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Veldhuijzen; P.J. Snijders; P. Reiss; C.J. Meijer; J.H. van de Wijgert

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection. The effect of HPV on public health is especially related to the burden of anogenital cancers, most notably cervical cancer. Determinants of exposure to HPV are similar to those for most sexually transmitted infections, but

  8. Human Factors in the Management of Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Langå; Alting, Leo

    2006-01-01

    challenges. Qualitative interviews with Danish stakeholders in the education of engineers (BA & MA) confirm the picture given in international literature. Therefore, the didactics concerning the ‘human factor’ in the curriculum on production management has to reflect these changes. This paper concludes...... with a proposal on essential issues to be addressed in the curriculum qualifying university candidates to production management....

  9. Alternative Control Technologies: Human Factors Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    vertical vibration to the 29,4, 1980, pp 462-466. head and shoulders of seated men", Royal Aircraft Lee, J. M.; Chartier , V. L.; Hartmann, D. P.; Lee, G...Suarez, P. F., Rogers , S., K., Ruck, D. W., for Effective Human-Computer Interaction", 2nd edition, Arndt, C., and Kabrisky, M., "A facial feature

  10. Recent technology products from Space Human Factors research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, James P.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of the NASA Space Human Factors program and the research carried out concerning human factors are discussed with emphasis given to the development of human performance models, data, and tools. The major products from this program are described, which include the Laser Anthropometric Mapping System; a model of the human body for evaluating the kinematics and dynamics of human motion and strength in microgravity environment; an operational experience data base for verifying and validating the data repository of manned space flights; the Operational Experience Database Taxonomy; and a human-computer interaction laboratory whose products are the display softaware and requirements and the guideline documents and standards for applications on human-computer interaction. Special attention is given to the 'Convoltron', a prototype version of a signal processor for synthesizing the head-related transfer functions.

  11. Factors Influencing the Private Involvement in Urban Rail Public-Private Partnership Projects in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Ke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Private investors have been encouraged to participate in the development and operation of urban rail projects in China through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs, given the fact that subnational governments are suffering from urgent development demands and severe fiscal pressure. However, there is no formal assessment to determine the private involvement in a PPP project. This problem is particularly critical in the sector of urban rail, in which the huge investment cannot rely on the private sector alone. This study hence aimed to uncover and identify the influencing factors. Multiple research methods, including content analysis, case study and focus group discussion were adopted to achieve the research purpose. Seven types of influencing factors were identified, including project financial model, government fiscal commitment, risk allocation, public accountability, efficiency considerations, policy and regulations, and organisational marketing strategies. The findings add to the current knowledge base by uncovering the drivers behind private involvement in a PPP project. They are also beneficial for industry practitioners as a basis/checklist to determine the private involvement.

  12. The Human Factors of Sensor Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    humans tend to use a combination of deductive and inductive logic, as well as intuition and emotion to reach general conclusions; however, if...into a machine but only resulting in a warning or caution and not as the actual emotion felt by the observer. The element of fear induced by the...extract meaning from text or spoken language which is veiled by semantic features such as sarcasm or formalism that contain a very great amount of

  13. Usability: Human Research Program - Space Human Factors and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina L.

    2009-01-01

    The Usability project addresses the need for research in the area of metrics and methodologies used in hardware and software usability testing in order to define quantifiable and verifiable usability requirements. A usability test is a human-in-the-loop evaluation where a participant works through a realistic set of representative tasks using the hardware/software under investigation. The purpose of this research is to define metrics and methodologies for measuring and verifying usability in the aerospace domain in accordance with FY09 focus on errors, consistency, and mobility/maneuverability. Usability metrics must be predictive of success with the interfaces, must be easy to obtain and/or calculate, and must meet the intent of current Human Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR). Methodologies must work within the constraints of the aerospace domain, be cost and time efficient, and be able to be applied without extensive specialized training.

  14. Adolescent gang involvement: The role of individual, family, peer, and school factors in a multilevel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Michela; Sharkey, Jill; Vieno, Alessio; Mayworm, Ashley; Dougherty, Danielle; Nylund-Gibson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang involvement is a serious public health challenge as adolescents involved in gangs are more likely than others to engage in violence and aggression. To better understand gang involvement, we examined the role of protective (empathy and parental support) and risk (peer deviance and lack of safety at school) factors, as well as their interactions, in predicting adolescent gang affiliation. The study involved a sample of 26,232 students (53.4% females; mean age = 14.62, SD = 1.69) participating in the California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS), a survey investigating a wide range of youth health and risk behaviors administered in all California schools every 2 years. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), findings indicated that high levels of empathy and parental support were associated with a lower likelihood of affiliating with a gang. Associating with deviant peers and perceiving the school as unsafe were positively correlated with gang membership. At the school level, lack of safety and type of school (special education, vocational, or alternative school vs. comprehensive schools) were associated with greater probability of gang membership. Empathy mitigated the association between deviant peers and gang membership.

  15. Class I ADP-ribosylation factors are involved in enterovirus 71 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in infants and children. Replication of enterovirus 71 depends on host cellular factors. The viral replication complex is formed in novel, cytoplasmic, vesicular compartments. It has not been elucidated which cellular pathways are hijacked by the virus to create these vesicles. Here, we investigated whether proteins associated with the cellular secretory pathway were involved in enterovirus 71 replication. We used a loss-of-function assay, based on small interfering RNA. We showed that enterovirus 71 RNA replication was dependent on the activity of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. Simultaneous depletion of ADP-ribosylation factors 1 and 3, but not three others, inhibited viral replication in cells. We also demonstrated with various techniques that the brefeldin-A-sensitive guanidine nucleotide exchange factor, GBF1, was critically important for enterovirus 71 replication. Our results suggested that enterovirus 71 replication depended on GBF1-mediated activation of Class I ADP-ribosylation factors. These results revealed a connection between enterovirus 71 replication and the cellular secretory pathway; this pathway may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies.

  16. Genetic, metabolic and environmental factors involved in the development of liver cirrhosis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-11-07

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is a chronic illness caused by inflammatory responses and progressive fibrosis. Globally, the most common causes of chronic liver disease include persistent alcohol abuse, followed by viral hepatitis infections and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, regardless of the etiological factors, the susceptibility and degree of liver damage may be influenced by genetic polymorphisms that are associated with distinct ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, metabolic genes are influenced by variable environmental lifestyle factors, such as diet, physical inactivity, and emotional stress, which are associated with regional differences among populations. This Topic Highlight will focus on the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the metabolism of alcohol and nutrients in the setting of distinct etiologies of liver disease. The interaction between genes and environment in the current-day admixed population, Mestizo and Native Mexican, will be described. Additionally, genes involved in immune regulation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix deposition may modulate the degree of severity. In conclusion, LC is a complex disease. The onset, progression, and clinical outcome of LC among the Mexican population are influenced by specific genetic and environmental factors. Among these are an admixed genome with a heterogenic distribution of European, Amerindian and African ancestry; a high score of alcohol consumption; viral infections; a hepatopathogenic diet; and a high prevalence of obesity. The variance in risk factors among populations suggests that intervention strategies directed towards the prevention and management of LC should be tailored according to such population-based features.

  17. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  18. The SMC5/6 complex is involved in crucial processes during human spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verver, Dideke E; Langedijk, Nathalia S M; Jordan, Philip W; Repping, Sjoerd; Hamer, Geert

    2014-07-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for safe reproduction. Therefore, chromatin structure and dynamics should be tightly regulated during germ cell development. Chromatin structure and function are in large part determined by the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, of which SMC5/6 recently has been shown to be involved in both spermatogonial differentiation and meiosis during mouse spermatogenesis. We therefore investigated the role of this complex in human spermatogenesis. We found SMC6 to be expressed in the human testis and present in a subset of type Adark and type Apale spermatogonia, all spermatocytes, and round spermatids. During human meiosis, SMC5/6 is located at the synaptonemal complex (SC), the XY body, and at the centromeres during meiotic metaphases. However, in contrast to mouse spermatogenesis, SMC6 is not located at pericentromeric heterochromatin in human spermatogenic cells, indicating subtle but perhaps important differences in not only SMC5/6 function but maybe also in maintenance of genomic integrity at the repetitive pericentromeric regions. Nonetheless, our data clearly indicate that the SMC5/6 complex, as shown in mice, is involved in numerous crucial processes during human spermatogenesis, such as in spermatogonial development, on the SC between synapsed chromosomes, and in DNA double-strand break repair on unsynapsed chromosomes during pachynema.

  19. Studying risk factors associated with Human Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is one of the most under diagnosed and underreported disease in both developed and developing countries including India. It is established that environmental conditions and occupational habit of the individuals put them at risk of acquiring disease, which varies from community to community. Various seroprevalence studies across the world have documented emerging situation of this neglected tropical disease, but limited have probed to identify the risk factors, especially in India. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the environmental and occupational risk factors associated with the disease in Udupi District. Materials and Methods: This population-based case-control study was carried out in Udupi, a District in Southern India from April 2012 until August 2012. Udupi is considered to be endemic for Leptospirosis and reported 116 confirmed cases in the year 2011. Seventy of 116 laboratory confirmed cases and 140 sex matched neighborhood healthy controls participated in the study. A predesigned, semi-structured and validated questionnaire was used for data collection through house to house visit and observations were noted about environmental conditions. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis (back ward conditional logistic regression was performed by using STATA version 9.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA to identify potential risk factors. Results: Occupational factors such as outdoor activities (matched odds ratio [OR] of 3.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-13.0, presence of cut or wound at body parts during work (matched OR: 4.88, CI: 1.83-13.02 and environmental factors such as contact with rodents through using the food materials ate by rat (matched OR: 4.29, CI: 1.45-12.73 and contact with soil or water contaminated with urine of rat (matched OR: 4.58, CI: 1.43-14.67 were the risk factors identified to be associated with disease. Conclusion: Leptospirosis is still

  20. Let's stay together? Intrinsic and extrinsic factors involved in pair bond dissolution in a recolonizing wolf population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleret, Cyril; Wabakken, Petter; Liberg, Olof; Åkesson, Mikael; Flagstad, Øystein; Andreassen, Harry Peter; Sand, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    For socially monogamous species, breeder bond dissolution has important consequences for population dynamics, but the extent to which extrinsic or intrinsic population factors causes pair dissolution remain poorly understood, especially among carnivores. Using an extensive life-history data set, a survival analysis and competing risks framework, we examined the fate of 153 different wolf (Canis lupus) pairs in the recolonizing Scandinavian wolf population, during 14 winters of snow tracking and DNA monitoring. Wolf pair dissolution was generally linked to a mortality event and was strongly affected by extrinsic (i.e. anthropogenic) causes. No divorce was observed, and among the pair dissolution where causes have been identified, death of one or both wolves was always involved. Median time from pair formation to pair dissolution was three consecutive winters (i.e. approximately 2 years). Pair dissolution was mostly human-related, primarily caused by legal control actions (36·7%), verified poaching (9·2%) and traffic-related causes (2·1%). Intrinsic factors, such as disease and age, accounted for only 7·7% of pair dissolutions. The remaining 44·3% of dissolution events were from unknown causes, but we argue that a large portion could be explained by an additional source of human-caused mortality, cryptic poaching. Extrinsic population factors, such as variables describing the geographical location of the pair, had a stronger effect on risk of pair dissolution compared to anthropogenic landscape characteristics. Population intrinsic factors, such as the inbreeding coefficient of the male pair member, had a negative effect on pair bond duration. The mechanism behind this result remains unknown, but might be explained by lower survival of inbred males or more complex inbreeding effects mediated by behaviour. Our study provides quantitative estimates of breeder bond duration in a social carnivore and highlights the effect of extrinsic (i.e. anthropogenic) and

  1. Human roughness perception and possible factors effecting roughness sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Tugba; Chen, Jianshe; Ettelaie, Rammile; Holmes, Melvin; Henson, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Surface texture sensation is significant for business success, in particular for solid surfaces for most of the materials; including foods. Mechanisms of roughness perception are still unknown, especially under different conditions such as lubricants with varying viscosities, different temperatures, or under different force loads during the observation of the surface. This work aims to determine the effect of those unknown factors, with applied sensory tests on 62 healthy participants. Roughness sensation of fingertip was tested under different lubricants including water and diluted syrup solutions at room temperature (25C) and body temperature (37C) by using simple pair-wise comparison to observe the just noticeable difference threshold and perception levels. Additionally, in this research applied force load during roughness observation was tested with pair-wise ranking method to illustrate its possible effect on human sensation. Obtained results showed that human's capability of roughness discrimination reduces with increased viscosity of the lubricant, where the influence of the temperature was not found to be significant. Moreover, the increase in the applied force load showed an increase in the sensitivity of roughness discrimination. Observed effects of the applied factors were also used for estimating the oral sensation of texture during eating. These findings are significant for our fundamental understanding to texture perception, and for the development of new food products with controlled textural features. Texture discrimination ability, more specifically roughness discrimination capability, is a significant factor for preference and appreciation for a wide range of materials, including food, furniture, or fabric. To explore the mechanism of sensation capability through tactile senses, it is necessary to identify the relevant factors and define characteristics that dominate the process involved. The results that will be obtained under these principles

  2. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  3. Status of Taenia solium cysticercosis and predisposing factors in developing countries involved in pig farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Kungu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Taenia solium cysticercosis is a disease of pigs and humans populations considered endemic in many developing countries of Latin America, Africa, and South East Asia having serious impact on public health and agriculture. We conducted an in-depth comparative analysis of literature on the disease situation and predisposing factors in selected countries known to be at the interface of poverty-emerging livestock systems-zoonoses and with a growing small holder pig industry. Transmission, methods of diagnosis and employed control strategies of T. solium infection in pig and human populations in these countries are also discussed. Limited knowledge on porcine cysticercosis (PC by various stakeholders expected to be key players in its control has undermined efforts for eliminating this potentially eradicable condition. Poor pig production practices, poor hygiene, and sanitation habits have also been important in the maintenance of the T. solium life-cycle. The major gaps identified in this review include scanty current information on PC prevalence in pigs with hardly any reports on the condition in humans in most developing countries. Factors affecting pattern of the infection and how they interact at the different levels of the pig value chain have not been exhaustively studied. Information on socioeconomic and public health impact is inadequate and not current.

  4. Human factors survey of advanced instrumentation and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey oriented towards identifying the human factors issues in regard to the use of advanced instrumentation and controls (I C) in the nuclear industry was conducted. A number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities were participants in the survey. Human factors items, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays (CGD), controls, organizational support, training, and related topics, were discussed. The survey found the industry to be concerned about the human factors issues related to the implementation of advanced I C. Fifteen potential human factors problems were identified. They include: the need for an advanced I C guideline equivalent to NUREG-0700; a role change in the control room from operator to supervisor; information overload; adequacy of existing training technology for advanced I C; and operator acceptance and trust. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Modifications in Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques; Clefton, Gordon; Joe, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    This report describes the basic aspects of control room modernization projects in the U.S. nuclear industry and the need for supplementary guidance on the integration of human factors considerations into the licensing and regulatory aspects of digital upgrades. The report pays specific attention to the integration of principles described in NUREG-0711 (Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model) and how supplementary guidance can help to raise general awareness in the industry regarding the complexities of control room modernization projects created by many interdependent regulations, standards and guidelines. The report also describes how human factors engineering principles and methods provided by various resources and international standards can help in navigating through the process of licensing digital upgrades. In particular, the integration of human factors engineering guidance and requirements into the process of licensing digital upgrades can help reduce uncertainty related to development of technical bases for digital upgrades that will avoid the introduction of new failure modes.

  6. Factors likely to enhance mycotoxin introduction into the human diet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors likely to enhance mycotoxin introduction into the human diet through maize in Kenya. ... African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... are no strict regulations that impose limits on the concentration of mycotoxins in ...

  7. New Calculations for Phase Space Factors Involved in Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Stoica, Sabin

    2013-01-01

    We present new results for the phase space factors involved in double beta decay for beta-beta- transitions to ground states and excited 0+1 states, for isotopes of experimental interest. The Coulomb distortion of the electron wave functions is treated by solving numerically the Dirac equation with inclusion of the finite nuclear size and electron screening effects, and using a Coulomb potential derived from a realistic proton density distribution in the daughter nucleus. Our results are compared with other results from literature, obtained in different approximations, and possible causes that can give differences are discussed.

  8. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of natural killer cell development and function: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elia Luevano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells belong to the innate immune system and are key effectors in the immune response against cancer and infection. Recent studies have contributed to the knowledge of events controlling NK cell fate. The use of knockout mice has enabled the discovery of key transcription factors (TFs essential for NK cell development and function. Yet, unwrapping the downstream targets of these TFs and their influence on NK cells remains a challenge. In this review we discuss the latest TFs described to be involved in the regulation of NK cell development and maturation.

  9. An Integrated Simulation System for Human Factors Study

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ying; Bennis, Fouad; Chablat, Damien

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that virtual reality can be a useful tool for ergonomics study. The proposed integrated simulation system aims at measuring operator's performance in an interactive way for 2D control panel design. By incorporating some sophisticated virtual reality hardware/software, the system allows natural human-system and/or human-human interaction in a simulated virtual environment; enables dynamic objective measurement of human performance; and evaluates the quality of the system design in human factors perspective based on the measurement. It can also be for operation training for some 2D control panels.

  10. Human Factors and Human-Computer Considerations in Teleradiology and Telepathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Krupinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiology and pathology are unique among other clinical specialties that incorporate telemedicine technologies into clinical practice, as, for the most part in traditional practice, there are few or no direct patient encounters. The majority of teleradiology and telepathology involves viewing images, which is exactly what occurs without the “tele” component. The images used are generally quite large, require dedicated displays and software for viewing, and present challenges to the clinician who must navigate through the presented data to render a diagnostic decision or interpretation. This digital viewing environment is very different from the more traditional reading environment (i.e., film and microscopy, necessitating a new look at how to optimize reading environments and address human factors issues. This paper will review some of the key components that need to be optimized for effective and efficient practice of teleradiology and telepathology using traditional workstations as well as some of the newer mobile viewing applications.

  11. Altered Expression Pattern of Molecular Factors Involved in Colonic Smooth Muscle Functions: An Immunohistochemical Study in Patients with Diverticular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattii, Letizia; Ippolito, Chiara; Segnani, Cristina; Battolla, Barbara; Colucci, Rocchina; Dolfi, Amelio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Blandizzi, Corrado; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of diverticular disease (DD) is thought to result from complex interactions among dietary habits, genetic factors and coexistence of other bowel abnormalities. These conditions lead to alterations in colonic pressure and motility, facilitating the formation of diverticula. Although electrophysiological studies on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have investigated colonic motor dysfunctions, scarce attention has been paid to their molecular abnormalities, and data on SMCs in DD are lacking. Accordingly, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of molecular factors involved in the contractile functions of SMCs in the tunica muscularis of colonic specimens from patients with DD. Methods and Findings By means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we examined the expression of Cx26 and Cx43, which are prominent components of gap junctions in human colonic SMCs, as well as pS368-Cx43, PKCps, RhoA and αSMA, all known to regulate the functions of gap junctions and the contractile activity of SMCs. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant abnormalities in DD samples, concerning both the expression and distribution patterns of most of the investigated molecular factors. Conclusion This study demonstrates, for the first time, that an altered pattern of factors involved in SMC contractility is present at level of the tunica muscularis of DD patients. Moreover, considering that our analysis was conducted on colonic tissues not directly affected by diverticular lesions or inflammatory reactions, it is conceivable that these molecular alterations may precede and predispose to the formation of diverticula, rather than being mere consequences of the disease. PMID:23437299

  12. Clinical incidents involving students on placement: an analysis of incident reports to identify potential risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, J E; Maloney, S; Lo, K; Morgan, P

    2015-06-01

    Students are sometimes involved in incidents during clinical training. To the authors' knowledge, no quantitative studies of incidents specifically involving physiotherapy students on clinical placement are available in the literature. A retrospective audit (2008 to 2011) of incident reports involving physiotherapy students was conducted to identify the nature and features of incidents. The study aimed to determine if injuries to a student or patient were more or less likely when the supervisor was in close proximity, and whether students with lower academic performance in their preclinical semester were more likely to be involved in an incident. There were 19 care-delivery-related and three equipment-related incidents. There were no incidents of violent, aggressive or demeaning behaviour towards students. The incident rate was 9.0/100,000 student-hours for third-year students and 6.8/100,000 student-hours for fourth-year students. The majority of incidents (55%) occurred from 11 am to 12-noon and from 3 pm to 3.30 pm. Incidents more often resulted in patient or student injury when the supervisor was not in close proximity (approximately 50% vs approximately 20%), although the difference was not significant (P=0.336). The academic results of students involved in incidents were equivalent to the whole cohort in their preclinical semester {mean 75 [standard deviation (SD) 6] vs 76 (SD 7); P=0.488}. The unexpected temporal clustering of incidents warrants further investigation. Student fatigue may warrant attention as a potential contributor; however, contextual factors, such as staff workload, along with organisational systems, structures and procedures may be more relevant. The potential relationship between supervisor proximity and injury also warrants further exploration. The findings of the present study should be integrated into clinical education curricula and communicated to clinical educators. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by

  13. Advanced Human Factors Engineering Tool Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-20

    the mail and telephone surveys. The authors would also like to extend a special thanks to Mr. David Rose of the Naval Air Development Center for his...ADVANCED NUNAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TOOL TECHNOLOGIES 3/3 (U) CARLON ASSOCIATES INC FAIRFAX Yff S A FLEGER ET AL. UNCLRS 20 NAR B? DARI5-BS-C-NO64 WIL...34" ".--: :’-...2,,. ,..:,.- ,’-"-’:"- "’-::"-,2 ., ..,," ,.- ..’.-.-.’.-,-. : .....v. _ *’--..., ...-- ,,. - -.; , :¢ 4., 5 5 lPeter laines Mr. David M. Ilarrah

  14. Resident interest and factors involved in entering a pediatric pulmonary fellowship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershan William M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known about interest in pediatric pulmonology among pediatric residents. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine at this institution: 1 the level of pediatric resident interest in pursuing a pulmonary fellowship, 2 potential factors involved in development of such interest, 3 whether the presence of a pulmonary fellowship program affects such interest. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all 52 pediatric residents at this institution in 1992 and to all 59 pediatric residents and 14 combined internal medicine/pediatrics residents in 2002, following development of a pulmonary fellowship program. Results Response rates were 79% in 1992 and 86% in 2002. Eight of the 43 responders in 1992 (19% had considered doing a pulmonary fellowship compared to 7 of 63 (11% in 2002. The highest ranked factors given by the residents who had considered a fellowship included wanting to continue one's education after residency, enjoying caring for pulmonary patients, and liking pulmonary physiology and the pulmonary faculty. Major factors listed by residents who had not considered a pulmonary fellowship included not enjoying the tracheostomy/ventilator population and chronic pulmonary patients in general, and a desire to enter general pediatrics or another fellowship. Most residents during both survey periods believed that they would be in non-academic or academic general pediatrics in 5 years. Only 1 of the 106 responding residents (~1% anticipated becoming a pediatric pulmonologist. Conclusions Although many pediatric residents consider enrolling in a pulmonary fellowship (~10–20% here, few (~1% here will actually pursue a career in pediatric pulmonology. The presence of a pulmonary fellowship program did not significantly alter resident interest, though other confounding factors may be involved.

  15. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  16. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  17. Th22 cells represent a distinct human T cell subset involved in epidermal immunity and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Pennino, Davide; Carbone, Teresa; Nasorri, Francesca; Pallotta, Sabatino; Cianfarani, Francesca; Odorisio, Teresa; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Behrendt, Heidrun; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Cavani, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Th subsets are defined according to their production of lineage-indicating cytokines and functions. In this study, we have identified a subset of human Th cells that infiltrates the epidermis in individuals with inflammatory skin disorders and is characterized by the secretion of IL-22 and TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, IL-4, or IL-17. In analogy to the Th17 subset, cells with this cytokine profile have been named the Th22 subset. Th22 clones derived from patients with psoriasis were stable in culture and exhibited a transcriptome profile clearly separate from those of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells; it included genes encoding proteins involved in tissue remodeling, such as FGFs, and chemokines involved in angiogenesis and fibrosis. Primary human keratinocytes exposed to Th22 supernatants expressed a transcriptome response profile that included genes involved in innate immune pathways and the induction and modulation of adaptive immunity. These proinflammatory Th22 responses were synergistically dependent on IL-22 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, Th22 supernatants enhanced wound healing in an in vitro injury model, which was exclusively dependent on IL-22. In conclusion, the human Th22 subset may represent a separate T cell subset with a distinct identity with respect to gene expression and function, present within the epidermal layer in inflammatory skin diseases. Future strategies directed against the Th22 subset may be of value in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  18. Reporting of ethical protection in recent oral and maxillofacial surgery research involving human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitak-Arnnop, P; Sader, R; Hervé, C; Dhanuthai, K; Bertrand, J-Ch; Hemprich, A

    2009-07-01

    This retrospective observational study investigated the frequency of reporting ethical approval and informed consent in recently published oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) research involving human subjects. All research involving human subjects published in the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery during January to June 2005-2007 were analysed for disclosure of ethical approval by a local ethical committee and obtaining informed consent from the subjects. 534 articles were identified; ethical approval was documented in 118 (22%) and individual patient consent in 135 (25%). 355 reports (67%) did not include a statement on ethical approval or informed consent and only 74 reports (14%) disclosed statements of both. Ethical documentation in retrospective and observational studies was scant; 12% of randomised controlled trials and 38% of non-random trials did not report both of ethical protections. Most recent OMS publications involving humans failed to mention ethical review or subjects' consent. Authors must adhere to the international research ethics guidelines and journal instructions, while editors should play a gatekeeper role to protect research participants, uphold scientific integrity and maintain public trust in the experimental process and OMS profession.

  19. Human factors assessment mechanical compression tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C. [BC Research Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    The design and use of mechanical compression tools in electrical distribution functions were examined from the point of view of effects of design and use of tools on human operators. Various alternative tools such as manual compression tools, battery operated tools, wedge pressure tools, hydraulic tools, and insulating piercing connectors were also examined for purposes of comparison. Results of the comparative assessment were summarized and a tool satisfaction ratings table was produced for Burndy MD6, Huskie-Robo (REC 258) and Ampact (small) tools, rating level of effort, fatigue experienced, tool mass, force required to crimp, ease of use, comfort while using the tool, maneuverability, and overall satisfaction. Both the battery operated tool as well as the wedge pressure tool have been found to have ergonomic advantages over the mechanical compression tool.

  20. Development of human factors design review guidelines(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Suk; Suh, Sang Moon; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop human factors engineering program review guidelines and alarm system review guidelines in order to resolve the two major technical issues: 25. Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model and 26. Review Criteria for Human Factors Aspects of Advanced Controls and Instrumentation, which are related to the development of human factors safety regulation guides being performed by KINS. For the development of human factors program review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG-0711 and added our comments by considering Korean regulatory situation and reviewing the reference documents of NUREG-0711. We also computerized the Korean version of NUREG-0711, additional comments, and selected portion of the reference documents for the developer of safety regulation guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG/CR-6105, which was published by NRC in 1994 as a guideline document for the human factors review of alarm systems. Then we will update the guidelines by reviewing the literature related to alarm design published after 1994. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Development of human factors design review guidelines(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Suk; Suh, Sang Moon; Lee, Hyun Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    The objective of this study is to develop human factors engineering program review guidelines and alarm system review guidelines in order to resolve the two major technical issues: '25, human factors engineering program review model' and '26, review criteria for human factors aspects of advanced controls and instrumentation', which are related to the development of human factors safety regulation guides being performed by KINS. For the development of human factors program review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG-0711 and added our comments by considering Korean regulatory situation and reviewing the reference documents NUREG--0711, additional comments, and selected portion of the reference documents for the developer of safety regulation guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guides in KINS to see the contents comparatively at a glance and use them easily. For the development of alarm system review guidelines, we made a Korean version of NUREG/CR-6105, which was published by NRC in 1994 as a guideline document for the human factors review of alarm system. Then we will update the guidelines by reviewing the literature related to alarm design published after 1994.

  2. Human Factors in Financial Trading: An Analysis of Trading Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver, Meghan; Reader, Tom W

    2016-09-01

    This study tests the reliability of a system (FINANS) to collect and analyze incident reports in the financial trading domain and is guided by a human factors taxonomy used to describe error in the trading domain. Research indicates the utility of applying human factors theory to understand error in finance, yet empirical research is lacking. We report on the development of the first system for capturing and analyzing human factors-related issues in operational trading incidents. In the first study, 20 incidents are analyzed by an expert user group against a referent standard to establish the reliability of FINANS. In the second study, 750 incidents are analyzed using distribution, mean, pathway, and associative analysis to describe the data. Kappa scores indicate that categories within FINANS can be reliably used to identify and extract data on human factors-related problems underlying trading incidents. Approximately 1% of trades (n = 750) lead to an incident. Slip/lapse (61%), situation awareness (51%), and teamwork (40%) were found to be the most common problems underlying incidents. For the most serious incidents, problems in situation awareness and teamwork were most common. We show that (a) experts in the trading domain can reliably and accurately code human factors in incidents, (b) 1% of trades incur error, and (c) poor teamwork skills and situation awareness underpin the most critical incidents. This research provides data crucial for ameliorating risk within financial trading organizations, with implications for regulation and policy. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  3. Human Factors of Queuing: A Library Circulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Jerry W.

    1981-01-01

    Classical queuing theories and their accompanying service facilities totally disregard the human factors in the name of efficiency. As library managers we need to be more responsive to human needs in the design of service points and make every effort to minimize queuing and queue frustration. Five references are listed. (Author/RAA)

  4. Research Directory for Manpower, Personnel, Training, and Human Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Design 89 * * * HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING (lIFE) * AIR FORCE Arnaiz J* Gentex Corp 717-282-3550 Support of the Evaluation of Night Vision Devices...Command 8 48 Armstrong R Mr Human Engineering Lab 10 76 Arnaiz J* Gentex Corp 10 90 Arnold D Office of the Chief of Naval Operations 6 41 Arnold L

  5. Human Factors Issues for Interaction with Bio-Inspired Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    subtle leaders of fish schools. Pheromone trails also suggest a way to support human interaction as has been explored to a limited extent... Human Factors issues for Interaction with Bio-Inspired Swarms Michael Lewis*, Michael Goodrich**, Katia Sycara+, Mark Steinberg++ * School of...Enabling a human to control such bio-inspired systems is a considerable challenge due to the limitations of each individual robot and the sheer

  6. Human Factors Throughout the Life Cycle: Lessons Learned from the Shuttle Program. [Human Factors in Ground Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    With the ending of the Space Shuttle Program, it is critical that we not forget the Human Factors lessons we have learned over the years. At every phase of the life cycle, from manufacturing, processing and integrating vehicle and payload, to launch, flight operations, mission control and landing, hundreds of teams have worked together to achieve mission success in one of the most complex, high-risk socio-technical enterprises ever designed. Just as there was great diversity in the types of operations performed at every stage, there was a myriad of human factors that could further complicate these human systems. A single mishap or close call could point to issues at the individual level (perceptual or workload limitations, training, fatigue, human error susceptibilities), the task level (design of tools, procedures and aspects of the workplace), as well as the organizational level (appropriate resources, safety policies, information access and communication channels). While we have often had to learn through human mistakes and technological failures, we have also begun to understand how to design human systems in which individuals can excel, where tasks and procedures are not only safe but efficient, and how organizations can foster a proactive approach to managing risk and supporting human enterprises. Panelists will talk about their experiences as they relate human factors to a particular phase of the shuttle life cycle. They will conclude with a framework for tying together human factors lessons-learned into system-level risk management strategies.

  7. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Leslie

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter.

  8. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a) a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b) an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c) application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter. PMID:20718963

  9. Involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor in nasal obstruction in patients with nasal allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Yamashita

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF enhances vascular permeability and that mast cells produce VEGF, suggesting the involvement of VEGF in allergic diseases. In the present study we quantitatively analyzed VEGF in the nasal lavage fluid of patients with nasal allergy. We performed nasal antigen challenge with Japanese cedar pollen antigen in 10 healthy adult volunteers and in 10 cedar pollen IgE-positive patients with nasal allergy. In all patients with nasal allergy, VEGF and histamine levels in the nasal lavage fluid reached a peak 30 min after antigen challenge, then returned to prechallenge values 2 h after antigen challenge. In these patients, the histamine level increased three-fold, while the VEGF level increased 10-fold. However, in all healthy adult volunteers, VEGF and histamine levels did not increase. A stronger correlation was noted between the ratio of decreased nasal cavity volume and the ratio of increased VEGF levels (R = 0.823; P < 0.001 than between the ratio of nasal cavity volume and the ratio of increased histamine levels (R = 0.660; P < 0.01. These results suggest that VEGF may contribute to the pathogenesis of nasal obstruction in the early phase of nasal allergy as a new factor involved in increasing vascular permeability.

  10. A pilot study on factors involved with work participation in the early stages of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Van der Hiele

    Full Text Available Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation.To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job.Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years.Patients with a paid job (57% reported better physical functioning (p<0.001, better memory functioning (p = 0.01 and a lower physical impact of fatigue (p = 0.018 than patients without a paid job. Physical functioning was the main predictor of employment status in a logistic regression model. In those with a paid job better memory functioning (r = 0.54, p = 0.005 and a lower social impact of fatigue (r =  -0.46, p = 0.029 correlated with an increased number of working hours.Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS.

  11. The influence of contextual factors on patient involvement during follow-up consultations after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thora G; Soelver, Lisbeth; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify the contextual factors that influence individual patient involvement during colorectal cancer surgical follow-up consultations. BACKGROUND: The healthcare system is subject to the requirement and expectation of greater involvement of patients and relatives...... the identification of current contextual factors. RESULTS: The results showed five contextual factors that seemed to have an impact on patient involvement. The first, 'Two dimensions of patient involvement: treatment-oriented and person-oriented' highlighted a dual interpretation of patient involvement...... in the consultation situation. The two dimensions seemed to be influenced by four additional factors: 'Doctors leading the agenda', 'Traditional health professional roles', 'Unclear responsibilities' and 'Guidance primarily focused on treatment'. CONCLUSION: The results showed how patient involvement in clinical...

  12. Identification of transcription factors potentially involved in the juvenile to adult phase transition in Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Mari-Cruz; Forment, Javier; Gadea, José; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Juarez, José; Navarro, Luís; Ancillo, Gema

    2013-11-01

    The juvenile to adult transition (JAT) in higher plants is required for them to reach reproductive competence. However, it is a poorly understood process in woody plants, where only a few genes have been definitely identified as being involved in this transition. This work aims at increasing our understanding of the mechanisms regulating the JAT in citrus. Juvenile and adult plants from Pineapple sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and Rough lemon (C. jambhiri) were used to screen for differentially expressed transcription factors (TFs) using a 1·15K microarray developed on the basis of the CitrusTF database. Murcott tangor (C. reticulata × C. sinensis) and Duncan grapefruit (C. paradisi) were incorporated into the quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR validation in order to select those genes whose phase-specific regulation was common to the four species. A browsable web database has been created with information about the structural and functional annotation related to 1152 unigenes of putative citrus TFs (CTFs). This database constitutes a valuable resource for research on transcriptional regulation and comparative genomics. Moreover, a microarray has been developed and used that contains these putative CTFs, in order to identify eight genes that showed differential expression in juvenile and adult meristems of four different species of citrus. Those genes have been characterized, and their expression pattern in vegetative and reproductive tissues has been analysed. Four of them are MADS-box genes, a family of TFs involved in developmental processes, whereas another one resembles MADS-box genes but lacks the MADS box itself. The other three showed high partial sequence similarity restricted to specific Arabidopsis protein domains but negligible outside those domains. The work presented here indicates that the JAT in citrus could be controlled by mechanisms that are in part common to those of Arabidopsis, but also somehow different, since specific factors

  13. Identification of CYP isozymes involved in benzbromarone metabolism in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kajiwara, Eri; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Oka, Hidenobu; Chiba, Kan

    2012-11-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is metabolized to 1'-hydroxy BBR and 6-hydroxy BBR in the liver. 6-Hydroxy BBR is further metabolized to 5,6-dihydroxy BBR. The aim of this study was to identify the CYP isozymes involved in the metabolism of BBR to 1'-hydroxy BBR and 6-hydroxy BBR and in the metabolism of 6-hydroxy BBR to 5,6-dihydroxy BBR in human liver microsomes. Among 11 recombinant P450 isozymes examined, CYP3A4 showed the highest formation rate of 1'-hydroxy BBR. The formation rate of 1'-hydroxy BBR significantly correlated with testosterone 6β-hydroxylation activity in a panel of 12 human liver microsomes. The formation of 1'-hydroxy BBR was completely inhibited by ketoconazole in pooled human liver microsomes. On the other hand, the highest formation rate of 6-hydroxy BBR was found in recombinant CYP2C9. The highest correlation was observed between the formation rate of 6-hydroxy BBR and diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation activity in 12 human liver microsomes. The formation of 6-hydroxy BBR was inhibited by tienilic acid in pooled human liver microsomes. The formation of 5,6-dihydroxy BBR from 6-hydroxy BBR was catalysed by recombinant CYP2C9 and CYP1A2. The formation rate of 5,6-dihydroxy BBR was significantly correlated with diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation activity and phenacetin O-deethylation activity in 12 human liver microsomes. The formation of 5,6-dihydroxy BBR was inhibited with either tienilic acid or α-naphthoflavone in human liver microsomes. These results suggest that (i) the formation of 1'-hydroxy BBR and 6-hydroxy BBR is mainly catalysed by CYP3A4 and CYP2C9, respectively, and (ii) the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy BBR is catalysed by CYP2C9 and CYP1A2 in human liver microsomes.

  14. Expression profile of critical genes involved in FGF signaling pathway in the developing human primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Chunni; Liu, Hong; Lin, Chensheng; Zhang, Yanding; Hu, Xuefeng

    2015-11-01

    Mammalian tooth development is regulated by paracrine signal molecules of several conserved family interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme. The expression patterns and regulative roles of FGF signaling have been extensively studied in the mouse odontogenesis; however, that is not well known in human tooth development. In order to unveil the molecular mechanisms that regulate human tooth morphogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of the critical molecules involved in FGF signaling pathway in the developing human tooth germ by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR, including FGF ligands, receptors, and intracellular transducer. We found overlapping but distinct expression pattern of FGF ligands and receptors in the different stages and components. Expression of FGF4, FGF7, FGF8, and FGF9 persists widespread in human tooth mesenchyme, which is quite different to that of in mouse. FGFR1 may be the major receptor in regulate mechanisms of FGF signals in human tooth development. Real-time RT-PCR indeed confirmed the results of in situ hybridization. Results of K-Ras, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, p-JNK, and p-PDK1 expression reveal spatial and temporal patterns of FGF signaling during morphogenesis and organogenesis of human tooth germ. Activity of the FGF signaling transducer protein in human tooth germ was much higher than that of in mouse. Our results provided important FGF singling information in the developing process, pinpoint to the domains where the downstream target genes of FGF signaling can be sought, and enlightened our knowledge about the nature of FGF signaling in human tooth germ.

  15. Comparative view on risk factor of human death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Atsuhiko; Sugahara, Tsutomu [Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Human being, namely. 'living' get involved in risk factor. Even if risk is limited to lethal danger, human history is coresponding with numberless risks from ancient up to today. For example, there is increase in risk of death by car-crash owing to get high efficiency in transfer. In Japan, the death toll by car-accident is about ten thousands per year constantly. State of deaths by car-accident not only include driver itself but cyclist and pedestrian. Death rate of both the cyclist and pedestrian amounts to 40% of all. In the age, rate of fracture as result of fall-down while walking is very high. It shows that the aged who give up driving and get out of danger car-crush are attacked the another accident as walkers. On type of danger, the decrease in risk of one-side come to increase in risk of other side. That is 'risk trade-off'. Examples of risk trade-off as above are numerous in environment. Acceptable death rate of various causes is about 10{sup -4} per year in generally. Flight accident happens on rare occasions (10{sup -7} per year in Japan, usually). Spite of insignificant probability, people fear by both reasons that the possibility of rescue is very few and the size of accident is enormous. In the cases of flight and nuclear power plant, estimated accidents is sever, but its probability is very small. Therefore, risk of annual deaths by accident must be considered as multiplication of size of risk (deaths per year) by probability (frequency per year). Obtained result by such analysis shall conduct to right risk perception and stable 'risk acceptance'. (author)

  16. Association of ABO Blood Types With Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Number of Involved Coronary Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golmohammadi Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. The relationship between ABO blood groups and main risk factors of CVD is unknown. So this study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between ABO blood groups and cardiovascular risk factors in otherwise healthy people. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, risk factors for CVD were screened in 300 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD who were hospitalized in Madani hospital (biggest heart center in Tabriz in 2013-2014 and evaluated by a questionnaire that aimed to extract information about age, sex, smoking, blood group type, weight, height, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and family history of CVD. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17. Results: Of the total selected 300 patients, 69.3% were male, 35.3% were smoker, 61% were hypertensive, 30.3% were diabetic mellitus, 31% had hyperlipidemia, 70.97% were obese and 17.3% had family history of CVD. The mean age was 62.06 ± 11.40 years. Blood groups O (28%, A (43.3%, B (19% and AB (7.3% were the most frequent ones, respectively. According to our results, we found that the rate of CAD in individuals with the blood group A was higher than the other blood groups. Regarding the risk factors, however, no significant difference was observed between the blood groups. Conclusion: A correlation was found between blood group A and the incidence of CAD and there was no significant difference between the blood groups and cardiovascular risk factors and number of involved coronary arteries.

  17. Transcription factor ZNF25 is associated with osteoblast differentiation of human skeletal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twine, Natalie A.; Harkness, Linda; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2016-01-01

    Background The differentiation of human bone marrow derived skeletal stem cells (known as human bone marrow stromal or mesenchymal stem cells, hMSCs) into osteoblasts involves the activation of a small number of well-described transcription factors. To identify additional osteoblastic transcription...... containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 and RAN-binding protein 3-like. We also observed enrichment in extracellular matrix organization, skeletal system development and regulation of ossification in the entire upregulated set of genes. Consistent with its function as a transcription factor during osteoblast...

  18. Nutritional and biochemical properties of human milk: II. Lipids, micronutrients, and bioactive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Palmero, M; Koletzko, B; Kunz, C; Jensen, R

    1999-06-01

    Human milk lipids contain preformed LCPUFA in considerable amounts, which serve as precursors for the formation of prostaglandins, prostacyclins, and other lipid mediators, as well as essential components in membrane-rich tissues (such as the brain and the retina), thus affecting functional outcomes. Besides a balanced nutrient composition and a number of conditionally essential nutrients, human milk provides different types and classes of bioactive factors, such as enzymes, hormones, and growth factors, many of which appear to have a role in supporting infantile growth and development. The bioactive agents include antimicrobial factors (e.g., secretory IgA, oligosaccharides, FA); anti-inflammatory agents; transporters (e.g., lactoferrin); and digestive enzymes (e.g., BSSL). Several nonpeptide hormones (thyroid hormones, cortisol, progesterone, pregnanediol, estrogens, and artificial contraceptive) and peptide hormones and growth factors (erythropoietin, hHG, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, epidermal growth factor insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, nerve growth factor, transforming growth factor-alpha, gastrointestinal regulatory peptides and thyroid-parathyroid hormones) have been isolated and quantitated in human milk. Some of these components are also involved in the maturation of the gastrointestinal tract of the infant. In addition to the passive benefits provided by human milk, several data support the hypothesis that breastfeeding promotes the development of the infant's own immune system, which might confer long-term benefits for the newborn infant. The risk of IDDM, Crohn's disease, and atopic disease is lower in individuals who had been breastfed during infancy. Areas of major interest in human milk research include the study of human milk synthesis and the contributions of dietary composition and maternal metabolism to human milk composition, infantile utilization of human milk components, and the study of bioactive components, such as

  19. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Besides their putative usage for therapies, stem cells are a promising tool for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis. For this purpose induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from patients harbouring specific mutations. In contrast to adult stem cells, iPS cells are pluripotent and can efficiently be grown in culture. However, iPS cells are modulated due to the ectopic induction of pluripotency, harbour other somatic mutations accumulated during the life span of the source cells, exhibit only imperfectly cleared epigenetic memory of the source cell, and are often genomically instable. In addition, iPS cells from patients only allow the investigation of mutations, which are not prenatally lethal. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have a high proliferation and differentiation potential, but raise ethical issues. Human embryos, which are not transferred in the course of in vitro fertilization, because of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a genetic defect, are still rarely donated for the establishment of ES cell lines. In addition, their usage for studies on gene functions for oncogenesis is hampered by the fact the ES cells are already tumorigenic per se. In 2003 amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been discovered, which meanwhile have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Monoclonal human AFS cell lines derived from amniocenteses have a high proliferative potential, are genomically stable and are not associated with ethical controversies. Worldwide amniocenteses are performed for routine human genetic diagnosis. We here discuss how generation and banking of monoclonal human AFS cell lines with specific chromosomal aberrations or monogenic disease mutations would allow to study the functional consequences of disease causing mutations. In addition, recently a protocol for efficient and highly reproducible siRNA-mediated long-term knockdown of endogenous gene

  20. Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-06-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence

  1. Mechanisms involved in alleviation of intestinal inflammation by bifidobacterium breve soluble factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Heuvelin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Soluble factors released by Bifidobacterium breve C50 (Bb alleviate the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immune cells, but their effect on intestinal epithelium remains elusive. To decipher the mechanisms accounting for the cross-talk between bacteria/soluble factors and intestinal epithelium, we measured the capacity of the bacteria, its conditioned medium (Bb-CM and other Gram(+ commensal bacteria to dampen inflammatory chemokine secretion. METHODS: TNFalpha-induced chemokine (CXCL8 secretion and alteration of NF-kappaB and AP-1 signalling pathways by Bb were studied by EMSA, confocal microscopy and western blotting. Anti-inflammatory capacity was also tested in vivo in a model of TNBS-induced colitis in mice. RESULTS: Bb and Bb-CM, but not other commensal bacteria, induced a time and dose-dependent inhibition of CXCL8 secretion by epithelial cells driven by both AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription pathways and implying decreased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and IkappaB-alpha molecules. In TNBS-induced colitis in mice, Bb-CM decreased the colitis score and inflammatory cytokine expression, an effect reproduced by dendritic cell conditioning with Bb-CM. CONCLUSIONS: Bb and secreted soluble factors contribute positively to intestinal homeostasis by attenuating chemokine production. The results indicate that Bb down regulate inflammation at the epithelial level by inhibiting phosphorylations involved in inflammatory processes and by protective conditioning of dendritic cells.

  2. 2014 Space Human Factors Engineering Standing Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), and NASA Headquarters on November 17, 2014 (list of participants is in Section XI of this report). The SRP reviewed the updated research plans for the Risk of Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design (HAB Risk) and the Risk of Performance Errors Due to Training Deficiencies (Train Risk). The SRP also received a status update on the Risk of Inadequate Critical Task Design (Task Risk), the Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI Risk), and the Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction (HCI Risk).

  3. Human Factors in Nuclear Power Engineering in Polish Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaczmarek-Kacprzak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper “Human factors in nuclear power engineering in Polish conditions” focuses on analysis of dynamics of preparing Polish society to build fi rst nuclear power plant in XXI century in Poland. Authors compare experience from constructing nuclear power plant Sizewell B (Great Britain and Sizewell C, which is in preparation phase with polish nuclear power program. Paper includes aspects e.g. of creating nuclear safety culture and social opinion about investment. Human factors in nuclear power engineering are as well important as relevant economical and technical factors, but very often negligible. In Poland where history about Czarnobyl is still alive, and social opinion is created on emotions after accident in Fukushima, human factors are crucial and should be under comprehensive consideration.

  4. [Rbf1 (RPG-box binding factor), a transcription factor involved in yeast-hyphal transition of Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Y; Ishii, N; Watanabe, M; Yoshihara, F; Arisawa, M

    1998-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen for fungal diseases which have become a major medical problem in the last few years is Candida albicans, which can grow both in yeast and hyphae forms. This ability of C. albicans is thought to contribute to its colonization and dissemination within host tissues. In a recent few years, accompanying the introduction of molecular biological tools into C. albicans organism, several factors involved in the signal transduction pathway for yeast-hyphal transition have been identified. One MAP kinase pathway in C. albicans, similar to that leading to STE12 activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been reported. C. albicans strains mutant in these genes show retarded filamentous growth on a solid media but no impairment of filamentous growth in mice. These results suggest two scenarios that a kinase signaling cascade plays a part in stimulating the morphological transition in C. albicans, and that there would be another signaling pathway effective in animals. In this latter true hyphal pathway, although some candidate proteins, such as Efg1 (transcription factor), Int1 (integrin-like membrane protein), or Phr1 (pH-regulated membrane protein), have been identified, it is still too early to say that we understand the whole picture of that cascade. We have cloned a C. albicans gene encoding a novel DNA binding protein, Rbf1, that predominantly localizes in the nucleus, and shows transcriptional activation capability. Disruption of the functional RBF1 genes of C. albicans induced the filamentous growth on all solid and liquid media tested, suggesting that Rbf1 might be another candidate for the true hyphal pathway. Relationships with other factors described above, and the target (regulated) genes of Rbf1 is under investigation.

  5. Effectiveness of human factors simulator; Eficiencia del simulador de factores humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moragas, F.

    2015-07-01

    En 2011, ANAV started the exploitation of the Human Factors Simulator installed in TECNATOM Training Center located in L'Hospital de L'Infant Tarragona. AVAN's Strategic Plan includes the Action Plan for the improvement of human behavior. The plan includes improving the efficiency of the efficiency of the human factors simulator. It is proposed to improve the efficiency into two different terms: winning effectiveness in modeling behaviors, and interweaving the activities in the simulator with the actual strategy of promoting Safety culture and human behaviour. (Author)

  6. Bifidobacterial enolase, a cell surface receptor for human plasminogen involved in the interaction with the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Centanni, Manuela; Turroni, Silvia; Vici, Manuela; Musiani, Francesco; Vitali, Beatrice; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2009-10-01

    The interaction with the host plasminogen/plasmin system represents a novel component in the molecular cross-talk between bifidobacteria and human host. Here, we demonstrated that the plasminogen-binding bifidobacterial species B. longum, B. bifidum, B. breve and B. lactis share the key glycolytic enzyme enolase as a surface receptor for human plasminogen. Enolase was visualized on the cell surface of the model strain B. lactis BI07. The His-tagged recombinant protein showed a high affinity for human plasminogen, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. By site-directed mutagenesis we demonstrated that the interaction between the B. lactis BI07 enolase and human plasminogen involves an internal plasminogen-binding site homologous to that of pneumococcal enolase. According to our data, the positively charged residues Lys-251 and Lys-255, as well as the negatively charged Glu-252, of the B. lactis BI07 enolase are crucial for plasminogen binding. Acting as a human plasminogen receptor, the bifidobacterial surface enolase is suggested to play an important role in the interaction process with the host.

  7. Equatorial segment protein (ESP) is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, M J; Digilio, L; Klotz, K; Shetty, J; Flickinger, C J; Herr, J C

    2008-01-01

    The equatorial segment of the sperm head is known to play a role in fertilization; however, the specific sperm molecules contributing to the integrity of the equatorial segment and in binding and fusion at the oolemma remain incomplete. Moreover, identification of molecular mediators of fertilization that are also immunogenic in humans is predicted to advance both the diagnosis and treatment of immune infertility. We previously reported the cloning of Equatorial Segment Protein (ESP), a protein localized to the equatorial segment of ejaculated human sperm. ESP is a biomarker for a subcompartment of the acrosomal matrix that can be traced through all stages of acrosome biogenesis (Wolkowicz et al, 2003). In the present study, ESP immunoreacted on Western blots with 4 (27%) of 15 antisperm antibody (ASA)-positive serum samples from infertile male patients and 2 (40%) of 5 ASA-positive female sera. Immunofluorescent studies revealed ESP in the equatorial segment of 89% of acrosome-reacted sperm. ESP persisted as a defined equatorial segment band on 100% of sperm tightly bound to the oolemma of hamster eggs. Antisera to recombinant human ESP inhibited both oolemmal binding and fusion of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. The results indicate that ESP is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion. Defined recombinant sperm immunogens, such as ESP, may offer opportunities for differential diagnosis of immune infertility.

  8. STUDY OF INJURY PATTERN IN HUMAN BEINGS IN ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS INVOLVING TWO WHEELERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seethalakshmi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available India experienced very rapid population growth from 48 million to 1.2 billion in a span of decades. In India rapid urbanization, industrialization, population explosion and migration of people in past two decades r esults in enormous growth in the field of road transportation. This resulted in increasing amount of the road traffic leading to increased risk for occurrence of road traffic accidents. In India road traffic injuries will be third leading cause of death by 2020 with the increase in the use of two wheelers and congestion and environmental pollution this mortality rate will continue to rise. Considering the preciousness of human lives, this study has been undertaken to analyse the pattern of injuries in Road Traffic Accidents Involving Two Wheelers to create awareness among the law enforcing authorities, transport authorities and public regarding two wheeler fatalities. A sincere attempt has been made in this study to analyse the distribution of the pattern of injuries sustained by two wheeler travellers, so that appropriate interventional strategies can be evolved at various levels and by different agencies. 147 Two wheeler Accident victims were randomly selected from 1063 road traffic accident cases brought t o the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Madras Medical College Chennai - 3 for routine medico legal examination. Preliminary data were collected from the medico legal documents such as history of the case, Inquest form, First Information Report, Accident Regis ter, Death Report, Clinical data submitted by the investigating officer at the time of medico legal examination. During autopsy, on external exami nation, nature of injury, size, number were measured in all cases. Internal organ injuries were recorded. Caus e of death was arrived at based on the findings made out during autopsy. Totally 147 motorcyclist victims were included in this study in which demographic factors such as age, sex, time of accident, manner of collision

  9. Chromatin remodeling and SWI/SNF2 factors in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokavec, Juraj; Podskocova, Jarmila; Zavadil, Jiri; Stopka, Tomas

    2008-05-01

    Chromatin structure and its changes or maintenance throughout developmental checkpoints play indispensable role in organismal homeostasis. Chromatin remodeling factors of the SWI/SNF2 superfamily use ATP hydrolysis to change DNA-protein contacts, and their loss-of-function or inappropriate increase leads to distinct human pathologic states. In this review, we focus on the translational view of human pathologic physiology involving SWI/SNF2 superfamily, combining latest finding from basic and clinical research. We discuss in mechanistic terms the consequences resulting from dose alteration of the SWI/SNF2 superfamily ATPases and emphasize the necessity of future human subject-based studies.

  10. Impact of Growth Factor Independence 1 in Human T-Cell Lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowska, Magdalena Julia; Dybkær, Karen; Johansen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    Impact of Growth Factor Independence 1 in Human T-Cell Lymphomas; Pathogenic Potential Identified by Insertional Mutagenesis in a Murine T-Cell Lymphoma Model. Magdalena Julia Dabrowska *,1, Karen Dybkaer *,1, Preben Johansen *,2, Hans Erik Johnsen1 and Finn Skou Pedersen *,3 1 Department...... role in the development of MLV induced lymphomas and strongly indicates that retroviral insertional mutagenesis in murine models of human NHLs can be used to identify new genes involved in lymphomagenesis and, by use of functional assays, their impact on human lymphomas can be evaluated. Disclosures...

  11. Factors Involved in the In Vitro Fermentability of Short Carbohydrates in Static Faecal Batch Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Gietl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research has focused on the positive effects of prebiotics on intestinal health and gut microbiota. The relationship between their chemical structure and their fermentation pattern by human intestinal microbiota is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of this relationship and identify factors that may be used to design galactooligosaccharides that reach more distal regions than commercial prebiotics which mainly target the proximal colon. The following factors were investigated: monomer type, linkage, substitution, and degree of polymerisation. Total organic acid production from sugars by faecal bacteria was fitted to a model which allowed an estimate of the time when half of the maximal organic acid concentration was reached (T50 in static faecal batch cultures. The different factors can be grouped by their effectiveness at prolonging fermentation time as follows: substitution is most effective, with methylgalactose, β-galactose-pentaacetate, D-fucose, and galactitol fermented more slowly than D-galactose. Monomers and linkage also influence fermentation time, with L rhamnose, arabinose, melezitose, and xylose being fermented significantly slower than D-glucose (P<0.05, maltose, isomaltose, cellobiose, and gentiobiose showing that Glcα1-6Glc and Glcβ1-4Glc were utilised slowest. Chain length had the smallest effect on fermentation time.

  12. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  13. Involvement of CYP2B6 in the biotransformation of propofol by human liver microsomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Bing; WANG Jun-ke; FENG Wan-yu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the cytochrome P4502B6 (CYP2B6) is involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes. Methods The change of propofol concentration in an incubation mixture with human liver microsomes was monitored by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), in order to calculate the rate constants of metabolism of propofol. The correlation between the rate constants and the rate of metabolism of CYP2B6 selective substrate bupropion, and the effect of two different CYP2B6 specific inhibitors on the propofol metabolism were examined. Results The mean rate constant of propofol metabolism by liver microsomes obtained from twelve individuals was 3.9 (95 % confidence intervals 3.3, 4.5) nmol·min-1·mg-1 protein. The rate constants of propofol metabolism by liver microsomes were significantly correlated with bupropion hydroxylation (r=0.888, P<0.001). Both selective chemical inhibitors of CYP2B6, orphenadrine and N, N′, N″-triethylenethiophosphoramide (thioTEPA), reduced the rate constants of propofol metabolism by 37.596 (P<0.001) and 42.796 (P<0.001)in liver microsomes, respectively. Conclusions CYP2B6 is predominantly involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes.

  14. Comparative Study of the Critical Chain and PERT Planning Methods: No Bad Human Behaviors Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ling Huang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 1997, Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM method has received a lot of attention and hundreds of successful cases have also been reported and all claims that it is possible to rapidly achieve highly reliable on-time delivery (OTD with short project lead time (PLT in multi-project environment. The main reason that CCPM can achieve highly reliable OTD and short PLT in multi-project environment can be contributed to that CCPM makes good use of safety time imbedded in tasks by two changes: logistical change and bad human behaviors change. However, if no bad human behaviors involved, does the mere emphasis on logistical change contributed to the success of project time reduction and OTD improvement? This is the key question still remained. A comparative study of the critical chain and Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT planning methods, no bad human behaviors involved, was performed in this study. The simulation results showed that in terms of mean project time, CCPM is no significantly better than PERT. However, in terms of plan reliability, CCPM achieve higher reliable than PERT did and this is the contribution of CCPM logistical change.

  15. Phenolic compounds alone or in combination may be involved in propolis effects on human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Eliza de Oliveira; Conti, Bruno José; Santiago, Karina Basso; Conte, Fernanda Lopes; Oliveira, Lucas Pires Garcia; Hernandes, Rodrigo Tavanelli; Golim, Marjorie de Assis; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2017-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product with a complex chemical composition. Its isolated compounds exert biological activities; however, its synergistic effects are unknown. The involvement of phenolic acids (caffeic - Caf, dihydrocinnamic - Cin and p-coumaric - Cou) alone or in combination was investigated in the action of propolis in human monocytes. Cell viability was analysed by MTT assay; TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); cell markers expression by flow cytometry; colony-forming units were counted to assess the microbicidal activity; and H2 O2 production was analysed by colorimetric assay. Treatments did not affect monocytes viability. Propolis and combinations containing Caf enhanced TNF-α production by resting cells. Propolis, Cin, Cou and Caf + Cin stimulated IL-6 production. All treatments upregulated IL-10. In LPS-stimulated cells, treatments downregulated IL-6 and maintained TNF-α and IL-10 production. A lower TLR-2 expression was seen than propolis. Caf + Cin enhanced TLR-4 expression. Propolis, Caf and Caf + Cin stimulated H2 O2 production, whereas propolis, Cin, Cou, and Caf + Cin + Cou induced a higher fungicidal activity. Cin and Cin + Cou increased the bactericidal activity of human monocytes. Propolis activated human monocytes, and acids were involved differently in propolis activity. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Are the risk and protective factors similar for gang-involved, pressured-to-join, and non-gang-involved youth? A social-ecological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrin, Gabriel J; Hong, Jun Sung; Espelage, Dorothy L

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the risk and protective factors for gang involvement among subgroups of youth (i.e., current or former gang members, youth who resisted gang membership, and non-gang-involved youth) using the social-ecological framework. Middle and high school students (N = 17,366) from school districts in a large Midwestern county participated. Results indicated that males were more likely than females to be involved in gangs. For the individual context, our findings indicate that racial and ethnic minorities, females, and youth with depression/suicidal ideation are likely to be at risk for gang involvement. For the family context, we found that having gang-involved family members and family dysfunction are related to youth gang involvement. For the peer context, peers' alcohol and drug use and bullying were significantly associated with gang involvement. For the school context, as our results demonstrate, youth who perceived fair treatment from teachers and other adults in school and those with a sense of belonging in school are more likely to avoid gang membership. For the neighborhood context, we found that presence of adult support in the neighborhood and perceived neighborhood safety are negatively associated with gang membership. Findings suggest that gang prevention efforts need to target multiple ecologies that surround and influence youth. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Studying Factors Involved in Biogenesis of Lysobacter sp. XL1 Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryakova, I V; Suzina, N E; Vinokurova, N G; Shishkova, N A; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL1 produces outer membrane vesicles that are heterogeneous in size, density, and protein composition. One of the subpopulations is secretory vesicles for lytic protease L5 of Lysobacter sp. XL1 (Kudryakova et al. (2015) FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 362, fnv137). Protein L5 was assumed to influence biogenesis of these secretory vesicles that contain it. Using a Pseudomonas fluorescens Q2-87/B expression system, it was shown that the recombinant L5 protein may act as a factor of vesicle biogenesis. This points to a possible involvement of L5 protein in Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicle biogenesis. Furthermore, it was established that the main phospholipid of Lysobacter sp. XL1 vesicles is cardiolipin, and vesicles are formed predominantly of outer membrane regions enriched with this phospholipid. This indicates that cardiolipin participates in biogenesis of all vesicle subpopulations in Lysobacter sp. XL1.

  18. Analysis of molecular markers as predictive factors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paula, Luciana Marques; De Moraes, Luis Henrique Ferreira; Do Canto, Abaeté Leite

    2017-01-01

    Nodal status is the most significant independent prognostic factor in breast cancer. Identification of molecular markers would allow stratification of patients who require surgical assessment of lymph nodes from the large numbers of patients for whom this surgical procedure is unnecessary, thus...... leading to a more accurate prognosis. However, up to now, the reported studies are preliminary and controversial, and although hundreds of markers have been assessed, few of them have been used in clinical practice for treatment or prognosis in breast cancer. The purpose of the present study...... ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase 2, BCL2 associated agonist of cell death, G2 and S-phase expressed 1 and PAX interacting protein 1 genes, described as prognostic markers in breast cancer in a previous microarray study, are also predictors of lymph node involvement in breast carcinoma Reverse...

  19. Consistent analysis of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors involving weakly- and strongly-bound nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okołowicz, J.; Lam, Y. H.; Płoszajczak, M.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    There is a considerable interest in understanding the dependence of one-nucleon removal cross sections on the asymmetry of the neutron Sn and proton Sp separation energies, following a large amount of experimental data and theoretical analyses in a framework of sudden and eikonal approximations of the reaction dynamics. These theoretical calculations involve both the single-particle cross section and the shell-model description of the projectile initial state and final states of the reaction residues. The configuration mixing in shell-model description of nuclear states depends on the proximity of one-nucleon decay threshold but does it depend sensitively on Sn -Sp? To answer this question, we use the shell model embedded in the continuum to investigate the dependence of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors on the asymmetry of Sn and Sp for mirror nuclei 24Si, 24Ne and 28S, 28Mg and for a series of neon isotopes (20 ≤ A ≤ 28).

  20. Discovery of insect and human dengue virus host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, October M; Barrows, Nicholas J; Souza-Neto, Jayme A; Robinson, Timothy J; Hershey, Christine L; Rodgers, Mary A; Ramirez, Jose L; Dimopoulos, George; Yang, Priscilla L; Pearson, James L; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2009-04-23

    Dengue fever is the most frequent arthropod-borne viral disease of humans, with almost half of the world's population at risk of infection. The high prevalence, lack of an effective vaccine, and absence of specific treatment conspire to make dengue fever a global public health threat. Given their compact genomes, dengue viruses (DENV-1-4) and other flaviviruses probably require an extensive number of host factors; however, only a limited number of human, and an even smaller number of insect host factors, have been identified. Here we identify insect host factors required for DENV-2 propagation, by carrying out a genome-wide RNA interference screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells using a well-established 22,632 double-stranded RNA library. This screen identified 116 candidate dengue virus host factors (DVHFs). Although some were previously associated with flaviviruses (for example, V-ATPases and alpha-glucosidases), most of the DVHFs were newly implicated in dengue virus propagation. The dipteran DVHFs had 82 readily recognizable human homologues and, using a targeted short-interfering-RNA screen, we showed that 42 of these are human DVHFs. This indicates notable conservation of required factors between dipteran and human hosts. This work suggests new approaches to control infection in the insect vector and the mammalian host.

  1. Integrating human factors research and surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouhed, Daniel; Gewertz, Bruce; Wiegmann, Doug; Catchpole, Ken

    2012-12-01

    To provide a review of human factors research within the context of surgery. We searched PubMed for relevant studies published from the earliest available date through February 29, 2012. The search was performed using the following keywords: human factors, surgery, errors, teamwork, communication, stress, disruptions, interventions, checklists, briefings, and training. Additional articles were identified by a manual search of the references from the key articles. As 2 human factors specialists, a senior clinician, and a junior clinician, we carefully selected the most appropriate exemplars of research findings with specific relevance to surgical error and safety. Seventy-seven articles of relevance were selected and reviewed in detail. Opinion pieces and editorials were disregarded; the focus was solely on articles based on empirical evidence, with a particular emphasis on prospectively designed studies. The themes that emerged related to the development of human factors theories, the application of those theories within surgery, a specific interest in the concept of flow, and the theoretical basis and value of human-related interventions for improving safety and flow in surgery. Despite increased awareness of safety, errors routinely continue to occur in surgical care. Disruptions in the flow of an operation, such as teamwork and communication failures, contribute significantly to such adverse events. While it is apparent that some incidence of human error is unavoidable, there is much evidence in medicine and other fields that systems can be better designed to prevent or detect errors before a patient is harmed. The complexity of factors leading to surgical errors requires collaborations between surgeons and human factors experts to carry out the proper prospective and observational studies. Only when we are guided by this valid and real-world data can useful interventions be identified and implemented.

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor involvement in myocardial remodeling following infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Huang, Valerie; Chen, Yuanjian; Ahokas, Robert A; Sun, Yao

    2011-11-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs in the infarcted heart (MI). The underlying regulatory mechanisms are under investigation. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a family of growth factors that stimulates cell growth, differentiation and migration. Herein, we sought to determine whether PDGF is involved in cardiac repair/remodeling following MI. The temporal and spatial expressions of PDGF isoforms (A, B, C and D) and PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-α and β as well as cell types expressing PDGF were examined in the infarcted rat heart. Sham-operated rats served as controls. We found that the normal myocardium expressed all PDGF isoforms, and cell types expressing PDGF were primarily interstitial cells. Following MI, PDGF-A and D were significantly increased in the infarcted myocardium during 6 weeks of the observation period and cells expressing PDGF-A and D were primarily endothelial cells, macrophages and myofibroblasts (myoFb). PDGF-B and C expressions were, however, reduced in the infarcted heart. In the noninfarcted myocardium, PDGF-D expression was increased in the late stage of MI and cells expressing PDGF-D were predominantly fibroblasts. Both PDGFR-α and β were significantly increased in the infarcted myocardium in the early and late stages of MI and in the noninfarcted myocardium in the late stage of MI. Enhanced PDGF-A, PDGF-D and PDGFR are coincident with angiogenesis, and inflammatory and fibrogenic responses in the infarcted myocardium, suggesting their regulation on cardiac repair. Elevated PDGF-D in the noninfarcted myocardium suggests its involvement in the development of interstitial fibrosis that appears in the late stage of MI.

  3. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  4. Trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis involves postsynaptic modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Melanie A; Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I

    2002-01-15

    Neurotrophic factors have well established roles in neuronal development, although their precise involvement in synapse formation and plasticity is yet to be fully determined. Using soma-soma synapses between identified Lymnaea neurons, we have shown recently that trophic factors are required for excitatory but not inhibitory synapse formation. However, neither the precise site (presynaptic versus postsynaptic cell) nor the underlying mechanisms have yet been defined. In the present study, synapse formation between the presynaptic cell visceral dorsal 4 (VD4) and its postsynaptic partner right pedal dorsal 1 (RPeD1) was examined to define the cellular mechanisms mediating trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis in cell culture. When paired in a soma-soma configuration in the presence of defined media (DM, nonproteinacious), mutually inhibitory synapses were appropriately reconstructed between VD4 and RPeD1. However, when cells were paired in the presence of increasing concentrations of Lymnaea brain-conditioned medium (CM), a biphasic synapse (initial excitatory synaptic component followed by inhibition) developed. The CM-induced excitatory synapse formation required trophic factor-mediated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases in the postsynaptic cell, RPeD1, and a concomitant modulation of existing postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Specifically, when RPeD1 was isolated in DM, exogenously applied ACh induced a hyperpolarizing response that was sensitive to the AChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). In contrast, a single RPeD1 isolated in CM exhibited a biphasic response to exogenously applied ACh. The initial depolarizing phase of the biphasic response was sensitive to both mecamylamine and hexamethonium chloride, whereas the hyperpolarizing phase was blocked by MLA. In soma-soma-paired neurons, the VD4-induced synaptic responses in RPeD1 were sensitive to the cholinergic antagonists in a concentration range similar to that

  5. Study of signal transduction factors involved in mycoparasitic response of Trichoderma atroviride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lorito M; Zeilinger S; Ambrosino P; Brunner K; Reithner B; Mach R L; Woo S L; Cristilli M; Scala F

    2004-01-01

    @@ Numerous Trichoderma spp. are mycoparasites and commercially applied as biological control agents against a large number of plant pathogenic fungi. The mycoparasitic interaction is host-specific and several research strategies have been applied to identify the main genes and compounds involved in the antagonist-plant-pathogen three-way interaction. During mycoparasitism, signals from the host fungus are recognised by Trichoderma, stimulating antifungal activities that are accompanied by morphological changes and the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics. Interestingly some morphological changes appeared highly conserved in the strategy of pathogenicity within the fungal world, i.e. the formation of appressoria as well as the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes seem to be general mechanisms of attack both for plant pathogens and mycoparasitic antagonists. This knowledge is being used to identify receptors and key components of signalling pathways involved in fungus-fungus interaction. For this purpose we have cloned the first genes (tmk1 , tga1 , tga3) from T. atroviride showing a high similarity to MAP kinase and G protein subunits (see abstract by Zeilinger et al.),which have been found to have an important role in pathogenicity by Magnaporthe grisea. To identify the function and involvement of these factors in mycoparasitism by T. atroviride, tmk1, tga1, tga3disruptant strains were produced. The knock-out mutants were tested by in vivo biocontrol assays for their ability to inhibit soil and foliar plant pathogens such as Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium ultimum and Botrytis cinerea . Disruption of these genes corresponded to a complete loss of biocontrol ability,suggesting a significant role in mycoparasitism. In particular, it has been suggested that tga3 regulates the expression of chitinase-encoding genes, the secretion of the corresponding enzymes and the process of conidiation. Comparative proteome analysis of wild type and disruptants supported this

  6. Perpetual factors involved in performance of air traffic controllers using a microwave landing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershzohn, G.

    1978-01-01

    The task involved the control of two simulated aircraft targets per trial, in a 37.0 -km radius terminal area, by means of conventional radar vectoring and/or speed control. The goal was to insure that the two targets crossed the Missed Approach Point (MAP) at the runway threshold exactly 60 sec apart. The effects on controller performance of the MLS configuration under wind and no-wind conditions were examined. The data for mean separation time between targets at the MAP and the range about that mean were analyzed by appropriate analyses of variance. Significant effects were found for mean separation times as a result of the configuration of the MLS and for interaction between the configuration and wind conditions. The analysis of variance for range indicated significantly poorer performance under the wind condition. These findings are believed to be a result of certain perceptual factors involved in radar air traffic control (ATC) using the MLS with separation of targets in time.

  7. cDNA microarray reveals signaling pathways involved in hormones expression of human pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yue-Yun; Qi, Xiao-Fei; Song, Shao-Jun; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Xin; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Teng, Yun; Han, Ze-Guang

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary, a master gland of neuroendocrine system, secretes hormones that orchestrate many physiological processes, under the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To investigate the genes involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, homemade cDNA microarray containing 14,800 human genes/ESTs were used to profile the gene expression in both fetal and adult pituitaries. Seven hundred and twelve known genes changed over 2-fold between the both tissues. Of which, 23 genes were changed with hormones expression in aging were confirmed by RT-PCR, not only the known regulators such as Pit1, GATA4, ESRRA, GABA-A, and EMK, but also LOC55884, DUSP3, PNN, and RCL, which had not been reported to be involved in the hormones expression. Correspondingly, the mRNAs of GH, PRL, POMC, TSH-beta, FSH-beta, and LH-beta, was increased as much as 6- to 20-fold in adult pituitary than those in fetal pituitary, by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay. In addition, the mRNAs of signaling pathways, such as cAMP-PKA-CREB, PI3K-Akt, and PKA-ERK were further investigated. Of them, it was only cAMP-PKA-CREB pathway, but not PI3K-Akt and PKA-ERK have the same expressing pattern as hormones. It suggested that cDNA microarray is highly advantages to profile the differential expressed genes that were involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, but it might ignore some responding proteins regulated posttranscriptionally.

  8. GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1, Involved in Pre-mRNA Splicing, Is Essential for Megagametogenesis and Embryogenesis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man Liu; Li Yuan; Nai-You Liu; Dong-Qiao Shi; Jie Liu; Wei-Cai Yang

    2009-01-01

    RNA biogenesis is essential and vital for accurate expression of genes. It is obvious that cells cannot continue normal metabolism when RNA splicing is interfered with. sgt13018 is such a mutant, with partial loss of function of GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1 (GFA1); a gene likely involved in RNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis. The mutant is featured in the phenotype of diminished female gametophyte development at stage FG5 and is associated with the arrest of early embryo development in Arabidopsis. Bioinformatics data showed that homoiogs of gene GFA1 in yeast and human encode putative U5 snRNPspecific proteins required for pre-mRNA splicing. Furthermore, the result of yeast two-hybrid assay indicated that GFA1 physically interacted with AtBrr2 and AtPrp8, the putative U5 snRNP components, of Arabidopsis. This investigation suggests that GFA1 is involved in mRNA biogenesis through interaction with AtBrr2 and AtPrp8 and functions in megagametogeneeis and embryogenesis in plant.

  9. 77 FR 3500 - VTECH Communications, Inc., Human Factors Department, Beaverton, OR; Amended Certification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Communications, Inc., Human Factors Department, Beaverton, OR; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To... the subject firm should read VTech Communications, Inc., Human Factors Department, Beaverton, Oregon... VTech Communications, Inc., Human Factors Department, Beaverton, Oregon. The intent of the...

  10. Fibulin-1 purification from human plasma using affinity chromatography on Factor H-Sepharose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiScipio, Richard G; Liddington, Robert C; Schraufstatter, Ingrid U

    2016-05-01

    A method is reported to purify Fibulin-1 from human plasma resulting in a 36% recovery. The steps involve removal of the cryoglobulin and the vitamin K dependent proteins followed by polyethylene glycol and ammonium sulfate precipitations, DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography and finally Factor H-Sepharose affinity purification. The procedure is designed to be integrated into an overall scheme for the isolation of over 30 plasma proteins from a single batch of human plasma. Results from mass spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blotting indicate that human plasma Fibulin-1 is a single chain of the largest isotype. Functional binding assays demonstrated calcium ion dependent interaction of Fibulin-1 for fibrinogen, fibronectin, and Factor H. The procedure described is the first to our knowledge that enables a large scale purification of Fibulin-1 from human plasma.

  11. Trisomy 21- affected placentas highlight prerequisite factors for human trophoblast fusion and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malassiné, André; Frendo, Jean-Louis; Evain-Brion, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Trophoblastic cell fusion is one essential step of the human trophoblast differentiation pathway and is a multifactorial and dynamic process finely regulated and still poorly known. Disturbances of syncytiotrophoblast formation are observed in numerous pathological clinical conditions such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation and trisomy 21. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the different membrane proteins directly involved in trophoblastic cell fusion, which we identified by using the physiological model of primary culture of villous trophoblastic cells. Connexin 43 and gap junctional intercellular communication point to the role of molecular exchanges through connexin channels preceding membrane fusion. Zona occludens-1, which can interact with connexin 43, is also directly involved in trophoblast fusion. The recently identified fusogenic membrane retroviral envelop glycoproteins syncytin 1 (encoded by the HERV-W gene) and syncytin 2 (encoded by the FRD gene) and their receptors are major factors involved in human placental development . We describe the increasing number of factors promoting or inhibiting trophoblast fusion and differentiation and emphasize the role of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and its receptor. Indeed, in trisomy 21 the dynamic process leading to membrane fusion is impaired due to an abnormal hCG signaling. This abnormal trophoblast fusion and differentiation in trisomy 21-affected placenta is reversible in vitro. Trisomy 21 trophoblastic cell culture may therefore be useful to identify the possible large number of prerequisite factors involved in trophoblast fusion, the limiting step of trophoblast differentiation.

  12. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus strains involved in human and bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Susana; García, Pilar; Fernández, Leonides; Jiménez, Esther; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; del Campo, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2011-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main etiological agents of mastitis in different mammalian species. At present, it is unknown whether strains isolated from human mastitis cases share phenotypic properties and genetic background with those obtained from animal mastitis cases. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize S. aureus strains isolated from women with lactational mastitis and to compare them with the strains responsible for bovine mastitis and noninfectious strains. All the strains were genotyped by both pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing and submitted to a characterization scheme that included diverse assays related to pathogenic potential and antibiotic resistance. Apart from siderophore production, no significant association was observed between the strains from bovine and human mastitis. Statistical differences between human- and bovine-mastitis-associated strains were detected for some traits and virulence determinants, such as the presence of prophages and cna and hlb genes, which were more frequently found within the bovine group. On the contrary, resistance to penicillin was significantly higher among strains isolated from human lactational mastitis, probably related to the common presence of the blaZ gene. A high genetic diversity was found among the strains involved in mastitis in breastfeeding women. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Human factor engineering applied to nuclear power plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, A. [TECNATOM SA, BWR General Electric Business Manager, Madrid (Spain); Valdivia, J.C. [TECNATOM SA, Operation Engineering Project Manager, Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, A. [TECNATOM SA, Operation Engineering Div. Manager, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    For the design and construction of new nuclear power plants as well as for maintenance and operation of the existing ones new man-machine interface designs and modifications are been produced. For these new designs Human Factor Engineering must be applied the same as for any other traditional engineering discipline. Advantages of implementing adequate Human Factor Engineering techniques in the design of nuclear reactors have become not only a fact recognized by the majority of engineers and operators but also an explicit requirement regulated and mandatory for the new designs of the so called advanced reactors. Additionally, the big saving achieved by a nuclear power plant having an operating methodology which significantly decreases the risk of operating errors makes it necessary and almost vital its implementation. The first step for this is preparing a plan to incorporate all the Human Factor Engineering principles and developing an integral design of the Instrumentation and Control and Man-machine interface systems. (author)

  14. Automotive Technology and Human Factors Research: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyuki Akamatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the history of automotive technology development and human factors research, largely by decade, since the inception of the automobile. The human factors aspects were classified into primary driving task aspects (controls, displays, and visibility, driver workspace (seating and packaging, vibration, comfort, and climate, driver’s condition (fatigue and impairment, crash injury, advanced driver-assistance systems, external communication access, and driving behavior. For each era, the paper describes the SAE and ISO standards developed, the major organizations and conferences established, the major news stories affecting vehicle safety, and the general social context. The paper ends with a discussion of what can be learned from this historical review and the major issues to be addressed. A major contribution of this paper is more than 180 references that represent the foundation of automotive human factors, which should be considered core knowledge and should be familiar to those in the profession.

  15. Addressing the human factors issues associated with control room modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.; Stubler, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology; Kramer, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    1998-03-01

    Advanced human-system interface (HSI) technology is being integrated into existing nuclear plants as part of plant modifications and upgrades. The result of this trend is that hybrid HSIs are created, i.e., HSIs containing a mixture of conventional (analog) and advanced (digital) technology. The purpose of the present research is to define the potential effects of hybrid HSIs on personnel performance and plant safety and to develop human factors guidance for safety reviews of them where necessary. In support of this objective, human factors issues associated with hybrid HSIs were identified. The issues were evaluated for their potential significance to plant safety, i.e., their human performance concerns have the potential to compromise plant safety. The issues were then prioritized and a subset was selected for design review guidance development.

  16. 40 CFR 26.1203 - Prohibition of research involving intentional exposure of any human subject who is a pregnant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... intentional exposure of any human subject who is a pregnant woman (and therefore her fetus), a nursing woman... Exposure of Human Subjects who are Children or Pregnant or Nursing Women § 26.1203 Prohibition of research involving intentional exposure of any human subject who is a pregnant woman (and therefore her fetus),...

  17. Identification of pathogenic factors potentially involved in Staphylococcus aureus keratitis using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamila; Cole, Nerida; Hume, Emma B H; Garthwaite, Linda L; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Walsh, Bradley J; Willcox, Mark D P

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus is a leading cause of microbial keratitis, characterized by destruction of the cornea by bacterial exoproteins and host-associated factors. The aim of this study was to compare extracellular and cell-associated proteins produced by two different isolates of S. aureus, a virulent clinical isolate (Staph 38) and a laboratory strain (Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4) of weaker virulence in the mouse keratitis model. Proteins were analyzed using 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by subsequent mass spectrometry. Activity of staphylococcal adhesins was assessed by allowing strains to bind to various proteins adsorbed onto polymethylmethacrylate squares. Thirteen proteins in the extracellular fraction and eight proteins in the cell-associated fractions after bacterial growth were produced in increased amounts in the clinical isolate Staph 38. Four of these proteins were S. aureus virulence factor adhesins, fibronectin binding protein A, staphopain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 2 and extracellular adherence protein. The clinical isolate Staph 38 adhered to a greater extent to all mammalian proteins tested, indicating the potential of the adhesins to be active on its surface. Other proteins with increased expression in Staph 38 included potential moonlighting proteins and proteins involved in transcription or translation. This is the first demonstration of the proteome of S. aureus isolates from keratitis. These results indicate that the virulent clinical isolate produces more potentially important virulence factors compared to the less virulent laboratory strain and these may be associated with the ability of a S. aureus strain to cause more severe keratitis.

  18. ROP6 is involved in root hair deformation induced by Nod factors in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Danxia; Li, Xiangyong; Han, Yapeng; Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hongyu; Wang, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Roots of leguminous plants perceive Nod factor signals, and then root hair deformation responses such as swelling and curling are activated. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of such root hair deformation. We have previously shown that LjROP6, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, was identified as an NFR5 (Nod Factor Receptor 5)-interacting protein and participated in symbiotic nodulation in Lotus japonicus. In this study, we identified ten LjROP GTPases including LjROP6, and they were distributed into groups II, III, IV but not group I by phylogenetic analysis. The expression profiles of ten LjROP genes during nodulation were examined. LjROP6 belonged to group IV and interacted with NFR5 in a GTP-dependent manner. Overexpression of either wild-type ROP6 or a constitutively active mutant (ROP6-CA) generated root hair tip growth depolarization, while overexpression of a dominant negative mutant (ROP6-DN) exhibited normal root hair growth. After inoculating with Mesorhizobium loti or adding Nod factors to hairy roots, overexpression of ROP6 and ROP6-CA exhibited extensive root hair deformation, while overexpression of ROP6-DN inhibited root hair deformation. The infection event and nodule number were increased in ROP6 and ROP6-CA overexpressing transgenic plants; but decreased in ROP6-DN overexpressing transgenic plants. These studies provide strong evidence that ROP6 GTPase, which binds NFR5 in a GTP-dependent manner, is involved in root hair development as well as root hair deformation responses induced by NFs in the early stage of symbiotic interaction in L. japonicus.

  19. Risk and Protective Factors of Suicidal Ideation and Attempt among Adolescents with Different Types of School Bullying Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Tai-Ling; Yang, Pinchen; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Suicide has been found to be prevalent among adolescents involved in bullying; however, there has been a lack of research examining whether the risk and protective factors of suicidal ideation and attempt are different among adolescents with different types of bullying involvement. The aims of this study were to examine the risk and protective factors of suicidal ideation and attempt among adolescents with different experiences of bullying involvement, victimization, and perpetration. A total of 4,533 adolescents participated in this study. Different groups of bullying involvement, victimization, and perpetration were determined through use of the Chinese version of the School Bullying Experience Questionnaire. The associations of suicidal ideation and attempt with possible risk factors (domestic violence, overweight, depression, anxiety, and alcohol abuse) and protective factors (family support and self-esteem) were examined using logistic regression analysis. Pure victims, pure perpetrators, and victim-perpetrators were more likely to report suicidal ideation and attempt than the neutral group. The risk and protective factors of suicidal ideation and attempt were different across adolescents with different experiences of bullying involvement, victimization, and perpetrators. The risk of suicide should be monitored among adolescents who are involved in any type of bullying. The risk and protective factors of suicide identified in this study should be taken into consideration in prevention and intervention programs for suicide in adolescents involved in bullying.

  20. Human Factors and Habitability Challenges for Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2015-01-01

    As NASA is planning to send humans deeper into space than ever before, adequate crew health and performance will be critical for mission success. Within the NASA Human Research Program (HRP), the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) team is responsible for characterizing the risks associated with human capabilities and limitations with respect to long-duration spaceflight, and for providing mitigations (e.g., guidelines, technologies, and tools) to promote safe, reliable and productive missions. SHFH research includes three domains: Advanced Environmental Health (AEH), Advanced Food Technology (AFT), and Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE). The AEH portfolio focuses on understanding the risk of microbial contamination of the spacecraft and on the development of standards for exposure to potential toxins such as chemicals, bacteria, fungus, and lunar/Martian dust. The two risks that the environmental health project focuses on are adverse health effects due to changes in host-microbe interactions, and risks associated with exposure to dust in planetary surface habitats. This portfolio also proposes countermeasures to these risks by making recommendations that relate to requirements for environmental quality, foods, and crew health on spacecraft and space missions. The AFT portfolio focuses on reducing the mass, volume, and waste of the entire integrated food system to be used in exploration missions, and investigating processing methods to extend the shelf life of food items up to five years, while assuring that exploration crews will have nutritious and palatable foods. The portfolio also delivers improvements in both the food itself and the technologies for storing and preparing it. SHFE sponsors research to establish human factors and habitability standards and guidelines in five risk areas, and provides improved design concepts for advanced crew interfaces and habitability systems. These risk areas include: Incompatible vehicle/habitat design

  1. Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tiffaney Miller

    2017-01-01

    Research results have shown that more than half of aviation, aerospace and aeronautics mishaps incidents are attributed to human error. As a part of Quality within space exploration ground processing operations, the identification and or classification of underlying contributors and causes of human error must be identified, in order to manage human error.This presentation will provide a framework and methodology using the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), as an analysis tool to identify contributing factors, their impact on human error events, and predict the Human Error probabilities (HEPs) of future occurrences. This research methodology was applied (retrospectively) to six (6) NASA ground processing operations scenarios and thirty (30) years of Launch Vehicle related mishap data. This modifiable framework can be used and followed by other space and similar complex operations.

  2. Meeting Human Reliability Requirements through Human Factors Design, Testing, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    In the design of novel systems, it is important for the human factors engineer to work in parallel with the human reliability analyst to arrive at the safest achievable design that meets design team safety goals and certification or regulatory requirements. This paper introduces the System Development Safety Triptych, a checklist of considerations for the interplay of human factors and human reliability through design, testing, and modeling in product development. This paper also explores three phases of safe system development, corresponding to the conception, design, and implementation of a system.

  3. NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubec, Keith; Connolly, Janis

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history, and development of NASA-STD-3001, NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health, and the related Human Integration Design Handbook. Currently being developed from NASA-STD-3000, this project standard currently in review will be available in two volumes, (i.e., Volume 1 -- VCrew Health and Volume 2 -- Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health) and the handbook will be both available as a pdf file and as a interactive website.

  4. Human factors in aircraft incidents: results of a 7-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, C E; Reynard, W D

    1984-10-01

    Human error causes or contributes to considerably over half of all aviation mishaps. This report describes a 7-year study of aircraft incident data conducted in an attempt to further our understanding of the phenomenon of human error. The study of incidents as a surrogate for aircraft accidents is relevant only if incidents constitute a population or universe of which accidents are a subset. This assumption has been examined in a study of over 35,000 reports of aviation incidents collected from 1976-83 by the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System. One-third of the reports involve conflicts among aircraft. The most common single-aircraft anomalies in flight involve altitude or track deviations. The most common controller errors involve failure to coordinate traffic with other elements of the air traffic control system. Analysis of these reports indicates that both human and system factors contributing to human errors can be identified. Many other incidents involve shortcomings specifically of the human, rather than of the system. Failures of control are rare in this series, but failures of decision-making and cockpit resource management are frequent. Boredom, complacency and ennui appear to underlie some failures, while very high workloads are associated with others. These data indicate that at least several categories of aircraft accidents involving operational and human factors are, in fact, subsets of populations of incidents containing the same elements. The environment in which an incident occurs is extremely important in determining its outcome. It is concluded that aviation incident reports are a necessary and important instrument in safety surveillance.

  5. Psychophysiological and other factors affecting human performance in accident prevention and investigation. [Comparison of aviation with other industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinestiver, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Psychophysiological factors are not uncommon terms in the aviation incident/accident investigation sequence where human error is involved. It is highly suspect that the same psychophysiological factors may also exist in the industrial arena where operator personnel function; but, there is little evidence in literature indicating how management and subordinates cope with these factors to prevent or reduce accidents. It is apparent that human factors psychophysological training is quite evident in the aviation industry. However, while the industrial arena appears to analyze psychophysiological factors in accident investigations, there is little evidence that established training programs exist for supervisors and operator personnel.

  6. Human factors and technology environment in multinational project: problems and solutions; Factores humanos y entorno tecnologico en proyectos multinacionales: dificultades y soluciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardi Besa, X.; Munoz Cervantes, A.

    2012-07-01

    At the onset of nuclear projects in Spain, there was an import of nuclear technology. In a second phase, there was a transfer of technology. Subsequently, there was an adaptation of the technology. In this evolution, comparable to that of other countries, were involved several countries, overcoming the difficulties of human factors involved. The current nuclear projects multinationals have a new difficulty: the different industrial technological environments. This paper will address the organizational challenges of multinational engineering projects, in the type of project and the human factors of the participating companies.

  7. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  8. Patient safety - the role of human factors and systems engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety.

  9. Human factors systems approach to healthcare quality and patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Rivera-Rodriguez, A. Joy; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Hoonakker, Peter; Holden, Richard; Gurses, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    Human factors systems approaches are critical for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. The SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) model of work system and patient safety is a human factors systems approach that has been successfully applied in healthcare research and practice. Several research and practical applications of the SEIPS model are described. Important implications of the SEIPS model for healthcare system and process redesign are highlighted. Principles for redesigning healthcare systems using the SEIPS model are described. Balancing the work system and encouraging the active and adaptive role of workers are key principles for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. PMID:23845724

  10. Human factors engineering report for the cold vacuum drying facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IMKER, F.W.

    1999-06-30

    The purpose of this report is to present the results and findings of the final Human Factors Engineering (HFE) technical analysis and evaluation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Ergonomics issues are also addressed in this report, as appropriate. This report follows up and completes the preliminary work accomplished and reported by the Preliminary HFE Analysis report (SNF-2825, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Human Factors Engineering Analysis: Results and Findings). This analysis avoids redundancy of effort except for ensuring that previously recommended HFE design changes have not affected other parts of the system. Changes in one part of the system may affect other parts of the system where those changes were not applied. The final HFE analysis and evaluation of the CVDF human-machine interactions (HMI) was expanded to include: the physical work environment, human-computer interface (HCI) including workstation and software, operator tasks, tools, maintainability, communications, staffing, training, and the overall ability of humans to accomplish their responsibilities, as appropriate. Key focal areas for this report are the process bay operations, process water conditioning (PWC) skid, tank room, and Central Control Room operations. These key areas contain the system safety-class components and are the foundation for the human factors design basis of the CVDF.

  11. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  12. Dehydration-induced vasopressin secretion in humans: involvement of the histaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, A; Knigge, U; Jørgensen, H; Warberg, J

    2000-12-01

    In rats, the hypothalamic neurotransmitter histamine participates in regulation of vasopressin secretion and seems to be of physiological importance, because blockade of the histaminergic system reduces dehydration-induced vasopressin secretion. We investigated whether histamine is also involved in regulation of vasopressin secretion during dehydration in humans. We found that 40 h of dehydration gradually increased plasma osmolality by 10 mosmol/kg and induced a fourfold increase in vasopressin levels. Pretreatment with the H(2)-receptor antagonists cimetidine or ranitidine significantly reduced the dehydration-induced increase in vasopressin levels approximately 40% after 34 and 37 h of dehydration, whereas this was not the case with the H(1)-receptor antagonist mepyramine. Dehydration reduced aldosterone secretion by approximately 50%. This effect of dehydration was reduced by both H(1)- and H(2)-receptor blockade after 16 and/or 34 h of dehydration. We conclude that vasopressin secretion in response to dehydration in humans is under the regulatory influence of histamine and that the effect seems to be mediated via H(2)-receptors. In addition, the regulation of aldosterone secretion during dehydration also seems to involve the histaminergic system via H(1) and H(2) receptors.

  13. Examining Socio-Cultural and Neighborhood Factors Associated with Trajectories of Mexican-Origin Mothers' Education-Related Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Sakshi; Bámaca-Colbert, Mayra Y; Witherspoon, Dawn P; Pomerantz, Eva M; Robins, Richard W

    2017-01-03

    Parental involvement in education is an important determinant of youth's academic success. Yet, there is limited knowledge on how Latino parents' education-related involvement changes over time. Using data from a longitudinal study of 674 Mexican-origin families (mother-adolescent dyad; M age of child at Wave 1=10.4, SD = 0.60), we examined trajectories of parental involvement from 5(th) to 11(th) grade and the effects of socio-cultural (e.g., family SES and acculturation) and contextual (e.g., neighborhood) factors on these trajectories. Results showed that mothers reduced two aspects of the educational involvement: home-based involvement and academic aspirations, but increased on a third aspect of involvement, resource seeking. Furthermore, family SES, acculturation, and neighborhood context were differentially associated with mothers' involvement at 5(th) grade and predicted changes in involvement across elementary and high school.

  14. Human factors/ergonomics as a systems discipline? "The human use of human beings" revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollnagel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the possible future of Human factors/ergonomics (HFE) usually take the past for granted in the sense that the future of HFE is assumed to be more of the same. This paper argues that the nature of work in the early 2010s is so different from the nature of work when HFE was formulated 60-70 years ago that a critical reassessment of the basis for HFE is needed. If HFE should be a systems discipline, it should be a soft systems rather than a hard systems discipline. It is not enough for HFE to seek to improve performance and well-being through systems design, since any change to the work environment in principle alters the very basis for the change. Instead HFE should try to anticipate how the nature of work will change so that it can both foresee what work will be and propose what work should be.

  15. Comparative genomics of human stem cell factor (SCF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Dehbashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a critical protein with key roles in the cell such as hematopoiesis, gametogenesis and melanogenesis. In the present study a comparative analysis on nucleotide sequences of SCF was performed in Humanoids using bioinformatics tools including NCBI-BLAST, MEGA6, and JBrowse. Our analysis of nucleotide sequences to find closely evolved organisms with high similarity by NCBI-BLAST tools and MEGA6 showed that human and Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes were placed into the same cluster. By using JBrowse, we found that SCF in Neanderthal had a single copy number similar to modern human and partly conserved nucleotide sequences. Together, the results approved the gene flow and genetics similarity of SCF among human and P. troglodytes. This may suggest that during evolution, SCF gene transferred partly intact either on the basis of sequence or function from the same ancestors to P. troglodytes, the ancient human like Neanderthal, and then to the modern human.

  16. Revolutions and shifting paradigms in human factors & ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Kenneth R

    2006-07-01

    The "Revolution in Information Technology" has spawned a series of transformational revolutions in the nature and practice of human factors and ergonomics (HFE). "Generation 1" HFE evolved with a focus on adapting equipment, workplace and tasks to human capabilities and limitations. Generation 2, focused on cognitive systems integration, arose in response to the need to manage automation and dynamic function allocation. Generation 3 is focused on symbiotic technologies that can amplify human physical and cognitive capabilities. Generation 4 is emergent and is focused on biological enhancement of physical or cognitive capabilities. The shift from HFE Generations 1 and 2 to Generations 3 and 4 profoundly alters accepted boundary constraints on the adaptability of humans in complex systems design. Furthermore, it has opened an ethical divide between those that see cognitive and physical enhancement as a great benefit to society and those who perceive this as tampering with the fundamentals of human nature.

  17. Klotho is a serum factor related to human aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖能明; 张焱明; 郑权; 顾军

    2004-01-01

    Background Does klotho (KL) protein exist in human serum, and is there any correlation between KL protein in serum with human aging? In order to answer those questions, we identified KL protein in human serum and established the correlation between KL protein in human serum and aging.Methods We prepared a polyclonal antibody against human KL protein that was able to recognize the C-terminal of human secreted KL protein. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to identify KL protein in human serum.Results In Western blot, the antibody specifically recognized a 60-kD KL protein in both human and mice serum. The population aged from 0 to 91 years screened by ELISA revealed that the level of serum KL declined while age increased, though each individual level was variable and that the trend of decreasing in serum KL had no difference in sex.Conclusion Our data suggest that KL is a serum factor related to human aging.

  18. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Supporting analyses of human-system interfaces, procedures and practices, training and organizational practices and policies. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science & Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the second, third, fourth, and fifth phases of the project, which involved detailed analyses of four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training practices and policies; and organizational practices and policies, respectively. Findings based on these analyses provided factual and conceptual support for the final phase of this project, which identified factors leading to human error in RAB. The impact of those factors on RAB performance was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance, and alternative approaches for resolving safety significant problems were identified and evaluated.

  19. Transcription factors of Schizophyllum commune involved in mushroom formation and modulation of vegetative growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkmans, Jordi F; Patil, Mohini B; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wösten, Han A B; Lugones, Luis G

    2017-03-22

    Mushrooms are the most conspicuous fungal structures. Transcription factors (TFs) Bri1 and Hom1 of the model fungus Schizophyllum commune are involved in late stages of mushroom development, while Wc-2, Hom2, and Fst4 function early in development. Here, it is shown that Bri1 and Hom1 also stimulate vegetative growth, while biomass formation is repressed by Wc-2, Hom2, and Fst4. The Δbri1Δbri1 and the Δhom1Δhom1 strains formed up to 0.6 fold less biomass when compared to wild-type, while Δwc-2Δwc-2, Δhom2Δhom2, and Δfst4Δfst4 strains formed up to 2.8 fold more biomass. Inactivation of TF gene tea1, which was downregulated in the Δwc-2Δwc-2, Δhom2Δhom2, and Δfst4Δfst4 strains, resulted in a strain that was severely affected in mushroom development and that produced 1.3 fold more biomass than the wild-type. In contrast, introducing a constitutive active version of hom2 that had 4 predicted phosphorylation motifs eliminated resulted in radial growth inhibition and prompt fructification in both Δhom2 and wild-type strains, even in sterile monokaryons. Together, it is concluded that TFs involved in mushroom formation also modulate vegetative growth. Among these TFs is the homeodomain protein Hom2, being the first time that this class of regulatory proteins is implicated in repression of vegetative growth in a eukaryote.

  20. Signaling pathways involved in LPS induced TNFalpha production in human adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Festy Franck

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of obesity has been linked to an inflammatory process, and the role of adipose tissue in the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as IL-6 or TNFalpha has now been largely confirmed. Although TNFalpha secretion by adipose cells is probably induced, most notably by TLR ligands, the activation and secretion pathways of this cytokine are not yet entirely understood. Moreover, given that macrophagic infiltration is a characteristic of obesity, it is difficult to clearly establish the level of involvement of the different cellular types present within the adipose tissue during inflammation. Methods Primary cultures of human adipocytes and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used. Cells were treated with a pathogen-associated molecular pattern: LPS, with and without several kinase inhibitors. Western blot for p38 MAP Kinase was performed on cell lysates. TNFalpha mRNA was detected in cells by RT-PCR and TNFalpha protein was detected in supernatants by ELISA assays. Results We show for the first time that the production of TNFalpha in mature human adipocytes is mainly dependent upon two pathways: NFkappaB and p38 MAP Kinase. Moreover, we demonstrate that the PI3Kinase pathway is clearly involved in the first step of the LPS-pathway. Lastly, we show that adipocytes are able to secrete a large amount of TNFalpha compared to macrophages. Conclusion This study clearly demonstrates that the LPS induced activation pathway is an integral part of the inflammatory process linked to obesity, and that adipocytes are responsible for most of the secreted TNFalpha in inflamed adipose tissue, through TLR4 activation.

  1. With eloquence and humanity? Human factors/ergonomics in sustainable human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dave; Barnard, Tim

    2012-12-01

    This article is based on a keynote presentation given at the 18th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association in Recife, Brazil, February 2012. It considers new, and not so new, approaches and practical roles for the emerging field of human factors/ergonomics (HFE) in sustainable development (SD).The material for this article was largely drawn from the literature in the fields of human development, sustainability, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and social/environmental impact assessment. Identifying the role of HFE in SD is not a simple one and from the outset is complicated by the widely differing ideas in the sustainability literature about what exactly it is we are hoping to sustain. Is it individual companies, business models, cultures, or the carrying capacity of our planet? Or combinations of these? For the purposes of this article, certain assumptions are made, and various emerging opportunities and responsibilities associated with our changing world of work are introduced. First, there are new versions of traditional tasks for us, such as working with the people and companies in the renewable energy sectors. Beyond this, however, it is suggested that there are emerging roles for HFE professionals in transdisciplinary work where we might play our part, for example, in tackling the twinned issues of climate change and human development in areas of significant poverty. In particular we have the tools and capabilities to help define and measure what groups have reason to value, and wish to sustain. It is suggested, that to do this effectively, however, will require a philosophical shift, or perhaps just a philosophical restatement at a collective level, regarding who and what we ultimately serve.

  2. Characterization of hematopoietic GATA transcription factor expression in mouse and human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheenstra, Maaike R; Salunkhe, Vishal; De Cuyper, Iris M; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Li, Eveline; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key initiators and regulators of the immune response. The development of the DC lineage and their subsets requires an orchestrated regulation of their transcriptional program. Gata1, a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic cell lineages, has been recently reported to be required for mouse DC development and function. In humans, GATA1 is involved in the lineage separation between monocyte-derived DCs and Langerhans cells (LC) and loss of GATA1 results in differentiation arrest at the monocyte stage. The hematopoietic GATA factors (i.e. Gata1, Gata2, Gata3) are known to regulate each other's expression and to function consecutively throughout lineage commitment (so-called GATA switch). In humans, mutations in GATA2 are causative of MonoMAC disease, a human immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by loss of DCs, monocytes, B and NK cells. However, additional data on the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in the DC lineage is missing. In this study, we have characterized the expression of hematopoietic GATA factors in murine and human DCs and their expression dynamics upon TLR stimulation. We found that all hematopoietic GATA factors are expressed in DCs, but identified species-specific differences in the relative expression of each GATA factor, and how their expression fluctuates upon stimulation.

  3. Calretinin as a marker for premotor neurons involved in upgaze in human brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eAdamczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements are generated by different premotor pathways. Damage to them can cause specific deficits of eye movements, such as saccades. For correlative clinico-anatomical post-mortem studies of cases with eye movement disorders it is essential to identify the functional cell groups of the oculomotor system in the human brain by marker proteins. Based on monkey studies, the premotor neurons of the saccadic system can be identified by the histochemical markers parvalbumin and perineuronal nets in humans. These areas involve the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC and the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fascicle (RIMLF, which both contain premotor neurons for upgaze and downgaze. Recent monkey and human studies revealed a selective excitatory calretinin-positive input to the motoneurons mediating upgaze, but not to those for downgaze. Three premotor regions were identified as sources of calretinin input in monkey: y-group, INC and RIMLF. These findings suggest that the expression pattern of parvalbumin and calretinin may help to identify premotor neurons involved in up- or downgaze. In a post-mortem study of five human cases without neurological diseases we investigated the y-group, INC and RIMLF for the presence of parvalbumin and calretinin positive neurons including their co-expression. Adjacent thin paraffin sections were stained for the aggrecan component of perineuronal nets, parvalbumin or calretinin and glutamate decarboxylase. The comparative analysis of scanned thin sections of INC and RIMLF revealed medium-sized parvalbumin positive neurons with and without calretinin coexpression, which were intermingled. The parvalbumin/calretinin positive neurons in both nuclei are considered as excitatory premotor upgaze neurons. Accordingly, the parvalbumin-positive neurons lacking calretinin are considered as premotor downgaze neurons in RIMLF, but may in addition include inhibitory premotor upgaze neurons in the INC as

  4. Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Home Activities with Their Children: Psychosocial Factors and the Role of Parental Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallo, Rebecca; Treyvaud, Karli; Cooklin, Amanda; Wade, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement in play, learning, and everyday home activities is important for promoting children's cognitive and language development. The aims of the study were to (a) examine differences between mothers' and fathers' self-reported involvement with their children, (b) explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors, and…

  5. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in reward processing in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hell, Hendrika H; Jager, Gerry; Bossong, Matthijs G; Brouwer, Annelies; Jansma, J Martijn; Zuurman, Lineke; van Gerven, Joop; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-02-01

    Disturbed reward processing in humans has been associated with a number of disorders, such as depression, addiction, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has been implicated in reward processing in animals, but in humans, the relation between eCB functioning and reward is less clear. The current study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of the eCB system in reward processing in humans by examining the effect of the eCB agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on reward-related brain activity. Eleven healthy males participated in a randomized placebo-controlled pharmacological fMRI study with administration of THC to challenge the eCB system. We compared anticipatory and feedback-related brain activity after placebo and THC, using a monetary incentive delay task. In this task, subjects are notified before each trial whether a correct response is rewarded ("reward trial") or not ("neutral trial"). Subjects showed faster reaction times during reward trials compared to neutral trials, and this effect was not altered by THC. THC induced a widespread attenuation of the brain response to feedback in reward trials but not in neutral trials. Anticipatory brain activity was not affected. These results suggest a role for the eCB system in the appreciation of rewards. The involvement of the eCB system in feedback processing may be relevant for disorders in which appreciation of natural rewards may be affected such as addiction.

  6. CFTR is involved in the regulation of glucagon secretion in human and rodent alpha cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Pedersen, Morten Gram; Lindqvist, Andreas; Wierup, Nils; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Eliasson, Lena

    2017-12-01

    Glucagon is the main counterregulatory hormone in the body. Still, the mechanism involved in the regulation of glucagon secretion from pancreatic alpha cells remains elusive. Dysregulated glucagon secretion is common in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) that develop CF related diabetes (CFRD). CF is caused by a mutation in the Cl(-) channel Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but whether CFTR is present in human alpha cells and regulate glucagon secretion has not been investigated in detail. Here, both human and mouse alpha cells showed CFTR protein expression, whereas CFTR was absent in somatostatin secreting delta cells. CFTR-current activity induced by cAMP was measured in single alpha cells. Glucagon secretion at different glucose levels and in the presence of forskolin was increased by CFTR-inhibition in human islets, whereas depolarization-induced glucagon secretion was unaffected. CFTR is suggested to mainly regulate the membrane potential through an intrinsic alpha cell effect, as supported by a mathematical model of alpha cell electrophysiology. In conclusion, CFTR channels are present in alpha cells and act as important negative regulators of cAMP-enhanced glucagon secretion through effects on alpha cell membrane potential. Our data support that loss-of-function mutations in CFTR contributes to dysregulated glucagon secretion in CFRD.

  7. Factors involved in selection of a career in surgery and orthopedics for medical students in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, C; Banza, L; Mkandawire, N

    2010-03-01

    There is a critical shortage of Orthopedic Surgeons in Malawi as well as all countries in sub-Saharan Africa. To date, there is no published literature that has investigated surgical or Orthopedic career selection amongst African medical trainees. With the goal of facilitating recruitment into Surgery and Orthopedics in Malawi, we explored the key aspects of Malawian Medical Students' choice of careers in surgical disciplines. An on-line survey of all students in clinical years at the College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi was performed. The survey was anonymous and constructed de novo by a stringent process including Item Generation, Item reduction, Survey composition, Pre-testing, Assessment of Validity by a recognized survey expert, Pilot testing in on-line format by several Malawian Medical Students, and then formal survey testing. Surgery was the most popular specialty choice among the medical trainees (46%). General Surgery was the popular surgical specialty (27%), followed by Neurosurgery (22%) and Orthopedics (19%). The majority of students (67%) feared occupational exposure to HIV but this did not appear to be a factor in specialty choice (p = 0.9). Students with Orthopedic mentors were significantly more likely to choose Orthopedics as their first choice surgical specialty (p = 0.01). Despite limited resources and surgeons in sub-Saharan Africa, surgical specialties are desirable career choices. This is the first evaluation of factors involved in surgical or Orthopedic career selection in any African context. Future initiatives to improve exposure and mentorship in Orthopedics are fundamental to recruitment into the specialty.

  8. Identification of Heat Shock Transcription Factor Genes Involved in Thermotolerance of Octoploid Cultivated Strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wan-Yu; Lin, Lee-Fong; Jheng, Jing-Lian; Wang, Chun-Chung; Yang, Jui-Hung; Chou, Ming-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) are mainly involved in the activation of genes in response to heat stress as well as other abiotic and biotic stresses. The growth, development, reproduction, and yield of strawberry are strongly limited by extreme temperatures and droughts. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing and obtained transcriptome data set from Fragaria × ananassa Duchessne cv. Toyonoka. Six contigs and three unigenes were confirmed to encode HSF proteins (FaTHSFs). Subsequently, we characterized the biological functions of two particularly selected unigenes, FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a, which were classified into class A2 and B HSFs, respectively. Expression assays revealed that FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a expression was induced by heat shock and correlated well with elevated ambient temperatures. Overexpression of FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a resulted in the activation of their downstream stress-associated genes, and notably enhanced the thermotolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Besides, both FaTHSFA2a and FaTHSFB1a fusion proteins localized in the nucleus, indicating their similar subcellular distributions as transcription factors. Our yeast one-hybrid assay suggested that FaTHSFA2a has trans-activation activity, whereas FaTHSFB1a expresses trans-repression function. Altogether, our annotated transcriptome sequences provide a beneficial resource for identifying most genes expressed in octoploid strawberry. Furthermore, HSF studies revealed the possible insights into the molecular mechanisms of thermotolerance, thus rendering valuable molecular breeding to improve the tolerance of strawberry in response to high-temperature stress. PMID:27999304

  9. [Factors involved in the burden of the primary caregiver of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, M C; Meza-Osnaya, G; Pérez-Cruz, I; Cortes-Campero, N; Hernández-Ovalle, J; Hernández-Paredes, P; Juárez-Romero, K; Chino-Hernández, B; Romero-Figueroa, M S

    The aim of the study was to identify the factors involved between burden in the primary caregiver of cancer patients and their quality of life. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a secondary level hospital on 100 primary caregivers of cancer patients. The level of burden was determined using the Zarit scale and the perception of quality of life using the World Health Organisation Quality of Life questionnaire. Quality of life was categorised as high or low and compared between groups according to their level of burden. Descriptive statistics were performed on the study variables, and differences between groups were analysed according to their level of burden. In assessing the overload, it was found that 31% of caregivers had burden. A good quality of life was perceived by 76% of caregivers, while the remaining 24% perceived it as poor. To identify association between these two variables Chi squared (X2) was used to determine whether there was any association between quality of life and overloading of the primary caregiver, giving a P≤.05. A Spearman correlation was also performed, obtaining an r-value of .321 with a P≤.05, finding a slightly positive correlation. The factors that have a bearing on a good quality of life despite having burden were: being married, dedicated to the home, and kinship (to be immediate family: spouse, parents and children). Conversely, the type of cancer, sleep hours, and hours of care influence the perception of a poor quality of life. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors involved in alleviating water stress by partial crop removal in pear trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsal, Jordi; Mata, Merce; Arbones, Amadeu; Del Campo, Jesus; Girona, Joan; Lopez, Gerardo

    2008-09-01

    We studied the relief of water stress associated with fruit thinning in pear (Pyrus communis L.) trees during drought to determine what mechanisms, other than stomatal adjustment, were involved. Combinations of control irrigation (equal to crop water use less effective rainfall) and deficit irrigation (equal to 20% of control irrigation), fruit load (unthinned and thinned to 40 fruits per tree) and root pruning (pruned and unpruned) treatments were applied to pear (cv. 'Conference') trees during Stage II of fruit development. Daily patterns of midday stem water potential (Psi(stem)) and leaf conductance to water vapor (g(l)) of deficit-irrigated trees differed after fruit thinning. In response to fruit thinning, gl progressively declined with water stress until 30 days after fruit thinning and then leveled off, whereas the effects of decreased fruit load on Psi(stem) peaked 30-40 days after fruit thinning and then tended to decline. Soil water depletion was significantly correlated with fruit load during drought. Our results indicate that stomatal adjustment and the resulting soil water conservation were the factors determining the Psi(stem) response to fruit thinning. However, these factors could not explain differences in daily patterns between g(l) and Psi(stem) after fruit thinning. In all cases, effects of root pruning treatments on Psi(stem) in deficit-irrigated trees were transitory (Psi(stem) recovered from root pruning in less than 30 days), but the recovery of Psi(stem) after root pruning was faster in trees with low fruit loads. This behavior is compatible with the concept that the water balance (reflected by Psi(stem) values) was better in trees with low fruit loads compared with unthinned trees, perhaps because more carbon was available for root growth. Thus, a root growth component is hypothesized as a mechanism to explain the bimodal Psi(stem) response to fruit thinning during drought.

  11. AP2/ERF Transcription Factors Involved in Response to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curly Virus in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curly virus (TYLCV, transmitted by the whitefly (, causes leaf curling and yellowing, plant dwarfism, and growth inhibition in tomato ( L.. The APETALA2 (AP2 and ethylene response factor (ERF transcription factor (TF family, the largest plant-specific TF family, was identified to function in plant development and pathogen defense. Our study aimed to analyze the mechanism underlying the function of ERF (SlERF TFs in response to TYLCV infection and improve useful information to increase the resistance to TYLCV in tomato. A total of 22 tomato AP2/ERF TFs in response to TYLCV were identified according to transcriptome database. Five ERF-B3 TFs were identified in cultivars Hongbeibei (highly resistant, Zheza-301, Zhefen-702 (both resistant, Jinpeng-1, and Xianke-6 (both susceptible. Interaction network indicated that SlERF TFs could interact with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK. Expression profiles of five ERF-B3 genes (, , , , and were detected by quantitative real-time–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR after TYLCV infection in five tomato cultivars. expression was upregulated in five tomato cultivars. The expressions of three genes (, , and were upregulated in Zheza-301 and Zhefen-702. and expressions were downregulated in Hongbeibei and Xianke-6, respectively. Yeast one-hybrid showed that the GCC-box binding ability of ERF-B3 TFs differed in resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars. Expression profiles were related to the GCC-box binding ability of SlERF TFs in resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars. The defense mechanism underlying the tomato’s response to TYLCV involved a complicated network, which provided important information for us in breeding and genetic analysis.

  12. Moral Responsibility and Confidence as Factors that Influence Teacher Involvement in Educational Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Cecilio

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Various factors that are not easily observed have a strong impact on educational change. In this paper, I examine some of the issues that emerged from the data collected while exploring my informants’ perceptions and attitudes towards their changing roles when confronted with curriculum innovation. This research demonstrates that the experience teachers acquire during their career may often enable them to participate in the design of a new study plan. However, this experience does not always justify their role as curriculum-designers in either the eyes of their colleagues or in their own eyes, particularly when coerced into playing this or other roles. The results indicate that teachers, depending on their levels of moral responsibility and confidence, become involved in different roles during their teaching career. Key words: Change, confidence, curriculum, innovation, moral responsibility Existen diversos factores que tienen un fuerte impacto en el cambio educativo y que no se observan fácilmente. En este artículo examino algunos de los temas que emergieron de los datos recogidos mientras exploraba las opiniones y las actitudes de mis informantes hacia sus roles siempre cambiantes cuando se enfrentan a la innovación curricular. Esta investigación demuestra que los profesores, con la experiencia que adquieren durante su carrera, pueden permitirse a menudo participar en el diseño de un nuevo plan de estudios. Sin embargo, para sus colegas o para ellos mismos, esta experiencia no justifica siempre su papel como diseñadores de un plan de estudios particularmente cuando están obligados a jugar éste u otros roles. Los resultados indican que los profesores se involucran en diversos roles durante su carrera como profesores, dependiendo de sus niveles de responsabilidad moral y de confianza. Palabras clave: cambio, confianza, currículo, innovación, responsabilidad moral

  13. Involvement of mitochondrial and B-RAF/ERK signaling pathways in berberine-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgeiro, Ana; Gajate, Consuelo; Dakir, El Habib; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2011-07-01

    The natural isoquinoline alkaloid berberine exhibits a wide spectrum of biological activities including antitumor activity, but its mechanism of action remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we report that berberine induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells, through a process that involved mitochondria and caspase activation. Berberine-induced activation of a number of caspases, including caspases 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9. Pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, and caspase-8 and caspase-9 inhibitors prevented apoptosis. Berberine also led to the generation of the p20 cleavage fragment of BAP31, involved in directing proapoptotic signals between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Treatment of SK-MEL-2 melanoma cells with berberine induced disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria to the cytosol, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and a decreased ATP/ADP ratio. Overexpression of bcl-xL by gene transfer prevented berberine-induced cell death, mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss, and cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor release, but not ROS generation. N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited the production of ROS, but did not abrogate the berberine-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, by using the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059, and reduction of B-RAF levels by silencing RNA induced cell death of SK-MEL-2 cells, and diminished the berberine concentration required to promote apoptosis. These data show that berberine-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells involves mitochondria and caspase activation, but ROS generation was not essential. Our results indicate that inhibition of B-RAF/ERK survival signaling facilitates the cell death response triggered by berberine.

  14. Human factors multi-technique approach to teenage engagement in digital technologies health research

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Alexandra R; Craven, Michael P; Atkinson, Sarah; Simons, Lucy; Cobb, Sue; Mazzola, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the use of multi-techniques for teenage HCI health research. Through four case studies we present information about adolescents as users of healthcare services and technologies, adolescent personal development and the human factors approaches through which teenagers have been involved in healthcare research projects. In each case study; comprising of the design or evaluation of a new digital technology for supporting health or well-being, the techniques used by researche...

  15. SafetyNet. Human factors safety training on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauland, G.; Pedrali, M.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes user requirements to an Internet based distance learning system of human factors training, i.e. the SafetyNet prototype, within the aviation (pilots and air traffic control), maritime and medical domains. User requirements totraining have been elicited through 19 semi...

  16. Improving human performance: Industry factors influencing the ability to perform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güera Massyn Romo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning interventions and new technologies that aim to improve human performance must take cognisance of industry factors inhibiting human performance. The dynamic and fast pace nature of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT and the engineering industries do not lend themselves to proper skills planning and management. These industries experience real skills gaps, to some of which they contribute by themselves. This study reports on these performance-inhibiting factors such as the underutilisation of available skills, tolerance for individual preferences, and dynamically, and informally refining a role objective while an employee is occupying a certain role. The important professional skills required by individuals to cope with these real life factors are also explored in the skills gaps management context. Moreover, these industries need a profile they refer to as Special Forces, which denotes a high calibre of worker that possesses well-developed professional skills whilst having advanced technical expertise and sufficient experience. This resource profile is required largely due to the poor management of human resource processes in practice and the current reported lack of adequate skills. Furthermore, this study refers to the recent lack of a working definition for these Special Forces leading to the omitted active development of these profiles in industry today, which appears to become a key human performance inhibiting factor.

  17. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  18. Human Factors Engineering and School Furniture: A Circular Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Kenneth E.; Richardson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    A search reveals only six articles that concern human-factors engineering as it relates to student furniture. Contacts with five school-furniture manufacturers disclose that designs were basically unaltered for years and are claimed to reflect what schools want in furniture. Proposes recommendations to design and secure furniture to meet students'…

  19. A Virtual Campus Based on Human Factor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Kang, Houliang

    2014-01-01

    Three Dimensional or 3D virtual reality has become increasingly popular in many areas, especially in building a digital campus. This paper introduces a virtual campus, which is based on a 3D model of The Tourism and Culture College of Yunnan University (TCYU). Production of the virtual campus was aided by Human Factor and Ergonomics (HF&E), an…

  20. Neuroscience in ergonomics and human factors research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Brouwer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the possible application of neuroscientific knowledge in human factors research and pratice. Can this knowledge be implemented to improve the design and evaluation of systems and functional environments? Or - to take it one step further - could it bring about the integration of

  1. Human factors in organizational design and management VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Koningsveld, E.A.P.; Dhondt, S.

    1998-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management held in The Hague, The Netherlands, August 19-22, 1998. The Symposium was sponsored jointly by the International Ergonomics Society, the Dutch Ergonomics Society, NIA TNO and

  2. A Virtual Campus Based on Human Factor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Kang, Houliang

    2014-01-01

    Three Dimensional or 3D virtual reality has become increasingly popular in many areas, especially in building a digital campus. This paper introduces a virtual campus, which is based on a 3D model of The Tourism and Culture College of Yunnan University (TCYU). Production of the virtual campus was aided by Human Factor and Ergonomics (HF&E), an…

  3. Human factors issues of tactice displays for military environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Self, B.P.

    2008-01-01

    The overall goal of this chapter is to give the reader insights into the human factors issues related to the use of tactile displays. Torso-mounted displays, which are particularly suited for direction and orientation cues, are emphasized. First, perceptual issues relevant to tactile stimulation are

  4. Human factors in organizational design and management VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Koningsveld, E.A.P.; Dhondt, S.

    1998-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management held in The Hague, The Netherlands, August 19-22, 1998. The Symposium was sponsored jointly by the International Ergonomics Society, the Dutch Ergonomics Society, NIA TNO and

  5. Human intrinsic factor expressed in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Laursen, Niels B; Nexø, Ebba

    2003-01-01

    Intrinsic factor (IF) is the gastric protein that promotes the intestinal uptake of vitamin B12. Gastric IF from animal sources is used in diagnostic tests and in vitamin pills. However, administration of animal IF to humans becomes disadvantageous because of possible pathogenic transmission...

  6. Immunolocalization of transforming growth factor alpha in normal human tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    the distribution of the growth factor in a broad spectrum of normal human tissues. Indirect immunoenzymatic staining methods were used. The polypeptide was detected with a polyclonal as well as a monoclonal antibody. The polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies demonstrated almost identical immunoreactivity. TGF...

  7. Involvement of P38MAPK in human corneal endothelial cell migration induced by TGF-β(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joko, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Akune, Yoko; Tokumaru, Sho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miyata, Kazunori; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2013-03-01

    Because human corneal endothelial cells do not proliferate once the endothelial monolayer is formed, corneal wound healing is thought to be mediated by cell enlargement or migration rather than proliferation. However, the cellular mechanisms involved in corneal wound healing have not been fully determined. Because transforming growth factor-β(2) (TGF-β(2)) isoform is present in high concentrations in normal human aqueous humor, it may play a role in human corneal endothelial cell wound healing. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of TGF-β(2) on the proliferation and migration of cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). To achieve this, we first examined the effect of TGF-β(2) on the wound closure rate in an in vitro HCEC wound healing model. However, unexpectedly TGF-β(2) had no effect on the wound closure rate in this model. Therefore, a real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) system and the BrdU incorporation assay were used to determine the effect of TGF-β(2) (0.1-10 ng/ml) on cultured HCEC proliferation during in vitro wound healing. The specificity of this effect was confirmed by adding the TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor. TGF-β(2) inhibited the proliferation of HCECs in a dose dependent way and was blocked by TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor. Next, the Boyden chamber assay was used to determine how TGF-β(2) (10 ng/ml) affect HCEC migration. Exposure to TGF-β(2) increased cell migration, and a synergistic effect was observed when FGF-2 was added. To determine whether the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in the migration of HCECs, western blot analysis and Bio-Plex™ suspension array were used to detect phosphorylation of Erk1/2, p38, and JNK in HCECs stimulated by TGF-β(2) and/or FGF-2. The effect of the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB239063 (10 μM), on TGF-β(2) and/or FGF-2-induced cellular migration was determined by the Boyden chamber assay. Both TGF-β(2) and FGF-2-induced p38

  8. Integrating human factors and artificial intelligence in the development of human-machine cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maanen, P.P. van; Lindenberg, J.; Neericx, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing machine intelligence leads to a shift from a mere interactive to a much more complex cooperative human-machine relation requiring a multidisciplinary development approach. This paper presents a generic multidisciplinary cognitive engineering method CE+ for the integration of human factors

  9. Control of angiogenesis by galectins involves the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Etulain

    Full Text Available Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases.

  10. Factors involved in the identification of stuttering severity in a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Marjan; Einarsdóttir, Jóhanna T; Van Borsel, John

    2015-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists nowadays are more and more confronted with clients who speak a language different from their own mother tongue. The assessment of persons who speak a foreign language poses particular challenges. The present study investigated the possible role and interplay of factors involved in the identification of stuttering severity in a foreign language. Nineteen speech-language pathologists from five different countries (i.e. Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Belgium) rated stuttering severity of speech samples featuring persons who stutter speaking Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, or Dutch. Additionally, they were asked to score how easy they found it to rate the samples. Accuracy of rating stuttering severity in another language appeared to be foremost determined by the client's stuttering severity, while experienced ease of rating stuttering severity was essentially related to closeness of the language of the clinician to that of the client and familiarity of the clinician with the client's language. Stuttering measurement training programmes in different languages are needed.

  11. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2: a novel gene involved in zebrafish central nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lina; Zhou, Wenhao; Wang, Huijun; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Shanshan; Li, Weihua; Li, Huawei; Mao, Zuohua; Ma, Duan

    2013-09-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (Tfpi-2) is an important serine protease inhibitor in the extracellular matrix (ECM), but its precise physiological significance remains unknown. This work is part of a series of studies intended to investigate functional roles of Tfpi-2 and explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. First, we cloned and identified zebrafish Tfpi-2 (zTfpi-2) as an evolutionarily conserved protein essential for zebrafish development. We also demonstrated that ztfpi-2 is mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) of zebrafish, and embryonic depletion of ztfpi-2 caused severe CNS defects. In addition, changes of neural markers, including pax2a, egr2b, huC, ngn1, gfap and olig2, confirmed the presence of developmental abnormalities in the relevant regions of ztfpi-2 morphants. Using microarray analysis, we found that members of the Notch pathway, especially her4 and mib, which mediate lateral inhibition in CNS development, were also downregulated. Intriguingly, both her4 and mib were able to partially rescue the ztfpi-2 morphant phenotype. Furthermore, Morpholino knockdown of ztfpi-2 resulted in upregulation of neuronal markers while downregulation of glial markers, providing evidence that the Notch pathway is probably involved in ztfpi-2-mediated CNS development.

  12. Molecular flexibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ribosome recycling factor and its functional consequences: An exploration involving mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Selvaraj; A Govindan; A Seshadri; B Dubey; U Varshney; M Vijayan

    2013-12-01

    Internal mobility of the two domain molecule of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is known to be important for its action. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RRF does not complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF (in the presence of E. coli EF-G alone). Crystal structure had revealed higher rigidity of the M. tuberculosis RRF due to the presence of additional salt bridges between domains. Two inter-domain salt bridges and one between the linker region and the domain containing C-terminal residues were disrupted by appropriate mutations. Except for a C-terminal deletion mutant, all mutants showed RRF activity in E. coli when M. tuberculosis EF-G was also co-expressed. The crystal structures of the point mutants, that of the C-terminal deletion mutant and that of the protein grown in the presence of a detergent, were determined. The increased mobility resulting from the disruption of the salt bridge involving the hinge region allows the appropriate mutant to weakly complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF even in the absence of simultaneous expression of the mycobacterial EF-G. The loss of activity of the C-terminal deletion mutant appears to be partly due to the rigidification of the molecule consequent to changes in the hinge region.

  13. Consistent analysis of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors involving weakly- and strongly-bound nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Okołowicz, J; Płoszajczak, M; Macchiavelli, A O; Smirnova, N A

    2015-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in understanding the dependence of one-nucleon removal cross sections on the asymmetry of the neutron $S_n$ and proton $S_p$ separation energies, following a large amount of experimental data and theoretical analyses in a framework of sudden and eikonal approximations of the reaction dynamics. These theoretical calculations involve both the single-particle cross section and the shell-model description of the projectile initial state and final states of the reaction residues. The configuration mixing in shell-model description of nuclear states depends on the proximity of one-nucleon decay threshold but does it depend sensitively on $S_n - S_p$? To answer this question, we use the shell model embedded in the continuum to investigate the dependence of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors on the asymmetry of $S_n$ and $S_p$ for mirror nuclei $^{24}$Si, $^{24}$Ne and $^{28}$S, $^{28}$Mg and for a series of neon isotopes ($20 \\leq A \\leq 28$).

  14. Religious factors associated with alcohol involvement: results from the Mauritian Joint Child Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Susan E; Prescott, Carol A; Dalais, Cyril; Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H; Mednick, Sarnoff A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine religious factors associated with alcohol involvement in Mauritius. The three main religions on the island, Hinduism, Catholicism, and Islam, promote different views of the appropriate use of alcohol. Based on reference group theory, we hypothesized that both the content of a religion's alcohol norms and an individual's religious commitment would relate to alcohol use behavior. Participants were from the Joint Child Health Project, a longitudinal study that has followed a birth cohort of 1.795 individuals since 1972 when they were 3 years old. All available participants (67%; 55% male) were assessed in mid-adulthood on religious variables, lifetime drinking, and lifetime alcohol use disorders. Across religions, individuals who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence were less likely to be drinkers. Religious commitment was associated with reduced probability of drinking only in those who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence. Among drinkers, abstention norms and religious commitment were not associated with lower likelihood of alcohol use disorders. In Catholics who viewed their religion as promoting abstinence and still were drinkers, high religious commitment was associated with increased risk for alcohol use disorders. Predictions based on reference group theory were largely supported, with religious norms and commitment differentially related to alcohol use and problems both across religions and among individuals within religions. Findings highlight the importance of examining multiple aspects of religion to better understand the relationship of religion with alcohol behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of Staphylococcus caprae Clinical Isolates Involved in Human Bone and Joint Infections, Compared with Goat Mastitis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ersu, J; Aubin, G G; Mercier, P; Nicollet, P; Bémer, P; Corvec, S

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus caprae is an emerging microorganism in human bone and joint infections (BJI). The aim of this study is to describe the features of S. caprae isolates involved in BJI (H for human) compared with those of isolates recovered in goat mastitis (A for animal). Fourteen isolates of each origin were included. Identifications were performed using a Vitek 2 GP ID card, tuf gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) Vitek MS. Molecular typing was carried out using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DiversiLab technology. The crystal violet method was used to determine biofilm-forming ability. Virulence factors were searched by PCR. Vitek MS technology provides an accurate identification for the two types of isolates compared to that of gold-standard sequencing (sensitivity, 96.4%), whereas the Vitek 2 GP ID card was more effective for H isolates. Molecular typing methods revealed two distinct lineages corresponding to the origin despite few overlaps: H and A. In our experimental conditions, no significant difference was observed in biofilm production ability between H and A isolates. Nine isolates (5 H isolates and 4 A isolates) behaved as weak producers while one A isolate was a strong producer. Concerning virulence factors, the autolysin atlC and the serine aspartate adhesin (sdrZ) genes were detected in 24 isolates (86%), whereas the lipase gene was always detected, except in one H isolate (96%). The ica operon was present in 23 isolates (82%). Fibrinogen-binding (fbe) or collagen-binding (cna) genes were not detected by using primers designed for Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis, even in low stringency conditions. Although S. caprae probably remains underestimated in human infections, further studies are needed to better understand the evolution and the adaptation of this species to its host.

  16. A Keyword Analysis for Human Resource Management Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Kürşad ÖZLEN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the constant increasing in technology and education, with development of multinational corporations and frequent changes in economic status and structures, Human Resources become the most crucial, the most reliable and necessary department. Moreover, in many companies, Human Resource Department is the most important department. The main purpose of this research is to mark off top rated factors related with Human Resource Management by analyzing all the abstracts of the published papers of a Human Resource Management journal for the period between the first issue of 2005 and the first issue of 2013. We identified the most frequent categories of the articles during this analyzed period. The literature is reviewed according to the identified factors related to Human Resource Management. If the keywords about Human Resources (35,7 % is not considered, it is observed that the researches, for the selected period, have organizational approach (39,2 % (Management, organizational strategy, organizational performance, organizational culture, contextual issues, technical issues and location and from the individual approach (24,4 % (Individual performance, training and education, employee rights, and behavioral issues. Furthermore, it is also observed that the researchers (a mainly give importance to the practice more than the theory and (b consider the organization more than the individual.

  17. Temporal SILAC-based quantitative proteomics identifies host factors involved in chikungunya virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffers, Emmely E; Tas, Ali; Scholte, Florine E M; Van, Myrthe N; Heemskerk, Matthias T; de Ru, Arnoud H; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J; van Veelen, Peter A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne reemerging human pathogen that generally causes a severe persisting arthritis. Since 2005, the virus has infected millions of people during outbreaks in Africa, Indian Ocean Islands, Asia, and South/Central America. Many steps of the replication and expression of CHIKV's 12-kb RNA genome are highly dependent on cellular factors, which thus constitute potential therapeutic targets. SILAC and LC-MS/MS were used to define the temporal dynamics of the cellular response to infection. Using samples harvested at 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, over 4700 proteins were identified and per time point 2800-3500 proteins could be quantified in both biological replicates. At 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, 13, 38, and 106 proteins, respectively, were differentially expressed. The majority of these proteins showed decreased abundance. Most subunits of the RNA polymerase II complex were progressively degraded, which likely contributes to the transcriptional host shut-off observed during CHIKV infection. Overexpression of four proteins that were significantly downregulated (Rho family GTPase 3 (Rnd3), DEAD box helicase 56 (DDX56), polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C (UbcH10) reduced susceptibility of cells to CHIKV infection, suggesting that infection-induced downregulation of these proteins is beneficial for CHIKV replication. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001330 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001330).

  18. ESTROGEN REGULATION OF LRP16 GENE EXPRESSION INVOLVES SP1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Yi-ling; HAN Wei-dong; ZhAO Ya-li; LI Qi; HAO Hao-jie; SONG Hai-jing; MU Yi-ming; YU Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of Sp1 as transcription factor required for transactivation of LRP16 gene by estrogen. Methods: Specific antibodies of Erα and Sp1 were used to precipitate the target DNA/protein complexes of MCF-7 cells at different time points after estrogen treatment (Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay), the promoter region of LRP16 gene was amplified by semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (snPCR). Small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Sp1 was transiently cotransfected with LRP16-Luc (containing the region from -213bp to -126bp of LRP16 gene promoter) in MCF-7 cells. The luciferase activities were measured by dual-luciferase assay. Results: The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Sp1 protein directly bound to the -213bp to -126bp region of LRP16 gene, and Erα could enhance the affinity of Sp1 to DNA. Sp1-siRNA specifically decreased the transactivation of LRP16-Luc by 17β-estradiol to 70-80%. Conclusion: The estrogen-induced transactivation of the human LRP16 gene was mediated by Sp1 protein. Moreover, the interactions of ER(/Sp1 functional complex with LRP16 promoter DNA were required for enhanced LRP16 gene transactivation.

  19. An Illumination Modeling System for Human Factors Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thong; Maida, James C.; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Seeing is critical to human performance. Lighting is critical for seeing. Therefore, lighting is critical to human performance. This is common sense, and here on earth, it is easily taken for granted. However, on orbit, because the sun will rise or set every 45 minutes on average, humans working in space must cope with extremely dynamic lighting conditions. Contrast conditions of harsh shadowing and glare is also severe. The prediction of lighting conditions for critical operations is essential. Crew training can factor lighting into the lesson plans when necessary. Mission planners can determine whether low-light video cameras are required or whether additional luminaires need to be flown. The optimization of the quantity and quality of light is needed because of the effects on crew safety, on electrical power and on equipment maintainability. To address all of these issues, an illumination modeling system has been developed by the Graphics Research and Analyses Facility (GRAF) and Lighting Environment Test Facility (LETF) in the Space Human Factors Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center. The system uses physically based ray tracing software (Radiance) developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, a human factors oriented geometric modeling system (PLAID) and an extensive database of humans and environments. Material reflectivity properties of major surfaces and critical surfaces are measured using a gonio-reflectometer. Luminaires (lights) are measured for beam spread distribution, color and intensity. Video camera performances are measured for color and light sensitivity. 3D geometric models of humans and the environment are combined with the material and light models to form a system capable of predicting lighting conditions and visibility conditions in space.

  20. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  1. Survey of Parents in a Predominately Latino Elementary School to Determine Factors that Affect Parental Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstab, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Present research has shown that parental involvement has a large effect on student achievement. The current study utilized both casual-comparative and correlation methodology and identified variables that influence parental involvement. A review of literature with respect to parental involvement was presented. The study utilized survey data from…

  2. The Influence of Psychosocial Factors on Bullying Involvement of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chad A.; Forber-Pratt, Anjali J.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Aragon, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of students with disabilities within the bullying dynamic has been recognized as a pressing issue within the nation's schools. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the psychosocial outcomes related to the bullying involvement of students with disabilities. However, involvement in bullying has been linked to negative short-…

  3. Multiscale factors affecting human attitudes toward snow leopards and wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Kulbhushansingh R; Bhatia, Saloni; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer; Redpath, Stephen; Mishra, Charudutt

    2014-12-01

    The threat posed by large carnivores to livestock and humans makes peaceful coexistence between them difficult. Effective implementation of conservation laws and policies depends on the attitudes of local residents toward the target species. There are many known correlates of human attitudes toward carnivores, but they have only been assessed at the scale of the individual. Because human societies are organized hierarchically, attitudes are presumably influenced by different factors at different scales of social organization, but this scale dependence has not been examined. We used structured interview surveys to quantitatively assess the attitudes of a Buddhist pastoral community toward snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and wolves (Canis lupus). We interviewed 381 individuals from 24 villages within 6 study sites across the high-elevation Spiti Valley in the Indian Trans-Himalaya. We gathered information on key explanatory variables that together captured variation in individual and village-level socioeconomic factors. We used hierarchical linear models to examine how the effect of these factors on human attitudes changed with the scale of analysis from the individual to the community. Factors significant at the individual level were gender, education, and age of the respondent (for wolves and snow leopards), number of income sources in the family (wolves), agricultural production, and large-bodied livestock holdings (snow leopards). At the community level, the significant factors included the number of smaller-bodied herded livestock killed by wolves and mean agricultural production (wolves) and village size and large livestock holdings (snow leopards). Our results show that scaling up from the individual to higher levels of social organization can highlight important factors that influence attitudes of people toward wildlife and toward formal conservation efforts in general. Such scale-specific information can help managers apply conservation measures at

  4. Regulatory Mechanisms Involved in the Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Growth Factor Nerve growth factor (NGF), the prototypical neurotrophin, originally isolated by Levi -Montalcini and colleagues ( Levi -Montalcini, 1987; see...inclusion of NGF antibodies ( Levi -Montalcini, 1987). In addition, these neurons exhibit enhanced differentiation, as evidenced by extensive neurite...the nerve growth factor family reveal a novel member abundantly expressed in Xenopus ovary. Neuron 6: 845-858, 1991. Hefti, F. Nerve growth factor

  5. The involvement of human RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Karmakar, Parimal; Aamann, Maria Diget

    2010-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder associated with mutation in RECQL4 gene, a member of the human RecQ helicases. The disease is characterized by genomic instability, skeletal abnormalities and predisposition to malignant tumors, especially osteosarcomas....... The precise role of RECQL4 in cellular pathways is largely unknown; however, recent evidence suggests its involvement in multiple DNA metabolic pathways. This study investigates the roles of RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The results show that RECQL4-deficient fibroblasts are moderately...... sensitive to gamma-irradiation and accumulate more gammaH2AX and 53BP1 foci than control fibroblasts. This is suggestive of defects in efficient repair of DSB's in the RECQL4-deficient fibroblasts. Real time imaging of live cells using laser confocal microscopy shows that RECQL4 is recruited early to laser...

  6. A human case of otoacariasis involving a histiostomatid mite (Acari: Histiostomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Arfaj, Ahmed M; Mullen, Gary R; Rashad, Rafiaa; Abdel-Hameed, Ahmed; OConnor, Barry M; Alkhalife, Ibrahim S; Dute, Roland R

    2007-05-01

    A 31-year-old Saudi man was seen at an ear, nose, and throat clinic at Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, with bilateral itching in the external auditory canal. On otoscopic examination, the skin lining the ear canal was thickened with whitish sheets of sloughed cells and thick discharge. Large numbers of mites of an undescribed species closely related to members of the genus Loxanoetus (Histiostomatidae) were present. The patient underwent successive washings of the ear canal with saline and 70% ethanol at intervals of 2-3 months and was treated with antibiotics. Treatment with Eurax (crotamiton) ear drops for one week cleared the mite infestation. This represents the first reported case of human otoacariasis involving a histiostomatid mite. Based on the known biology of histiostomatid mites and the associated hosts of Loxanoetus and related genera, there is reason to speculate that the patient acquired the infestation while swimming in a lake or pond where this mite was present.

  7. The Involvement of Ser1898 of the Human L-Type Calcium Channel in Evoked Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Bachnoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A PKA consensus phosphorylation site S1928 at the α11.2 subunit of the rabbit cardiac L-type channel, CaV1.2, is involved in the regulation of CaV1.2 kinetics and affects catecholamine secretion. This mutation does not alter basal CaV1.2 current properties or regulation of CaV1.2 current by PKA and the beta-adrenergic receptor, but abolishes CaV1.2 phosphorylation by PKA. Here, we test the contribution of the corresponding PKA phosphorylation site of the human α11.2 subunit S1898, to the regulation of catecholamine secretion in bovine chromaffin cells. Chromaffin cells were infected with a Semliki-Forest viral vector containing either the human wt or a mutated S1898A α11.2 subunit. Both subunits harbor a T1036Y mutation conferring nifedipine insensitivity. Secretion evoked by depolarization in the presence of nifedipine was monitored by amperometry. Depolarization-triggered secretion in cells infected with either the wt α11.2 or α11.2/S1898A mutated subunit was elevated to a similar extent by forskolin. Forskolin, known to directly activate adenylyl-cyclase, increased the rate of secretion in a manner that is largely independent of the presence of S1898. Our results are consistent with the involvement of additional PKA regulatory site(s at the C-tail of α11.2, the pore forming subunit of CaV1.2.

  8. Inducing effects of hepatocyte growth factor on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human colorectal carcinoma cells through MEK and PI3K signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-hua; WEI Wei; XU Hao; WANG Yan-yan; WU Wen-xi

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor plays a key role in human colorectal carcinoma invasion and metastasis. However, the regulation mechanism remains unknown. Recent studies have shown that several cytokines can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor cells. In this study, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Methods Hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in human serum were measured by ELISA.The mRNA level of vascular endothelial growth factor was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. Western blot assay was performed to evaluate levels of c-Met and several other proteins involved in the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in colorectal carcinoma cells.Results Serum hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were significantly increased in colorectal carcinoma subjects. In vitro extraneous hepatocyte growth factor markedly increased protein and mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells. Hepatocyte growth factor induced phosphorylation of c-Met, ERK1/2 and AKT in a dose-dependent manner. Specific inhibitors on MEK and PI3K inhibited the hepatocyte growth factor-induced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells.Conclusion This present study indicates that hepatocyte growth factor upregulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma cells via the MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways.

  9. Characterization of transcription factor networks involved in umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem cells-derived erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biaoru Li

    Full Text Available Fetal stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB possess a great capacity for proliferation and differentiation and serve as a valuable model system to study gene regulation. Expanded knowledge of the molecular control of hemoglobin synthesis will provide a basis for rational design of therapies for β-hemoglobinopathies. Transcriptome data are available for erythroid progenitors derived from adult stem cells, however studies to define molecular mechanisms controlling globin gene regulation during fetal erythropoiesis are limited. Here, we utilize UCB-CD34+ stem cells induced to undergo erythroid differentiation to characterize the transcriptome and transcription factor networks (TFNs associated with the γ/β-globin switch during fetal erythropoiesis. UCB-CD34+ stem cells grown in the one-phase liquid culture system displayed a higher proliferative capacity than adult CD34+ stem cells. The γ/β-globin switch was observed after day 42 during fetal erythropoiesis in contrast to adult progenitors where the switch occurred around day 21. To gain insights into transcription factors involved in globin gene regulation, microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from UCB-CD34+ cell-derived erythroid progenitors harvested on day 21, 42, 49 and 56 using the HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip. After data normalization, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified transcription factors (TFs with significant changes in expression during the γ/β-globin switch. Forty-five TFs were silenced by day 56 (Profile-1 and 30 TFs were activated by day 56 (Profile-2. Both GSEA datasets were analyzed using the MIMI Cytoscape platform, which discovered TFNs centered on KLF4 and GATA2 (Profile-1 and KLF1 and GATA1 for Profile-2 genes. Subsequent shRNA studies in KU812 leukemia cells and human erythroid progenitors generated from UCB-CD34+ cells supported a negative role of MAFB in γ-globin regulation. The characteristics of erythroblasts derived from UCB-CD34

  10. Envolvimento nos direitos humanos e sistemas de valores Involvement in human rights and value systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cícero Pereira

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Com base no modelo da análise quantitativa das representações sociais, o estudo (N = 300 tratou do posicionamento de estudantes universitários em relação aos Direitos Humanos (DHs e à ancoragem social desse posicionamento nos sistemas de valores dos estudantes. Os resultados mostram que as representações dos estudantes sobre o envolvimento nos DHs envolvem quatro princípios organizadores: pessoal-abstrato; pessoal-concreto; governamental-abstrato; governamental-concreto. Em relação à ancoragem social dos princípios organizadores do envolvimento nos DHs, observou-se que os valores pós-materialistas se relacionaram positivamente com o envolvimento pessoal-abstrato, enquanto a adesão aos valores religiosos implicou maior envolvimento no princípio pessoal-concreto. Além disso, a adesão aos valores materialistas levou a uma avaliação mais positiva do envolvimento do Governo Brasileiro nos DHs, ao passo que os valores pós-materialistas contribuíram com uma avaliação mais crítica desse governo. As discussões abordam a centralidade dos valores na formação das representações sociais dos DHs.Based on the quantitative analysis model of social representations, a study (N=300 was carried out concerning the opinion of university students on Human Rights (HR, and the social link of this positioning in the students system of values. The results show that the students representations of the involvement in HR comprise four organizing principles: personal-abstract; personal-concrete; governmental-abstract; governmental-concrete. With regard to the social anchorage of the organizing principles of involvement in HR, it has been observed that post-materialist values were positively related to the involvement personal-abstract, whereas adherence to religious values implied a greater involvement in the personal-concrete principle. In addition, adherence to materialist values led to a more positive appraisal of the Brazilian Government

  11. Human and organizational factors in nuclear safety; Factores humanos y organizativos en la seguridad nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.; Barrientos, M.; Gil, B.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear installations are socio technical systems where human and organizational factors, in both utilities and regulators, have a significant impact on safety. Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, original of several initiatives in the human factors field, nevertheless became a lost opportunity to timely acquire lessons related to the upper tiers of the system. Nowadays, Spanish nuclear installations have integrated in their processes specialists and activities in human and organizational factors, promoted by the licensees After many years of hard work, Spanish installations have achieved a better position to face new challenges, such as those posed by Fukushima. With this experience, only technology-centered action plan would not be acceptable, turning this accident in yet another lost opportunity. (Author)

  12. Possible involvement of infection with human coronavirus 229E, but not NL63, in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Kazuya; Imada, Yoshio; Kawase, Miyuki; Nakagaki, Keiko; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2014-12-01

    Although human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 was once considered a possible causative agent of Kawasaki disease based on RT-PCR analyses, subsequent studies could not confirm the result. In this study, this possibility was explored using serological tests. To evaluate the role of HCoV infection in patients with Kawasaki disease, immunofluorescence assays and virus neutralizing tests were performed. Paired serum samples were obtained from patients with Kawasaki disease who had not been treated with γ-globulin. HCoV-NL63 and two antigenically different isolates of HCoV-229E (ATCC-VR740 and a new isolate, Sendai-H) were examined as controls. Immunofluorescence assays detected no difference in HCoV-NL63 antibody positivity between the patients with Kawasaki disease and controls, whereas the rate of HCoV-229E antibody positivity was higher in the patients with Kawasaki disease than that in controls. The neutralizing tests revealed no difference in seropositivity between the acute and recovery phases of patients with Kawasaki disease for the two HCoV-229Es. However, the Kawasaki disease specimens obtained from patients in recovery phase displayed significantly higher positivity for Sendai-H, but not for ATCC-VR740, as compared to the controls. The serological test supported no involvement of HCoV-NL63 but suggested the possible involvement of HCoV-229E in the development of Kawasaki disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Structural motifs and potential sigma homologies in the large subunit of human general transcription factor TFIIE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuma, Y; Sumimoto, H; Hoffmann, A; Shimasaki, S; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G

    1991-12-05

    The general transcription factor TFIIE has an essential role in eukaryotic transcription initiation together with RNA polymerase II and other general factors. Human TFIIE consists of two subunits of relative molecular mass 57,000 (TFIIE-alpha) and 34,000 (TFIIE-beta) and joins the preinitiation complex after RNA polymerase II and TFIIF. Here we report the cloning and structure of a complementary DNA encoding a functional human TFIIE-alpha. TFIIE-alpha is necessary for transcription initiation together with TFIIE-beta, and recombinant TFIIE-alpha can fully replace the natural subunit in an in vitro transcription assay. The sequence contains several interesting structural motifs (leucine repeat, zinc finger and helix-turn-helix) and sequence similarities to bacterial sigma factors that suggest direct involvement in the regulation of transcription initiation.

  14. The development of human factors experimental evaluation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Bong Shick; Oh, In Suk; Cha, Kyung Ho; Lee, Hyun Chul; Park, Geun Ok; Cheon, Se Woo; Suh, Sang Moon

    1997-07-01

    New human factors issues, such as evaluation of information navigation, the consideration of operator characteristics, and operator performance assessment, related to the HMI design based on VDUs are being risen. Thus, in order to solve these human factors issues, this project aims to establish the experimental technologies including the techniques for experimental design, experimental measurement, data collection and analysis, and to develop ITF (Integrated Test Facility) suitable for the experiment of HMI design evaluation. For the establish of the experimental data analysis and evaluation methodologies, we developed as the following: (1) a paradigm for human factors experimentation including experimental designs, procedures, and data analysis. (2) the methods for the assessment of operator`s mental workload (3) DAEXESS (data analysis and experiment evaluation supporting system). Also, we have established a experiment execution technologies through the preliminary experiments, such as the suitability evaluation of information display on a LSDP, the evaluation of information display on a LSDP, the evaluation of computerized operation procedure and an experiment of advanced alarm system (ADIOS). Finally, we developed the ITF including human machine simulator, telemetry system, an eye tracking system, an audio/video data measurement system, and three dimensional micro behaviour analysis system. (author). 81 refs., 68 tabs., 73 figs.

  15. Human Factors Issues For Multi-Modular Reactor Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan Q Tran; Humberto E. Garcia; Ronald L. Boring; Jeffrey C. Joe; Bruce P. Hallbert

    2007-08-01

    Smaller and multi-modular reactor (MMR) will be highly technologically-advanced systems allowing more system flexibility to reactors configurations (e.g., addition/deletion of reactor units). While the technical and financial advantages of systems may be numerous, MMR presents many human factors challenges that may pose vulnerability to plant safety. An important human factors challenge in MMR operation and performance is the monitoring of data from multiple plants from centralized control rooms where human operators are responsible for interpreting, assessing, and responding to different system’s states and failures (e.g., simultaneously monitoring refueling at one plant while keeping an eye on another plant’s normal operating state). Furthermore, the operational, safety, and performance requirements for MMR can seriously change current staffing models and roles, the mode in which information is displayed, procedures and training to support and guide operators, and risk analysis. For these reasons, addressing human factors concerns in MMR are essential in reducing plant risk.

  16. Human factors engineering checklists for application in the SAR process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overlin, T.K.; Romero, H.A.; Ryan, T.G.

    1995-03-01

    This technical report was produced to assist the preparers and reviewers of the human factors portions of the SAR in completing their assigned tasks regarding analysis and/or review of completed analyses. The checklists, which are the main body of the report, and the subsequent tables, were developed to assist analysts in generating the needed analysis data to complete the human engineering analysis for the SAR. The technical report provides a series of 19 human factors engineering (HFE) checklists which support the safety analyses of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) reactor and nonreactor facilities and activities. The results generated using these checklists and in the preparation of the concluding analyses provide the technical basis for preparing the human factors chapter, and subsequent inputs to other chapters, required by DOE as a part of the safety analysis reports (SARs). This document is divided into four main sections. The first part explains the origin of the checklists, the sources utilized, and other information pertaining to the purpose and scope of the report. The second part, subdivided into 19 sections, is the checklists themselves. The third section is the glossary which defines terms that could either be unfamiliar or have specific meanings within the context of these checklists. The final section is the subject index in which the glossary terms are referenced back to the specific checklist and page the term is encountered.

  17. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum.

  18. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  19. DEFB1 polymorphisms are involved in susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection in Brazilian gynaecological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Segat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The human beta defensin 1 (hBD-1 antimicrobial peptide is a member of the innate immune system known to act in the first line of defence against microorganisms, including viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV. In this study, five functional polymorphisms (namely g-52G>A, g-44C>G and g-20G>A in the 5’UTR and c.*5G>A and c.*87A>G in the 3’UTR in the DEFB1 gene encoding for hBD-1 were analysed to investigate the possible involvement of these genetic variants in susceptibility to HPV infection and in the development of HPV-associated lesions in a population of Brazilian women. The DEFB1 g-52G>A and c.*5G>A single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and the GCAAA haplotype showed associations with HPV-negative status; in particular, the c.*5G>A SNP was significantly associated after multiple test corrections. These findings suggest a possible role for the constitutively expressed beta defensin-1 peptide as a natural defence against HPV in the genital tract mucosa.

  20. Persistent Amplification of DNA Damage Signal Involved in Replicative Senescence of Normal Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX and ATM are the surrogate markers of DNA double strand breaks. We previously reported that the residual foci increased their size after irradiation, which amplifies DNA damage signals. Here, we addressed whether amplification of DNA damage signal is involved in replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Large phosphorylated H2AX foci (>1.5 μm diameter were specifically detected in presenescent cells. The frequency of cells with large foci was well correlated with that of cells positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Hypoxic cell culture condition extended replicative life span of normal human fibroblast, and we found that the formation of large foci delayed in those cells. Our immuno-FISH analysis revealed that large foci partially localized at telomeres in senescent cells. Importantly, large foci of phosphorylated H2AX were always colocalized with phosphorylated ATM foci. Furthermore, Ser15-phosphorylated p53 showed colocalization with the large foci. Since the treatment of senescent cells with phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, suppressed p53 phosphorylation, it is suggested that amplification of DNA damage signaling sustains persistent activation of ATM-p53 pathway, which is essential for replicative senescence.

  1. Pathways involved in Drosophila and human cancer development: the Notch, Hedgehog, Wingless, Runt, and Trithorax pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Klaus; Zach, Otto

    2012-05-01

    Animal models are established tools to study basic questions of biology in a systematic way. They have greatly facilitated our understanding of the mechanisms by which nature forms and maintains organisms. Much of the knowledge on molecular changes underlying the development of organisms originates from research in the fruit fly model Drosophila melanogaster. Vertebrate models including the mouse and zebrafish model, but also other animal models coming from different corners of the animal kingdom have shown that much of the basic machinery of development is essentially identical, not just in all vertebrates but in all major phyla of invertebrates too. Moreover, key elements of this machinery have been demonstrated to be involved in recurrent molecular abnormalities detected in tumor-tissue from patients, indicating their implication in the genesis of human cancer. Thus, research in this field has become a common topic for both biologists and hemato-oncologists. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on some of these key elements and molecular pathways such as Notch, Hedgehog, Wingless, Runt, and Trithorax that have been originally described and studied in animal models and which seem to play a major role in the pathophysiology and targeted management of human cancer.

  2. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha in Toll-like receptor 7/8-mediated inflammatory response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally A Nicholas; Vadim V Sumbayev

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 are crucial in host defence against single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses. Such viruses cause severe illnesses, which remain a serious medical burden in both industrialised and developing countries. TLR7/8 downstream signaling leads to a dramatic cellular stress associated with energy consumption. However, the molecular mechanisms of cell survival and adaptation to TLR7/8-induced stress, which give the cells an opportunity to initiate proper inflammatory reactions, are not clear at all. Here we report for the first time that ligand-induced ac-tivation of TLR7/8 leads to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) protein in THP-1 human myeloid macrophages via redox-and reactive nitrogen species-dependent mechanisms. MAP kinases and phosphoi-nositol-3K are not involved in TLR7/8-mediated HIF-1α accumulation. Experiments with HIF-la knockdown THP-1 cells have clearly demonstrated that HIF-1α is important for the protection of these cells against TLR7/8-induced depletion of ATP. Thus, HIF-1α might support both cell survival and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines upon TLR7/8 activation.

  3. My 20 years of experience in the human factors field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnino, A. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1992-01-01

    My first encounter with human factors happened in early 1973: I was performing a reliability assessment of the safety injection system of the Fessenheim reactor, and I found that the operators had to switch to the recirculation phase manually and had only 6 min between the low and low-low level alarm indicating that the water tank was empty. It of course led us to replace this manual action by an automatic positioning for the recirculation phase. In July of the same year, I attended a North Atlantic Treaty Organization workshop in Liverpool on reliability assessment, and I met Alan Swain from the United States and Jens Rasmussen from Denmark. During the long rainy evenings of the seminar, we had time to discuss human errors and human factors, and that was the beginning of a very fruitful collaboration between us. I realized then the complexity of the problem. Quantification needs were obvious for reliability and risk assessment studies, but, at the same time, there were needs for better understanding of human behavior and the mechanisms that could lead to human errors. Knowledge of the man-machine interface also seemed very poor, although some basic ergonomic rules were available and could be applied. But a major problem was the lack of data.

  4. An expansive human regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neph, Shane; Vierstra, Jeff; Stergachis, Andrew B; Reynolds, Alex P; Haugen, Eric; Vernot, Benjamin; Thurman, Robert E; John, Sam; Sandstrom, Richard; Johnson, Audra K; Maurano, Matthew T; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Wang, Hao; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Diegel, Morgan; Roach, Vaughn; Dunn, Douglas; Neri, Jun; Schafer, Anthony; Hansen, R Scott; Kutyavin, Tanya; Giste, Erika; Weaver, Molly; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter; Zhang, Miaohua; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; MacCoss, Michael J; Akey, Joshua M; Bender, M A; Groudine, Mark; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-06

    Regulatory factor binding to genomic DNA protects the underlying sequence from cleavage by DNase I, leaving nucleotide-resolution footprints. Using genomic DNase I footprinting across 41 diverse cell and tissue types, we detected 45 million transcription factor occupancy events within regulatory regions, representing differential binding to 8.4 million distinct short sequence elements. Here we show that this small genomic sequence compartment, roughly twice the size of the exome, encodes an expansive repertoire of conserved recognition sequences for DNA-binding proteins that nearly doubles the size of the human cis-regulatory lexicon. We find that genetic variants affecting allelic chromatin states are concentrated in footprints, and that these elements are preferentially sheltered from DNA methylation. High-resolution DNase I cleavage patterns mirror nucleotide-level evolutionary conservation and track the crystallographic topography of protein-DNA interfaces, indicating that transcription factor structure has been evolutionarily imprinted on the human genome sequence. We identify a stereotyped 50-base-pair footprint that precisely defines the site of transcript origination within thousands of human promoters. Finally, we describe a large collection of novel regulatory factor recognition motifs that are highly conserved in both sequence and function, and exhibit cell-selective occupancy patterns that closely parallel major regulators of development, differentiation and pluripotency.

  5. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Suan Poo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA.

  6. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder medication use: factors involved in prescribing, safety aspects and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Raga, Jose; Ferreros, Amparo; Knecht, Carlos; de Alvaro, Raquel; Carabal, Eloisa

    2016-01-01

    While treatment of patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is based on a multimodal approach that combines medication with specific psychological interventions, pharmacotherapy alone is generally considered an essential and cost-effective element. This paper aims to comprehensively and critically review factors involved in prescribing and medication use in individuals diagnosed with ADHD, focusing on the difficulties facing patients with ADHD seeking treatment, as well as the safety and tolerability aspects of ADHD pharmacotherapies, with particular attention on the cardiovascular adverse events and the potential risk of misuse or diversion of ADHD medications. A comprehensive and systematic literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE database was conducted to identify studies published in peer-reviewed journals until 1 August 2016. Children, adolescents and adults often encounter significant difficulties in the process of accessing specialist assessment and treatment for ADHD as a consequence of disparities in service organization and available treatment provision. Despite the well-established efficacy and overall safety profile, ADHD medications are not exempt from adverse events. The cardiovascular safety of pharmacotherapies used for treating individuals with ADHD has raised particular concerns; however there is little evidence of serious cardiovascular adverse events, including no serious corrected QT (QTc) abnormalities associated with stimulants, atomoxetine or α2-adrenergic receptor agonists. Although the abuse of prescription stimulant drugs, particularly, short-acting stimulants is a prevalent and growing problem, nonmedical use of prescription stimulants within the clinical context is very limited. In addition, nonstimulant ADHD medications lack any reinforcing effects and consequently any abuse potential.

  7. Human Parturition Involves Phosphorylation of Progesterone Receptor-A at Serine-345 in Myometrial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Peyvand; Michniuk, Daniel; Kuo, Kelly; Yi, Lijuan; Skomorovska-Prokvolit, Yelenna; Peters, Gregory A; Tan, Huiqing; Wang, Junye; Malemud, Charles J; Mesiano, Sam

    2016-11-01

    The hypothesis that phosphorylation of progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms, PR-A and PR-B, in myometrial cells affects progesterone action in the context of human parturition was tested. Immunodetection of phosphoserine (pSer) PR forms in term myometrium revealed that the onset of labor is associated with increased phosphorylation of PR-A at serine-345 (pSer345-PRA) and that pSer345-PRA localized to the nucleus of myometrial cells. In explant cultures of term myometrium generation of pSer345-PRA was induced by interleukin-1β and dependent on progesterone, suggesting that pSer345-PRA generation is induced by a proinflammatory stimulus. In the hTERT-HM(A/B) human myometrial cell line, abundance of pSer345-PRA was induced by progesterone in a dose- (EC50 ∼1 nM) and time-dependent manner. Prevention of pSer345 (by site-directed mutagenesis) abolished the capacity for PR-A to inhibit anti-inflammatory actions of progesterone mediated by PR-B but had no effect on the transrepressive activity of PR-A at a canonical progesterone response element. Taken together, the data show that human parturition involves the phosphorylation of PR-A at serine-345 in myometrial cells and that this process is ligand dependent and induced by a proinflammatory stimulus. We also found that in myometrial cells, pSer345 activates the capacity for PR-A to inhibit antiinflammatory actions of progesterone mediated by PR-B. Phosphorylation of PR-A at serine-345 may be an important functional link between tissue-level inflammation and PR-A-mediated functional progesterone withdrawal to trigger parturition.

  8. The integration of Human Factors (HF) in the SAR process training course text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-03-01

    This text provides the technical basis for a two-day course on human factors (HF), as applied to the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) process. The overall objective of this text and course is to: provide the participant with a working knowledge of human factors-related requirements, suggestions for doing a human safety analysis applying a graded approach, and an ability to demonstrate using the results of the human safety analysis, that human factors elements as defined by DOE (human factors engineering, procedures, training, oversight, staffing, qualifications), can support wherever necessary, nuclear safety commitments in the SAR. More specifically, the objectives of the text and course are: (1) To provide the SAR preparer with general guidelines for doing HE within the context of a graded approach for the SAR; (2) To sensitize DOE facility managers and staff, safety analysts and SAR preparers, independent reviewers, and DOE reviewers and regulators, to DOE Order 5480.23 requirements for HE in the SAR; (3) To provide managers, analysts, reviewers and regulators with a working knowledge of HE concepts and techniques within the context of a graded approach for the SAR, and (4) To provide SAR managers and DOE reviewers and regulators with general guidelines for monitoring and coordinating the work of preparers of HE inputs throughout the SAR process, and for making decisions regarding the safety relevance of HE inputs to the SAR. As a ready reference for implementing the human factors requirements of DOE Order 5480.22 and DOE Standard 3009-94, this course text and accompanying two-day course are intended for all persons who are involved in the SAR.

  9. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  10. The CS1 segment of fibronectin is involved in human OSCC pathogenesis by mediating OSCC cell spreading, migration, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Silva Nisha J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alternatively spliced V region or type III connecting segment III (IIICS of fibronectin is important in early development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, however, its role in oral cancer has not been fully investigated. Thus, we investigated the role of CS-1, a key site within the CSIII region of fibronectin, in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Methods To determine the expression of CS-1 in human normal and oral SCC tissue specimens immunohistochemical analyses were performed. The expression of CS1 was then associated with clinicopathological factors. To investigate the role of CS-1 in regulating OSCC cell spreading, migration and invasion, OSCC cells were assayed for spreading and migration in the presence of a CS-1 peptide or a CS-1 blocking peptide, and for invasion using Matrigel supplemented with these peptides. In addition, integrin α4siRNA or a focal adhesion kinase (FAK anti-sense oligonucleotide was transfected into OSCC cells to examine the mechanistic role of integrin α4 or FAK in CS1-mediated cell spreading and migration, respectively. Results CS-1 expression levels were significantly higher in OSCC tissues compared to normal tissues (p Conclusion These data indicate that the CS-1 site of fibronectin is involved in oral cancer pathogenesis and in regulating OSCC cell spreading, migration and invasion.

  11. Involvement of superoxide generated by NADPH oxidase in the shedding of procoagulant vesicles from human monocytic cells exposed to bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azma, Toshiharu; Ogawa, Saori; Nishioka, Akira; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Kawahito, Shinji; Nagasaka, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki

    2017-08-17

    It is known that a variety of sized procoagulant vesicles that express tissue factor are released from several types of cells including monocytes by mechanisms related to the induction of apoptosis, while it has not yet been evaluated whether superoxide is involved in the production of such vesicles. Here, we report that a local anesthetic bupivacaine induces apoptosis in human monocytic cells THP-1 within a short observation period, where the shedding of procoagulant vesicles is associated. The property as procoagulant vesicles was evaluated using flow cytometry by the binding of FITC-conjugated fibrinogen to vesicles in the presence of fresh frozen plasma and the suppression of this binding by heparin. Bupivacaine (1 mg/ml) increased the apoptotic cells and procoagulant vesicles. LY294002 (100 µM), that inhibits the recruiting of intracellular component of NADPH oxidase to construct the activated form of this enzyme complex, or superoxide dismutase (1500 unit/ml) suppressed bupivacaine-provoked induction of apoptosis and the increase of procoagulant vesicles. We suggest that this simple experimental system is useful to explore the molecular mechanisms of action of superoxide in the shedding of procoagulant vesicles from human monocytic cells.

  12. Factors influencing trace element composition in human teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Iyengar, G.V. [Biomineral Sciences International, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The authors recently compiled and reviewed the literature published in or after 1978 for 45 major, minor, and trace elements in human teeth as a part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) study. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the various factors that influence the concentration levels of certain trace elements in human teeth. The sampling practices and analytical techniques that are applicable for trace element analysis are also discussed. It is also our intention to identify reference range of values, where data permit such conclusions. The scrutiny was designed to identify only the healthy permanent teeth, and values from teeth with fillings, caries, or periodontal diseases were eliminated.

  13. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its two receptors in normal human endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海燕; 陈贵安

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: We try to demonstrate the expression of vascular endothelial growthfactor (VEGF) and its receptors, flt-1 and KDR, in normal human emdometrium duringthe menstrual cycle.Methods: Immunohistochemical method was used to observe the expression ofVEGF and its two receptors in emdometrium throughout the normal menstrual cyclemeanwhile the isoforms of VEGF were also detected by Western blot analysis. The en-dothelial cells of micro-vessels were marked with Ⅷ factor antibody.Results: VEGF and its receptors existed in endometrial glandular, stromal and vas-cular endothelial cells of human endometrium. Their expressions were higher in the mid-secretory phase of menstrual cycle and highest at menstruation. VEGF121 and VEGF165were the predominant isoforms in normal human endometrium.Conclusion: The expression of VEGF and its two receptors showed cycle-dependentin human endometrium, probably involved in embryonic implantation and endometrialproliferation and differentiation.

  14. Space Flight Human System Standards (SFHSS). Volume 2; Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Factors" and Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Fitts, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the standards for space flight hardware based on human capabilities and limitations. The contents include: 1) Scope; 2) Applicable documents; 3) General; 4) Human Physical Characteristics and Capabilities; 5) Human Performance and Cognition; 6) Natural and Induced Environments; 7) Habitability Functions; 8) Architecture; 9) Hardware and Equipment; 10) Crew Interfaces; 11) Spacesuits; 12) Operatons: Reserved; 13) Ground Maintenance and Assembly: Reserved; 14) Appendix A-Reference Documents; 15) Appendix N-Acronyms and 16) Appendix C-Definition. Volume 2 is supported by the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH)s.

  15. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor and MT1-MMP Involved in Development of Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-zhen GUO; Andres J. Espinoza; Christian A. Espinoza; Terence M. Doherty; Xiao WANG

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Genetic deficiency of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in atherosclerosis-prone (apoE-/-) mice markedly reduces formation of atheroma. But Little is known about the potential effects of other colony stimulating factors(CSF), such as granulocyte CSF(G-CSF), on atherosclerosis. This study tested the hypothesis that G-CSF would be involved in development of atherosclerotic plaque. Methods apoE-/- mice fed with a Western-style diet (0.15% cholesterol) were injected subcutaneously with recombinant human G-CSF(10 mg/day) daily for 9 weeks then sacrificed. The matrix metalloproteinase(MMP)2 and MMP9 in serum of mice were measured by Gelatin Zymography analysis and c-kit and membrane type1-MMP(MT1-MMP) antigens were detected using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Meanwhile, complete blood counts (CBC) and serum cholesterol, relative fractions of VLDL,LDL, and HDL were evaluated by spectrophotometric techniques and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)respectively. Atherosclerotic Lesions of the aorta were also analyzed by histological methods. Results G-CSF treatment resulted in increased proportions of circulating monocytes (6.9±2.2% vs.3.8±0.3%;P<0.05), and decreased serum levels of total cholesterol (1225±594 vs.1991±1009;P<0.005) compared to control mice. A greater proportion of bone marrow cells from G-CSF treated mice expressed MT1-MMP (14.5±5.5% vs.6.2±5.0%, P<0.05) compared to bone marrow cells from vehicle treated mice. G-CSF treatment was also associated with smaller atheromatous plaque, and decreased oil red O staining. Conclusions G-CSF lowers serum cholesterol, increases circulating monocytes, increases bone marrow cell expression of MT1-MMP, inhibits plaque development, and decreases lipid and macrophage infiltration into developing plaque.

  16. Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Alain; Low, Shyan H; Emmenlauer, Mario; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-08-05

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular pathogens that infect animals as their natural hosts. Transmission to humans is most commonly caused by direct contact with infected animals or by ingestion of contaminated food and can lead to severe chronic infections. Brucella can invade professional and non-professional phagocytic cells and replicates within endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The host factors required for Brucella entry into host cells, avoidance of lysosomal degradation, and replication in the ER-like compartment remain largely unknown. Here we describe two assays to identify host factors involved in Brucella entry and replication in HeLa cells. The protocols describe the use of RNA interference, while alternative screening methods could be applied. The assays are based on the detection of fluorescently labeled bacteria in fluorescently labeled host cells using automated wide-field microscopy. The fluorescent images are analyzed using a standardized image analysis pipeline in CellProfiler which allows single cell-based infection scoring. In the endpoint assay, intracellular replication is measured two days after infection. This allows bacteria to traffic to their replicative niche where proliferation is initiated around 12 hr after bacterial entry. Brucella which have successfully established an intracellular niche will thus have strongly proliferated inside host cells. Since intracellular bacteria will greatly outnumber individual extracellular or intracellular non-replicative bacteria, a strain constitutively expressing GFP can be used. The strong GFP signal is then used to identify infected cells. In contrast, for the entry assay it is essential to differentiate between intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Here, a strain encoding for a tetracycline-inducible GFP is used. Induction of GFP with simultaneous inactivation of extracellular bacteria by gentamicin enables the differentiation between intracellular and extracellular

  17. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J. [INSERM, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus genome RNA in vitro: requirement of cellular factor(s).

    OpenAIRE

    Barik, S

    1992-01-01

    Extracts made from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected Hep-2 cells synthesized mRNAs encoded by all known viral genes. In contrast, RSV ribonucleoproteins purified from infected cells failed to transcribe in vitro; transcription was restored by addition of a cytoplasmic extract of uninfected Hep-2 cells, demonstrating that a cellular factor(s) has a role in RSV gene expression. Quantitation of the individual gene mRNAs transcribed in vitro revealed polarity of transcription of th...

  19. The human chromosomal fragile sites more often involved in constitutional deletions and duplications - A genetic and statistical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dora Prata; Sequeira, Inês J.; Figueiredo, Carlos; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2016-12-01

    Human chromosomal fragile sites (CFSs) are heritable loci or regions of the human chromosomes prone to exhibit gaps, breaks and rearrangements. Determining the frequency of deletions and duplications in CFSs may contribute to explain the occurrence of human disease due to those rearrangements. In this study we analyzed the frequency of deletions and duplications in each human CFS. Statistical methods, namely data display, descriptive statistics and linear regression analysis were applied to analyze this dataset. We found that FRA15C, FRA16A and FRAXB are the most frequently involved CFSs in deletions and duplications occurring in the human genome.

  20. Involvement of hGLD-2 in cytoplasmic polyadenylation of human p53 mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Norrild, Bodil

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation is a post-transcriptional mechanism regulating mRNA stability and translation. The human p53 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) contains two regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) just upstream of the poly(A) hexanucleotide. Evaluation of the p53 CPE...... cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase] is overexpressed instead. The stability of a luciferase mRNA containing the p53 3'-UTR downstream, is decreased when hCPEB1 is overexpressed as seen by qPCR. Expression of hGLD-2 restores the mRNA stability. This is due to elongation of the poly(A) tail as seen by a PCR......-based poly(A) test and in vitro poly(A) assay. Taken together, our results suggest that hCPEB1 and hGLD-2 are antagonizing factors regulating p53 mRNA stability....