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Sample records for human extracellular fluid

  1. Handling and storage of human body fluids for analysis of extracellular vesicles

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    Yuana Yuana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Because procedures of handling and storage of body fluids affect numbers and composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs, standardization is important to ensure reliable and comparable measurements of EVs in a clinical environment. We aimed to develop standard protocols for handling and storage of human body fluids for EV analysis. Conditions such as centrifugation, single freeze–thaw cycle, effect of time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation and storage were investigated. Plasma is the most commonly studied body fluid in EV research. We mainly focused on EVs originating from platelets and erythrocytes and investigated the behaviour of these 2 types of EVs independently as well as in plasma samples of healthy subjects. EVs in urine and saliva were also studied for comparison. All samples were analysed simultaneously before and after freeze–thawing by resistive pulse sensing, nanoparticle tracking analysis, conventional flow cytometry (FCM and transmission (scanning electron microscopy. Our main finding is that the effect of centrifugation markedly depends on the cellular origin of EVs. Whereas erythrocyte EVs remain present as single EVs after centrifugation, platelet EVs form aggregates, which affect their measured concentration in plasma. Single erythrocyte and platelet EVs are present mainly in the range of 100–200 nm, far below the lower limit of what can be measured by conventional FCM. Furthermore, the effects of single freeze–thaw cycle, time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation up to 1 hour and storage up to 1 year are insignificant (p>0.05 on the measured concentration and diameter of EVs from erythrocyte and platelet concentrates and EVs in plasma, urine and saliva. In conclusion, in standard protocols for EV studies, centrifugation to isolate EVs from collected body fluids should be avoided. Freezing and storage of collected body fluids, albeit their insignificant effects, should be performed

  2. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current da...

  3. Development of a Rat Plasma and Brain Extracellular Fluid Pharmacokinetic Model for Bupropion and Hydroxybupropion Based on Microdialysis Sampling, and Application to Predict Human Brain Concentrations.

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    Cremers, Thomas I F H; Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Rollema, Hans; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Administration of bupropion [(±)-2-(tert-butylamino)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)propan-1-one] and its preformed active metabolite, hydroxybupropion [(±)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-propanyl)amino]-1-propanone], to rats with measurement of unbound concentrations by quantitative microdialysis sampling of plasma and brain extracellular fluid was used to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetics model to describe the blood-brain barrier transport of both substances. The population model revealed rapid equilibration of both entities across the blood-brain barrier, with resultant steady-state brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio estimates of 1.9 and 1.7 for bupropion and hydroxybupropion, respectively, which is thus indicative of a net uptake asymmetry. An overshoot of the brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio at early time points was observed with bupropion; this was modeled as a time-dependent uptake clearance of the drug across the blood-brain barrier. Translation of the model was used to predict bupropion and hydroxybupropion exposure in human brain extracellular fluid after twice-daily administration of 150 mg bupropion. Predicted concentrations indicate that preferential inhibition of the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters by the metabolite, with little to no contribution by bupropion, would be expected at this therapeutic dose. Therefore, these results extend nuclear imaging studies on dopamine transporter occupancy and suggest that inhibition of both transporters contributes significantly to bupropion's therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

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    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  5. Analysis of extracellular RNA in cerebrospinal fluid

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    Saugstad, Julie A.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R.; Phillips, Jay I.; Lind, Babett; Harrington, Christina A.; McFarland, Trevor J.; Courtright, Amanda L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Yeri, Ashish S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Messer, Karen; Akers, Johnny C.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the extracellular vesicle (EV) and RNA composition of pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and CSF from five major neurological disorders: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), low-grade glioma (LGG), glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), representing neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and severe acute brain injury. We evaluated: (I) size and quantity of EVs by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), (II) RNA yield and purity using four RNA isolation kits, (III) replication of RNA yields within and between laboratories, and (IV) composition of total and EV RNAs by reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and RNA sequencing (RNASeq). The CSF contained ~106 EVs/μL by NTA and VFC. Brain tumour and SAH CSF contained more EVs and RNA relative to normal, AD, and PD. RT-qPCR and RNASeq identified disease-related populations of microRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) relative to normal CSF, in both total and EV fractions. This work presents relevant measures selected to inform the design of subsequent replicative CSF studies. The range of neurological diseases highlights variations in total and EV RNA content due to disease or collection site, revealing critical considerations guiding the selection of appropriate approaches and controls for CSF studies. PMID:28717417

  6. Is There Volume Transmission Along Extracellular Fluid Pathways Corresponding to the Acupuncture Meridians?

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    Weibo Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Volume transmission is a new major communication signaling via extracellular fluid (interstitial fluid pathways. It was proposed by the current authors that such pathways can explain the meridian phenomena and acupuncture effects. To investigate whether meridian-like structures exist in fish body and operate via volume transmission in extracellular fluid pathways, we injected alcian blue (AB under anesthesia into Gephyrocharax melanocheir, which has a translucent body. The migration of AB could be seen directly and was recorded by a digital camera. The fish was then embedded and cut transversely to observe the position of tracks in three dimensions. Eight longitudinal threadlike blue tracks were recognized on the fish. The positions of these threadlike tracks were similar to meridians on the human body. Transverse sections showed that these tracks distributed to different layers of distinct subcutaneous loose connective tissues and intermuscular septa. Lymphatic vessels were sometimes associated with the extracellular blue tracks where the migration of AB occurred. Extracellular fluid pathways were found on fish through their transport of AB. These pathways operating via volume transmission appeared to be similar in positions and functions to the acupuncture meridians in Chinese medicine.

  7. Extracellular Mitochondria in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neurological Recovery After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

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    Chou, Sherry H-Y; Lan, Jing; Esposito, Elga; Ning, MingMing; Balaj, Leonora; Ji, Xunming; Lo, Eng H; Hayakawa, Kazuhide

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that extracellular mitochondria may be involved in the pathophysiology of stroke. In this study, we assessed the functional relevance of endogenous extracellular mitochondria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rats and humans after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A standard rat model of SAH was used, where an intraluminal suture was used to perforate a cerebral artery, thus leading to blood extravasation into subarachnoid space. At 24 and 72 hours after SAH, neurological outcomes were measured, and the standard JC1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl-benzimidazolylcarbocyanineiodide) assay was used to quantify mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF. To further support the rat model experiments, CSF samples were obtained from 41 patients with SAH and 27 control subjects. Mitochondrial membrane potentials were measured with the JC1 assay, and correlations with clinical outcomes were assessed at 3 months. In the standard rat model of SAH, extracellular mitochondria was detected in CSF at 24 and 72 hours after injury. JC1 assays demonstrated that mitochondrial membrane potentials in CSF were decreased after SAH compared with sham-operated controls. In human CSF samples, extracellular mitochondria were also detected, and JC1 levels were also reduced after SAH. Furthermore, higher mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF were correlated with good clinical recovery at 3 months after SAH onset. This proof-of-concept study suggests that extracellular mitochondria may provide a biomarker-like glimpse into brain integrity and recovery after injury. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

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    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  9. The plasticity of extracellular fluid homeostasis in insects.

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    Beyenbach, Klaus W

    2016-09-01

    In chemistry, the ratio of all dissolved solutes to the solution's volume yields the osmotic concentration. The present Review uses this chemical perspective to examine how insects deal with challenges to extracellular fluid (ECF) volume, solute content and osmotic concentration (pressure). Solute/volume plots of the ECF (hemolymph) reveal that insects tolerate large changes in all three of these ECF variables. Challenges beyond those tolerances may be 'corrected' or 'compensated'. While a correction simply reverses the challenge, compensation accommodates the challenge with changes in the other two variables. Most insects osmoregulate by keeping ECF volume and osmotic concentration within a wide range of tolerance. Other insects osmoconform, allowing the ECF osmotic concentration to match the ambient osmotic concentration. Aphids are unique in handling solute and volume loads largely outside the ECF, in the lumen of the gut. This strategy may be related to the apparent absence of Malpighian tubules in aphids. Other insects can suspend ECF homeostasis altogether in order to survive extreme temperatures. Thus, ECF homeostasis in insects is highly dynamic and plastic, which may partly explain why insects remain the most successful class of animals in terms of both species number and biomass.

  10. Supersaturation in human gastric fluids.

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    Bevernage, Jan; Hens, Bart; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2012-05-01

    The current study reports on supersaturation, precipitation and excipient mediated precipitation inhibition of five poorly soluble drugs (loviride, glibenclamide, itraconazole, danazol, and etravirine) in human and simulated gastric fluids. Upon induction of supersaturation in human gastric fluids (HGFs), simulated gastric fluid (SGF), and fasted state simulated gastric fluid (FaSSGF) using a solvent shift method, supersaturation and precipitation were assessed as a function of time. In addition, the precipitation inhibitory capacity of three polymers (Eudragit® E PO, HPMC-E5, and PVP K25) was investigated. Supersaturation in human gastric fluids was observed for all model compounds, but proved to be relatively unstable (fast precipitation), except for itraconazole. Only modest excipient-mediated stabilizing effects on supersaturation were observed using HPMC-E5 and Eudragit® E PO whereas PVP K25 exerted no effect. In contrast to SGF, the observed precipitation behavior in FaSSGF was similar to the behavior in human gastric fluids. The present study demonstrates that supersaturation stability of drugs in human gastric fluids is in general inferior to supersaturation stability in intestinal fluids. As the potential for excipient mediated precipitation inhibition in gastric fluids was only limited, our data suggest that supersaturation should preferably be targeted to the intestine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The prognostic value of brain extracellular fluid nitric oxide metabolites after traumatic brain injury.

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    Tisdall, Martin M; Rejdak, Konrad; Kitchen, Neil D; Smith, Martin; Petzold, Axel

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a compound with both protective and damaging effects on neurons. Quantification of NO metabolites in humans is limited by sample contamination with blood. In vivo cerebral microdialysis may offer an alternative approach as sampling of extracellular fluid (ECF) adjacent to neurons becomes possible. We investigate the prognostic value of brain ECF NO metabolites in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective case cohort of 195 ECF samples collected from 11 cases over 4 days following TBI was collected. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations ([NO x ]) were quantified using a vanadium-based colorimetric assay. Early ECF [NO x ] (survival (sensitivity 100%, specificity 75%). Early ECF NO x concentrations are of prognostic value after TBI. ECF NO x may be a useful biomarker for treatment trials targeted at nitric oxide metabolism.

  12. Local fluid transfer regulation in heart extracellular matrix.

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    McGee, Maria P; Morykwas, Michael J; Jordan, James E; Wang, Rui; Argenta, Louis C

    2016-06-01

    The interstitial myocardial matrix is a complex and dynamic structure that adapts to local fluctuations in pressure and actively contributes to the heart's fluid exchange and hydration. However, classical physiologic models tend to treat it as a passive conduit for water and solute, perhaps because local interstitial regulatory mechanisms are not easily accessible to experiment in vivo. Here, we examined the interstitial contribution to the fluid-driving pressure ex vivo. Interstitial hydration potentials were determined from influx/efflux rates measured in explants from healthy and ischemia-reperfusion-injured pigs during colloid osmotic pressure titrations. Adaptive responses were further explored by isolating myocardial fibroblasts and measuring their contractile responses to water activity changes in vitro. Results show hydration potentials between 5 and 60 mmHg in healthy myocardia and shifts in excess of 200 mmHg in edematous myocardia after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Further, rates of fluid transfer were temperature-dependent, and in collagen gel contraction assays, myocardial fibroblasts tended to preserve the micro-environment's hydration volume by slowing fluid efflux rates at pressures above 40 mmHg. Our studies quantify components of the fluid-driving forces in the heart interstitium that the classical Starling's equation does not explicitly consider. Measured hydration potentials in healthy myocardia and shifts with edema are larger than predicted from the known values of hydrostatic and colloid osmotic interstitial fluid pressures. Together with fibroblast responses in vitro, they are consistent with regulatory mechanisms that add local biological controls to classic fluid-balance models.

  13. Diversity of extracellular vesicles in human ejaculates revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

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    Johanna L. Höög

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human ejaculates contain extracellular vesicles (EVs, that to a large extent are considered to originate from the prostate gland, and are often denominated “prostasomes.” These EVs are important for human fertility, for example by promoting sperm motility and by inducing immune tolerance of the female immune system to the spermatozoa. So far, the EVs present in human ejaculate have not been studied in their native state, inside the seminal fluid without prior purification and isolation procedures. Using cryo-electron microscopy and tomography, we performed a comprehensive inventory of human ejaculate EVs. The sample was neither centrifuged, fixed, filtered or sectioned, nor were heavy metals added. Approximately 1,500 extracellular structures were imaged and categorized. The extracellular environment of human ejaculate was found to be diverse, with 5 major subcategories of EVs and 6 subcategories of extracellular membrane compartments, including lamellar bodies. Furthermore, 3 morphological features, including electron density, double membrane bilayers and coated surface, are described in all subcategories. This study reveals that the extracellular environment in human ejaculate is multifaceted. Several novel morphological EV subcategories are identified and clues to their cellular origin may be found in their morphology. This inventory is therefore important for developing future experimental approaches, and to interpret previously published data to understand the role of EVs for human male fertility.

  14. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor in human pancreatic cells

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    Rácz, G Z; Kittel, Á; Riccardi, D; Case, R M; Elliott, A C; Varga, G

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The extracellular calcium sensing receptor (CaR) plays a key role in the calcium homeostatic system and is therefore widely expressed in tissues involved in calcium metabolism. However, the CaR has also been identified in other tissues where its role is less clear. We have investigated the presence of the CaR in the human pancreas. Methods: Messenger RNA for the CaR was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the protein was localised by immunostaining. CaR function was assayed in Capan-1 cells by measuring intracellular calcium and [3H] thymidine incorporation. Results: The receptor was highly expressed in human pancreatic ducts. It was also expressed in exocrine acinar cells, in islets of Langerhans, and in intrapancreatic nerves and blood vessels. The CaR was expressed in both normal and neoplastic human tissue samples but was detected in only one of five ductal adenocarcinoma cells lines examined. Experiments on the CaR expressing adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 showed that the CaR was functional and was linked to mobilisation of intracellular calcium. Stimulation of the CaR reduced Capan-1 cell proliferation. Conclusions: We propose that the CaR may play multiple functional roles in the human pancreas. In particular, the CaR on the duct luminal membrane may monitor and regulate the Ca2+ concentration in pancreatic juice by triggering ductal electrolyte and fluid secretion. This could help to prevent precipitation of calcium salts in the duct lumen. The CaR may also help to regulate the proliferation of pancreatic ductal cells. PMID:12377811

  15. Comparative Analysis of Technologies for Quantifying Extracellular Vesicles (EVs in Clinical Cerebrospinal Fluids (CSF.

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    Johnny C Akers

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs have emerged as a promising biomarker platform for glioblastoma patients. However, the optimal method for quantitative assessment of EVs in clinical bio-fluid remains a point of contention. Multiple high-resolution platforms for quantitative EV analysis have emerged, including methods grounded in diffraction measurement of Brownian motion (NTA, tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS, vesicle flow cytometry (VFC, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Here we compared quantitative EV assessment using cerebrospinal fluids derived from glioblastoma patients using these methods. For EVs 150 nm in diameter, NTA consistently detected lower number of EVs relative to TRPS. These results unveil the strength and pitfalls of each quantitative method alone for assessing EVs derived from clinical cerebrospinal fluids and suggest that thoughtful synthesis of multi-platform quantitation will be required to guide meaningful clinical investigations.

  16. Detection of extracellular genomic DNA scaffold in human thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanisms underlying transition of a thrombus susceptible to tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) fibrinolysis to one that is resistant is unclear. Demonstration of a new possible thrombus scaffold may open new avenues of research in thrombolysis and may provide mechanistic insight...... thrombi. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive detection of genomic DNA associated with histones in the extracellular matrix of human and mouse thrombi suggest the presence of a new thrombus-associated scaffold....

  17. [Extracellular fluid, plasma and interstitial volume in cirrhotic patients without clinical edema or ascites].

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    Noguera Viñas, E C; Hames, W; Mothe, G; Barrionuevo, M P

    1989-01-01

    Extracellular fluid volume (E.C.F.) and plasma volume (P.V.), were measured with sodium sulfate labeled with 35I and 131I human serum albumin, respectively, by the dilution technique in control subjects and in cirrhotic patients without clinical ascites or edema, renal or hepatic failure, gastrointestinal bleeding or diuretics. Results are expressed as mean +/- DS in both ml/m2 and ml/kg. In normal subjects E.C.F. (n = 8) was 7,533 +/- 817 ml/m2 (201.3 +/- 182 ml/kg), P.V. (n = 11) 1,767 +/- 337 ml/m2 (47.2 +/- 9.3 ml/kg), and interstitial fluid (I.S.F.) (n = 7) 5,758 +/- 851 ml/m2 (Table 2). In cirrhotic patients E.C.F. (n = 11) was 10,318 +/- 2,980 ml/m2 (261.7 +/- 76.8 ml/kg), P.V. (n = 12) 2,649 +/- 558 ml/m2 (67.7 +/- 15.6 ml/kg) and I.S.F. (n = 11) 7,866 +/- 2,987 ml/m2 (Table 3). Cirrhotic patients compared with normal subjects have hypervolemia due to a significant E.C.F. and P.V. expansion (p less than 0.02 and less than 0.001 respectively) (Fig. 1). Reasons for E.C.F. and P.V. abnormalities in cirrhotic patients may reflect urinary sodium retention related to portal hipertension which stimulates aldosterone release or enhanced renal tubular sensitivity to the hormone. However, it is also possible that these patients, in the presence of hypoalbuminemia (Table 1), have no clinical edema or ascites due to increased glomerular filtration, suppressed release of vasopressin, increased natriuretic factor, and urinary prostaglandin excretion, in response to the intravascular expansion, all of which increased solute and water delivery to the distal nephron and improved renal water excretion. We conclude that in our clinical experience cirrhotic patients without ascites or edema have hypervolemia because of a disturbance in E.C.F.

  18. Synovial fluid pretreatment with hyaluronidase facilitates isolation of CD44+ extracellular vesicles

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    Boere, Janneke; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Libregts, Sten F. W. M.; Arkesteijn, Ger J. A.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.; Malda, Jos; van Weeren, P. René; Wauben, Marca H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) in synovial fluid (SF) are gaining increased recognition as important factors in joint homeostasis, joint regeneration, and as biomarkers of joint disease. A limited number of studies have investigated EVs in SF samples of patients with joint disease, but knowledge on the role of EVs in healthy joints is lacking. In addition, no standardized protocol is available for isolation of EVs from SF. Based on the high viscosity of SF caused by high concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) – a prominent extracellular matrix component – it was hypothesized that EV recovery could be optimized by pretreatment with hyaluronidase (HYase). Therefore, the efficiency of EV isolation from healthy equine SF samples was tested by performing sequential ultracentrifugation steps (10,000g, 100,000g and 200,000g) in the presence or absence of HYase. Quantitative EV analysis using high-resolution flow cytometry showed an efficient recovery of EVs after 100,000g ultracentrifugation, with an increased yield of CD44+ EVs when SF samples were pretreated with HYase. Morphological analysis of SF-derived EVs with cryo-transmission-electron microscopy did not indicate damage by high-speed ultracentrifugation and revealed that most EVs are spherical with a diameter of 20–200 nm. Further protein characterization by Western blotting revealed that healthy SF-derived EVs contain CD9, Annexin-1, and CD90/Thy1.1. Taken together, these data suggest that EV isolation protocols for body fluids that contain relatively high amounts of HA, such as SF, could benefit from treatment of the fluid with HYase prior to ultracentrifugation. This method facilitates recovery and detection of CD44+ EVs within the HA-rich extracellular matrix. Furthermore, based on the findings presented here, it is recommended to sediment SF-derived EVs with at least 100,000g for optimal EV recovery. PMID:27511891

  19. Extracellular DNA affects NO content in human endothelial cells.

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    Efremova, L V; Alekseeva, A Yu; Konkova, M S; Kostyuk, S V; Ershova, E S; Smirnova, T D; Konorova, I L; Veiko, N N

    2010-08-01

    Fragments of extracellular DNA are permanently released into the blood flow due to cell apoptosis and possible de novo DNA synthesis. To find out whether extracellular DNA can affect the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), one of key vascular tone regulators, we studied in vitro effects of three artificial DNA probes with different sequences and 10 samples of extracellular DNA (obtained from healthy people and patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis) on NO synthesis in endothelial cell culture (HUVEC). For detection of NO in live cells and culture medium, we used a NO-specific agent CuFL penetrating into the cells and forming a fluorescent product FL-NO upon interaction with NO. Human genome DNA fragments affected the content of NO in endothelial cells; this effect depended on both the base sequence and concentration of DNA fragments. Addition of artificial DNA and extracellular DNA from healthy people into the cell culture in a low concentration (5 ng/ml) increased the detected NO concentration by 4-fold at most. Cytosine-guanine (CG)-rich fragment of the transcribed sequence of ribosomal repeat was the most powerful NO-inductor. The effect of DNA fragments on NO synthesis was comparable with that of low doses of oxidizing agents, H(2)O(2) and 17β-estradiol. Extracellular DNA samples obtained from patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis decreased NO content in cells and medium by 1.3-28 times compared to the control; the effect correlated with the content of CG-rich sequences.

  20. An extracellular proteasome releases endostatin from human collagen XVIII.

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    Reiss-Pistilli, Maria L V; Schuppan, Detlef; Barroso, Madalena M S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Farias, Shirley; Lery, Letícia; Bauer, Michael; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    Endostatin is a potent anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor protein capable of regressing tumors without inducing acquired resistance. Since it is a fragment of the parental molecule, collagen XVIII, its endogenous production depends on the activity of a specific proteolytic enzyme. While such an enzyme has been described in mice, a human counterpart has not been identified so far. Here, we searched for this enzyme by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide containing the cleavage site of human collagen XVIII. We found that the cleavage activity was present in various murine and human tumor cells but not in untransformed cells. It was ascribed to a large protein complex identified as an extracellular form of proteasome 20S. Since circulating proteasome 20S has recently emerged as an important marker of tumor progression, the possibility of proteasomes controlling the production of angiostatic endostatin may inspire the development of new anticancer therapies.

  1. Extracellular vesicles such as prostate cancer cell fragments as a fluid biopsy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, S I; Kim, Y; Biggs, C N; Chin, J L; Leong, H S

    2015-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles generated through a process of cell membrane shedding or storage vesicle release, as occurs during apoptosis, necrosis or exocytosis. Initially perceived as cellular by-products or 'dust' of insignificant biological importance, recent research has shed light on the role of EVs as mediators of intercellular communication, blood coagulation and disease progression. The prostate is a source of EVs and their abundance in complex biological fluids such as plasma, serum and urine make them compelling entities for a 'fluid biopsy'. As such, prostate cancer cell fragments (PCCF) are EVs generated by the tumor resident within the prostate and are also present in blood, expressing a portion of biomarkers representative of the primary tumor. High-throughput analytical techniques to determine biomarker expression on EVs is the last hurdle towards translating the full potential of prostate EVs for clinical use. We describe current state-of-the-art methods for the analysis of prostate-derived EVs in patient fluids such as plasma and the challenges that lie ahead in this emerging field of translational research.

  2. Acute extracellular fluid volume changes increase ileocolonic resistance to saline flow in anesthetized dogs

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    Santiago Jr. A.T.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effect of acute extracellular fluid volume changes on saline flow through 4 gut segments (ileocolonic, ileal, ileocolonic sphincter and proximal colon, perfused at constant pressure in anesthetized dogs. Two different experimental protocols were used: hypervolemia (iv saline infusion, 0.9% NaCl, 20 ml/min, volume up to 5% body weight and controlled hemorrhage (up to a 50% drop in mean arterial pressure. Mean ileocolonic flow (N = 6 was gradually and significantly decreased during the expansion (17.1%, P<0.05 and expanded (44.9%, P<0.05 periods while mean ileal flow (N = 7 was significantly decreased only during the expanded period (38%, P<0.05. Mean colonic flow (N = 7 was decreased during expansion (12%, P<0.05 but returned to control levels during the expanded period. Mean ileocolonic sphincter flow (N = 6 was not significantly modified. Mean ileocolonic flow (N = 10 was also decreased after hemorrhage (retracted period by 17% (P<0.05, but saline flow was not modified in the other separate circuits (N = 6, 5 and 4 for ileal, ileocolonic sphincter and colonic groups, respectively. The expansion effect was blocked by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, iv both on the ileocolonic (N = 6 and ileal (N = 5 circuits. Acute extracellular fluid volume retraction and expansion increased the lower gastrointestinal resistances to saline flow. These effects, which could physiologically decrease the liquid volume being supplied to the colon, are possible mechanisms activated to acutely balance liquid volume deficit and excess.

  3. A common theme in extracellular fluids of beetles: extracellular superoxide dismutases crucial for balancing ROS in response to microbial challenge

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    Gretscher, René R.; Streicher, Priska E.; Strauß, Anja S.; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Wang, Ding; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical for balancing the level of reactive oxygen species in the extracellular matrix of eukaryotes. In the present study we have detected constitutive SOD activity in the haemolymph and defensive secretions of different leaf beetle species. Exemplarily, we have chosen the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae, as representative model organism to investigate the role of extracellular SODs in antimicrobial defence. Qualitative and quantitative proteome analyses resulted in the identification of two extracellular Cu/Zn SODs in the haemolymph and one in the defensive secretions of juvenile P. cochleariae. Furthermore, quantitative expression studies indicated fat body tissue and defensive glands as the main synthesis sites of these SODs. Silencing of the two SODs revealed one of them, PcSOD3.1, as the only relevant enzyme facilitating SOD activity in haemolymph and defensive secretions in vivo. Upon challenge with the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, PcSOD3.1-deficient larvae exhibited a significantly higher mortality compared to other SOD-silenced groups. Hence, our results serve as a basis for further research on SOD regulated host-pathogen interactions. In defensive secretions PcSOD3.1-silencing affected neither deterrent production nor activity against fungal growth. Instead, we propose another antifungal mechanism based on MRJP/yellow proteins in the defensive exudates. PMID:27068683

  4. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes produced by human pathogenic Vibrio species

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    Shin-Ichi eMiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria in the genus Vibrio produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes to obtain nutrients via digestion of various protein substrates. However, the enzymes secreted by human pathogenic species have been documented to modulate the bacterial virulence. Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed vibriolysin. The vibriolysin from V. vulnificus, a causative agent of serious systemic infection, is a major toxic factor eliciting the secondary skin damage characterized by formation of the hemorrhagic brae. The vibriolysin from intestinal pathogens may play indirect roles in pathogenicity because it can activate protein toxins and hemagglutinin by the limited proteolysis and can affect the bacterial attachment to or detachment from the intestinal surface by degradation of the mucus layer. Two species causing wound infections, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus, produce another metalloproteases so-called collagenases. Although the detailed pathological roles have not been studied, the collagenase is potent to accelerate the bacterial dissemination through digestion of the protein components of the extracellular matrix. Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. The intestinal pathogens produce sufficient amounts of the metalloprotease at the small intestinal temperature; however, the metalloprotease production by extra-intestinal pathogens is much higher around the body surface temperature. On the other hand, the serine protease is expressed only in the absence of the metalloprotease.

  5. Exosomal and Non-Exosomal Transport of Extra-Cellular microRNAs in Follicular Fluid: Implications for Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mahmodul Hasan Sohel

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication within the follicle involves many signaling molecules, and this process may be mediated by secretion and uptake of exosomes that contain several bioactive molecules including extra-cellular miRNAs. Follicular fluid and cells from individual follicles of cattle were grouped based on Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB staining of the corresponding oocytes. Both Exoquick precipitation and differential ultracentrifugation were used to separate the exosome and non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid. Following miRNA isolation from both fractions, the human miRCURY LNA™ Universal RT miRNA PCR array system was used to profile miRNA expression. This analysis found that miRNAs were present in both exosomal and non-exosomal fraction of bovine follicular fluid. We found 25 miRNAs differentially expressed (16 up and 9 down in exosomes and 30 miRNAs differentially expressed (21 up and 9 down in non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid in comparison of BCB- versus BCB+ oocyte groups. Expression of selected miRNAs was detected in theca, granulosa and cumulus oocyte complex. To further explore the potential roles of these follicular fluid derived extra-cellular miRNAs, the potential target genes were predicted, and functional annotation and pathway analysis revealed most of these pathways are known regulators of follicular development and oocyte growth. In order to validate exosome mediated cell-cell communication within follicular microenvironment, we demonstrated uptake of exosomes and resulting increase of endogenous miRNA level and subsequent alteration of mRNA levels in follicular cells in vitro. This study demonstrates for the first time, the presence of exosome or non-exosome mediated transfer of miRNA in the bovine follicular fluid, and oocyte growth dependent variation in extra-cellular miRNA signatures in the follicular environment.

  6. Exosomal and Non-Exosomal Transport of Extra-Cellular microRNAs in Follicular Fluid: Implications for Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohel, Md Mahmodul Hasan; Hoelker, Michael; Noferesti, Sina Seifi; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Rings, Franca; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Spencer, Thomas E; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell communication within the follicle involves many signaling molecules, and this process may be mediated by secretion and uptake of exosomes that contain several bioactive molecules including extra-cellular miRNAs. Follicular fluid and cells from individual follicles of cattle were grouped based on Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB) staining of the corresponding oocytes. Both Exoquick precipitation and differential ultracentrifugation were used to separate the exosome and non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid. Following miRNA isolation from both fractions, the human miRCURY LNA™ Universal RT miRNA PCR array system was used to profile miRNA expression. This analysis found that miRNAs were present in both exosomal and non-exosomal fraction of bovine follicular fluid. We found 25 miRNAs differentially expressed (16 up and 9 down) in exosomes and 30 miRNAs differentially expressed (21 up and 9 down) in non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid in comparison of BCB- versus BCB+ oocyte groups. Expression of selected miRNAs was detected in theca, granulosa and cumulus oocyte complex. To further explore the potential roles of these follicular fluid derived extra-cellular miRNAs, the potential target genes were predicted, and functional annotation and pathway analysis revealed most of these pathways are known regulators of follicular development and oocyte growth. In order to validate exosome mediated cell-cell communication within follicular microenvironment, we demonstrated uptake of exosomes and resulting increase of endogenous miRNA level and subsequent alteration of mRNA levels in follicular cells in vitro. This study demonstrates for the first time, the presence of exosome or non-exosome mediated transfer of miRNA in the bovine follicular fluid, and oocyte growth dependent variation in extra-cellular miRNA signatures in the follicular environment.

  7. Feasibility and impact of the measurement of extracellular fluid volume simultaneous with GFR by I-125-iothalamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Folkert W.; Muntinga, Jaap H. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Navis, Gerjan

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility, validity, and possible applications of the assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) simultaneous with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed in a series of validation studies using the constant infusion method of I-125-iothalamate (IOT). In 48 subjects with a broad ra

  8. Human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete the extracellular matrix protein, thrombospondin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, N E; Dixit, V M; Frazier, W A; Clark, R A

    1987-02-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) a glycoprotein originally identified as the endogenous lectin of platelets, is also synthesized by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, pneumocytes, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Thrombospondin is subdivided into functional domains which bind specifically to heparin, fibronectin, collagen, and to specific cellular receptors. It is found within the basement membranes of kidney, lung, smooth muscle, and skin. Thus TSP may serve as an important link between cells and matrices. Thrombospondin also has been reported at the epidermal-dermal junction. We wished to determine whether human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete TSP. Pure human keratinocytes were grown in defined medium without fibroblast feeder layers. Immunofluorescent staining with either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies to human platelet TSP yielded specific granular staining within the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. Culture media and cellular lysates were harvested from cultures metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine. Trichloroacetic acid precipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and autoradiography revealed a major labeled band comigrating with purified platelet TSP in both the media and the cellular lysates. Immunoprecipitation with either the polyclonal or the monoclonal anti-TSP antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography identified this band as TSP. Thus keratinocytes in culture synthesize and secrete TSP. Thrombospondin may play an important role in epidermal interactions with extracellular matrix.

  9. Human neutrophils produce extracellular traps against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Susana P; Cano, Luz E; López, Juan A; Hernandez, Orville; González, Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Neutrophils play an important role as effector cells and contribute to the resistance of the host against microbial pathogens. Neutrophils are able to produce extracellular traps (NETs) in response to medically important fungi, including Aspergillus spp., Candida albicans and Cryptococcus gattii. However, NET production in response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has yet to be studied. We have demonstrated that human neutrophils produce NETs against both conidia and yeasts of P. brasiliensis. Although the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) did not alter NET production against conidia, it partially suppressed NET formation against P. brasiliensis yeasts. Cytochalasin D or IFN-γ did not affect the production of NETs against the fungus. Additionally, a mutant strain of P. brasiliensis with reduced expression of an alternative oxidase induced significantly higher levels of NETs in comparison with the WT strain. Finally, c.f.u. quantification of P. brasiliensis showed no significant differences when neutrophils were treated with DPI, DNase I or cytochalasin D as compared with untreated cells. These data establish that NET formation by human neutrophils appears to be either dependent or independent of reactive oxygen species production, correlating with the fungal morphotype used for stimulation. However, this mechanism was ineffective in killing the fungus.

  10. Response of atrial natriuretic factor to acute extracellular fluid volume in patients with pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, R; Rodríguez, E; Amato, D; Sánchez, G; Ron, O; Rodríguez, F; Herrera-Acosta, J

    2000-01-01

    Patients with pheochromocytoma have been reported to show high plasmatic atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) levels. Its source may not be the atrium because blood volume, the most important physiological stimulus for ANF release, is usually reduced in these patients. To evaluate ANF secretion functional integrity, we studied three patients with pheochromocytoma before and after surgical removal of the tumor. Extracellular fluid (ECF) volume, plasmatic ANF levels, and plasmatic renin activity (PRA) were measured. ANF was measured before and after an acute saline load of 1.5L in 90 min. Before surgery, ECF volume was normal or reduced, and PRA was normal but decreased after the saline load. By contrast, ANF was elevated and did not change after the saline load. After surgery ANF decreased, ECF volume rose, and the saline load induced a significant increase of plasma ANF and reduction of PRA. ANF was present in significant amounts in tumoral tissue homogenates. These data suggest that the tumor was the source of ANF in these patients with pheochromocytoma because high levels of ANF, despite reduced or normal ECF volume, as well as unresponsiveness to acute saline infusion, were found before surgery with subsequent normalization after tumor removal.

  11. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Capossela

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  12. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Eva E; Salaiza, Norma; Pulido, Julieta; Rodríguez, Mayra C; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica.

  13. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-04-04

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  14. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Ermakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2 that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments.

  15. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Eva E.; Rodríguez, Mayra C.; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P.; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica. PMID:27415627

  16. Profiles of extracellular miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases correlate with disease status and features of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Kasandra; Malenica, Ivana; Metpally, Raghu; Courtright, Amanda; Rakela, Benjamin; Beach, Thomas; Shill, Holly; Adler, Charles; Sabbagh, Marwan; Villa, Stephen; Tembe, Waibhav; Craig, David; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall

    2014-01-01

    The discovery and reliable detection of markers for neurodegenerative diseases have been complicated by the inaccessibility of the diseased tissue--such as the inability to biopsy or test tissue from the central nervous system directly. RNAs originating from hard to access tissues, such as neurons within the brain and spinal cord, have the potential to get to the periphery where they can be detected non-invasively. The formation and extracellular release of microvesicles and RNA binding proteins have been found to carry RNA from cells of the central nervous system to the periphery and protect the RNA from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs detectable in peripheral circulation can provide information about cellular changes associated with human health and disease. In order to associate miRNA signals present in cell-free peripheral biofluids with neurodegenerative disease status of patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, we assessed the miRNA content in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from postmortem subjects with full neuropathology evaluations. We profiled the miRNA content from 69 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 67 with Parkinson's disease and 78 neurologically normal controls using next generation small RNA sequencing (NGS). We report the average abundance of each detected miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and in serum and describe 13 novel miRNAs that were identified. We correlated changes in miRNA expression with aspects of disease severity such as Braak stage, dementia status, plaque and tangle densities, and the presence and severity of Lewy body pathology. Many of the differentially expressed miRNAs detected in peripheral cell-free cerebrospinal fluid and serum were previously reported in the literature to be deregulated in brain tissue from patients with neurodegenerative disease. These data indicate that extracellular miRNAs detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum are reflective of cell-based changes in pathology and can be used to assess

  17. Profiles of extracellular miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases correlate with disease status and features of pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasandra Burgos

    Full Text Available The discovery and reliable detection of markers for neurodegenerative diseases have been complicated by the inaccessibility of the diseased tissue--such as the inability to biopsy or test tissue from the central nervous system directly. RNAs originating from hard to access tissues, such as neurons within the brain and spinal cord, have the potential to get to the periphery where they can be detected non-invasively. The formation and extracellular release of microvesicles and RNA binding proteins have been found to carry RNA from cells of the central nervous system to the periphery and protect the RNA from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs detectable in peripheral circulation can provide information about cellular changes associated with human health and disease. In order to associate miRNA signals present in cell-free peripheral biofluids with neurodegenerative disease status of patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, we assessed the miRNA content in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from postmortem subjects with full neuropathology evaluations. We profiled the miRNA content from 69 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 67 with Parkinson's disease and 78 neurologically normal controls using next generation small RNA sequencing (NGS. We report the average abundance of each detected miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and in serum and describe 13 novel miRNAs that were identified. We correlated changes in miRNA expression with aspects of disease severity such as Braak stage, dementia status, plaque and tangle densities, and the presence and severity of Lewy body pathology. Many of the differentially expressed miRNAs detected in peripheral cell-free cerebrospinal fluid and serum were previously reported in the literature to be deregulated in brain tissue from patients with neurodegenerative disease. These data indicate that extracellular miRNAs detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum are reflective of cell-based changes in pathology and can

  18. Rosuvastatin increases extracellular adenosine formation in humans in vivo: a new perspective on cardiovascular protection.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, P; Oyen, W.J.G.; Dekker, D.; Broek, P.H.H. van den; Wouters, C.W.; Boerman, O.C.; Scheffer, G. J.; Smits, P; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Statins may increase extracellular adenosine formation from adenosine monophosphate by enhancing ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. This theory was tested in humans using dipyridamole-induced vasodilation as a read-out for local adenosine formation. Dipyridamole inhibits the transport of extracellular adenosine into the cytosol resulting in increased extracellular adenosine and subsequent vasodilation. In addition, we studied the effect of statin therapy in a forearm model of ischemia-...

  19. [Anaphylaxis caused by human seminal fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubira, N; Roger, A; Nogueiras, C; Server, T; Guspi, R; Cadahia, A

    1995-01-01

    Anaphylaxis to human seminal fluid (HSF) is rare. We present an atopic woman with postcoital cutaneous and respiratory symptoms. Prick by prick to HSF was positive. CAP to FSH was also positive (4 KU/l). The clinical findings, differential diagnosis and different treatments are discussed.

  20. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorca-Guiliani A; Erler JT

    2013-01-01

    Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Exte...

  1. Role of Microvascular Tone and Extracellular Matrix Contraction in the Regulation of Interstitial Fluid: Implications for Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain; Henrion, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiology of aortic dissection is poorly understood, and its risk is resistant to medical treatment. Most studies have focused on a proposed pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β in Marfan disease and related thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections. However, clinical testing of this concept using angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to block transforming growth factor-β signaling fell short of promise. Genetic mutations that predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections affect components of the extracellular matrix and proteins involved in cellular force generation. Thus, a role for dysfunctional mechanosensing in abnormal aortic wall remodeling is emerging. However, how abnormal mechanosensing leads to aortic dissection remains a mystery. Here, we review current knowledge about the regulation of interstitial fluid dynamics and myogenic tone and propose that alteration in contractile force reduces vascular tone in the microcirculation (here, aortic vasa vasorum) and leads to elevations of blood flow, transmural pressure, and fluid flux into the surrounding aortic media. Furthermore, reduced contractile force in medial smooth muscle cells coupled with alteration of structural components of the extracellular matrix limits extracellular matrix contraction, further promoting the formation of intramural edema, a critical step in the initiation of aortic dissection. The concept is supported by several pathophysiological and clinical observations. A direct implication of this concept is that drugs that lower blood pressure and limit interstitial fluid accumulation while preserving or increasing microvascular tone would limit the risk of dissection. In contrast, drugs that substantially lower microvascular tone would be ineffective or may accelerate the disease and precipitate aortic dissection.

  2. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  3. Dual Impact of Tolvaptan on Intracellular and Extracellular Water in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients with Fluid Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Murakami, Takuya; Igarashi, Yusuke; Okabe, Kyochika; Kobayashi, Takahisa; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Saito, Takako; Sekiguchi, Chuji; Miyazawa, Yasuharu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tolvaptan, an oral selective V2-receptor antagonist, is a water diuretic that ameliorates fluid retention with a lower risk of a worsening renal function than conventional loop diuretics. Although loop diuretics predominantly decrease extracellular water (ECW) compared with intracellular water (ICW), the effect of tolvaptan on fluid distribution remains unclear. We therefore examined how tolvaptan changes ICW and ECW in accordance with the renal function. Methods Six advanced chronic kidney disease patients (stage 4 or 5) with fluid retention were enrolled in this study. Tolvaptan (7.5 mg/day) added to conventional diuretic treatment was administered to remove fluid retention. The fluid volume was measured using a bioimpedance analysis device before (day 0) and after (day 5 or 6) tolvaptan treatment. Results Body weight decreased by 2.6%±1.3% (64.4±6.5 vs. 62.8±6.3 kg, p=0.06), and urine volume increased by 54.8%±23.9% (1,215±169 vs. 1,709±137 mL/day, p=0.03) between before and after tolvaptan treatment. Tolvaptan significantly decreased ICW (6.5%±1.5%, p=0.01) and ECW (7.5%±1.4%, p=0.02), which had similar reduction rates (p=0.32). The estimated glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged during the treatment (14.6±2.8 vs. 14.9±2.7 mL/min/1.732 m, p=0.35). Conclusion Tolvaptan ameliorates body fluid retention, and induces an equivalent reduction rate of ICW and ECW without a worsening renal function. Tolvaptan is a novel water diuretic that has a different effect on fluid distribution compared with conventional loop diuretics. PMID:27725533

  4. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorca-Guiliani A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network. Keywords: cancer, extracellular matrix, lysyl oxidase, metastasis

  5. Immunometabolism of human autoimmune diseases: from metabolites to extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Candia, Paola; De Rosa, Veronica; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ceriello, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-06-26

    Immunometabolism focuses on the mechanisms regulating the impact of metabolism on lymphocyte activity and autoimmunity outbreak. The adipose tissue is long known to release adipokines, either pro- or anti-inflammatory factors bridging nutrition and immune function. More recently, adipocytes were discovered to also release extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing a plethora of biological molecules, including metabolites and microRNAs, which can regulate cell function/metabolism in distant tissues, suggesting that immune regulatory function by the adipose tissue may be far more complex than originally thought. Moreover, EVs were also identified as important mediators of immune cell-to-cell communication, adding a further microenvironmental mechanism of plasticity to fine-tune specific lymphocyte responses. This Review will first focus on the known mechanisms by which metabolism impacts immune function, presenting a systemic (nutrition and long-ranged adipokines) and a cellular point of view (metabolic pathway derangement in autoimmunity). It will then discuss the new discoveries concerning how EVs may act as nanometric vehicles integrating immune/metabolic responses at the level of the extracellular environment and affecting pathological processes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Distribution volumes of macromolecules in human ovarian and endometrial cancers--effects of extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslene-Hox, Hanne; Oveland, Eystein; Woie, Kathrine; Salvesen, Helga B; Tenstad, Olav; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Elements of the extracellular matrix (ECM), notably collagen and glucosaminoglycans, will restrict part of the space available for soluble macromolecules simply because the molecules cannot occupy the same space. This phenomenon may influence macromolecular drug uptake. To study the influence of steric and charge effects of the ECM on the distribution volumes of macromolecules in human healthy and malignant gynecologic tissues we used as probes 15 abundant plasma proteins quantified by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The available distribution volume (VA) of albumin was increased in ovarian carcinoma compared with healthy ovarian tissue. Furthermore, VA of plasma proteins between 40 and 190 kDa decreased with size for endometrial carcinoma and healthy ovarian tissue, but was independent of molecular weight for the ovarian carcinomas. An effect of charge on distribution volume was only found in healthy ovaries, which had lower hydration and high collagen content, indicating that a condensed interstitium increases the influence of negative charges. A number of earlier suggested biomarker candidates were detected in increased amounts in malignant tissue, e.g., stathmin and spindlin-1, showing that interstitial fluid, even when unfractionated, can be a valuable source for tissue-specific proteins. We demonstrate that the distribution of abundant plasma proteins in the interstitium can be elucidated by mass spectrometry methods and depends markedly on hydration and ECM structure. Our data can be used in modeling of drug uptake, and give indications on ECM components to be targeted to increase the uptake of macromolecular substances.

  7. Cultured rat and purified human Pneumocystis carinii stimulate intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Aliouat, E M; Lundgren, B

    1998-01-01

    The production of free radicals in human neutrophils was studied in both Pneumocystis carinii derived from cultures of L2 rat lung epithelial-like cells and Pneumocystis carinii purified from human lung. Using the cytochrome C technique, which selectively measured extracellular superoxide....... It was established that 1) P. carinii stimulated intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils, 2) opsonized cultured rat-derived P. carinii stimulated human neutrophils to a strong intracellular response of superoxide production, and 3) opsonized P. carinii, purified from human lung also...

  8. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 decreases the concentrations of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid in amygdale kindling rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-hui CHEN; Cui-cui WANG; Xia XIAO; Li WEI; Guoxiong XU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was responsible for drug resistence in refractory epilepsy in amygdale kindling rats.Methods:Rat amygdale kindling was used as a model of refractory epilepsy.The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein in the brains was examined using RT-PCR and Western blot.MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus were studied with immunohistochemical staining.The rats were intraperitoneally injected with phenytoin (50 mg/kg) or carbamazepine (20 mg/kg),and their concentrations in the cortical extracellular fluid were measured using microdialysis and HPLC.Probenecid,a MRP1 inhibitor (40 mmol/L,50 μL) was administered through an inflow tube into the cortex 30 min before injection of the antiepileptic drugs.Results:The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus in amygdale kindling rats compared with the control group.Furthermore,the number of MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus was also significantly increased in amygdale kindling rats.Microdialysis studies showed that the concentrations of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the cortical extracellular fluid were significantly decreased in amygdale kindling rats.Pre-administration of probenecid could restore the concentrations back to their control levels.Conclusion:Up-regulation of MRP1 is responsible for the resistance of brain cells to antiepileptic drugs in the amygdale kindling rats.

  9. A noninvasive method to study regulation of extracellular fluid volume in rats using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NMR fluid measurements of commonly used rat strains when subjected to SQ normotonic or hypertonic salines, as well as physiologic comparisons to sedentary and...

  10. Finite element approach to study the behavior of fluid distribution in the dermal regions of human body due to thermal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Khanday

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a complex structure where the balance of mass and heat transport in all tissues is necessary for its normal functioning. The stabilities of intracellular and extracellular fluids are important physiological factors responsible for homoeostasis. To estimate the effects of thermal stress on the behavior of extracellular fluid concentration in human dermal regions, a mathematical model based on diffusion equation along with appropriate boundary conditions has been formulated. Atmospheric temperature, evaporation rate, moisture concentration and other factors affecting the fluid concentration were taken into account. The variational finite element approach has been employed to solve the model and the results were interpreted graphically.

  11. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorca-Guiliani, Alejandro; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-25

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network.

  12. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorca-Guiliani, Alejandro; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network. PMID:24348049

  13. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  14. [K+/Na+ in the animal extracellular fluid at weathering of granitoids and problem of the origin of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V; Felitsyn, S B; Klimova, E V; Shakhmatova, E I

    2012-01-01

    Leaching of granitoids of the paleoproterozoic age was performed from several seconds to 360 days in water solutions (pH water reservoirs with predominance of K+ over Na+. The K+/Na+ ratio exceeding 1 has been shown in prokaryotes, in cells and tissues of the free living and parasitic species of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. At the same time in the extracellular fluid of the fresh water, marine, and terrestrial animals, in which the Na+ concentration varies from 13 to 482 mmol/l, the K+/Na+ ratio is preserved at the level of 0.034 +/- 0.001. These results are discussed in connection with the problem of origin of protocells and of concentration ratios of monovalent cations in water phases of multicellular organisms.

  15. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Baiocchini

    Full Text Available Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis. Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies.

  16. Feasibility and impact of the measurement of extracellular fluid volume simultaneous with GFR by 125I-iothalamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Folkert W; Muntinga, Jaap H J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Navis, Gerjan

    2008-09-01

    The feasibility, validity, and possible applications of the assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) simultaneous with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed in a series of validation studies using the constant infusion method of (125)I-iothalamate (IOT). In 48 subjects with a broad range of GFR, distribution volume (V(d)) of IOT corresponded well with V(d) bromide (16.71 +/- 3.0 and 16.73 +/- 3.2 l, respectively, not significant), with a strong correlation (r = 0.933, P IOT during strictly standardized (50 mmol Na(+)/d) sodium intake. An increase in dietary sodium intake (200 mmol Na(+)/d) induced a corresponding rise in V(d) IOT of 1.11 +/- 1.5 l (P IOT. After appropriate validation, also other GFR tracers could be used for such a simultaneous estimation, providing a valuable resource of data on ECFV in renal studies and, moreover, allowing GFR to be indexed to the body fluid compartment it clears: the ECFV.

  17. Recombinant expression in E. coli of human FGFR2 with its transmembrane and extracellular domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Bajinting

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs are a family of receptor tyrosine kinases containing three domains: an extracellular receptor domain, a single transmembrane helix, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. FGFRs are activated by fibroblast growth factors (FGFs as part of complex signal transduction cascades regulating angiogenesis, skeletal formation, cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival, and cancer. We have developed the first recombinant expression system in E. coli to produce a construct of human FGFR2 containing its transmembrane and extracellular receptor domains. We demonstrate that the expressed construct is functional in binding heparin and dimerizing. Size exclusion chromatography demonstrates that the purified FGFR2 does not form a complex with FGF1 or adopts an inactive dimer conformation. Progress towards the successful recombinant production of intact FGFRs will facilitate further biochemical experiments and structure determination that will provide insight into how extracellular FGF binding activates intracellular kinase activity.

  18. Fluid Dynamics of Human Phonation and Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajat; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of the fluid dynamics, flow-structure interactions, and acoustics associated with human phonation and speech. Our voice is produced through the process of phonation in the larynx, and an improved understanding of the underlying physics of this process is essential to advancing the treatment of voice disorders. Insights into the physics of phonation and speech can also contribute to improved vocal training and the development of new speech compression and synthesis schemes. This article introduces the key biomechanical features of the laryngeal physiology, reviews the basic principles of voice production, and summarizes the progress made over the past half-century in understanding the flow physics of phonation and speech. Laryngeal pathologies, which significantly enhance the complexity of phonatory dynamics, are discussed. After a thorough examination of the state of the art in computational modeling and experimental investigations of phonatory biomechanics, we present a synopsis of the pacing issues in this arena and an outlook for research in this fascinating subject.

  19. Factors Involved in Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Human Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregori Casals

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular mechanisms by which myocardial ischemia translates into ventricular remodeling remain unclear. Methods: We investigated whether hypoxia and proinflammatory cytokines are specific inducers of remodeling signals in an in vitro model of cultured adult human ventricular myocytes (AC16 cells. Results:Hypoxia modified the ratio of matrix remodeling factors by increasing the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP and reducing tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase type 1 (TIMP-1 secretion in AC16 cells. These effects, however, were not associated with either modifications in expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2, collagen-I or metalloproteinase activity. Hypoxia does, actually increase the production of the cardiac antifibrogenic growth factors, Apelin and VEGF, through an Hypoxia Inducible Factor type 1-dependent mechanism. Concerning proinflammatory signaling pathways, IL1β emerged as a powerful inducer of matrix turnover, since it significantly enhanced PIIINP, TIMP-1 and hyaluronic acid production and increased metalloproteinase activity. In contrast, TNFα did not modify matrix turnover but markedly induced the production of Apelin and VEGF. Conclusion: Hypoxia and increased TNFα activity likely exert cardioprotective actions by activating the cardiac antifibrogenic factors Apelin and VEGF. In contrast, IL1β is a strong promoter of interstitial collagen remodeling that may contribute to ventricular dilation and heart failure in the ischemic myocardium.

  20. Detection of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation products in the extracellular matrix of human atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Linton, Stuart M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    for 83-96% of the total oxidized protein side-chain products detected in these plaques. Oxidation of matrix components extracted from healthy artery tissue, and model proteins, with reagent HOCl is shown to give rise to a similar pattern of products to those detected in advanced human lesions......Oxidation is believed to play a role in atherosclerosis. Oxidized lipids, sterols and proteins have been detected in early, intermediate and advanced human lesions at elevated levels. The spectrum of oxidized side-chain products detected on proteins from homogenates of advanced human lesions has...... by activated monocytes (and possibly macrophages) and is a highly basic protein, it would be expected to associate with polyanions such as the glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix, and might result in damage being localized at such sites. In this study proteins extracted from extracellular matrix...

  1. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-06-18

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils.

  2. Effects of extracellular modulation through hypoxia on the glucose metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustisia, I.; Jusman, S. W. A.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer stem cells have been reported to maintain stemness under certain extracellular changes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracellular O2 level modulation on the glucose metabolism of human CD24-/CD44+ breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) for 0.5, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hours. After each incubation period, HIF1α, GLUT1 and CA9 expressions, as well as glucose metabolism status, including glucose consumption, lactate production, O2 consumption and extracellular pH (pHe) were analyzed using qRT-PCR, colorimetry, fluorometry, and enzymatic reactions, respectively. Hypoxia caused an increase in HIF1α mRNA expressions and protein levels and shifted the metabolic states to anaerobic glycolysis, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production, as well as decreased O2 consumption and pHe. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GLUT1 and CA9 mRNA expressions simultaneously increased, in line with HIF1α expression. In conclusion, modulation of the extracellular environment of human BCSCs through hypoxia shifedt the metabolic state of BCSCs to anaerobic glycolysis, which might be associated with GLUT1 and CA9 expressions regulated by HIFlα transcription factor.

  3. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gho, Yong Song; Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastat...

  4. Simplified methods for assessment of renal function as the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to extracellular fluid volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Brøchner-Mortensen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background: Instead of scaling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to a body surface area of 1.73m2, it has been suggested to scale GFR to extracellular fluid volume (ECV). The ratio GFR/ECV has physiological meaning in that it indicates how often ‘that which is to be regulated’ (i.e. ECV) comes...... into contact with the ‘regulator’ (i.e. the kidneys). Aim: The aim of the present study was as follows: to analyse two published calculation methods for determining ECV and GFR/ECV; to develop a new simple and accurate formula for determining ECV; and to compare and evaluate these methods. Materials...... and methods: GFR was determined as 51Cr-EDTA clearance. The study comprised 128 individuals (35 women, 66 men and 27 children) with a full 51Cr-EDTA plasma concentration curve, determined from injection until 4–5 h p.i. Reference values for GFR and ECV were calculated from the full curve. One...

  5. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  6. Cardiovascular and fluid volume control in humans in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The human cardiovascular system and regulation of fluid volume are heavily influenced by gravity. When decreasing the effects of gravity in humans such as by anti-orthostatic posture changes or immersion into water, venous return is increased by some 25%. This leads to central blood volume expans...... is of importance for understanding pathophysiology of heart failure, where gravity plays a strong role in fluid and sodium retention.......The human cardiovascular system and regulation of fluid volume are heavily influenced by gravity. When decreasing the effects of gravity in humans such as by anti-orthostatic posture changes or immersion into water, venous return is increased by some 25%. This leads to central blood volume...... on this complex interaction, because it is the only way to completely abolish the effects of gravity over longer periods. Results from space have been unexpected, because astronauts exhibit a fluid and sodium retaining state with activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which subjects during simulations...

  7. Differential responses of normal human melanocytes to intra- and extracellular dsRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Suiquan; Liu, Dongyin; Jin, Rong; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Aie

    2015-06-01

    Viral factor has been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. To elucidate the effects of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) on melanocytes and to explore the underlying mechanisms, primary cultured normal human melanocytes were treated with synthetic viral dsRNA analog poly(I:C). The results demonstrated that poly(I:C)-triggered apoptosis when transfected into melanocytes, while extracellular poly(I:C) did not have that effect. Intracellular poly(I:C)-induced melanocyte death was decreased by RIG-I or MDA5 siRNA, but not by TLR3 siRNA. Both intracellular and extracellular poly(I:C) induced the expression of IFNB, TNF, IL6, and IL8. However, extracellular poly(I:C) demonstrated a much weaker induction capacity of cytokine genes than intracellular poly(I:C). Further analysis revealed that phosphorylation of TBK1, IRF3, IRF7, and TAK1 was differentially induced by intra- or extracellular poly(I:C). NFκB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 decreased the induction of all the cytokines by poly(I:C), suggesting the ubiquitous role of NFκB in the process. Poly(I:C) treatment also induced the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK in melanocytes. Both JNK and p38 inhibitors showed suppression on the cytokine induction by intra- or extracellular poly(I:C). However, only the JNK inhibitor decreased the intracellular poly(I:C)-induced melanocyte death. Taken together, this study provides the possible mechanism of viral factor in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.

  8. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  9. Extracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate: a novel actor in human glioblastoma stem cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Riccitelli

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are the most frequent and aggressive intracranial neoplasms in humans, and despite advances and the introduction of the alkylating agent temozolomide in therapy have improved patient survival, resistance mechanisms limit benefits. Recent studies support that glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs, a cell subpopulation within the tumour, are involved in the aberrant expansion and therapy resistance properties of glioblastomas, through still unclear mechanisms. Emerging evidence suggests that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P a potent onco-promoter able to act as extracellular signal, favours malignant and chemoresistance properties in GSCs. Notwithstanding, the origin of S1P in the GSC environment remains unknown. We investigated S1P metabolism, release, and role in cell survival properties of GSCs isolated from either U87-MG cell line or a primary culture of human glioblastoma. We show that both GSC models, grown as neurospheres and expressing GSC markers, are resistant to temozolomide, despite not expressing the DNA repair protein MGMT, a major contributor to temozolomide-resistance. Pulse experiments with labelled sphingosine revealed that both GSC types are able to rapidly phosphorylate the long-chain base, and that the newly produced S1P is efficiently degraded. Of relevance, we found that S1P was present in GSC extracellular medium, its level being significantly higher than in U87-MG cells, and that the extracellular/intracellular ratio of S1P was about ten-fold higher in GSCs. The activity of sphingosine kinases was undetectable in GSC media, suggesting that mechanisms of S1P transport to the extracellular environment are constitutive in GSCs. In addition we found that an inhibitor of S1P biosynthesis made GSCs sensitive to temozolomide (TMZ, and that exogenous S1P reverted this effect, thus involving extracellular S1P as a GSC survival signal in TMZ resistance. Altogether our data implicate for the first time GSCs as a pivotal source

  10. Phosphocreatine, an Intracellular High-Energy Compound, is Found in the Extracellular Fluid of the Seminal Vesicles in Mice and Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. J.; Fillers, W. S.; Iyengar, M. R.

    1988-10-01

    High levels of phosphocreatine, a compound known to serve as an intracellular energy reserve, were found in the fluid contained in seminal vesicle glands. The concentrations of phosphocreatine in the extracellular fluid in the mouse and rat were found to be 5.6 ± 1.6 and 2.2 ± 0.8 μ mol/g, respectively, which are higher than the intracellular levels reported for smooth muscles. The creatine concentrations in the seminal vesicular fluid from these two species were 22.8 ± 3.1 and 13.0 ± 5.3 μ mol/g, respectively. These creatine levels are approximately 100 and 65 times higher than the creatine levels in mammalian blood. Smaller amounts of ATP (phosphocreatine/ATP ratio of 20-40) and traces of ADP were also found. Comparison of the pattern of distribution of macromolecules (proteins and DNA) with the distribution of phosphocreatine between the cells and the fluid of the seminal vesicle indicates that cell lysis did not account for the phosphocreatine in the seminal vesicle fluid. Rather, the available evidence strongly suggests that this high-energy compound is actively secreted. We found that in the testes, the sperm are exposed to the highest known creatine concentration in any mammalian tissue studied. Based on these results and other recent reports, we propose that the extracellular phosphocreatine, ATP, and creatine are involved in sperm metabolism.

  11. Procoagulant tissue factor-exposing vesicles in human seminal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, C; Böing, A N; Hau, C M; Montag, M; Strowitzki, T; Nieuwland, R; Toth, B

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies indicate that various types of vesicles, like microparticles (MP) and exosomes, are present in blood, saliva, bone marrow, urine and synovial fluid. These vesicles, which are released upon activation or shear stress, are thought to play a role in coagulation, neovascularisation, inflammation and intercellular signalling. Seminal fluid is a cell-, sperm- and protein-rich suspension. Although seminal fluid is known to contain vesicles like prostasomes, MP and exosomes have never been characterised. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyse and characterise vesicles in seminal fluid in male partners of patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF/ICSI. MP from seminal fluid of patients during routine IVF/ICSI procedures were detected and analysed with flow cytometry (FACS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using antibodies against tissue factor (TF), CD10, CD13, CD26 and annexin V. The coagulant properties of vesicles were studied using a fibrin generation test. MP were detected in human seminal fluid by both flow cytometry and TEM. Seminal fluid-derived MP expressed CD10, CD13, CD26 and TF, which was highly procoagulant and a powerful trigger of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. The extent to which the procoagulant activity of MP in seminal fluid contributes to the implantation process itself and therefore affects human reproduction needs to be further elucidated.

  12. Comparative pharmacokinetics of tetramethylpyrazine phosphate in rat plasma and extracellular fluid of brain after intranasal, intragastric and intravenous administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Meng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of tetramethylpyrazine phosphate (TMPP in plasma and extracellular fluid of the cerebral cortex of rats via three delivery routes: intranasal (i.n., intragastric (i.g. and intravenous (i.v. administration. After i.n., i.g. and i.v. administration of a single-dose at 10 mg/kg, cerebral cortex dialysates and plasma samples drawn from the carotid artery were collected at timed intervals. The concentration of TMPP in the samples was analyzed by HPLC. The area under the concentration–time curve (AUC and the ratio of the AUCbrain to the AUCplasma (drug targeting efficiency, DTE was calculated to evaluate the brain targeting efficiency of the drug via these different routes of administration. After i.n. administration, TMPP was rapidly absorbed to reach its peak plasma concentration within 5 min and showed a delayed uptake into cerebral cortex (tmax=15 min. The ratio of the AUCbrain dialysates value between i.n. route and i.v. injection was 0.68, which was greater than that obtained after i.g. administration (0.43. The systemic bioavailability obtained with i.n. administration was greater than that obtained by the i.g. route (86.33% vs. 50.39%, whereas the DTE of the nasal route was 78.89%, close to that of oral administration (85.69%. These results indicate that TMPP is rapidly absorbed from the nasal mucosa into the systemic circulation, and then crosses the blood–brain barrier (BBB to reach the cerebral cortex. Intranasal administration of TMPP could be a promising alternative to intravenous and oral approaches.

  13. Development of biomimetic nanocomposites as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Arundhati; Mitra, Tapas; Gnanamani, Arumugam; Das, Manas; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2016-05-05

    Here, we have developed biomimetic nanocomposites containing chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) and nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed interconnected macroporous structures. Moreover, in this study, the problem related to fabricating a porous composite with good mechanical strength has been resolved by incorporating 5wt% of nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide into chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix; the present composite showed high tensile strength (20.25MPa) while maintaining appreciable porosity (65.25%). These values are similar to human cancellous bone. These nanocomposites also showed superior water uptake, antimicrobial and biodegradable properties than the previously reported results. Compatibility with human blood and pH was observed, indicating nontoxicity of these materials to the human body. Moreover, proliferation of osteoblastic MG-63 cells onto the nanocomposites was also observed without having any negative effect.

  14. Extracellular fibrils of pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus gattii are important for ecological niche, murine virulence and human neutrophil interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Springer

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii, an emerging fungal pathogen of humans and animals, is found on a variety of trees in tropical and temperate regions. The ecological niche and virulence of this yeast remain poorly defined. We used Arabidopsis thaliana plants and plant-derived substrates to model C. gattii in its natural habitat. Yeast cells readily colonized scratch-wounded plant leaves and formed distinctive extracellular fibrils (40-100 nm diameter x500-3000 nm length. Extracellular fibrils were observed on live plants and plant-derived substrates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and by high voltage- EM (HVEM. Only encapsulated yeast cells formed extracellular fibrils as a capsule-deficient C. gattii mutant completely lacked fibrils. Cells deficient in environmental sensing only formed disorganized extracellular fibrils as apparent from experiments with a C. gattii STE12alpha mutant. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were more virulent in murine model of pulmonary and systemic cryptococcosis than cells lacking fibrils. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were also significantly more resistant to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN in vitro even though these PMN produced elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. These observations suggest that extracellular fibril formation could be a structural adaptation of C. gattii for cell-to-cell, cell-to-substrate and/or cell-to- phagocyte communications. Such ecological adaptation of C. gattii could play roles in enhanced virulence in mammalian hosts at least initially via inhibition of host PMN- mediated killing.

  15. [Effect of synchronous perfusion of NaN3 in changes in content of cholinergic neurotransmitter in medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampal extra-cellular fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei-Yu; Sun, Dan-Dan; Liu, Yang; Cui, Yue; Zhao, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Dan-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    To observe the effect of synchronous perfusion of specific respiratory chain complex IV inhibitor sodium azide (NaN3) in brain on rat ventromedial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and acetylcholine (ACh) and choline (Ch) contents in hippocampal extra-cellular fluid, and establish the AD rat model induced by mitochondrial acute injury. The synchronous dual-probe dual-channel brain microdialysis sampling technology was applied to synchronously perfuse modified Ringer's solution containing NaN3 (50 micro mol L-1) and neostigmine (2 micro mol L-1) into mPFC and hippocampus of conscious, freely moving normal rats, and continuously collect dialysates from different encephalic areas. Dynamic contents of ACh and Ch were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-post-column immobilized enzyme reactor-electrochemical process. ACh and Ch contents in mPFC extracellular fluid of normal rats were higher than that in hippocampus. During the process of perfusion, NaN3 could significantly reduce ACh in mPFC/hippocampal extra-cellular fluid, but remarkably increase Ch, and constantly inhibit the recovery of ACh and Ch contents in mPFC/hippocampus. The synchronous perfusion of NaN3in rat mPFC and hippocampus can injure functions of the cholinergic nerve projection area, and cause the acute AD model with ACh and Ch metabolic disorders. This model can be used in pathogenetic and pharmacological studies.

  16. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Piña-Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina. The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa.

  17. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in the Formation of Extracellular Traps (ETs in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Stoiber

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular traps (ETs are reticulate structures of extracellular DNA associated with antimicrobial molecules. Their formation by phagocytes (mainly by neutrophils: NETs has been identified as an essential element of vertebrate innate immune defense. However, as ETs are also toxic to host cells and potent triggers of autoimmunity, their role between pathogen defense and human pathogenesis is ambiguous, and they contribute to a variety of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Since the discovery of ET formation (ETosis a decade ago, evidence has accumulated that most reaction cascades leading to ET release involve ROS. An important new facet was added when it became apparent that ETosis might be directly linked to, or be a variant of, the autophagy cell death pathway. The present review analyzes the evidence to date on the interplay between ROS, autophagy and ETosis, and highlights and discusses several further aspects of the ROS-ET relationship that are incompletely understood. These aspects include the role of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS, the molecular requirements of NADPH oxidase-dependent ETosis, the roles of NADPH oxidase subtypes, extracellular ROS and of ROS from sources other than NADPH oxidase, and the present evidence for ROS-independent ETosis. We conclude that ROS interact with ETosis in a multidimensional manner, with influence on whether ETosis shows beneficial or detrimental effects.

  18. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade. PMID:28205573

  19. Proteomic analysis of human blastocoel fluid and blastocyst cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst and can differentiate into any cell type in the human body. These cells hold a great potential for regenerative medicine, but to obtain enough cells needed for medical treatment, culture is required......, the blastocoel fluid, which is in contact with all the cells in the blastocyst, including hESCs. Fifty-three surplus human blastocysts were donated after informed consent, and blastocoel fluid was isolated by micromanipulation. Using highly sensitive nano-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass...

  20. Human neuroglobin protein in cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whalen Gail

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroglobin is a hexacoordinated member of the globin family of proteins. It is predominantly localized to various brain regions and retina where it may play a role in protection against ischemia and nitric oxide-induced neural injury. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected from 12 chronic regional or systemic pain and 5 control subjects. Proteins were precipitated by addition of 50% 0.2 N acetic acid, 50% ethanol, 0.02% sodium bisulfite. The pellet was extensively digested with trypsin. Peptides were separated by capillary liquid chromatography using a gradient from 95% water to 95% acetonitrile in 0.2% formic acid, and eluted through a nanoelectrospray ionization interface into a quadrapole – time-of-flight dual mass spectrometer (QToF2, Waters, Milford, MA. Peptides were sequenced (PepSeq, MassLynx v3.5 and proteins identified using MASCOT ®. Results Six different neuroglobin peptides were identified in various combinations in 3 of 9 female pain subjects, but none in male pain, or female or male control subjects. Conclusion This is the first description of neuroglobin in cerebrospinal fluid. The mechanism(s leading to its release in chronic pain states remain to be defined.

  1. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri.

  2. Human epidermal keratinocyte cell response on integrin-specific artificial extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin, Monica Suryana; Chua, Alvin Wen Choong; Ma, Dong Rui; Lee, Seng Teik; Fong, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    Cell-matrix interactions play critical roles in regulating cellular behavior in wound repair and regeneration of the human skin. In particular, human skin keratinocytes express several key integrins such as alpha5beta1, alpha3beta1, and alpha2beta1 for binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) present in the basement membrane in uninjured skin. To mimic these key integrin-ECM interactions, artificial ECM (aECM) proteins containing functional domains derived from laminin 5, type IV collagen, fibronectin, and elastin are prepared. Human skin keratinocyte cell responses on the aECM proteins are specific to the cell-binding domain present in each construct. Keratinocyte attachment to the aECM protein substrates is also mediated by specific integrin-material interactions. In addition, the aECM proteins are able to support the proliferation of keratinocyte stem cells, demonstrating their promise for use in skin tissue engineering.

  3. Fluid resuscitation in human sepsis: Time to rewrite history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Liam; Van Haren, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation continues to be recommended as the first-line resuscitative therapy for all patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The current acceptance of the therapy is based in part on long history and familiarity with its use in the resuscitation of other forms of shock, as well as on an incomplete and incorrect understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis. Recently, the safety of intravenous fluids in patients with sepsis has been called into question with both prospective and observational data suggesting improved outcomes with less fluid or no fluid. The current evidence for the continued use of fluid resuscitation for sepsis remains contentious with no prospective evidence demonstrating benefit to fluid resuscitation as a therapy in isolation. This article reviews the historical and physiological rationale for the introduction of fluid resuscitation as treatment for sepsis and highlights a number of significant concerns based on current experimental and clinical evidence. The research agenda should focus on the development of hyperdynamic animal sepsis models which more closely mimic human sepsis and on experimental and clinical studies designed to evaluate minimal or no fluid strategies in the resuscitation phase of sepsis.

  4. Viral communities associated with human pericardial fluids in idiopathic pericarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fancello

    Full Text Available Pericarditis is a common human disease defined by inflammation of the pericardium. Currently, 40% to 85% of pericarditis cases have no identified etiology. Most of these cases are thought to be caused by an infection of undetected, unsuspected or unknown viruses. In this work, we used a culture- and sequence-independent approach to investigate the viral DNA communities present in human pericardial fluids. Seven viral metagenomes were generated from the pericardial fluid of patients affected by pericarditis of unknown etiology and one metagenome was generated from the pericardial fluid of a sudden infant death case. As a positive control we generated one metagenome from the pericardial fluid of a patient affected by pericarditis caused by herpesvirus type 3. Furthermore, we used as negative controls a total of 6 pericardial fluids from 6 different individuals affected by pericarditis of non-infectious origin: 5 of them were sequenced as a unique pool and the remaining one was sequenced separately. The results showed a significant presence of torque teno viruses especially in one patient, while herpesviruses and papillomaviruses were present in the positive control. Co-infections by different genotypes of the same viral type (torque teno viruses or different viruses (herpesviruses and papillomaviruses were observed. Sequences related to bacteriophages infecting Staphylococcus, Enterobacteria, Streptococcus, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas were also detected in three patients. This study detected torque teno viruses and papillomaviruses, for the first time, in human pericardial fluids.

  5. Establishment and characterization of human engineered cells stably expressing large extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Daekee; Kang, Gwang-Sik; Han, Dong Keun; Park, Kwideok; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel-coated culture plates have been used to study the relationship between the ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior. However, it is unclear whether ECM-coated dishes mimic the natural ECM microenvironment because the architecture of the ECM is constructed of randomly distributed fibers. The purpose of this study was the production and confirmation of human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as collagen I/II and fibronectin. First, large (over 10 kb) ECM vectors encoding human collagen I/II and fibronectin were constructed and the circular vectors were linearized. Second, the linear ECM vectors were introduced into immortalized human embryonic kidney cells using various transfection methods. The polyethylenimine and liposome methods showed higher efficiencies than electroporation for transfection of these large vectors. Third, human ECM engineered cells were established by stable integration of the vector into the genomic DNA and resulted in stable overexpression of mRNA and proteins. In summary, human engineered cell lines stably expressing large ECM proteins such as human collagen I/II and fibronectin were successfully prepared, and secretion of the ECM components into the surrounding environment was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Thus, human ECM engineered cells naturally secreting ECM components could be valuable for studying the relationship between the native ECM microenvironment and stem cell behavior.

  6. Human beta defensin is absent in burn blister fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M R; Ganz, T; Milner, S M

    2000-12-01

    Defensins are a family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that participate in innate host defence. Human beta defensin-2 (HBD-2) is produced by human keratinocytes, and has a potent bactericidal activity against a wide spectrum of microorganisms. We have recently shown that expression of HBD-2 is present in normal skin and lost in the full-thickness burn wound. Defensins have been found in the blister fluid of chronic wounds. Our study was designed to examine blister fluid from partial-thickness burns for defensin content. Fluid from five patients was collected from partial-thickness burn blisters, and then analysed by sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) with a monoclonal antibody and rabbit polyclonal antibody to HBD-2. The assay was validated against a Western blot assay for HBD-2 in samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with inflammatory lung disease. No HBD-2 was detectable in any of the burn blister fluids analysed. HBD-2 is lost in the full-thickness burn wound, and we have now demonstrated its absence in burn blister fluid. This finding represents evidence of a host defence defect within the burn wound and suggests a possible therapeutic role for antimicrobial peptides in the management of burn wounds.

  7. Human hamstring tenocytes survive when seeded into a decellularized porcine Achilles tendon extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Anke; Stoll, Christiane; Albrecht, Marit; Denner, Andreas; John, Thilo; Krüger, Kay; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and defects remain major orthopaedic challenges. Tendon healing is a time-consuming process, which results in scar tissue with an altered biomechanical competence. Using a xenogeneic tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) as a natural scaffold, which can be reseeded with autologous human tenocytes, might be a promising approach to reconstruct damaged tendons. For this purpose, the porcine Achilles (AS) tendons serving as a scaffold were histologically characterized in comparison to human cell donor tendons. AS tendons were decellularized and then reseeded with primary human hamstring tenocytes using cell centrifuging, rotating culture and cell injection techniques. Vitality testing, histology and glycosaminoglycan/DNA quantifications were performed to document the success of tendon reseeding. Porcine AS tendons were characterized by a higher cell and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content than human cell donor tendons. Complete decellularization could be achieved, but led to a wash out of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Nevertheless, porcine tendon could be recellularized with vital human tenocytes. The recellularization led to a slight increase in cell number compared to the native tendon and some glycosaminoglycan recovery. This study indicates that porcine tendon can be de- and recellularized using adult human tenocytes. Future work should optimize cell distribution within the recellularized tendon ECM and consider tendon- and donor species-dependent differences.

  8. Dentinal fluid dynamics in human teeth, in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucchi, B; Bouillaguet, S; Holz, J; Pashley, D

    1995-04-01

    Cavities were prepared in human premolars scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons. The smear layer was removed from the dentin surface by acid etching, and the cavity was sealed using a hollow chamber. The chamber was filled with sterile saline solution and connected via tubing to a hydraulic circuit featuring an adjustable pressure reservoir and a device that measures fluid movement across dentin. In the absence of any exogenous pressure, all cavities exhibited an outward fluid flow rate of 0.36 microliters min-1 cm-2. As exogenous pressure was applied to the cavity, the outward flow slowed. The exogenous pressure that stopped outward fluid flow was taken to be equal to normal pulpal tissue pressure. The mean value was 14.1 cm H2O in five teeth. This simple method permits measurement of dentinal fluid flux, the hydraulic conductance of dentin, and estimates pulpal tissue pressure.

  9. Extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent enhancement of cytocidal potency of zoledronic acid in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Sayaka; Arai, Naoya; Tomihara, Kei; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi; Noguchi, Makoto

    2015-08-15

    Direct antitumor effects of bisphosphonates (BPs) have been demonstrated in various cancer cells in vitro. However, the effective concentrations of BPs are typically much higher than their clinically relevant concentrations. Oral cancers frequently invade jawbone and may lead to the release of Ca(2+) in primary lesions. We investigated the effects of the combined application of zoledronic acid (ZA) and Ca(2+) on proliferation and apoptosis of oral cancer cells. Human oral cancer cells, breast cancer cells, and colon cancer cells were treated with ZA at a wide range of concentrations in different Ca(2+) concentration environments. Under a standard Ca(2+) concentration (0.6mM), micromolar concentrations of ZA were required to inhibit oral cancer cell proliferation. Increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations greatly enhanced the potency of the ZA cytocidal effect. The ability of Ca(2+) to enhance the cytocidal effects of ZA was negated by the Ca(2+)-selective chelator EGTA. In contrast, the cytocidal effect of ZA was less pronounced in breast and colon cancer cells regardless of whether extracellular Ca(2+) was elevated. In oral cancer cells incubated with 1.6mM Ca(2+), ZA up-regulated mitochondrial Bax expression and increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of cytochrome c. We suggest that ZA can specifically produce potent cytocidal activity in oral cancer cells in an extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent manner, implying that BPs may be useful for treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma with jawbone invasion leading to the hypercalcemic state.

  10. Changes in extracellular matrix composition regulate cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alique, Matilde; Calleros, Laura; Luengo, Alicia; Griera, Mercedes; Iñiguez, Miguel Ángel; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2011-04-01

    Glomerular diseases are characterized by a sustained synthesis and accumulation of abnormal extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen type I. The extracellular matrix transmits information to cells through interactions with membrane components, which directly activate many intracellular signaling events. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that eicosanoids derived from cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 participate in a number of pathological processes in immune-mediated renal diseases, and it is known that protein kinase B (AKT) may act through different transcription factors in the regulation of the COX-2 promoter. The present results show that progressive accumulation of collagen I in the extracellular medium induces a significant increase of COX-2 expression in human mesangial cells, resulting in an enhancement in PGE(2) production. COX-2 overexpression is due to increased COX-2 mRNA levels. The study of the mechanism implicated in COX-2 upregulation by collagen I showed focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. Furthermore, we observed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway by collagen I and collagen I-induced COX-2 overexpression was abolished by PI3K and AKT inhibitors. Additionally, we showed that the cAMP response element (CRE) transcription factor is implicated. Finally, we studied COX-2 expression in an animal model, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hypertensive rats. In renal tissue and vascular walls, COX-2 and collagen type I content were upregulated. In summary, our results provide evidence that collagen type I increases COX-2 expression via the FAK/PI3K/AKT/cAMP response element binding protein signaling pathway.

  11. Aggrecan-based extracellular matrix is an integral part of the human basal ganglia circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, G; Morawski, M; Arendt, T

    2008-01-24

    The extracellular matrix is known to be involved in neuronal communication and the regulation of plastic changes, and also considered to protect neurons and synapses against damage. The goal of this study was to investigate how major extracellular matrix components (aggrecan, link protein, hyaluronan) constitute the pathways of the nigral system in the human basal ganglia circuit affected by neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Here we show that aggrecan- and link protein-related components form clear regional distribution patterns, whereas hyaluronan is widely distributed in gray and white matter. Two predominant phenotypes of the aggrecan-based matrix can be discriminated: (1) perineuronal nets (PNs) and (2) axonal coats (ACs) encapsulating preterminal fibers and synaptic boutons. Clearly contoured PNs are associated with GABAergic projection neurons in the external and internal division of the globus pallidus, the lateral and reticular part of the substantia nigra, as well as subpopulations of striatal and thalamic inhibitory interneurons. Dopaminergic nigral neurons are devoid of PNs but are contacted to a different extent by matrix-coated boutons forming subnucleus-specific patterns. A very dense network of ACs is characteristic especially of the posterior lateral cell groups of the compact substantia nigra (nigrosome 1). In the subthalamic nucleus and the lateral thalamic nuclei numerous AC-associated axons were attached to principal neurons devoid of PNs. We conclude from the region-specific patterns that the aggrecan-based extracellular matrix is adapted to the fast processing of sensorimotor activities which are the therapeutic target of surgery and deep brain stimulation in the treatment of advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  13. Metabolites of amygdalin under simulated human digestive fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Soon-Mi; Kwon, Hoonjeong

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, degradation of amygdalin in the human digestive fluids and absorption of its metabolites by the human small intestine were evaluated by simulating a gastrointestinal digestion model combined with a human intestinal cell culture. Orally administered amygdalin was degraded into prunasin by digestive enzymes after passing through the salivary and gastrointestinal phases. Prunasin, the major metabolite of amygdalin in the digestive fluids, was incubated in a caco-2 cell culture system. Prunasin was degraded into the mandelonitrile by β-glucosidase and then hydroxylated across the small intestinal wall, producing hydroxymandelonitrile (149 Da). Results from this study suggest that risk assessment of amygdalin from food consumption can be done in a more accurate way by determining a pathway of amygdalin metabolism in the simulating human upper gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Cloning, Purification, and Characterization of Recombinant Human Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in SF9 Insect Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pravesh; Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Woo Taek; Kim, Tae-Yoon; Lee, Weontae

    2016-03-01

    A balance between production and degradation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Increased levels of ROS during oxidative stress are associated with disease conditions. Antioxidant enzymes, such as extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), in the extracellular matrix (ECM) neutralize the toxicity of superoxide. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of EC-SOD in protecting the brain, lungs, and other tissues from oxidative stress. Therefore, EC-SOD would be an excellent therapeutic drug for treatment of diseases caused by oxidative stress. We cloned both the full length (residues 1-240) and truncated (residues 19-240) forms of human EC-SOD (hEC-SOD) into the donor plasmid pFastBacHTb. After transposition, the bacmid was transfected into the Sf9-baculovirus expression system and the expressed hEC-SOD purified using FLAG-tag. Western blot analysis revealed that hEC-SOD is present both as a monomer (33 kDa) and a dimer (66 kDa), as detected by the FLAG antibody. A water-soluble tetrazolium (WST-1) assay showed that both full length and truncated hEC-SOD proteins were enzymatically active. We showed that a potent superoxide dismutase inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC), inhibits hEC-SOD activity.

  15. Factor H Binds to Extracellular DNA Traps Released from Human Blood Monocytes in Response to Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Luke D.; Abdelfatah, Mahmoud A.; Jo, Emeraldo A. H.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Westermann, Martin; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Lorkowski, Stefan; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Upon systemic infection with human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans), human monocytes and polymorph nuclear neutrophilic granulocytes are the first immune cells to respond and come into contact with C. albicans. Monocytes exert immediate candidacidal activity and inhibit germination, mediate phagocytosis, and kill fungal cells. Here, we show that human monocytes spontaneously respond to C. albicans cells via phagocytosis, decondensation of nuclear DNA, and release of this decondensed DNA in the form of extracellular traps (called monocytic extracellular traps: MoETs). Both subtypes of monocytes (CD14++CD16−/CD14+CD16+) formed MoETs within the first hours upon contact with C. albicans. MoETs were characterized by the presence of citrullinated histone, myeloperoxidase, lactoferrin, and elastase. MoETs were also formed in response to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, indicating a general reaction of monocytes to infectious microbes. MoET induction differs from extracellular trap formation in macrophages as MoETs are not triggered by simvastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and inducer of extracellular traps in macrophages. Extracellular traps from both monocytes and neutrophils activate complement and C3b is deposited. However, factor H (FH) binds via C3b to the extracellular DNA, mediates cofactor activity, and inhibits the induction of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta in monocytes. Altogether, the results show that human monocytes release extracellular DNA traps in response to C. albicans and that these traps finally bind FH via C3b to presumably support clearance without further inflammation. PMID:28133459

  16. Assembly of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix of early and late passage human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The specific binding of soluble /sup 125/I-human plasma fibronectin (/sup 125/I-HFN-P) to confluent cultures of early and late passage human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Previous studies HFN-P bound to fibroblast cell layers indicated that HNF-P was present in the cultures in two separate pools, distinguishable on the basis of their solubility in 1% deoxycholate. Examination of the kinetics of /sup 125/I-HFN-P binding to Pool I of early and late passage cultures revealed that both cultures required 2-4 h to approach steady-state conditions. Other kinetic studies showed that the rates of low of /sup 125/I-HFN-P from either Pool I or Pool II were similar for both cultures. Further, Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of Pool I binding sites with apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) of 5.3 x 10/sup -8/M (early passage) and 4.2 x 10/sup -8/M (late passage). These results indicate that early and late passage cultures of human fibroblasts exhibit differences in the number of cell surface biding sites for soluble fibronectin, and in the extent to which they incorporate soluble fibronectin into the extracellular matrix. Parameters which affect the fibronectin matrix assembly system of human skin fibroblasts were also examined. In addition, several monoclonal anti-fibronectin antibodies were characterized and developed as experimental probes for fibronectin structure and function.

  17. Role of extracellular DNA oxidative modification in radiation induced bystander effects in human endotheliocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, Anna Yu.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Efremova, Liudmila V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-03

    The development of the bystander effect induced by low doses of irradiation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) depends on extracellular DNA (ecDNA) signaling pathway. We found that the changes in the levels of ROS and NO production by human endothelial cells are components of the radiation induced bystander effect that can be registered at a low dose. We exposed HUVECs to X-ray radiation and studied effects of ecDNA{sup R} isolated from the culture media conditioned by the short-term incubation of irradiated cells on intact HUVECs. Effects of ecDNA{sup R} produced by irradiated cells on ROS and NO production in non-irradiated HUVECs are similar to bystander effect. These effects at least partially depend on TLR9 signaling. We compared the production of the nitric oxide and the ROS in human endothelial cells that were (1) irradiated at a low dose; (2) exposed to the ecDNA{sup R} extracted from the media conditioned by irradiated cells; and (3) exposed to human DNA oxidized in vitro. We found that the cellular responses to all three stimuli described above are essentially similar. We conclude that irradiation-related oxidation of the ecDNA is an important component of the ecDNA-mediated bystander effect.

  18. Monocytes increase human cardiac myofibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling through TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Lipon, Brodie D; Svystonyuk, Daniyil A; Teng, Guoqi; Guzzardi, David G; Silva, Claudia; Yong, V Wee; Fedak, Paul W M

    2016-03-15

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myofibroblasts remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM), preventing mechanical complications. However, prolonged myofibroblast activity leads to dysregulation of the ECM, maladaptive remodeling, fibrosis, and heart failure (HF). Chronic inflammation is believed to drive persistent myofibroblast activity; however, the mechanisms are unclear. We assessed the influence of peripheral blood monocytes on human cardiac myofibroblast activity in a three-dimensional (3D) ECM microenvironment. Human cardiac myofibroblasts isolated from surgical biopsies of the right atrium and left ventricle were seeded into 3D collagen matrices. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human donors and cocultured with myofibroblasts. Monocytes increased myofibroblast activity measured by collagen gel contraction (baseline: 57.6 ± 5.9% vs. coculture: 65.2 ± 7.1% contraction; P matrix metalloproteinase 9 compared with baseline (122.9 ± 10.1 pg/ml and 3,496.0 ± 190.4 pg/ml, respectively, vs. 21.5 ± 16.3 pg/ml and 183.3 ± 43.9 pg/ml; P matrix. Peripheral blood monocyte interaction with human cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates myofibroblast activity through release of TGF-β1. These data implicate inflammation as a potential driver of cardiac fibrosis.

  19. Scanning Electron Microscopic Examination of the Extracellular Matrix in the Decellularized Mouse and Human Cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A; Aldaya, Robair; Brown, Alec; Johnson, Shane; Stromback, Tyler; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-06-01

    Decellularized tissues have been used to investigate the extracellular matrix (ECM) in a number of different tissues and species. Santi and Johnson JARO 14:3-15 (2013) first described the decellularized inner ear in the mouse, rat, and human using scanning thin-sheet laser imaging microscopy (sTSLIM). The purpose of the present investigation is to examine decellularized cochleas in the mouse and human at higher resolution using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh cochleas were harvested and decellularized using detergent extraction methods. Following decellularization, the ECM of the bone, basilar membrane, spiral limbus, and ligament remained, and all of the cells were removed from the cochlea. A number of similarities and differences in the ECM of the mouse and human were observed. A novel, spirally directed structure was present on the basilar membrane and is located at the border between Hensen and Boettcher cells. These septa-like structures formed a single row in the mouse and multiple rows in the human. The basal lamina of the stria vascularis capillaries was present and appeared thicker in the human compared with the mouse. In the mouse, numerous openings beneath the spiral prominence that previously housed the root processes of the external sulcus cells were observed but in the human there was only a single row of openings. These and other anatomical differences in the ECM between the mouse and human may reflect functional differences and/or be due to aging; however, decellularized cochleas provide a new way to examine the cochlear ECM and reveal new observations.

  20. Human cardiac extracellular matrix supports myocardial lineage commitment of pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberwallner, Barbara; Brodarac, Andreja; Anić, Petra;

    2015-01-01

    lysis buffer, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and foetal bovine serum (FBS). Murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were seeded and grown in standard culture, on cECM or on non-specific ECM preparations (Matrigel® or Geltrex®). Cell......OBJECTIVES: Cross-talk between organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) and stem cells is often assumed but has not been directly demonstrated. We developed a protocol for the preparation of human cardiac ECM (cECM) and studied whether cECM has effects on pluripotent stem cell differentiation...... that may be useful for future cardiac regeneration strategies in patients with end-stage heart failure. METHODS: Of note, 0.3 mm-thick cECM slices were prepared from samples of myocardium from patients with end-stage non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, using a three-step protocol involving hypotonic...

  1. Dielectric properties of human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyman, A [Physical Dosimetry Department, Health Protection Agency, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Gabriel, C [MCL-P, Newbury RG14 5PY, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Benedickter, H R; Froehlich, J, E-mail: Azadeh.peyman@hpa.org.uk [Electromagnetic Fields and Microwave Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-04-07

    The dielectric properties of freshly delivered human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid have been acquired at 37 deg. C and in the frequency range of 200 MHz-10 GHz. The experimental data were fitted to a Cole-Cole expression. The results show that dielectric properties of the umbilical cord are significantly higher than placenta due to the presence of high water content Wharton's jelly. The results also demonstrate large differences in the dielectric properties of amniotic and cerebrospinal fluids. The data presented can be used in numerical simulations of the exposure of pregnant women to electromagnetic fields. (note)

  2. Dielectric properties of human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, A.; Gabriel, C.; Benedickter, H. R.; Fröhlich, J.

    2011-04-01

    The dielectric properties of freshly delivered human placenta, umbilical cord and amniotic fluid have been acquired at 37 °C and in the frequency range of 200 MHz-10 GHz. The experimental data were fitted to a Cole-Cole expression. The results show that dielectric properties of the umbilical cord are significantly higher than placenta due to the presence of high water content Wharton's jelly. The results also demonstrate large differences in the dielectric properties of amniotic and cerebrospinal fluids. The data presented can be used in numerical simulations of the exposure of pregnant women to electromagnetic fields.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Human Blastocoel Fluid and Blastocyst Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen;

    the cells of the blastocyst are exposed. The ICM is the starting point for the development of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which posses the potential to develop into any cell type present in the adult human body [1,2]. This ability makes hESCs a potential source of cells...... for regenerative medicine, such as in the treatment of diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, blindness, and spinal cord injury. In the context of developing regenerative medicine based on hESCs, it remains a challenge to employ safe, xenofree and defined culture conditions. The blastocoel fluid is per se the in vivo......The human blastocyst consists of 100-200 cells that are organized in an outer layer of differentiated trophectoderm (TE) cells lining the blastocyst cavity into which the undifferentiated inner cell mass (ICM) protrudes. The cavity of the blastocyst is filled with blastocoel fluid to which all...

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Human Blastocoel Fluid and Blastocyst Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen

    the cells of the blastocyst are exposed. The ICM is the starting point for the development of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which posses the potential to develop into any cell type present in the adult human body [1,2]. This ability makes hESCs a potential source of cells......The human blastocyst consists of 100-200 cells that are organized in an outer layer of differentiated trophectoderm (TE) cells lining the blastocyst cavity into which the undifferentiated inner cell mass (ICM) protrudes. The cavity of the blastocyst is filled with blastocoel fluid to which all...... for regenerative medicine, such as in the treatment of diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, blindness, and spinal cord injury. In the context of developing regenerative medicine based on hESCs, it remains a challenge to employ safe, xenofree and defined culture conditions. The blastocoel fluid is per se the in vivo...

  5. Human Dupuytren's Ex Vivo Culture for the Study of Myofibroblasts and Extracellular Matrix Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkampouna, Sofia; Kloen, Peter; Obdeijn, Miryam C; Riester, Scott M; van Wijnen, Andre J; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Organ fibrosis or "scarring" is known to account for a high death toll due to the extensive amount of disorders and organs affected (from cirrhosis to cardiovascular diseases). There is no effective treatment and the in vitro tools available do not mimic the in vivo situation rendering the progress of the out of control wound healing process still enigmatic. To date, 2D and 3D cultures of fibroblasts derived from DD patients are the main experimental models available. Primary cell cultures have many limitations; the fibroblasts derived from DD are altered by the culture conditions, lack cellular context and interactions, which are crucial for the development of fibrosis and weakly represent the derived tissue. Real-time PCR analysis of fibroblasts derived from control and DD samples show that little difference is detectable. 3D cultures of fibroblasts include addition of extracellular matrix that alters the native conditions of these cells. As a way to characterize the fibrotic, proliferative properties of these resection specimens we have developed a 3D culture system, using intact human resections of the nodule part of the cord. The system is based on transwell plates with an attached nitrocellulose membrane that allows contact of the tissue with the medium but not with the plastic, thus, preventing the alteration of the tissue. No collagen gel or other extracellular matrix protein substrate is required. The tissue resection specimens maintain their viability and proliferative properties for 7 days. This is the first "organ" culture system that allows human resection specimens from DD patients to be grown ex vivo and functionally tested, recapitulating the in vivo situation.

  6. Lefty Glycoproteins in Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Extracellular Delivery Route and Posttranslational Modification in Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Galat, Vasiliy; Galat, Yekaterina; Gilgur, Alina; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2016-09-19

    Lefty is a member of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily and a potent antagonist of the TGF-β/Nodal/Activin signaling pathway. Lefty is critical in sustaining self-renewal/pluripotency status, and implicated in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, emerging studies depict Lefty as a multifaceted protein involved in myriad cellular events. Lefty proteins (human Lefty A and B) are secreted glycoproteins, but their mode of secretion and the significance of their "glycan" moiety remain mostly unexplored. By employing an in vitro system of human ESCs (hESCs), we observed that Lefty protein(s) are encased in exosomes for extracellular release. The exosomal- and cell-associated Lefty diverge in their proteolytic processing, and possess N-glycan structures of high mannose and complex nature. Differentiation of hESCs to mesenchymal cells (MSCs) or neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) entails distinct changes in the Lefty A/Lefty B gene(s), and protein expression. Specifically, the proteolytic cleavage and N-glycan composition of the cell-associated and exosomal Lefty differ in the differentiated progenies. These modifications affected Lefty's inhibitory effect on Nodal signaling in aggressive melanoma cells. The microheterogeneity in the processing and glycosylation of Lefty protein(s) between hESCs, MSCs, and NPCs could present efficient means of diversifying the endogenous functions of Lefty. Whether Lefty's diverse functions in embryonic patterning, as well as its diffusion range in the extracellular environment, are similarly affected remains to be determined. Our studies underscore the potential relevance of Lefty-packaged exosomes for combating debilitating diseases such as cancer.

  7. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  8. A balanced view of the cerebrospinal fluid composition and functions: Focus on adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Reynold; Robert Snodgrass, S; Johanson, Conrad E

    2015-11-01

    In this review, a companion piece to our recent examination of choroid plexus (CP), the organ that secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we focus on recent information in the context of reliable older data concerning the composition and functions of adult human CSF. To accomplish this, we define CSF, examine the methodology employed in studying the CSF focusing on ideal or near ideal experiments and discuss the pros and cons of several widely used analogical descriptions of the CSF including: the CSF as the "third circulation," the CSF as a "nourishing liquor," the similarities of the CSF/choroid plexus to the glomerular filtrate/kidney and finally the CSF circulation as part of the "glymphatic system." We also consider the close interrelationship between the CSF and extracellular space of brain through gap junctions and the paucity of data suggesting that the cerebral capillaries secrete a CSF-like fluid. Recently human CSF has been shown to be in dynamic flux with heart-beat, posture and especially respiration. Functionally, the CSF provides buoyancy, nourishment (e.g., vitamins) and endogenous waste product removal for the brain by bulk flow into the venous (arachnoid villi and nerve roots) and lymphatic (nasal) systems, and by carrier-mediated reabsorptive transport systems in CP. The CSF also presents many exogenous compounds to CP for metabolism or removal, indirectly cleansing the extracellular space of brain (e.g., of xenobiotics like penicillin). The CSF also carries hormones (e.g., leptin) from blood via CP or synthesized in CP (e.g., IGF-2) to the brain. In summary the CP/CSF, the third circulation, performs many functions comparable to the kidney including nourishing the brain and contributing to a stable internal milieu for the brain. These tasks are essential to normal adult brain functioning.

  9. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J McCoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf. Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases.In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections.Human innate immune cells are able to recognize, attach to and kill B. malayi

  10. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Ciaran J.; Reaves, Barbara J.; Giguère, Steeve; Coates, Ruby; Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Background Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf). Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs) in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases. Principal findings In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections. Conclusions/Significance Human innate immune cells are able to

  11. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is the most common genetic neuropathy with an incidence of 1 in 2600. Several forms of CMT have been identified arising from different genomic abnormalities such as CMT1 including CMT1A, CMT1B, and CMTX. CMT1 with associated peripheral nervous system (PNS) demyelination, the most frequent diagnosis, demonstrates slowed nerve conduction velocities and segmental demyelination upon nerve biopsy. One of its subtypes, CMT1A, presents a 1.5-Mb duplication in the p11-p12 region of the human chromosome 17 which encodes peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). CMT1B, a less common form, arises from the mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene on chromosome 1, region q22-q23, which encodes the major structural component of the peripheral myelin. A rare type of CMT1 has been found recently and is caused by point mutations in early growth response gene 2 (EGR2), encoding a zinc finger transcription factor in Schwann cells. In addition, CMTX, an X-linked form of CMT, arises from a mutation in the connexin-32 gene. Myelin protein zero, associated with CMT1B, is a transmembrane protein of 219 amino acid residues. Human MPZ consists of three domains: 125 residues constitute the glycosylated immunoglobulin-like extracellular domain; 27 residues span the membrane; and 67 residues comprise the highly basic intracellular domain. MPZ makes up approximately 50% of the protein content of myelin, and is expressed predominantly in Schwann cells, the myelinating cell of the PNS. Myelin protein zero, a homophilic adhesion molecule, is a member of the immunoglobulin super-family and is essential for normal myelin structure and function. In addition, MPZ knockout mice displayed abnormal myelin that severely affects the myelination pathway, and overexpression of MPZ causes congenital hypomyelination of peripheral nerves. Myelin protein zero mutations account for {approx}5% of patients with CMT. To date, over 125

  12. The Drug-Drug Effects of Rhein on the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Clozapine in Rat Brain Extracellular Fluid by In Vivo Microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Mei-Ling; Lin, Chi-Hung; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-10-01

    Clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent, is highly effective in treatment-resistant schizophrenia; however, its major side effect is constipation. Instead of laxatives, rhein is a pharmacologically active component found in Rheum palmatum L., a medicinal herbal remedy for constipation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether rhein impacts the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of clozapine in brain when used to relieve clozapine-induced constipation. Here, we have investigated not only the PK of clozapine in blood but also the effects of rhein on the PK of clozapine in blood and in brain extracellular fluid together with the PD effects on neurotransmitters in extracellular fluid. The concentrations of clozapine and norclozapine in biologic samples were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The drug-drug effects of rhein on extracellular neurotransmitter efflux in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) produced by clozapine were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. The results demonstrate that the clozapine PK was nonlinear. Pretreatment with rhein for 7 days increased the total blood concentration of clozapine, but significantly reduced the unbound clozapine concentrations in the mPFC by approximately 3-fold. Furthermore, 7 days of rhein pretreatment thoroughly abolished the efflux of dopamine and its metabolite (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and altered the profile of homovanillic acid, another metabolite of dopamine, in the mPFC. In conclusion, rhein was found to substantially decrease clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in the mPFC dialysate, and this is accompanied by lower concentrations in the neurotransmitters in the same biophase. These findings suggest that a detailed clinical study for drug-drug interactions is recommended.

  13. Potential applications of human saliva as diagnostic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, M; Picciotti, P M; Messana, I; Fanali, C; Fiorita, A; Cabras, T; Calò, L; Pisano, E; Passali, G C; Iavarone, F; Paludetti, G; Scarano, E

    2011-12-01

    The use of human saliva as a diagnostic and prognostic fluid has until recently been somewhat disregarded. Although sample collection is non-invasive, physiological and genetic variations were largely responsible for its infrequent application in the past. Recently, several proteomic studies contributed to partial elucidation of the salivary proteome (more than 2400 protein components have been characterized), both in terms of composition, contributions to whole saliva and genetic/physiological variability. On this basis, is not too optimistic to believe that in the near future human saliva could become a relevant diagnostic fluid. In this review, the characterization by proteomic approaches of new salivary markers in oncology, head and neck carcinoma (oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and salivary glands), breast and gastric cancers, salivary gland function and disease, Sjögren syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dental and gingival pathology, systemic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, is described.

  14. Correlation of apical fluid-regulating channel proteins with lung function in human COPD lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runzhen Zhao

    Full Text Available Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, and aquaporin 5 (AQP5 proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI and II (ATII-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD.

  15. Effects of weightlessness on human fluid and electrolyte physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Skylab and Spacelab data on changes occurring in human fluid and electrolyte physiology during the acute and adaptive phases of adaptation to spaceflight are summarized. The combined results for all three Spacelab studies show that hyponatremia developed within 20 h after the onset of weightlessness and continued throughout the flights, and hypokalemia developed by 40 h. Antidiuretic hormone was increased in plasma throughout the flights. Aldosterone decreased by 40 h, but after 7 days it had reached preflight levels.

  16. FIB-SEM tomography of human skin telocytes and their extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretoiu, Dragos; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Hummel, Eric; Zimmermann, Hans; Simionescu, Olga; Popescu, Laurentiu M

    2015-04-01

    We have shown in 2012 the existence of telocytes (TCs) in human dermis. TCs were described by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as interstitial cells located in non-epithelial spaces (stroma) of many organs (see www.telocytes.com). TCs have very long prolongations (tens to hundreds micrometers) named Telopodes (Tps). These Tps have a special conformation with dilated portions named podoms (containing mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae) and very thin segments (below resolving power of light microscopy), called podomers. To show the real 3D architecture of TC network, we used the most advanced available electron microscope technology: focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) tomography. Generally, 3D reconstruction of dermal TCs by FIB-SEM tomography revealed the existence of Tps with various conformations: (i) long, flattened irregular veils (ribbon-like segments) with knobs, corresponding to podoms, and (ii) tubular structures (podomers) with uneven calibre because of irregular dilations (knobs) - the podoms. FIB-SEM tomography also showed numerous extracellular vesicles (diameter 438.6 ± 149.1 nm, n = 30) released by a human dermal TC. Our data might be useful for understanding the role(s) of TCs in intercellular signalling and communication, as well as for comprehension of pathologies like scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, etc.

  17. In vitro immunotoxicity assessment of culture-derived extracellular vesicles in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Lucia E.; Elgamal, Ola A.; Mo, Xiaokui; Phelps, Mitch A.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Papenfuss, Tracey L.

    2016-01-01

    The potential to engineer extracellular vesicles (EV) that target specific cells and deliver a therapeutic payload has propelled a growing interest in their development as promising therapeutics. These EV are often produced from cultured cells. Very little is known about the interaction of cell culture-derived EV with cells of the immune system and their potential immunomodulatory effects. The present study evaluated potential immunotoxic effects of HEK293T-derived EV on the human monocytic cell lines THP-1 and U937. Incubation of cells with different doses of EV for 16–24 h was followed by assessment of cytotoxicity and cell function by flow cytometry. Changes in cell functionality were evaluated by the capacity of cells to phagocytize fluorescent microspheres. In addition, the internalization of labeled EV in THP-1 and U937 cells was evaluated. Exposure to EV did not affect the viability of THP-1 or U937 cells. Although lower doses of the EV increased phagocytic capacity in both cell lines, phagocytic efficiency of individual cells was not affected by EV exposure at any of the doses evaluated. This study also demonstrated that THP-1 and U937 monocytic cells are highly permissive to EV entry in a dose-response manner. These results suggest that, although HEK293T-derived EV are efficiently internalized by human monocytic cells, they do not exert a cytotoxic effect or alter phagocytic efficiency on the cell lines evaluated. PMID:27075513

  18. Expression of human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand extracellular region in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐蓓; HE; Fengtian; 等

    2002-01-01

    This study is conducted to clone the cDNA encoding human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand(hTRAIL)extracellular region(amino acids 41-281,hTRAIL41-281)and to express it in E.coli.The hTRAIL41-281 cDNA is amplified by reverse transcription(RT)PCR from total RNA derived from human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60.After sequenced,the cDNA is cloned into the vector pQE-80L and transformed into E.coli DH5α to express the recombinant hTRAIL41-281(rhTRAIL41-281)induced by IPTG.The recombinant protein is analyzed by SDS-PAGE.The cloned cDNA is consistent with the cDNA sequence encoding hTRAIL41-281 reported in GenBankTM.After inducing.the hTRAIL41-281 protein is expressed,and the mass of the recombinant protein is about 30% of total bacteria protein,which demonstrates that the cDNA encoding hTRAIL41-281 is successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli.

  19. Proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis of smooth muscle cells cultured from human coronary atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. MacLeod (Donald); B.H. Strauss (Bradley); J. Escaned (Javier); V.A.W.M. Umans (Victor); R-J. van Suylen (Robert-Jan); A. Verkerk (Anton); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M. de Jong (Marcel)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to examine the proliferative capacity and extracellular matrix synthesis of human coronary plaque cells in vitro. BACKGROUND. Common to both primary atherosclerosis and restenosis are vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and production of ex

  20. Extracellular microvesicle production by human eosinophils activated by “inflammatory” stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Akuthota

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A key function of human eosinophils is to secrete cytokines, chemokines and cationic proteins, trafficking and releasing these mediators for roles in inflammation and other immune responses. Eosinophil activation leads to secretion of pre-synthesized granule-stored mediators through different mechanisms, but the ability of eosinophils to secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs, very small vesicles with preserved membrane topology, is still poorly understood. In the present work, we sought to identify and characterize EVs released from human eosinophils during different conditions: after a culturing period or after isolation and stimulation with inflammatory stimuli, which are known to induce eosinophil activation and secretion: CCL11 (eotaxin-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. EV production was investigated by nanoscale flow cytometry, conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM and pre-embedding immunonanogold EM. The tetraspanins CD63 and CD9 were used as EV biomarkers for both flow cytometry and ultrastructural immunolabeling. Nanoscale flow cytometry showed that human eosinophils produce EVs in culture and that a population of EVs expressed detectable CD9, while CD63 was not consistently detected. When eosinophils were stimulated immediately after isolation and analyzed by TEM, EVs were clearly identified as microvesicles (MVsoutwardly budding off the plasma membrane. Both CCL11 and TNF-α induced significant increases of MVs compared to unstimulated cells.TNF-α induced amplified release of MVs more than CCL11. Eosinophil MV diameters varied from 20-1000 nm. Immunonanogold EM revealed clear immunolabeling for CD63 and CD9 on eosinophil MVs, although not all MVs were labeled. Altogether, we identified, for the first time, that human eosinophils secrete MVs and that this production increases in response to inflammatory stimuli. This is important to understand the complex secretory activities of eosinophils underlying immune

  1. On-chip immunoelectrophoresis of extracellular vesicles released from human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Takanori; Kato, Kei; Kobayashi, Masashi; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes and microvesicles have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell biology and medicine. For a better understanding of EVs and further exploration of their applications, the development of analytical methods for biological nanovesicles has been required. In particular, considering the heterogeneity of EVs, methods capable of measuring individual vesicles are desired. Here, we report that on-chip immunoelectrophoresis can provide a useful method for the differential protein expression profiling of individual EVs. Electrophoresis experiments were performed on EVs collected from the culture supernatant of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells using a measurement platform comprising a microcapillary electrophoresis chip and a laser dark-field microimaging system. The zeta potential distribution of EVs that reacted with an anti-human CD63 (exosome and microvesicle marker) antibody showed a marked positive shift as compared with that for the normal immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotype control. Thus, on-chip immunoelectrophoresis could sensitively detect the over-expression of CD63 glycoproteins on EVs. Moreover, to explore the applicability of on-chip immunoelectrophoresis to cancer diagnosis, EVs collected from the blood of a mouse tumor model were analyzed by this method. By comparing the zeta potential distributions of EVs after their immunochemical reaction with normal IgG, and the anti-human CD63 and anti-human CD44 (cancer stem cell marker) antibodies, EVs of tumor origin circulating in blood were differentially detected in the real sample. The result indicates that the present method is potentially applicable to liquid biopsy, a promising approach to the low-invasive diagnosis of cancer.

  2. On-chip immunoelectrophoresis of extracellular vesicles released from human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Akagi

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs including exosomes and microvesicles have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell biology and medicine. For a better understanding of EVs and further exploration of their applications, the development of analytical methods for biological nanovesicles has been required. In particular, considering the heterogeneity of EVs, methods capable of measuring individual vesicles are desired. Here, we report that on-chip immunoelectrophoresis can provide a useful method for the differential protein expression profiling of individual EVs. Electrophoresis experiments were performed on EVs collected from the culture supernatant of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells using a measurement platform comprising a microcapillary electrophoresis chip and a laser dark-field microimaging system. The zeta potential distribution of EVs that reacted with an anti-human CD63 (exosome and microvesicle marker antibody showed a marked positive shift as compared with that for the normal immunoglobulin G (IgG isotype control. Thus, on-chip immunoelectrophoresis could sensitively detect the over-expression of CD63 glycoproteins on EVs. Moreover, to explore the applicability of on-chip immunoelectrophoresis to cancer diagnosis, EVs collected from the blood of a mouse tumor model were analyzed by this method. By comparing the zeta potential distributions of EVs after their immunochemical reaction with normal IgG, and the anti-human CD63 and anti-human CD44 (cancer stem cell marker antibodies, EVs of tumor origin circulating in blood were differentially detected in the real sample. The result indicates that the present method is potentially applicable to liquid biopsy, a promising approach to the low-invasive diagnosis of cancer.

  3. Effect of extracellular vesicles of human adipose tissue on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Visseren, Frank L J; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; de Jager, Wilco; Wauben, Marca H M; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a key mechanism in obesity-induced cardiovascular disease. To unravel mechanisms whereby human adipose tissue (AT) contributes to systemic IR, the effect of human AT-extracellular vesicles (EVs) on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells was determined. EVs released from human subcutaneous (SAT) and omental AT (OAT)-explants ex vivo were used for stimulation of hepatocytes and myotubes in vitro. Subsequently, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and expression of gluconeogenic genes (G6P, PEPCK) was determined. AT-EV adipokine levels were measured by multiplex immunoassay, and AT-EVs were quantified by high-resolution flow cytometry. In hepatocytes, AT-EVs from the majority of patients inhibited insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation, while EVs from some patients stimulated insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. In myotubes AT-EVs exerted an ambiguous effect on insulin signaling. Hepatic Akt phosphorylation related negatively to G6P-expression by both SAT-EVs (r = -0.60, P = 0.01) and OAT-EVs (r = -0.74, P = 0.001). MCP-1, IL-6, and MIF concentrations were higher in OAT-EVs compared to SAT-EVs and differently related to lower Akt phosphorylation in hepatocytes. Finally, the number of OAT-EVs correlated positively with liver enzymes indicative for liver dysfunction. Human AT-EVs can stimulate or inhibit insulin signaling in hepatocytes- possibly depending on their adipokine content- and may thereby contribute to systemic IR. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  4. Pellet-free isolation of human and bovine milk extracellular vesicles by size-exclusion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blans, Kristine; Hansen, Maria S.; Sørensen, Laila V.; Hvam, Michael L.; Howard, Kenneth A.; Möller, Arne; Wiking, Lars; Larsen, Lotte B.; Rasmussen, Jan T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies have suggested that nanoscale extracellular vesicles (EV) in human and bovine milk carry immune modulatory properties which could provide beneficial health effects to infants. In order to assess the possible health effects of milk EV, it is essential to use isolates of high purity from other more abundant milk structures with well-documented bioactive properties. Furthermore, gentle isolation procedures are important for reducing the risk of generating vesicle artefacts, particularly when EV subpopulations are investigated. In this study, we present two isolation approaches accomplished in three steps based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) resulting in effective and reproducible EV isolation from raw milk. The approaches do not require any EV pelleting and can be applied to both human and bovine milk. We show that SEC effectively separates phospholipid membrane vesicles from the primary casein and whey protein components in two differently obtained casein reduced milk fractions, with one of the fractions obtained without the use of ultracentrifugation. Milk EV isolates were enriched in lactadherin, CD9, CD63 and CD81 compared to minimal levels of the EV-marker proteins in other relevant milk fractions such as milk fat globules. Nanoparticle tracking analysis and electron microscopy reveals the presence of heterogeneous sized vesicle structures in milk EV isolates. Lipid analysis by thin layer chromatography shows that EV isolates are devoid of triacylglycerides and presents a phospholipid profile differing from milk fat globules surrounded by epithelial cell plasma membrane. Moreover, the milk EV fractions are enriched in RNA with distinct and diverging profiles from milk fat globules. Collectively, our data supports that successful milk EV isolation can be accomplished in few steps without the use of ultracentrifugation, as the presented isolation approaches based on SEC effectively isolates EV in both human and bovine milk. PMID:28386391

  5. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  6. Extracellular traps are associated with human and mouse neutrophil and macrophage mediated killing of larval Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne-Année, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Lok, James B; Nolan, Thomas J; Abraham, David

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils are multifaceted cells that are often the immune system's first line of defense. Human and murine cells release extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in response to several pathogens and diseases. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is crucial to trapping and killing extracellular pathogens. Aside from neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils also release ETs. We hypothesized that ETs serve as a mechanism of ensnaring the large and highly motile helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis thereby providing a static target for the immune response. We demonstrated that S. stercoralis larvae trigger the release of ETs by human neutrophils and macrophages. Analysis of NETs revealed that NETs trapped but did not kill larvae. Induction of NETs was essential for larval killing by human but not murine neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. In mice, extracellular traps were induced following infection with S. stercoralis larvae and were present in the microenvironment of worms being killed in vivo. These findings demonstrate that NETs ensnare the parasite facilitating larval killing by cells of the immune system.

  7. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymor......Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages......), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide...

  8. Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel Derived from Human Umbilical Cord as a Scaffold for Neural Tissue Repair and Its Comparison with Extracellular Matrix from Porcine Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočí, Zuzana; Výborný, Karel; Dubišová, Jana; Vacková, Irena; Jäger, Aleš; Lunov, Oleg; Jiráková, Klára; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels prepared by tissue decellularization have been reported as natural injectable materials suitable for neural tissue repair. In this study, we prepared ECM hydrogel derived from human umbilical cord (UC) and evaluated its composition and mechanical and biological properties in comparison with the previously described ECM hydrogels derived from porcine urinary bladder (UB), brain, and spinal cord. The ECM hydrogels did not differ from each other in the concentration of collagen, while the highest content of glycosaminoglycans as well as the shortest gelation time was found for UC-ECM. The elastic modulus was then found to be the highest for UB-ECM. In spite of a different origin, topography, and composition, all ECM hydrogels similarly promoted the migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and differentiation of neural stem cells, as well as axonal outgrowth in vitro. However, only UC-ECM significantly improved proliferation of tissue-specific UC-derived MSCs when compared with the other ECMs. Injection of UC-ECM hydrogels into a photothrombotic cortical ischemic lesion in rats proved its in vivo gelation and infiltration with host macrophages. In summary, this study proposes UC-ECM hydrogel as an easily accessible biomaterial of human origin, which has the potential for neural as well as other soft tissue reconstruction.

  9. Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Osteogenically Induced Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Can Modulate Lineage Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Martins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effective osteogenic commitment of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs is critical for bone regenerative therapies. Extracellular vesicles (EVs derived from hBMSCs have a regenerative potential that has been increasingly recognized. Herein, the osteoinductive potential of osteogenically induced hBMSC-EVs was examined. hBMSCs secreted negatively charged nanosized vesicles (∼35 nm with EV-related surface markers. The yield of EVs over 7 days was dependent on an osteogenic stimulus (standard chemical cocktail or RUNX2 cationic-lipid transfection. These EVs were used to sequentially stimulate homotypic uncommitted cells during 7 days, matching the seeding density of EV parent cells, culture time, and stimuli. Osteogenically committed hBMSC-EVs induced an osteogenic phenotype characterized by marked early induction of BMP2, SP7, SPP1, BGLAP/IBSP, and alkaline phosphatase. Both EV groups outperformed the currently used osteoinductive strategies. These data show that naturally secreted EVs can guide the osteogenic commitment of hBMSCs in the absence of other chemical or genetic osteoinductors.

  10. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eBarrientos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme Alu I was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins (histone 3, lactoferrin were quantified by western blotting, and dsDNA was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, lactoferrin, elastase and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  11. Isolation of human salivary extracellular vesicles by iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation and their characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Iwai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic methods that focus on the extracellular vesicles (EVs present in saliva have been attracting great attention because of their non-invasiveness. EVs contain biomolecules such as proteins, messenger RNA (mRNA and microRNA (miRNA, which originate from cells that release EVs, making them an ideal source for liquid biopsy. Although there have been many reports on density-based fractionation of EVs from blood and urine, the number of reports on EVs from saliva has been limited, most probably because of the difficulties in separating EVs from viscous saliva using density gradient centrifugation. This article establishes a protocol for the isolation of EVs from human saliva using density gradient centrifugation. The fractionated salivary EVs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that salivary EVs have a smaller diameter (47.8±12.3 nm and higher density (1.11 g/ml than EVs isolated from conditioned cell media (74.0±23.5 nm and 1.06 g/ml, respectively. Additionally, to improve the throughput of density-based fractionation of EVs, the original protocol was further modified by using a fixed angle rotor instead of a swinging rotor. It was also confirmed that several miRNAs were expressed strongly in the EV-marker-expressing fractions.

  12. Isolation of human salivary extracellular vesicles by iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation and their characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kazuya; Minamisawa, Tamiko; Suga, Kanako; Yajima, Yasutomo; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic methods that focus on the extracellular vesicles (EVs) present in saliva have been attracting great attention because of their non-invasiveness. EVs contain biomolecules such as proteins, messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA), which originate from cells that release EVs, making them an ideal source for liquid biopsy. Although there have been many reports on density-based fractionation of EVs from blood and urine, the number of reports on EVs from saliva has been limited, most probably because of the difficulties in separating EVs from viscous saliva using density gradient centrifugation. This article establishes a protocol for the isolation of EVs from human saliva using density gradient centrifugation. The fractionated salivary EVs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that salivary EVs have a smaller diameter (47.8±12.3 nm) and higher density (1.11 g/ml) than EVs isolated from conditioned cell media (74.0±23.5 nm and 1.06 g/ml, respectively). Additionally, to improve the throughput of density-based fractionation of EVs, the original protocol was further modified by using a fixed angle rotor instead of a swinging rotor. It was also confirmed that several miRNAs were expressed strongly in the EV-marker-expressing fractions. PMID:27193612

  13. Photobiomodulation on human annulus fibrosus cells during the intervertebral disk degeneration: extracellular matrix-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Min Ho; Kim, Kyoung Soo; Yoo, Chang Min; Shin, Jae Hee; Nam, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Jin Su; Kim, Joo Han; Lee, Kwang Ho; Choi, Hyuk

    2016-05-01

    Destruction of extracellular matrix (ECM) leads to degeneration of the intervertebral disk (IVD), which is a major contributor to many spine disorders. IVD degeneration is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), which are secreted by immune cells, including macrophages and neutrophils. The cytokines modulate ECM-modifying enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. The resulting imbalance in catabolic and anabolic enzymes can cause generalized back, neck, and low back pain (LBP). Photobiomodulation (PBM) is known to regulate inflammatory responses and wound healing. The aim of this study was to mimic the degenerative IVD microenvironment, and to investigate the effect of a variety of PBM conditions (wavelength: 635, 525, and 470 nm; energy density: 16, 32, and 64 J/cm(2)) on the production of ECM-modifying-enzymes by AF cells under degenerative conditions induced by macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM), which contains pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-β secreted by macrophage during the development of intervertebral disk inflammation. We showed that the MCM-stimulated AF cells express imbalanced ratios of TIMPs (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) and MMPs (MMP-1 and MMP-3). PBM selectively modulated the production of ECM-modifying enzymes in AF cells. These results suggest that PBM can be a therapeutic tool for degenerative IVD disorders.

  14. Biocompatibility of pure titanium modified by human endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang Jin, E-mail: jinxxwang@263.net [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhu Ying; Tu Qiufen; Huang Nan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) used to modify biomaterial surface is a promising method for improving cardiovascular material hemocompatibility. In the present work, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured and native ECM is obtained on pure titanium surface. Fourier infrared spectrum (FTIR) test proves the existence of amide I and amide II band on the modified titanium surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further confirms the chemical composition and binding types of the ECM proteins on the titanium substrate. The results of light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibit the morphology of HUVEC derived ECM. There are higher water contact angles on the ECM modified samples. Furthermore, some ECM components, including fibronectin (FN), laminin (LN) and type IV collagen (IV-COL) are presented on ECM-covered titanium surface by immunofluorescence staining. The biological behavior of cultured HUVECs and adherent platelets on different samples are investigated by in vitro HUVECs culture and platelet adhesion. Cells exhibit better morphology and their proliferation ability greatly improve on the ECM-covered titanium. At the same time, the platelet adhesion and spreading are inhibited on ECM-covered titanium surface. These investigations demonstrate that ECM produced by HUVECs cannot only improve adhesion and proliferation ability of endothelial cell but also inhibit adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for preparation of modified surface in cardiovascular implants application.

  15. Urine proteomes of healthy aging humans reveal extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations and immune system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakun, M; Senatorski, G; Rubel, T; Lukasik, A; Zielenkiewicz, P; Dadlez, M; Paczek, L

    2014-02-01

    Aging is a complex physiological process that poses considerable conundrums to rapidly aging societies. For example, the risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases and/or cancer steadily declines for people after their 60s, and other causes of death predominate for seniors older than 80 years of age. Thus, physiological aging presents numerous unanswered questions, particularly with regard to changing metabolic patterns. Urine proteomics analysis is becoming a non-invasive and reproducible diagnostic method. We investigated the urine proteomes in healthy elderly people to determine which metabolic processes were weakened or strengthened in aging humans. Urine samples from 37 healthy volunteers aged 19-90 years (19 men, 18 women) were analyzed for protein expression by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This generated a list of 19 proteins that were differentially expressed in different age groups (young, intermediate, and old age). In particular, the oldest group showed protein changes reflective of altered extracellular matrix turnover and declining immune function, in which changes corresponded to reported changes in cardiovascular tissue remodeling and immune disorders in the elderly. Thus, urinary proteome changes in the elderly appear to reflect the physiological processes of aging and are particularly clearly represented in the circulatory and immune systems. Detailed identification of "protein trails" creates a more global picture of metabolic changes that occur in the elderly.

  16. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Khang, Gilson; Soker, Shay

    2013-02-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation.

  17. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration.

  18. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Lorena; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Le-Moal, Vanessa Lievin; Sandré, Catherine; Bianchini, Elsa; Nicolas, Valerie; Pallardy, Marc; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis, and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme AluI was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins [histone 3, lactoferrin (LF)] were quantified by western blotting, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase (ELA) activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, LF, ELA, and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating, and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  19. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  20. Vanadium in foods and in human body fluids and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, A R; Kosta, L

    1978-07-01

    Using neutron activation analysis, vanadium was analysed in a range of foods, human body fluids and tissues. On the basis of these results and those of other workers, it was concluded that daily dietary intake amounts to some tens of micrograms. Analysis of body fluids (including milk, blood and excreta) and organs and tissues provided an estimate for the total body pool of vanadium in man of about 100 microgram. Vanadium was not detectable in blood and urine at the level of 0.3 ng/g, while low levels were found in muscle, fat, bone, teeth and other tissues. The relationship between dietary intake to pulmonary absorption is discussed in relation to the occurrence of vanadium in man-made air particulates. The very low levels found in milks and eggs suggest minimal vanadium requirements in growth. The findings are discussed in the light of previous results and also in relation to the possible essentiality of vanadium.

  1. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappa, Germana [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Le, Thuc T. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Johlfs, Mary G. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Fiscus, Ronald R. [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Center for Diabetes and Obesity Prevention, Treatment, Research and Education, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States); Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Pfotenhauerstr. 108, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Corbeil, Denis [Tissue Engineering Laboratories (BIOTEC) and DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Technische Universität Dresden, Tatzberg 47–49, 01307 Dresden, Germany Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lorico, Aurelio, E-mail: alorico@roseman.edu [Cancer Research Program, Roseman University of Health Sciences, 10530 Discovery Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); College of Pharmacy, Roseman University of Health Sciences, Henderson, NV 89104 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ∼40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ► First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ► Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in

  2. Demonstration of extracellular peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) activity in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a novel assay for citrullination of fibrinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Senolt, Ladislav; Nielsen, Michael Friberg

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Members of the peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) family catalyse the posttranslational conversion of peptidylarginine to peptidylcitrulline. Citrullination of proteins is well described in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and hypercitrullination of proteins may be related to inflammation...... in general. PAD activity has been demonstrated in various cell lysates, but so far not in synovial fluid. We aimed to develop an assay for detection of PAD activity, if any, in synovial fluid from RA patients. METHODS: An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human fibrinogen as the immobilized substrate...... for citrullination and anti-citrullinated fibrinogen antibody as the detecting agent were used for measurement of PAD activity in synovial fluid samples from five RA patients. The concentrations of PAD2 and calcium were also determined. RESULTS: Approximately 150 times lower levels of recombinant human PAD2 (rhPAD2...

  3. Impact of acetaminophen consumption and resistance exercise on extracellular matrix gene expression in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivam H; D'Lugos, Andrew C; Eldon, Erica R; Curtis, Donald; Dickinson, Jared M; Carroll, Chad C

    2017-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) given during chronic exercise reduces skeletal muscle collagen and cross-linking in rats. We propose that the effect of APAP on muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) may, in part, be mediated by dysregulation of the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of APAP consumption during acute resistance exercise (RE) on several regulators of the ECM in human skeletal muscle. In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover design, recreationally active men (n = 8, 25 ± 2 yr) performed two trials of knee extension. Placebo (PLA) or APAP (1,000 mg/6 h) was given for 24 h before and immediately following RE. Vastus lateralis biopsies were taken at baseline and 1 and 3 h post-RE. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine differences in mRNA expression. MMP-2, type I collagen, and type III collagen mRNA expression was not altered by exercise or APAP (P > 0.05). When compared with PLA, TIMP-1 expression was lower at 1 h post-RE during APAP conditions but greater than PLA at 3 h post-RE (P 0.05). Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38-MAPK increased (P < 0.05) with RE but was not influenced by APAP. Our findings do not support our hypothesis and suggest that short-term APAP consumption before RE has a small impact on the measured ECM molecules in human skeletal muscle following acute RE. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Increases in extracellular fluid glucose levels in the rat hippocampus following an anesthetic dose of pentobarbital or ketamine-xylazine: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E; McNay, Ewan C; Gold, Paul E

    2005-02-15

    Using in vivo microdialysis, we examined glucose levels in the extracellular fluid (ECF) of the hippocampus and in the blood prior to and during pentobarbital (45 mg/kg) or ketamine-xylazine (66 mg/kg, 7 mg/kg) anesthesia. Anesthesia with either pentobarbital or ketamine-xylazine significantly increased hippocampal ECF glucose levels (mean peak increases of +71% and +85%, respectively). In addition, there were substantial increases in blood glucose levels (mean peak increases of +24% and +30%, respectively). The increased levels of hippocampal ECF glucose during anesthesia complement past evidence for decreases in ECF glucose in the hippocampus observed while rats perform a memory task sensitive to hippocampal damage, providing further support for the view that ECF glucose levels in the hippocampus are dynamically coupled to local neural activity.

  5. Biological Activities of Extracellular Vesicles and Their Cargos from Bovine and Human Milk in Humans and Implications for Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempleni, Janos; Aguilar-Lozano, Ana; Sadri, Mahrou; Sukreet, Sonal; Manca, Sonia; Wu, Di; Zhou, Fang; Mutai, Ezra

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) in milk harbor a variety of compounds, including lipids, proteins, noncoding RNAs, and mRNAs. Among the various classes of EVs, exosomes are of particular interest, because cargo sorting in exosomes is a regulated, nonrandom process and exosomes play essential roles in cell-to-cell communication. Encapsulation in exosomes confers protection against enzymatic and nonenzymatic degradation of cargos and provides a pathway for cellular uptake of cargos by endocytosis of exosomes. Compelling evidence suggests that exosomes in bovine milk are transported by intestinal cells, vascular endothelial cells, and macrophages in human and rodent cell cultures, and bovine-milk exosomes are delivered to peripheral tissues in mice. Evidence also suggests that cargos in bovine-milk exosomes, in particular RNAs, are delivered to circulating immune cells in humans. Some microRNAs and mRNAs in bovine-milk exosomes may regulate the expression of human genes and be translated into protein, respectively. Some exosome cargos are quantitatively minor in the diet compared with endogenous synthesis. However, noncanonical pathways have been identified through which low concentrations of dietary microRNAs may alter gene expression, such as the accumulation of exosomes in the immune cell microenvironment and the binding of microRNAs to Toll-like receptors. Phenotypes observed in infant-feeding studies include higher Mental Developmental Index, Psychomotor Development Index, and Preschool Language Scale-3 scores in breastfed infants than in those fed various formulas. In mice, supplementation with plant-derived MIR-2911 improved the antiviral response compared with controls. Porcine-milk exosomes promote the proliferation of intestinal cells in mice. This article discusses the above-mentioned advances in research concerning milk exosomes and their cargos in human nutrition. Implications for infant nutrition are emphasized, where permitted, but data in infants are

  6. Conditions of Mytilus edulis extracellular body fluids and shell composition in a pH-treatment experiment: Acid-base status, trace elements and δ11B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Agnes; Fietzke, Jan; Melzner, Frank; BöHm, Florian; Thomsen, JöRn; Garbe-SchöNberg, Dieter; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Mytilus edulis were cultured for 3 months under six different seawater pCO2 levels ranging from 380 to 4000 μatm. Specimen were taken from Kiel Fjord (Western Baltic Sea, Germany) which is a habitat with high and variable seawater pCO2 and related shifts in carbonate system speciation (e.g., low pH and low CaCO3 saturation state). Hemolymph (HL) and extrapallial fluid (EPF) samples were analyzed for pH and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) to calculate pCO2 and [HCO3-]. A second experiment was conducted for 2 months with three different pCO2 levels (380, 1400 and 4000 μatm). Boron isotopes (δ11B) were investigated by LA-MC-ICP-MS (Laser Ablation-Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) in shell portions precipitated during experimental treatment time. Additionally, elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF of specimen from the second experiment were measured via ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry). Extracellular pH was not significantly different in HL and EPF but systematically lower than ambient water pH. This is due to high extracellular pCO2 values, a prerequisite for metabolic CO2 excretion. No accumulation of extracellular [HCO3-] was measured. Elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF increased slightly with pH which is in accordance with increasing growth and calcification rates at higher seawater pH values. Boron isotope ratios were highly variable between different individuals but also within single shells. This corresponds to a high individual variability in fluid B/Ca ratios and may be due to high boron concentrations in the organic parts of the shell. The mean δ11B value shows no trend with pH but appears to represent internal pH (EPF) rather than ambient water pH.

  7. Antioxidant defenses in human blood plasma and extra-cellular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Roland

    2016-04-01

    I had the fortune to be introduced to Helmut Sies during the mid 1980s, while working as a post-doctoral scientist at the University of California, Berkeley. At that time, Helmut was a frequent visitor of the Bruce Ames' laboratory and a leading authority in antioxidants and oxidative stress. His concepts, ideas and willingness to listen and make constructive suggestions have been far-reaching and visionary. Moreover, they have also been highly infectious, so much so that much of my research to this day has been on the same topic. The following is a personal recount on how the field of antioxidants has evolved since those exciting days in Berkeley.

  8. Visualization of extracellular matrix components within sectioned Salmonella biofilms on the surface of human gallstones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M Marshall

    Full Text Available Chronic carriage of Salmonella Typhi is mediated primarily through the formation of bacterial biofilms on the surface of cholesterol gallstones. Biofilms, by definition, involve the formation of a bacterial community encased within a protective macromolecular matrix. Previous work has demonstrated the composition of the biofilm matrix to be complex and highly variable in response to altered environmental conditions. Although known to play an important role in bacterial persistence in a variety of contexts, the Salmonella biofilm matrix remains largely uncharacterized under physiological conditions. Initial attempts to study matrix components and architecture of the biofilm matrix on gallstone surfaces were hindered by the auto-fluorescence of cholesterol. In this work we describe a method for sectioning and direct visualization of extracellular matrix components of the Salmonella biofilm on the surface of human cholesterol gallstones and provide a description of the major matrix components observed therein. Confocal micrographs revealed robust biofilm formation, characterized by abundant but highly heterogeneous expression of polysaccharides such as LPS, Vi and O-antigen capsule. CsgA was not observed in the biofilm matrix and flagellar expression was tightly restricted to the biofilm-cholesterol interface. Images also revealed the presence of preexisting Enterobacteriaceae encased within the structure of the gallstone. These results demonstrate the use and feasibility of this method while highlighting the importance of studying the native architecture of the gallstone biofilm. A better understanding of the contribution of individual matrix components to the overall biofilm structure will facilitate the development of more effective and specific methods to disrupt these bacterial communities.

  9. Visualization of Extracellular Matrix Components within Sectioned Salmonella Biofilms on the Surface of Human Gallstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanna M.; Flechtner, Alan D.; La Perle, Krista M.; Gunn, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic carriage of Salmonella Typhi is mediated primarily through the formation of bacterial biofilms on the surface of cholesterol gallstones. Biofilms, by definition, involve the formation of a bacterial community encased within a protective macromolecular matrix. Previous work has demonstrated the composition of the biofilm matrix to be complex and highly variable in response to altered environmental conditions. Although known to play an important role in bacterial persistence in a variety of contexts, the Salmonella biofilm matrix remains largely uncharacterized under physiological conditions. Initial attempts to study matrix components and architecture of the biofilm matrix on gallstone surfaces were hindered by the auto-fluorescence of cholesterol. In this work we describe a method for sectioning and direct visualization of extracellular matrix components of the Salmonella biofilm on the surface of human cholesterol gallstones and provide a description of the major matrix components observed therein. Confocal micrographs revealed robust biofilm formation, characterized by abundant but highly heterogeneous expression of polysaccharides such as LPS, Vi and O-antigen capsule. CsgA was not observed in the biofilm matrix and flagellar expression was tightly restricted to the biofilm-cholesterol interface. Images also revealed the presence of preexisting Enterobacteriaceae encased within the structure of the gallstone. These results demonstrate the use and feasibility of this method while highlighting the importance of studying the native architecture of the gallstone biofilm. A better understanding of the contribution of individual matrix components to the overall biofilm structure will facilitate the development of more effective and specific methods to disrupt these bacterial communities. PMID:24551241

  10. IAPP modulates cellular autophagy, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix metabolism in human intervertebral disc cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghuo; Song, Yu; Liu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Duan, Zhenfeng; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic process of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is characterized by imbalance in the extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have important roles in maintaining the proper structure and tissue homeostasis of disc ECM. These cells need adequate supply of glucose and oxygen. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) exerts its biological effects by regulating glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of IAPP in degenerated IVD tissue, and IAPP modulation of ECM metabolism in human NP cells, especially the crosstalk mechanism between apoptosis and autophagy in these cells. We found that the expression of IAPP and Calcr-RAMP decreased considerably during IDD progression, along with the decrease in the expression of AG, BG, and Col2A1. Induction of IAPP in NP cells by transfection with pLV-IAPP enhanced the synthesis of aggrecan and Col2A1 and attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1. Upregulation of IAPP also affected the expression of the catabolic markers—matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 3, 9 and 13 and ADAMTS 4 and 5. Downregulation of IAPP by siRNA inhibited the expression of anabolic genes but increased the expression of catabolic genes and inflammatory factors. The expressions of autophagic and apoptotic markers in NP cells transfected with pLV-IAPP were upregulated, including BECLIN1, ATG5, ATG7, LC3 II/I and Bcl-2, while significantly increase in the expression of Bax and Caspase-3 in NP cells transfected with pLV-siIAPP. Mechanistically, PI3K/AKT-mTOR and p38/JNK MAPK signal pathways were involved. We propose that IAPP might play a pivotal role in the development of IDD, by regulating ECM metabolism and controlling the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in NP, thus potentially offering a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of IDD.

  11. Identification of Extracellular Matrix Components and Biological Factors in Micronized Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jennifer; Priddy, Lauren B.; Lim, Jeremy J.; Massee, Michelle; Koob, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The use of bioactive extracellular matrix (ECM) grafts such as amniotic membranes is an attractive treatment option for enhancing wound repair. In this study, the concentrations, activity, and distribution of matrix components, growth factors, proteases, and inhibitors were evaluated in PURION® Processed, micronized, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM; MiMedx Group, Inc.). Approach: ECM components in dHACM tissue were assessed by using immunohistochemical staining, and growth factors, cytokines, proteases, and inhibitors were quantified by using single and multiplex ELISAs. The activities of proteases that were native to the tissue were determined via gelatin zymography and EnzChek® activity assay. Results: dHACM tissue contained the ECM components collagens I and IV, hyaluronic acid, heparin sulfate proteoglycans, fibronectin, and laminin. In addition, numerous growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, proteases, and protease inhibitors that are known to play a role in the wound-healing process were quantified in dHACM. Though matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were present in dHACM tissues, inhibitors of MMPs overwhelmingly outnumbered the MMP enzymes by an overall molar ratio of 28:1. Protease activity assays revealed that the MMPs in the tissue existed primarily either in their latent form or complexed with inhibitors. Innovation: This is the first study to characterize components that function in wound healing, including inhibitor and protease content and activity, in micronized dHACM. Conclusion: A variety of matrix components and growth factors, as well as proteases and their inhibitors, were identified in micronized dHACM, providing a better understanding of how micronized dHACM tissue can be used to effectively promote wound repair. PMID:28224047

  12. Silicon-based quantum dots induce inflammation in human lung cells and disrupt extracellular matrix homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Miruna-Silvia; Sima, Cornelia; Cinteza, Ludmila Otilia; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are nanocrystalline semiconductor materials that have been tested for biological applications such as cancer therapy, cellular imaging and drug delivery, despite the serious lack of information of their effects on mammalian cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of Si/SiO2 QDs to induce an inflammatory response in MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Cells were exposed to different concentrations of Si/SiO2 QDs (25-200 μg·mL(-1)) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. The results obtained showed that uptake of QDs was dependent on biocorona formation and the stability of nanoparticles in various biological media (minimum essential medium without or with 10% fetal bovine serum). The cell membrane damage indicated by the increase in lactate dehydrogenase release after exposure to QDs was dose- and time-dependent. The level of lysosomes increased proportionally with the concentration of QDs, whereas an accumulation of autophagosomes was also observed. Cellular morphology was affected, as shown by the disruption of actin filaments. The enhanced release of nitric oxide and the increase in interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 protein expression suggested that nanoparticles triggered an inflammatory response in MRC-5 cells. QDs decreased the protein expression and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and also MMP-1 caseinase activity, whereas the protein levels of MMP-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 increased. The present study reveals for the first time that silicon-based QDs are able to generate inflammation in lung cells and cause an imbalance in extracellular matrix turnover through a differential regulation of MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 protein expression.

  13. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  14. Human red blood cells deformed under thermal fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Ji-Jinn; Chan, Vincent; Feng, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2006-03-01

    The flow-induced mechanical deformation of a human red blood cell (RBC) during thermal transition between room temperature and 42.0 degrees C is interrogated by laser tweezer experiments. Based on the experimental geometry of the deformed RBC, the surface stresses are determined with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulation. It is found that the RBC is more deformable while heating through 37.0 degrees C to 42.0 degrees C, especially at a higher flow velocity due to a thermal-fluid effect. More importantly, the degree of RBC deformation is irreversible and becomes softer, and finally reaches a plateau (at a uniform flow velocity U > 60 microm s(-1)) after the heat treatment, which is similar to a strain-hardening dominated process. In addition, computational simulated stress is found to be dependent on the progression of thermotropic phase transition. Overall, the current study provides new insights into the highly coupled temperature and hydrodynamic effects on the biomechanical properties of human erythrocyte in a model hydrodynamic flow system.

  15. Drug delivery to the human brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howden, L.; Aroussi, A. [Univ. of Nottingham, School of Mechanical, Material, Manufacturing Engineering and Managements, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: eaxljh@nottingham.ac.uk; Vloeberghs, M. [Queens Medical Centre, Dept. of Child Health, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    This Study investigates the flow of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) inside the human ventricular system with particular emphasis on drug path flow for the purpose of medical drug injections. The investigation is conducted using the computational fluid dynamics package FLUENT. The role of the ventricular system is very important in protecting the brain from injury by cushioning it against the cranium during sudden movements. If for any reason the passage of CSF through the ventricular system is blocked (usually by stenosis) then a condition known as Hydrocephalus occurs, where by the blocked CSF causes the Intra Cranial Pressure (ICP) inside the brain to rise. If this is not treated then severe brain damage and death can occur. Previous work conducted by the authors on this subject has focused on the technique of ventriculostomy to treat hydrocephalus. The present study carries on from the previous work but focuses on delivering medical drugs to treat brain tumors that are conventionally not accessible and which require complicated surgical procedures to remove them. The study focuses on the possible paths for delivering drugs to tumors in the human nervous system through conventionally accessible locations without major surgery. The results of the investigation have shown that it is possible to reach over 95% of the ventricular system by injection of drugs however the results also show that there are many factors that can affect the drug flow paths through the ventricular system and thus the areas reachable, by these drugs. (author)

  16. Extracellular O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine: Its biology and relationship to human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsutaka; Ogawa; Koichi; Furukawa; Tetsuya; Okajima

    2014-01-01

    The O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine(O-GlcNAc)ylation of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins regulates basic cellular functions and is involved in the etiology of neurodegeneration and diabetes. Intracellular O-GlcNAcylation is catalyzed by a single O-GlcNAc transferase, O-GlcNAc transferase(OGT). Recently, an atypical O-GlcNAc transferase, extracellular O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine(EOGT), which is responsible for the modification of extracellular O-GlcNAc, was identified. Although both OGT and EOGT are regulated through the common hexosamine biosynthesis pathway, EOGT localizes to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and transfers GlcNAc to epidermal growth factor-like domains in an OGT-independent manner. In Drosophila, loss of Eogt gives phenotypes similar to those caused by defects in the apical extracellular matrix. Dumpy, a membrane-anchored apical extracellular matrix protein, was identified as a major O-GlcNAcylated protein, and EOGT mediates Dumpy-dependent cell adhesion. In mammals, extracellular O-GlcNAc was detected on extracellular proteins including heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2, Nell1, laminin subunit alpha-5, Pamr1, and transmembrane proteins, including Notch receptors. Although the physiological function of O-GlcNAc in mammals has not yet been elucidated, exome sequencing identified homozygous EOGT mutations in patients with Adams-Oliver syndrome, a rare congenital disorder characterized by aplasia cutis congenita and terminal transverse limb defects. This review summarizes the current knowledge of extracellular O-GlcNAc and its implications in the pathological processes in Adams-Oliver syndrome.

  17. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Pmuscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  18. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Pmuscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  19. α1-Adrenoceptor-mediated Ca2+-entry from the extracellular fluid and Ca2+-release from intracellular stores: No role for α(1A,B)-adrenoceptor subtypes in the pithed rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwietert, H.R.; Mathy, M.-J.; Wilhelm, D.; Wilffert, B.; Pfaffendorf, M.; Van Zwieten, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    1. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that in the pithed rat preparation two subtypes of the α1-adrenoceptor are linked to two different signal transduction mechanisms, both of which contribute to vasoconstriction, one facilitating Ca2+-entry from the extracellular fluid (α(1A)) and one

  20. Glutamine deficiency in extracellular fluid exerts adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2014-05-01

    Characteristic feature of critical illness, such as trauma and sepsis, is muscle wasting associated with activated oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine) and enhanced release of glutamine (GLN) to the blood. GLN consumption in visceral tissues frequently exceeds its release from muscle resulting in GLN deficiency that may exert adverse effects on the course of the disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of GLN depletion in extracellular fluid on GLN production and protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as a model of sepsis. After 24 h, soleus muscle (SOL, slow-twitch, red muscle) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch, white muscle) were isolated and incubated in a medium containing 0.5 mM GLN or without GLN. L-[1-(14)C]leucine was used to estimate protein synthesis and leucine oxidation, 3-methylhistidine release was used to evaluate myofibrillar protein breakdown. CLP increased GLN release from muscle, protein breakdown and leucine oxidation, and decreased protein synthesis. The effects were more pronounced in EDL. Alterations induced by laparotomy were similar to those observed in sepsis, but of a lower extent. GLN deficiency in medium enhanced GLN release and decreased intramuscular GLN concentration, decreased protein synthesis in muscles of intact and laparotomized rats, and enhanced leucine oxidation in SOL of intact and protein breakdown in SOL of laparotomized rats. It is concluded that (1) fast-twitch fibers are more sensitive to septic stimuli than slow-twitch fibers, (2) extracellular GLN deficiency may exert adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle, and (3) muscles of healthy and laparotomized animals are more sensitive to GLN deficiency than muscles of septic animals.

  1. Extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch impact human cardiac fibroblast responses to transforming growth factor beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Chris J; Phelan, Dermot; Collier, Patrick; Horgan, Stephen; Glezeva, Nadia; Cooke, Gordon; Xu, Maojia; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth; Baugh, John A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the impact of extracellular matrix sub-types and mechanical stretch on cardiac fibroblast activity is required to help unravel the pathophysiology of myocardial fibrotic diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate pro-fibrotic responses of primary human cardiac fibroblast cells exposed to different extracellular matrix components, including collagen sub-types I, III, IV, VI and laminin. The impact of mechanical cyclical stretch and treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) on collagen 1, collagen 3 and alpha smooth muscle actin mRNA expression on different matrices was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results revealed that all of the matrices studied not only affected the expression of pro-fibrotic genes in primary human cardiac fibroblast cells at rest but also affected their response to TGFβ1. In addition, differential cellular responses to mechanical cyclical stretch were observed depending on the type of matrix the cells were adhered to. These findings may give insight into the impact of selective pathological deposition of extracellular matrix proteins within different disease states and how these could impact the fibrotic environment.

  2. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Denis, M. Florencia; Alvarez, H. Ariel; Lauri, Natalia; Alvarez, Cora L.; Chara, Osvaldo; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7) triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs) the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe), interacting with P (purinergic) receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr), we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe. Methods and Treatments We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors. Results In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40–50% and swelling by 40–60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%. Analysis and Discussion Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop

  3. Regulation of extracellular ATP in human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora Lilia Alvarez

    Full Text Available In human erythrocytes (h-RBCs various stimuli induce increases in [cAMP] that trigger ATP release. The resulting pattern of extracellular ATP accumulation (ATPe kinetics depends on both ATP release and ATPe degradation by ectoATPase activity. In this study we evaluated ATPe kinetics from primary cultures of h-RBCs infected with P. falciparum at various stages of infection (ring, trophozoite and schizont stages. A "3V" mixture containing isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist, forskolin (adenylate kinase activator and papaverine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor was used to induce cAMP-dependent ATP release. ATPe kinetics of r-RBCs (ring-infected RBCs, t-RBCs (trophozoite-infected RBCs and s-RBCs (schizont-infected RBCs showed [ATPe] to peak acutely to a maximum value followed by a slower time dependent decrease. In all intraerythrocytic stages, values of ΔATP1 (difference between [ATPe] measured 1 min post-stimulus and basal [ATPe] increased nonlinearly with parasitemia (from 2 to 12.5%. Under 3V exposure, t-RBCs at parasitemia 94% (t94-RBCs showed 3.8-fold higher ΔATP1 values than in h-RBCs, indicative of upregulated ATP release. Pre-exposure to either 100 µM carbenoxolone, 100 nM mefloquine or 100 µM NPPB reduced ΔATP1 to 83-87% for h-RBCs and 63-74% for t94-RBCs. EctoATPase activity, assayed at both low nM concentrations (300-900 nM and 500 µM exogenous ATPe concentrations increased approx. 400-fold in t94-RBCs, as compared to h-RBCs, while intracellular ATP concentrations of t94-RBCs were 65% that of h-RBCs. In t94-RBCs, production of nitric oxide (NO was approx. 7-fold higher than in h-RBCs, and was partially inhibited by L-NAME pre-treatment. In media with L-NAME, ΔATP1 values were 2.7-times higher in h-RBCs and 4.2-times higher in t94-RBCs, than without L-NAME. Results suggest that P. falciparum infection of h-RBCs strongly activates ATP release via Pannexin 1 in these cells. Several processes partially counteracted ATPe accumulation: an

  4. Aerosolized human extracellular superoxide dismutase prevents hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ching Yen

    Full Text Available An important issue in critical care medicine is the identification of ways to protect the lungs from oxygen toxicity and reduce systemic oxidative stress in conditions requiring mechanical ventilation and high levels of oxygen. One way to prevent oxygen toxicity is to augment antioxidant enzyme activity in the respiratory system. The current study investigated the ability of aerosolized extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD to protect the lungs from hyperoxic injury. Recombinant human EC-SOD (rhEC-SOD was produced from a synthetic cassette constructed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Female CD-1 mice were exposed in hyperoxia (FiO2>95% to induce lung injury. The therapeutic effects of EC-SOD and copper-zinc SOD (CuZn-SOD via an aerosol delivery system for lung injury and systemic oxidative stress at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of hyperoxia were measured by bronchoalveolar lavage, wet/dry ratio, lung histology, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG in lung and liver tissues. After exposure to hyperoxia, the wet/dry weight ratio remained stable before day 2 but increased significantly after day 3. The levels of oxidative biomarker 8-oxo-dG in the lung and liver were significantly decreased on day 2 (P<0.01 but the marker in the liver increased abruptly after day 3 of hyperoxia when the mortality increased. Treatment with aerosolized rhEC-SOD increased the survival rate at day 3 under hyperoxia to 95.8%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (57.1%, albumin treated group (33.3%, and CuZn-SOD treated group (75%. The protective effects of EC-SOD against hyperoxia were further confirmed by reduced lung edema and systemic oxidative stress. Aerosolized EC-SOD protected mice against oxygen toxicity and reduced mortality in a hyperoxic model. The results encourage the use of an aerosol therapy with EC-SOD in intensive care units to reduce oxidative injury in patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, including

  5. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Florencia Leal Denis

    Full Text Available The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7 triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe, interacting with P (purinergic receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr, we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe.We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors.In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40-50% and swelling by 40-60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%.Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop underlying ATP-induced ATP release of rbcs.

  6. Interactions of human tenascin-X domains with dermal extracellular matrix molecules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egging, D.; Berkmortel, F. van den; Taylor, G.; Bristow, J.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2007-01-01

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is a large 450 kDa extracellular matrix protein expressed in a variety of tissues including skin, joints and blood vessels. Deficiency of TNX causes a recessive form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by joint hypermobility, skin fragility and hyperextensible skin. Skin of TNX

  7. Adding "hemodynamic and fluid leads" to the ECG. Part I: the electrical estimation of BNP, chronic heart failure (CHF) and extracellular fluid (ECF) accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabal, Falko; Pichler, Georg P; Gratze, Gerfried; Holler, Albert

    2014-07-01

    In primary care the diagnosis of CHF and ECF accumulation is no triviality. We aimed to predict plasma BNP, CHF and ECF accumulation with segmental impedance spectroscopy while using and extending the electrodes of the conventional electrocardiography. Three combined multiple electrodes were added to the 15 lead ECG for segmental impedance spectroscopy and for measuring the maximal rate of segmental fluid volume change with heart action at the thorax and the legs. The obtained signals were analyzed by partial correlation analyses in comparison with plasma BNP, CHF classes, ejection fraction by echocardiography and cardiac index by double gas re-breathing. 119 subjects (34 healthy volunteers, 50 patients with CHF, NYHA classes II to IV and 35 patients without CHF) were investigated. The maximal rate of volume change with heart action at the thorax and at the legs, as well as the ECF/ICF ratio at the legs contribute equally and independently to the prediction of BNP and heart failure in an unknown test sample of 49 patients (multiple r=0.88, p400 pg/ml gave an AUC=0.93. The absence or the presence of heart failure could be predicted correctly by a binomial logistic regression in 92.9 and 87.5% of cases, respectively. The methodology, which is based on inverse coupling of BNP release and of maximal blood acceleration and on sensitive detection of ECF overload, could enable the diagnosis of CHF with useful sensitivity and specificity while writing a routine-ECG. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluids in human bodies and biomineralization – parallels to global water resources and reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skinner, H. Catherine W.; King, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The amount of surface freshwaters on Earth is remarkably small considering the human population needing drinking water to survive and to ensure water in their bodies is at that very important locale where cells operate, the transcellular fluid. Like the fluid in and on the planet, body fluid is

  9. Fluids in human bodies and biomineralization – parallels to global water resources and reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skinner, H. Catherine W.; King, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The amount of surface freshwaters on Earth is remarkably small considering the human population needing drinking water to survive and to ensure water in their bodies is at that very important locale where cells operate, the transcellular fluid. Like the fluid in and on the planet, body fluid is high

  10. Extracellular vesicles in blood, milk and body fluids of the female and male urogenital tract and with special regard to reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B P; Balassa, T; Benen, T D; Dominovic, M; Elmadjian, G K; Florova, V; Fransolet, M D; Kestlerova, A; Kmiecik, G; Kostadinova, I A; Kyvelidou, C; Meggyes, M; Mincheva, M N; Moro, L; Pastuschek, J; Spoldi, V; Wandernoth, P; Weber, M; Toth, B; Markert, U R

    2016-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released from almost all cells and tissues. They are able to transport substances (e.g. proteins, RNA or DNA) at higher concentrations than in their environment and may adhere in a receptor-controlled manner to specific cells or tissues in order to release their content into the respective target structure. Blood contains high concentrations of EVs mainly derived from platelets, and, at a smaller amount, from erythrocytes. The female and male reproductive tracts produce EVs which may be associated with fertility or infertility and are released into body fluids and mucosas of the urogenital organs. In this review, the currently relevant detection methods are presented and critically compared. During pregnancy, placenta-derived EVs are dynamically detectable in peripheral blood with changing profiles depending upon progress of pregnancy and different pregnancy-associated pathologies, such as preeclampsia. EVs offer novel non-invasive diagnostic tools which may reflect the situation of the placenta and the foetus. EVs in urine have the potential of reflecting urogenital diseases including cancers of the neighbouring organs. Several methods for detection, quantification and phenotyping of EVs have been established, which include electron microscopy, flow cytometry, ELISA-like methods, Western blotting and analyses based on Brownian motion. This review article summarises the current knowledge about EVs in blood and cord blood, in the different compartments of the male and female reproductive tracts, in trophoblast cells from normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies, in placenta ex vivo perfusate, in the amniotic fluid, and in breast milk, as well as their potential effects on natural killer cells as possible targets.

  11. The Human Pancreas as a Source of Protolerogenic Extracellular Matrix Scaffold for a New-generation Bioartificial Endocrine Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Andrea; Urbani, Luca; Cravedi, Paolo; Katari, Ravi; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fallas, Mario Enrique Alvarez; Sordi, Valeria; Citro, Antonio; Purroy, Carolina; Niu, Guoguang; McQuilling, John P; Sittadjody, Sivanandane; Farney, Alan C; Iskandar, Samy S; Zambon, Joao P; Rogers, Jeffrey; Stratta, Robert J; Opara, Emmanuel C; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Furdui, Cristina M; Soker, Shay; De Coppi, Paolo; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Our study aims at producing acellular extracellular matrix scaffolds from the human pancreas (hpaECMs) as a first critical step toward the production of a new-generation, fully human-derived bioartificial endocrine pancreas. In this bioartificial endocrine pancreas, the hardware will be represented by hpaECMs, whereas the software will consist in the cellular compartment generated from patient's own cells. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-based scaffolds obtained through the decellularization of native organs have become the favored platform in the field of complex organ bioengineering. However, the paradigm is now switching from the porcine to the human model. To achieve our goal, human pancreata were decellularized with Triton-based solution and thoroughly characterized. Primary endpoints were complete cell and DNA clearance, preservation of ECM components, growth factors and stiffness, ability to induce angiogenesis, conservation of the framework of the innate vasculature, and immunogenicity. Secondary endpoint was hpaECMs' ability to sustain growth and function of human islet and human primary pancreatic endothelial cells. Results show that hpaECMs can be successfully and consistently produced from human pancreata and maintain their innate molecular and spatial framework and stiffness, and vital growth factors. Importantly, hpaECMs inhibit human naïve CD4 T-cell expansion in response to polyclonal stimuli by inducing their apoptosis and promoting their conversion into regulatory T cells. hpaECMs are cytocompatible and supportive of representative pancreatic cell types. We, therefore, conclude that hpaECMs has the potential to become an ideal platform for investigations aiming at the manufacturing of a regenerative medicine-inspired bioartificial endocrine pancreas.

  12. Protein pathways working in human follicular fluid: the future for tailored IVF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Laura; Gagliardi, Assunta; Landi, Claudia; Focarelli, Riccardo; De Leo, Vincenzo; Luddi, Alice; Bini, Luca; Piomboni, Paola

    2016-05-06

    The human follicular fluid (HFF) contains molecules and proteins that may affect follicle growth, oocyte maturation and competence acquiring. Despite the numerous studies, an integrated broad overview on biomolecular and patho/physiological processes that are proved or supposed to take place in HFF during folliculogenesis and oocyte development is still missing. In this review we report, for the first time, all the proteins unambiguously detected in HFF and, applying DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) and MetaCore bioinformatic resources, we shed new lights on their functional correlation, delineating protein patterns and pathways with reasonable potentialities for oocyte quality estimation in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) programs. Performing a rigorous PubMed search, we redacted a list of 617 unique proteins unambiguously-annotated as HFF components. Their functional processing suggested the occurrence in HFF of a tight and highly dynamic functional-network, which is balanced by specific effectors, primarily involved in extracellular matrix degradation and remodelling, inflammation and coagulation. Metalloproteinases, thrombin and vitamin-D-receptor/retinoid-X-receptor-alpha resulted as the main key factors in the nets and their differential activity may be indicative of ovarian health and oocyte quality. Despite future accurate clinical investigations are absolutely needed, the present analysis may provide a starting point for more accurate oocyte quality estimation and for defining personalised therapies in reproductive medicine.

  13. Adaptation of group A Streptococcus to human amniotic fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Sitkiewicz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For more than 100 years, group A Streptococcus has been identified as a cause of severe and, in many cases, fatal infections of the female urogenital tract. Due to advances in hospital hygiene and the advent of antibiotics, this type of infection has been virtually eradicated. However, within the last three decades there has been an increase in severe intra- and post-partum infections attributed to GAS. METHODOLOGY: We hypothesized that GAS alters its transcriptome to survive in human amniotic fluid (AF and cause disease. To identify genes that were up or down regulated in response to growth in AF, GAS was grown in human AF or standard laboratory media (THY and samples for expression microarray analysis were collected during mid-logarithmic, late-logarithmic, and stationary growth phases. Microarray analysis was performed using a custom Affymetrix chip and normalized hybridization values derived from three biological replicates were collected at each growth point. Ratios of AF/THY above a 2-fold change and P-value <0.05 were considered significant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The majority of changes in the GAS transcriptome involved down regulation of multiple adhesins and virulence factors and activation of the stress response. We observed significant changes in genes involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and in the nucleotide de novo synthesis pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work provides new insight into how pathogenic bacteria respond to their environment to establish infection and cause disease.

  14. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  15. Multifunctional liposomes interact with Abeta in human biological fluids: Therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Elisa; Gregori, Maria; Radice, Isabella; Da Re, Fulvio; Grana, Denise; Re, Francesca; Salvati, Elisa; Masserini, Massimo; Ferrarese, Carlo; Zoia, Chiara Paola; Tremolizzo, Lucio

    2017-02-23

    The accumulation of extracellular amyloid beta (Abeta42) both in brain and in cerebral vessels characterizes Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Recently, the possibility to functionalize nanoparticles (NPs) surface with Abeta42 binding molecules, making them suitable tools for reducing Abeta42 burden has been shown effective in models of AD. Aim of this work consisted in proving that NPs might be effective in sequestering Abeta42 in biological fluids, such as CSF and plasma. This demonstration is extremely important considering that these Abeta42 pools are in continuum with the brain parenchyma with drainage of Abeta from interstitial brain tissue to blood vessel and plasma. In this work, liposomes (LIP) were functionalized as previously shown in order to promote high-affinity Abeta binding, i.e., either with, phosphatidic acid (PA), or a modified Apolipoprotein E-derived peptide (mApo), or with a curcumin derivative (TREG); Abeta42 levels were determined by ELISA in CSF and plasma samples. mApo-PA-LIP (25 and 250 μM) mildly albeit significantly sequestered Abeta42 proteins in CSF samples obtained from healthy subjects (p < 0.01). Analogously a significant binding (∼20%) of Abeta42 (p < 0.001) was demonstrated following exposure to all functionalized liposomes in plasma samples obtained from selected AD or Down's syndrome patients expressing high levels of Abeta42. The same results were obtained by quantifying Abeta42 content after removal of liposome-bound Abeta by using gel filtration chromatography or ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. In conclusion, we demonstrate that functionalized liposomes significantly sequester Abeta42 in human biological fluids. These data may be critical for future in vivo administration tests using NPs for promoting sink effect.

  16. The role of amniotic fluid in force transfer during human birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Alexa; Lehn, Andrea; Leftwich, Megan

    2013-11-01

    This study seeks to understand the fundamental fluid dynamic processes involved in human birth. We begin by examining the importance of amniotic fluid. This is done using two experimental techniques that approximate the laboring human uterus to different degrees of anatomical correctness. The first, in which a latex uterus is filled with fluid and a solid fetus is extracted, investigates the importance of both amniotic fluid properties and fetal position in the force required to remove a fetus. The second experiment simplifies the geometry of birth even more. In this case, a solid cylindrical rod is pulled through a highly flexible outer tube. The force to pull the inner cylinder as a function of the gap fluid properties is measured. By carefully controlling the fluid properties of the experiment, the study will provide further insight into the roles of amniotic fluid in human birth.

  17. Histochemical evidence of osteoclastic degradation of extracellular matrix in osteolytic metastasis originating from human lung small carcinoma (SBC-5) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio; Takeuchi, Kiichi; Freitas, Paulo H L; Kawano, Yoshiro; Hoshino, Masaaki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of osteoclast migration and the degradation of unmineralized extracellular matrix in an osteolytic metastasis by examining a well-standardized lung cancer metastasis model of nude mice. SBC-5 human lung small carcinoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of 6-week-old BALB/c nu/nu mice under anesthesia. At 25-30 days after injection, the animals were sacrificed and their femora and/or tibiae were removed for histochemical analyses. Metastatic lesions were shown to occupy a considerable area extending from the metaphyses to the bone marrow region. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive osteoclasts were found in association with an alkaline phosphatase (ALPase)-positive osteoblastic layer lining the bone surface, but could also be localized in the ALPase-negative stromal tissues that border the tumor nodules. These stromal tissues were markedly positive for osteopontin, and contained a significant number of TRAPase-positive osteoclasts expressing immunoreactivity for CD44. We thus speculated that, mediating its affinity for CD44, osteopontin may serve to facilitate osteoclastic migration after their formation associated with ALPase-positive osteoblasts. We next examined the localization of cathepsin K and matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) in osteoclasts. Osteoclasts adjacent to the bone surfaces were positive for both proteins, whereas those in the stromal tissues in the tumor nests showed only MMP-9 immunoreactivity. Immunoelectron microscopy disclosed the presence of MMP-9 in the Golgi apparatus and in vesicular structures at the baso-lateral cytoplasmic region of the osteoclasts found in the stromal tissue. MMP-9-positive vesicular structures also contained fragmented extracellular materials. Thus, osteoclasts appear to either select an optimized function, namely secreting proteolytic enzymes from ruffled borders during bone resorption, or recognize the surrounding extracellular

  18. Do alterations in follicular fluid proteases contribute to human infertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookingham, Lisa Marii; Van Voorhis, Bradley J; Ascoli, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are known to play critical roles in follicular rupture, ovulation, and fertility in mice. Similar studies in humans are limited; however, both are known to increase during the periovulatory period. No studies have examined either protease in the follicular fluid of women with unexplained infertility or infertility related to advanced maternal age (AMA). We sought to determine if alterations in cathepsin L and/or ADAMTS-1 existed in these infertile populations. Patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) for unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility were prospectively recruited for the study; patients with tubal or male factor infertility were recruited as controls. Follicular fluid was collected to determine gene expression (via quantitative polymerase chain reaction), enzyme concentrations (via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), and enzymatic activities (via fluorogenic enzyme cleavage assay or Western blot analysis) of cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1. The analysis included a total of 42 patients (14 per group). We found no statistically significant difference in gene expression, enzyme concentration, or enzymatic activity of cathepsin L or ADAMTS-1 in unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility as compared to controls. We also found no statistically significant difference in expression or concentration with advancing age. Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are not altered in women with unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility undergoing IVF, and they do not decline with advancing age. It is possible that differences exist in natural cycles, contributing to infertility; however, our findings do not support a role for protease alterations as a common cause of infertility.

  19. Importance of the Extracellular Loop 4 in the Human Serotonin Transporter for Inhibitor Binding and Substrate Translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Wilson, Pamela; Kristensen, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    is connected to both sides of the membrane by permeation pathways, of which only one is accessible at a time. The coordinated conformational changes in SERT associated with substrate translocation are not fully understood. Here, we have identified a Leu to Glu mutation at position 406 (L406E......) in the extracellular loop 4 (EL4) of human SERT, which induced a remarkable gain-of-potency (up to >40-fold) for a range of SERT inhibitors. The effects were highly specific for L406E relative to six other mutations in the same position, including the closely related L406D mutation, showing that the effects induced...

  20. Extracellular creatine regulates creatine transport in rat and human muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Muscle cells do not synthesize creatine; they take up exogenous creatine by specific Na+-dependent plasma membrane transporters. We found that extracellular creatine regulates the level of expression of these creatine transporters in L6 rat muscle cells. L6 myoblasts maintained for 24 hr in medium containing 1 mM creatine exhibited 1/3rd of the creatine transport activity of cells maintained for 24 hr in medium without creatine. Down-regulation of creatine transport was partially reversed whe...

  1. Sphingolipids in human synovial fluid--a lipidomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Krystyna Kosinska

    Full Text Available Articular synovial fluid (SF is a complex mixture of components that regulate nutrition, communication, shock absorption, and lubrication. Alterations in its composition can be pathogenic. This lipidomic investigation aims to quantify the composition of sphingolipids (sphingomyelins, ceramides, and hexosyl- and dihexosylceramides and minor glycerophospholipid species, including (lysophosphatidic acid, (lysophosphatidylglycerol, and bis(monoacylglycerophosphate species, in the SF of knee joints from unaffected controls and from patients with early (eOA and late (lOA stages of osteoarthritis (OA, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. SF without cells and cellular debris from 9 postmortem donors (control, 18 RA, 17 eOA, and 13 lOA patients were extracted to measure lipid species using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry--directly or coupled with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. We provide a novel, detailed overview of sphingolipid and minor glycerophospholipid species in human SF. A total of 41, 48, and 50 lipid species were significantly increased in eOA, lOA, and RA SF, respectively when compared with normal SF. The level of 21 lipid species differed in eOA SF versus SF from lOA, an observation that can be used to develop biomarkers. Sphingolipids can alter synovial inflammation and the repair responses of damaged joints. Thus, our lipidomic study provides the foundation for studying the biosynthesis and function of lipid species in health and most prevalent joint diseases.

  2. Establishing the proteome of normal human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the entire protein content, the proteome, of normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF would enable insights into neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Until now technologic hurdles and access to true normal samples hindered attaining this goal. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity and resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine CSF from healthy normal individuals. 2630 proteins in CSF from normal subjects were identified, of which 56% were CSF-specific, not found in the much larger set of 3654 proteins we have identified in plasma. We also examined CSF from groups of subjects previously examined by others as surrogates for normals where neurologic symptoms warranted a lumbar puncture but where clinical laboratory were reported as normal. We found statistically significant differences between their CSF proteins and our non-neurological normals. We also examined CSF from 10 volunteer subjects who had lumbar punctures at least 4 weeks apart and found that there was little variability in CSF proteins in an individual as compared to subject to subject. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent the most comprehensive characterization of true normal CSF to date. This normal CSF proteome establishes a comparative standard and basis for investigations into a variety of diseases with neurological and psychiatric features.

  3. Excipient-mediated supersaturation stabilization in human intestinal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevernage, Jan; Forier, Thomas; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2011-04-04

    It was the purpose of this study to investigate excipient-mediated precipitation inhibition upon induction of supersaturation of poorly water-soluble drugs in aspirated human intestinal fluids (HIF) representing both the fasted and fed state. Etravirine, ritonavir, loviride, danazol and fenofibrate were selected as model compounds. For comparative purposes, precipitation inhibition was also evaluated in simple aqueous buffer, and in intestinal simulation media representative for the fasted and fed state (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively). Supersaturation was induced in the test media containing predissolved excipient (HPMC-AS, HPMC-E5, HPMC-E50, HPMC-E4M, HPMC-P and PVP) at a defined degree of supersaturation (DS = 20) using the solvent shift method. The results illustrate that cellulosic polymers can reduce the precipitation rate and stabilize supersaturation in HIF. The extent of stabilization was compound and excipient dependent but independent of the nutritional state. Whenever excipient effects were observed, the predictive value of simple buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF was rather limited. In general, excipient-mediated precipitation inhibition was less pronounced in HIF compared to simple aqueous buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF. However, excipients showing no effect in simple aqueous buffer or FaSSIF/FeSSIF also proved to be ineffective in HIF, indicating the value of these simulation media in the elimination of excipients during formulation development.

  4. Human cervicovaginal fluid biomarkers to predict term and preterm labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Yujing J.; Liong, Stella; Permezel, Michael; Rice, Gregory E.; Di Quinzio, Megan K. W.; Georgiou, Harry M.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB; birth before 37 completed weeks of gestation) remains the major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The current generation of biomarkers predictive of PTB have limited utility. In pregnancy, the human cervicovaginal fluid (CVF) proteome is a reflection of the local biochemical milieu and is influenced by the physical changes occurring in the vagina, cervix and adjacent overlying fetal membranes. Term and preterm labor (PTL) share common pathways of cervical ripening, myometrial activation and fetal membranes rupture leading to birth. We therefore hypothesize that CVF biomarkers predictive of labor may be similar in both the term and preterm labor setting. In this review, we summarize some of the existing published literature as well as our team's breadth of work utilizing the CVF for the discovery and validation of putative CVF biomarkers predictive of human labor. Our team established an efficient method for collecting serial CVF samples for optimal 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolution and analysis. We first embarked on CVF biomarker discovery for the prediction of spontaneous onset of term labor using 2D-electrophoresis and solution array multiple analyte profiling. 2D-electrophoretic analyses were subsequently performed on CVF samples associated with PTB. Several proteins have been successfully validated and demonstrate that these biomarkers are associated with term and PTL and may be predictive of both term and PTL. In addition, the measurement of these putative biomarkers was found to be robust to the influences of vaginal microflora and/or semen. The future development of a multiple biomarker bed-side test would help improve the prediction of PTB and the clinical management of patients. PMID:26029118

  5. Altered expression of mitochondrial and extracellular matrix genes in the heart of human fetuses with chromosome 21 trisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olla Carlo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Down syndrome phenotype has been attributed to overexpression of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 genes. However, the expression profile of Hsa21 genes in trisomic human subjects as well as their effects on genes located on different chromosomes are largely unknown. Using oligonucleotide microarrays we compared the gene expression profiles of hearts of human fetuses with and without Hsa21 trisomy. Results Approximately half of the 15,000 genes examined (87 of the 168 genes on Hsa21 were expressed in the heart at 18–22 weeks of gestation. Hsa21 gene expression was globally upregulated 1.5 fold in trisomic samples. However, not all genes were equally dysregulated and 25 genes were not upregulated at all. Genes located on other chromosomes were also significantly dysregulated. Functional class scoring and gene set enrichment analyses of 473 genes, differentially expressed between trisomic and non-trisomic hearts, revealed downregulation of genes encoding mitochondrial enzymes and upregulation of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins. There were no significant differences between trisomic fetuses with and without heart defects. Conclusion We conclude that dosage-dependent upregulation of Hsa21 genes causes dysregulation of the genes responsible for mitochondrial function and for the extracellular matrix organization in the fetal heart of trisomic subjects. These alterations might be harbingers of the heart defects associated with Hsa21 trisomy, which could be based on elusive mechanisms involving genetic variability, environmental factors and/or stochastic events.

  6. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu, E-mail: tamotsui@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  7. Characteristics of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells and their tropism to human ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liru Li

    Full Text Available The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs derived from amniotic fluid (AF have become an attractive stem cells source for cell-based therapy because they can be harvested at low cost and avoid ethical disputes. In human research, stem cells derived from AF gradually became a hot research direction for disease treatment, specifically for their plasticity, their reduced immunogenicity and their tumor tropism regardless of the tumor size, location and source. Our work aimed to obtain and characterize human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs and detect their ovarian cancer tropsim in nude mice model. Ten milliliters of twenty independent amniotic fluid samples were collected from 16-20 week pregnant women who underwent amniocentesis for fetal genetic determination in routine prenatal diagnosis in the first affiliated hospital of Harbin medical university. We successfully isolated the AFMSCs from thirteen of twenty amniotic fluid samples. AFMSCs presented a fibroblastic-like morphology during the culture. Flow cytometry analyses showed that the cells were positive for specific stem cell markers CD73,CD90, CD105, CD166 and HLA-ABC (MHC class I, but negative for CD 45,CD40, CD34, CD14 and HLA-DR (MHC class II. RT-PCR results showed that the AFMSCs expressed stem cell marker OCT4. AFMSCs could differentiate into bone cells, fat cells and chondrocytes under certain conditions. AFMSCs had the high motility to migrate to ovarian cancer site but didn't have the tumorigenicity. This study enhances the possibility of AFMSCs as drug carrier in human cell-based therapy. Meanwhile, the research emphasis in the future can also put in targeting therapy of ovarian cancer.

  8. IgA Complexes in Plasma and Synovial Fluid of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Induce Neutrophil Extracellular Traps via FcαRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyd, Esil; Al, Marjon; Tuk, Cornelis W; van der Laken, Conny J; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2016-12-15

    Autoantibodies, including rheumatoid factor (RF), are an important characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interestingly, several studies reported a correlation between the presence of IgA autoantibodies and worse disease course. We demonstrated previously that triggering the IgA Fc receptor (FcαRI) on neutrophils results in neutrophil recruitment and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Because this can lead to tissue damage, we investigated whether IgA immune complexes in plasma and synovial fluid of RA patients activate neutrophils. RF isotypes were measured with ELISA, and immune complexes were precipitated using polyethylene glycol 6000. Isolated neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes, and activation and release of NETs were determined in the presence or absence of FcαRI-blocking Abs. Plasma and SF of RA patients contained IgM, IgG, and IgA RFs. Patient plasma IgA RF and IgM RF showed a strong correlation. No uptake of IgM and minimal endocytosis of IgG immune complexes by neutrophils was observed, in contrast to avid uptake of IgA complexes. Incubation of neutrophils with immune complexes resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species, as well as the release of NETs, lactoferrin, and chemotactic stimuli. Importantly, activation of neutrophils was reduced when FcαRI was blocked. Neutrophils were activated by IgA immune complexes, which suggests that neutrophils play a role in inducing joint damage in RA patients who have IgA autoantibody complexes, thereby increasing the severity of disease. Blocking FcαRI inhibited neutrophil activation and, as such, may represent an additional attractive novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RA.

  9. Integrin-mediated interactions with extracellular matrix proteins for nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgen, D T; Gilchrist, C L; Richardson, W J; Isaacs, R E; Brown, C R; Yang, K L; Chen, J; Setton, L A

    2013-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the human intervertebral disc is rich in molecules that interact with cells through integrin-mediated attachments. Porcine nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have been shown to interact with laminin (LM) isoforms LM-111 and LM-511 through select integrins that regulate biosynthesis and cell attachment. Since human NP cells lose many phenotypic characteristics with age, attachment and interaction with the ECM may be altered. Expression of LM-binding integrins was quantified for human NP cells using flow cytometry. The cell-ECM attachment mechanism was determined by quantifying cell attachment to LM-111, LM-511, or type II collagen after functionally blocking specific integrin subunits. Human NP cells express integrins β1, α3, and α5, with over 70% of cells positive for each subunit. Blocking subunit β1 inhibited NP cell attachment to all substrates. Blocking subunits α1, α2, α3, and α5 simultaneously, but not individually, inhibits NP cell attachment to laminins. While integrin α6β1 mediated porcine NP cell attachment to LM-111, we found integrins α3, α5, and β1 instead contributed to human NP cell attachment. These findings identify integrin subunits that may mediate interactions with the ECM for human NP cells and could be used to promote cell attachment, survival, and biosynthesis in cell-based therapeutics.

  10. Phthalates and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid in human amniotic fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Søndergaard; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Toft, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    Measures of prenatal environmental exposures are important, and amniotic fluid levels may directly reflect fetal exposures during hypothesized windows of vulnerability.......Measures of prenatal environmental exposures are important, and amniotic fluid levels may directly reflect fetal exposures during hypothesized windows of vulnerability....

  11. Large-scale isolation and cytotoxicity of extracellular vesicles derived from activated human natural killer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Ambrose Y.; Wu, Chun-Hua; Li, Jingbo; Sun, Jianping; Fabbri, Muller; Wayne, Alan S.; Seeger, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been the focus of great interest, as they appear to be involved in numerous important cellular processes. They deliver bioactive macromolecules such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, allowing intercellular communication in multicellular organisms. EVs are secreted by all cell types, including immune cells such as natural killer cells (NK), and they may play important roles in the immune system. Currently, a large-scale procedure to obtain functional NK EVs is lacking, limiting their use clinically. In this report, we present a simple, robust, and cost-effective method to isolate a large quantity of NK EVs. After propagating and activating NK cells ex vivo and then incubating them in exosome-free medium for 48 h, EVs were isolated using a polymer precipitation method. The isolated vesicles contain the tetraspanin CD63, an EV marker, and associated proteins (fibronectin), but are devoid of cytochrome C, a cytoplasmic marker. Nanoparticle tracking analysis showed a size distribution between 100 and 200 nm while transmission electron microscopy imaging displayed vesicles with an oval shape and comparable sizes, fulfilling the definition of EV. Importantly, isolated EV fractions were cytotoxic against cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate for the first time that isolated activated NK (aNK) cell EVs contain the cytotoxic proteins perforin, granulysin, and granzymes A and B, incorporated from the aNK cells. Activation of caspase -3, -7 and -9 was detected in cancer cells incubated with aNK EVs, and caspase inhibitors blocked aNK EV-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that aNK EVs activate caspase pathways in target cells. The ability to isolate functional aNK EVs on a large scale may lead to new clinical applications. Abbreviations: NK: natural killer cells; activated NK (aNK) cells; EVs: extracellular vesicles; ALL: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; aAPC: artificial antigen-presenting cell; TEM: transmission

  12. PRDM14 Promotes the Migration of Human Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Through Extracellular Matrix Degradation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Bi; Han-Bing Shi; Ting Zhang; Ge Cui

    2015-01-01

    Background:As a novel molecular markerof non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC),PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing protein 14 (PRDM 14) is over-expressed in NSCLC tumor tissues.Extracellular matrix degradation mediated by the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) is one of the most important mechanism in lung cancer metastasis.This study aimed to determine if PRDM 14 promoted the migration of NSCLC cells through extracellular matrix degradation mediated by change of MMP/TIMP expression.Methods:The expression of PRDM14 was down-regulated in human cell line A 549 after transfection with lentiviral vector-mediated short-hairpin ribonucleic acids (shRNAs) which targeted the PRDM 14 promoter.Cellular migration ofshRNA-infected cells was detected by a scratch wound healing assay and transwell cell migration assay.Expression levels of MMP1,MMP2,TIMP1,and TIMP2 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results:Migration ofPRDM 14-shRNA-infected cells was significantly inhibited relative to control cells as measured by the scratch wound healing (P < 0.05) and transwell cell migration assays (P < 0.01).The expression of MMP1 in A549 cells infected by PRDM14-shRNA was down-regulated significantly (P < 0.01),whereas the expression of TIMPl and TIMP2 was up-regulated significantly (P < 0.01).Conclusions:PRDM 14 accelerates A549 cells migration in vitro through extracellular matrix degradation.PRDM 14 is considered as a potential therapeutic target in metastatic NSCLC.

  13. Induction of interleukin-8 by Naegleria fowleri lysates requires activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in human astroglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Daeho; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba which causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental animals. To investigate the mechanisms of such inflammatory diseases, potential chemokine gene activation in human astroglial cells was investigated following treatment with N. fowleri lysates. We demonstrated that N. fowleri are potent inducers for the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) genes in human astroglial cells which was preceded by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In addition, N. fowleri lysates induces the DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1), an important transcription factor for IL-8 induction. The specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK inhibitor, U0126, blocks N. fowleri-mediated AP-1 activation and subsequent IL-8 induction. N. fowleri-induced IL-8 expression requires activation of ERK in human astroglial cells. These findings indicate that treatment of N. fowleri on human astroglial cells leads to the activation of AP-1 and subsequent expression of IL-8 which are dependent on ERK activation. These results may help understand the N. fowleri-mediated upregulation of chemokine and cytokine expression in the astroglial cells.

  14. Light and electron microscopic study of epithelial cells from the human oviduct and uterus subcultured on extracellular matrix gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Ashtiani, Saeed Kazemi; Eftekhari-Yazdi, Poopak

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the structure of epithelial cells from the human oviduct and uterus on extracellular matrix (ECM) gel in the first passage. Human oviducts and endometrial tissues were obtained from patients undergoing total hysterectomy; the epithelial cells, having been isolated by enzyme digestion, were cultured on polystyrene plastic surfaces. The epithelial nature of the cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, and their morphology was examined by microscopy. Cells of an epithelial nature were then trypsinized and cultured on an ECM gel-coated filter insert for 5 days. The cells, in parallel with the tissues, were subsequently prepared for transmission electron microscopy. Plastic-cultured cells had no sign of differentiation and appeared as elongated spindle cells in sections. These cells looked columnar and highly polarized after being cultured on ECM gel surfaces. They were similar to epithelial cells from the corresponding tissue fragment. Cultured on ECM gel, the ciliated epithelial cells of human oviducts appeared ultrastructurally similar to glandular cells from the human uterus. Cilia did not form under culture conditions. It seems that human uterine and oviduct epithelial cells can acquire polarized morphology and differentiated states on ECM gel after having lost it on plastic surfaces and that ECM gel by itself is not enough to induce cilia formation in culture.

  15. Human amniotic fluid derived cells can competently substitute dermal fibroblasts in a tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; Hosper, Nynke; Luginbuehl, Joachim; Biedermann, Thomas; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin

    Human amniotic fluid comprises cells with high differentiation capacity, thus representing a potential cell source for skin tissue engineering. In this experimental study, we investigated the ability of human amniotic fluid derived cells to substitute dermal fibroblasts and support epidermis

  16. Nature of extracellular signal that triggers RhoA/ROCK activation for the basal internal anal sphincter tone in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Phillips, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    The extracellular signal that triggers activation of rho-associated kinase (RhoA/ROCK), the major molecular determinant of basal internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone, is not known. Using human IAS tissues, we identified the presence of the biosynthetic machineries for angiotensin II (ANG II), thromboxane A2 (TXA2), and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α). These end products of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (ANG II) and arachidonic acid (TXA2 and PGF2α) pathways and their effects in human IAS vs. rectal smooth muscle (RSM) were studied. A multipronged approach utilizing immunocytochemistry, Western blot analyses, and force measurements was implemented. Additionally, in a systematic analysis of the effects of respective inhibitors along different steps of biosynthesis and those of antagonists, their end products were evaluated either individually or in combination. To further describe the molecular mechanism for the IAS tone via these pathways, we monitored RhoA/ROCK activation and its signal transduction cascade. Data showed characteristically higher expression of biosynthetic machineries of RAS and AA pathways in the IAS compared with the RSM. Additionally, specific inhibition of the arachidonic acid (AA) pathway caused ~80% decrease in the IAS tone, whereas that of RAS lead to ~20% decrease. Signal transduction studies revealed that the end products of both AA and RAS pathways cause increase in the IAS tone via activation of RhoA/ROCK. Both AA and RAS (via the release of their end products TXA2, PGF2α, and ANG II, respectively), provide extracellular signals which activate RhoA/ROCK for the maintenance of the basal tone in human IAS.

  17. Human amniotic fluid: a source of stem cells for possible therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadosz, Margaret; Basch, Ross S; Young, Bruce K

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells with the capacity for differentiation. Amniotic fluid cells have emerged only recently as a possible source of stem cells for clinical purposes. There are no ethical or sampling constraints for the use of amniocentesis as a standard clinical procedure for obtaining an abundant supply of amniotic fluid cells. Amniotic fluid cells of human origin proliferate rapidly and are multipotent with the potential for expansion in vitro to multiple cell lines. Tissue engineering technologies that use amniotic fluid cells are being explored. Amniotic fluid cells may be of clinical benefit for fetal therapies, degenerative disease, and regenerative medicine applications. We present a comprehensive review of the evolution of human amniotic fluid cells as a possible modality for therapeutic use.

  18. Current Applications of Chromatographic Methods in the Study of Human Body Fluids for Diagnosing Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwik, Jagoda; Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, analysis of various human body fluids is one of the most essential and promising approaches to enable the discovery of biomarkers or pathophysiological mechanisms for disorders and diseases. Analysis of these fluids is challenging due to their complex composition and unique characteristics. Development of new analytical methods in this field has made it possible to analyze body fluids with higher selectivity, sensitivity, and precision. The composition and concentration of analytes in body fluids are most often determined by chromatography-based techniques. There is no doubt that proper use of knowledge that comes from a better understanding of the role of body fluids requires the cooperation of scientists of diverse specializations, including analytical chemists, biologists, and physicians. This article summarizes current knowledge about the application of different chromatographic methods in analyses of a wide range of compounds in human body fluids in order to diagnose certain diseases and disorders.

  19. Extracellular matrix elasticity modulates TGF-β-induced p38 activation and myofibroblast transdifferentiation in human tenon fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-ter-Vehn, Tobias; Han, Hong; Grehn, Franz; Schlunck, Günther

    2011-11-25

    Extracellular matrix and the cytokine TGF-β influence scar formation in an interdependent fashion. In this study, the impact of extracellular matrix elasticity on TGF-β-induced signal transduction and myofibroblast transdifferentiation was examined. Primary human tenon fibroblasts were seeded on collagen-coated glass coverslips (rigid environment) or collagen or polyacrylamide gels (elastic environment) of different compliance and stimulated with TGF-β. Myofibroblast transdifferentiation was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blot analysis for the marker gene α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and SMA incorporation into stress fibers was determined by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. CTGF transcription was assessed by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were examined by Western blot using phosphospecific antibodies and by immunofluorescence microscopy. TGF-β-dependent myofibroblast transdifferentiation was enhanced in a stiff environment. Increasing matrix elasticity attenuated TGF-β-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation and the associated CTGF expression. TGF-β-induced p38 activation was reduced on elastic substrates. The results suggest that matrix elasticity influences TGF-β-dependent activation of p38 signaling and subsequent myofibroblast transdifferentiation. Biomechanical cues represent an important determinant of scarring processes. Therefore, cellular signals elicited by mechanotransduction deserve consideration in the design of novel antifibrotic strategies.

  20. Pathways and subcellular compartmentation of NAD biosynthesis in human cells: from entry of extracellular precursors to mitochondrial NAD generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2011-06-17

    NAD is a vital redox carrier, and its degradation is a key element of important regulatory pathways. NAD-mediated functions are compartmentalized and have to be fueled by specific biosynthetic routes. However, little is known about the different pathways, their subcellular distribution, and regulation in human cells. In particular, the route(s) to generate mitochondrial NAD, the largest subcellular pool, is still unknown. To visualize organellar NAD changes in cells, we targeted poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity into the mitochondrial matrix. This activity synthesized immunodetectable poly(ADP-ribose) depending on mitochondrial NAD availability. Based on this novel detector system, detailed subcellular enzyme localizations, and pharmacological inhibitors, we identified extracellular NAD precursors, their cytosolic conversions, and the pathway of mitochondrial NAD generation. Our results demonstrate that, besides nicotinamide and nicotinic acid, only the corresponding nucleosides readily enter the cells. Nucleotides (e.g. NAD and NMN) undergo extracellular degradation resulting in the formation of permeable precursors. These precursors can all be converted to cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD. For mitochondrial NAD synthesis, precursors are converted to NMN in the cytosol. When taken up into the organelles, NMN (together with ATP) serves as substrate of NMNAT3 to form NAD. NMNAT3 was conclusively localized to the mitochondrial matrix and is the only known enzyme of NAD synthesis residing within these organelles. We thus present a comprehensive dissection of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, the groundwork to understand regulation of NAD-mediated processes, and the organismal homeostasis of this fundamental molecule.

  1. Compact MR fluid clutch device for human-friendly actuator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Ikeda, K; Otsuki, K; Kakehashi, T; Furusho, J [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a design method and experimental results of a newly developed MR Fluid clutch which has a multi-layered disks and micro-size (50 micro meters) gaps of MR Fluid. The micro-size gap works for the reduction of magnetic resistance, amount of power supply and size of the total system. Static torques of the device was predictable with conventional magnetostatic analyses. Additionally, dynamic test shows that its response time is about 20 milliseconds.

  2. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  3. Changes in vascular extracellular matrix composition during decidual spiral arteriole remodeling in early human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samantha D; Choudhury, Ruhul H; Matos, Patricia; Horn, James A; Lye, Stephen J; Dunk, Caroline E; Aplin, John D; Jones, Rebecca L; Harris, Lynda K

    2016-05-01

    Uterine spiral arteriole (SA) remodeling in early pregnancy involves a coordinated series of events including decidual immune cell recruitment, vascular cell disruption and loss, and colonization by placental-derived extravillous trophoblast (EVT). During this process, decidual SA are converted from narrow, muscular vessels into dilated channels lacking vasomotor control. We hypothesized that this extensive alteration in SA architecture must require significant reorganization and/or breakdown of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). First trimester decidua basalis (30 specimens) was immunostained to identify spiral arterioles undergoing trophoblast-independent and -dependent phases of remodeling. Serial sections were then immunostained for a panel of ECM markers, to examine changes in vascular ECM during the remodeling process. The initial stages of SA remodeling were characterized by loss of laminin, elastin, fibrillin, collagen types III, IV and VI from the basement membrane, vascular media and/or adventitia, and surrounding decidual stromal cells. Loss of ECM correlated with disruption and disorganization of vascular smooth muscle cells, and the majority of changes occurred prior to extensive colonization of the vessel wall by EVT. The final stages of SA remodeling, characterized by the arrival of EVT, were associated with the increased mural deposition of fibronectin and fibrinoid. This study provides the first detailed analysis of the spatial and temporal loss of ECM from the walls of remodeling decidual SA in early pregnancy.

  4. Adhesion of the human pathogen Sporothrix schenckii to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.C. Lima

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis. This subcutaneous mycosis may disseminate in immunocompromised individuals and also affect several internal organs and tissues, most commonly the bone, joints and lung. Since adhesion is the first step involved with the dissemination of pathogens in the host, we have studied the interaction between S. schenckii and several extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. The binding of two morphological phases of S. schenckii, yeast cells and conidia, to immobilized type II collagen, laminin, fibronectin, fibrinogen and thrombospondin was investigated. Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (poly-HEMA was used as the negative control. Cell adhesion was assessed by ELISA with a rabbit anti-S. schenckii antiserum. The results indicate that both morphological phases of this fungus can bind significantly to type II collagen, fibronectin and laminin in comparison to the binding observed with BSA (used as blocking agent. The adhesion rate observed with the ECM proteins (type II collagen, fibronectin and laminin was statistically significant (P<0.05 when compared to the adhesion obtained with BSA. No significant binding of conidia was observed to either fibrinogen or thrombospondin, but yeast cells did bind to the fibrinogen. Our results indicate that S. schenckii can bind to fibronectin, laminin and type II collagen and also show differences in binding capacity according to the morphological form of the fungus.

  5. Comparative Proteomics of Human Monkeypox and Vaccinia Intracellular Mature and Extracellular Enveloped Virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manes, Nathan P.; Estep, Ryan D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Clauss, Therese RW; Monroe, Matthew E.; Du, Xiuxia; Adkins, Joshua N.; Wong, Scott; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-03-07

    Orthopoxviruses are the largest and most complex of the animal viruses. In response to the recent emergence of monkeypox in Africa and the threat of smallpox bioterrorism, virulent (monkeypox virus) and benign (vaccinia virus) orthopoxviruses were proteomically compared with the goal of identifying proteins required for pathogenesis. Orthopoxviruses were grown in HeLa cells to two different viral forms (intracellular mature virus and extracellular enveloped virus), purified by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, denatured using RapiGest™ surfactant, and digested with trypsin. Unfractionated samples and strong cation exchange HPLC fractions were analyzed by reversed-phase LC-MS/MS, and analyses of the MS/MS spectra using SEQUEST® and X! Tandem resulted in the identification of hundreds of monkeypox, vaccinia, and copurified host proteins. The unfractionated samples were additionally analyzed by LC-MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap™, and the accurate mass and elution time tag approach was used to perform quantitative comparisons. Possible pathophysiological roles of differentially expressed orthopoxvirus genes are discussed.

  6. Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Hyun; Shin, Hyun Woo; Jung, Ae Ryang; Kwon, Oh Sung; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Park, Jaesung; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We aimed to investigate the prognostic potential of prostate-specific EVs in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Plasma and prostate tissue were collected from patients who underwent surgery for PCa (n = 82) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, n = 28). To analyze the quantity of EVs in prostate, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immuno-TEM with CD63 and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and immunofluorescence staining. After EV isolation from plasma, CD63 and PSMA concentration was measured using ELISA kits. PSMA-positive areas in prostate differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (2.4, 8.2, 17.5, 26.5%, p BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (21.9, 43.4, 49.2, 59.9 ng/mL, p BPH (AUC 0.943). Patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration had greater prostate volume (50.2 vs. 33.4 cc, p pathologic Gleason score (p = 0.025). During the median follow-up of 18 months, patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration tended to have a lower risk of biochemical failure than those with higher levels of prostate-specific EVs (p = 0.085). PMID:27503267

  7. Hydrogen peroxide induce modifications of human extracellular superoxide dismutase that results in enzyme inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi H. Gottfredsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD controls the level of superoxide in the extracellular space by catalyzing the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In addition, the enzyme reacts with hydrogen peroxide in a peroxidase reaction which is known to disrupt enzymatic activity. Here, we show that the peroxidase reaction supports a site-specific bond cleavage. Analyses by peptide mapping and mass spectrometry shows that oxidation of Pro112 supports the cleavage of the Pro112–His113 peptide bond. Substitution of Ala for Pro112 did not inhibit fragmentation, indicating that the oxidative fragmentation at this position is dictated by spatial organization and not by side-chain specificity. The major part of EC-SOD inhibited by the peroxidase reaction was not fragmented but found to encompass oxidations of histidine residues involved in the coordination of copper (His98 and His163. These oxidations are likely to support the dissociation of copper from the active site and thus loss of enzymatic activity. Homologous modifications have also been described for the intracellular isozyme, Cu/Zn-SOD, reflecting the almost identical structures of the active site within these enzymes. We speculate that the inactivation of EC-SOD by peroxidase activity plays a role in regulating SOD activity in vivo, as even low levels of superoxide will allow for the peroxidase reaction to occur.

  8. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure Enhances Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils through the NADPH Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Scheer, Marleen H; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are abundantly present in modern society, and the potential biological consequences of exposure to these fields are under intense debate. Immune cells are suggested as possible target cells, though a clear mechanism is lacking. Considering their crucial role in innate immune activation, we selected an ex vivo exposure set-up with human neutrophils to investigate a possible correlation between neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation and LF EMF exposure. Our study shows that formation of NETs is enhanced by LF EMF exposure. Enhanced NET formation leads to increased antimicrobial properties as well as damage to surrounding cells. We found that LF-EMF-induced NET formation is dependent on the NADPH oxidase pathway and production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, LF EMF exposure does not influence autophagy and PAD4 activity. Our study provides a mechanism by which exposure to LF EMFs could influence the innate immune system.

  9. An extracellular cell-attached pullulanase confers branched α-glucan utilization in human gut Lactobacillus acidophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Goh, Yong Jun; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig

    2017-01-01

    Of the few predicted extracellular glycan-active enzymes, glycoside hydrolase family 13 subfamily 14 (GH13_14) pullulanases are the most common in human gut lactobacilli. These enzymes share a unique modular organization, not observed in other bacteria, featuring a catalytic module, two starch...... binding modules, a domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal surface layer association protein (SLAP) domain. Here we explore the specificity of a representative of this group of pullulanases, LaPul13_14 and its role in branched α-glucans metabolism in the well characterized Lactobacillus acidophilus...... NCFM that is widely used as a probiotic. Growth experiments of L. acidophilus NCFM on starch-derived branched substrates revealed preference for α-glucans with short branches of about two to three glucosyl moieties over amylopectin with longer branches. Cell-attached debranching activity was measurable...

  10. The human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 is a membrane scaffold protein for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Olesen, Christina W;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is an S/T kinase with more than 200 known substrates, and with critical roles in regulation of cell growth and differentiation and currently no membrane proteins have been linked to ERK2 scaffolding. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we identify...... the human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (hNHE1) as a membrane scaffold protein for ERK2 and show direct hNHE1-ERK1/2 interaction in cellular contexts. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and immunofluorescence analysis we demonstrate that ERK2 scaffolding by hNHE1 occurs by one of three D...... and ERK2, and provides a molecular mechanism for the important ERK2 scaffolding function of the membrane protein hNHE1, which regulates the phosphorylation of both hNHE1 and ERK2....

  11. The human Na+/H+ exchanger 1 is a membrane scaffold protein for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Pedraz Cuesta, Elena; Olesen, Christina Wilkens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is an S/T kinase with more than 200 known substrates, and with critical roles in regulation of cell growth and differentiation and currently no membrane proteins have been linked to ERK2 scaffolding. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we identify...... the human Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (hNHE1) as a membrane scaffold protein for ERK2 and show direct hNHE1-ERK1/2 interaction in cellular contexts. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and immunofluorescence analysis we demonstrate that ERK2 scaffolding by hNHE1 occurs by one of three D...... in vitro, in a distinct temporal order, with the phosphorylation rates at the individual sites being modulated by the docking sites in a distant dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: This work characterizes a new type of scaffolding complex, which we term a "shuffle complex", between the disordered hNHE1-tail...

  12. Evaluation of Human Body Fluids for the Diagnosis of Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Badiee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Because the etiologic agents of these infections are abundant in nature, their isolation from biopsy material or sterile body fluids is needed to document infection. This review evaluates and discusses different human body fluids used to diagnose fungal infections.

  13. Effects of extracellular plaque components on the chlorhexidine sensitivity of strains of Streptococcus mutans and human dental plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolinsky, L.E.; Hume, W.R.

    1985-08-01

    An in vitro study was undertaken to determine the effects of sucrose-derived extracellular plaque components on the sensitivity of selected oral bacteria to chlorhexidine (CX). Cultures of Streptococcus mutans HS-6, OMZ-176, Ingbritt C, 6715-wt13, and pooled human plaque were grown in trypticase soy media with or without 1% sucrose. The sensitivity to CX of bacteria grown in each medium was determined by fixed-time exposure to CX and subsequent measurement of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake. One-hour exposure to CX at concentrations of 10(-4) M (0.01% w/v) or greater substantially inhibited subsequent cellular division among all the S. mutans strains and human plaque samples tested. An IC50 (the CX concentration which depressed /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation to 50% of control level) of close to 10(-4) M was noted for S. mutans strains HS-6, OMZ-176, and 6715-wt13 when grown in the presence of sucrose. The same strains grown in cultures without added sucrose showed about a ten-fold greater sensitivity to CX (IC50 close to 10(-5) M). A three-fold difference was noted for S. mutans Ingbritt C. Only a slight increase in the IC50 was noted for the plaque samples cultured in sucrose-containing media, but their threshold for depression of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake by CX was lower than that for the sucrose-free plaque samples. The study showed that extracellular products confer some protection against CX to the bacteria examined, and provided an explanation for the disparity between clinically-recommended concentrations for plaque suppression and data on in vitro susceptibility.

  14. Perilla frutescens leaves extract ameliorates ultraviolet radiation-induced extracellular matrix damage in human dermal fibroblasts and hairless mice skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung-Soo; Han, Mira; Shin, Hee Soon; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-01-04

    Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. (Lamiaceae) is a traditional herb that is consumed in East Asian countries as a traditional medicine. This traditional herb has been documented for centuries to treat various diseases such as depression, allergies, inflammation and asthma. However, the effect of Perilla frutescens on skin has not been characterized well. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Perilla frutescens leaves extract (PLE) on ultraviolet radiation-induced extracellular matrix damage in human dermal fibroblasts and hairless mice skin. Human dermal fibroblasts and Skh-1 hairless mice were irradiated with UV and treated with PLE. Protein and mRNA levels of various target molecules were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Histological changes of mouse skin were analyzed by H&E staining. To elucidate underlying mechanism of PLE, activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding assay and the measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed. PLE significantly inhibited basal and UV-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression dose-dependently, and also decreased UV-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and c-Jun N-terminal kinases. This inhibitory effects of PLE on MMP-1 and MMP-3 were mediated by reduction of ROS generation and AP-1 DNA binding activity induced by UV. Furthermore, PLE promoted type I procollagen production irrespective of UV irradiation. In the UV-irradiated animal model, PLE significantly reduced epidermal skin thickness and MMP-13 expression induced by UV. Our results demonstrate that PLE has the protective effect against UV-induced dermal matrix damage. Therefore, we suggest that PLE can be a potential agent for prevention of skin aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human placental lactogen levels in amniotic fluid in normal and toxemic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolis, D; Kaskarelis, D

    1978-01-01

    Amniotic fluid human placental lactogen (HPL) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay in 162 cases of women with normal pregnancy and 43 with toxemic pregnancy, in the last trimester of pregnancy. A significant differences in levels was observed.

  16. Comparison of four decontamination treatments on porcine renal decellularized extracellular matrix structure, composition, and support of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Nielsen, Jeffery J; Morris, Ryan J; Gassman, Jason R; Reynolds, Paul R; Roeder, Beverly L; Cook, Alonzo D

    2016-03-01

    Engineering whole organs from porcine decellularized extracellular matrix and human cells may lead to a plentiful source of implantable organs. Decontaminating the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix scaffolds is an essential step prior to introducing human cells. However, decontamination of whole porcine kidneys is a major challenge because the decontamination agent or irradiation needs to diffuse deep into the structure to eliminate all microbial contamination while minimizing damage to the structure and composition of the decellularized extracellular matrix. In this study, we compared four decontamination treatments that could be applicable to whole porcine kidneys: 70% ethanol, 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl, 0.2% peracetic acid in 4% ethanol, and gamma (γ)-irradiation. Porcine kidneys were decellularized by perfusion of 0.5% (w/v) aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate and the four decontamination treatments were optimized using segments (n = 60) of renal tissue to ensure a consistent comparison. Although all four methods were successful in decontamination, γ-irradiation was very damaging to collagen fibers and glycosaminoglycans, leading to less proliferation of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells within the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix. The effectiveness of the other three optimized solution treatments were then all confirmed using whole decellularized porcine kidneys (n = 3). An aqueous solution of 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl was determined to be the best method for decontamination of porcine decellularized extracellular matrix.

  17. Interactions of surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes of Mycoplasma pneumoniae with components of the human extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründel, Anne; Jacobs, Enno; Dumke, Roger

    2016-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major cause of community-acquired respiratory infections worldwide. Due to the strongly reduced genome, the number of virulence factors expressed by this cell wall-less pathogen is limited. To further understand the processes during host colonization, we investigated the interactions of the previously confirmed surface-located glycolytic enzymes of M. pneumoniae (pyruvate dehydrogenase A-C [PdhA-C], glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GapA], lactate dehydrogenase [Ldh], phosphoglycerate mutase [Pgm], pyruvate kinase [Pyk] and transketolase [Tkt]) to the human extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins fibrinogen (Fn), fibronectin (Fc), lactoferrin (Lf), laminin (Ln) and vitronectin (Vc), respectively. Concentration-dependent interactions between Fn and Vc and all eight recombinant proteins derived from glycolytic enzymes, between Ln and PdhB-C, GapA, Ldh, Pgm, Pyk and Tkt, between Lf and PdhA-C, GapA and Pyk, and between Fc and PdhC and GapA were demonstrated. In most cases, these associations are significantly influenced by ionic forces and by polyclonal sera against recombinant proteins. In immunoblotting, the complex of human plasminogen, activator (tissue-type or urokinase plasminogen activator) and glycolytic enzyme was not able to degrade Fc, Lf and Ln, respectively. In contrast, degradation of Vc was confirmed in the presence of all eight enzymes tested. Our data suggest that the multifaceted associations of surface-localized glycolytic enzymes play a potential role in the adhesion and invasion processes during infection of human respiratory mucosa by M. pneumoniae.

  18. Extracellular-like matrices and leukaemia inhibitory factor for in vitro culture of human primordial follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Assiel J; Lerer-Serfaty, Galit; Stav, Dana; Sabbah, Bethsabee; Shochat, Tzippy; Kessler-Icekson, Gania; Zahalka, Muayad A; Shachar-Goldenberg, Michal; Ben-Haroush, Avi; Fisch, Benjamin; Abir, Ronit

    2017-02-01

    The possibility of maturing human primordial follicles in vitro would assist fertility restoration without the danger of reseeding malignancies. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and certain culture matrices may promote human follicular growth. The present study compared human primordial follicular growth on novel culture matrices, namely human recombinant vitronectin (hrVit), small intestine submucosa (SIS), alginate scaffolds and human recombinant virgin collagen bioengineered in tobacco plant lines (CollPlant). The frozen-thawed ovarian samples that were used had been obtained from girls or young women undergoing fertility preservation. In the first part of the study, 20 samples were cultured for 6 days on hrVit or SIS with basic culture medium alone or supplemented with one of two concentrations of LIF (10ngmL-1 and 100ngmL-1), with and without LIF-neutralising antibody. In the second part of the study, 15 samples were cultured for 6 days on alginate scaffolds or CollPlant matrices with basic culture medium. Follicular development was assessed by follicular counts and classification, Ki67 immunohistochemistry and 17β-oestradiol and anti-Müllerian hormone measurements in spent media samples. Primordial follicular growth was not enhanced by LIF. Despite some significant differences among the four matrices, none appeared to have a clear advantage, apart from significantly more Ki67-stained follicles on alginate and CollPlant matrices. Further studies of other culture matrices and medium supplements are needed to obtain an optimal system.

  19. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as delayed wound healing and skin cancer development. This review describes cellular mechanisms that give rise to self-perpetuating, collagen fibril fragmentation that creates an age-associated dermal microenvironment (AADM), which contributes to decline of human skin function. PMID:25660807

  20. Microdialysis in the human brain: extracellular measurements in the thalamus of parkinsonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, B A; Linderoth, B; Karlsson, H; Ungerstedt, U

    1990-01-01

    Microdialysis in the human brain has been performed for the first time during thalamotomy intended to relieve tremor in patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim was to test the reliability of the microdialysis technique for biochemical characterization of a target area in the human brain during a routine operation. Microdialysis probes were introduced through the same trajectory as the lesioning electrode thus causing no additional damage to the brain. Dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, 5-HIAA, hypoxanthine, inosine, guanosine, adenosine, GABA, taurine, aspartate and glutamate were measured in the perfusate from the target region - the Vim nucleus. The results show initial high levels that reach baseline levels after 10-20 minutes. Surprisingly, consistent and reproducible levels were found, the only exception being one patient on 1-DOPA therapy who had elevated DA and metabolite levels.

  1. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin d...

  2. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikegami Toru

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG. Results In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (polyHEMA beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 × 106 (M-1 for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. Conclusions MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid.

  3. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Ling, Kai; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-22

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue.

  4. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF, along with hyaluronic acid (HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM, and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees.

  5. The generation of hybrid electrospun nanofiber layer with extracellular matrix derived from human pluripotent stem cells, for regenerative medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtrichman, Ronit; Zeevi-Levin, Naama; Zaid, Rinat; Barak, Efrat; Fishman, Bettina; Ziskind, Anna; Shulman, Rita; Novak, Atara; Avrahami, Ron; Livne, Erella; Lowenstein, Lior; Zussman, Eyal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been utilized as a biological scaffold for tissue engineering applications in a variety of body systems, due to its bioactivity and biocompatibility. In the current study we developed a modified protocol for the efficient and reproducible derivation of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) from human embryonic stem cells as well as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) originating from hair follicle keratinocytes (HFKTs). ECM was produced from these MPCs and characterized in comparison to adipose mesenchymal stem cell ECM, demonstrating robust ECM generation by the excised HFKT-iPSC-MPCs. Exploiting the advantages of electrospinning we generated two types of electrospun biodegradable nanofiber layers (NFLs), fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), which provide mechanical support for cell seeding and ECM generation. Elucidating the optimized decellularization treatment we were able to generate an available "off-the-shelf" implantable product (NFL-ECM). Using rat subcutaneous transplantation model we demonstrate that this stem-cell-derived construct is biocompatible and biodegradable and holds great potential for tissue regeneration applications.

  6. Oligosaccharide substrate preferences of human extracellular sulfatase Sulf2 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based glycomics approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    Full Text Available Sulfs are extracellular endosulfatases that selectively remove the 6-O-sulfate groups from cell surface heparan sulfate (HS chain. By altering the sulfation at these particular sites, Sulfs function to remodel HS chains. As a result of the remodeling activity, HSulf2 regulates a multitude of cell-signaling events that depend on interactions between proteins and HS. Previous efforts to characterize the substrate specificity of human Sulfs (HSulfs focused on the analysis of HS disaccharides and synthetic repeating units. In this study, we characterized the substrate preferences of human HSulf2 using HS oligosaccharides with various lengths and sulfation degrees from several naturally occurring HS sources by applying liquid chromatography mass spectrometry based glycomics methods. The results showed that HSulf2 preferentially digests highly sulfated HS oligosaccharides with zero acetyl groups and this preference is length dependent. In terms of length of oligosaccharides, HSulf2 digestion induced more sulfation decrease on DP6 (DP: degree of polymerization compared to DP2, DP4 and DP8. In addition, the HSulf2 preferentially digests the oligosaccharide domain located at the non-reducing end (NRE of the HS and heparin chain. In addition, the HSulf2 digestion products were altered only for specific isomers. HSulf2 treated NRE oligosaccharides also showed greater decrease in cell proliferation than those from internal domains of the HS chain. After further chromatographic separation, we identified the three most preferred unsaturated hexasaccharide for HSulf2.

  7. Stiffness of hyaluronic acid gels containing liver extracellular matrix supports human hepatocyte function and alters cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cynthia; Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony; Shupe, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering and cell based liver therapies have utilized primary hepatocytes with limited success due to the failure of hepatocytes to maintain their phenotype in vitro. In order to overcome this challenge, hyaluronic acid (HA) cell culture substrates were formulated to closely mimic the composition and stiffness of the normal liver cellular microenvironment. The stiffness of the substrate was modulated by adjusting HA hydrogel crosslinking. Additionally, the repertoire of bioactive molecules within the HA substrate was bolstered by supplementation with normal liver extracellular matrix (ECM). Primary human hepatocyte viability and phenotype were determined over a narrow physiologically relevant range of substrate stiffnesses from 600 to 4600Pa in both the presence and absence of liver ECM. Cell attachment, viability, and organization of the actin cytoskeleton improved with increased stiffness up to 4600Pa. These differences were not evident in earlier time points or substrates containing only HA. However, gene expression for the hepatocyte markers hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and albumin significantly decreased on the 4600Pa stiffness at day 7 indicating that cells may not have maintained their phenotype long-term at this stiffness. Function, as measured by albumin secretion, varied with both stiffness and time in culture and peaked at day 7 at the 1200Pa stiffness, slightly below the stiffness of normal liver ECM at 3000Pa. Overall, gel stiffness affected primary human hepatocyte cell adhesion, functional marker expression, and morphological characteristics dependent on both the presence of liver ECM in gel substrates and time in culture.

  8. Electrical stimulation of neural stem cells mediated by humanized carbon nanotube composite made with extracellular matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Nadine Wong Shi; Jan, Edward; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges to engineering neural interfaces is to minimize their immune response toward implanted electrodes. One potential approach is to manufacture materials that bear greater structural resemblance to living tissues and by utilizing neural stem cells. The unique electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them excellent candidates for neural interfaces, but their adoption hinges on finding approaches for "humanizing" their composites. Here we demonstrated the fabrication of layer-by-layer assembled composites from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and laminin, which is an essential part of human extracellular matrix. Laminin-SWNT thin films were found to be conducive to neural stem cells (NSC) differentiation and suitable for their successful excitation. We observed extensive formation of functional neural network as indicated by the presence of synaptic connections. Calcium imaging of the NSCs revealed generation of action potentials upon the application of a lateral current through the SWNT substrate. These results indicate that the protein-SWNT composite can serve as materials foundation of neural electrodes with chemical structure better adapted with long-term integration with the neural tissue.

  9. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  10. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ly, David; Burgess, Janette K.; Brock, Thomas G.; Lee, Tak H.; Black, Judith L.; Oliver, Brian G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Van Ly D, Burgess JK, Brock TG, Lee TH, Black JL, Oliver BG. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 303: L239-L250, 2012. First published Ma

  11. Exosome levels in human body fluids: A tumor marker by themselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Francesco; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Campanella, Claudia; Bavisotto, Celeste Caruso; Marcilla, Antonio; Properzi, Francesca; Fais, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable research efforts, the finding of reliable tumor biomarkers remains challenging and unresolved. In recent years a novel diagnostic biomedical tool with high potential has been identified in extracellular nanovesicles or exosomes. They are released by the majority of the cells and contain detailed molecular information on the cell of origin including tumor hallmarks. Exosomes can be isolated from easy accessible body fluids, and most importantly, they can provide several biomarkers, with different levels of specificity. Recent clinical evidence shows that the levels of exosomes released into body fluids may themselves represent a predictive/diagnostic of tumors, discriminating cancer patients from healthy subjects. The aim of this review is to highlight these latest challenging findings to provide novel and groundbreaking ideas for successful tumor early diagnosis and follow-up.

  12. Amniotic fluid elicits appetitive responses in human newborns: fatty acids and appetitive responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Carlos M; Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Mendoza-López, Remedios; Rodríguez-Landa, Juan Francisco; Bernal-Morales, Blandina; Díaz-Marte, Cynthia

    2013-04-01

    In humans, maternal cues guide newborns to the maternal breast, and transitional cues may be present in maternal-fetal fluids. The aim of the present study was to determine the consistent presence of sensorial cues in three maternal-fetal fluids--amniotic fluid, colostrum, and milk--and test the ability of these cues to produce appetitive responses in newborns. In the analytical study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detected eight fatty acids consistently present in the amniotic fluid, colostrum, and milk from 12 healthy volunteers, but we do not find a mammalian pheromone, identified in another mammalian species (rabbits), in another 30 volunteers. In the behavioral study, we explored the ability of amniotic fluid or its fatty acids to produce appetitive responses in 19 human newborns fluid or an artificial fatty acid mixture produced a longer duration of facial reactions that suggested appetitive (sucking) movements compared with respective vehicles (i.e., propylene glycol or centrifuged amniotic fluid with a low fatty acid content verified by GC-MS). We conclude that the fatty acids contained in amniotic fluid may constitute a transitional sensorial cue that guides newborns to the maternal breast.

  13. Pellet-free isolation of human and bovine milk extracellular vesicles by size-exclusion chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blans, Kristine Ingrid Marie; Hansen, Maria Stenum; Sørensen, Laila V.

    2017-01-01

    -marker proteins in other relevant milk fractions such as milk fat globules. Nanoparticle tracking analysis and electron microscopy reveals the presence of heterogeneous sized vesicle structures in milk EV isolates. Lipid analysis by thin layer chromatography shows that EV isolates are devoid of triacylglycerides...... accomplished in three steps based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) resulting in effective and reproducible EV isolation from raw milk. The approaches do not require any EV pelleting and can be applied to both human and bovine milk. We show that SEC effectively separates phospholipid membrane vesicles...

  14. Profiling of endogenous peptides in human synovial fluid by NanoLC-MS : Method validation and peptide identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphorst, J.J.; Heijden, R. van der; Groot, J. de; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Reijmers, T.H.; El, B. van; Tjaden, U.R.; Greef, J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid potentially contains markers for early diagnosis and disease progression in degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, a method is described for profiling endogenous peptides in human synovial fluid, using ultrafiltration, solid-phase extraction, nanoscale liquid chroma

  15. Exposure measurement of aflatoxins and aflatoxin metabolites in human body fluids. A short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Yin-Hui; Latiff, Aishah A; Ahmad, Nurul Izzah; Rosma, Ahmad

    2012-05-01

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic secondary fungal metabolites mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Human exposure to aflatoxins may result directly from ingestion of contaminated foods, or indirectly from consumption of foods from animals previously exposed to aflatoxins in feeds. This paper focuses on exposure measurement of aflatoxins and aflatoxin metabolites in various human body fluids. Research on different metabolites present in blood, urine, breast milk, and other human fluids or tissues including their detection techniques is reviewed. The association between dietary intake of aflatoxins and biomarker measurement is also highlighted. Finally, aspects related to the differences between aflatoxin determination in food versus the biomarker approach are discussed.

  16. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Human Milk-derived Extracellular Vesicles Unveils a Novel Functional Proteome Distinct from Other Milk Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; Zonneveld, Marijke I; Goerdayal, Soenita; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Garssen, Johan; Stahl, Bernd; Maarten Altelaar, A F; Redegeld, Frank A; Wauben, Marca H M

    2016-11-01

    Breast milk contains several macromolecular components with distinctive functions, whereby milk fat globules and casein micelles mainly provide nutrition to the newborn, and whey contains molecules that can stimulate the newborn's developing immune system and gastrointestinal tract. Although extracellular vesicles (EV) have been identified in breast milk, their physiological function and composition has not been addressed in detail. EV are submicron sized vehicles released by cells for intercellular communication via selectively incorporated lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. Because of the difficulty in separating EV from other milk components, an in-depth analysis of the proteome of human milk-derived EV is lacking. In this study, an extensive LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis was performed of EV that had been purified from breast milk of seven individual donors using a recently established, optimized density-gradient-based EV isolation protocol. A total of 1963 proteins were identified in milk-derived EV, including EV-associated proteins like CD9, Annexin A5, and Flotillin-1, with a remarkable overlap between the different donors. Interestingly, 198 of the identified proteins are not present in the human EV database Vesiclepedia, indicating that milk-derived EV harbor proteins not yet identified in EV of different origin. Similarly, the proteome of milk-derived EV was compared with that of other milk components. For this, data from 38 published milk proteomic studies were combined in order to construct the total milk proteome, which consists of 2698 unique proteins. Remarkably, 633 proteins identified in milk-derived EV have not yet been identified in human milk to date. Interestingly, these novel proteins include proteins involved in regulation of cell growth and controlling inflammatory signaling pathways, suggesting that milk-derived EVs could support the newborn's developing gastrointestinal tract and immune system. Overall, this study provides an expansion of

  17. Quantitative analysis of the toxicity of human amniotic fluid to cultured rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewek, M J; Bruner, J P; Whetsell, W O; Tulipan, N

    1997-10-01

    It has been proposed that the myelodysplastic components of a myelomeningocele are secondarily damaged as the result of exposure to amniotic fluid, the so-called 'two-hit' hypothesis. The critical time at which this secondary insult might occur has not been clearly defined. The present study addresses this issue by quantitatively assessing the toxic effects of human amniotic fluid of various gestational ages upon organotypic cultures of rat spinal cord. Using an assay for lactate dehydrogenase efflux to evaluate toxicity in such spinal cord cultures, we found that the amniotic fluid became toxic at approximately 34 weeks' gestation. This toxic effect of amniotic fluid appears to emerge rather suddenly. Accordingly, it seems reasonable to suggest that prevention of exposure of vulnerable spinal cord tissue to this toxicity by surgical closure of a myelomeningocele defect prior to the emergence of toxicity in amniotic fluid may prevent injury to vulnerable myelodysplastic spinal cord tissue.

  18. Comparative expression of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the mouse, rat, and human kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graca, J A Z; Schepelmann, M; Brennan, S C; Reens, J; Chang, W; Yan, P; Toka, H; Riccardi, D; Price, S A

    2016-03-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was cloned over 20 years ago and functionally demonstrated to regulate circulating levels of parathyroid hormone by maintaining physiological serum ionized calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]). The receptor is highly expressed in the kidney; however, intrarenal and intraspecies distribution remains controversial. Recently, additional functions of the CaSR receptor in the kidney have emerged, including parathyroid hormone-independent effects. It is therefore critical to establish unequivocally the localization of the CaSR in the kidney to relate this to its proposed physiological roles. In this study, we determined CaSR expression in mouse, rat, and human kidneys using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry (using 8 different commercially available and custom-made antibodies), and proximity ligation assays. Negative results in mice with kidney-specific CaSR ablation confirmed the specificity of the immunohistochemistry signal. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed CaSR expression in the thick ascending limb, distal tubule, and collecting duct of all species, with the thick ascending limb showing the highest levels. Within the collecting ducts, there was significant heterogeneity of expression between cell types. In the proximal tubule, lower levels of immunoreactivity were detected by immunohistochemistry and proximity ligation assays. Proximity ligation assays were the only technique to demonstrate expression within glomeruli. This study demonstrated CaSR expression throughout the kidney with minimal discrepancy between species but with significant variation in the levels of expression between cell and tubule types. These findings clarify the intrarenal distribution of the CaSR and enable elucidation of the full physiological roles of the receptor within this organ.

  19. Glycomics analysis of mammalian heparan sulfates modified by the human extracellular sulfatase HSulf2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory O Staples

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Sulfs are a family of endosulfatases that selectively modify the 6O-sulfation state of cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS molecules. Sulfs serve as modulators of cell-signaling events because the changes they induce alter the cell surface co-receptor functions of HS chains. A variety of studies have been aimed at understanding how Sulfs modify HS structure, and many of these studies utilize Sulf knockout cell lines as the source for the HS used in the experiments. However, genetic manipulation of Sulfs has been shown to alter the expression levels of HS biosynthetic enzymes, and in these cases an assessment of the fine structural changes induced solely by Sulf enzymatic activity is not possible. Therefore, the present work aims to extend the understanding of substrate specificities of HSulf2 using in vitro experiments to compare HSulf2 activities on HS from different organ tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further the understanding of Sulf enzymatic activity, we conducted in vitro experiments where a variety of mammalian HS substrates were modified by recombinant human Sulf2 (HSulf2. Subsequent to treatment with HSulf2, the HS samples were exhaustively depolymerized and analyzed using size-exclusion liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SEC-LC/MS. We found that HSulf2 activity was highly dependent on the structural features of the HS substrate. Additionally, we characterized, for the first time, the activity of HSulf2 on the non-reducing end (NRE of HS chains. The results indicate that the action pattern of HSulf2 at the NRE is different compared to internally within the HS chain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study indicate that the activity of Sulfs is dependent on the unique structural features of the HS populations that they edit. The activity of HSulf2 at HS NREs implicates the Sulfs as key regulators of this region of the chains, and concomitantly, the protein-binding events that occur

  20. The detection and discrimination of human body fluids using ATR FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphanou, Charlotte-Maria; Walton-Williams, Laura; Mountain, Harry; Cassella, John

    2015-07-01

    Blood, saliva, semen and vaginal secretions are the main human body fluids encountered at crime scenes. Currently presumptive tests are routinely utilised to indicate the presence of body fluids, although these are often subject to false positives and limited to particular body fluids. Over the last decade more sensitive and specific body fluid identification methods have been explored, such as mRNA analysis and proteomics, although these are not yet appropriate for routine application. This research investigated the application of ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for the detection and discrimination of human blood, saliva, semen and vaginal secretions. The results demonstrated that ATR FT-IR spectroscopy can detect and distinguish between these body fluids based on the unique spectral pattern, combination of peaks and peak frequencies corresponding to the macromolecule groups common within biological material. Comparisons with known abundant proteins relevant to each body fluid were also analysed to enable specific peaks to be attributed to the relevant protein components, which further reinforced the discrimination and identification of each body fluid. Overall, this preliminary research has demonstrated the potential for ATR FT-IR spectroscopy to be utilised in the routine confirmatory screening of biological evidence due to its quick and robust application within forensic science.

  1. Non-Linear and Flexible Regions of the Human Notch1 Extracellular Domain Revealed by High-Resolution Structural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshuhn, Philip C; Sheppard, Devon; Taylor, Paul; Whiteman, Pat; Lea, Susan M; Handford, Penny A; Redfield, Christina

    2016-04-05

    The Notch receptor is a key component of a core metazoan signaling pathway activated by Delta/Serrate/Lag-2 ligands expressed on an adjacent cell. This results in a short-range signal with profound effects on cell-fate determination, cell proliferation, and cell death. Key to understanding receptor function is structural knowledge of the large extracellular portion of Notch which contains multiple repeats of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Here we investigate the EGF4-13 region of human Notch1 (hN1) using a multidisciplinary approach. Ca(2+)-binding measurements, X-ray crystallography, {(1)H}-(15)N heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings support a non-linear organization for the EGF4-13 region with a rigid, bent conformation for EGF4-7 and a single flexible linkage between EGF9 and EGF10. These data allow us to construct an informed model for EGF10-13 which, in conjunction with comparative binding studies, demonstrates that EGF10 has an important role in determining Notch receptor sensitivity to Dll-4.

  2. Gravity loading induces adenosine triphosphate release and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mai; Arakawa, Toshiya; Okayama, Miki; Shitara, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Takuma, Taishin

    2014-11-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) receives mechanical stress (MS) from dental occlusion or orthodontic tooth movement. Mechanical stress is thought to be a trigger for remodeling of the PDL and alveolar bone, although its signaling mechanism is still unclear. So we investigated the effect of MS on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation in PDL cells. Mechanical stress was applied to human PDL cells as centrifugation-mediated gravity loading. Apyrase, Ca(2+)-free medium and purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists were utilized to analyze the contribution of purinergic receptors to ERK phosphorylation. Gravity loading and ATP increased ERK phosphorylation by 5 and 2.5 times, respectively. Gravity loading induced ATP release from PDL cells by tenfold. Apyrase and suramin diminished ERK phosphorylation induced by both gravity loading and ATP. Under Ca(2+)-free conditions the phosphorylation by gravity loading was partially decreased, whereas ATP-induced phosphorylation was unaffected. Receptors P2Y4 and P2Y6 were prominently expressed in the PDL cells. Gravity loading induced ATP release and ERK phosphorylation in PDL fibroblasts, and ATP signaling via P2Y receptors was partially involved in this phosphorylation, which in turn would enhance gene expression for the remodeling of PDL tissue during orthodontic tooth movement. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Urease-induced alkalinization of extracellular pH and its antitumor activity in human breast and lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wah Yau; DeLuca, Carl I; Tian, Baomin; Wilson, Iain; Molund, Sharon; Warriar, Nalini; Govindan, Manjapra V; Segal, Donald; Chao, Heman

    2005-01-01

    Jack bean urease catalyzes the decomposition of urea into ammonia, which in turn increases the pH of the surrounding medium. Based on these two properties, we have investigated the antitumor effects of urease in vitro and in vivo on human lung and breast cancer cell lines either by the enzyme itself or in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs. First, through the generation of toxic ammonia, urease exerted direct cytotoxicity on A549 and MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with LC50 of 0.22 and 0.45 U/ml, respectively. The cytotoxic effects could effectively be blocked using the reversible urease inhibitor acetohydroxamic acid. Complete protection was observed at dose > or = 2 mM. In addition, nude mouse xenograft models demonstrated that intratumoral urease injections (1 - 10 U/dose) inhibited A549 and MCF-7 tumor growth in vivo. Second, when combined with weak-base anticancer drugs, urease provided indirect antitumor effects via pH augmentation. Alkalinization of extracellular pH by urease (2 U/ml) and urea (> or = 2 mM) was found to enhance the antitumor efficacy of doxorubicin (50 microM) and vinblastine (100 microM) significantly.

  4. Potential application of extracellular vesicles of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Takeshi; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have attracted attention as a versatile cell-cell communication mediator. The biological significance of EVs remains to be fully elucidated, but many reports have suggested that the functions of EVs mirror, at least in part, those of the cells from which they originate. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cell that can be isolated from connective tissue including bone marrow and adipose tissue and have emerged as an attractive candidate for cell therapy applications. Accordingly, an increasing number of reports have shown that EVs derived from MSCs have therapeutic potential in multiple diseases. We recently reported a novel therapeutic potential of EVs secreted from human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hADSCs) (also known as adipose tissue-derived stem cells; ASCs) against Alzheimer's disease (AD). We found that hADSCs secrete exosomes carrying enzymatically active neprilysin, the most important β-amyloid peptide (Aβ)-degrading enzyme in the brain. In this chapter, we describe a method by which to evaluate the therapeutic potential of hADSC-derived EVs against AD from the point of view of their Aβ-degrading capacity.

  5. RNA interference targeting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) inhibits growth and increases chemosensitivity in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Zeng, Y L; Zhang, X G; Chen, W J; Yang, R; Li, S J

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inducer (EMMPRIN CD147) has been implicated in the growth and survival of malignant cells. However, its presence and role in cervical cancer cells has not been well-studied. In the present study, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was designed and synthesized to breakdown the expression of CD147. The present data demonstrated that 24 and 48 hours after transfecting CD147 siRNA, both the CD147 mRNA and protein expression were significantly inhibited as determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry. Meanwhile, simultaneous silencing of CD147 resulted in distinctly increasing MMP-9, VEGF, and MDR-1. Further studies demonstrated decreased CD147 expression, resulted in G1/S phase transition with flow cytometry analysis, as well as the resistance of the cells to 5-FU. These findings provide further evidence that CD147 may become a promising therapeutic target for human cervical cancer and a potential chemotherapy-sensitizing agent.

  6. Propyl gallate inhibits adipogenesis by stimulating extracellular signal-related kinases in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeung-Eun; Kim, Jung-Min; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Lim, Se-Young; Choi, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Nan-Hee; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Choi, Ung-Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) used as an additive in various foods has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Although the functional roles of PG in various cell types are well characterized, it is unknown whether PG has effect on stem cell differentiation. In this study, we demonstrated that PG could inhibit adipogenic differentiation in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) by decreasing the accumulation of intracellular lipid droplets. In addition, PG significantly reduced the expression of adipocyte-specific markers including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), CCAAT enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBP-α), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2 (aP2). PG inhibited adipogenesis in hAMSCs through extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Decreased adipogenesis following PG treatment was recovered in response to ERK blocking. Taken together, these results suggest a novel effect of PG on adipocyte differentiation in hAMSCs, supporting a negative role of ERK1/2 pathway in adipogenic differentiation.

  7. Skip Regulates TGF-β1-Induced Extracellular Matrix Degrading Proteases Expression in Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Villar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether Ski-interacting protein (SKIP regulates TGF-β1-stimulated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and uPA Inhibitor (PAI-1 in the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell model. Materials and Methods. PC-3 prostate cancer cell line was used. The role of SKIP was evaluated using synthetic small interference RNA (siRNA compounds. The expression of uPA, MMP-9, and PAI-1 was evaluated by zymography assays, RT-PCR, and promoter transactivation analysis. Results. In PC-3 cells TGF-β1 treatment stimulated uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 expressions. The knockdown of SKIP in PC-3 cells enhanced the basal level of uPA, and TGF-β1 treatment inhibited uPA production. Both PAI-1 and MMP-9 production levels were increased in response to TGF-β1. The ectopic expression of SKIP inhibited both TGF-β1-induced uPA and MMP-9 promoter transactivation, while PAI-1 promoter response to the factor was unaffected. Conclusions. SKIP regulates the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 stimulated by TGF-β1 in PC-3 cells. Thus, SKIP is implicated in the regulation of extracellular matrix degradation and can therefore be suggested as a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer treatment.

  8. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodelling and Limits Embryo Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Stuart P.; Quiñonero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the trophoblast into the maternal decidua is regulated by both the trophoectoderm and the endometrial stroma, and entails the action of tissue remodeling enzymes. Trophoblast invasion requires the action of metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and in turn, decidual cells express tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). The balance between these promoting and restraining factors is a key event for the successful outcome of pregnancy. Gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that unpacks condensed chromatin activating gene expression. In this study we analyze the effect of histone acetylation on the expression of tissue remodeling enzymes and activity of human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) related to trophoblast invasion control. Treatment of hESCs with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) increased the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 while decreased MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA and have an inhibitory effect on trophoblast invasion. Moreover, histone acetylation is detected at the promoters of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 genes in TSA-treated. In addition, in an in vitro decidualized hESCs model, the increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression is associated with histone acetylation at the promoters of these genes. Our results demonstrate that histone acetylation disrupt the balance of ECM modulators provoking a restrain of trophoblast invasion. These findings are important as an epigenetic mechanism that can be used to control trophoblast invasion. PMID:22291969

  9. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shuang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering.

  10. Contribution of cysteine residues in the extracellular domain of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus to its function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melero José A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mature F protein of all known isolates of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV contains fifteen absolutely conserved cysteine (C residues that are highly conserved among the F proteins of other pneumoviruses as well as the paramyxoviruses. To explore the contribution of the cysteines in the extracellular domain to the fusion activity of HRSV F protein, each cysteine was changed to serine. Mutation of cysteines 37, 313, 322, 333, 343, 358, 367, 393, 416, and 439 abolished or greatly reduced cell surface expression suggesting these residues are critical for proper protein folding and transport to the cell surface. As expected, the fusion activity of these mutations was greatly reduced or abolished. Mutation of cysteine residues 212, 382, and 422 had little to no effect upon cell surface expression or fusion activity at 32°C, 37°C, or 39.5°C. Mutation of C37 and C69 in the F2 subunit either abolished or reduced cell surface expression by 75% respectively. None of the mutations displayed a temperature sensitive phenotype.

  11. Flavonoids suppress human glioblastoma cell growth by inhibiting cell metabolism, migration, and by regulating extracellular matrix proteins and metalloproteinases expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Balbino L; Oliveira, Mona N; Coelho, Paulo L C; Pitanga, Bruno P S; da Silva, Alessandra B; Adelita, Taís; Silva, Victor Diógenes A; Costa, Maria de F D; El-Bachá, Ramon S; Tardy, Marcienne; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Costa, Silvia L

    2015-12-01

    The malignant gliomas are very common primary brain tumors with poor prognosis, which require more effective therapies than the current used, such as with chemotherapy drugs. In this work, we investigated the effects of several polyhydroxylated flavonoids namely, rutin, quercetin (F7), apigenin (F32), chrysin (F11), kaempferol (F12), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone (F2) in human GL-15 glioblastoma cells. We observed that all flavonoids decreased the number of viable cells and the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, they damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, inducing apoptosis. Flavonoids also induced a delay in cell migration, related to a reduction in filopodia-like structures on the cell surface, reduction on metalloproteinase (MMP-2) expression and activity, as well as an increase in intra- and extracellular expression of fibronectin, and intracellular expression of laminin. Morphological changes were also evident in adherent cells characterized by the presence of a condensed cell body with thin and long cellular processes, expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Therefore, these flavonoids should be tested as potential antitumor agents in vitro and in vivo in other malignant glioma models.

  12. Influence of culture conditions and extracellular matrix alignment on human mesenchymal stem cells invasion into decellularized engineered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhamer, Nathan K; Moore, Dusty L; Lobo, Fluvio L; Klair, Nathaniel T; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-05-01

    The variables that influence the in vitro recellularization potential of decellularized engineered tissues, such as cell culture conditions and scaffold alignment, have yet to be explored. The goal of this work was to explore the influence of insulin and ascorbic acid and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment on the recellularization of decellularized engineered tissue by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Aligned and non-aligned tissues were created by specifying the geometry and associated mechanical constraints to fibroblast-mediated fibrin gel contraction and remodelling using circular and C-shaped moulds. Decellularized tissues (matrices) of the same alignment were created by decellularization with detergents. Ascorbic acid promoted the invasion of hMSCs into the matrices due to a stimulated increase in motility and proliferation. Invasion correlated with hyaluronic acid secretion, α-smooth muscle actin expression and decreased matrix thickness. Furthermore, hMSCs invasion into aligned and non-aligned matrices was not different, although there was a difference in cell orientation. Finally, we show that hMSCs on the matrix surface appear to differentiate toward a smooth muscle cell or myofibroblast phenotype with ascorbic acid treatment. These results inform the strategy of recellularizing decellularized engineered tissue with hMSCs.

  13. The mechanical properties of human adipose tissues and their relationships to the structure and composition of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouli, Nadia; Mansfield, Jessica; Green, Ellen; Bell, James; Knight, Beatrice; Liversedge, Neil; Tham, Ji Chung; Welbourn, Richard; Shore, Angela C; Kos, Katarina; Winlove, C Peter

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion in obesity is characterized by cellular growth and continuous extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling with increased fibrillar collagen deposition. It is hypothesized that the matrix can inhibit cellular expansion and lipid storage. Therefore, it is important to fully characterize the ECM's biomechanical properties and its interactions with cells. In this study, we characterize and compare the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous and omental tissues, which have different physiological functions. AT was obtained from 44 subjects undergoing surgery. Force/extension and stress/relaxation data were obtained. The effects of osmotic challenge were measured to investigate the cellular contribution to tissue mechanics. Tissue structure and its response to tensile strain were determined using nonlinear microscopy. AT showed nonlinear stress/strain characteristics of up to a 30% strain. Comparing paired subcutaneous and omental samples (n = 19), the moduli were lower in subcutaneous: initial 1.6 ± 0.8 (means ± SD) and 2.9 ± 1.5 kPa (P = 0.001), final 11.7 ± 6.4 and 32 ± 15.6 kPa (P matrix fibers. These results suggest that subcutaneous AT has greater capacity for expansion and recovery from mechanical deformation than omental AT.

  14. Non-fibrous inorganic particles in human bronchoalveolar lavage fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumortier, P; De Vuyst, P; Yernault, J C

    1989-12-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a simple and non-invasive sampling technique of the deep lung. Analytical electron microscopy was used for the identification and quantification of non-fibrous inorganic particles recovered in BAL fluid samples from 51 subjects with various occupational exposures (silica, silicates, metals and alloys, metallic oxides, precious and hard metals, abrasives). Around 4750 particles were analysed. More than sixty different compounds were identified, among which silica, kaolinite, illite, mica, Fe oxides and hydroxides, appeared to be ubiquitous. Feldspar, talc, chlorite, Al oxide, Ti oxide, tungsten carbide, stainless steel, carbonaceous compounds and flyash were also frequently encountered. From 1 to 21 compounds were identified in each sample. Repeated BAL samples obtained for 2 subjects did not show significant differences. Particles characteristic of the occupational exposure were found in BAL up to 21 years after cessation. BAL content can also reflect mixed occupational exposures. Absolute particle concentrations measured in twelve samples ranged between 0.1 and 9.9 x 10(6) particles/ml BAL fluid and mean particle diameter ranged between 0.5 and 1.2 microns. Mineralogical analysis of non-fibrous particles in BAL can be a useful tool to investigate occupational exposures. It allows, in most cases, a better characterization of the exposure than medical questioning. It may be helpful in identifying pathogenic particles, however it must be kept in mind that a positive result is only a proof of exposure and never a proof of disease. The main limitations of this technique are difficulties in sampling severely diseased subjects and inaccuracy in detecting easily soluble compounds and particles with a high rate of alveolar clearance.

  15. Human resting extracellular heat shock protein 72 concentration decreases during the initial adaptation to exercise in a hot, humid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen C.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Nimmo, Myra A.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 72 is a cytosolic protein that also is present in the circulation. Extracellular Hsp72 (eHsp72) is inducible by exercise and is suggested to act as a danger signal to the immune system. The adaptive response of eHsp72 to repeated exercise-heat exposures in humans remains to be determined. An intracellular animal study found a reduced Hsp72 response, with no change in resting levels, during heat stress after a single day of passive heat acclimation. The current study therefore tested whether adaptations in human eHsp72 levels would similarly occur 24 hours after a single exercise-heat exposure. Seven males completed cycle exercise (42.5% V̇O2peak for 2 hours) in a hot, humid environment (38°C, 60% relative humidity) on each of 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein before exercise and 0 hours and 22 hours postexercise for the analysis of eHsp72. Exercise-heat stress resulted in enhanced eHsp72, with a similar absolute increase found on both days (day 1: 1.26 ng/mL [0.80 ng/mL]; day 2: 1.29 ng/mL [1.60 ng/mL]). Resting eHsp72 decreased from rest on day 1 to day 2's 22-hour postexercise sample (P < 0.05). It is suggested that the reduction in resting eHsp72 after 2 consecutive exercise-heat exposures is possibly due to an enhanced removal from the circulation, for either immunoregulatory functions, or for improved cellular stress tolerance in this initial, most stressful period of acclimation. PMID:16817318

  16. Bioprocess development for extracellular production of recombinant human interleukin-3 (hIL-3) in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagar, Vikas Kumar; Adivitiya; Devi, Nirmala; Khasa, Yogender Pal

    2016-10-01

    Human interleukin-3 (hIL-3) is a therapeutically important cytokine involved in the maturation and differentiation of various cells of the immune system. The codon-optimized hIL-3 gene was cloned in fusion with the N-terminus α-mating factor signal peptide of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under an inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) promoter. A Zeocin concentration up to 2000 mg/L was used to select hyper-producers. The shake flask cultivation studies in the Pichia pastoris GS115 host resulted a maximum recombinant hIL-3 expression level of 145 mg/L in the extracellular medium under the control of AOX1 promoter. The batch fermentation strategy allowed us to attain a fairly pure glycosylated hIL-3 protein in the culture supernatant at a final concentration of 475 mg/L with a high volumetric productivity of 4.39 mg/L/h. The volumetric product concentration achieved at bioreactor level was 3.28 folds greater than the shake flask results. The 6x His-tagged protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and confirmed further by western blot analysis using anti-6x His tag antibody. The glycosylation of recombinant hIL-3 protein was confirmed in a PNGase F deglycosylation reaction where it showed a molecular weight band pattern similar to E. coli produced non-glycosylated hIL-3 protein. The structural properties of recombinant hIL-3 protein were confirmed by CD and fluorescence spectroscopy where protein showed 40 % α-helix, 12 % β-sheets with an emission maxima at 343 nm. MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis was used to establish the protein identity. The biological activity of purified protein was confirmed by the human erythroleukemia TF-1 cell proliferation assay.

  17. Short waves-induced enhancement of proliferation of human chondrocytes: involvement of extracellular signal-regulated map-kinase (erk).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue-Long; Chan, Rai-Chi; Cheng, He-Hsiung; Huang, Chun-Jen; Lu, Yih-Chau; Chen, I-Shu; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chang, Hong-Tai; Huang, Jong-Khing; Chen, Jin-Shyr; Ho, Chin-Man; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2007-07-01

    1. Short-wave diathermy (SWD) is a form of radiofrequency radiation that is used therapeutically by physiotherapists. The cellular mechanisms of SWD are unclear. The present study was performed to explore the effect of different conditions of short-wave exposure on the proliferation of cultured human chondrocytes. 2. Cells exposed to short waves once per day for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in proliferation by 42% compared with the control cells. In cells that were treated with short waves twice per day for seven consecutive days, or only once on Day 1 and then examined for proliferation on Day 7, cell proliferation was greater than the control cells by 40% and 30%, respectively. 3. Given the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in the proliferation of different cell types, efforts were extended to explore the role of three major types of MAPK; that is, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38. 4. It was found that the level of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK 1 and ERK 2) increased significantly within 5-120 min following consecutive exposure to short waves for 7 days. Exposure to short waves failed to alter the intensity of phosphorylated JNK and p38 within 0-240 min. 5. Cells were exposed to short waves once for seven consecutive days in the presence of 0, 10 micromol/L, 20 micromol/L or 50 micromol/L PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor). PD98059 totally inhibited short waves-induced enhancement of proliferation without altering normal control viability. In the presence of short waves and PD98059, the cell viability was lower than the normal control. Together, the data suggest that short waves could increase proliferation in human chondrocytes through activation of the ERK pathway, which is also involved in maintaining normal cell proliferation under physiological conditions.

  18. Oxidation modifies the structure and function of the extracellular matrix generated by human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Christine Y; Degendorfer, Georg; Hammer, Astrid; Whitelock, John M; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2014-04-15

    ECM (extracellular matrix) materials, such as laminin, perlecan, type IV collagen and fibronectin, play a key role in determining the structure of the arterial wall and the properties of cells that interact with the ECM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peroxynitrous acid, an oxidant generated by activated macrophages, on the structure and function of the ECM laid down by HCAECs (human coronary artery endothelial cells) in vitro and in vivo. We show that exposure of HCAEC-derived native matrix components to peroxynitrous acid (but not decomposed oxidant) at concentrations >1 μM results in a loss of antibody recognition of perlecan, collagen IV, and cell-binding sites on laminin and fibronectin. Loss of recognition was accompanied by decreased HCAEC adhesion. Real-time PCR showed up-regulation of inflammation-associated genes, including MMP7 (matrix metalloproteinase 7) and MMP13, as well as down-regulation of the laminin α2 chain, in HCAECs cultured on peroxynitrous acid-treated matrix compared with native matrix. Immunohistochemical studies provided evidence of co-localization of laminin with 3-nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of peroxynitrous acid damage, in type II-III/IV human atherosclerotic lesions, consistent with matrix damage occurring during disease development in vivo. The results of the present study suggest a mechanism through which peroxynitrous acid modifies endothelial cell-derived native ECM proteins of the arterial basement membrane in atherosclerotic lesions. These changes to ECM and particularly perlecan and laminin may be important in inducing cellular dysfunction and contribute to atherogenesis.

  19. Cell-free DNA in human follicular fluid as a biomarker of embryo quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, E; Traver, S; Molinari, N; Mullet, T; Monforte, M; Vintejoux, E; Hamamah, S

    2014-12-01

    Could cell-free DNA (cfDNA) quantification in individual human follicular fluid (FF) samples become a new non-invasive predictive biomarker for in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes? CfDNA level in human follicular fluid samples was significantly correlated with embryo quality and could be used as an innovative non-invasive biomarker to improve IVF outcomes. CfDNA fragments, resulting from apoptotic or necrotic events, are present in the bloodstream and their quantification is already used as a biomarker for gynaecological and pregnancy disorders. Follicular fluid is important for oocyte development and contains plasma components and factors secreted by granulosa cells during folliculogenesis. CfDNA presence in follicular fluid and its potential use as an IVF outcome biomarker have never been investigated. One hundred individual follicular fluid samples were collected from 43 female patients undergoing conventional IVF (n = 26) or ICSI (n = 17). CfDNA level was quantified in each individual follicular fluid sample. At oocyte collection day, follicles were aspirated individually. Only blood-free follicular fluid samples were included in the study. Follicle size was calculated based on the follicular fluid volume. Each corresponding cumulus-oocyte complex was isolated for IVF or ICSI procedures. Follicular fluid cfDNA was measured by quantitative PCR with ALU-specific primers. Human follicular fluid samples from individual follicles contain measurable amounts of cfDNA (mean ± SD, 1.62 ± 2.08 ng/µl). CfDNA level was significantly higher in small follicles (8-12 mm in diameter) than in large ones (>18 mm) (mean ± SD, 2.54 ± 0.78 ng/µl versus 0.71 ± 0.44 ng/µl, respectively, P = 0.007). Moreover, cfDNA concentration was significantly and negatively correlated with follicle size (r = -0.34; P = 0.003). A weak significant negative correlation between DNA integrity and 17β-estradiol level in follicular fluid samples at oocyte collection day was observed (r = -0

  20. Modulation of extracellular matrix genes reflects the magnitude of physiological adaptation to aerobic exercise training in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenhaff Paul L

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular exercise reduces cardiovascular and metabolic disease partly through improved aerobic fitness. The determinants of exercise-induced gains in aerobic fitness in humans are not known. We have demonstrated that over 500 genes are activated in response to endurance-exercise training, including modulation of muscle extracellular matrix (ECM genes. Real-time quantitative PCR, which is essential for the characterization of lower abundance genes, was used to examine 15 ECM genes potentially relevant for endurance-exercise adaptation. Twenty-four sedentary male subjects undertook six weeks of high-intensity aerobic cycle training with muscle biopsies being obtained both before and 24 h after training. Subjects were ranked based on improvement in aerobic fitness, and two cohorts were formed (n = 8 per group: the high-responder group (HRG; peak rate of oxygen consumption increased by +0.71 ± 0.1 L min-1; p -1, ns. ECM genes profiled included the angiopoietin 1 and related genes (angiopoietin 2, tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and EGF-like domains 1 (TIE1 and 2 (TIE2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and related receptors (VEGF receptor 1, VEGF receptor 2 and neuropilin-1, thrombospondin-4, α2-macroglobulin and transforming growth factor β2. Results neuropilin-1 (800%; p VEGF receptor 2 (300%; p VEGF receptor 1 mRNA actually declined in the LRG (p TIE1 and TIE2 mRNA levels were unaltered in the LRG, whereas transcription levels of both genes were increased by 2.5-fold in the HRG (p thrombospondin-4 (900%; p α2-macroglobulin (300%, p transforming growth factor β2 transcript increased only in the HRG (330%; p Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that aerobic training activates angiopoietin 1 and TIE2 genes in human muscle, but only when aerobic capacity adapts to exercise-training. The fourfold-greater increase in aerobic fitness and markedly differing gene expression profile in the HRG indicates that

  1. Coarse-Graining the Fluid Flow around a Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Smith, David J.; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2017-03-01

    The flagellar beat is extracted from human sperm digital imaging microscopy and used to determine the flow around the cell and its trajectory, via boundary element simulation. Comparison of the predicted cell trajectory with observation demonstrates that simulation can predict fine-scale sperm dynamics at the qualitative level. The flow field is also observed to reduce to a time-dependent summation of regularized Stokes flow singularities, approximated at leading order by a blinking force triplet. Such regularized singularity decompositions may be used to upscale cell level detail into population models of human sperm motility.

  2. Head movement, an important contributor to human cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Chi, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cong; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lin, Xiang-Tao; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via the myodural bridges (MDBs). Recently, it was suggested that they might work as a pump to provide power for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the suboccipital muscles contractions on the CSF flow. Forty healthy adult volunteers were subjected to cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Each volunteer was scanned twice, once before and once after one-minute-head-rotation period. CSF flow waveform parameters at craniocervical junction were analyzed. The results showed that, after the head rotations, the maximum and average CSF flow rates during ventricular diastole were significantly increased, and the CSF stroke volumes during diastole and during entire cardiac cycle were significantly increased. This suggested that the CSF flow was significantly promoted by head movements. Among the muscles related with head movements, only three suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via MDBs. It was believed that MDBs might transform powers of the muscles to CSF. The present results suggested that the head movements served as an important contributor to CSF dynamics and the MDBs might be involved in this mechanism. PMID:27538827

  3. Correlations between Different Heavy Metals in Diverse Body Fluids: Studies of Human Semen Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Mínguez-Alarcón

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that exposure to heavy metals may impair male reproduction. To measure the effect produced by low doses of heavy metals on semen parameters, it is necessary to clarify in which body fluids those measurements must be performed. Sixty-one men attending infertility clinics participated in our study. Concentrations of lead, cadmium, and mercury were measured in whole blood, blood plasma, and seminal plasma using spectroanalytical and electrochemical methods. Semen analyses were performed according to World Health Organization criteria. For statistical analysis, Spearman's rank correlations, mean comparison tests, and discriminant analysis were calculated. Significant correlations between the measured concentrations of the three heavy metals in the same biological fluids were observed. However, no similar relationship was seen when comparing the concentrations in different body fluids of the same metal. According to our results and previous publications, seminal plasma might be the best body fluid for assessing impairment of human semen parameters.

  4. Mapping molecular differences and extracellular matrix gene expression in segmental outflow pathways of the human ocular trabecular meshwork.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice A Vranka

    Full Text Available Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is the primary risk factor for glaucoma, and lowering IOP remains the only effective treatment for glaucoma. The trabecular meshwork (TM in the anterior chamber of the eye regulates IOP by generating resistance to aqueous humor outflow. Aqueous humor outflow is segmental, but molecular differences between high and low outflow regions of the TM are poorly understood. In this study, flow regions of the TM were characterized using fluorescent tracers and PCR arrays. Anterior segments from human donor eyes were perfused at physiological pressure in an ex vivo organ culture system. Fluorescently-labeled microspheres of various sizes were perfused into anterior segments to label flow regions. Actively perfused microspheres were segmentally distributed, whereas microspheres soaked passively into anterior segments uniformly labeled the TM and surrounding tissues with no apparent segmentation. Cell-tracker quantum dots (20 nm were localized to the outer uveal and corneoscleral TM, whereas larger, modified microspheres (200 nm localized throughout the TM layers and Schlemm's canal. Distribution of fluorescent tracers demonstrated a variable labeling pattern on both a macro- and micro-scale. Quantitative PCR arrays allowed identification of a variety of extracellular matrix genes differentially expressed in high and low flow regions of the TM. Several collagen genes (COL16A1, COL4A2, COL6A1 and 2 and MMPs (1, 2, 3 were enriched in high, whereas COL15A1, and MMP16 were enriched in low flow regions. Matrix metalloproteinase activity was similar in high and low regions using a quantitative FRET peptide assay, whereas protein levels in tissues showed modest regional differences. These gene and protein differences across regions of the TM provide further evidence for a molecular basis of segmental flow routes within the aqueous outflow pathway. New insight into the molecular mechanisms of segmental aqueous outflow may aid in

  5. Transfer of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Human Cystic Fibrosis Cells Mediated by Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vituret, Cyrielle; Gallay, Kathy; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Ftaich, Najate; Matei, Constantin I; Archer, Fabienne; Ronfort, Corinne; Mornex, Jean-François; Chanson, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio; Boulanger, Pierre; Hong, Saw See

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, resulting in a deficiency in chloride channel activity. In this study, extracellular vesicles (EVs), microvesicles, and exosomes were used as vehicles to deliver exogenous CFTR glycoprotein and its encoding mRNA (mRNA(GFP-CFTR)) to CF cells to correct the CFTR chloride channel function. We isolated microvesicles and exosomes from the culture medium of CFTR-positive Calu-3 cells, or from A549 cells transduced with an adenoviral vector overexpressing a GFP-tagged CFTR (GFP-CFTR). Both microvesicles and exosomes had the capacity to package and deliver the GFP-CFTR glycoprotein and mRNA(GFP-CFTR) to target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Homologous versus heterologous EV-to-cell transfer was studied, and it appeared that the cellular uptake of EVs was significantly more efficient in homologous transfer. The incubation of CF15 cells, a nasal epithelial cell line homozygous for the ΔF508 CFTR mutation, with microvesicles or exosomes loaded with GFP-CFTR resulted in the correction of the CFTR function in CF cells in a dose-dependent manner. A time-course analysis of EV-transduced CF cells suggested that CFTR transferred as mature glycoprotein was responsible for the CFTR-associated channel activity detected at early times posttransduction, whereas GFP-CFTR translated from exogenous mRNA(GFP-CFTR) was responsible for the CFTR function at later times. Collectively, this study showed the potential application of microvesicles and exosomes as vectors for CFTR transfer and functional correction of the genetic defect in human CF cells.

  6. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Marijke I.; Brisson, Alain R.; van Herwijnen, Martijn J. C.; Tan, Sisareuth; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Redegeld, Frank A.; Garssen, Johan; Wauben, Marca H. M.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored) breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at −80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system. PMID:25206958

  7. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Marijke I; Brisson, Alain R; van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; Tan, Sisareuth; van de Lest, Chris H A; Redegeld, Frank A; Garssen, Johan; Wauben, Marca H M; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored) breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at -80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system.

  8. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke I. Zonneveld

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at −80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system.

  9. Effects of topical human amniotic fluid and human serum in a mouse model of keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto, Guilherme G; Camacho, Walter; Castro-Combs, Juan; Li, Li; Martins, Suy Anne R; Wittmann, Priscila; Campos, Mauro; Behrens, Ashley

    2012-04-01

    To compare the effects of topical human amniotic fluid (HAF), topical human serum (HS), and topical artificial tears in a mouse model of dry eye. Thirty C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 treatment groups: HAF, HS, and preservative-free artificial tears. Dry eye was induced by an injection of botulinum toxin B (BTX-B) into the lacrimal gland. Tear production and ocular surface fluorescein staining were evaluated in each mouse at 6 time points during a 4-week period. Goblet cell density was assessed in stained histological sections. Apoptotic keratocytes were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling test assay. A significant decrease in tear production was observed 3 days after BTX-B injection in all groups. At week 1, the HAF and HS groups had improved tear production compared with the control group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively). HAF had a significantly improved fluorescein staining score compared with the HS (P = 0.043) and control (P = 0.007) groups at week 2. Goblet cell density was significantly decreased in the control group compared with the HAF and HS groups (P < 0.001). No difference in the amount of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive keratocytes was observed among the groups. HAF was superior to HS and artificial tears for improving corneal staining within 2 weeks of therapy in this induced mouse model of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Clinical studies are needed to ascertain the benefits of these therapies in patients with ocular surface disorders associated with dry eye.

  10. Fluid mechanics of human fetal right ventricles from image-based computational fluid dynamics using 4D clinical ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiputra, Hadi; Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Heng, Joel Jia Wei; Guo, Lan; Soomar, Sanah Merchant; Leo, Hwa Liang; Biwas, Arijit; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    There are 0.6-1.9% of US children who were born with congenital heart malformations. Clinical and animal studies suggest that abnormal blood flow forces might play a role in causing these malformation, highlighting the importance of understanding the fetal cardiovascular fluid mechanics. We performed computational fluid dynamics simulations of the right ventricles, based on four-dimensional ultrasound scans of three 20-wk-old normal human fetuses, to characterize their flow and energy dynamics. Peak intraventricular pressure gradients were found to be 0.2-0.9 mmHg during systole, and 0.1-0.2 mmHg during diastole. Diastolic wall shear stresses were found to be around 1 Pa, which could elevate to 2-4 Pa during systole in the outflow tract. Fetal right ventricles have complex flow patterns featuring two interacting diastolic vortex rings, formed during diastolic E wave and A wave. These rings persisted through the end of systole and elevated wall shear stresses in their proximity. They were observed to conserve ∼25.0% of peak diastolic kinetic energy to be carried over into the subsequent systole. However, this carried-over kinetic energy did not significantly alter the work done by the heart for ejection. Thus, while diastolic vortexes played a significant role in determining spatial patterns and magnitudes of diastolic wall shear stresses, they did not have significant influence on systolic ejection. Our results can serve as a baseline for future comparison with diseased hearts.

  11. Inhibition of Brain Swelling after Ischemia-Reperfusion by β-Adrenergic Antagonists: Correlation with Increased K+ and Decreased Ca2+ Concentrations in Extracellular Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infarct size and brain edema following ischemia/reperfusion are reduced by inhibitors of the Na+, K+, 2Cl−, and water cotransporter NKCC1 and by β1-adrenoceptor antagonists. NKCC1 is a secondary active transporter, mainly localized in astrocytes, driven by transmembrane Na+/K+ gradients generated by the Na+,K+-ATPase. The astrocytic Na+,K+-ATPase is stimulated by small increases in extracellular K+ concentration and by the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Larger K+ increases, as occurring during ischemia, also stimulate NKCC1, creating cell swelling. This study showed no edema after 3 hr medial cerebral artery occlusion but pronounced edema after 8 hr reperfusion. The edema was abolished by inhibitors of specifically β1-adrenergic pathways, indicating failure of K+-mediated, but not β1-adrenoceptor-mediated, stimulation of Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 transport during reoxygenation. Ninety percent reduction of extracellular Ca2+ concentration occurs in ischemia. Ca2+ omission abolished K+ uptake in normoxic cultures of astrocytes after addition of 5 mM KCl. A large decrease in ouabain potency on K+ uptake in cultured astrocytes was also demonstrated in Ca2+-depleted media, and endogenous ouabains are needed for astrocytic K+ uptake. Thus, among the ionic changes induced by ischemia, the decrease in extracellular Ca2+ causes failure of the high-K+-stimulated Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 ion/water uptake, making β1-adrenergic activation the only stimulus and its inhibition effective against edema.

  12. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in amniotic fluid modulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human amnion-derived WISH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Im; Jo, Eun Jin; Lee, Ha-Young; Cha, Moon Seok; Min, Jung Kee; Choi, Chang Hwan; Lee, Yong Moon; Choi, Young-Ae; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Kyu Sup; Kwak, Jong-Young; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2003-08-22

    The metabolism of arachidonic acid, in particular the generation of prostaglandins (PGs), has been proposed to play a key role in the regulation of labor. Moreover, several extracellular proteins have been reported to modulate PG synthesis in amnion cells. In this study, we found that lipid components dissolved in the amniotic fluid modulate PG synthesis in WISH human amnion cells and identified one of these components as a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). WISH cells express several S1P receptors including S1P1, S1P2, and S1P3. When WISH cells were stimulated with S1P, PGE2 synthesis increased in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximal activity at around 100 nM. S1P treatment also caused the up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein, which was apparent within 3-12 h of stimulation. In terms of the intracellular signaling pathway of S1P-induced WISH cell activation, we found that S1P stimulated two kinds of MAPK, ERK, and p38 kinase. We examined the roles of these two MAPKs in S1P-induced COX-2 expression. S1P-induced COX-2 expression was blocked completely by PD-98059 but not by SB-203580, suggesting that ERK has a critical role in the process. Transfection of S1P1 or S1P3 but not of S1P2 antisense oligonucleotide inhibited S1P-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in WISH cells, indicating the involvements of S1P1 and S1P3 in the processes. This study demonstrates the physiological role of S1P in amniotic fluid and its effect on the modulation of COX-2 expression and PGs synthesis in WISH cells.

  13. Survey of 800+ datasets from human tissue and body fluid reveals XenomiRs are likely artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Wenjing; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Holm, Anja

    2017-01-01

    -study in the field, surveying the presence and abundances of cross-species miRNAs (xenomiRs) in 824 sequencing datasets from various human tissues and body fluids. We find that xenomiRs are commonly present in tissues (17%) and body fluids (69%), however the abundances are low, comprising 0.001% of host human mi......RNA counts. Further, we do not detect a significant enrichment of xenomiRs in sequencing data originating from tissues and body fluids that are exposed to dietary intake (such as liver). Likewise, there is no significant depletion of xenomiRs in tissues and body fluids that are relatively separated from...... the main bloodstream (such as brain and cerebro-spinal fluids). Interestingly, the majority (81%) of body fluid xenomiRs stem from rodents, which are rare human dietary contributions, but common laboratory animals. Body fluid samples from the same studies tend to group together when clustered by xenomi...

  14. α1-Adrenergic responsiveness in human skeletal muscle feed arteries: the impact of reducing extracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Stephen J; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Noyes, R Dirk; Morgan, R Garrett; Gifford, Jayson R; Park, Song-Young; Symons, J David; Richardson, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Graded exercise results not only in the modulation of adrenergic mediated smooth muscle tone and a preferential increase in blood flow to the active skeletal muscle termed 'functional sympatholysis', but is also paralleled by metabolically induced reductions in pH. We therefore sought to determine whether pH attenuates α(1)-adrenergic receptor sensitivity in human feed arteries. Feed arteries (560 ± 31 μm i.d.) were harvested from 24 humans (55 ± 4 years old) and studied using the isometric tension technique. Vessel function was assessed using KCl, phenylephrine (PE), ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) concentration-response curves to characterize non-receptor-mediated and receptor-mediated vasocontraction, as well as endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxation, respectively. All concentration-response curves were obtained from (originally contiguous) vessel rings in separate baths with a pH of 7.4, 7.1, 6.8 or 6.5. Reduction of the pH, via HCl, reduced maximal PE-induced vasocontraction (pH 7.4 = 85 ± 19, pH 7.1 = 57 ± 16, pH 6.8 = 34 ± 15 and pH 6.5 = 16 ± 5% KCl(max)), which was partly due to reduced smooth muscle function, as assessed by KCl (pH 7.4 = 88 ± 13, pH 7.1 = 67 ± 8, pH 6.8 = 67 ± 9 and pH 6.5 = 58 ± 8% KCl(max)). Graded acidosis had no effect on maximal vasorelaxation. In summary, these data reveal that reductions in extracellular pH attenuate α(1)-mediated vasocontraction, which is partly explained by reduced smooth muscle function, although vasorelaxation in response to ACh and SNP remained intact. These findings support the concept that local acidosis is likely to contribute to functional sympatholysis and exercise hyperaemia by opposing sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction while not impacting vasodilatation.

  15. Fluid and electrolyte control systems in the human body: A study report

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Research in the area of modeling of the fluid and electrolyte system is briefly reviewed and a model of this system, which is adequate for a basic description of the requisite physiological processes, is presented. The use of this model as an individual subsystem model and as a component of a more complete human model is discussed.

  16. Non-immunoglobulin fraction of human milk protects rabbits against enterotoxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Otnaess, A B; Svennerholm, A M

    1982-01-01

    Human milk was fractionated by ammonium sulphate precipitation and column chromatography. A milk fraction depleted of secretory immunoglobulin A and with an apparent molecular weight of greater than 400,000 inhibited fluid secretion induced by cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin in rabbit ileal loops.

  17. Comparative lipidomic analysis of synovial fluid in human and canine osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinska, M. K.; Mastbergen, S. C.; Liebisch, G.; Wilhelm, J.; Dettmeyer, R. B.; Ishaque, B.; Rickert, M.; Schmitz, G.; Lafeber, F. P.; Steinmeyer, J.

    Objective: The lipid profile of synovial fluid (SF) is related to the health status of joints. The early stages of human osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood, which larger animals are expected to be able to model closely. This study examined whether the canine groove model of OA represents

  18. Comparative lipidomic analysis of synovial fluid in human and canine osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinska, M. K.; Mastbergen, S. C.; Liebisch, G.; Wilhelm, J.; Dettmeyer, R. B.; Ishaque, B.; Rickert, M.; Schmitz, G.; Lafeber, F. P.; Steinmeyer, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The lipid profile of synovial fluid (SF) is related to the health status of joints. The early stages of human osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood, which larger animals are expected to be able to model closely. This study examined whether the canine groove model of OA represents earl

  19. Biomarker discovery in human cerebrospinal fluid: The need for integrative metabolome and proteome databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Schwarz (Emanuel); F.E. Torrey; P.C. Guest (Paul); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe number of metabolites identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has steadily increased over the past 5 years, and in this issue of Genome Medicine David Wishart and colleagues provide a comprehensive update that brings the number of metabolites listed in the CSF metabolome databa

  20. Deorphanization of the human leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) receptor by a signaling screen of the extracellular proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbing; Pao, Lily I.; Zhou, Aileen; Brace, Arthur D.; Halenbeck, Robert; Hsu, Amy W.; Bray, Thomas L.; Hestir, Kevin; Bosch, Elizabeth; Lee, Ernestine; Wang, Gang; Liu, Haixia; Wong, Brian R.; Kavanaugh, W. Michael; Williams, Lewis T.

    2014-01-01

    There are many transmembrane receptor-like proteins whose ligands have not been identified. A strategy for finding ligands when little is known about their tissue source is to screen each extracellular protein individually expressed in an array format by using a sensitive functional readout. Taking this approach, we have screened a large collection (3,191 proteins) of extracellular proteins for their ability to activate signaling of an orphan receptor, leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK). Only two related secreted factors, FAM150A and FAM150B (family with sequence similarity 150 member A and member B), stimulated LTK phosphorylation. FAM150A binds LTK extracellular domain with high affinity (KD = 28 pM). FAM150A stimulates LTK phosphorylation in a ligand-dependent manner. This strategy provides an efficient approach for identifying functional ligands for other orphan receptors. PMID:25331893

  1. Comparison of apoprotein B of low density lipoproteins of human interstitial fluid and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J L; Pflug, J; Reichl, D

    1984-08-15

    Virtually all apoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins of the peripheral interstitial fluid of subjects with primary lymphoedema float in the ultracentrifugal field in the density interval 1.019-1.063 g/ml; in this respect they are similar to plasma low-density lipoproteins (LDL). 2. Virtually all apo-B-containing lipoproteins of interstitial fluid migrate in the electrophoretic field with pre-beta mobility; in this respect they are similar to plasma very-low-density lipoproteins. 3. The apoB of lipoproteins of interstitial fluid does not differ in terms of Mr from apoB-100 of human plasma [Kane, Hardman & Paulus (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 2465-2469] as determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 4. Both apoB of interstitial fluid and plasma are heterogenous in terms of their charge as determined by isoelectric focusing of their complexes with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P40. ApoB of plasma LDL focuses between pH5.9 and 6.65, and that of interstitial fluid LDL between pH 5.9 and 6.1. Thus the overall charge of apoB of interstitial fluid is more negative than that of its plasma LDL counterpart.

  2. The molecular structure and lubricating activity of lubricin isolated from bovine and human synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, D A; Silver, F H; Slayter, H S; Stafford, W; Shore, E

    1985-01-01

    Lubricin was isolated from bovine ankle, metacarpophalangeal and knee and human knee synovial fluids. The lubricins isolated from the bovine joint fluids had the same amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but differences were observed in the relative molecular masses. The Mr values of bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle lubricin determined by light-scattering measurements were about 200 000, whereas values of 132 000 and 143 000 were obtained for the bovine knee lubricin. The human knee lubricin had a similar carbohydrate composition to bovine knee lubricin except for the higher glucosamine content, and the amino acid composition differed slightly. The human sample had a lower glutamic acid content and a leucine/isoleucine ratio of 2:1 compared with 1:1 in the bovine. The Mr value of the human knee lubricin (166 000) was also lower than that of the bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle samples. The Mr value of the bovine knee lubricin determined by sedimentation-equilibrium measurements was 171 000. The length measurements determined by electron microscopy and also the sedimentation measurements showed considerable polydispersity and indicate that the degree of extension of lubricin molecules can vary. Friction measurements showed that the human knee synovial-fluid lubricin had equivalent lubricating ability in a test system in vitro to that observed for lubricin isolated from normal bovine synovial fluids. The lubricating ability of lubricin was concentration-dependent, and each lubricin sample was able to act as a lubricant in vitro in an equivalent manner to whole synovial fluid at concentrations that are thought to occur in vivo. PMID:3977823

  3. Experiments on the fluid dynamics of the human cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Gary

    2011-11-01

    Human coughing is studied non-intrusively by high-speed schlieren videography, revealing a turbulent jet lasting up to 1 sec with a total expelled air volume of about 2 L. Velocimetry of eddy motion reveals a jet centerline airspeed of at least 8 m/sec. With Re roughly 18,000 the cough jet is inertia-driven and buoyancy is negligible. It shows typical round-turbulent-jet behavior, including a conical spreading angle of 24 deg, despite irregular initial conditions. The cough jet is projected several m into the surrounding air before it mixes out. It is well known that a cough can transmit infectious agents, and we are advised to cover our mouths in an apparent attempt to thwart the jet formation. Present experiments have shown that wearing a surgical mask or respirator designed to prevent the inhalation of infectious agents also interferes with the cough-jet formation, redirecting it into the person's rising thermal plume. (Tang et al., J. Royal. Soc. Interface 6, S727, 2009.)

  4. Co-transfection of decorin and interleukin-10 modulates pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix gene expression in human tenocyte culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbah, Sunny A.; Thomas, Dilip; Browne, Shane; O'Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix synthesis and remodelling are driven by increased activity of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). In tendon tissue repair, increased activity of TGF-β1 leads to progressive fibrosis. Decorin (DCN) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) antagonise pathological collagen synthesis by exerting a neutralising effect via downregulation of TGF-β1. Herein, we report that the delivery of DCN and IL-10 transgenes from a collagen hydrogel system supresses the constitutive expression of TGF-β1 and a range of pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix genes.

  5. Human amniotic fluid derived cells can competently substitute dermal fibroblasts in a tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; Hosper, Nynke; Luginbuehl, Joachim; Biedermann, Thomas; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid comprises cells with high differentiation capacity, thus representing a potential cell source for skin tissue engineering. In this experimental study, we investigated the ability of human amniotic fluid derived cells to substitute dermal fibroblasts and support epidermis formati

  6. Cardiac fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (biomatrix) as a model for the studies of cardiac primitive cell biological properties in normal and pathological adult human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Clotilde; Di Meglio, Franca; Miraglia, Rita; Sacco, Anna Maria; Romano, Veronica; Bancone, Ciro; Della Corte, Alessandro; Montagnani, Stefania; Nurzynska, Daria

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tissue regeneration is guided by stem cells and their microenvironment. It has been recently described that both cardiac stem/primitive cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) change in pathological conditions. This study describes the method for the production of ECM typical of adult human heart in the normal and pathological conditions (ischemic heart disease) and highlights the potential use of cardiac fibroblast-derived ECM for in vitro studies of the interactions between ECM components and cardiac primitive cells responsible for tissue regeneration. Fibroblasts isolated from adult human normal and pathological heart with ischemic cardiomyopathy were cultured to obtain extracellular matrix (biomatrix), composed of typical extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, and matricellular proteins, laminin, and tenascin. After decellularization, this substrate was used to assess biological properties of cardiac primitive cells: proliferation and migration were stimulated by biomatrix from normal heart, while both types of biomatrix protected cardiac primitive cells from apoptosis. Our model can be used for studies of cell-matrix interactions and help to determine the biochemical cues that regulate cardiac primitive cell biological properties and guide cardiac tissue regeneration.

  7. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  8. Cardiac Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix (Biomatrix as a Model for the Studies of Cardiac Primitive Cell Biological Properties in Normal and Pathological Adult Human Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Castaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue regeneration is guided by stem cells and their microenvironment. It has been recently described that both cardiac stem/primitive cells and extracellular matrix (ECM change in pathological conditions. This study describes the method for the production of ECM typical of adult human heart in the normal and pathological conditions (ischemic heart disease and highlights the potential use of cardiac fibroblast-derived ECM for in vitro studies of the interactions between ECM components and cardiac primitive cells responsible for tissue regeneration. Fibroblasts isolated from adult human normal and pathological heart with ischemic cardiomyopathy were cultured to obtain extracellular matrix (biomatrix, composed of typical extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen and fibronectin, and matricellular proteins, laminin, and tenascin. After decellularization, this substrate was used to assess biological properties of cardiac primitive cells: proliferation and migration were stimulated by biomatrix from normal heart, while both types of biomatrix protected cardiac primitive cells from apoptosis. Our model can be used for studies of cell-matrix interactions and help to determine the biochemical cues that regulate cardiac primitive cell biological properties and guide cardiac tissue regeneration.

  9. Expression of matrix metrallproteinase-2 in human tears fluid after LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Wei Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To monitor long-term changes of matrix metalloproteinase-2(MMP-2in human tears fluid after laser in situ keratomileusis(LASIK. METHODS: Thirty-two myopia cases(64 eyesunderwent uneventful LASIK were enrolled in the study. Tear fluid were collected and MMP-2 expression was analyzed by Western-bolt assay preoperatively and postoperatively on 15d, at 1, 3mo, and 1a. RESULTS: LASIK increased the concentration of MMP-2 in human tear fluid. At 15d postoperatively, the magnitude of MMP-2 was 1.4 times that of preoperative, thereafter subsided, but didn't return to preoperative level by 3mo(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: MMP-2 is significantly expressed in human tear fluid after LASIK, then subsided with time, but didn't return to preoperative level by 3mo and almost recovered up to 1a, indicating wound healing of LASIK would continue up at least 3mo after surgery and almost recovered 1a postoperatively.

  10. In vitro studies evaluating leaching of mercury from mine waste calcine using simulated human body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almadén, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute primary ore or compounds formed during Hg retorting. Elevated leachate Hg concentrations were found during calcine leaching using a simulated gastric fluid (as much as 6200 μg of Hg leached/g sample). Elevated Hg concentrations were also found in calcine leachates using a simulated lung fluid (as much as 9200 μg of Hg leached/g), serum-based fluid (as much as 1600 μg of Hg leached/g), and water of pH 5 (as much as 880 μg of Hg leached/g). The leaching capacity of Hg is controlled by calcine mineralogy; thus, calcines containing soluble Hg compounds contain higher leachate Hg concentrations. Results indicate that ingestion or inhalation of Hg mine-waste calcine may lead to increased Hg concentrations in the human body, especially through the ingestion pathway.

  11. Culturing on decellularized extracellular matrix enhances antioxidant properties of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhen [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou, Long; Chen, Xi [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Liu, Tao [Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Pan, Guoqing; Cui, Wenguo; Li, Mao; Luo, Zong-Ping [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Pei, Ming [Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Yang, Huilin [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gong, Yihong, E-mail: gongyih@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); He, Fan, E-mail: fanhe@suda.edu.cn [Orthopaedic Institute, Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) have attracted great interest in clinical application because of their regenerative potential and their lack of ethical issues. Our previous studies showed that decellularized cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) provided an in vivo-mimicking microenvironment for MSCs and facilitated in vitro cell expansion. This study was conducted to analyze the cellular response of UC-MSCs when culturing on the ECM, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular antioxidative enzymes, and the resistance to exogenous oxidative stress. After decellularization, the architecture of cell-deposited ECM was characterized as nanofibrous, collagen fibrils and the matrix components were identified as type I and III collagens, fibronectin, and laminin. Compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) plates, culturing on ECM yielded a 2-fold increase of UC-MSC proliferation and improved the percentage of cells in the S phase by 2.4-fold. The levels of intracellular ROS and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in ECM-cultured cells were reduced by 41.7% and 82.9%, respectively. More importantly, ECM-cultured UC-MSCs showed enhanced expression and activity of intracellular antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, up-regulated expression of silent information regulator type 1, and suppressed phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, a continuous treatment with exogenous 100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dramatically inhibited osteogenic differentiation of UC-MSCs cultured on TCPS, but culturing on ECM retained the differentiation capacity for matrix mineralization and osteoblast-specific marker gene expression. Collectively, by providing sufficient cell amounts and enhancing antioxidant capacity, decellularized ECM can be a promising cell culture platform for in vitro expansion of UC-MSCs. - Highlights: • Decellularization preserved the architecture and components of cell

  12. Ability of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex to repair photoaged skin by stimulation of biomarkers in human extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCook JP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available John P McCook,1 Thomas J Stephens,2 Lily I Jiang,2 Robert M Law,3 Vincent Gotz4 1Discovery Partners LLC, Frisco, 2Thomas J. Stephens & Associates, Inc., Richardson, 3ProPath, Dallas, TX, 4MDRejuvena, Inc., San Diego, CA, USA Purpose: To examine the effect of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex on the expression of biomarkers of photoaged dermal extracellular matrix indicative of skin repair.Patients and methods: Following a previously published 12-day clinical assessment model, skin biopsy samples from the forearms of four healthy females with signs of photoaged skin were obtained and samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for key biomarkers of aging skin after each subject was treated with a test material consisting of a gel containing a liposomal dispersion of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex 0.05%, a positive control of tretinoin cream 0.025%, and an untreated negative control.Results: There was a statistically significantly greater amount of fibrillin/amyloid P and epidermal mucins found for skin treated with the test material containing 0.05% sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and the reference control tretinoin 0.025% cream compared to the negative control (untreated site. Expression of procollagen 1 and dermal mucin also showed a greater presence in the samples treated with the test material and the reference control compared to the negative control, though the differences were not statistically significant. No adverse events were observed or reported by the subjects during the course of the study.Conclusion: The results of this human biopsy study suggest that both retinoids and sodium copper chlorophyllin complex have beneficial effects on biomarkers of photoaged skin. Products containing both sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and retinols may provide a dual approach to reversing age-related decreases in hyaluronic acid (HA in the skin: inhibition of the breakdown of HA via sodium copper chlorophyllin complex by inhibition

  13. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, John B; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E

    2016-08-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces.

  14. Extracellular matrix components supporting human islet function in alginate-based immunoprotective microcapsules for treatment of diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Llacua Carrasco, Luis; de Haan, Bart J; Smink, Sandra A; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In the pancreas, extracellular matrix (ECM) components play an import role in providing mechanical and physiological support, and also contribute to the function of islets. These ECM-connections are damaged during islet-isolation from the pancreas and are not fully recovered after encapsulation and

  15. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Liu, J.; Macias, B.; Martin, D. S.; Minkoff, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Smith, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  16. DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid as biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhen; Shi, Min; Chung, Kathryn A; Quinn, Joseph F; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas; Jankovic, Joseph; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Leverenz, James B; Baird, Geoffrey; Montine, Thomas J; Hancock, Aneeka M; Hwang, Hyejin; Pan, Catherine; Bradner, Joshua; Kang, Un J; Jensen, Poul H; Zhang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    Biomarkers are urgently needed for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Both DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein, two proteins critically involved in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis, have been tested as disease biomarkers in several recent studies with inconsistent results. These have been largely due to variation in the protein species detected by different antibodies, limited numbers of patients in some studies, or inadequate control of several important variables. In this study, the nature of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid was studied by a combination of western blotting, gel filtration and mass spectrometry. Sensitive and quantitative Luminex assays detecting most, if not all, species of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid were established. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein from 117 patients with Parkinson's disease, 132 healthy individuals and 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease were analysed using newly developed, highly sensitive Luminex technology while controlling for several major confounders. A total of 299 individuals and 389 samples were analysed. The results showed that cerebrospinal fluid DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein levels were dependent on age and influenced by the extent of blood contamination in cerebrospinal fluid. Both DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein levels were decreased in Parkinson's patients versus controls or Alzheimer's patients when blood contamination was controlled for. In the population aged > or = 65 years, when cut-off values of 40 and 0.5 ng/ml were chosen for DJ-1 and alpha-synuclein, respectively, the sensitivity and specificity for patients with Parkinson's disease versus controls were 90 and 70% for DJ-1, and 92 and 58% for alpha-synuclein. A combination of the two markers did not enhance the test performance. There was no association between DJ-1 or alpha-synuclein and the severity of Parkinson's disease. Taken together, this represents

  17. Fluid shifts and muscle function in humans during acute simulated weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, A. R.; Tipton, C. M.; Gollnick, P. D.; Mubarak, S. J.; Tucker, B. J.; Akeson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The acute effects of simulated weightlessness on transcapillary fluid balance, tissue fluid shifts, muscle function, and triceps surface reflex time were studied in eight supine human subjects who were placed in a 5 degrees head-down tilt position for 8 hr. Results show a cephalic fluid shift from the legs as indicated by facial edema, nasal congestion, increased urine flow, decreased creatinine excretion, reduced calf girth, and decreased lower leg volume. The interstitial fluid pressure in the tibialis anterior muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg was found to fall significantly, while other transcapillary pressures (capillary and interstitial fluid colloid osmotic pressures) were relatively unchanged. The total water content of the soleus muscle was unchanged during the head-down tilt. After head-down tilt, isometric strength and isokinetic strength of the plantar flexors were unchanged, while the triceps surae reflex time associated with plantar flexion movement slowed slightly. These results demonstrate a dehydration effect of head-down tilt on muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg that may affect muscle function.

  18. Survey of 800+ datasets from human tissue and body fluid reveals XenomiRs are likely artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Wenjing; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Holm, Anja;

    2017-01-01

    -study in the field, surveying the presence and abundances of cross-species miRNAs (xenomiRs) in 824 sequencing datasets from various human tissues and body fluids. We find that xenomiRs are commonly present in tissues (17%) and body fluids (69%), however the abundances are low, comprising 0.001% of host human mi......RNA counts. Further, we do not detect a significant enrichment of xenomiRs in sequencing data originating from tissues and body fluids that are exposed to dietary intake (such as liver). Likewise, there is no significant depletion of xenomiRs in tissues and body fluids that are relatively separated from...

  19. Isolation of osteogenic progenitors from human amniotic fluid using a single step culture protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salini Vincenzo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells isolated from amniotic fluid are known to be able to differentiate into different cells types, being thus considered as a potential tool for cellular therapy of different human diseases. In the present study, we report a novel single step protocol for the osteoblastic differentiation of human amniotic fluid cells. Results The described protocol is able to provide osteoblastic cells producing nodules of calcium mineralization within 18 days from withdrawal of amniotic fluid samples. These cells display a complete expression of osteogenic markers (COL1, ONC, OPN, OCN, OPG, BSP, Runx2 within 30 days from withdrawal. In order to test the ability of these cells to proliferate on surfaces commonly used in oral osteointegrated implantology, we carried out cultures onto different test disks, namely smooth copper, machined titanium and Sandblasted and Acid Etching titanium (SLA titanium. Electron microscopy analysis evidenced the best cell growth on this latter surface. Conclusion The described protocol provides an efficient and time-saving tool for the production of osteogenic cells from amniotic fluid that in the future could be used in oral osteointegrated implantology.

  20. Drosophila glia use a conserved cotransporter mechanism to regulate extracellular volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiserson, William M; Forbush, Biff; Keshishian, Haig

    2011-02-01

    The nervous system is protected by blood barriers that use multiple systems to control extracellular solute composition, osmotic pressure, and fluid volume. In the human nervous system, misregulation of the extracellular volume poses serious health threats. Here, we show that the glial cells that form the Drosophila blood-nerve barrier have a conserved molecular mechanism that regulates extracellular volume: the Serine/Threonine kinase Fray, which we previously showed is an ortholog of mammalian PASK/SPAK; and the Na-K-Cl cotransporter Ncc69, which we show is an ortholog of human NKCC1. In mammals, PASK/SPAK binds to NKCC1 and regulates its activity. In Drosophila, larvae mutant for Ncc69 develop a peripheral neuropathy, where fluid accumulates between glia and axons. The accumulation of fluid has no detectable impact on action potential conduction, suggesting that the role of Ncc69 is to maintain volume or osmotic homeostasis. Drosophila Ncc69 has kinetics similar to human NKCC1, and NKCC1 can rescue Ncc69, suggesting that they function in a conserved physiological mechanism. We show that fray and Ncc69 are coexpressed in nerve glia, interact in a yeast-two-hybrid assay, and have an essentially identical bulging nerve phenotype. We propose that normally functioning nerves generate extracellular solutes that are removed by Ncc69 under the control of Fray. This mechanism may perform a similar role in humans, given that NKCC1 is expressed at the blood-brain barrier.

  1. The human angiotensin AT(1) receptor supports G protein-independent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Aplin, Mark; Hansen, Jonas Tind;

    2008-01-01

    The angiotensin AT(1) receptor is a key regulator of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis, and it plays a key role in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia. The importance of human angiotensi...... by the human angiotensin AT(1) receptor has clear pharmacological implications for development of drugs with pathway-specific actions and defined biological outcomes....

  2. Human amniotic fluid derived cells can competently substitute dermal fibroblasts in a tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analog

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Human amniotic fluid comprises cells with high differentiation capacity, thus representing a potential cell source for skin tissue engineering. In this experimental study, we investigated the ability of human amniotic fluid derived cells to substitute dermal fibroblasts and support epidermis formation and stratification in a humanized animal model. METHODS: Dermo-epidermal skin grafts with either amniocytes or with fibroblasts in the dermis were compared in a rat model. Full-thicknes...

  3. Role of secreted glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the infection mechanism of enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: interaction of the extracellular enzyme with human plasminogen and fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, L; Aguilera, L; Giménez, R; Sorolla, M A; Aguilar, J; Badía, J; Baldoma, L

    2007-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) (EC 1.2.1.12) is an anchorless, multifunctional protein displayed on the surface of several fungi and Gram-positive pathogens, which contributes to their adhesion and virulence. To date a role for extracellular GAPDH in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative bacteria has not been described. The aim of this study was to analyze the extracellular localization of GAPDH in enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli strains and to examine its interaction with host components that could be related to the infection mechanism. Recombinant E. coli GAPDH was purified and polyclonal antibodies were obtained. Western blotting and immunoelectron microscopy showed that GAPDH is located on the bacterial surface and released to the culture medium of EHEC and EPEC strains. GAPDH export in these Gram-negative pathogens depends on the external medium, is not mediated by vesicles and leads to an extracellular active enzyme. Non-pathogenic E. coli strains do not secrete GAPDH. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis showed that in E. coli GAPDH is present at least in two major forms with different isoelectric points. Of these forms, the more basic is secreted. Purified GAPDH was found to bind human plasminogen and fibrinogen in Far-Western blot and ELISA-based assays. In addition, GAPDH remained associated with colonic Caco-2 epithelial cells after adhesion of EHEC or EPEC. These observations indicate that exported GAPDH may act as a virulence factor which could contribute to EHEC and EPEC pathogenesis. This is the first description of an extracellular localization for this enzyme, with a function other than its glycolytic role in Gram-negative pathogens.

  4. Uranium(VI) Binding Forms in Selected Human Body Fluids: Thermodynamic Calculations versus Spectroscopic Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Alfatih A A; Geipel, Gerhard; Barkleit, Astrid; Bernhard, Gert

    2015-02-16

    Human exposure to uranium increasingly becomes a subject of interest in many scientific disciplines such as environmental medicine, toxicology, and radiation protection. Knowledge about uranium chemical binding forms(speciation) in human body fluids can be of great importance to understand not only its biokinetics but also its relevance in risk assessment and in designing decorporation therapy in the case of accidental overexposure. In this study, thermodynamic calculations of uranium speciation in relevant simulated and original body fluids were compared with spectroscopic data after ex-situ uranium addition. For the first time, experimental data on U(VI) speciation in body fluids (saliva, sweat, urine) was obtained by means of cryogenic time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (cryo-TRLFS) at 153 K. By using the time dependency of fluorescence decay and the band positions of the emission spectra, various uranyl complexes were demonstrated in the studied samples. The variations of the body fluids in terms of chemical composition, pH, and ionic strength resulted in different binding forms of U(VI). The speciation of U(VI) in saliva and in urine was affected by the presence of bioorganic ligands, whereas in sweat, the distribution depends mainly on inorganic ligands. We also elucidated the role of biological buffers, i.e., phosphate (H(2)PO(4−)/HPO(4)(2−)) on U(VI) distribution, and the system Ca(2+)/UO(2)(2+)/PO(4)(3−) was discussed in detail in both saliva and urine. The theoretical speciation calculations of the main U(VI) species in the investigated body fluids were significantly consistent with the spectroscopic data. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy showed success and reliability for direct determination of U(VI) in such biological matrices with the possibility for further improvement.

  5. Modeling the Fluid Dynamics in a Human Stomach to Gain Insight of Food Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrua, MJ; Singh, RP

    2010-01-01

    During gastric digestion, food is disintegrated by a complex interaction of chemical and mechanical effects. Although the mechanisms of chemical digestion are usually characterized by using in vitro analysis, the difficulty in reproducing the stomach geometry and motility has prevented a good understanding of the local fluid dynamics of gastric contents. The goal of this study was to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to develop a 3-D model of the shape and motility pattern of the stomach wall during digestion, and use it to characterize the fluid dynamics of gastric contents of different viscosities. A geometrical model of an averaged-sized human stomach was created, and its motility was characterized by a series of antral-contraction waves of up to 80% relative occlusion. The flow field within the model (predicted using the software Fluent™) strongly depended on the viscosity of gastric contents. By increasing the viscosity, the formation of the 2 flow patterns commonly regarded as the main mechanisms driving digestion (i.e., the retropulsive jet-like motion and eddy structures) was significantly diminished, while a significant increase of the pressure field was predicted. These results were in good agreement with experimental data previously reported in the literature, and suggest that, contrary to the traditional idea of a rapid and complete homogenization of the meal, gastric contents associated with high viscous meals are poorly mixed. This study illustrates the capability of CFD to provide a unique insight into the fluid dynamics of the gastric contents, and points out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the mechanisms involved in the digestion process. Practical Application This study illustrates the capability of computational fluid dynamic techniques to provide a unique insight into the dynamics of the gastric contents, pointing out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the human

  6. Isolation of c-Kit+ human amniotic fluid stem cells from second trimester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzobon, Michela; Piccoli, Martina; Schiavo, Andrea Alex; Atala, Anthony; De Coppi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS) cells have been described as an appealing source of stem cells because of their (1) fetal, non-embryonic origin, (2) easy access during pregnancy overcoming the ethical issues related both to the use of human embryonic cells and to the postnatal tissue biopsy with donor site morbidity, and (3) their undemanding ability to be expanded. We and others have demonstrated the broad differentiation potential and here we describe the established protocol we developed to obtain c-Kit+ human AFS cells, starting from second trimester amniocentesis samples.

  7. An SV-GMR Needle Sensor-Based Estimation of Volume Density of Magnetic Fluid inside Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Gooneratne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A spin-valve giant magneto-resistive (SV-GMR sensor of needle-type configuration is reported to estimate the volume density of magnetic fluid inside human body. The magnetic fluid is usually injected into human body to kill cancerous cell using hyperthermia-based treatment. To control the heat treatment, a good knowledge of temperature is very much essential. The SV-GMR-based needle-type sensor is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic fluid inside the human body from which the temperature is estimated. The needle-type sensor provides a semi-invasive approach of temperature determination.

  8. Identification of α1-Antitrypsin as a Potential Candidate for Internal Control for Human Synovial Fluid in Western Blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Zhou, Jingming; Wei, Xiaochun; Li, Pengcui; Li, Kai; Wang, Dongming; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wei, Lei

    Western blot of synovial fluid has been widely used for osteoarthritis (OA) research and diagnosis, but there is no ideal loading control for this purpose. Although β-actin is extensively used as loading control in western blot, it is not suitable for synovial fluid because it is not required in synovial fluid as a cytoskeletal protein. A good loading control for synovial fluid in OA studies should have unchanged content in synovial fluids from normal and OA groups, because synovial fluid protein content can vary with changes in synovial vascular permeability with OA onset. In this study, we explore the potential of using α1-antitripsin (A1AT) as loading control for OA synovial fluid in western blot. A1AT level is elevated in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Unlike RA, OA is a non-inflammation disease, which does not induce A1AT. In this study, we identified A1AT as an abundant component of synovial fluid by Mass Spectrometry and confirmed that the level of A1AT is relative constant between human OA and normal synovial fluid by western blot and ELISA. Hence, we proposed that A1AT may be a good loading control for western blot in human OA synovial fluid studies provided that pathological conditions such as RA or A1AT deficiency associated liver or lung diseases are excluded.

  9. Transcriptome adaptation of group B Streptococcus to growth in human amniotic fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Sitkiewicz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus is a bacterial pathogen that causes severe intrauterine infections leading to fetal morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of GBS infection in this environment is poorly understood, in part because we lack a detailed understanding of the adaptation of this pathogen to growth in amniotic fluid. To address this knowledge deficit, we characterized the transcriptome of GBS grown in human amniotic fluid (AF and compared it with the transcriptome in rich laboratory medium. METHODS: GBS was grown in Todd Hewitt-yeast extract medium and human AF. Bacteria were collected at mid-logarithmic, late-logarithmic and stationary growth phase. We performed global expression microarray analysis using a custom-made Affymetrix GeneChip. The normalized hybridization values derived from three biological replicates at each growth point were obtained. AF/THY transcript ratios representing greater than a 2-fold change and P-value exceeding 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have discovered that GBS significantly remodels its transcriptome in response to exposure to human amniotic fluid. GBS grew rapidly in human AF and did not exhibit a global stress response. The majority of changes in GBS transcripts in AF compared to THY medium were related to genes mediating metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, and nucleotides. The majority of the observed changes in transcripts affects genes involved in basic bacterial metabolism and is connected to AF composition and nutritional requirements of the bacterium. Importantly, the response to growth in human AF included significant changes in transcripts of multiple virulence genes such as adhesins, capsule, and hemolysin and IL-8 proteinase what might have consequences for the outcome of host-pathogen interactions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work provides extensive new information about how the transcriptome of GBS responds

  10. Catalytic ferrous iron in amniotic fluid as a predictive marker of human maternal-fetal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yuka; Mukaide, Takahiro; Jiang, Li; Kotani, Tomomi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yukio; Sumigama, Seiji; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid contains numerous biomolecules derived from fetus and mother, thus providing precious information on pregnancy. Here, we evaluated oxidative stress of human amniotic fluid and measured the concentration of catalytic Fe(II). Amniotic fluid samples were collected with consent from a total of 89 subjects in Nagoya University Hospital, under necessary medical interventions: normal pregnancy at term, normal pregnancy at the 2nd trimester, preterm delivery with maternal disorders but without fetal disorders, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, fetal growth restriction, pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, Down syndrome and trisomy 18. Catalytic Fe(II) and oxidative stress markers (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-OHdG; dityrosine) were determined with RhoNox-1 and specific antibodies, respectively, using plate assays. Levels of 8-OHdG and dityrosine were higher in the 3rd trimester compared with the 2nd trimester in normal subjects, and the abnormal groups generally showed lower levels than the controls, thus suggesting that they represent fetal metabolic activities. In contrast, catalytic Fe(II) was higher in the 2nd trimester than the 3rd trimester in the normal subjects, and overall the abnormal groups showed higher levels than the controls, suggesting that high catalytic Fe(II) at late gestation reflects fetal pathologic alterations. Notably, products of H2O2 and catalytic Fe(II) remained almost constant in amniotic fluid.

  11. Fluid shifts across human dentine in vitro in response to hydrodynamic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, D H; Matthews, W G; Zhang, Y; Johnson, M

    1996-11-01

    Most authorities agree that the hydrodynamic theory of dentine sensitivity best explains the stimulus-response relations of most painful stimuli. However, as the usual hydrodynamic stimuli are so different, it has been impossible to compare them. The equivalency of hydrodynamic stimuli can be evaluated from measurements of the fluid movement induced in vitro and relating this to the hydraulic conductance (Lp) of the same dentine specimen. From this determination, a common denominator is obtained which is equivalent to the hydrostatic pressure that would be required to cause the same magnitude of fluid movement. The purpose of this study was to measure the direction and magnitude of fluid shifts across dentine in extracted human crown segments with a flat, dentine occlusal surface in response to the following hydrodynamic stimuli; air blast, 56 degrees C water, 2 degrees C water, tactile and osmotic. In acid-etched superficial dentine, which simulates hypersensitive dentine, the largest to the smallest fluid flows obtained were: hot > cold > air blast > osmotic > tactile. When these were converted to equivalency units, the ranking of stimuli from strongest to weakest was hot > cold > air blast > osmotic > tactile. This new approach to comparing hydrodynamic stimuli should be verified in vivo.

  12. Microvesicles Derived From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Alveolar Fluid Clearance in Human Lungs Rejected for Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennai, S; Monsel, A; Hao, Q; Park, J; Matthay, M A; Lee, J W

    2015-09-01

    The need to increase the donor pool for lung transplantation is a major public health issue. We previously found that administration of mesenchymal stem cells "rehabilitated" marginal donor lungs rejected for transplantation using ex vivo lung perfusion. However, the use of stem cells has some inherent limitation such as the potential for tumor formation. In the current study, we hypothesized that microvesicles, small anuclear membrane fragments constitutively released from mesenchymal stem cells, may be a good alternative to using stem cells. Using our well established ex vivo lung perfusion model, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells increased alveolar fluid clearance (i.e. ability to absorb pulmonary edema fluid) in a dose-dependent manner, decreased lung weight gain following perfusion and ventilation, and improved airway and hemodynamic parameters compared to perfusion alone. Microvesicles derived from normal human lung fibroblasts as a control had no effect. Co-administration of microvesicles with anti-CD44 antibody attenuated these effects, suggesting a key role of the CD44 receptor in the internalization of the microvesicles into the injured host cell and its effect. In summary, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells were as effective as the parent mesenchymal stem cells in rehabilitating marginal donor human lungs. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Glial fibrillary acidic protein is a body fluid biomarker for glial pathology in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel

    2015-03-10

    This review on the role of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as a biomarker for astroglial pathology in neurological diseases provides background to protein synthesis, assembly, function and degeneration. Qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques for the investigation of human tissue and biological fluid samples are discussed including partial lack of parallelism and multiplexing capabilities. Pathological implications are reviewed in view of immunocytochemical, cell-culture and genetic findings. Particular emphasis is given to neurodegeneration related to autoimmune astrocytopathies and to genetic gain of function mutations. The current literature on body fluid levels of GFAP in human disease is summarised and illustrated by disease specific meta-analyses. In addition to the role of GFAP as a diagnostic biomarker for chronic disease, there are important data on the prognostic value for acute conditions. The published evidence permits to classify the dominant GFAP signatures in biological fluids. This classification may serve as a template for supporting diagnostic criteria of autoimmune astrocytopathies, monitoring disease progression in toxic gain of function mutations, clinical treatment trials (secondary outcome and toxicity biomarker) and provide prognostic information in neurocritical care if used within well defined time-frames.

  14. Measurement of the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to plasma volume from the technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid renogram: comparison with glomerular filtration rate in relation to extracellular fluid volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Allison, H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Ussov, W.Yu. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-01

    We describe a technique which does not require a blood sample, is already normalised for plasma volume and uses the robust Patlak plot for measuring renal uptake. The rate of kidney uptake, dR(t)/dt, at time = 0, as a fraction of the injected dose, is equal to the fraction of the plasma volume (PV) filtered per minute, i.e. IKGFR/PV. The gradient dR(0)/dt cannot be accurately measured directly but is equal to [[alpha] . LV(0)], where [alpha] is the renal uptake constant (proportional to IKGFR) and LV is the count rate over a left ventricular ROI. LV(0) was obtained by extrapolation of LV(t), while [alpha] is the slope of the Patlak plot up to 3 min. GFR/PV (i.e. right plus left kidneys) in patients with normal renal function was about 0.04 min[sup -1], as would be expected from normal values of GFR (120 ml/min) and plasma volume (3 l). GFR/PV correlated significantly with the ratio of GFR to extracellular fluid volume (ECV), measured from the terminal exponential of the plasma clearance curve (GFR/PV = 3.2.GFR/ECV + 5.3 ml/min/l [r = 0.82, n = 82]). GFR/PV (r = 0.74) and GFR/ECV (r = 0.82) both correlated inversely and non-linearly with plasma creatinine in 43 studies where the measurement was made within 1 week of the [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA study. They also correlated significantly with the plasma cyclosporin trough level in 14 patients with dermatomyositis on the 30 occasions when this measurement was made within 1 week of the renogram (r = -0.38, P < 0.05 for GFR/PV and r = -0.77, P < 0.001 for GFR/ECV). The ratio of GFR/PV to GFR/ECV is the ratio of extracellular fluid volume to plasma volume, and this was 4.0 (SD 0.99). We conclude that both GFR/PV and GFR/ECV can be easily measured with [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA and are physiologically valid expressions of GFR. (orig./MG)

  15. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development.

  16. Human amniotic fluid contaminants alter thyroid hormone signalling and early brain development in Xenopus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Jean-Baptiste; Mughal, Bilal B.; Le Mével, Sébastien; Leemans, Michelle; Lettmann, Mélodie; Spirhanzlova, Petra; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development in vertebrates. In humans, abnormal maternal thyroid hormone levels during early pregnancy are associated with decreased offspring IQ and modified brain structure. As numerous environmental chemicals disrupt thyroid hormone signalling, we questioned whether exposure to ubiquitous chemicals affects thyroid hormone responses during early neurogenesis. We established a mixture of 15 common chemicals at concentrations reported in human amniotic fluid. An in vivo larval reporter (GFP) assay served to determine integrated thyroid hormone transcriptional responses. Dose-dependent effects of short-term (72 h) exposure to single chemicals and the mixture were found. qPCR on dissected brains showed significant changes in thyroid hormone-related genes including receptors, deiodinases and neural differentiation markers. Further, exposure to mixture also modified neural proliferation as well as neuron and oligodendrocyte size. Finally, exposed tadpoles showed behavioural responses with dose-dependent reductions in mobility. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture of ubiquitous chemicals at concentrations found in human amniotic fluid affect thyroid hormone-dependent transcription, gene expression, brain development and behaviour in early embryogenesis. As thyroid hormone signalling is strongly conserved across vertebrates the results suggest that ubiquitous chemical mixtures could be exerting adverse effects on foetal human brain development. PMID:28266608

  17. Balance between apoptosis or survival induced by changes in extracellular-matrix composition in human mesangial cells: a key role for ILK-NFκB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Nogal, María; Luengo, Alicia; Olmos, Gemma; Lasa, Marina; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Calleros, Laura

    2012-12-01

    Renal fibrosis is the final outcome of many clinical conditions that lead to chronic renal failure, characterized by a progressive substitution of cellular elements by extracellular-matrix proteins, in particular collagen type I. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms responsible for human mesangial cell survival, conditioned by changes in extracellular-matrix composition. Our results indicate that collagen I induces apoptosis in cells but only after inactivation of the pro-survival factor NFκB by either the super-repressor IκBα or the PDTC inhibitor. Collagen I activates a death pathway, through ILK/GSK-3β-dependent Bim expression. Moreover, collagen I significantly increases NFκB-dependent transcription, IκBα degradation and p65/NFκB translocation to the nucleus; it activates β1 integrin and this is accompanied by increased activity of ILK which leads to AKT activation. Knockdown of ILK or AKT with small interfering RNA suppresses the increase in NFκB activity. NFκB mediates cell survival through the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Our data suggest that human mesangial cells exposed to abnormal collagen I are protected against apoptosis by a complex mechanism involving integrin β1/ILK/AKT-dependent NFκB activation with consequent Bcl-xL overexpression, that opposes a simultaneously activated ILK/GSK-3β-dependent Bim expression and this dual mechanism may play a role in the progression of glomerular dysfunction.

  18. Evaluation of cultured human dermal- and dermo-epidermal substitutes focusing on extracellular matrix components: Comparison of protein and RNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostendorp, Corien; Meyer, Sarah; Sobrio, Monia; van Arendonk, Joyce; Reichmann, Ernst; Daamen, Willeke F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of full-thickness skin defects with split-thickness skin grafts is generally associated with contraction and scar formation and cellular skin substitutes have been developed to improve skin regeneration. The evaluation of cultured skin substitutes is generally based on qualitative parameters focusing on histology. In this study we focused on quantitative evaluation to provide a template for comparison of human bio-engineered skin substitutes between clinical and/or research centers, and to supplement histological data. We focused on extracellular matrix proteins since these components play an important role in skin regeneration. As a model we analyzed the human dermal substitute denovoDerm and the dermo-epidermal skin substitute denovoSkin. The quantification of the extracellular matrix proteins type III collagen and laminin 5 in tissue homogenates using western blotting analysis and ELISA was not successful. The same was true for assaying lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in crosslinking of matrix molecules. As an alternative, gene expression levels were measured using qPCR. Various RNA isolation procedures were probed. The gene expression profile for specific dermal and epidermal genes could be measured reliably and reproducibly. Differences caused by changes in the cell culture conditions could easily be detected. The number of cells in the skin substitutes was measured using the PicoGreen dsDNA assay, which was found highly quantitative and reproducible. The (dis) advantages of assays used for quantitative evaluation of skin substitutes are discussed.

  19. Efficient production and purification of extracellular domain of human FGFR-Fc fusion proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska-Wedzina, Aleksandra; Borek, Aleksandra; Chudzian, Julia; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Otlewski, Jacek

    2014-07-01

    The family of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) plays an important role in cell growth, survival, differentiation and angiogenesis. The three immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains of FGFR (D1, D2, and D3) are critical for ligand binding and specificity towards fibroblast growth factor and heparan sulfate. Fibroblast growth factor receptors are overexpressed in a wide variety of tumors, such as breast, bladder, and prostate cancer, and therefore they are attractive targets for different types of anticancer therapies. In this study, we have cloned, expressed in CHO cells and purified Fc-fused extracellular domains of different types of FGFRs (ECD_FGFR1a-Fc, ECD_FGFR1b-Fc, ECD_FGFR2a-Fc, ECD_FGFR2b-Fc, ECD_FGFR3a-Fc, ECD_FGFR3b-Fc, ECD_FGFR4a-Fc, ECD_FGFR4b-Fc), which could be used as molecular targets for the selection of specific antibodies. The fusion proteins were analyzed using gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and mass spectrometry. To facilitate their full characterization, the fusion proteins were deglycosylated using PNGase F enzyme. With an optimized transient transfection protocol and purification procedure we were able to express the proteins at a high level and purify them to homogeneity.

  20. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Styrczewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD, phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  1. Different EV enrichment methods suitable for clinical settings yield different subpopulations of urinary extracellular vesicles from human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Urine sample analysis is irreplaceable as a non-invasive method for disease diagnosis and follow-up. However, in urine samples, non-degraded protein and RNA may be only found in urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs. In recent years, various methods of uEV enrichment using low volumes of urine and unsophisticated equipment have been developed, with variable success. We compared the results of the differential ultracentrifugation procedure with 4 of these methods. The methods tested were a lectin-based purification, Exoquick (System Biosciences, Total Exosome Isolation from Invitrogen and an in-house modified procedure employing the Exosomal RNA Kit from Norgen Biotek Corp. The analysis of selected gene transcripts and protein markers of extracellular vesicles (EVs revealed that each method isolates a different mixture of uEV protein markers. In our conditions, the extraction with Norgen's reagent achieved the best performance in terms of gene transcript and protein detection and reproducibility. By using this method, we were able to detect alterations of EVs protein markers in urine samples from prostate cancer adenoma patients. Taken together, our results show that the isolation of uEVs is feasible from small volumes of urine and avoiding ultracentrifugation, making easier the analysis in a clinical facility. However, caution should be taken in the selection of the enrichment method since they have a differential affinity for protein uEVs markers and by extension for different subpopulation of EVs.

  2. Differential expression of extracellular matrix proteins in senescent and young human fibroblasts: a comparative proteomics and microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyeong Eun; Kwon, Joseph; Rhim, Ji-Heon; Choi, Jong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Junsoo; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2011-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an essential structural framework for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, and undergoes progressive changes during senescence. To investigate changes in protein expression in the extracellular matrix between young and senescent fibroblasts, we compared proteomic data (LTQ-FT) with cDNA microarray results. The peptide counts from the proteomics analysis were used to evaluate the level of ECM protein expression by young cells and senescent cells, and ECM protein expression data were compared with the microarray data. After completing the comparative analysis, we grouped the genes into four categories. Class I included genes with increased expression levels in both analyses, while class IV contained genes with reduced expression in both analyses. Class II and Class III contained genes with an inconsistent expression pattern. Finally, we validated the comparative analysis results by examining the expression level of the specific gene from each category using Western blot analysis and semiquantitative RT-PCR. Our results demonstrate that comparative analysis can be used to identify differentially expressed genes.

  3. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  4. Three-dimensional structures of human phospholipase A2 from pancreas and synovial fluid by model building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Svensson, L A

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from human pancreas and from human synovial fluid were constructed by model building based on high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures and homology considerations. The structure of the human pancreatic PLA2 was based...

  5. Three-dimensional structures of human phospholipase A2 from pancreas and synovial fluid by model building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Svensson, L A;

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from human pancreas and from human synovial fluid were constructed by model building based on high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures and homology considerations. The structure of the human pancreatic PLA2 was based on t...

  6. [Effect of burn blister fluid on human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in vitro and its phenotypic modulation in culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Zhu; Rong, Xin-Zhou; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Rong-Hua; Wang, Zhen

    2009-06-01

    To study the effect of blister fluid obtained from burn patient on human MSCs in vitro and its phenotypic modulation in culture. Blister fluid from burn patients was collected at 12, 24, 48 post burn hour (PBH). The human MSCs were isolated, cultured, amplified and identified in vitro, then were divided into A (culture with 20% blister fluid collected at 12 PBH) , B (culture with 20% blister fluid collected at 24 PBH), C (culture with 20% blister fluid collected at 48 PBH), N (with ordinary culture medium) groups. The growth of MSCs and micro-organisms in blister fluid were observed. Positive expression rates of CD44 and CK7 were detected by flow cytometry after culture for 8 days. Bacterial and fungal growths were absent in 15 blister fluid samples. There was no obvious change in MSC morphology in each group. Compared with that of N group, the number of MSCs in A, B, C groups was decreased, especially in C group. CD44 positive expression rate in A, B, C groups was (83.0 +/- 3.1)%, (77.2 +/- 2.9)% and (65.1 +/- 2.3)%, respectively,which was obviously lower than that in N group [(89.5 +/- 3.2)%, P blister fluid can obviously inhibit the growth of human MSC cultured in vitro, and may promote modulation of its phenotype to certain extent.

  7. Effect of Tamarindus indica L. leaves' fluid extract on human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona-Arranz, J C; Garcia-Diaz, J; Perez-Rosés, R; De la Vega, J; Rodríguez-Amado, J; Morris-Quevedo, H J

    2014-01-01

    Tamarind leaves are edible; however, their saponin content could be toxic to human blood cells. In this article, the effect of tamarind leaf fluid extract (TFE) on human blood cells was evaluated by using several tests. Results revealed that TFE did not cause significant haemolysis on human red blood cells even at the lowest evaluated concentration (20 mg/mL). Blood protein denaturalisation ratio was consistently lower than in control at TFE concentrations greater than 40 mg/mL. Erythrocyte membrane damage caused by the action of oxidative H2O2 displayed a steady reduction with increasing TFE concentrations. In the reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement by using flow cytometry assay, leucocyte viability was over 95% at tested concentrations, and a high ROS inhibition was also recorded. Protective behaviour found in TFE should be attributed to its polyphenol content. Thus, tamarind leaves can be regarded as a potential source of interesting phytochemicals.

  8. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Brinkley, Garrett J; Khalil, Hassan A; Sears, Connie M; Lei, Nan Ye; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  9. Type I Collagen as an Extracellular Matrix for the In Vitro Growth of Human Small Intestinal Epithelium: e107814

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziyad Jabaji; Garrett J Brinkley; Hassan A Khalil; Connie M Sears; Nan Ye Lei; Michael Lewis; Matthias Stelzner; Martín G Martín; James C Y Dunn

    2014-01-01

    .... There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells...

  10. Neural Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin FARIVAR*

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: : Farivar S, Mohamadzade Z, Shiari R, Fahimzad AR. Neural Differentiation of Human Umbilical CordMesenchymal Stem Cells by Cerebrospinal Fluid. . Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter; 9(1:87-93.  Abstract Objective Wharton’s jelly (WJ is the gelatinous connective tissue from the umbilical cord. It is composed of mesenchymal stem cells, collagen fibers, and proteoglycans. The stem cells in WJ have properties that are interesting for research. For example, they are simple to harvest by noninvasive methods, provide large numbers of cells without risk to the donor, the stem cell population may be expanded in vitro, cryogenically stored, thawed, genetically manipulated, and differentiated in vitro. In our study, we investigated the effect of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF on neural differentiation of human WJ stem cells.Material & Methods The cells in passage 2 were induced into neural differentiation with different concentrations of human cerebrospinal fluid. Differentiation along with neural lineage was documented by expression of three neural markers: Nestin, Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 (MAP2, and Glial Fibrillary Astrocytic Protein (GFAP for 21 days. The expression of the identified genes was confirmed by Reverse Transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR.Results Treatment with 100 and 200μg/ml CSF resulted in the expression of GFAP and glial cells marker on days 14 and 21. The expression of neural-specific genes following CSF treatment was dose-dependent and time-dependent. Treatment of the cells with a twofold concentration of CSF, led to the expression of MAP2 on day 14 of induction. No expression of GFAP was detected before day 14 or MAP2 before day 21, which shows the importance of the treatment period. In the present study, expression analysis for the known neural markers: Nestin, GFAP, and MAP2 using RT-PCR were performed. The data demonstrated that CSF could play a role as a strong inducer.Conclusion RT-PCR showed that

  11. Oxidized extracellular DNA suppresses nitric oxide production by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in human endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, S V; Alekseeva, A Yu; Kon'kova, M S; Glebova, K V; Smirnova, T D; Kameneva, L V; Izhevskaya, V L; Veiko, N N

    2014-06-01

    Circulating DNA from patients with cardiovascular diseases reduce the synthesis of NO in endothelial cells, which is probably related to oxidative modification of DNA. To test this hypothesis, HUVEC cells were cultured in the presence of DNA containing ~1 (nonoxidized DNA), 700, or 2100 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleosides. Nonoxidized DNA stimulated the synthesis of NO, which was associated with an increase in the expression of endothelial NO synthase. Oxidized NO decreased the amount of mRNA and protein for endothelial NO synthase, but increased the relative content of its low active form. These changes were accompanied by reduction of NO production. These findings suggest that oxidative modification of circulating extracellular DNA contributes to endothelial dysfunction manifested in suppression of NO production.

  12. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: A Novel Source for Modeling of Human Genetic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Antonucci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, great interest has been devoted to the use of Induced Pluripotent Stem cells (iPS for modeling of human genetic diseases, due to the possibility of reprogramming somatic cells of affected patients into pluripotent cells, enabling differentiation into several cell types, and allowing investigations into the molecular mechanisms of the disease. However, the protocol of iPS generation still suffers from technical limitations, showing low efficiency, being expensive and time consuming. Amniotic Fluid Stem cells (AFS represent a potential alternative novel source of stem cells for modeling of human genetic diseases. In fact, by means of prenatal diagnosis, a number of fetuses affected by chromosomal or Mendelian diseases can be identified, and the amniotic fluid collected for genetic testing can be used, after diagnosis, for the isolation, culture and differentiation of AFS cells. This can provide a useful stem cell model for the investigation of the molecular basis of the diagnosed disease without the necessity of producing iPS, since AFS cells show some features of pluripotency and are able to differentiate in cells derived from all three germ layers “in vitro”. In this article, we describe the potential benefits provided by using AFS cells in the modeling of human genetic diseases.

  13. The key residue within the second extracellular loop of human EP3 involved in selectively turning down PGE2- and retaining PGE1-mediated signaling in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Hironari; Thaliachery, Natasha; Zheng, Xianghai; Blumenthal, Marissa; Nikhar, Sameer; Murdoch, Emma E; Ling, Qinglan; Ruan, Ke-He

    2017-02-15

    Key residues and binding mechanisms of PGE1 and PGE2 on prostanoid receptors are poorly understood due to the lack of X-ray structures for the receptors. We constructed a human EP3 (hEP3) model through integrative homology modeling using the X-ray structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor transmembrane domain and NMR structures of the thromboxane A2 receptor extracellular loops. PGE1 and PGE2 docking into the hEP3 model showed differing configurations within the extracellular ligand recognition site. While PGE2 could form possible binding contact with S211, PGE1 is unable to form similar contacts. Therefore, S211 could be the critical residue for PGE2 recognition, but is not a significant for PGE1. This prediction was confirmed using HEK293 cells transfected with hEP3 S211L cDNA. The S211L cells lost PGE2 binding and signaling. Interestingly, the S211L cells retained PGE1-mediated signaling. It indicates that S211 within the second extracellular loop is a key residue involved in turning down PGE2 signaling. Our study provided information that S211L within EP3 is the key residue to distinguish PGE1 and PGE2 binding to mediate diverse biological functions at the initial recognition step. The S211L mutant could be used as a model for studying the binding mechanism and signaling pathway specifically mediated by PGE1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Viscoelastic behaviour of human blood and polyacrylamide model fluids for heart valve testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, Dietmar; Vlastos, Georgios; Koch, Brigitte; Pohl, Manfred; Affeld, Klaus

    1993-06-01

    New heart valves and other cardiovascular assist systems have to be tested for hydrodynamic performance. In place of human blood simple model fluids like glycerol solutions are employed often due to ethical and practical reasons. But blood exhibits complex non-Newtonian and viscoelastic behaviour. Rheological blood properties are reviewed based on literature and own experimental results. Furthermore we studied polymer solutions with respect to blood-like flow behaviour. Rheology was assessed by means of the low shear rotational viscometer (LS 40, Mettler-Toledo, Switzerland) under stationary and dynamic shear conditions (variation of frequency and angular displacement).

  15. Computer Simulation of Gd(III) Speciation in Human Interstitial Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The speciation and distribution of Gd(III) in human interstitial fluid was studied by computer simulation. Meantime artificial neural network was applied to the estimation of log β values of complexes. The results show that the precipitate species, GdPO4 and Gd2(CO3)3, are the predominant species. Among soluble species, the free Gd(III), [Gd(HSA)] , [Gd(Ox)] and then the ternary complexes of Gd(III) with citrate are main species and [Gd3(OH)4] becomes the predominant species at the Gd(III) total concentration of 2.2×10-2mol/L.

  16. Water Metabolism and Fluid Compartment Volumes in Humans at Altitude. A Compendium of Research (1914 - 1996)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, J. L.; Stad, N. J.; Gay, E.; West, G. I.; Barnes, P. R.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    This compendium includes abstracts and synopses of clinical observations and of more basic studies involving physiological mechanisms concerning interaction of water metabolism and fluid compartment volumes in humans during altitude exposure. If the author's abstract or summary was appropriate, it was included. In other cases a more detailed synopsis of the paper was prepared under the subheadings Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions. Author and subject indices are provided, plus an additional selected bibliography of related work of those papers received after the volume was being prepared for publication. This volume includes material published from 1914 through 1995.

  17. Agglutination of human erythrocytes by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine-651 on the extracellular domain of band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyotake, Kento; Ochiai, Hideharu; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Clustering of band 3, chloride/bicarbonate exchanger, has been reported in Zn(2+)-treated human erythrocytes. However, the agglutination of human erythrocytes is also induced by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine on band 3. Identification of histidine that interacts with Zn(2+)ion remains to be determined. The Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes was unaffected by chymotrypsin cleavage of the small loop region containing His-547 in the extracellular domain of band 3. On the other hand, papain digestion of the large loop region containing His-651 in band 3 inhibited such Zn(2+)-induced agglutination. Moreover, Zn(2+)-induced erythrocyte agglutination was inhibited by the peptide (ARGWVIHPLG) containing His-651, but not by the peptide such as ARGWVIRPLG, which His-651 was substituted by arginine. Among 10 kinds of animal erythrocytes tested, interestingly, no agglutination by Zn(2+)ions was observed in cow cells only that the forth amino acid in the upstream from His-669 on the large loop of cow band 3 is aspartate (Asp-665) instead of glycine. As expected, the agglutination of human erythrocytes by Zn(2+) ions was inhibited in the presence of aspartate. These data indicate that the interaction of Zn(2+) ion with His-651 residue of band 3 plays an important role in the Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes.

  18. Immunosuppressive activity of human amniotic fluid of normal and abnormal pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohat, B; Faktor, J M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty specimens of amniotic fluid (AF) obtained between week 16 and 18 of gestation from normal pregnant women and six specimens from pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found were tested for immunosuppressive activity. Incubation of normal human donor lymphocytes with 0.2-1 mL of AF from normal pregnant women for one hour at 37 degrees C was sufficient for induction of significant inhibition of the ability of these cells to induce a local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) as well as inhibition of E and E-active rosette formation, the GVHR being the most sensitive test. On the other hand, amniotic fluid obtained from the six pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found showed no inhibitory activity in either the E or E-active rosette formation, nor in the local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction. AF from all the women tested was found to have no effect on phenotype expression of the lymphocytes, as tested by the monoclonal antibodies OKT4+ and OKT8+, nor on B-lymphocytes, as tested by surface immunoglobulins. No correlation was found between the alpha-fetoprotein levels in the sera of those women and the immunosuppressive activity. These findings indicate that genetic defects of the conceptus are not limited to the embryo but may affect the composition of immunosuppressive components present in normal amniotic fluid.

  19. Drug supersaturation in simulated and human intestinal fluids representing different nutritional states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevernage, Jan; Brouwers, Joachim; Clarysse, Sarah; Vertzoni, Maria; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    It was the purpose of this study to explore supersaturation of poorly soluble drugs in human intestinal fluids (HIF), and to assess potential food effects on the creation and maintenance of supersaturation. Duodenal fluids were collected from healthy volunteers and pooled according to three nutritional states (fasted-, fed-, and fat-enriched fed state). Supersaturation was created at a fixed degree of supersaturation (DS=20) using the solvent-shift method. Fasted- and fed-state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF) were used as intestinal simulation media. Supersaturation in HIF showed to be stable up to a certain degree for different poorly soluble drugs. In HIF as well as in FaSSIF and FeSSIF, supersaturation appeared to be compound and medium specific. Supersaturation stability was found to be inversely proportional to the solubility in the corresponding media. Food intake affected itraconazole supersaturation positively. On the contrary, etravirine and loviride supersaturation decreased upon food intake. Supersaturation experiments in FaSSIF and FeSSIF showed similar results as in HIF for etravirine and loviride, whereas itraconazole supersaturation behaved differently in HIF versus simulation media. The present study illustrates, for the first time, that supersaturation can be created and maintained in HIF, even in the absence of excipients. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  20. Extracellular polymeric substance from Aphanizomenon flos-aquae induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xing; Lv, Ying; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhao, Youhong; Zhang, Lili; Xu, Shiyuan

    2015-09-01

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) is a substance secreted during algal growth, which has been found to have numerous health-promoting effects. In the present study, A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were selected as target cells and cultivated in vitro as an experimental model to investigate the anti-cancer effect of extracellular polymeric substances from Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (EPS-A) and the possible underlying mechanism. Apoptosis- and cell cycle-associated molecules as well as the mitochondrial membrane potential of the cells were quantified using flow cytometry (FCM). FCM showed that EPS-A induced cell cycle arrest, which led to a loss of mitochondrial function of the A431 cells and an increase in necrotic and late apoptotic cells. In order to evaluate the apoptosis and cell viability, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining was used, morphological changes were observed using fluorescence microscopy and typical apoptotic characteristics were observed. Following treatment with a high dose of EPS-A, transmission electron microscopy showed nuclear fragmentation, chromosome condensation, cell shrinkage and expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum; apoptotic bodies were also observed. In conclusion, EPS-A caused cell cycle arrest, stimulated cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway and exhibited important anti-cancer activity.

  1. Grape seed extract triggers apoptosis in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells through reactive oxygen species and calcium increase: extracellular signal-regulated kinase involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinicola, Simona; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Morabito, Caterina; Guarnieri, Simone; Cucina, Alessandra; Pasqualato, Alessia; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Proietti, Sara; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2013-09-14

    Grape seed extract (GSE) from Italia, Palieri and Red Globe cultivars inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In order to investigate the mechanism(s) supporting the apoptotic process, we analysed reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, intracellular Ca2+ handling and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Upon exposure to GSE, ROS and intracellular Ca2+ levels increased in Caco-2 cells, concomitantly with ERK inactivation. As ERK activity is thought to be essential for promoting survival pathways, inhibition of this kinase is likely to play a relevant role in GSE-mediated anticancer effects. Indeed, pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine, a ROS scavenger, reversed GSE-induced apoptosis, and promoted ERK phosphorylation. This effect was strengthened by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid-mediated inhibition of extracellular Ca2+ influx. ROS and Ca2+ influx inhibition, in turn, increased ERK phosphorylation, and hence almost entirely suppressed GSE-mediated apoptosis. These data suggested that GSE triggers a previously unrecognised ERK-based mechanism, involving both ROS production and intracellular Ca2+ increase, eventually leading to apoptosis in cancer cells.

  2. Recognition of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells is mediated by dectin-2 and results in formation of extracellular traps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio V Loures

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs were initially considered as critical for innate immunity to viruses. However, our group has shown that pDCs bind to and inhibit the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae and that depletion of pDCs renders mice hypersusceptible to experimental aspergillosis. In this study, we examined pDC receptors contributing to hyphal recognition and downstream events in pDCs stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. Our data show that Dectin-2, but not Dectin-1, participates in A. fumigatus hyphal recognition, TNF-α and IFN-α release, and antifungal activity. Moreover, Dectin-2 acts in cooperation with the FcRγ chain to trigger signaling responses. In addition, using confocal and electron microscopy we demonstrated that the interaction between pDCs and A. fumigatus induced the formation of pDC extracellular traps (pETs containing DNA and citrullinated histone H3. These structures closely resembled those of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. The microarray analysis of the pDC transcriptome upon A. fumigatus infection also demonstrated up-regulated expression of genes associated with apoptosis as well as type I interferon-induced genes. Thus, human pDCs directly recognize A. fumigatus hyphae via Dectin-2; this interaction results in cytokine release and antifungal activity. Moreover, hyphal stimulation of pDCs triggers a distinct pattern of pDC gene expression and leads to pET formation.

  3. Comparative proteomic profiling of human osteoblast-derived extracellular matrices identifies proteins involved in mesenchymal stromal cell osteogenic differentiation and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, Marta; van der Eerden, Bram C; Kan, Yik-Yang; Alves, Rodrigo D; Demmers, Jeroen A; van de Peppel, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Johannes P

    2018-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic component of tissue architecture that physically supports cells and actively influences their behavior. In the context of bone regeneration, cell-secreted ECMs have become of interest as they reproduce tissue-architecture and modulate the promising properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We have previously created an in vitro model of human osteoblast-derived devitalized ECM that was osteopromotive for MSCs. The aim of this study was to identify ECM regulatory proteins able to modulate MSC differentiation to broaden the spectrum of MSC clinical applications. To this end, we created two additional models of devitalized ECMs with different mineralization phenotypes. Our results showed that the ECM derived from osteoblast-differentiated MSCs had increased osteogenic potential compared to ECM derived from undifferentiated MSCs and non-ECM cultures. Proteomic analysis revealed that structural ECM proteins and ribosomal proteins were upregulated in the ECM from undifferentiated MSCs. A similar response profile was obtained by treating osteoblast-differentiating MSCs with Activin-A. Extracellular proteins were upregulated in Activin-A ECM, whereas mitochondrial and membrane proteins were downregulated. In summary, this study illustrates that the composition of different MSC-secreted ECMs is important to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These models of devitalized ECMs could be used to modulate MSC properties to regulate bone quality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Inflammation determines the pro-adhesive properties of high extracellular d-glucose in human endothelial cells in vitro and rat microvessels in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Azcutia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia is acknowledged as an independent risk factor for developing diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. At present, most therapeutic approaches are targeted at a tight glycemic control in diabetic patients, although this fails to prevent macrovascular complications of the disease. Indeed, it remains highly controversial whether or not the mere elevation of extracellular D-glucose can directly promote vascular inflammation, which favors early pro-atherosclerotic events. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present work, increasing extracellular D-glucose from 5.5 to 22 mmol/L was neither sufficient to induce intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression, analyzed by flow cytometry, nor to promote leukocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC in vitro, measured by flow chamber assays. Interestingly, the elevation of D-glucose levels potentiated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion induced by a pro-inflammatory stimulus, such as interleukin (IL-1beta (5 ng/mL. In HUVEC, high D-glucose augmented the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2 and nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB elicited by IL-1beta, measured by Western blot and electromobility shift assay (EMSA, respectively, but had no effect by itself. Both ERK 1/2 and NF-kappaB were necessary for VCAM-1 expression, but not for ICAM-1 expression. In vivo, leukocyte trafficking was evaluated in the rat mesenteric microcirculation by intravital microscopy. In accordance with the in vitro data, the acute intraperitoneal injection of D-glucose increased leukocyte rolling flux, adhesion and migration, but only when IL-1beta was co-administered. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the elevation of extracellular D-glucose levels is not sufficient to promote vascular inflammation, and they highlight the pivotal role of a pro-inflammatory environment in diabetes, as

  5. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Liliana F; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R; Guilak, Farshid; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2015-09-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  6. Multi-platform metabolomics assays for human lung lavage fluids in an air pollution exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Izabella; Karimpour, Masoumeh; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Wu, Junfang; Unosson, Jon; Bosson, Jenny A; Blomberg, Anders; Pourazar, Jamshid; Sandström, Thomas; Behndig, Annelie F; Trygg, Johan; Nording, Malin L

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomics protocols are used to comprehensively characterize the metabolite content of biological samples by exploiting cutting-edge analytical platforms, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) assays, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. We have developed novel sample preparation procedures combined with GC-MS, LC-MS, and NMR metabolomics profiling for analyzing bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 15 healthy volunteers following exposure to biodiesel exhaust and filtered air. Our aim was to investigate the responsiveness of metabolite profiles in the human lung to air pollution exposure derived from combustion of biofuels, such as rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel, which are increasingly being promoted as alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Our multi-platform approach enabled us to detect the greatest number of unique metabolites yet reported in BW and BAL fluid (82 in total). All of the metabolomics assays indicated that the metabolite profiles of the BW and BAL fluids differed appreciably, with 46 metabolites showing significantly different levels in the corresponding lung compartments. Furthermore, the GC-MS assay revealed an effect of biodiesel exhaust exposure on the levels of 1-monostearylglycerol, sucrose, inosine, nonanoic acid, and ethanolamine (in BAL) and pentadecanoic acid (in BW), whereas the LC-MS assay indicated a shift in the levels of niacinamide (in BAL). The NMR assay only identified lactic acid (in BW) as being responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Our findings demonstrate that the proposed multi-platform approach is useful for wide metabolomics screening of BW and BAL fluids and can facilitate elucidation of metabolites responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract illustrating the study workflow. NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, LC-TOFMS Liquid chromatography-Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry, GC Gas

  7. Glucose-Based Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids Downregulate Toll-Like Receptors and Trigger Hyporesponsiveness to Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns in Human Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Yun-Fang; Wang, Ya-Ning; Liu, Mei; Dong, Xiu-Qing; Fan, Jin-Jin; Yu, Xue-Qing

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of glucose-based peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids and icodextrin-based PD fluids on the expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)/TLR4 and subsequent ligand-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). A human peritoneal mesothelial cell line (HMrSV5) was stimulated with glucose-based and icodextrin-based peritoneal dialysis fluids. Cell viability was assessed using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide]. TLR2/TLR4 expression was determined by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and an immunofluorescence assay. In addition, cells were pretreated with different PD solutions and then incubated with Pam3CSK4 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the degrees of MAPK and NF-κB activation were reflected by detecting the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and p65, using a Western blot method. TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR. Glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids suppressed the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 proteins in HPMCs. Challenge of cells with either Pam3CSK4 or LPS resulted in impaired TNF-α and IL-1β production. Moreover, reduced TLR2 and TLR4 levels in glucose-based peritoneal dialysis solution-treated mesothelial cells were accompanied by reduced p42/44 (ERK1/2), JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation upon TLR ligand engagement. No significant changes in MAPK and NF-κB signaling and TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression were observed in icodextrin-based PD solution-treated mesothelial cells. Glucose-based PD solution, but not icodextrin-based PD solution, downregulates expression of TLR2/TLR4 by human peritoneal mesothelial cells and triggers hyporesponsiveness to pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PMID

  8. Irrigation of human prepared root canal – ex vivo based computational fluid dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šnjarić, Damir; Čarija, Zoran; Braut, Alen; Halaji, Adelaida; Kovačević, Maja; Kuiš, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze the influence of the needle type, insertion depth, and irrigant flow rate on irrigant flow pattern, flow velocity, and apical pressure by ex-vivo based endodontic irrigation computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Methods Human upper canine root canal was prepared using rotary files. Contrast fluid was introduced in the root canal and scanned by computed tomography (CT) providing a three-dimensional object that was exported to the computer-assisted design (CAD) software. Two probe points were established in the apical portion of the root canal model for flow velocity and pressure measurement. Three different CAD models of 27G irrigation needles (closed-end side-vented, notched open-end, and bevel open-end) were created and placed at 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the working length (WL). Flow rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mL/s were simulated. A total of 60 irrigation simulations were performed by CFD fluid flow solver. Results Closed-end side-vented needle required insertion depth closer to WL, regarding efficient irrigant replacement, compared to open-end irrigation needle types, which besides increased velocity produced increased irrigant apical pressure. For all irrigation needle types and needle insertion depths, the increase of flow rate was followed by an increased irrigant apical pressure. Conclusions The human root canal shape obtained by CT is applicable in the CFD analysis of endodontic irrigation. All the analyzed values –irrigant flow pattern, velocity, and pressure – were influenced by irrigation needle type, as well as needle insertion depth and irrigant flow rate. PMID:23100209

  9. Pluripotency can be rapidly and efficiently induced in human amniotic fluid-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunliang; Zhou, Junmei; Shi, Guilai; Ma, Yu; Yang, Ying; Gu, Junjie; Yu, Hongyao; Jin, Shibo; Wei, Zhe; Chen, Fang; Jin, Ying

    2009-11-15

    Direct reprogramming of human somatic cells into pluripotency has broad implications in generating patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for disease modeling and cellular replacement therapies. However, the low efficiency and safety issues associated with generation of human iPS cells have limited their usage in clinical settings. Cell types can significantly influence reprogramming efficiency and kinetics. To date, human iPS cells have been obtained only from a few cell types. Here, we report for the first time rapid and efficient generation of iPS cells from human amniotic fluid-derived cells (hAFDCs) via ectopic expression of four human factors: OCT4/SOX2/KLF4/C-MYC. Significantly, typical single iPS cell colonies can be picked up 6 days after viral infection with high efficiency. Eight iPS cell lines have been derived. They can be continuously propagated in vitro and express pluripotency markers such as AKP, OCT4, SOX2, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81, maintaining the normal karyotype. Transgenes are completely inactivated and the endogenous OCT4 promoter is adequately demethylated in the established iPS cell lines. Moreover, various cells and tissues from all three germ layers are found in embryoid bodies and teratomas, respectively. In addition, microarray analysis demonstrates a high correlation coefficient between hAFDC-iPS cells and human embryonic stem cells, but a low correlation coefficient between hAFDCs and hAFDC-iPS cells. Taken together, these data identify an ideal human somatic cell resource for rapid and efficient generation of iPS cells, allowing us to establish human iPS cells using more advanced approaches and possibly to establish disease- or patient-specific iPS cells.

  10. Reduced Expression of Cytoskeletal and Extracellular Matrix Genes in Human Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corydon, Thomas J; Mann, Vivek; Slumstrup, Lasse;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Microgravity (µg) has adverse effects on the eye of humans in space. The risk of visual impairment is therefore one of the leading health concerns for NASA. The impact of µg on human adult retinal epithelium (ARPE-19) cells is unknown. METHODS: In this study we investigated the i...

  11. Lactation in the Human Breast From a Fluid Dynamics Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negin Mortazavi, S; Geddes, Donna; Hassanipour, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    This study is a collaborative effort among lactation specialists and fluid dynamic engineers. The paper presents clinical results for suckling pressure pattern in lactating human breast as well as a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of milk flow using these clinical inputs. The investigation starts with a careful, statistically representative measurement of suckling vacuum pressure, milk flow rate, and milk intake in a group of infants. The results from clinical data show that suckling action does not occur with constant suckling rate but changes in a rhythmic manner for infants. These pressure profiles are then used as the boundary condition for the CFD study using commercial ansys fluent software. For the geometric model of the ductal system of the human breast, this work takes advantage of a recent advance in the development of a validated phantom that has been produced as a ground truth for the imaging applications for the breast. The geometric model is introduced into CFD simulations with the aforementioned boundary conditions. The results for milk intake from the CFD simulation and clinical data were compared and cross validated. Also, the variation of milk intake versus suckling pressure are presented and analyzed. Both the clinical and CFD simulation show that the maximum milk flow rate is not related to the largest vacuum pressure or longest feeding duration indicating other factors influence the milk intake by infants.

  12. Exploring food effects on indinavir absorption with human intestinal fluids in the mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstock, Nico; De Bruyn, Tom; Bevernage, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Mols, Raf; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2013-04-11

    Food can have a significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs, as it may affect drug solubility as well as permeability. Since fed state conditions cannot easily be implemented in the presently available permeability tools, including the frequently used Caco-2 system, exploring food effects during drug development can be quite challenging. In this study, we investigated the effect of fasted and fed state conditions on the intestinal absorption of the HIV protease inhibitor indinavir using simulated and human intestinal fluids in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice. Although the solubility of indinavir was 6-fold higher in fed state human intestinal fluids (FeHIF) as compared to fasted state HIF (FaHIF), the intestinal permeation of indinavir was 22-fold lower in FeHIF as compared to FaHIF. Dialysis experiments showed that only a small fraction of indinavir is accessible for absorption in FeHIF due to micellar entrapment, possibly explaining its low intestinal permeation. The presence of ritonavir, a known P-gp inhibitor, increased the intestinal permeation of indinavir by 2-fold in FaHIF, while there was no increase when using FeHIF. These data confirm that drug-food interactions form a complex interplay between solubility and permeability effects. The use of HIF in in situ intestinal perfusions holds great promise for biorelevant absorption evaluation as it allows to directly explore this complex solubility/permeability interplay on drug absorption.

  13. Human heart conjugate cooling simulation: unsteady thermo-fluid-stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Abas; Dulikravich, George S; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Stowe, David F; Jahania, M Salik

    2014-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to demonstrate computationally that realistic human hearts can be cooled much faster by performing conjugate heat transfer consisting of pumping a cold liquid through the cardiac chambers and major veins while keeping the heart submerged in cold gelatin filling a cooling container. The human heart geometry used for simulations was obtained from three-dimensional, high resolution CT-angio scans. Two fluid flow domains for the right (pulmonic) and left (systemic) heart circulations, and two solid domains for the heart tissue and gelatin solution were defined for multi-domain numerical simulation. Detailed unsteady temperature fields within the heart tissue were calculated during the conjugate cooling process. A linear thermoelasticity analysis was performed to assess the stresses applied on the heart due to the coolant fluid shear and normal forces and to examine the thermal stress caused by temperature variation inside the heart. It was demonstrated that a conjugate cooling effort with coolant temperature at +4°C is capable of reducing the average heart temperature from +37°C to +8°C in 25 minutes for cases in which the coolant was steadily pumped only through major heart inlet veins and cavities. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Potential antitumor therapeutic strategies of human amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Kim, S U; Kim, Y-B; Hyun, S-H; Jeung, E-B; Choi, K-C

    2012-08-01

    As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and can generate differentiated progenies for organ development, they are considered as potential source for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Along with this capacity, stem cells have the therapeutic potential for treating human diseases including cancers. According to the origins, stem cells are broadly classified into two types: embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In terms of differentiation potential, ESCs are pluripotent and adult stem cells are multipotent. Amnion, which is a membranous sac that contains the fetus and amniotic fluid and functions in protecting the developing embryo during gestation, is another stem cell source. Amnion-derived stem cells are classified as human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells, human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells. They are in an intermediate stage between pluripotent ESCs and lineage-restricted adult stem cells, non-tumorigenic, and contribute to low immunogenicity and anti-inflammation. Furthermore, they are easily available and do not cause any controversial issues in their recovery and applications. Not only are amnion-derived stem cells applicable in regenerative medicine, they have anticancer capacity. In non-engineered stem cells transplantation strategies, amnion-derived stem cells effectively target the tumor and suppressed the tumor growth by expressing cytotoxic cytokines. Additionally, they also have a potential as novel delivery vehicles transferring therapeutic genes to the cancer formation sites in gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy. Owing to their own advantageous properties, amnion-derived stem cells are emerging as a new candidate in anticancer therapy.

  15. The First Extracellular Linker Is Important for Several Aspects of the Gating Mechanism of Human TRPA1 Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsakova, Lenka; Barvik, Ivan; Zima, Vlastimil; Zimova, Lucie; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2017-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is an excitatory ion channel involved in pain, inflammation and itching. This channel gates in response to many irritant and proalgesic agents, and can be modulated by calcium and depolarizing voltage. While the closed-state structure of TRPA1 has been recently resolved, also having its open state is essential for understanding how this channel works. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations combined with electrophysiological measurements and systematic mutagenesis to predict and explore the conformational changes coupled to the expansion of the presumptive channel's lower gate. We show that, upon opening, the upper part of the sensor module approaches the pore domain of an adjacent subunit and the conformational dynamics of the first extracellular flexible loop may govern the voltage-dependence of multimodal gating, thereby serving to stabilize the open state of the channel. These results are generally important in understanding the structure and function of TRPA1 and offer new insights into the gating mechanism of TRPA1 and related channels. PMID:28197074

  16. Transplantation of three-dimensional artificial human vascular tissues fabricated using an extracellular matrix nanofilm-based cell-accumulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yoshiya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Okano, Daisuke; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    We have established a novel three-dimensional (3D) tissue-constructing technique, referred to as the 'cell-accumulation method', which is based on the self-assembly of cultured human cells. In this technique, cells are coated with fibronectin and gelatin to construct extracellular matrix (ECM) nanofilms and cultured to form multi-layers in vitro. By using this method, we have successfully fabricated artificial tissues with vascular networks constructed by co-cultivation of human umbilical vein-derived vascular endothelial cells between multi-layers of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, to assess these engineered vascular tissues as therapeutic implants, we transplanted the 3D human tissues with microvascular networks, fabricated based on the cell-accumulation method, onto the back skin of nude mice. After the transplantation, we found vascular networks with perfusion of blood in the transplanted graft. At the boundary between host and implanted tissue, connectivity between murine and human vessels was found. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted artificial vascular tubules demonstrated the ultrastructural features of blood capillaries. Moreover, maturation of the vascular tissues after transplantation was shown by the presence of pericyte-like cells and abundant collagen fibrils in the ECM surrounding the vasculature. These results demonstrated that artificial human vascular tissues constructed by our method were engrafted and matured in animal skin. In addition, the implanted artificial human vascular networks were connected with the host circulatory system by anastomosis. This method is an attractive technique for engineering prevascularized artificial tissues for transplantation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. 人脂肪组织细胞外基质支架的构建%Construction of scaffold with human extracellular matrix from adipose tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    察鹏飞; 高建华; 陈阳; 鲁峰

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨从人脂肪组织中提取细胞外基质并构建支架的方法,研究其结构特点,分析其作为脂肪组织工程支架的可行性.方法 收集抽脂术患者的脂肪组织,共7例,每例约310 ml,10 ml用来分离培养脂肪来源干细胞,300 ml提取细胞外基质,并制备成粉末状,扫描电镜观察其表面结构.DiI荧光标记脂肪来源干细胞,统计荧光标记后细胞存活率;将荧光标记前、后的细胞与支架粘附,检测其粘附率,所得数据用SPSS 13.0软件两样本t检验进行统计学比较,分析标记前后细胞粘附率有无差异;荧光显微镜下观察细胞在支架表面生长情况.结果 从人脂肪组织中提取得到脂肪来源干细胞和细胞外基质粉末.脂肪来源干细胞具有成脂、成软骨和成骨分化的能力;扫描电镜观察细胞外基质粉末具有多孔、粗糙表面和光滑表面的结构.脂肪来源干细胞与支架粘附较好;DiI标记前、后细胞粘附率分别为(88.81±4.81)%和(86.48±4.58)%,两样本t检验,P=0.371,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).荧光显微镜下脂肪来源干细胞在细胞外基质支架上生长状态良好.结论 人脂肪组织细胞外基质粉末容易获取,形状和颗粒体积具有高度的多样性,表面积较大,有利于脂肪干细胞的粘附和增殖,可作为一种较理想的脂肪组织工程支架材料.%Objective To investigate the feasibility of constructing scaffold for tissue engineering with human extracellular matrix from adipose tissue.Methods Fresh human adipose tissue was obtained by liposuction in 7 women who undergone liposuction.One part of the fat was used to isolate the adiposederived stem cells(ADSCs),the other part was used to extract human extracellular matrix powder.After removing blood and oil components,the tissue was homogenized,centrifuged,freeze-dried,and crushed to powder by instrument.The structure of human ECM powder was observed with electron microscopy. The

  18. Expression at a 20L scale and purification of the extracellular domain of the Schistosoma mansoni TSP-2 recombinant protein: a vaccine candidate for human intestinal schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Elena; Kwityn, Clifford; Zhan, Bin; Gillespie, Portia; Brelsford, Jill; Deumic, Vehid; Plieskatt, Jordan; Rezende, Wanderson C; Tsao, Eric; Kalampanayil, Bose; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-11-01

    A novel recombinant protein vaccine for human schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni is under development. The Sm-TSP-2 schistosomiasis vaccine is comprised of a 9 kDa recombinant protein corresponding to the extracellular domain of a unique S. mansoni tetraspanin. Here, we describe the cloning and the expression of the external loop of Sm-TSP-2 recombinant protein secreted by Pichia Pink the process development at 20L scale fermentation, and the two-steps purification, which resulted in a protein recovery yield of 31% and a protein purity of 97%. The developed processes are suitable for the production of purified protein for subsequent formulation and Phase 1 clinical studies.

  19. Hypoxia-increased expression of genes involved in inflammation, dedifferentiation, pro-fibrosis, and extracellular matrix remodeling of human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiafe, Bridget; Adesida, Adetola; Churchill, Thomas; Adewuyi, Esther Ekpe; Li, Zack; Metcalfe, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO) is characterized by exaggerated stretch, hydrodynamic pressure, and inflammation which cause significant damage and fibrosis to the bladder wall. Several studies have implicated hypoxia in its pathophysiology. However, the isolated progressive effects of hypoxia on bladder cells are not yet defined. Sub-confluent normal human bladder smooth muscle cells (hbSMC) were cultured in 3% O2 tension for 2, 24, 48, and 72 h. RNA, cellular proteins, and secreted proteins were used for gene expression analysis, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Transcription of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α and HIF2α were transiently induced after 2 h of hypoxia (p inflammation, de-differentiation, pro-fibrotic changes, and increased extracellular matrix expression. This elucidates mechanisms of hypoxia-driven bladder deterioration in bladder cells, which is important in tailoring in vivo experiments and may ultimately translate into improved clinical outcomes.

  20. Evidence of connections between cerebrospinal fluid and nasal lymphatic vessels in humans, non-human primates and other mammalian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong Dianna

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The parenchyma of the brain does not contain lymphatics. Consequently, it has been assumed that arachnoid projections into the cranial venous system are responsible for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF absorption. However, recent quantitative and qualitative evidence in sheep suggest that nasal lymphatics have the major role in CSF transport. Nonetheless, the applicability of this concept to other species, especially to humans has never been clarified. The purpose of this study was to compare the CSF and nasal lymph associations in human and non-human primates with those observed in other mammalian species. Methods Studies were performed in sheep, pigs, rabbits, rats, mice, monkeys and humans. Immediately after sacrifice (or up to 7 hours after death in humans, yellow Microfil was injected into the CSF compartment. The heads were cut in a sagittal plane. Results In the seven species examined, Microfil was observed primarily in the subarachnoid space around the olfactory bulbs and cribriform plate. The contrast agent followed the olfactory nerves and entered extensive lymphatic networks in the submucosa associated with the olfactory and respiratory epithelium. This is the first direct evidence of the association between the CSF and nasal lymph compartments in humans. Conclusions The fact that the pattern of Microfil distribution was similar in all species tested, suggested that CSF absorption into nasal lymphatics is a characteristic feature of all mammals including humans. It is tempting to speculate that some disorders of the CSF system (hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension for example may relate either directly or indirectly to a lymphatic CSF absorption deficit.

  1. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and peptide histidine methionine. Presence in human follicular fluid and effects on DNA synthesis and steroid secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, S; Ovesen, P; Andersen, A N;

    1994-01-01

    fluid and cells were obtained from patients undergoing in-vitro fertilization for tubal infertility. The concentrations of VIP and PHM in pre-ovulatory human follicular fluid were measured radioimmunochemically. Granulosa/lutein cells isolated from follicular fluid were cultured under serum......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine methionine (PHM) originate from the same precursor molecule, prepro VIP. In the present study we examined the concentrations of VIP and PHM in human follicular fluid and their effects on cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. Follicular......-free conditions with VIP and PHM in varying concentrations (0.1, 10, 1000 nmol/l). [3H]Thymidine incorporation in the cells and oestradiol as well as progesterone concentrations in the culture medium were measured. The mean (+/- SEM) concentrations of VIP and PHM were 6.8 +/- 0.1 and 7.7 +/- 0.8 pmol...

  2. Expression of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase and Angiotensin-converting Enzyme in Human Atria during Atrial Fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴友平; 王祥; 曹林生; 杨杪; 邬堂春

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the changes in the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/ERK2) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), 52 patients with rheumatic heart diseases were examined. Nineteen patients had chronic persistent AF (AF≥6 months, CAF), 12 patients had paroxymal AF (PAF) and 21 patients had no history of AF. The ERK expression was detected at the mRNA level by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, at the protein level by Western blotting and at atrial tissue level by immunohistochemistry. ERK-activating kinases (MEK1/2) and ACE were determined by Western blotting techniques. The expression of ERK2-mRNA was increased in the patients with CAF (74±19 U vs sinus rhythm: 32±24 U, P<0.05). Activated ERK1/ERK2 and MEK1/2 were increased to more than 150 % in the patients with AF compared to those with sinus rhythm. No significant difference between CAF and PAF was found. The expression of ACE was three-fold increased in the patients with CAF compared to those with sinus rhythm. Patients with AF showed an increased expression of ERK1/ERK2 in atrial interstitial cells and marked atrial fibrosis. An ACE-dependent increase in the amounts of activated ERK1/ERK2 in atrial interstitial cells may be one of molecular mechanisms for the development of atrial fibrosis in the patients with AF. These findings may have important impact on the treatment of AF.

  3. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dzobo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell–matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures.

  4. The 15 SCR flexible extracellular domains of human complement receptor type 2 can mediate multiple ligand and antigen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Hannah E; Asokan, Rengasamy; Holers, V Michael; Perkins, Stephen J

    2006-10-01

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) is a cell surface protein that links the innate and adaptive immune response during the activation of B cells. The extracellular portion of CR2 comprises 15 or 16 short complement regulator (SCR) domains, for which the overall arrangement in solution is unknown. This was determined by constrained scattering and ultracentrifugation modelling. The radius of gyration of CR2 SCR 1-15 was determined to be 11.5 nm by both X-ray and neutron scattering, and that of its cross-section was 1.8 nm. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the overall length of CR2 SCR 1-15 was 38 nm. Sedimentation equilibrium curve fits gave a mean molecular weight of 135,000 (+/- 13,000) Da, in agreement with a fully glycosylated structure. Velocity experiments using the g*(s) derivative method gave a sedimentation coefficient of 4.2 (+/- 0.1) S. In order to construct a model of CR2 SCR 1-15 for constrained fitting, homology models for the 15 SCR domains were combined with randomised linker peptides generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Using an automated procedure, the analysis of 15,000 possible CR2 SCR 1-15 models showed that only those models in which the 15 SCR domains were flexible but partially folded back accounted for the scattering and sedimentation data. The best-fit CR2 models provided a visual explanation for the versatile interaction of CR2 with four ligands C3d, CD23, gp350 and IFN-alpha. The flexible location of CR2 SCR 1-2 is likely to facilitate interactions of C3d-antigen complexes with the B cell receptor.

  5. Platelet-rich plasma stimulates human dermal fibroblast proliferation via a Ras-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tomoya; Kakudo, Natsuko; Morimoto, Naoki; Ogawa, Takeshi; Lai, Fangyuan; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains a high concentration of several growth factors and contributes to soft-tissue engineering and wound healing. However, the effect of PRP on human dermal fibroblast proliferation and responses is unknown. This was investigated in the present study using PRP prepared from the whole human blood using the double-spin method. Human dermal fibroblast cultures were established from skin samples collected during plastic surgery. Platelet concentration and growth factor levels in PRP were estimated, and a cell proliferation assay was carried out after PRP treatment. The role of Ras-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in the effects of PRP was investigated in human dermal fibroblasts by suppressing ERK1/2 expression with an inhibitor or by short interfering (si)RNA-mediated knockdown, and assessing ERK1/2 phosphorylation by western blotting as well as proliferation in PRP-treated cells. We found that PRP stimulated human dermal fibroblast proliferation, which was suppressed by ERK1/2 inhibitor treatment (P < 0.01). ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in the presence of PRP, while siRNA-mediated knockdown of ERK1/2 blocked cell proliferation normally induced by PRP treatment (P < 0.01). These results demonstrate that PRP induces human dermal fibroblast proliferation via activation of ERK1/2 signaling. Our findings provide a basis for the development of agents that can promote wound healing and can be applied to soft-tissue engineering.

  6. Human breast biomonitoring and environmental chemicals: use of breast tissues and fluids in breast cancer etiologic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaKind, Judy S; Wilkins, Amy A; Bates, Michael N

    2007-09-01

    Extensive research indicates that the etiology of breast cancer is complex and multifactorial and may include environmental risk factors. Breast cancer etiology and exposure to xenobiotic compounds, diet, electromagnetic fields, and lifestyle have been the subject of numerous scientific inquiries, but research has yielded inconsistent results. Biomonitoring has been used to explore associations between breast cancer and levels of environmental chemicals in the breast. Research using breast tissues and fluids to cast light on the etiology of breast cancer is, for the most part, predicated on the assumption that the tissue or fluid samples either contain measurable traces of the environmental agent(s) associated with the cancer or that they retain biological changes that are biomarkers of such exposure or precursors of carcinogenic effect. In this paper, we review breast cancer etiology research utilizing breast biomonitoring. We first provide a brief synopsis of the current state of understanding of associations between exposure to environmental chemicals and breast cancer etiology. We then describe the published breast cancer research on tissues and fluids, which have been used for biomonitoring, specifically human milk and its components, malignant and benign breast tissue, nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) and breast cyst fluid. We conclude with a discussion on recommendations for biomonitoring of breast tissues and fluids in future breast cancer etiology research. Both human milk and NAF fluids, and the cells contained therein, hold promise for future biomonitoring research into breast cancer etiology, but must be conducted with carefully delineated hypotheses and a scientifically supportable epidemiological approach.

  7. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  8. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad Jabaji

    Full Text Available We previously reported in vitro maintenance and proliferation of human small intestinal epithelium using Matrigel, a proprietary basement membrane product. There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells.Human small intestine was procured from fresh surgical pathology specimens. Small intestinal crypts were isolated using EDTA chelation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts were isolated from a pediatric sample and expanded in vitro. After suspension in Matrigel or type I collagen gel, crypts were co-cultured above a confluent layer of myofibroblasts. Crypts were also grown in monoculture with exposure to myofibroblast conditioned media; these were subsequently sub-cultured in vitro and expanded with a 1∶2 split ratio. Cultures were assessed with light microscopy, RT-PCR, histology, and immunohistochemistry.Collagen supported viable human epithelium in vitro for at least one month in primary culture. Sub-cultured epithelium expanded through 12 passages over 60 days. Histologic sections revealed polarized columnar cells, with apical brush borders and basolaterally located nuclei. Collagen-based cultures gave rise to monolayer epithelial sheets at the gel-liquid interface, which were not observed with Matrigel. Immunohistochemical staining identified markers of differentiated intestinal epithelium and myofibroblasts. RT-PCR demonstrated expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in myofibroblasts and E-Cadherin, CDX2, villin 1, intestinal alkaline phosphatase, chromogranin A, lysozyme, and Lgr5 in epithelial cells. These markers were maintained through several passages.Type I collagen gel supports long-term in vitro maintenance and expansion of fully elaborated human intestinal epithelium. Collagen-based methods yield familiar enteroid structures as well as a new pattern of sheet

  9. A quantitative label-free analysis of the extracellular proteome of human supraspinatus tendon reveals damage to the pericellular and elastic fibre niches in torn and aged tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Osnat; Ternette, Nicola; Murphy, Richard; Kessler, Benedikt M; Carr, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Tears of the human supraspinatus tendon are common and often cause painful and debilitating loss of function. Progressive failure of the tendon leading to structural abnormality and tearing is accompanied by numerous cellular and extra-cellular matrix (ECM) changes in the tendon tissue. This proteomics study aimed to compare torn and aged rotator cuff tissue to young and healthy tissue, and provide the first ECM inventory of human supraspinatus tendon generated using label-free quantitative LC-MS/MS. Employing two digestion protocols (trypsin and elastase), we analysed grain-sized tendon supraspinatus biopsies from older patients with torn tendons and from healthy, young controls. Our findings confirm measurable degradation of collagen fibrils and associated proteins in old and torn tendons, suggesting a significant loss of tissue organisation. A particularly marked reduction of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) raises the possibility of using changes in levels of this glycoprotein as a marker of abnormal tissue, as previously suggested in horse models. Surprisingly, and despite using an elastase digestion for validation, elastin was not detected, suggesting that it is not highly abundant in human supraspinatus tendon as previously thought. Finally, we identified marked changes to the elastic fibre, fibrillin-rich niche and the pericellular matrix. Further investigation of these regions may yield other potential biomarkers and help to explain detrimental cellular processes associated with tendon ageing and tendinopathy.

  10. PME-1 protects extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity from protein phosphatase 2A-mediated inactivation in human malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puustinen, Pietri; Junttila, Melissa R; Vanhatupa, Sari; Sablina, Anna A; Hector, Melissa E; Teittinen, Kaisa; Raheem, Olayinka; Ketola, Kirsi; Lin, Shujun; Kast, Juergen; Haapasalo, Hannu; Hahn, William C; Westermarck, Jukka

    2009-04-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activity is regulated by the antagonist function of activating kinases and inactivating protein phosphatases. Sustained ERK pathway activity is commonly observed in human malignancies; however, the mechanisms by which the pathway is protected from phosphatase-mediated inactivation in the tumor tissue remain obscure. Here, we show that methylesterase PME-1-mediated inhibition of the protein phosphatase 2A promotes basal ERK pathway activity and is required for efficient growth factor response. Mechanistically, PME-1 is shown to support ERK pathway signaling upstream of Raf, but downstream of growth factor receptors and protein kinase C. In malignant gliomas, PME-1 expression levels correlate with both ERK activity and cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, PME-1 expression significantly correlates with disease progression in human astrocytic gliomas (n=222). Together, these observations identify PME-1 expression as one mechanism by which ERK pathway activity is maintained in cancer cells and suggest an important functional role for PME-1 in the disease progression of human astrocytic gliomas.

  11. Differential expression of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues and cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Weiguo, E-mail: liangweiguo@tom.com [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); Fang, Dejian [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); Ye, Dongping [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Zou, Longqiang; Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); Xu, Jiake, E-mail: jiake.xu@uwa.edu.au [Guangzhou Institute of Traumatic Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510220 (China); School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • ERK5 involved in NP cells. • ERK5 involved in NP tissue. • It was important modulator. - Abstract: Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and regulates a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, necrosis, apoptosis and degeneration. However, the expression of ERK5 and its role in degenerated human nucleus pulposus (NP) is hitherto unknown. In this study, we observed the differential expression of ERK5 in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues by using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Treatment of NP cells with Pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α decreased ERK5 gene expression as well as NP marker gene expression; including the type II collagen and aggrecan. Suppression of ERK5 gene expression in NP cells by ERK5 siRNA resulted in decreased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK5 activation by BIX02188 (5 μM) decreased the gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in NP cells. Our results document the expression of ERK5 in degenerated nucleus pulposus tissues, and suggest a potential involvement of ERK5 in human degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  12. Cryoprotectant-free vitrification of human spermatozoa in new artificial seminal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha-Rahimi, A; Khalili, M A; Nottola, S A; Miglietta, S; Moradi, A

    2016-11-01

    Vitrification is a new method that has been recently introduced in Assisted Reproduction Technique programs. The aim of this study was to design a new medium similar to normal human seminal fluid (SF), formulation artificial seminal fluid (ASF), and to compare the cryoprotective potency of this medium with SF and human tubal fluid (HTF) medium. Thirty normal ejaculates were processed with the swim-up technique and sperm suspensions were divided into four aliquots: (i) fresh sample (control); (ii) vitrification in HTF medium supplemented with 5 mg/mL human serum albumin and 0.25 mol sucrose (Vit HTF); (iii) vitrification with patients' SF (Vit SF); and (iv) vitrification in ASF (Vit ASF). After warming, sperm parameters of motility, viability, and morphology were analyzed using WHO criteria. Also, sperm pellets were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde and processed for scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations. The results showed that progressive motility (46.09 ± 10.33 vs. 36.80 ± 13.75), grade A motility (36.59 ± 11.40 vs. 16.41 ± 11.24), and normal morphology (18.74 ± 8.35 vs. 11.85 ± 5.84) and viability (68.22 ± 10.83 vs. 60.86 ± 11.72) of spermatozoa were significantly higher in Vit ASF than in Vit HTF. All parameters were better in Vit ASF than in Vit SF, but only viability was significantly different (p = 0.006). After cryopreservation, deep invagination in cytoplasm and mechanically weak point sites and folded tail were commonly observed. But, this phenomenon was more significant in Vit HTF and Vit SF than in ASF (p HTF and Vit SF than in ASF (p HTF. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  13. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and peptide histidine methionine. Presence in human follicular fluid and effects on DNA synthesis and steroid secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, S; Ovesen, P; Andersen, A N;

    1994-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine methionine (PHM) originate from the same precursor molecule, prepro VIP. In the present study we examined the concentrations of VIP and PHM in human follicular fluid and their effects on cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. Follicular...

  14. The use of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells as the feeder layer to establish human embryonic stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Yung-Kwei; Huang, Shang-Yu; Yeh, Chiu-Hsiang; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Cheng, Po-Jen; Shaw, S W Steven

    2015-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cells that have the potential to differentiate into the three germ layers and possibly all tissues of the human body. To fulfil the clinical potentials for cell-based therapy, banks of hESC lines that express different combinations of the major histocompatibility genes should be established, preferably without exposing such cells to animal cells and proteins. In this study, we tested human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) as feeder cells to support the growth of hESCs. Our results indicated that mitomycin-treated AFMSCs were able to support the newly established hESC lines CGLK-1 and CGLK-2. The hESC colonies cultured on AFMSCs expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-4, Nanog and Sox-2, which are markers for undifferentiated hESCs. Chromosomal analyses of both hESC lines, CGLK-1 and CGLK-2, which were cultured on AFMSC feeders for 22 and 14 passages, respectively, were confirmed to be normal karyotypes (46, XX). The ability of AFMSCs as feeder cells to maintain the undifferentiated growth and pluripotency of hESCs was confirmed by in vivo formation of teratomas derived on AFMSC hESCs in severe combined immune-compromised mice. The use of AFMSCs for feeder cells to culture hESCs has several advantages, in that AFMSCs are not tumourigenic and can be expanded extensively with a short doubling time.

  15. Extracellular matrix gel is necessary for in vitro cultivation of insulin producing cells from human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Feng; WU De-quan; HU Yan-hua; JIN Guang-xin

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islet cell transplantation is an effective approach to treat type 1 diabetes. However, this therapy is not widely used because of the severe shortage of transplantable donor islets. This study investigated whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB) could be transdifferentiated into insulin producing cells in vitro and the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) gel in this procedure.Methods Human UCB samples were collected and MSCs were isolated. MSCs specific marker proteins were analyzed by a flow cytometer. The capacities of osteoblast and adipocyte to differentiate were tested. Differentiation into islet like cell was induced by a 15-day protocol with or without ECM gel. Pancreatic characteristics were evaluated with immunofluorescence, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Insulin content and release in response to glucose stimulation were detected with chemiluminescent immunoassay system.Results Sixteen MSCs were isolated from 42 term human UCB units (38%). Human UCB-MSCs expressed MSCs specific markers and could be induced in vitro into osteoblast and adipocyte. Islet like cell clusters appeared about 9 days after pancreatic differentiation in the inducing system with ECM gel. The insulin positive cells accounted for (25.2±3.4)% of the induced cells. The induced cells expressed islet related genes and hormones, but were not very responsive to glucose challenge. When MSCs were induced without ECM gel, clusters formation and secretion of functional islet proteins could not be observed.Conclusions Human UCB-MSCs can differentiate into islet like cells in vitro and ECM gel plays an important role in pancreatic endocrine cell maturation and formation of three dimensional structures.

  16. Increase of {sup 210}Po levels in human semen fluid after mussel ingestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.co [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Radiometry-LARARA-PLS, Universidade Federal Fluminense, P.O.Box 100.436, 24001-970 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Programs in Environmental Science and Marine Biology, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Gouvea, Rita de Cassia dos Santos [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Radiometry-LARARA-PLS, Universidade Federal Fluminense, P.O.Box 100.436, 24001-970 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    Polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po) radioactive concentrations were determined in human semen fluid of vasectomized non-smoker volunteers. The {sup 210}Po levels ranged from 0.10 to 0.39 mBq g{sup -1} (mean: 0.23 {+-} 0.08 mBq g{sup -1}). This value decreased to 0.10 {+-} 0.02 mBq g{sup -1} (range from 0.07 to 0.13 mBq g{sup -1}) after two weeks of a controlled diet, excluding fish and seafood. Then, volunteers ate during a single meal 200 g of the cooked mussel Perna perna L., and {sup 210}Po levels were determined again, during ten days, in semen fluid samples collected every morning. Volunteers continued with the controlled diet and maintained sexual abstinence through the period of the experiment. A 300% increase of {sup 210}Po level was observed the day following mussel consumption, with a later reduction, such that the level returned to near baseline by day 4.

  17. Increase of 210Po levels in human semen fluid after mussel ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelecom, Alphonse; Gouvea, Rita de Cássia dos Santos

    2011-05-01

    Polonium-210 ((210)Po) radioactive concentrations were determined in human semen fluid of vasectomized non-smoker volunteers. The (210)Po levels ranged from 0.10 to 0.39 mBq g(-1) (mean: 0.23 ± 0.08 mBq g(-1)). This value decreased to 0.10 ± 0.02 mBq g(-1) (range from 0.07 to 0.13 mBq g(-1)) after two weeks of a controlled diet, excluding fish and seafood. Then, volunteers ate during a single meal 200 g of the cooked mussel Perna perna L., and (210)Po levels were determined again, during ten days, in semen fluid samples collected every morning. Volunteers continued with the controlled diet and maintained sexual abstinence through the period of the experiment. A 300% increase of (210)Po level was observed the day following mussel consumption, with a later reduction, such that the level returned to near baseline by day 4.

  18. AFM studies of cellular mechanics during osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, Pan; Chen, Jia-Nan; Cai, Ji-Ye; Cai, Xiao-Fang; Ding, Hui; Pan, Yun-Long

    2010-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are becoming an important source of cells for regenerative medicine given with apparent advantages of accessibility, renewal capacity and multipotentiality. In this study, the mechanical properties of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), such as the average Young's modulus, were determined by atomic force microscopy (3.97 ± 0.53 kPa for hAFSCs vs. 1.52 ± 0.63 kPa for fully differentiated osteoblasts). These differences in cell elasticity result primarily from differential actin cytoskeleton organization in these two cell types. Furthermore, ultrastructures, nanostructural details on the surface of cell, were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was clearly shown that surface of osteoblasts were covered by mineralized particles, and the histogram of particles size showed that most of the particles on the surface of osteoblasts distributed from 200 to 400 nm in diameter, while the diameter of hAFSCs particles ranged from 100 to 200 nm. In contrast, there were some dips on the surface of hAFSCs, and particles were smaller than that of osteoblasts. Additionally, as osteogenic differentiation of hAFSCs progressed, more and more stress fibers were replaced by a thinner actin network which is characteristic of mature osteoblasts. These results can improve our understanding of the mechanical properties of hAFSCs during osteogenic differentiation. AFM can be used as a powerful tool for detecting ultrastructures and mechanical properties.

  19. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification...... distinct size fraction of colloidal assemblies, whereas FeSSIF contained 2 fractions of colloidal species with significantly different sizes. These size fractions likely represent (1) mixed taurocholate-phospholipid-micelles, as indicated by a size range up to 70 nm (in diameter) and a strong UV absorption...... sizes of approximately 50 and 200 nm, respectively (intensity-weighted mean diameter, Dz), likely representing mixed cholate/phospholipid micelles and phospholipid vesicles, respectively. The sizes of the smaller 2 fractions being below the size range of multiangle laser light scattering analysis (

  20. Human and murine amniotic fluid c-Kit+Lin- cells display hematopoietic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditadi, Andrea; de Coppi, Paolo; Picone, Olivier; Gautreau, Laetitia; Smati, Rim; Six, Emmanuelle; Bonhomme, Delphine; Ezine, Sophie; Frydman, René; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2009-04-23

    We have isolated c-Kit(+)Lin(-) cells from both human and murine amniotic fluid (AF) and investigated their hematopoietic potential. In vitro, the c-Kit(+)Lin(-) population in both species displayed a multilineage hematopoietic potential, as demonstrated by the generation of erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cells. In vivo, cells belonging to all 3 hematopoietic lineages were found after primary and secondary transplantation of murine c-Kit(+)Lin(-) cells into immunocompromised hosts, thus demonstrating the ability of these cells to self-renew. Gene expression analysis of c-Kit(+) cells isolated from murine AF confirmed these results. The presence of cells with similar characteristics in the surrounding amnion indicates the possible origin of AF c-Kit(+)Lin(-) cells. This is the first report showing that cells isolated from the AF do have hematopoietic potential; our results support the idea that AF may be a new source of stem cells for therapeutic applications.

  1. Computer Simulation of Insoluble Pr(Ⅲ) Speciation in Human Interstitial Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaiYuanZHANG; XingLU; 等

    2002-01-01

    A multi-phase model of Pr(Ⅲ) speciation in human interstitial fluid was constructed and insoluble Pr(Ⅲ)speciation was studied. When the total concentration of Pr(Ⅲ)is below 8.401E-10 mol/L, soluble Pr(Ⅲ) species are main species. With rising the total concentration of Pr(Ⅲ), Pr(Ⅲ) is firstly bound to phosphate to form precipitate of PrPO4,then bound to carbonate and another precipitate of Pr2(CO3)3 was obtained. When the total concentration is between 1.583E-9 mol/L and 4.000E-3 mol/L, the insoluble species are predominant Pr(Ⅲ) species.

  2. Computer Simulation of Insoluble Pr(III) Speciation in Human Interstitial Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A multi-phase model of Pr(III) speciation in human interstitial fluid was constructed and insoluble Pr(III) speciation was studied. When the total concentration of Pr(III) is below 8.401E-10 mol/L, soluble Pr(III) species are main species. With rising the total concentration of Pr(III), Pr(III) is firstly bound to phosphate to form precipitate of PrPO4, then bound to carbonate and another precipitate of Pr2(CO3)3 was obtained. When the total concentration is between 1.583E-9 mol/L and 4.000E-3 mol/L, the insoluble species are predominant Pr(III) species.

  3. DNA methylation patterns of imprinting centers for H19, SNRPN, and KCNQ1OT1 in single-cell clones of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Huei Peng

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells contain a unique epigenetic signature during in vitro cell culture. H19 and KCNQ1OT1 possessed a substantial degree of hypermethylation status, and variable DNA methylation patterns of SNRPN was observed during in vitro cell culture of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells. Our results urge further understanding of epigenetic status of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells before it is applied in cell replacement therapy.

  4. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Krömmelbein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  7. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as delayed wound healing and skin cancer development. This mini-review describes cellular mechanisms that give rise to self-perpetuating, collagen fibril fragmentation that creates an age-associated dermal microenvironment, which contributes to decline of human skin function.

  8. Survey of 800+ data sets from human tissue and body fluid reveals xenomiRs are likely artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wenjing; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Holm, Anja; Houben, Anna J.S.; Müller, Anne Holt; Thymann, Thomas; Pociot, Flemming; Estivill, Xavier; Friedländer, Marc R.

    2017-01-01

    miRNAs are small 22-nucleotide RNAs that can post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. It has been proposed that dietary plant miRNAs can enter the human bloodstream and regulate host transcripts; however, these findings have been widely disputed. We here conduct the first comprehensive meta-study in the field, surveying the presence and abundances of cross-species miRNAs (xenomiRs) in 824 sequencing data sets from various human tissues and body fluids. We find that xenomiRs are commonly present in tissues (17%) and body fluids (69%); however, the abundances are low, comprising 0.001% of host human miRNA counts. Further, we do not detect a significant enrichment of xenomiRs in sequencing data originating from tissues and body fluids that are exposed to dietary intake (such as liver). Likewise, there is no significant depletion of xenomiRs in tissues and body fluids that are relatively separated from the main bloodstream (such as brain and cerebro-spinal fluids). Interestingly, the majority (81%) of body fluid xenomiRs stem from rodents, which are a rare human dietary contribution but common laboratory animals. Body fluid samples from the same studies tend to group together when clustered by xenomiR compositions, suggesting technical batch effects. Last, we performed carefully designed and controlled animal feeding studies, in which we detected no transfer of plant miRNAs into rat blood, or bovine milk sequences into piglet blood. In summary, our comprehensive computational and experimental results indicate that xenomiRs originate from technical artifacts rather than dietary intake. PMID:28062594

  9. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Boheler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs and induced PSCs (hiPSCs. Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures.

  10. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. (Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  11. The development of a radioimmunoassay for reverse triiodothyronine sulfate in human serum and amniotic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sing-Yung (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Long Beach, CA (United States)); Huang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Lian (Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)); Polk, D.; Reviczky, A.; Williams, J. III; Chopra, I.J.; Fisher, D.A. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Sulfated iodothyronines including T[sub 4]-sulfate (T[sub 4]S) and T[sub 3]-sulfate (T[sub 3]S) have been identified in human serum and amniotic fluid. Little is know, however, about the existence of sulfate conjugation of reverse T[sub 3] (rT[sub 3]S) in man. In this report, the authors employed a novel, sensitive, and specific rT[sub 3]S RIA to address this question. The rabbit antiserum to rT[sub 3]S was highly specific; T[sub 4], T[sub 3], rT[sub 3], and 3,3'-T[sub 2] showed less than 0.002% cross-reaction with the antiserum. Only T[sub 4]S and T[sub 3]S cross-reacted significantly (0.3% and 0.01%, respectively); other analogs cross-reacted less than 0.0001%. The detection threshold of the RIA was 14 pmol/L (1.0 ng/dL). The mean serum rT[sub 3]S concentration (pmol/L) was 40 in euthyroid subjects. Values were similar in hypothyroid patients (38) and pregnant women (52) but significantly (P < 0.01) elevated to 176 in hyperthyroid patient, 74 in patients with nonthyroid illnesses, and 684 in cord sera of newborns. Serum rT[sub 3]S increased significantly in hyperthyroid patients 1 day after administration of 1 g sodium ipodate orally. Reverse T[sub 3]S was detected consistently in amniotic fluid at 14 to 22 weeks of gestation and showed a marked rise 1-3 weeks after intraamniotic administration of 500-1000 [mu]g T[sub 4]. The various data suggest that : (1) rT[sub 3]S is a normal component of human serum and amniotic fluid; (2) it is derived from metabolism of T[sub 4] or rT[sub 3]; (3) circulating rT[sub 3]S increases in hyperthyroidism and in circumstances where type I 5'-monodeiodinating activity is low, e.g. nonthyroid illnesses, fetal life, and after administration of ipodate. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Novel anti-bacterial activities of β-defensin 1 in human platelets: suppression of pathogen growth and signaling of neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern F Kraemer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human β-defensins (hBD are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria.

  13. Role of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in regulating replication of Penicillium marneffei in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renqiong; Li, Xiqing; Lu, Sha; Ma, Tuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Liang, Yuheng; Xi, Liyan

    2014-05-01

    Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei) is a human pathogen which persists in macrophages and threatens the immunocompromised patients. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) pathways in cytokine expression, phagosome-lysosome fusion and replication of P. marneffei in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages. Analysis of both ERK1/2 and p38 showed rapid phosphorylation in response to P. marneffei. Using specific inhibitors of p38 (SB203580) and MAP kinase kinase-1 (PD98059), we found that ERK1/2 and p38 were essential for P. marneffei-induced tumor necrosis factor-α production, whereas p38, but not that of ERK, was essential for IL-10 production. Furthermore, the presence of PD98059 always decreased phagosomal acidification and maturation and increased intracellular multiplication of P. marneffei, whereas the use of SB203580 always increased phagosomal acidification and maturation and decreased intracellular replication. These data suggest that a proper balance of between ERK1/2 and p38 may play an important role in controlling the replication of P. marneffei. Our findings further indicate a novel therapeutic avenue for treating P. marneffei by stimulating ERK1/2 or activating ERK1/2-dependent mechanisms.

  14. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strain C1845 induces neutrophil extracellular traps that kill bacteria and damage human enterocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Turbica, Isabelle; Dufour, Guillaume; Semiramoth, Nicolas; Gleizes, Aude; Gorges, Roseline; Beau, Isabelle; Servin, Alain L; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Sandré, Catherine; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2012-05-01

    We recently documented the neutrophil response to enterovirulent diffusely adherent Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr fimbriae (Afa/Dr DAEC), using the human myeloid cell line PLB-985 differentiated into fully mature neutrophils. Upon activation, particularly during infections, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides, histones, and proteases, which entrap and kill pathogens. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy, we observed NET production by PLB-985 cells infected with the Afa/Dr wild-type (WT) E. coli strain C1845. We found that these NETs were able to capture, immobilize, and kill WT C1845 bacteria. We also developed a coculture model of human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cells and PLB-985 cells previously treated with WT C1845 and found, for the first time, that the F-actin cytoskeleton of enterocyte-like cells is damaged in the presence of bacterium-induced NETs and that this deleterious effect is prevented by inhibition of protease release. These findings provide new insights into the neutrophil response to bacterial infection via the production of bactericidal NETs and suggest that NETs may damage the intestinal epithelium, particularly in situations such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  15. Artificial extracellular matrices of collagen and sulphated hyaluronan enhance the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in the presence of dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, V; Miron, A; Möller, S; Schnabelrauch, M; Heinemann, S; Worch, H; Scharnweber, D

    2014-04-01

    In this study we investigated the potential of artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) coatings containing collagen II and two types of glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) with different degrees of sulphation to promote human bone formation in biomedical applications. To this end their impact on growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was assessed. The cell proliferation was found to be significantly retarded in the first 14 days of culture on surfaces coated with collagen II and GAGs (coll-II/GAG) as compared to tissue culture polystyrol (TCPS) and those coated with collagen II. At later time points it only tended to be retarded on coll-II/sHya3.1. Heat-inactivation of the serum significantly reduced cell numbers on collagen II and coll-II/sHya3.1. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition, on the other hand, were higher for coatings containing sHya3.1 and were not significantly changed by heat-inactivation of the serum. Expression levels of the bone matrix proteins bone sialoprotein (BSP-II) and osteopontin (OP) were also increased on aECM coatings as compared to TCPS, which further validated the differentiation of hMSCs towards the osteogenic lineage. These observations reveal that aECM coatings, in particular those containing sHya3.1, are suitable to promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  16. Sequenced response of extracellular matrix deadhesion and fibrotic regulators after muscle damage is involved in protection against future injury in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Abigail L; Brandstetter, Simon; Schjerling, Peter; Bojsen-Moller, Jens; Qvortrup, Klaus; Pedersen, Mette M; Doessing, Simon; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter; Langberg, Henning

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that remodeling of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) is involved in protecting human muscle against injury. Biopsies were obtained from medial gastrocnemius muscles after a single bout of electrical stimulation (B) or a repeated bout (RB) 30 d later, or 30 d after a single stimulation bout (RBc). A muscle biopsy was collected from the control leg for comparison with the stimulated leg. Satellite cell content, tenascin C, and muscle regeneration were assessed by immunohistochemistry; real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA levels of collagens, laminins, heat-shock proteins (HSPs), inflammation, and related growth factors. The large responses of HSPs, CCL2, and tenascin C detected 48 h after a single bout were attenuated in the RB trial, indicative of protection against injury. Satellite cell content and 12 target genes, including IGF-1, were elevated 30 d after a single bout. Among those displaying the greatest difference vs. control muscle, ECM laminin-β1 and collagen types I and III were elevated ∼6- to 9-fold (P<0.001). The findings indicate that the sequenced events of load-induced early deadhesion and later strengthening of skeletal muscle ECM play a role in protecting human muscle against future injury.

  17. Matrine-induced apoptosis of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via in vitro vascular endothelial growth factor-A/extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 pathway inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M; He, G; Wang, R; Shi, S; Chen, J; Ye, Y; Xie, L; Yi, X; Tang, A

    2014-07-01

    Matrine, a main active extract from Sophora flavescens Ait, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects on various cancer cell lines, such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. However, it is currently unclear whether matrine could also elicit an inhibitory effect on growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), let alone the possible molecular mechanisms. Therefore, in a previous study, we investigated matrine-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in NPC cells. It was shown that proliferation of human NPC cells (CNE1 and CNE2) was significantly diminished by matrine in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced in both 2 NPC cells, particularly in CNE2 cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis rate in matrine-treated CNE2 cells confirmed the proapoptotic activity of matrine. We further found that matrine treatment dose- and time-dependently reduced the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and inactivated extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), followed by increased expression of downstream target caspase-3. Overall, we conclude that matrine could induce apoptosis of human NPC cells via VEGF-A/ERK1/2 pathway, which supports the potential use of matrine in clinically treating NPC.

  18. Characterization and biological role of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wójtowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV form a heterogeneous population of mostly spherical membrane structures released by almost all cells, including tumour cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Their size varies from 30 nm to 1 μm, and size is one of the main criteria of the selection of two categories of EV: small (30-100 nm, more homogeneous exosomes and larger fragments (0.1-1 μm called membrane microvesicles or ectosomes. The presence of EV has already been detected in many human body fluids: blood, urine, saliva, semen and amniotic fluid. Formation of EV is tightly controlled, and their function and biochemical composition depend on the cell type they originate from. EV are the “vehicles” of bioactive molecules, such as proteins, mRNA and microRNA, and may play an important role in intercellular communication and modulation of e.g. immune system cell activity. In addition, on the surface of tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV, called oncosomes, several markers specific for cancer cells were identified, which indicates a role of TMV in tumour growth and cancer development. On the other hand, TMV may be an important source of tumour-associated antigens (TAA which can be potentially useful as biomarkers with prognostic value, as well as in development of new forms of targeted immunotherapy of cancer.

  19. Intracerebral injection of oil cyst content of human craniopharyngioma (oil machinery fluid) as a toxic model in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Hernández-Campos, Ma Elena; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Santamaría, Abel

    2014-04-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CPs) are benign epithelial cystic tumors of the sellar and suprasellar region with a high survival rate and high recurrence in children. CPs contain dense oily fluid, but little is known yet about this content and its contribution to tissue damage and tumoral growth. In this study, we developed a simple experimental model produced by intracortical injection to rats of the cyst fluid content collected from human CPs to explore its possible contribution to brain tissue damage. The cyst fluid of the CPs ("oil machinery fluid") was collected during surgical removal, briefly preserved and further tested in rats through intracortical infusion. The group receiving "oil machinery fluid" presented increased reactive oxygen species formation, oxidative damage to lipids and reactive gliosis accompanied by augmented immunoreactivity to peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin reductase 1 at 15, 30 and 45 days post-injection. Other markers of inflammation and cell damage were stimulated at all post-lesion days tested. There was also a body weight gain. The persistence of tissue damage and oxidative stress suggests that "oil machinery fluid" exerts progressive alterations similar to those observed in patients with CPs, supporting the concept that some components of cyst fluid may contribute to brain tissue damage in these patients.

  20. In vivo electrochemical corrosion study of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy in human synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igual Munoz, A; Schwiesau, J; Jolles, B M; Mischler, S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was initiated with the aim to assess the in vivo electrochemical corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo biomedical alloys in human synovial fluids in an attempt to identify possible patient or pathology specific effects. For this, electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential OCP, polarization resistance Rp, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS) were carried out on fluids extracted from patients with different articular pathologies and prosthesis revisions. Those electrochemical measurements could be carried out with outstanding precision and signal stability. The results show that the corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo alloy in synovial fluids not only depends on material reactivity but also on the specific reactions of synovial fluid components, most likely involving reactive oxygen species. In some patients the latter were found to determine the whole cathodic and anodic electrochemical response. Depending on patients, corrosion rates varied significantly between 50 and 750 mg dm(-2)year(-1).

  1. Mass spectrometry-based cDNA profiling as a potential tool for human body fluid identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donfack, Joseph; Wiley, Anissa

    2015-05-01

    Several mRNA markers have been exhaustively evaluated for the identification of human venous blood, saliva, and semen in forensic genetics. As new candidate human body fluid specific markers are discovered, evaluated, and reported in the scientific literature, there is an increasing trend toward determining the ideal markers for cDNA profiling of body fluids of forensic interest. However, it has not been determined which molecular genetics-based technique(s) should be utilized to assess the performance of these markers. In recent years, only a few confirmatory, mRNA/cDNA-based methods have been evaluated for applications in body fluid identification. The most frequently described methods tested to date include quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). However these methods, in particular qPCR, often favor narrow multiplex PCR due to the availability of a limited number of fluorescent dyes/tags. In an attempt to address this technological constraint, this study explored matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for human body fluid identification via cDNA profiling of venous blood, saliva, and semen. Using cDNA samples at 20pg input phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) amounts, body fluid specific markers for the candidate genes were amplified in their corresponding body fluid (i.e., venous blood, saliva, or semen) and absent in the remaining two (100% specificity). The results of this study provide an initial indication that MALDI-TOF MS is a potential fluorescent dye-free alternative method for body fluid identification in forensic casework. However, the inherent issues of low amounts of mRNA, and the damage caused to mRNA by environmental exposures, extraction processes, and storage conditions are important factors that significantly hinder the implementation of cDNA profiling into forensic casework. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Extracellular Disposal of Tumor-Suppressor miRs-145 and -34a via Microvesicles and 5-FU Resistance of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Akao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA expression causes various kinds of diseases. Especially, alterations in miRNA expression levels are frequently observed in human tumor cells and are associated with cancer pathogenesis. Earlier we established Fluorouracil (5-FU-resistant human colon cancer DLD-1 cells (DLD-1/5FU from parental 5-FU- sensitive DLD-1 cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of miRNA in each cell line and in its extracellular microvesicles (MVs before and after treatment with 5-FU. The nascent RNAs of anti-oncogenic miR-34a and -145 labeled with EU in both cells were proved to be transferred into MVs in both cell lines. The levels of miR-34a and -145 in the cells and in their MVs were not largely different in the two cell lines, and a substantial amount of both miRNAs was secreted by both cell lines even in the steady-state condition. The exposure of both cell lines to 5-FU significantly increased the intracellular levels of miR-145 and miR-34a in the 5-FU-sensitive DLD-1 cells, whereas the level of neither miR was elevated in the DLD-1/5FU cells. Interestingly, the amount of miR-145 detected in the small MVs shed into the medium of the parental cells was reduced after the treatment with 5-FU. On the other hand, the intracellular expression of miR-34a in the DLD-1/5FU cells was down-regulated compared with that in the parental DLD-1 cells even in the steady-state condition. As to the miR-34a secreted into MVs, the increase in the level in DLD-1/5FU cells was greater than that in the parental DLD-1 cells after the treatment with 5-FU. Thus, the intra- and extracellular miR-145 and -34a were closely associated with 5-FU resistance, and the resistance was in part due to the enhanced secretion of miR-145 and -34a via MVs, resulting in low intracellular levels of both miRNAs.

  3. Elevated extracellular calcium increases expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene via a calcium channel and ERK pathway in human dental pulp cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Hiroyuki [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nemoto, Eiji, E-mail: e-nemoto@umin.ac.jp [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kanaya, Sousuke; Hamaji, Nozomu; Sato, Hisae; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2010-04-16

    Dental pulp cells, which have been shown to share phenotypical features with osteoblasts, are capable of differentiating into odontoblast-like cells and generating a dentin-like mineral structure. Elevated extracellular Ca{sup 2+}Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} has been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} signaling in odontogenesis remains unclear. We found that elevated Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} increases bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 gene expression in human dental pulp cells. The increase was modulated not only at a transcriptional level but also at a post-transcriptional level, because treatment with Ca{sup 2+} increased the stability of BMP-2 mRNA in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. A similar increase in BMP-2 mRNA level was observed in other human mesenchymal cells from oral tissue; periodontal ligament cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, the latter cells exhibited considerably lower expression of BMP-2 mRNA compared with dental pulp cells and periodontal ligament cells. The BMP-2 increase was markedly inhibited by pretreatment with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, and partially inhibited by the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels inhibitor, nifedipine. However, pretreatment with nifedipine had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation triggered by Ca{sup 2+}, suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+} influx from Ca{sup 2+} channels may operate independently of ERK signaling. Dental pulp cells do not express the transcript of Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptors (CaSR) and only respond slightly to other cations such as Sr{sup 2+} and spermine, suggesting that dental pulp cells respond to Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} to increase BMP-2 mRNA expression in a manner different from CaSR and rather specific for Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} among cations.

  4. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Besides their putative usage for therapies, stem cells are a promising tool for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis. For this purpose induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from patients harbouring specific mutations. In contrast to adult stem cells, iPS cells are pluripotent and can efficiently be grown in culture. However, iPS cells are modulated due to the ectopic induction of pluripotency, harbour other somatic mutations accumulated during the life span of the source cells, exhibit only imperfectly cleared epigenetic memory of the source cell, and are often genomically instable. In addition, iPS cells from patients only allow the investigation of mutations, which are not prenatally lethal. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have a high proliferation and differentiation potential, but raise ethical issues. Human embryos, which are not transferred in the course of in vitro fertilization, because of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a genetic defect, are still rarely donated for the establishment of ES cell lines. In addition, their usage for studies on gene functions for oncogenesis is hampered by the fact the ES cells are already tumorigenic per se. In 2003 amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been discovered, which meanwhile have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Monoclonal human AFS cell lines derived from amniocenteses have a high proliferative potential, are genomically stable and are not associated with ethical controversies. Worldwide amniocenteses are performed for routine human genetic diagnosis. We here discuss how generation and banking of monoclonal human AFS cell lines with specific chromosomal aberrations or monogenic disease mutations would allow to study the functional consequences of disease causing mutations. In addition, recently a protocol for efficient and highly reproducible siRNA-mediated long-term knockdown of endogenous gene

  5. Reactivating the extracellular matrix synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans to improve the human skin aspect and its mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajra H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hanane Chajra,1 Daniel Auriol,1 Francine Joly,2 Aurélie Pagnon,3 Magda Rodrigues,4 Sophie Allart,4 Gérard Redziniak,5 Fabrice Lefevre1 1Libragen, Induchem (Givaudan Active Beauty, Toulouse, 2Sephra Pharma, Puteaux, 3Novotec, Bron, 4Centre de Physiopathologie de Toulouse-Purpan, Toulouse, 5Cosmetic Inventions, Antony, France Background: The aim of this study was to demonstrate that a defined cosmetic composition is able to induce an increase in the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs and/or proteoglycans and finally to demonstrate that the composition, through its combined action of enzyme production and synthesis of macromolecules, modulates organization and skin surface aspect with a benefit in antiaging applications. Materials and methods: Gene expression was studied by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using normal human dermal fibroblasts isolated from a 45-year-old donor skin dermis. De novo synthesis of sGAGs and proteoglycans was determined using Blyscan™ assay and/or immunohistochemical techniques. These studies were performed on normal human dermal fibroblasts (41- and 62-year-old donors and on human skin explants. Dermis organization was studied either ex vivo on skin explants using bi-photon microscopy and transmission electron microscopy or directly in vivo on human volunteers by ultrasound technique. Skin surface modification was investigated in vivo using silicone replicas coupled with macrophotography, and the mechanical properties of the skin were studied using Cutometer. Results: It was first shown that mRNA expression of several genes involved in the synthesis pathway of sGAG was stimulated. An increase in the de novo synthesis of sGAGs was shown at the cellular level despite the age of cells, and this phenomenon was clearly related to the previously observed stimulation of mRNA expression of genes. An increase in the expression of the corresponding core protein of decorin, perlecan

  6. A murine monoclonal antibody that binds N-terminal extracellular segment of human protease-activated receptor-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangawa, Takeshi; Nogi, Terukazu; Takagi, Junichi

    2008-10-01

    Abstract A monoclonal antibody that recognizes native G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is generally difficult to obtain. Protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4) is a GPCR that plays an important role in platelet activation as a low-affinity thrombin receptor. By immunizing peptide corresponding to the N-terminal segment of human PAR4, we obtained a monoclonal antibody that recognizes cell surface expressed PAR4. Epitope mapping using a series of artificial fusion proteins that carry PAR4-derived peptide revealed that the recognition motif is fully contained within the 6-residue portion adjacent to the thrombin cleavage site. The antibody blocked PAR4 peptide cleavage by thrombin, suggesting its utility in the functional study of PAR4 signaling.

  7. Extracellular Matrix Modulates Morphology, Growth, Oxidative Stress Response and Functionality of Human Skin Fibroblasts during Aging In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter; Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    The Hayflick system of cellular aging and replicative senescence in vitro has been used widely in both basic and applied research in biogerontology. The state of replicative senescence is generally considered to be irreversible, but is modifiable by genetic and environmental manipulations. Some...... recent observations indicate that replicative lifespan, senescence and functionality of cells in vitro can be significantly affected by the quality of the extra cellular matrix (ECM). Following up on those reports, here we show that using the ECM prepared from early passage young cells, partial...... rejuvenation of serially passaged human facial skin fibroblasts was possible in pre-senescent middle-aged cells, but not in fully senescent late passage cells. ECM from young cells improved the appearance, viability, stress tolerance and wound healing ability of skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, young ECM...

  8. Extracellular lipase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: biochemical characterization and effect on human neutrophil and monocyte function in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, K E; Kharazmi, A; Høiby, N

    1991-01-01

    on neutrophils. The inhibitory effect was concentration dependent and was abolished by heat treatment of the enzyme at 100 degrees C. Since monocytes are one of the important cells of the host defence system the inhibition of the function of these cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of infections caused...... concentrations of this lipase preparation were preincubated with human peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. The chemotaxis and chemiluminescence of these cells were then determined. It was shown that lipase inhibited the monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence, whereas it had no or very little effect...... chromatography revealed spherical particles with diameters ranging from 5 to 20 nm. Biochemical characterization and SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggested that these particles consisted of protein and carbohydrate including lipopolysaccharide with the major enzyme activity being lipase. Various...

  9. Expression of extracellular matrix components and related growth factors in human tendon and muscle after acute exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Bjerrum, S S; Schjerling, P

    2013-01-01

    the patellar tendon and vastus lateralis muscle of each leg at 2 (n = 10), 6 (n = 11), or 26 h (n = 10) after exercise. Levels of messenger ribonucleic acid mRNA for collagens, noncollagenous matrix proteins, and growth factors were measured with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction......Acute kicking exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle in humans, but it is not known if this relates to increased collagen transcription and if other matrix genes are regulated. Young men performed 1 h of one-leg kicking at 67% of max workload. Biopsies were taken from....... In tendon, gene expression was unchanged except for a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-IEa (IGF-IEa; P ...

  10. Reduced Expression of Cytoskeletal and Extracellular Matrix Genes in Human Adult Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Corydon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microgravity (µg has adverse effects on the eye of humans in space. The risk of visual impairment is therefore one of the leading health concerns for NASA. The impact of µg on human adult retinal epithelium (ARPE-19 cells is unknown. Methods: In this study we investigated the influence of simulated µg (s-µg; 5 and 10 days (d, using a Random Positioning Machine (RPM, on ARPE-19 cells. We performed phase-contrast/fluorescent microscopy, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and pathway analysis. Results: Following RPM-exposure a subset of ARPE-19 cells formed multicellular spheroids (MCS, whereas the majority of the cells remained adherent (AD. After 5d, alterations of F-actin and fibronectin were observed which reverted after 10d-exposure, suggesting a time-dependent adaptation to s-µg. Gene expression analysis of 12 genes involved in cell structure, shape, adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis suggested significant changes after a 10d-RPM-exposure. 11 genes were down-regulated in AD and MCS 10d-RPM-samples compared to 1g, whereas FLK1 was up-regulated in 5d- and 10d-RPM-MCS-samples. Similarly, TIMP1 was up-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples, whereas the remaining genes were down-regulated in 5d-RPM-samples. Western blotting revealed similar changes in VEGF, β-actin, laminin and fibronectin of 5d-RPM-samples compared to 10d, whereas different alterations of β-tubulin and vimentin were observed. The pathway analysis showed complementing effects of VEGF and integrin β-1. Conclusions: These findings clearly show that s-µg induces significant alterations in the F-actin-cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-related proteins of ARPE-19, in addition to changes in cell growth behavior and gene expression patterns involved in cell structure, growth, shape, migration, adhesion and angiogenesis.

  11. Different Phenotypes in Human Prostate Cancer: α6 or α3 Integrin in Cell-extracellular Adhesion Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Schmelz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of α6/α3 integrin in adhesion complexes at the basal membrane in human normal and cancer prostate glands was analyzed in 135 biopsies from 61 patients. The levels of the polarized α6/α3 integrin expression at the basal membrane of prostate tumor glands were determined by quantitative immunohistochemistry. The α6/α3 integrin expression was compared with Gleason sum score, pathological stage, and preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. The associations were assessed by statistical methods. Eighty percent of the tumors expressed the α6 or α3 integrin and 20% was integrin-negative. Gleason sum score, but not serum PSA, was associated with the integrin expression. Low Gleason sum score correlated with increased integrin expression, high Gleason sum score with low and negative integrin expression. Three prostate tumor phenotypes were distinguished based on differential integrin expression. Type I coexpressed both α6 and α3 subunits, type II exclusively expressed a6 integrin, and type III expressed α3 integrin only. Fifteen cases were further examined for the codistribution of vinculin, paxillin, and CD 151 on frozen serial sections using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The α6/α3 integrins, CD151, paxillin, and vinculin were present within normal glands. In prostate carcinoma, α6 integrin was colocalized with CD 151, but not with vinculin or paxillin. In tumor phenotype I, the α6 subunit did not colocalize with the α3 subunit indicating the existence of two different adhesion complexes. Human prostate tumors display on their cell surface the α6β1 and/or α3β1 integrins. Three tumor phenotypes associated with two different adhesion complexes were identified, suggesting a reorganization of cell adhesion structures in prostate cancer.

  12. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in human follicular fluid and in vitro fertilization outcomes, a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Michael S; Fujimoto, Victor Y; Storm, Robin; Zhang, Li; Butts, Celeste D; Sollohub, Diana; Jansing, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are ubiquitously distributed among the U.S. population and adversely impact human reproduction. These compounds have been detected in human ovarian follicular fluid (FF), where they directly contact a developing oocyte. As a pilot investigation, we measured 43 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), and its persistent metabolite p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in residual FF collected from 32 women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). We identified significant inverse associations between higher levels of PCB congeners and indicators of ovarian reserve (e.g., antral follicle count), follicular response to administered gonadotropins (e.g., peak estradiol, number of oocytes retrieved, endometrial thickness), intermediate IVF endpoints (e.g., oocyte fertilization and embryo quality), and clinical IVF outcomes (e.g., embryo implantation and live birth), after adjusting for body mass index, cigarette smoking, race, and age. Our results suggest that ongoing exposure to POPs impacts IVF and merit confirmation in a larger and more definitive future study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear Nox4 Role in Stemness Power of Human Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullia Maraldi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC are an attractive source for cell therapy due to their multilineage differentiation potential and accessibility advantages. However the clinical application of human stem cells largely depends on their capacity to expand in vitro, since there is an extensive donor-to-donor heterogeneity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS and cellular oxidative stress are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes of stem cells, including pluripotency, proliferation, differentiation, and stress resistance. The mode of action of ROS is also dependent on the localization of their target molecules. Thus, the modifications induced by ROS can be separated depending on the cellular compartments they affect. NAD(PH oxidase family, particularly Nox4, has been known to produce ROS in the nucleus. In the present study we show that Nox4 nuclear expression (nNox4 depends on the donor and it correlates with the expression of transcription factors involved in stemness regulation, such as Oct4, SSEA-4, and Sox2. Moreover nNox4 is linked with the nuclear localization of redox sensitive transcription factors, as Nrf2 and NF-κB, and with the differentiation potential. Taken together, these results suggest that nNox4 regulation may have important effects in stem cell capability through modulation of transcription factors and DNA damage.

  14. Comparison of osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity of human osteoclasts on tissue culture polystyrene and on natural extracellular bone matrix in 2D and 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, C; Schmid, F F; Schmid, F V; Kluger, P J

    2015-07-10

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by osteoblasts (bone formation) and osteoclasts (bone resorption). While there have been numerous studies investigating mesenchymal stem cells and their potential to differentiate into osteoblasts as well as their interaction with different bone substitute materials, there is only limited knowledge concerning in vitro generated osteoclasts. Due to the increasing development of degradable bone-grafting materials and the need of sophisticated in vitro test methods, it is essential to gain deeper insight into the process of osteoclastogenesis and the resorption functionality of human osteoclasts. Therefore, we focused on the comparison of osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and bovine extracellular bone matrices (BMs). Cortical bone slices were used as two-dimensional (2D) substrates, whereas a thermally treated cancellous bone matrix was used for three-dimensional (3D) experiments. We isolated primary human monocytes and induced osteoclastogenesis by medium supplementation. Subsequently, the expression of the vitronectin receptor (αVβ3) and cathepsin K as well as the characteristic actin formation on TCPS and the two BMs were examined. The cell area of human osteoclasts was analyzed on TCPS and on BMs, whereas significantly larger osteoclasts could be detected on BMs. Additionally, we compared the diameter of the sealing zones with the measured diameter of the resorption pits on the BMs and revealed similar diameters of the sealing zones and the resorption pits. We conclude that using TCPS as culture substrate does not affect the expression of osteoclast-specific markers. The analysis of resorption activity can successfully be conducted on cortical as well as on cancellous bone matrices. For new in vitro test systems concerning bone resorption, we suggest the establishment of a 2D assay for high throughput screening of new degradable bone substitute materials with osteoclasts.

  15. Structure and barrier properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells are affected by extracellular matrix protein coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkio, Anni; Hongisto, Heidi; Kaarniranta, Kai; Uusitalo, Hannu; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a vital role in cell morphology, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells. We investigated the role of ECM proteins on the structure and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells during their differentiation and maturation from hESCs into RPE cells in adherent differentiation cultures on several human ECM proteins found in native human Bruch's membrane, namely, collagen I, collagen IV, laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin, as well as on commercial substrates of xeno-free CELLstart™ and Matrigel™. Cell pigmentation, expression of RPE-specific proteins, fine structure, as well as the production of basal lamina by hESC-RPE on different protein coatings were evaluated after 140 days of differentiation. The integrity of hESC-RPE epithelium and barrier properties on different coatings were investigated by measuring transepithelial resistance. All coatings supported the differentiation of hESC-RPE cells as demonstrated by early onset of cell pigmentation and further maturation to RPE monolayers after enrichment. Mature RPE phenotype was verified by RPE-specific gene and protein expression, correct epithelial polarization, and phagocytic activity. Significant differences were found in the degree of RPE cell pigmentation and tightness of epithelial barrier between different coatings. Further, the thickness of self-assembled basal lamina and secretion of the key ECM proteins found in the basement membrane of the native RPE varied between hESC-RPE cultured on compared protein coatings. In conclusion, this study shows that the cell culture substrate has a major effect on the structure and basal lamina production during the differentiation and maturation of hESC-RPE potentially influencing the success of cell integrations and survival after cell transplantation.

  16. Dream of future on human-machine cooperative system; Ningen robot system ni okeru fluid power gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Y. [Hosei University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    2000-01-15

    This paper describes the human-machine cooperative system and fluid power technology. Most of Japanese robot R and D activities shifted from early R and D on hydraulic or pneumatic driving to that on simple electric driving, and development of fluid power technology as actuator and control technology is retarded. For creating an artificial work environment with a presence by virtual reality formation technology, an equipment (actuator) directly acting such five senses (sensor) of operators as visual, auditory, pressure and contact senses is essential. Pneumatic actuator is extremely suitable for such one because of its small size, light weight, safety and high power density. Robocup has been held as the soccer game of many autonomous robots. For the soccer game of human beings and robots, development of such technologies for advanced autonomous robots is necessary as realtime processing, advanced intelligence, human friendliness, safety, high-efficiency high-power actuator equivalent to human muscle, and energy source. (NEDO)

  17. [Detection of human papillomavirus in gingival fluid of Venezuelan HIV patients with periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona, Laura; Correnti, María; Veitía, Dayahindira; Perrone, Marianella

    2011-09-01

    Evidence suggests that viruses may be involved in the activation of periodontal disease, allowing the overgrowth of periodontal pathogens. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in HIV+ Venezuelan patients with periodontal disease. We evaluated GCF samples from 20 HIV+ patients with periodontal disease from the Infectious Disease Center, Faculty of Dentistry, Central University of Venezuela, and were clinically examined to establish their periodontal conditions, 13 under HAART (antiretroviral therapy) and 7 without HAART. Seven seronegative patients with chronic periodontitis and 7 seronegative patients, without periodontal disease were included. DNA extraction was performed, the consensus primers MY09 and MY11 for the HPV L1 region were used for PCR amplification. Genotipification was made for the 6, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 45 genotypes. HPV were detected in 46% of HIV+ patients under therapy. The CD4 cell counts in the IIPV+ patients were not significantly different from the HPV-group. The viral load in the HPV+ group was significantly higher (200,470 +/- 324,244 copy/mL) than in the HPV-patients (10,246 +/- 23,805 copy/mL). Genotypes 6 and 11 were observed in the HPV positive samples, of which 4/6 (66.6%) presented coinfection with both types. No significant differences in the periodontal conditions were observed between patients with IIPV-HIV infection related to patients with only HIV. HPV was detected only in the gingival crevicular fluid of HIV+ patients under HAART independently of the periodontal conditions.

  18. Postmortem distribution of MAB-CHMINACA in body fluids and solid tissues of a human cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koutaro; Wurita, Amin; Minakata, Kayoko; Gonmori, Kunio; Nozawa, Hideki; Yamagishi, Itaru; Watanabe, Kanako; Suzuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    During the latter part of 2014, we experienced an autopsy case in which 5-fluoro-ADB, one of the most dangerous synthetic cannabinoids, was identified and quantitated in solid tissues and in three herbal blend products [Forensic Toxicol (2015) 33:112-121]. At that time, although we suspected that there may be some drug(s) other than 5-fluoro-ADB in the herbal products, all trials to find it/them were unsuccessful. Subsequently, we carefully re-examined the presence of other synthetic cannabinoid(s) in the above herbal blend products using accurate mass spectrometry and found two new compounds, 5-fluoro-ADB-PINACA and MAB-CHMINACA (Forensic Toxicol. doi: 10.1007/s 11419-015-0264-y). In the present communication, we report the distribution of MAB-CHMINACA in body fluids and solid tissue specimens collected from the same deceased individual (kept frozen at -80 °C) as described above for demonstration of 5-fluoro-ADB. Unexpectedly, unchanged MAB-CHMINACA could be identified and quantitated in whole blood and in pericardial fluid specimens, but it was below the detection limit (0.1 ng/ml) in the urine specimen. A higher concentration of MAB-CHMINACA could be found in all of the nine solid tissues; the highest concentration of MAB-CHMINACA was found in the liver (156 ng/g), followed by the kidney, pancreas and so on. The compounds were detected in all nine solid tissues; their levels were generally higher than those in the whole blood and pericardial fluid. Contrary to expectations, the concentration of MAB-CHMINACA in the adipose tissue was relatively low. Our results show that the victim smoked one of the three herbal blend products containing both MAB-CHMINACA and 5-fluoro-ADB, resulting in the coexistence of both compounds. It should be concluded that 5-fluoro-ADB and MAB-CHMINACA synergically exerted their toxicities, leading to death after a short interval. The differences in the distribution of 5-fluoro-ADB and MAB-CHMINACA among the cadaver specimens were

  19. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of the histone deacetylase inhibitor, belinostat (PXD101), in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, K.E.; McCully, C.; Dvinge, H.

    2008-01-01

    is a novel, potent, pan-HDAC inhibitor with antiproliferative activity on a wide variety of tumor cell lines. We studied the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of intravenous (IV) belinostat in a non-human primate model as a surrogate for blood:brain barrier penetration. DESIGN: Five adult rhesus monkeys...

  20. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of free and total sialic acid in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M. van der; Koning, T.J. de; Lefeber, D.J.; Fleer, A.; Prinsen, B.H.; Sain-van der Velden, M.G. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of sialic acid (SA) metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is important for clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) method for free sialic acid (FSA) and total sialic acid (TSA) in human CSF was v

  1. Micropatterning Extracellular Matrix Proteins on Electrospun Fibrous Substrate Promote Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation Toward Neurogenic Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaqiong; Wen, Feng; Chen, Huizhi; Pal, Mintu; Lai, Yuekun; Zhao, Allan Zijian; Tan, Lay Poh

    2016-01-13

    In this study, hybrid micropatterned grafts constructed via a combination of microcontact printing and electrospinning techniques process were utilized to investigate the influencing of patterning directions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation to desired phenotypes. We found that the stem cells could align and elongate along the direction of the micropattern, where they randomly distributed on nonmicropatterned surfaces. Concomitant with patterning effect of component on stem cell alignment, a commensurate increase on the expression of neural lineage commitment markers, such as microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), Nestin, NeuroD1, and Class III β-Tubulin, were revealed from mRNA expression by quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) and MAP2 expression by immunostaining. In addition, the effect of electrospun fiber orientation on cell behaviors was further examined. An angle of 45° between the direction of micropatterning and orientation of aligned fibers was verified to greatly prompt the outgrowth of filopodia and neurogenesis of hMSCs. This study demonstrates that the significance of hybrid components and electrospun fiber alignment in modulating cellular behavior and neurogenic lineage commitment of hMSCs, suggesting promising application of porous scaffolds with smart component and topography engineering in clinical regenerative medicine.

  2. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  3. Induction of E-cadherin+ human amniotic fluid cell differentiation into oocyte-like cells via culture in medium supplemented with follicular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Te; Huang, Yongyi; Bu, Yanzhen; Zhao, Yanhui; Zou, Gang; Liu, Zhixue

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent human amniotic fluid cells (HuAFCs) can differentiate into various types of somatic cell in vitro. However, their differentiation into oocyte-like cells has never been described to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, differentiation of E-cadherin+ and E-cadherin- HuAFC sub-populations into oocyte-like cells was induced via culture in medium containing bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. The E-cadherin+ HuAFCs expressed DAZL highly. Post-induction, cells with an oocyte-like phenotype were found among the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, expressing markers specific to germ cells and oocytes (VASA, ZP3 and GDF9) and meiosis (DMC1 and SCP3). When specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to suppress E-cadherin in the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, the levels of DAZL expression were reduced. Post-induction, the morphology of the siRNA‑E‑cadherin HuAFCs was poorer and the expression levels of germ cell-specific markers were lower compared with those of the siRNA-mock HuAFCs. Therefore, E-cadherin+ HuAFCs could be more easily induced to differentiate into oocyte-like cells by bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. In addition, the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs exhibited potential characteristics of DAZL protein expression, and thus it was conjectured that bovine follicular fluid acts on DAZL protein and promotes E-cadherin+ HuAFC differentiation into oocyte-like cells.

  4. 'Wave-type' structure of a synthetic hexaglycosylated decapeptide: A part of the extracellular domain of human glycophorin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Oliver; Klich, Gunther; Sinnwell, Volker; Kraenz, Helge; Paulsen, Hans; Meyer, Bernd [University of Hamburg, Institute for Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry (Germany)

    1999-05-15

    The three-dimensional structure of a glycopeptide, His-Thr*-Ser*-Thr*-Ser*-Ser*-Ser*-Val-Thr-Lys, with 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-{alpha}-D-galactose (GalNAc) residues linked to six adjacent amino acids from Thr-10 to Ser-15, was studied by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The hexaglycosylated decapeptide is part of the extracellular domain of human glycophorin A and shows an extended structure of the peptide backbone due to O-glycosylation. Furthermore, each GalNAc residue exhibits one and only one NOE contact from the NHAc proton to the backbone amide proton of the amino acid that the sugar is directly bound to. This indicates a strong preference for the orientation of all GalNAc residues towards the N-terminus. NOE build-up curves were used to determine 42 inter-proton distances that, in connection with {phi} angles of the peptide backbone obtained from 3J-coupling constants, resulted in constraints for a MD simulation in water. The NMR data and the MD simulations show a preference for an extended backbone structure. The GalNAc residues are located alternatingly on opposite sides of the backbone and reduce the flexibility of the peptide backbone. The conformation of the molecule is relatively rigid and shows a 'wave-type' 3D structure of the peptide backbone within the glycosylation cluster. This new structural element is also supported by the unusual CD spectrum of the glycopeptide.

  5. Thrombopoietin potentiates the protein-kinase-C-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1998-12-15

    The thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor is expressed in the megakaryocytic lineage from late progenitors to platelets. We investigated the effect of TPO on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation pathway in human platelets. TPO by itself did not activate ERK1, ERK2 and protein kinase C (PKC), whereas TPO directly enhanced the PKC-dependent activation of ERKs induced by other agonists including thrombin and phorbol esters, without affecting the PKC activation by those agonists. TPO did not activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases, MEK1 and MEK2, but activated Raf-1 and directly augmented the PKC-mediated MEK activation, suggesting that TPO primarily potentiates the ERK pathway through regulating MEKs or upstream steps of MEKs including Raf-1. The MEK inhibitor PD098059 failed to affect not only thrombin-induced or phorbol ester-induced aggregation, but also potentiation of aggregation by TPO, denying the primary involvement of ERKs and MEKs in those events. ERKs and MEKs were located mainly in the detergent-soluble/non-cytoskeletal fractions. ERKs but not MEKs were relocated to the cytoskeleton following platelet aggregation and actin polymerization. These data indicate that TPO synergizes with other agonists in the ERK activation pathway of platelets and that this synergy might affect functions of the cytoskeleton possibly regulated by ERKs.

  6. Elevated tonic extracellular dopamine concentration and altered dopamine modulation of synaptic activity precede dopamine loss in the striatum of mice overexpressing human α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hoa A; Wu, Nanping; Cely, Ingrid; Kelly, Rachel L; Hean, Sindalana; Richter, Franziska; Magen, Iddo; Cepeda, Carlos; Ackerson, Larry C; Walwyn, Wendy; Masliah, Eliezer; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Levine, Michael S; Maidment, Nigel T

    2011-07-01

    Overexpression or mutation of α-synuclein (α-Syn), a protein associated with presynaptic vesicles, causes familial forms of Parkinson's disease in humans and is also associated with sporadic forms of the disease. We used in vivo microdialysis, tissue content analysis, behavioral assessment, and whole-cell patch clamp recordings from striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSSNs) in slices to examine dopamine transmission and dopaminergic modulation of corticostriatal synaptic function in mice overexpressing human wild-type α-Syn under the Thy1 promoter (α-Syn mice). Tonic striatal extracellular dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine levels were elevated in α-Syn mice at 6 months of age, prior to any reduction in total striatal tissue content, and were accompanied by an increase in open-field activity. Dopamine clearance and amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux were unchanged. The frequency of MSSN spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was lower in α-Syn mice. Amphetamine reduced sEPSC frequency in wild types (WTs) but produced no effect in α-Syn mice. Furthermore, whereas quinpirole reduced and sulpiride increased sEPSC frequency in WT mice, they produced the opposite effects in α-Syn mice. These observations indicate that overexpression of α-Syn alters dopamine efflux and D2 receptor modulation of corticostriatal glutamate release at a young age. At 14 months of age, the α-Syn mice presented with significantly lower striatal tissue dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase content relative to WT littermates, accompanied by an L-DOPA-reversible sensory motor deficit. Together, these data further validate this transgenic mouse line as a slowly progressing model of Parkinson's disease and provide evidence for early dopamine synaptic dysfunction prior to loss of striatal dopamine. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Kean

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering methods are insufficient for total joint resurfacing, and chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation when expanded on tissue culture plastic. De-differentiated chondrocytes show poor re-differentiation in culture, giving reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen matrix accumulation. To address this, porcine synoviocyte-derived extracellular matrix and low (5% oxygen tension were assessed for their ability to enhance human articular chondrocyte expansion and maintain re-differentiation potential.Porcine synoviocyte matrices were devitalized using 3 non-detergent methods. These devitalized synoviocyte matrices were compared against tissue culture plastic for their ability to support human chondrocyte expansion. Expansion was further compared at both low (5%, and atmospheric (20% oxygen tension on all surfaces. Expanded cells then underwent chondrogenic re-differentiation in aggregate culture at both low and atmospheric oxygen tension. Aggregates were assessed for their GAG and collagen content both biochemically and histologically.Human chondrocytes expanded twice as fast on devitalized synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic, and cells retained their re-differentiation capacity for twice the number of population doublings. There was no significant difference in growth rate between low and atmospheric oxygen tension. There was significantly less collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan and more MMP13 expression in cells expanded on synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic. There were also significant effects due to oxygen tension on gene expression, wherein there was greater collagen type I, collagen type II, SOX9 and less MMP13 expression on tissue culture plastic compared to synoviocyte matrix. There was a significant increase in GAG, but not collagen, accumulation in chondrocyte aggregates re-differentiated at low oxygen tension over that achieved in atmospheric oxygen conditions

  8. Fluid absorption related to ion transport in human airway epithelial spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P S; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Larsen, P L

    1999-01-01

    , and amiloride inhibited both values. Fluid transport rates were calculated from repeated measurements of spheroid diameters. The results showed that 1) non-CF and CF spheroids absorbed fluid at identical rates (4.4 microl x cm(-2) x h(-1)), 2) amiloride inhibited fluid absorption to a lower residual level......) osmotic water permeabilities were equal in non-CF and CF spheroids ( approximately 27 x 10(-7) cm x s(-1) x atm(-1))....

  9. Characterization of proteoglycan metabolites in human gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G; Samuels, R H

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have identified glycosaminoglycans in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) associated with a variety of clinical conditions, notably those involving bone resorptive activity. GCF was here collected from around teeth undergoing active orthodontic movement. Proteoglycan metabolites were purified from GCF by anion-exchange chromatography using fast performance liquid chromatography. Sulphated glycosaminoglycan was associated with the most highly anionic protein fractions IV, V and VI, and biochemical analysis was restricted to these fractions. Analysis included glycosaminoglycan content by cellulose acetate electrophoresis, molecular size by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting and amino acid analyses. Fraction IV contained hyaluronan (18.7%) and chondroitin sulphate (10.9%), fraction V heparan sulphate (29.5%) and chondroitin sulphate (19.6%) and fraction VI chondroitin sulphate only (21.3%). SDS-PAGE revealed two Coomassie blue bands in fraction V of 72 and 60 kDa and two further bands in fraction VI of 71 and 56 kDa. These proteoglycans appeared resistant to digestion by chondroitinase ABC or heparinase III, although the glycosaminoglycan chains underwent degradation after protein-core removal. The molecular mass and amino acid composition of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan fractions showed a close similarity to those of human alveolar bone proteoglycan. The presence of heparan sulphate proteoglycan in GCF in association with orthodontic movement is in accord with previous reports. The findings support the view that proteoglycans in GCF are 'biomarkers', notably those associated with active resorption of alveolar bone.

  10. Data for a comprehensive map and functional annotation of the human cerebrospinal fluid proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteome serves as a baseline reference for CSF biomarker discovery and provides insight into CSF physiology. In this study, high-pH reverse-phase liquid chromatography (hp-RPLC was first integrated with a TripleTOF 5600 mass spectrometer to comprehensively profile the normal CSF proteome. A total of 49,836 unique peptides and 3256 non-redundant proteins were identified. To obtain high-confidence results, 2513 proteins with at least 2 unique peptides were further selected as bona fide CSF proteins. Nearly 30% of the identified CSF proteins have not been previously reported in the normal CSF proteome. More than 25% of the CSF proteins were components of CNS cell microenvironments, and network analyses indicated their roles in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. The top canonical pathway in which the CSF proteins participated was axon guidance signaling. More than one-third of the CSF proteins (788 proteins were related to neurological diseases, and these proteins constitute potential CSF biomarker candidates. The mapping results can be freely downloaded at http://122.70.220.102:8088/csf/, which can be used to navigate the CSF proteome. For more information about the data, please refer to the related original article [1], which has been recently accepted by Journal of Proteomics.

  11. Neural differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells: role of human traumatic cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Hashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the key producer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, the choroid plexus (CP provides a unique protective system in the central nervous system. CSF components are not invariable and they can change based on the pathological conditions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of non-traumatic and traumatic CSF on the differentiation of multipotent stem-like cells of CP into the neural and/or glial cells. CP epithelial cells were isolated from adult male rats and treated with human non-traumatic and traumatic CSF. Alterations in mRNA expression of Nestin and microtubule-associated protein (MAP2, as the specific markers of neurogenesis, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in cultured CP epithelial cells were evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The data revealed that treatment with CSF (non-traumatic and traumatic led to increase in mRNA expression levels of MAP2 and GFAP. Moreover, the expression of Nestin decreased in CP epithelial cells treated with non-traumatic CSF, while treatment with traumatic CSF significantly increased its mRNA level compared to the cells cultured only in DMEM/F12 as control. It seems that CP epithelial cells contain multipotent stem-like cells which are inducible under pathological conditions including exposure to traumatic CSF because of its compositions.

  12. Identification of Disease Markers in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Using Lipidomic and Proteomic Methods

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    Alfred N. Fonteh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids comprise the bulk of the dry mass of the brain. In addition to providing structural integrity to membranes, insulation to cells and acting as a source of energy, lipids can be rapidly converted to mediators of inflammation or to signaling molecules that control molecular and cellular events in the brain. The advent of soft ionization procedures such as electrospray ionization (ESI and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI have made it possible for compositional studies of the diverse lipid structures that are present in brain. These include phospholipids, ceramides, sphingomyelin, cerebrosides, cholesterol and their oxidized derivatives. Lipid analyses have delineated metabolic defects in disease conditions including mental retardation, Parkinson's Disease (PD, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's Disease (AD, depression, brain development, and ischemic stroke. In this review, we examine the structure of the major lipid classes in the brain, describe methods used for their characterization, and evaluate their role in neurological diseases. The potential utility of characterizing lipid markers in the brain, with specific emphasis on disease mechanisms, will be discussed. Additionally, we describe several proteomic strategies for characterizing lipid-metabolizing proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. These proteins may be potential therapeutic targets since they transport lipids required for neuronal growth or convert lipids into molecules that control brain physiology. Combining lipidomics and proteomics will enhance existing knowledge of disease pathology and increase the likelihood of discovering specific markers and biochemical mechanisms of brain diseases.

  13. Localized corrosion behaviour in simulated human body fluids of commercial Ni-Ti orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondelli, G; Vicentini, B

    1999-04-01

    The corrosion performances in simulated human body fluids of commercial equiatomic Ni-Ti orthodontic wires having various shape and size and produced by different manufacturers were evaluated; for comparison purposes wires made of stainless steel and of cobalt-based alloy were also examined. Potentiodynamic tests in artificial saliva at 40 degrees C indicated a sufficient pitting resistance for the Ni-Ti wires, similar to that of cobalt-based alloy wire; the stainless steel wire, instead, exhibited low pitting potential. Potentiodynamic tests at 40 degrees C in isotonic saline solution (0.9% NaCl) showed, for Ni-Ti and stainless steel wires, pitting potential values in the range approximately 200-400 mV and approximately 350 mV versus SCE, respectively: consequently, according to literature data (Hoar TP, Mears DC. Proc Roy Soc A 1996;294:486-510), these materials should be considered potentially susceptible to pitting; only the cobalt-based alloy should be immune from pitting. The localized corrosion potentials determined in the same environment by the ASTM F746 test (approximately 0-200 mV and 130 mV versus SCE for Ni-Ti and stainless steel, respectively) pointed out that for these materials an even higher risk of localized corrosion. Slight differences in localized corrosion behaviour among the various Ni-Ti wires were detected.

  14. Lubricin expression in human osteoarthritic knee meniscus and synovial fluid: a morphological, immunohistochemical and biochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosalia; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Castorina, Sergio; Mobasheri, Ali

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lubricin, the product of the human PRG4 (proteoglycan 4) gene, in menisci and synovial fluid from normal donors and patients with osteoarthritis (OA), using a combination of histology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and Western blotting analysis, to provide further insight on the role of this protein in the progression of OA and pathological processes in the meniscus. Lubricin expression was studied in samples from 40 patients and in 9 normal donors after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Histological analysis confirmed normal microanatomy and the absence of structural changes in control samples. Menisci derived from OA patients showed evidence of structural alterations, fibrillations and clefts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed very strong lubricin immunostaining in normal menisci in contrast to weak/moderate staining seen in osteoarthritic menisci. Quantitative ELISA and Western blot analysis confirmed the above results. The findings of this study support the notion that changes in lubricin expression and boundary-lubricating ability of cartilage is followed by the development of OA. This study could provide the biological foundation for the development of novel therapeutic treatments, to be applied before the surgery, for the prevention of post-traumatic cartilage damage.

  15. Human papillomavirus infection in oral fluids of HIV-1-positive men: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaester, Karen; Fonseca, Luiz A M; Luiz, Olinda; Assone, Tatiane; Fontes, Adriele Souza; Costa, Fernando; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2014-10-17

    Human papillomavirus is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The natural history of oral HPV infection is unclear, and its risk factors have not been explored. Immunocompromised individuals, as exemplified by HIV patients, are at high risk for HPV-related diseases. The mean of this study is to determine the prevalence of HPV in the oral tract of HIV-1-positive male subjects and its association with risk factors. A total of 283 oral wash samples from HIV-1-positive men were tested. The oral fluid samples were used for DNA extraction and conventional PCR amplification; HPV genotyping was performed by hybridization. HPV genotyping revealed that nine samples (3.5%) were positive for HPV DNA; the major high-risk HPV types identified were 51 and 66. Worldwide studies have shown a variable prevalence of oral HPV. The diversity of genotypes and the high prevalence of multiple infections in HIV-infected subjects can be better explained by the effects of HIV-induced immunosuppression. The most important risk factors are unprotected sexual intercourse, but other factors for this infection have been described elsewhere including smoking, age and HIV-positive serostatus. In this study, smoking was the most important risk factor for acquiring oral HPV in HIV-1-infected subjects in Brazil.

  16. Antitumor Activity of Human Hydatid Cyst Fluid in a Murine Model of Colon Cancer

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    Edgardo Berriel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the antitumor immune response induced by human hydatic cyst fluid (HCF in an animal model of colon carcinoma. We found that anti-HCF antibodies were able to identify cell surface and intracellular antigens in CT26 colon cancer cells. In prophylactic tumor challenge experiments, HCF vaccination was found to be protective against tumor formation for 40% of the mice (P=0.01. In the therapeutic setting, HCF vaccination induced tumor regression in 40% of vaccinated mice (P=0.05. This vaccination generated memory immune responses that protected surviving mice from tumor rechallenge, implicating the development of an adaptive immune response in this process. We performed a proteomic analysis of CT26 antigens recognized by anti-HCF antibodies to analyze the immune cross-reactivity between E. granulosus (HCF and CT26 colon cancer cells. We identified two proteins: mortalin and creatine kinase M-type. Interestingly, CT26 mortalin displays 60% homology with E. granulosus hsp70. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the capacity of HCF vaccination to induce antitumor immunity which protects from tumor growth in an animal model. This new antitumor strategy could open new horizons in the development of highly immunogenic anticancer vaccines.

  17. Antitumor Activity of Human Hydatid Cyst Fluid in a Murine Model of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Sofía; Berois, Nora; Fernández, Gabriel; Freire, Teresa; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the antitumor immune response induced by human hydatic cyst fluid (HCF) in an animal model of colon carcinoma. We found that anti-HCF antibodies were able to identify cell surface and intracellular antigens in CT26 colon cancer cells. In prophylactic tumor challenge experiments, HCF vaccination was found to be protective against tumor formation for 40% of the mice (P = 0.01). In the therapeutic setting, HCF vaccination induced tumor regression in 40% of vaccinated mice (P = 0.05). This vaccination generated memory immune responses that protected surviving mice from tumor rechallenge, implicating the development of an adaptive immune response in this process. We performed a proteomic analysis of CT26 antigens recognized by anti-HCF antibodies to analyze the immune cross-reactivity between E. granulosus (HCF) and CT26 colon cancer cells. We identified two proteins: mortalin and creatine kinase M-type. Interestingly, CT26 mortalin displays 60% homology with E. granulosus hsp70. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the capacity of HCF vaccination to induce antitumor immunity which protects from tumor growth in an animal model. This new antitumor strategy could open new horizons in the development of highly immunogenic anticancer vaccines. PMID:24023528

  18. Thermostabilisation of human serum butyrylcholinesterase for detection of its inhibitors in water and biological fluids

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    Lakshmanan Jaganathan

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of gelatine-trehalose to convert the normally fragile, dry human serum BChE into a thermostable enzyme and its use in the detection of cholinesterase inhibitors in water and biological fluids is described. Gelatine or trehalose alone is unable to protect the dry enzyme against exposure to high temperature, while a combination of gelatine and trehalose were able to protect the enzyme activity against prolonged exposure to temperature as high as +50°C. A method for rapid, simple and inexpensive means of screening for cholinesterase inhibitors such as carbamates and organophosphates in water, vegetables and human blood has been developed.A capacidade da gelatina-trehalose em converter a frágil BChE do soro humano em uma enzima termoestável e seu uso na descoberta de inibidores de colinesterase em água e fluidos biológicos é apresentado. A Gelatina ou trehalose são incapazes de proteger a enzima seca BchE do soro humano contra exposição a elevadas temperaturas, enquanto que uma combinação de gelatina e trehalose são capazes de proteger a atividade de enzima contra exposição prolongada a temperaturas elevadas e da ordem de 50° C. Um método barato, simples e rápido de screening para inibidores de colinesterase tal como carbamatos e organofosfatos em água, verduras e sangue humano foi desenvolvido.

  19. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid

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    Sanie-Jahromi Fatemeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells with amniotic fluid (AF, RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Results Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1 confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells.

  20. Human amniotic fluid stem cell injection therapy for urethral sphincter regeneration in an animal model

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    Kim Bum

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cell injection therapies have been proposed to overcome the limited efficacy and adverse reactions of bulking agents. However, most have significant limitations, including painful procurement, requirement for anesthesia, donor site infection and a frequently low cell yield. Recently, human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs have been proposed as an ideal cell therapy source. In this study, we investigated whether periurethral injection of hAFSCs can restore urethral sphincter competency in a mouse model. Methods Amniotic fluids were collected and harvested cells were analyzed for stem cell characteristics and in vitro myogenic differentiation potency. Mice underwent bilateral pudendal nerve transection to generate a stress urinary incontinence (SUI model and received either periurethral injection of hAFSCs, periurethral injection of Plasma-Lyte (control group, or underwent a sham (normal control group. For in vivo cell tracking, cells were labeled with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate (MNPs@SiO2 (RITC and were injected into the urethral sphincter region (n = 9. Signals were detected by optical imaging. Leak point pressure and closing pressure were recorded serially after injection. Tumorigenicity of hAFSCs was evaluated by implanting hAFSCs into the subcapsular space of the kidney, followed two weeks later by retrieval and histologic analysis. Results Flow activated cell sorting showed that hAFSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC markers, but no hematopoietic stem cell markers. Induction of myogenic differentiation in the hAFSCs resulted in expression of PAX7 and MYOD at Day 3, and DYSTROPHIN at Day 7. The nanoparticle-labeled hAFSCs could be tracked in vivo with optical imaging for up to 10 days after injection. Four weeks after injection, the mean LPP and CP were significantly increased in the hAFSC-injected group compared with the control group. Nerve regeneration and

  1. Genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride on human amniotic fluid cells cultured in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogu, G. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dept. of Physiological, Biochemical and Cellular sciences; Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Centre of Clinical Genetics; Congiu, A. M.; Sini, M. C.; Ladu, R. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dept. of Physiological, Biochemical and Cellular sciences; Campus, P. M.; Sanna, R.; Soro, G. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Centre of Clinical Genetics

    2000-12-01

    In this study it has been reported the results of cytogenetic tests, namely a search for chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), performed on human amniotic fluid cells cultured and treated with Cadmium chloride. The cells from primary cultures were exposed to CdCl{sub 2} at 1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M for 24 h. At the higher dose, no metaphases were scored and at the lower dose (1 {mu}M) no effects were evident on cell proliferation, and no chromosome aberrations were found. In the subsequent experiments were used cells from subcultures exposed to 1 {mu}M and 5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. At the 5 {mu}M dose was evident the induction of chromatid breaks, while the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges shows a small increase, not statistically significant at the dose of 1 {mu}M. In this study it was positively demonstrated that amniotic fluid cells grown in vitro are reliable for testing various mutagenic or teratogenic substances. With regard to cadmium treatment results, it is evident a clastogenic effect of cadmium chloride but not a significant induction of SCEs. [Italian] In questo studio abbiamo riportato i risultati dei tests citogenici di valutazione degli scambi fra cromatidi fratelli (SCEs) e di induzione di aberrazioni cromosomiche (CA) condotti su colture cellulari di liquido amniotico umano, trattate con cloruro di cadmio. Le cellule delle colture primarie venivano esposte al CdCl{sub 2} a concentrazioni di 1 {mu}M 10 {mu}M per 24 h. Alla dose piu' alta (10 {mu}M) non sono state osservate metafasi, mentre alla dose piu' bassa (1 {mu}M) non sono stati evidenziati ne' effetti sulla proliferazione cellulare ne' CA. Nei successivi esperimenti il CdC{sub 2} e' stato testato su subcolture cellulari alle dosi di 1 {mu}M e 5 {mu}M. Alla dose di 5 {mu}M sono state evidenziate rotture cromatidiche, mentre la frequenza di SCE alla dose di 1 {mu}M ha mostrato un piccolo incremento, statisticamente non significativo. In questo

  2. Interactions of the human cardiopulmonary, hormonal and body fluid systems in parabolic flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limper, U; Gauger, P; Beck, P; Krainski, F; May, F; Beck, L E J

    2014-06-01

    Commercial parabolic flights accessible to customers with a wide range of health states will become more prevalent in the near future because of a growing private space flight sector. However, parabolic flights present the passengers' cardiovascular system with a combination of stressors, including a moderately hypobaric hypoxic ambient environment (HH) and repeated gravity transitions (GT). Thus, the aim of this study was to identify unique and combined effects of HH and GT on the human cardiovascular, pulmonary and fluid regulation systems. Cardiac index was determined by inert gas rebreathing (CI(rb)), and continuous non-invasive finger blood pressure (FBP) was repeatedly measured in 18 healthy subjects in the standing position while they were in parabolic flight at 0 and 1.8 G(z). Plasma volume (PV) and fluid regulating blood hormones were determined five times over the flight day. Eleven out of the 18 subjects were subjected to an identical test protocol in a hypobaric chamber in ambient conditions comparable to parabolic flight. CI(rb) in 0 G(z) decreased significantly during flight (early, 5.139 ± 1.326 L/min; late, 4.150 ± 1.082 L/min) because of a significant decrease in heart rate (HR) (early, 92 ± 15 min(-1); late, 78 ± 12 min(-1)), even though the stroke volume (SV) remained the same. HH produced a small decrease in the PV, both in the hypobaric chamber and in parabolic flight, indicating a dominating HH effect without a significant effect of GT on PV (-52 ± 34 and -115 ± 32 ml, respectively). Pulmonary tissue volume decreased in the HH conditions because of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (0.694 ± 0.185 and 0.560 ± 0.207 ml) but increased at 0 and 1.8 G(z) in parabolic flight (0.593 ± 0.181 and 0.885 ± 0.458 ml, respectively), indicating that cardiac output and arterial blood pressure rather than HH are the main factors affecting pulmonary vascular regulation in parabolic flight. HH and GT each lead to specific responses of the

  3. A titanium surface with nano-ordered spikes and pores enhances human dermal fibroblastic extracellular matrix production and integration of collagen fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kato, Eiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2016-02-02

    The acquisition of substantial dermal sealing determines the prognosis of percutaneous titanium-based medical devices or prostheses. A nano-topographic titanium surface with ordered nano-spikes and pores has been shown to induce periodontal-like connective tissue attachment and activate gingival fibroblastic functions. This in vitro study aimed to determine whether an alkali-heat (AH) treatment-created nano-topographic titanium surface could enhance human dermal fibroblastic functions and binding strength to the deposited collagen on the titanium surface. The surface topographies of commercially pure titanium machined discs exposed to two different AH treatments were evaluated. Human dermal fibroblastic cultures grown on the discs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) and proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, and physicochemical binding strength of surface-deposited collagen. An isotropically-patterned, shaggy nano-topography with a sponge-like inner network and numerous well-organized, anisotropically-patterned fine nano-spikes and pores were observed on each nano-topographic surface type via scanning electron microscopy. In contrast to the typical spindle-shaped cells on the machined surfaces, the isotropically- and anisotropically-patterned nano-topographic titanium surfaces had small circular/angular cells containing contractile ring-like structures and elongated, multi-shaped cells with a developed cytoskeletal network and multiple filopodia and lamellipodia, respectively. These nano-topographic surfaces enhanced dermal-related ECM synthesis at both the protein and gene levels, without proinflammatory cytokine synthesis or reduced proliferative activity. Deposited collagen fibers were included in these surfaces and sufficiently bound to the nano-topographies to resist the physical, enzymatic and chemical detachment treatments, in contrast to machined surfaces. Well-organized, isotropically

  4. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of mineral nanoparticles derived from human body fluids and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Jan; Young, David; Young, Andrew; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Chen, Chi-De; Yu, Jau-Song; Young, John D

    2011-11-01

    Mineralo-protein nanoparticles (NPs) formed spontaneously in the body have been associated with ectopic calcifications seen in atherosclerosis, chronic degenerative diseases, and kidney stone formation. Synthetic NPs are also known to become coated with proteins when they come in contact with body fluids. Identifying the proteins found in NPs should help unravel how NPs are formed in the body and how NPs in general, be they synthetic or naturally formed, interact within the body. Here, we developed a proteomic approach based on liquid chromatography (LC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine the protein composition of carbonate-apatite NPs derived from human body fluids (serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, ascites, pleural effusion, and synovial fluid). LC-MS/MS provided not only an efficient and comprehensive determination of the protein constituents, but also a semiquantitative ranking of the identified proteins. Notably, the identified NP proteins mirrored the protein composition of the contacting body fluids, with albumin, fetuin-A, complement C3, α-1-antitrypsin, prothrombin, and apolipoproteins A1 and B-100 being consistently associated with the particles. Since several coagulation factors, calcification inhibitors, complement proteins, immune regulators, protease inhibitors, and lipid/molecule carriers can all become NP constituents, our results suggest that mineralo-protein complexes may interface with distinct biochemical pathways in the body depending on their protein composition. We propose that LC-MS/MS be used to characterize proteins found in both synthetic and natural NPs.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles triggered by human mucosal fluid and lysozyme can prime host tissue surfaces for bacterial adhesion

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    Matteo Maria Emiliano Metruccio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to PBS controls (~100 fold. TEM and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (~4-fold, P < 0.01. Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections.

  6. The extracellular loop 2 (ECL2 of the human histamine H4 receptor substantially contributes to ligand binding and constitutive activity.

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    David Wifling

    Full Text Available In contrast to the corresponding mouse and rat orthologs, the human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R shows extraordinarily high constitutive activity. In the extracellular loop (ECL, replacement of F169 by V as in the mouse H4R significantly reduced constitutive activity. Stabilization of the inactive state was even more pronounced for a double mutant, in which, in addition to F169V, S179 in the ligand binding site was replaced by M. To study the role of the FF motif in ECL2, we generated the hH4R-F168A mutant. The receptor was co-expressed in Sf9 insect cells with the G-protein subunits Gαi2 and Gβ1γ2, and the membranes were studied in [3H]histamine binding and functional [35S]GTPγS assays. The potency of various ligands at the hH4R-F168A mutant decreased compared to the wild-type hH4R, for example by 30- and more than 100-fold in case of the H4R agonist UR-PI376 and histamine, respectively. The high constitutive activity of the hH4R was completely lost in the hH4R-F168A mutant, as reflected by neutral antagonism of thioperamide, a full inverse agonist at the wild-type hH4R. By analogy, JNJ7777120 was a partial inverse agonist at the hH4R, but a partial agonist at the hH4R-F168A mutant, again demonstrating the decrease in constitutive activity due to F168A mutation. Thus, F168 was proven to play a key role not only in ligand binding and potency, but also in the high constitutive activity of the hH4R.

  7. Silencing of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene expression affects both the contents and the amounts of extracellular microvesicles released from HPV-positive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, Anja; Leitz, Jenny; Bulkescher, Julia; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2013-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes play a crucial role in the HPV-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, the authors investigated whether silencing of endogenous HPV E6/E7 expression may influence the contents or amounts of extracellular microvesicles (eMVs) released from HPV-positive cancer cells. It was found that eMVs secreted from HeLa cells are enriched for Survivin protein. RNA interference studies revealed that maintenance of both intracellular and microvesicular Survivin amounts was strongly dependent on continuous E6/E7 expression. This indicates that intracellular HPV activities are translated into visible alterations of protein contents in eMVs. Besides Survivin, eMVs from HeLa cells contain additional members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family (XIAP, c-IAP1 and Livin). In contrast, no evidence for the presence of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in eMVs was obtained. Moreover, it was found that silencing of HPV E6/E7 expression led to a significant increase of exosomes-representing eMVs of endocytic origin-released from HeLa cells. This effect was associated with the reinduction of p53, stimulation of the p53 target genes TSAP6 and CHMP4C that can enhance exosome production and induction of senescence. Taken together, these results show that silencing of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression profoundly affects both the composition and amounts of eMVs secreted by HPV-positive cancer cells. This indicates that HPVs can induce molecular signatures in eMVs that may affect intercellular communication and could be explored for diagnostic purposes. © 2013 UICC.

  8. Relative impact of residues at the intracellular and extracellular ends of the human GABAC rho1 receptor M2 domain on picrotoxinin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carland, Jane E; Johnston, Graham A R; Chebib, Mary

    2008-02-02

    The relative impact on picrotoxinin activity of residues at the intracellular (2' and 6' residues) and extracellular (15' and 17' residues) ends of the second transmembrane (M2) domain of the human gamma-aminobutyric acid-C (GABA(C)) rho1 receptor was investigated. A series of GABA(C) rho1 subunits were produced containing either single or multiple mutations at the positions of interest. Wild-type and mutant subunits (containing one or more of the following mutations: P2'S, T6'M, I15'N, G17'H) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized using agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Changes in agonist activity were observed for mutant receptors. Most notably, mutation at the 2' position resulted in decreased agonist potency, while mutation at the 15' and 17' residues increased agonist potency. The affinity of the competitive antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) was unchanged compared to wild-type at all mutant receptors. Of the four residues studied, mutation of residues at the 2' and 6' positions had the greatest impact on picrotoxinin activity. Inclusion of the P2'S mutation typically produced receptors with increased picrotoxinin potency, while the T6'M mutation reduced picrotoxinin potency. Picrotoxinin is a mixed antagonist at wild-type and all mutant receptors, with the exception of the double mutant rho1P2'S/T6'M receptors at which the non-competitive component was isolated. It is proposed that the contribution of M2 domain residues to picrotoxinin activity is potentially two-fold: (1) their role as a potential picrotoxinin binding site within the pore; and (2) they are critical for receptor activation properties of the receptor, thus may alter the allosteric mechanism of picrotoxinin.

  9. The extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) of the human histamine H4 receptor substantially contributes to ligand binding and constitutive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wifling, David; Bernhardt, Günther; Dove, Stefan; Buschauer, Armin

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the corresponding mouse and rat orthologs, the human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R) shows extraordinarily high constitutive activity. In the extracellular loop (ECL), replacement of F169 by V as in the mouse H4R significantly reduced constitutive activity. Stabilization of the inactive state was even more pronounced for a double mutant, in which, in addition to F169V, S179 in the ligand binding site was replaced by M. To study the role of the FF motif in ECL2, we generated the hH4R-F168A mutant. The receptor was co-expressed in Sf9 insect cells with the G-protein subunits Gαi2 and Gβ1γ2, and the membranes were studied in [3H]histamine binding and functional [35S]GTPγS assays. The potency of various ligands at the hH4R-F168A mutant decreased compared to the wild-type hH4R, for example by 30- and more than 100-fold in case of the H4R agonist UR-PI376 and histamine, respectively. The high constitutive activity of the hH4R was completely lost in the hH4R-F168A mutant, as reflected by neutral antagonism of thioperamide, a full inverse agonist at the wild-type hH4R. By analogy, JNJ7777120 was a partial inverse agonist at the hH4R, but a partial agonist at the hH4R-F168A mutant, again demonstrating the decrease in constitutive activity due to F168A mutation. Thus, F168 was proven to play a key role not only in ligand binding and potency, but also in the high constitutive activity of the hH4R.

  10. Mechanism and physiologic significance of the suppression of cholesterol esterification in human interstitial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Eric Miller

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol esterification in high density lipoproteins (HDLs by lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT promotes unesterified cholesterol (UC transfer from red cell membranes to plasma in vitro. However, it does not explain the transfer of UC from most peripheral cells to interstitial fluid in vivo, as HDLs in afferent peripheral lymph are enriched in UC. Having already reported that the endogenous cholesterol esterification rate (ECER in lymph is only five per cent of that in plasma, we have now explored the underlying mechanism. In peripheral lymph from 20 healthy men, LCAT concentration, LCAT activity (assayed using an optimized substrate, and LCAT specific activity averaged respectively 11.8, 10.3, and 84.9 per cent of plasma values. When recombinant human LCAT was added to lymph, the increments in enzyme activity were similar to those when LCAT was added to plasma. Addition of apolipoprotein AI (apo AI, fatty acid-free albumin, Intralipid, or the d<1.006 g/ml plasma fraction had no effect on ECER. During incubation of lymph plus plasma, the ECER was similar to that observed with buffer plus plasma. When lymph was added to heat-inactivated plasma, the ECER was 11-fold greater than with lymph plus buffer. Addition of discoidal proteoliposomes of apo AI and phosphatidycholine (PC to lymph increased ECER ten-fold, while addition of apo AI/PC/UC discs did so by only six-fold. We conclude that the low ECER in lymph is due to a property of the HDLs, seemingly substrate inhibition of LCAT by excess cell-derived UC. This is reversed when lymph enters plasma, consequent upon redistribution of UC from lymph HDLs to plasma lipoproteins.

  11. High Resolution Discovery Proteomics Reveals Candidate Disease Progression Markers of Alzheimer's Disease in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid.

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    Ronald C Hendrickson

    Full Text Available Disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD constitute a major goal in medicine. Current trends suggest that biomarkers reflective of AD neuropathology and modifiable by treatment would provide supportive evidence for disease modification. Nevertheless, a lack of quantitative tools to assess disease modifying treatment effects remains a major hurdle. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical markers such as total tau, p-tau and Ab42 are well established markers of AD; however, global quantitative biochemical changes in CSF in AD disease progression remain largely uncharacterized. Here we applied a high resolution open discovery platform, dMS, to profile a cross-sectional cohort of lumbar CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients versus those from non-AD/non-demented (control patients. Multiple markers were identified to be statistically significant in the cohort tested. We selected two markers SME-1 (p<0.0001 and SME-2 (p = 0.0004 for evaluation in a second independent longitudinal cohort of human CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients and age-matched and case-matched control patients. In cohort-2, SME-1, identified as neuronal secretory protein VGF, and SME-2, identified as neuronal pentraxin receptor-1 (NPTXR, in AD were 21% (p = 0.039 and 17% (p = 0.026 lower, at baseline, respectively, than in controls. Linear mixed model analysis in the longitudinal cohort estimate a decrease in the levels of VGF and NPTXR at the rate of 10.9% and 6.9% per year in the AD patients, whereas both markers increased in controls. Because these markers are detected by mass spectrometry without the need for antibody reagents, targeted MS based assays provide a clear translation path for evaluating selected AD disease-progression markers with high analytical precision in the clinic.

  12. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and osteopontin in human gingival crevicular fluid during initial tooth movement

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    Dhaval Oswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: During orthodontic treatment, the early response of periodontal tissues to mechanical stress involves several metabolic changes that allow tooth movement. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate osteopontin (OPN and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7 in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of human teeth exposed to orthodontic force. Materials and Methods: GCF samples were obtained from 15 healthy orthodontic patients (age, 12-22 years. In each patient, the left maxillary canine having the fixed orthodontic appliance was used as the test tooth, and its antagonist, with no appliance, was the control. Orthodontic force, 75 g was applied using a 16 × 22 beta titanium closing loop. The GCF sampling on the disto-buccal aspects of experimental and control tooth was performed at specific time interval with sterilized absorbent paper point. Processing was carried out with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect OPN and MMP-7 levels. Results: The peak level of OPN was seen after 1 h application of orthodontic force which was 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02. The peak level of MMP-7 was seen at 0 h which was 598.3 pg/ml ± 107.5. The levels of OPN after 1 h increased to 1280.36 pg/ml ± 185.02, and they decreased at 24 h to 1012.86 pg/ml ± 168.47 (P = 0.001. The levels of MMP-7 after 1 h decreased to 478 pg/ml ± 99.7 which increased at 24 h to 526.9 pg/ml ± 99.2. Conclusions: Orthodontic forces affect both OPN and MMP-7 protein levels on the compression side in a time-dependent fashion.

  13. Highly potent soluble amyloid-β seeds in human Alzheimer brain but not cerebrospinal fluid

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    Kaeser, Stephan A.; Maia, Luis F.; Portelius, Erik; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Winkler, David T.; Maetzler, Walter; Keyvani, Kathy; Spitzer, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jens; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Jucker, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The soluble fraction of brain samples from patients with Alzheimer’s disease contains highly biologically active amyloid-β seeds. In this study, we sought to assess the potency of soluble amyloid-β seeds derived from the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Soluble Alzheimer’s disease brain extracts were serially diluted and then injected into the hippocampus of young, APP transgenic mice. Eight months later, seeded amyloid-β deposition was evident even when the hippocampus received subattomole amounts of brain-derived amyloid-β. In contrast, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, which contained more than 10-fold higher levels of amyloid-β peptide than the most concentrated soluble brain extracts, did not induce detectable seeding activity in vivo. Similarly, cerebrospinal fluid from aged APP-transgenic donor mice failed to induce cerebral amyloid-β deposition. In comparison to the soluble brain fraction, cerebrospinal fluid largely lacked N-terminally truncated amyloid-β species and exhibited smaller amyloid-β-positive particles, features that may contribute to the lack of in vivo seeding by cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, the same cerebrospinal fluid showed at least some seeding activity in an in vitro assay. The present results indicate that the biological seeding activity of soluble amyloid-β species is orders of magnitude greater in brain extracts than in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25212850

  14. C/EBP β Mediates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulated Inflammatory Response and Extracellular Matrix Degradation in LPS-Stimulated Human Periodontal Ligament Cells

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    Yudi Bai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an oral inflammatory disease that not only affects the integrity of local tooth-supporting tissues but also impacts systemic health. A compositional shift in oral microbiota has been considered as the main cause of periodontitis; however, the potential mechanism has not been fully defined. Herein, we investigated the role of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP β, a member of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, in