WorldWideScience

Sample records for human exposures effects

  1. EFFECTS OF ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Sueli de Lima Rodrigues

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ingestion of inorganic arsenic from drinking water has emerged as an important public health concern. It enters drinking water supplies from natural deposits in the earth or from agricultural and industrial practices, mainly the mining. The health consequences of chronic arsenic exposure include increased risk for various forms of cancer and numerous pathologic effects, such as cutaneous effects (hyperpigmentation and hyperkeratoses, gastrointestinal effects, vascular effects, diabetes mellitus, and peripheral neuropathy. This way, this study presents through a critical revision of the literature, the more relevant current aspects on the immunological consequences, carcinogenic and resulting genetics of the human intoxication for arsenic. They were identified and analyzed 50 works published on the subject among the years of 1979 and 2008, being used as main sources LILACS-BIREME MEDLINE/Index Medicus, SciELO and PubMed. The specific Arsênio e saúde humana effects of the intoxication for arsenic about the human health are not still completely elucidated. Thus, is possible that this element affects functions still unknown, becoming important the scientificexploration on the subject.

  2. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Toxic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide. Warming and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. We examine the evidence for adverse human health effects associated with exposure to toxic blooms in drinking water, recreational water a...

  3. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Toxic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide. Warming and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. We examine the evidence for adverse human health effects associated with exposure to toxic blooms in drinking water, recreational water a...

  4. Assessment of human exposure effects of nitrous acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.R.; Kjaergaard, S.K. (University of Aarhus. Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (Denmark)); Brauer, M. (Harvard School of Public Health. Department of Environmental Health, Exposure Assessment and Engineering Program (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The study aimed at an estimation of the relative contribution of nitrous acid to measurable human exposure effects in relation to indoor environments with unvented gas combustion. Fifteen medically examined totally healthy non-smoker adults aged between 22 and 57 years were exposed in a double-blind, balanced design (3x3 latin square) to clean air and nitrous acid (HONO) concentration in an empty 74 m[sup 3] climate chamber. 3 teams of 5 subjects each were randomly exposed and the latin square was selected at random. Each exposure period was 3.5 hours and preceded by a 1 hour base-line pre-exposure measurement period. After 1 hr 40 minutes the subjects exercised for ten minutes on bicycle ergometers in order to increase the uptake of HONO by increasing ventilatory rate 3-4 fold. Workloads were calculated individually and ranged from 21800-34600 kpm/h. During the 10 minutes the test subjects were mouth-breathing to encourage deeper penetration of nitrous acid in the respiratory system so as to induce a mild cooling which would increase their responsiveness to irritants. The amount of deliverable H[sup +] was estimated at 16.350 nmoles with exposure to 395 ppb HONO with subjects breathing at the rate of 5 L min[sup -1]. It was assumed that HONO is efficiently absorbed into the respiratory system. Details are given of the results. Findings were highly variable, largely negative effects of exposure to nitrous acid which appear similiar to results seen in nitrogen dioxide exposure studies. It is concluded to be unlikely that HONO exposures alone can be responsible for exposure misclassification in NO[sub 2] exposure studies. (AB) (52 refs.).

  5. Assessment of human exposure effects of nitrous acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.R.; Kjaergaard, S.K. [University of Aarhus. Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (Denmark); Brauer, M. [Harvard School of Public Health. Department of Environmental Health, Exposure Assessment and Engineering Program (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The study aimed at an estimation of the relative contribution of nitrous acid to measurable human exposure effects in relation to indoor environments with unvented gas combustion. Fifteen medically examined totally healthy non-smoker adults aged between 22 and 57 years were exposed in a double-blind, balanced design (3x3 latin square) to clean air and nitrous acid (HONO) concentration in an empty 74 m{sup 3} climate chamber. 3 teams of 5 subjects each were randomly exposed and the latin square was selected at random. Each exposure period was 3.5 hours and preceded by a 1 hour base-line pre-exposure measurement period. After 1 hr 40 minutes the subjects exercised for ten minutes on bicycle ergometers in order to increase the uptake of HONO by increasing ventilatory rate 3-4 fold. Workloads were calculated individually and ranged from 21800-34600 kpm/h. During the 10 minutes the test subjects were mouth-breathing to encourage deeper penetration of nitrous acid in the respiratory system so as to induce a mild cooling which would increase their responsiveness to irritants. The amount of deliverable H{sup +} was estimated at 16.350 nmoles with exposure to 395 ppb HONO with subjects breathing at the rate of 5 L min{sup -1}. It was assumed that HONO is efficiently absorbed into the respiratory system. Details are given of the results. Findings were highly variable, largely negative effects of exposure to nitrous acid which appear similiar to results seen in nitrogen dioxide exposure studies. It is concluded to be unlikely that HONO exposures alone can be responsible for exposure misclassification in NO{sub 2} exposure studies. (AB) (52 refs.).

  6. Nonthermal Effects of Radar Exposure on Human: A Review Article

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    vida zaroushani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Microwave is part of the electromagnetic spectrum that has different application such as communications, military, air-traffic Control and etc... Previous studies showed that radar frequency could be a health hazard agent. This review article mentioned some of the studies that investigated non-thermal effects of radar frequencies. Reproductive effects, cancers, blood effects, genetic, adverse immune effects and mental effects are non-thermal effects that presented in this report. There are many unknown aspects of the biological effects and many of them did not determined very well such as oxidative stress and mental effects. Compliance with permissible exposure limits, reduction in exposure, and shielding are some of the controlling methods to protect workers from the exposure of microwave and among them, The use of shielding is a superior method for prevention of microwave exposure and among them, electromagnetic Nano composites shields is appropriate for protection of workers from radar exposure.

  7. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  8. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins: What Do We Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants unlike people in most ambient ex...

  9. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  10. Effects of exposure to oil spills on human health: Updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffon, Blanca; Pásaro, Eduardo; Valdiglesias, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Oil spills may involve health risks for people participating in the cleanup operations and coastal inhabitants, given the toxicological properties of the oil components. In spite of this, only after a few major oil spills (crude oil or fuel oil no. 6) have studies on effects of exposure to diverse aspects of human health been performed. Previously, Aguilera et al. (2010) examined all documents published to that date dealing with any type of human health outcome in populations exposed to oil spills. The aim of the present review was to compile all new information available and determine whether evidence reported supports the existence of an association between exposure and adverse human health risks. Studies were classified in three groups according to type of health outcome addressed: (i) effects on mental health, (ii) physical/physiological effects, and (iii) genotoxic, immunotoxic, and endocrine toxicity. New studies published on oil-spill-exposed populations-coastal residents in the vicinity of the spills or participants in cleanup operations-provide additional support to previous evidence on adverse health effects related to exposure regarding different parameters in all three categories considered. Some of the observed effects even indicated that several symptoms may persist for some years after exposure. Hence, (1) health protection in these individuals should be a matter of concern; and (2) health risk assessment needs to be carried out not only at the time of exposure but also for prolong periods following exposure, to enable early detection of any potential exposure-related harmful effects.

  11. Assessment of human exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebret, E. [RIVM-National Inst. of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    This article describes some of the features of the assessment of human exposure to environmental pollutants in epidemiological studies. Since exposure assessment in air pollution epidemiology studies typically involve professionals from various backgrounds, interpretation of a concepts like `exposure` may vary. A brief descriptions is therefore given by way of introduction

  12. Assessment of dietary exposure and effect in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duynhoven, Van John P.M.; Jacobs, Doris M.

    2016-01-01

    In human nutritional science progress has always depended strongly on analytical measurements for establishing relationships between diet and health. This field has undergone significant changes as a result of the development of NMR and mass spectrometry methods for large scale detection, identif

  13. Sensory and Physiological Effects on Humans of Combined Exposures to Air Temperatures and Volatile Organic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Lars; Liu, Zunyong; Jørgensen, Anne Hempel

    1993-01-01

    Ten healthy humans were exposed to combinations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and air temperature (0 mg/m3 and 10 mg/m3 of a mixture of 22 volatile organic compounds and 18, 22 and 26° C). Previously demonstrated effects of VOCs and thermal exposures were replicated. For the first time nasal...... cross-sectional areas and nasal volumes, as measured by acoustic rhinometry, were shown to decrease with decreasing temperature and increasing VOC exposure. Temperature and pollutant exposures affected air quality, the need for more ventilation, skin humidity on the forehead, sweating, acute sensory...

  14. Controlled exposures of human volunteers to sulfate aerosols. Health effects and aerosol characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avol, E L; Jones, M P; Bailey, R M; Chang, N M; Kleinman, M T; Linn, W S; Bell, K A; Hackney, J D

    1979-08-01

    Our laboratory has undertaken the study of possible acute adverse health effects of sulfate aerosols through controlled exposures of volunteer human subjects. Both healthy and asthmatic adult men were exposed for 2-hour periods (with intermittent exercise) to ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid of particle size distributions and concentrations intended to simulate "worst case" exposures during Los Angeles smog episodes. Lung function tests were performed by the subjects on entering and before exiting from a carefully controlled environmental chamber. Subject symptoms were evluated in a standardized manner. Aerosol concentrations and size distributions were determined by an on-line computer/aerometric monitoring system; gravimetric and chemical analyses were performed on impactor and total filter samples after test exposures. We found little or no evidence of adverse health effects from 2-hour multiple-day exposures to any of the compounds at "worst case" ambient concentrations.

  15. Biological effects on human health due to radiofrequency/microwave exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Berg, Gabriele; Blettner, Maria

    2003-01-01

    electromagnetic pulses similar to those after a nuclear explosion. In all studies (except one that used a qualitative job-exposure-matrix) either the duration of occupational work as an approximation to actual exposure was determined or a simple yes/no differentiation was used based on a definition of high......We evaluated the methods and results of nine cohort studies dealing with the biological effects on human health from exposure to radiofrequencies/microwaves, published between 1980 and 2002. The size of the cohorts varied between 304 (3,362 person years) and nearly 200,000 persons (2.7 million...... person years). As exposures were defined: dielectric heaters in a plastic manufacturing plant, working with radio devices (professional and amateur), production of wireless communication technologies, radar devices of the Canadian police, radar units used by the military as well as artificially produced...

  16. Effects of Long-term Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide on Human Red Blood Cells

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    A Saeedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S exhibits both physiological and toxicological roles in the biological systems. Acute exposure to high levels of H2S is life threatening while long-term exposure to ambient levels of H2S elicits human health effects. Objective: To study the harmful effects of long-term exposure to low levels of H2S on human blood cells. Methods: 110 adult workers from Iran who were occupationally exposed to 0–90 ppb H2S for 1–30 years were studied. The participants aged between 18 and 60 years and were exposed directly or indirectly to sulfur compounds (exposed group. The origin of H2S was natural gas processing plants. A control group consisting of 110 males who were not in contact with H2S was also studied. For all participants, hematological profile including total hemoglobin and red blood cell count and sulfhemoglobin, methemoglobin levels were measured. Results: Among all parameters evaluated in this study the mean methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin levels were significantly higher among workers who were exposed to sulfur compounds than the control group. Major differences throughout the study period for sulfhemoglobinemia among exposed groups were observed. Conclusion: Long-term exposure to even low levels of H2S in workplaces may have potential harmful effects on human health.

  17. Effect of JP-8 jet fuel exposure on protein expression in human keratinocyte cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzmann, F A; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Inman, A O; Kimpel, M A; Pedrick, N M; Ringham, H N; Riviere, J E

    2005-12-30

    Dermal exposure to jet fuel is a significant occupational hazard. Previous studies have investigated its absorption and disposition in skin, and the systemic biochemical and immunotoxicological sequelae to exposure. Despite studies of JP-8 jet fuel components in murine, porcine or human keratinocyte cell cultures, proteomic analysis of JP-8 exposure has not been investigated. This study was conducted to examine the effect of JP-8 administration on the human epidermal keratinocyte (HEK) proteome. Using a two-dimensional electrophoretic approach combined with mass spectrometric-based protein identification, we analyzed protein expression in HEK exposed to 0.1% JP-8 in culture medium for 24 h. JP-8 exposure resulted in significant expression differences (p<0.02) in 35 of the 929 proteins matched and analyzed. Approximately, a third of these alterations were increased in protein expression, two-thirds declined with JP-8 exposure. Peptide mass fingerprint identification of effected proteins revealed a variety of functional implications. In general, altered proteins involved endocytotic/exocytotic mechanisms and their cytoskeletal components, cell stress, and those involved in vesicular function.

  18. Effect of Exposure to Non-ionizing Radiation (Electromagnetic Fields on Human System: A Literature Review

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    Paula Rubya Souza C and acirc;mara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate presence of radio base stations, which emit non-ionizing radiation (NIR, as well as the frequent use of mobile phones, can cause increased susceptibility of populations to the emergence of diseases such as cancers of the head and neck, biochemical, hematopoietic and hepatic changes, among others. Exposure to physical contamination, including NIR, has been implicated in numerous diseases, raising concerns about the widespread sources of exposure to this type of radiation. This paper reviews studies that have assessed associations between likely exposure to electromagnetic fields, such as radiofrequency transmissions, and many kinds of human diseases including cancer, as well as alerts to the current knowledge on the association between environmental exposure to NIR and the risk of development of adverse human health effects. This way, there appears to be an urgent need to reconsider exposure limits for low frequency and static magnetic fields, based on combined experimental and epidemiological research. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(4.000: 187-190

  19. Effects of Variable Spot Size on Human Exposure to 95 GHz Millimeter Wave Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2017-0017 Effects of Variable Spot Size on Human Exposure to 95-GHz Millimeter Wave Energy James E. Parker Eric J. Nelson...release by the 88th ABW Public Affairs Office and is available to the general public, including foreign nationals. Copies may be obtained from the...This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange , and its publication does not constitute the

  20. Mobile phone radiofrequency exposure has no effect on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Elisa; Lippi, Giuseppe; Buonocore, Ruggero; Benati, Marco; Bovo, Chiara; Bonaguri, Chiara; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Brocco, Giorgio; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Montagnana, Martina

    2017-07-01

    The use of mobile phones has been associated with an increased risk of developing certain type of cancer, especially in long term users. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the potential genotoxic effect of mobile phone radiofrequency exposure on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. The study population consisted in 14 healthy volunteers. After collection of two whole blood samples, the former was placed in a plastic rack, 1 cm from the chassis of a commercial mobile phone (900 MHz carrier frequency), which was activated by a 30-min call. The second blood sample was instead maintained far from mobile phones or other RF sources. The influence of mobile phone RF on DNA integrity was assessed by analyzing γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes using immunofluorescence staining kit on AKLIDES. No measure of γ-H2AX foci was significantly influenced by mobile phone RF exposure, nor mobile phone exposure was associated with significant risk of genetic damages in vitro (odds ratio comprised between 0.27 and 1.00). The results of this experimental study demonstrate that exposure of human lymphocytes to a conventional 900 MHz RF emitted by a commercial mobile phone for 30 min does not significantly impact DNA integrity.

  1. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-12-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  2. Effects of bright light exposure during daytime on peripheral clock gene expression in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Wakamura, Tomoko; Morita, Takeshi; Okamoto, Akihiko; Akashi, Makoto; Matsui, Takuya; Sato, Motohiko

    2016-12-01

    Light is the strongest synchronizer controlling circadian rhythms. The intensity and duration of light change throughout the year, thereby influencing body weight, food preferences, and melatonin secretion in humans and animals. Although the expression of clock genes has been examined using human samples, it currently remains unknown whether bright light during the daytime affects the expression of these genes in humans. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of bright light exposure during the daytime on clock gene expression in the hair follicular and root cells of the human scalp. Seven healthy men (20.4 ± 2.2 years old; 172.3 ± 5.8 cm; 64.3 ± 8.5 kg; BMI 21.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2, mean ± SD) participated in this study. Subjects completed 3-day experimental sessions twice in 1 month during which they were exposed to bright and dim light conditions. The mRNA expression of Per1-3, Cry1-2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2), and Dec1 was analyzed using branched DNA probes. No significant changes were observed in the expression of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), or Dec1 following exposure to bright light conditions. However, the expression of Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2) tended to be stronger under bright light than dim light conditions. These results suggest that the bright light stimulus did not influence the expression of clock genes in humans. Long-lasting bright light exposure during the daytime may be required to change the expression of clock genes in humans.

  3. Effects of inhaled acid aerosols on lung mechanics: an analysis of human exposure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utell, M J

    1985-11-01

    There exist significant gaps in our understanding of human health effects from inhalation of pollutants associated with acid precipitation. Controlled clinical studies examine effects of criteria pollutants almost exclusively by assessing changes in lung mechanics. One constituent of acid precipitation, sulfuric acid aerosols, has been shown to induce bronchoconstriction in exercising extrinsic asthmatics at near ambient levels. These asthmatics may be an order of magnitude more sensitive to sulfuric acid aerosols than normal adults. More recently, a second component nitrogen dioxide has been observed to provoke changes in lung mechanics at progressively lower concentrations. To date, virtually no data exist from clinical exposures to acidic aerosols for subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  4. Individual differences in the effects of mobile phone exposure on human sleep: rethinking the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Sarah P; McKenzie, Raymond J; Jackson, Melinda L; Howard, Mark E; Croft, Rodney J

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phone exposure-related effects on the human electroencephalogram (EEG) have been shown during both waking and sleep states, albeit with slight differences in the frequency affected. This discrepancy, combined with studies that failed to find effects, has led many to conclude that no consistent effects exist. We hypothesised that these differences might partly be due to individual variability in response, and that mobile phone emissions may in fact have large but differential effects on human brain activity. Twenty volunteers from our previous study underwent an adaptation night followed by two experimental nights in which they were randomly exposed to two conditions (Active and Sham), followed by a full-night sleep episode. The EEG spectral power was increased in the sleep spindle frequency range in the first 30 min of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep following Active exposure. This increase was more prominent in the participants that showed an increase in the original study. These results confirm previous findings of mobile phone-like emissions affecting the EEG during non-REM sleep. Importantly, this low-level effect was also shown to be sensitive to individual variability. Furthermore, this indicates that previous negative results are not strong evidence for a lack of an effect and, given the far-reaching implications of mobile phone research, we may need to rethink the interpretation of results and the manner in which research is conducted in this field.

  5. The effect of dust emissions from open storage piles to particle ambient concentration and human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalvatzaki, E; Aleksandropoulou, V; Glytsos, T; Lazaridis, M

    2012-12-01

    The current study focus on the determination of dust emissions from piles in open storage yards of a municipal solid waste (MSW) composting site and the subsequent atmospheric dust dispersion. The ISC3-ST (Industrial Source Complex Version 3 - Short Term) model was used for the evaluation of the PM(10) ambient concentrations associated with the dispersion of MSW compost dust emissions in air. Dust emission rates were calculated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency proposed dust resuspension formulation from open storage piles using local meteorological data. The dispersion modelling results on the spatial distribution of PM(10) source depletion showed that the maximum concentrations were observed at a distance 25-75 m downwind of the piles in the prevailing wind direction. Sensitivity calculations were performed also to reveal the effect of the compost pile height, the friction velocity and the receptor height on the ambient PM(10) concentration. It was observed that PM(10) concentrations (downwind in the prevailing wind direction) increased with increasing the friction velocity, increasing the pile height (for distances greater than 125 m from the source) and decreasing the receptor height (for distances greater than 125 m from the source). Furthermore, the results of ISC3-ST were analysed with the ExDoM (Exposure Dose Model) human exposure model. The ExDoM is a model for calculating the human exposure and the deposition dose, clearance, and finally retention of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract (RT). PM(10) concentration at the composting site was calculated as the sum of the concentration from compost pile dust resuspension and the background concentration. It was found that the exposure to PM(10) and deposited lung dose for an adult Caucasian male who is not working at the composting site is less by 20-74% and 29-84%, respectively, compared to those for a worker exposed to PM concentrations at the composting site.

  6. Human Exposure Database System (HEDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) provides public access to data sets, documents, and metadata from EPA on human exposure. It is primarily intended for...

  7. Biological effects of exposure to static electric fields in humans and vertebrates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Anne-Kathrin; Schmiedchen, Kristina; Stunder, Dominik; Dechent, Dagmar; Kraus, Thomas; Bailey, William H; Driessen, Sarah

    2017-04-17

    High-voltage direct current (HVDC) lines are the technology of choice for the transport of large amounts of energy over long distances. The operation of these lines produces static electric fields (EF), but the data reviewed in previous assessments were not sufficient to assess the need for any environmental limit. The aim of this systematic review was to update the current state of research and to evaluate biological effects of static EF. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) recommendations, we collected and evaluated experimental and epidemiological studies examining biological effects of exposure to static EF in humans (n = 8) and vertebrates (n = 40). There is good evidence that humans and animals are able to perceive the presence of static EF at sufficiently high levels. Hair movements caused by electrostatic forces may play a major role in this perception. A large number of studies reported responses of animals (e.g., altered metabolic, immunologic or developmental parameters) to a broad range of static EF strengths as well, but these responses are likely secondary physiological responses to sensory stimulation. Furthermore, the quality of many of the studies reporting physiological responses is poor, which raises concerns about confounding. The weight of the evidence from the literature reviewed did not indicate that static EF have adverse biological effects in humans or animals. The evidence strongly supported the role of superficial sensory stimulation of hair and skin as the basis for perception of the field, as well as reported indirect behavioral and physiological responses. Physical considerations also preclude any direct effect of static EF on internal physiology, and reports that some physiological processes are affected in minor ways may be explained by other factors. While this literature does not support a level of concern about biological effects of exposure to static EF, the conditions

  8. Potential genotoxic effects of GSM-1800 exposure on human cutaneous and nerve cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, S.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Ruffie, G.; Lagroye, I.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B. [PIOM laboratory, UMR 5501 CNRS, ENSCPB, 33 -Pessac (France)

    2006-07-01

    Introduction The GSM-1800 signal has been in use for several years in Europe and questions raised about its potential biological effects, in view of the fact that, with respect to GSM-900, the increase in the carrier frequency corresponds to a more superficial absorption in the tissues. Consequently, the skin becomes an even more important target for the absorption of the radiofrequency radiation (R.F.R.) emitted by mobile phones. Nevertheless, brain tissues remain a critical target. Cells In order to determine whether R.F.R. at 1800 MHz could behave as a genotoxic agent, skin and brain cells were exposed to a 217-Hz-modulated GSM-1800 signal and assayed using the comet assay: (1) normal human epidermal keratinocytes (N.H.E.K.) and dermal fibroblasts (N.H.D.F.) which are cutaneous cells from epidermis and dermis respectively, and (2) the S.H. -S.Y.5.Y. and C.H.M.E.-5 human cell lines, which are neuroblastoma and micro-glial cells, respectively. Exposure The R.F.R. exposure system that was used in these experiments was manufactured by I.T. I.S. (Zurich, Switzerland). It consists in two shorted waveguides allowing to run exposed and sham conditions at the same time in the same culture incubator, at 37 Celsius degrees, 5% CO{sub 2}. It is controlled by a software, which provides blind conditions until completion of data analysis. The specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) used was 2 W/kg, corresponding to the public exposure limit recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. and the exposure duration was 48 hours. Comet assay At the end of the exposure, cells were removed from their Petri dish by trypsin/EDTA treatment, counted and 5 x 10{sup 4} cells were used to detect DNA damage including single DNA breaks. Positive controls were performed using hydrogen peroxidase (1%, 1 hour). The genotoxic effects were detected using the alkaline comet assay kit (Trevigen slides) following the supplier procedure. Under these conditions, 6 independent experiments were performed for each cell type (2

  9. Thermal effects of continuous wave CO sub 2 laser exposure on human teeth: An in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miserendino, L.J.; Neiburger, E.J.; Walia, H.; Luebke, N.; Brantley, W.

    1989-07-01

    The thermal effects of continuous wave carbon dioxide laser irradiation on human teeth were investigated. Internal temperature changes were monitored by means of electrical thermistors implanted within the pulp chambers of 20 extracted, unerupted human molar teeth. One-hundred test exposures at various powers and durations were obtained. Linear regression/correlation analysis of the data suggests a direct relationship between the independent variable, exposure energy (joules), and the dependent variable, internal temperature, under the conditions of this study.

  10. Negative Effects of High Glucose Exposure in Human Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Morelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are often associated with male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, suggesting that hypothalamic defects involving GnRH neurons may impair the reproductive function. Among metabolic factors hyperglycemia has been implicated in the control of the reproductive axis at central level, both in humans and in animal models. To date, little is known about the direct effects of pathological high glucose concentrations on human GnRH neurons. In this study, we investigated the high glucose effects in the human GnRH-secreting FNC-B4 cells. Gene expression profiling by qRT-PCR, confirmed that FNC-B4 cells express GnRH and several genes relevant for GnRH neuron function (KISS1R, KISS1, sex steroid and leptin receptors, FGFR1, neuropilin 2, and semaphorins, along with glucose transporters (GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. High glucose exposure (22 mM; 40 mM significantly reduced gene and protein expression of GnRH, KISS1R, KISS1, and leptin receptor, as compared to normal glucose (5 mM. Consistent with previous studies, leptin treatment significantly induced GnRH mRNA expression at 5 mM glucose, but not in the presence of high glucose concentrations. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a deleterious direct contribution of high glucose on human GnRH neurons, thus providing new insights into pathogenic mechanisms linking metabolic disorders to reproductive dysfunctions.

  11. Biomonitoring of Human Exposure to Prestige Oil: Effects on DNA and Endocrine Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pérez-Cadahía

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1960, about 400 tankers spilled more than 377765 tons of oil, with the Prestige accident (Galician coast, NW Spain, November 2002 the most recent. Taking into account the consistent large number of individuals exposed to oil that exists all over the world, it seems surprising the absence in the literature of studies focused on the chronic effects of this exposure on human health. In this work we evaluated the level of DNA damage by means of comet assay, and the potential endocrine alterations (prolactin and cortisol caused by Prestige oil exposure in a population of 180 individuals, classified in 3 groups according to the tasks performed, and 60 controls. Heavy metals in blood were determined as exposure biomarkers, obtaining significant increases of aluminum, nickel and lead in the exposed groups as compared to controls. Higher levels of genetic damage and endocrine alterations were also observed in the exposed population. DNA damage levels were influenced by age, sex, and the use of protective clothes, and prolactin concentrations by the last two factors. Surprisingly, the use of mask did not seem to protect individuals from genetic or endocrine alterations. Moreover, polymorphisms in genes encoding for the main enzymes involved in the metabolism of oil components were analyzed as susceptibility biomarkers. CYP1A1-3’UTR and EPHX1 codons 113 and 139 variant alleles were related to higher damage levels, while lower DNA damage was observed in GSTM1 and GSTT1 null individuals.

  12. Biomonitoring of Human Exposure to Prestige Oil: Effects on DNA and Endocrine Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cadahía, Beatriz; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Lafuente, Anunciación; Cabaleiro, Teresa; Laffon, Blanca

    2008-01-01

    Since 1960, about 400 tankers spilled more than 377765 tons of oil, with the Prestige accident (Galician coast, NW Spain, November 2002) the most recent. Taking into account the consistent large number of individuals exposed to oil that exists all over the world, it seems surprising the absence in the literature of studies focused on the chronic effects of this exposure on human health. In this work we evaluated the level of DNA damage by means of comet assay, and the potential endocrine alterations (prolactin and cortisol) caused by Prestige oil exposure in a population of 180 individuals, classified in 3 groups according to the tasks performed, and 60 controls. Heavy metals in blood were determined as exposure biomarkers, obtaining significant increases of aluminum, nickel and lead in the exposed groups as compared to controls. Higher levels of genetic damage and endocrine alterations were also observed in the exposed population. DNA damage levels were influenced by age, sex, and the use of protective clothes, and prolactin concentrations by the last two factors. Surprisingly, the use of mask did not seem to protect individuals from genetic or endocrine alterations. Moreover, polymorphisms in genes encoding for the main enzymes involved in the metabolism of oil components were analyzed as susceptibility biomarkers. CYP1A1-3′UTR and EPHX1 codons 113 and 139 variant alleles were related to higher damage levels, while lower DNA damage was observed in GSTM1 and GSTT1 null individuals. PMID:21572833

  13. Molecular effects of 1-naphthyl-methylcarbamate and solar radiation exposures on human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucio, Bianca; Tiago, Manoela; Fannin, Richard D; Liu, Liwen; Gerrish, Kevin; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Paules, Richard S; Barros, Silvia Berlanga de Moraes

    2017-02-01

    Carbaryl (1-naphthyl-methylcarbamate), a broad-spectrum insecticide, has recently been associated with the development of cutaneous melanoma in an epidemiological cohort study with U.S. farm workers also exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the main etiologic factor for skin carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that carbaryl exposure may increase deleterious effects of UV solar radiation on skin melanocytes. This study aimed to characterize human melanocytes after individual or combined exposure to carbaryl (100μM) and solar radiation (375mJ/cm(2)). In a microarray analysis, carbaryl, but not solar radiation, induced an oxidative stress response, evidenced by the upregulation of antioxidant genes, such as Hemeoxygenase-1 (HMOX1), and downregulation of Microphtalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF), the main regulator of melanocytic activity; results were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Carbaryl and solar radiation induced a gene response suggestive of DNA damage and cell cycle alteration. The expression of CDKN1A, BRCA1/2 and MDM2 genes was notably more intense in the combined treatment group, in a synergistic manner. Flow cytometry assays demonstrated S-phase cell cycle arrest, reduced apoptosis levels and faster induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) lesions in carbaryl treated groups. Our data suggests that carbaryl is genotoxic to human melanocytes, especially when associated with solar radiation.

  14. Effects of ozone exposure on lipid metabolism in human alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, M.; Madden, M.C.; Samet, J.M.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA) which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A2 or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Following release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biological active mediators including prostaglandins and platelet activating factor (PAF). To examine the possibility that these mediators may account for some of the pathophysiologic alterations seen in the lung following O3 exposure, human AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal subjects, plated into tissue culture dishes, and the adherent cells were incubated with 3H-AA or 3H-lysoPAF. Human AM exposed 1.0 ppm O3 for 2 hr released 65 + or - 12% more tritium, derived from 3H-AA, than paired air-exposed controls into media supernatants. In other studies using a similar O3 exposure protocol, there was also a significant increase in human AM PGE2 production (2.0 + or - 0.5 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.01, n=17). In additional studies, using a similar O3 exposure protocol (1.0 ppm for 1 hr), there was also a significant increase in human AM PAF content (1.7 + or - 0.2 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.02, n=5).

  15. [Effects of lead exposure on the human body and health implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fátima Ramos; Moreira, Josino Costa

    2004-02-01

    To review the literature concerning the risks associated with exposure to lead and lead compounds, especially in children and in populations that are occupationally exposed. Using "chumbo" [lead] and "efeitos" [effects] as search terms, two large databases, namely PubMed (United States National Library of Medicine) and LILACS (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [Latin American and Caribbean Literature in the Health Sciences]), were searched for studies on lead toxicity from 1988 to 2002. Other sources used to conduct the search include the web page of the United States Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, in Atlanta, Georgia, and the library of the Toxicology Laboratory of the Center for Workers' Health and Human Ecology at the National School of Public Health [Centro de Estudos da Saúde de Trabalhador e Ecologia Humana, Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública], Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The toxic effects of lead and lead compounds have been extensively studied for over a century. In recent years, epidemiologic studies have focused primarily on the neurotoxic effects of lead on children, particularly in terms of impaired intellectual ability and behavioral problems. However, there is still insufficient information on the mechanisms of action that account for such toxicity. More in-depth studies are also needed on the effects of lead exposure on bone, the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, the liver, the male and female reproductive systems, and the endocrine system. The potential teratogenicity and carcinogenicity of lead, as well as its effect on pregnancy outcomes and neonatal growth and development, also require further study.

  16. The effect of environmental exposure to pyrethroids and DNA damage in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurewicz, Joanna; Radwan, Michał; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Sobala, Wojciech; Piskunowicz, Marta; Radwan, Paweł; Bochenek, Michał; Hanke, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with sperm DNA damage. Between January 2008 and April 2011 286 men under 45 years of age with a normal sperm concentration of 15-300 10(6)/ml [WHO 2010] were recruited from an infertility clinic in Lodz, Poland. Participants were interviewed and provided urine, saliva, and semen samples. The pyrethroids metabolites: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA), and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analyzed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. Sperm DNA damage was assessed using a flow cytometry based on sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). A positive association was observed between CDCCA >50th percentile and the percentage of medium DNA fragmentation index (M DFI) and percentage of immature sperms (HDS) (p = 0.04, p = 0.04 respectively). The level of 3PBA >50th percentile in urine was positively related to the percentage of high DNA fragmentation index (H DFI) (p = 0.03). The TDCCA, DBCA levels, and the sum of pyrethroid metabolites were not associated with any sperm DNA damage measures. Our results suggest that environmental pyrethroid exposure may affect sperm DNA damage measures index indicated the reproductive effects of pyrethroid exposure on adult men. In view of the importance of human reproductive health and the widespread usage of pyrethroids, it is important to further investigate these correlations.

  17. Effects of ozone exposure on lipid metabolism in human alveolar macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, M.; Madden, M.C.; Samet, J.M. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)); Koren, H.S. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1992-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA), which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A[sub C] or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. After release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biologically active mediators including prostaglandins and platelet-activating factor (PAF). To examine the possibility that these mediators may account for some of the pathophysiologic alterations seen in the lung after ozone (O[sub 3]) exposure, human AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal subjects, plated into tissue culture dishes, and the adherent cells were incubated with [[sup 3]H]AA or [[sup 3]H]lysoPAF. Human AM exposed to 1.0 ppm O[sub 3] for 2 hr released 65 [+-] 12% more tritium, derived from [[sup 3]H]AA, than paired, air-exposed controls into media supernatants. In other studies using a similar O[sub 3] exposure protocol, there was also a significant increase in human AM prostaglandin E[sub 2] production (2.0 [+-] 0.5-fold increase above air-exposure values, p < 0.02, n = 5). These potent lipid mediators, originally derived from human AM, may play an important role in the mechanisms of O[sub 3] lung toxicity. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation.

  19. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0±0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8±2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety. PMID:24896095

  20. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  1. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isheeta Seth

    Full Text Available Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy, and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (p<0.0001. These data indicate that neutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  2. Metabolic profiling detects early effects of environmental and lifestyle exposure to cadmium in a human population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis James K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'exposome' represents the accumulation of all environmental exposures across a lifetime. Top-down strategies are required to assess something this comprehensive, and could transform our understanding of how environmental factors affect human health. Metabolic profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics defines an individual's metabolic phenotype, which is influenced by genotype, diet, lifestyle, health and xenobiotic exposure, and could also reveal intermediate biomarkers for disease risk that reflect adaptive response to exposure. We investigated changes in metabolism in volunteers living near a point source of environmental pollution: a closed zinc smelter with associated elevated levels of environmental cadmium. Methods High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy (metabonomics was used to acquire urinary metabolic profiles from 178 human volunteers. The spectral data were subjected to multivariate and univariate analysis to identify metabolites that were correlated with lifestyle or biological factors. Urinary levels of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine were also measured, using mass spectrometry, as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. Results Six urinary metabolites, either associated with mitochondrial metabolism (citrate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 4-deoxy-erythronic acid or one-carbon metabolism (dimethylglycine, creatinine, creatine, were associated with cadmium exposure. In particular, citrate levels retained a significant correlation to urinary cadmium and smoking status after controlling for age and sex. Oxidative stress (as determined by urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine levels was elevated in individuals with high cadmium exposure, supporting the hypothesis that heavy metal accumulation was causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions This study shows evidence that an NMR-based metabolic profiling study in an uncontrolled human population is capable of identifying intermediate biomarkers of response to toxicants at true environmental

  3. Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on social behavior in humans and other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S J; Day, N; Streissguth, A P

    2000-01-01

    Alcohol exposure during development causes central nervous system alterations in both humans and animals. Although the most common behavioral manifestation of these alterations is a reduction in cognitive abilities, it is becoming increasingly apparent that deficits in social behavior may be very prevalent sequelae of developmental alcohol exposure. In infancy and early childhood, deficits in attachment behavior and state regulation are seen in both alcohol-exposed people and animals, suggesting that these changes are largely the result of the alcohol exposure rather than maternal behavior. In the periadolescent period, people exposed to alcohol during development show a variety of difficulties in the social domain as measured by checklists filled out by either a parent or teacher. Rats exposed to alcohol during development show changes in play and parenting behaviors. In adulthood, prenatal alcohol exposure is related to high rates of trouble with the law, inappropriate sexual behavior, depression, suicide, and failure to care for children. These high rates all suggest that there may be fundamental problems in the social domain. In other animals, perinatal alcohol exposure alters aggression, active social interactions, social communication and recognition, maternal behavior, and sexual behavior in adults. In conclusion, research suggests that people exposed to alcohol during development may exhibit striking changes in social behavior; the animal research suggests that these changes may be largely the result of the alcohol insult and not the environment.

  4. Effects of subchronic exposures to concentrated ambient particles in mice. IX. Integral assessment and human health implications of subchronic exposures of mice to CAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Morton; Gordon, Terry; Chen, Lung Chi

    2005-04-01

    In order to examine the biologic plausibility of adverse chronic cardiopulmonary effects in humans associated with ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure, we exposed groups of normal mice (C57) and knockout mice that develop atherosclerotic plaque (ApoE-/- and ApoE-/- LDLr-/-) for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk for 5 or 6 mo during the spring/summer of 2003 to either filtered air or 10-fold concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in Tuxedo, NY (average PM2.5 concentration during exposure = 110 microg/m3). Some of the mice had implanted electrocardiographic monitors. We demonstrated that: (1) this complex interdisciplinary study was technically feasible in terms of daily exposure, collection of air quality monitoring data, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of continuous data on cardiac function, and the collection and analyses of tissues of the animals sacrificed at the end of the study; (2) the daily variations in CAPs were significantly associated, in ApoE-/- mice, with daily variations in cardiac functions; (3) there were significant differences between CAPs and sham-exposed ApoE-/- mice in terms of cardiac function after the end of exposure period, as well as small differences in atherosclerotic plaque density, coronary artery disease, and cell density in the substantia nigra in the brain in the ApoE-/- mice; (4) there are suggestive indications of gene expression changes for genes associated with the control of circadian rhythm in the ApoE-/- LDLr-/- double knockout (DK) mice. These various CAPs-related effects on cardiac function and the development of histological evidence of increased risk of clinically significant disease at the end of exposures in animal models of atherosclerosis provide biological plausibility for the premature mortality associated with PM2.5 exposure in human subjects and provide suggestive evidence for neurogenic disease as well.

  5. Sun Exposure and Its Effects on Human Health: Mechanisms through Which Sun Exposure Could Reduce the Risk of Developing Obesity and Cardiometabolic Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Naomi; Geldenhuys, Sian; Gorman, Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant burden on global healthcare due to its high prevalence and associations with chronic health conditions. In our animal studies, ongoing exposure to low dose ultraviolet radiation (UVR, found in sunlight) reduced weight gain and the development of signs of cardiometabolic dysfunction in mice fed a high fat diet. These observations suggest that regular exposure to safe levels of sunlight could be an effective means of reducing the burden of obesity. However, there is limited knowledge around the nature of associations between sun exposure and the development of obesity and cardiometabolic dysfunction, and we do not know if sun exposure (independent of outdoor activity) affects the metabolic processes that determine obesity in humans. In addition, excessive sun exposure has strong associations with a number of negative health consequences such as skin cancer. This means it is very important to “get the balance right” to ensure that we receive benefits without increasing harm. In this review, we detail the evidence around the cardiometabolic protective effects of UVR and suggest mechanistic pathways through which UVR could be beneficial. PMID:27727191

  6. Sun Exposure and Its Effects on Human Health: Mechanisms through Which Sun Exposure Could Reduce the Risk of Developing Obesity and Cardiometabolic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Fleury

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant burden on global healthcare due to its high prevalence and associations with chronic health conditions. In our animal studies, ongoing exposure to low dose ultraviolet radiation (UVR, found in sunlight reduced weight gain and the development of signs of cardiometabolic dysfunction in mice fed a high fat diet. These observations suggest that regular exposure to safe levels of sunlight could be an effective means of reducing the burden of obesity. However, there is limited knowledge around the nature of associations between sun exposure and the development of obesity and cardiometabolic dysfunction, and we do not know if sun exposure (independent of outdoor activity affects the metabolic processes that determine obesity in humans. In addition, excessive sun exposure has strong associations with a number of negative health consequences such as skin cancer. This means it is very important to “get the balance right” to ensure that we receive benefits without increasing harm. In this review, we detail the evidence around the cardiometabolic protective effects of UVR and suggest mechanistic pathways through which UVR could be beneficial.

  7. Review of the non-neoplastic kidney effects of hydrocarbon exposure in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, S.C.; Petrone, R.L.; Hemstreet, G.P. III

    1988-07-01

    This review has demonstrated that there is a considerable amount of information in the medical literature concerning hydrocarbon-associated kidney effects. Ravnskov has stated that glomerulonephritis should be recognized legally as an occupational disease, yet there is no mention of hydrocarbon exposure in the differential diagnosis of glomerulonephritis in two standard American textbooks of internal medicine. Two recently published textbooks of occupational medicine state without reservation that studies have linked hydrocarbon exposure to glomerulonephritis and base this conclusion on the previously cited studies of Beirne and Brennan, Zimmerman, and Ravnskov. The following conclusions have been reasonably substantiated: 1. Massive exposure to petroleum distillates on rare occasions may cause acute renal failure due to tubular necrosis. This appears to be a reversible lesion which, depending on the level of exposure, the medical care and support available, and pre-existing renal function, may be without chronic sequelae. 2. Case reports linking Goodpasture's syndrome and other types of glomerulonephritis to hydrocarbon exposure are based on circumstantial evidence and cannot be used to establish a causal association. 3. The evidence from the eight case-control studies of hydrocarbon exposure and glomerulonephritis is inconclusive. Six of the eight published case-control studies show a positive association between hydrocarbon exposure and glomerulonephritis, but four of the six studies have methodologic flaws that could explain the observed effect. The findings in the one positive study that is methodologically acceptable were not replicated in a subsequent study utilizing a similar design. 4. Studies of hydrocarbon-exposed occupational cohorts have generally revealed a lower than expected risk of death from renal causes. 69 references.

  8. Ultraviolet Radiation: Human Exposure and Health Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkate, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation and associated health effects as well as risk estimates for acute and chronic conditions resulting from such exposure. Demonstrates substantial reductions in health risk that can be achieved through preventive actions. Also includes a risk assessment model for skin cancer. Contains 36…

  9. [Long-term effect of environmental cadmium exposure on human body's mineral metabolic balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, H T; Huang, R; Liang, X X; Li, Z X; Wang, J; Tan, J B; Wu, S X; Wang, P; Chen, Z H; Huang, Q; Lyu, Y J; Jiang, Q; Yang, X F; Wu, Y N

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effect of long-term exposure to environmental cadmium on eight mineral element's metabolic balance of human body. To choose a high cadmium area polluted by smelting and mining north of Guangdong province and a cadmium-free area with a similar economic level, and living and eating habit of residents as a contrast from April 2011 to August 2012. Stratified random sampling and clustered sampling method were adopted to choose the non-occupationally cadmium-exposed respondents who have lived in local area for more than 15 years, older than 40 years, having local rice and vegetable as the main dietary source, with simple and relatively stable diet, and without diabetes, kidney disease, thyroid disease, liver disease or other history of chronic disease. This study included 298 respondents, of whom 155 were in cadmium exposure group and 143 in control group. Questionnaires was used to acquire their health status and their morning urine samples were collected. Electrolytically coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to test the concentrations of sodium(Na), magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and iodine (I). The Mann-Whitney U test method was used to compare the differences of concentrations of urinary cadmium, Na, Mg, P, K, Ca, Cu, Zn, I, and the ratio of Na to K (Na/K), Ca to P (Ca/P) between exposed group and control group.χ(2) test was used to compare the abnormal rate of urinary cadmium between exposed group and control group. Pearson correlation and multiple regression method were used to investigate the relationship between urinary cadmium levels, gender, age, smoking, passive smoking, and minerals. The urinary cadmium level P50 (P25-P75) in exposed group was 5.45 (2.62-10.68) μg/g·cr, which was higher than that of the control group, which was 1.69 (1.22-2.36) μg/g·cr (Z=-10.49,Phuman body.

  10. Effects of gasoline and ethanol-gasoline exhaust exposure on human bronchial epithelial and natural killer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michèle; Usemann, Jakob; Bisig, Christoph; Comte, Pierre; Czerwinski, Jan; Mayer, Andreas C R; Beier, Konstantin; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Latzin, Philipp; Müller, Loretta

    2017-08-24

    Air pollution exposure, including passenger car emissions, may cause substantial respiratory health effects and cancer death. In western countries, the majority of passenger cars are driven by gasoline fuel. Recently, new motor technologies and ethanol fuels have been introduced to the market, but potential health effects have not been thoroughly investigated. We developed and verified a coculture model composed of bronchial epithelial cells (ECs) and natural killer cells (NKs) mimicking the human airways to compare toxic effects between pure gasoline (E0) and ethanol-gasoline-blend (E85, 85% ethanol, 15% gasoline) exhaust emitted from a flexfuel gasoline car. We drove a steady state cycle, exposed ECs for 6h and added NKs. We assessed exhaust effects in ECs alone and in cocultures by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and oxidative stress assay. We found no toxic effects after exposure to E0 or E85 compared to air controls. Comparison between E0 and E85 exposure showed a weak association for less oxidative DNA damage after E85 exposure compared to E0. Our results indicate that short-term exposure to gasoline exhaust may have no major toxic effects in ECs and NKs and that ethanol as part of fuel for gasoline cars may be favorable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of environmental exposure to mercury on the functioning of the human body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Cyran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is classified as a heavy metal and thus is commonly referred to as a death metal due to its high toxicity. In the environment it occurs in metallic form or in combination with other compounds. Amidst the sources of exposure to mercury, the most important environmental sources are dental amalgam and mercury vapor from the production of chlorine which is the most important source of occupational exposure. Mercury is easily soluble in fats, so it penetrates through biological membranes. Both - acute and chronic mercury poisoning causes characteristic clinical symptoms. There are several connections between exposure to this metal and toxic effects on the nervous system, cardiovascular system, endocrine system and kidneys. Thus mercury damages the structure of many organs and impairs their function

  12. Additive Effects of Millimeter Waves and 2-Deoxyglucose Co-Exposure on the Human Keratinocyte Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubere Mahamoud, Yonis; Aite, Meziane; Martin, Catherine; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter Waves (MMW) will be used in the next-generation of high-speed wireless technologies, especially in future Ultra-Broadband small cells in 5G cellular networks. Therefore, their biocompatibilities must be evaluated prior to their massive deployment. Using a microarray-based approach, we analyzed modifications to the whole genome of a human keratinocyte model that was exposed at 60.4 GHz-MMW at an incident power density (IPD) of 20 mW/cm2 for 3 hours in athermic conditions. No keratinocyte transcriptome modifications were observed. We tested the effects of MMWs on cell metabolism by co-treating MMW-exposed cells with a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxyglucose (2dG, 20 mM for 3 hours), and whole genome expression was evaluated along with the ATP content. We found that the 2dG treatment decreased the cellular ATP content and induced a high modification in the transcriptome (632 coding genes). The affected genes were associated with transcriptional repression, cellular communication and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. The MMW/2dG co-treatment did not alter the keratinocyte ATP content, but it did slightly alter the transcriptome, which reflected the capacity of MMW to interfere with the bioenergetic stress response. The RT-PCR-based validation confirmed 6 MMW-sensitive genes (SOCS3, SPRY2, TRIB1, FAM46A, CSRNP1 and PPP1R15A) during the 2dG treatment. These 6 genes encoded transcription factors or inhibitors of cytokine pathways, which raised questions regarding the potential impact of long-term or chronic MMW exposure on metabolically stressed cells. PMID:27529420

  13. Additive Effects of Millimeter Waves and 2-Deoxyglucose Co-Exposure on the Human Keratinocyte Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubere Mahamoud, Yonis; Aite, Meziane; Martin, Catherine; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves; Habauzit, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter Waves (MMW) will be used in the next-generation of high-speed wireless technologies, especially in future Ultra-Broadband small cells in 5G cellular networks. Therefore, their biocompatibilities must be evaluated prior to their massive deployment. Using a microarray-based approach, we analyzed modifications to the whole genome of a human keratinocyte model that was exposed at 60.4 GHz-MMW at an incident power density (IPD) of 20 mW/cm2 for 3 hours in athermic conditions. No keratinocyte transcriptome modifications were observed. We tested the effects of MMWs on cell metabolism by co-treating MMW-exposed cells with a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxyglucose (2dG, 20 mM for 3 hours), and whole genome expression was evaluated along with the ATP content. We found that the 2dG treatment decreased the cellular ATP content and induced a high modification in the transcriptome (632 coding genes). The affected genes were associated with transcriptional repression, cellular communication and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. The MMW/2dG co-treatment did not alter the keratinocyte ATP content, but it did slightly alter the transcriptome, which reflected the capacity of MMW to interfere with the bioenergetic stress response. The RT-PCR-based validation confirmed 6 MMW-sensitive genes (SOCS3, SPRY2, TRIB1, FAM46A, CSRNP1 and PPP1R15A) during the 2dG treatment. These 6 genes encoded transcription factors or inhibitors of cytokine pathways, which raised questions regarding the potential impact of long-term or chronic MMW exposure on metabolically stressed cells.

  14. Relevance of estrogenic and aromatase inhibiting effects of mixtures of xenoestrogens for human exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meeuwen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Daily humans are exposed to various sources of estrogen-like compounds (xenoestrogens), such as food (naturally occurring, residues or contaminants), clothes and cosmetics. Non-governmental organisations give the impression that this causes adverse effects on human health and the

  15. Relevance of estrogenic and aromatase inhibiting effects of mixtures of xenoestrogens for human exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meeuwen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Daily humans are exposed to various sources of estrogen-like compounds (xenoestrogens), such as food (naturally occurring, residues or contaminants), clothes and cosmetics. Non-governmental organisations give the impression that this causes adverse effects on human health and the environ

  16. Effects of acute exercise on fear extinction in rats and exposure therapy in humans: Null findings from five experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquart, Jolene; Roquet, Rheall F; Papini, Santiago; Powers, Mark B; Rosenfield, David; Smits, Jasper A J; Monfils, Marie-H

    2017-08-01

    Exposure therapy is an established learning-based intervention for the treatment of anxiety disorders with an average response rate of nearly 50%, leaving room for improvement. Emerging strategies to enhance exposure therapy in humans and fear extinction retention in animal models are primarily pharmacological. These approaches are limited as many patients report preferring non-pharmacological approaches in therapy. With general cognitive enhancement effects, exercise has emerged as a plausible non-pharmacological augmentation strategy. The present study tested the hypothesis that fear extinction and exposure therapy would be enhanced by a pre-training bout of exercise. We conducted four experiments with rats that involved a standardized conditioning and extinction paradigm and a manipulation of exercise. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated vigorous-intensity exercise prior to a standardized virtual reality exposure therapy session among adults with fear of heights. In experiments 1-4, exercise did not facilitate fear extinction, long-term memory, or fear relapse tests. In experiment 5, human participants showed an overall reduction in fear of heights but exercise did not enhance symptom improvement. Although acute exercise prior to fear extinction or exposure therapy, as operationalized in the present 5 studies, did not enhance outcomes, these results must be interpreted within the context of a broader literature that includes positive findings. Taken all together, this suggests that more research is necessary to identify optimal parameters and key individual differences so that exercise can be implemented successfully to treat anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of exposure duration of self etch dentin bonding on the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lestari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Self etch dentin bonding created to make light easily activate the application of composite resin on tooth surface. The monomer content has acid effect that could irritate tooth pulp. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light exposure duration of self etch dentin bonding on toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture by MTT assay. Self etch dentin bonding was used as on experimental unit and the sample was exposed by visible light curing in different duration: 10, 20, 30 seconds and immerged in artificial saliva in pH 7 for 24 hours. 100 µl artificial saliva was exposed to human gingival fibroblast of cell culture 20.000 cells/100 µl RPMI for 24 hours. Toxicity was evaluated by MTT assay, optical density was measured using 550 nm spectrophotometer. The data was analyzed using Kruskal Wallis in 5% degree of significance. The result showed that increasing exposure duration (10, 20, 30 seconds of self etch dentin bonding will reduce the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture. It is concluded that 30 seconds-exposure of self etch dentin bonding will reduce the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture.

  18. STUDIES ON HUMAN SPERMATOZOAL MOTILITY WITH THE USE OF THE MULTIPLE EXPOSURE PHOTOGRAPHY METHOD - EFFECTS OF VARIOUS COMPOUNDS -

    OpenAIRE

    羽間, 稔

    1982-01-01

    The effects of various compounds, such as Kallikrein, 17β-estradiol, progesterone, prolactin, L-arginine, caffeine, and Solcoseryl, on sperm motility were studied. These compounds were added to fresh human semen offered by 28 volunteers who had presented with various findings, and the percentage of motile sperm and spermatozoal velocity were evaluated by objective semen analysis with the new multiple exposure photography (MEP) method using a stroboscope for photography and a computer for data...

  19. Effects of maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposure on CEM T-lymphoblastoid human cell growth and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, K.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields similar to those produced by maglev vehicles (combined ac and dc components) was studied for the ability to alter cell growth and chemically induced cellular differentiation processes in cultured human CEM Tlymphoblastoid leukemia cells. A series of continuous and intermittent magnetic field (MF) exposures for varying lengths of time were tested at intensities up to 7-fold greater than that produced by the German TR07 maglev vehicle. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or mycophenolic acid were used to induce cell differentiation. Changes in cell number, morphology, and fluorescence expression of antigenic markers of differentiation were monitored. The results indicated that maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposures up to 2 gauss had little effect on culture growth or chemically induced cellular differentiation when exposed to maglev-spectrum magnetic fields compared to chemically treated but MF-unexposed controls.

  20. Sister chromatid exchange in human populations: the effect of smoking, drug treatment, and occupational exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B.; Bredberg, A.; McKenzie, W.; Sten, M.

    1982-01-01

    Increased rate of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in peripheral lymphocytes has been observed in smokers as compared to nonsmokers and in patients receiving certain cytostatic drugs. The increased SCE frequency in smokers was shown to depend on the number of cigarettes smoked per day, as well as on the duration of smoking. DNA cross-links caused by photochemotherapy against psoriasis, 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA irradiation (PUVA), as well as by the anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent CCNU, were shown to be more effective at inducing SCE's than other types of DNA damage caused by these treatments. These observations suggest that SCE analysis may be used as an indicator of genotoxic exposure in vivo, provided that the various types of DNA damage caused by genotoxic agents and the dose, as well as the time of exposure in relation to the time of sampling, are considered.

  1. Effects of 3G cell phone exposure on the structure and function of the human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanvir, Shazia; Thuróczy, György; Selmaoui, Brahim; Silva Pires Antonietti, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Lévêque, Philippe; Pulvin, Sylviane; de Seze, René

    2016-10-01

    Cell phones increase exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Whether EMFs exert specific effects on biological systems remains debatable. This study investigated the effect of cell phone exposure on the structure and function of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). CPR plays a key role in the electron transfer to cytochrome P450, which takes part in a wide range of oxidative metabolic reactions in various organisms from microbes to humans. Human CPR was exposed for 60min to 1966-MHz RF inside a transverse electromagnetic cell (TEM-cell) placed in an incubator. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was 5W·kg(-1). Conformation changes have been detected through fluorescent spectroscopy of flavin and tryptophan residues, and investigated through circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and microelectrophoresis. These showed that CPR was narrowed. By using cytochrome C reductase activity to assess the electron flux through the CPR, the Michaelis Menten constant (Km) and the maximum initial velocity (Vmax) decreased by 22% as compared with controls. This change was due to small changes in the tertiary and secondary structures of the protein at 37°C. The relevance of these findings to an actual RF exposure scenario demands further biochemical and in-vivo confirmation.

  2. Effect of ultraviolet A exposure on transport of compatible organic osmolytes in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D Y; Zhang, J S

    2015-05-18

    Compatible organic osmolytes, such as betaine, myoinositol, and taurine, are involved in antioxidant defense, protein stabilization, and stress responses. This osmolyte strategy requires the expression of specific osmolyte transporters such as betaine (BGT-1), myoinositol (SMIT), and taurine (TAUT). In contrast to the kidney, keratinocytes, and neural cells, few studies have examined osmolytes in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs). We examined the expression of mRNA specific for BGT-1, SMIT, and TAUT in HLECs. In comparison to normoosmotic (305 mOsM) controls, there was a 3-5-fold time-dependent reaction of BGT-1, SMIT, and TAUT mRNA levels in HLECs exposed to hyperosmotic stress (405 mOsM). Maximal responses were obtained for BGT-1, SMIT, and TAUT mRNA expression after 3, 24 and 9 h of hyperosmotic exposure, respectively. This expression was correlated with increased osmolyte uptake. In contrast, hypoosmotic (205 mOsM) stimulation led to a significant efflux of osmolytes. Exposure to ultraviolet A (340-400 nm) radiation significantly stimulated osmolyte uptake. Increased osmolyte uptake was associated with upregulation of mRNA steady-state levels for osmolyte transporters in irradiated cells. These results demonstrate that ultraviolet A radiation leads to the accumulation of compatible organic osmolytes in HLECs as hyperosmotic pressure, which can maintain cellular environmental homeostasis.

  3. Effects of exposure to noise and indoor air pollution on human perception and symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witterseh, Thomas; Wargocki, Pawel; Fang, Lei

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate human perception and SBS symptoms when people are exposed simultaneously to different levels of air pollution and ventilation noise. The air quality in an office was modified by placing or removing a carpet and the background noise level...... was modified by playing a recording of ventilation noise. Thirty female subjects, six at a time, occupied the office for 4.4 hours. The subjects assessed the air quality, the noise, and the indoor environment upon entering the office and on six occasions during occupation. Furthermore, SBS symptoms...... of the occupants were recorded throughout the exposure period. During occupation, the subjects performed simulated office work. The results show that elevated air pollution and noise in an office can interact and negatively affect office workers by increasing the prevalence of SBS symptoms. A moderate increase...

  4. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE.

  5. The effect on human eye blink frequency of exposure to limonene oxidation products and methacrolein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Jacob Klenø; Christensen, Karl Bang; Wolkoff, Peder

    2005-01-01

    to LOPs and methacrolein compared to the baseline of clean air, and the findings coincided with weak eye irritation symptoms. Lowest observed effect levels were 286 ppb methacrolein and a 10-min-old LOPs mixture of initially 92 ppb limonene and 101 ppb ozone (O3), which increased the BF comparably by 18......% (p=0.001) and 17% (p=0.003), respectively. The increase in BF was smaller, although not significantly different, during exposure to LOPs at 50% RH to 20% RH in mixtures prepared from ca. 350 ppb limonene and 300 ppb O3. LOPs may cause trigeminal stimulation and possibly eye irritation at O3...

  6. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohland, Martina; Baaske, Kai; Gläser, Katharina; Hintzsche, Henning; Stopper, Helga; Kleine-Ostmann, Thomas; Schrader, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg-1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM), 1950 MHz (UMTS) and 2535 MHz (LTE). The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  7. Exposure Setup and Dosimetry for a Study on Effects of Mobile Communication Signals on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rohland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the design of an exposure setup used to study possible non-thermal effects due to the exposure of human hematopoietic stem cells to GSM, UMTS and LTE mobile communication signals. The experiments are performed under fully blinded conditions in a TEM waveguide located inside an incubator to achieve defined environmental conditions as required for the living cells. Chamber slides containing the cells in culture medium are placed on the septum of the waveguide. The environmental and exposure parameters such as signal power, temperatures, relative humidity and CO2 content of the surrounding atmosphere are monitored permanently during the exposure experiment. The power of the exposure signals required to achieve specific absorption rates of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 W kg−1 are determined by numerical calculation of the field distribution inside the cell culture medium at 900 MHz (GSM, 1950 MHz (UMTS and 2535 MHz (LTE. The dosimetry is verified both with scattering parameter measurements on the waveguide with and without containers filled with cell culture medium and with temperature measurements with non-metallic probes in separate heating experiments.

  8. Pharmacological and toxicological effects of co-exposure of human gingival fibroblasts to silver nanoparticles and sodium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona; Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Medina, Carlos; Radomski, Marek W

    2014-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and fluoride (F) are pharmacological agents widely used in oral medicine and dental practice due to their anti-microbial/anti-cavity properties. However, risks associated with the co-exposure of local cells and tissues to these xenobiotics are not clear. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of AgNPs and F co-exposure on human gingival fibroblast cells. Methods Human gingival fibroblast cells (CRL-2014) were exposed to AgNPs and/or F at different concentrations for up to 24 hours. Cellular uptake of AgNPs was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Downstream inflammatory effects and oxidative stress were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and real-time quantitative PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Finally, the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) was studied using Western blot. Results We found that AgNPs penetrated the cell membrane and localized inside the mitochondria. Co-incubation experiments resulted in increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. In addition, we found that co-exposure to both xenobiotics phosphorylated MAPK, particularly p42/44 MAPK. Conclusion A combined exposure of human fibroblasts to AgNPs and F results in increased cellular damage. Further studies are needed in order to evaluate pharmacological and potentially toxicological effects of AgNPs and F on oral health. PMID:24729703

  9. Pulsed and continuous wave mobile phone exposure over left versus right hemisphere: effects on human cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarala, Christian; Takio, Fiia; Rintee, Taija; Laine, Matti; Koivisto, Mika; Revonsuo, Antti; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2007-05-01

    The possible effects of continuous wave (CW) and pulse modulated (PM) electromagnetic field (EMF) on human cognition was studied in 36 healthy male subjects. They performed cognitive tasks while exposed to CW, PM, and sham EMF. The subjects performed the same tasks twice during each session; once with left-sided and once with right-sided exposure. The EMF conditions were spread across three testing sessions, each session separated by 1 week. The exposed hemisphere, EMF condition, and test order were counterbalanced over all subjects. We employed a double-blind design: both the subject and the experimenter were unaware of the EMF condition. The EMF was created with a signal generator connected via amplifier to a dummy phone antenna, creating a power output distribution similar to the original commercial mobile phone. The EMF had either a continuous power output of 0.25 W (CW) or pulsed power output with a mean of 0.25 W. An additional control group of 16 healthy male volunteers performed the same tasks without any exposure equipment to see if mere presence of the equipment could have affected the subjects' performance. No effects were found between the different EMF conditions, separate hemisphere exposures, or between the control and experimental group. In conclusion, the current results indicate that normal mobile phones have no discernible effect on human cognitive function as measured by behavioral tests.

  10. Effects of inhaled acid aerosols on lung mechanics: an analysis of human exposure studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Utell, M J

    1985-01-01

    There exist significant gaps in our understanding of human health effects from inhalation of pollutants associated with acid precipitation. Controlled clinical studies examine effects of criteria pollutants almost exclusively by assessing changes in lung mechanics. One constituent of acid precipitation, sulfuric acid aerosols, has been shown to induce bronchoconstriction in exercising extrinsic asthmatics at near ambient levels. These asthmatics may be an order of magnitude more sensitive to ...

  11. Exposure to bisphenol A and gender differences: from rodents to humans evidences and hypothesis about the health effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Caporossi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA interacts with the endocrine system and seems to produce different effects in relation to gender. The objective of the study was to clarify the possible health effects of exposure to BPA in relation to gender. A literature search was performed using three different search engines: Medline, PubMed and Scopus. Data on both animals and humans showed that BPA acts as a xenoestrogen and interacts with the androgens’ metabolism, producing different outcomes: uterotropic effects, decreasing sperm production, stimulation of prolactin release. Gender difference plays a key role in understanding the real toxic effects, the BPA serum concentrations were, all the time, higher in male subjects, possibly due to the difference in androgen-related enzyme activity levels, compared with the healthly female subjects, to equal levels of exposure; while higher BPA levels in women have been associated with a variety of conditions including obesity, endometrial hyperplasia, recurrent miscarriages, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. The data collected are sufficiently robust to raise concerns about the potentially deleterious impact of BPA on humans, even with some methodological limitations; the different impact of BPA in men and in women is documented and of a certain interest. In toxicology it is necessary to assess effects in relation to gender differences, in order to set up prevention plans in the work environment targeting the specific risk.

  12. Human Exposure Modeling - Databases to Support Exposure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure modeling relates pollutant concentrations in the larger environmental media to pollutant concentrations in the immediate exposure media. The models described here are available on other EPA websites.

  13. Human effect monitoring in cases of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs: a method comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevekordes, S.; Gebel, T. W.; Hellwig, M.; Dames, W.; Dunkelberg, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether DNA damage increased in subjects possibly exposed to high amounts of antineoplastic agents. METHODS: The level of genetic damage was determined in peripheral mononuclear blood cells with the sister chromatid exchange test, the alkaline elution technique, and the cytokinesis block micronucleus test. RESULTS: The supposed increased exposure of the study subjects was caused by a malfunction of a safety hood resulting in leakage of air during preparation of an infusion of an antineoplastic drug. Two months after a new safety hood was installed, the frequencies of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges of exposed nurses (n = 10) were still significantly increased when compared with a matched control group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, one sided Wilcoxon test, respectively). In a second examination seven months later, the frequency of micronuclei had significantly decreased to control values (p < 0.05, one sided Wilcoxon test, n = 6). Moreover, the study subjects who smoked (n = 8) had significantly increased frequencies of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, one sided U test, respectively). No differences in the rate of DNA damage could be detected with the alkaline elution technique. CONCLUSIONS: Control measures on the level of biological effect should be performed regularly to ensure maximum safety precautions for workers potentially exposed to genotoxic agents.   PMID:9624264

  14. The effects of brushing on human enamel surface roughness after NaF gel and theobromine gel exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahardhika, A.; Noerdin, A.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of brushing on human enamel surface roughness after different exposure times of 200 mg/L theobromine gel (8, 16, and 32 minutes) and 2% NaF gel (16 minutes). Twenty-four human upper premolars were used and divided into four groups. Group 1 was exposed to 2% NaF gel for 16 minutes. In contrast, groups 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to 200 mg/L theobromine gel for 8 minutes, 16 minutes, and 32 minutes, and each group was then brushed for 9 minutes and 20 seconds. After the treatment, samples were tested using a surface roughness tester (Mitutoyo SJ 301, Japan). The Wilcoxon test showed significant changes (p enamel surface and then increase roughness after brushing.

  15. The Adverse Effects of Heavy Metals with and without Noise Exposure on the Human Peripheral and Central Auditory System: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Castellanos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to some chemicals in the workplace can lead to occupational chemical-induced hearing loss. Attention has mainly focused on the adverse auditory effects of solvents. However, other chemicals such as heavy metals have been also identified as ototoxic agents. The aim of this work was to review the current scientific knowledge about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure with and without co-exposure to noise in humans. PubMed and Medline were accessed to find suitable articles. A total of 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. Results from the review showed that no evidence about the ototoxic effects in humans of manganese is available. Contradictory results have been found for arsenic, lead and mercury as well as for the possible interaction between heavy metals and noise. All studies found in this review have found that exposure to cadmium and mixtures of heavy metals induce auditory dysfunction. Most of the studies investigating the adverse auditory effects of heavy metals in humans have investigated human populations exposed to lead. Some of these studies suggest peripheral and central auditory dysfunction induced by lead exposure. It is concluded that further evidence from human studies about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure is still required. Despite this issue, audiologists and other hearing health care professionals should be aware of the possible auditory effects of heavy metals.

  16. The Adverse Effects of Heavy Metals with and without Noise Exposure on the Human Peripheral and Central Auditory System: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Marie-Josée; Fuente, Adrian

    2016-12-09

    Exposure to some chemicals in the workplace can lead to occupational chemical-induced hearing loss. Attention has mainly focused on the adverse auditory effects of solvents. However, other chemicals such as heavy metals have been also identified as ototoxic agents. The aim of this work was to review the current scientific knowledge about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure with and without co-exposure to noise in humans. PubMed and Medline were accessed to find suitable articles. A total of 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. Results from the review showed that no evidence about the ototoxic effects in humans of manganese is available. Contradictory results have been found for arsenic, lead and mercury as well as for the possible interaction between heavy metals and noise. All studies found in this review have found that exposure to cadmium and mixtures of heavy metals induce auditory dysfunction. Most of the studies investigating the adverse auditory effects of heavy metals in humans have investigated human populations exposed to lead. Some of these studies suggest peripheral and central auditory dysfunction induced by lead exposure. It is concluded that further evidence from human studies about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure is still required. Despite this issue, audiologists and other hearing health care professionals should be aware of the possible auditory effects of heavy metals.

  17. Building-associated neurological damage modeled in human cells: a mechanism of neurotoxic effects by exposure to mycotoxins in the indoor environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasena, Enusha; Larrañaga, Michael D; Simoni, Jan S; Douglas, David R; Straus, David C

    2010-12-01

    Damage to human neurological system cells resulting from exposure to mycotoxins confirms a previously controversial public health threat for occupants of water-damaged buildings. Leading scientific organizations disagree about the ability of inhaled mycotoxins in the indoor environment to cause adverse human health effects. Damage to the neurological system can result from exposure to trichothecene mycotoxins in the indoor environment. This study demonstrates that neurological system cell damage can occur from satratoxin H exposure to neurological cells at exposure levels that can be found in water-damaged buildings contaminated with fungal growth. The constant activation of inflammatory and apoptotic pathways at low levels of exposure in human brain capillary endothelial cells, astrocytes, and neural progenitor cells may amplify devastation to neurological tissues and lead to neurological system cell damage from indirect events triggered by the presence of trichothecenes.

  18. Human fecal and pathogen exposure pathways in rural Indian villages and the effect of increased latrine coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagiri, Mitsunori; Schriewer, Alexander; Daniels, Miles E; Wuertz, Stefan; Smith, Woutrina A; Clasen, Thomas; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Jin, Yujie; Torondel, Belen; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Jenkins, Marion W

    2016-09-01

    Efforts to eradicate open defecation and improve sanitation access are unlikely to achieve health benefits unless interventions reduce microbial exposures. This study assessed human fecal contamination and pathogen exposures in rural India, and the effect of increased sanitation coverage on contamination and exposure rates. In a cross-sectional study of 60 villages of a cluster-randomized controlled sanitation trial in Odisha, India, human and domestic animal fecal contamination was measured in community tubewells and ponds (n = 301) and via exposure pathways in homes (n = 354), using Bacteroidales microbial source tracking fecal markers validated in India. Community water sources were further tested for diarrheal pathogens (rotavirus, adenovirus and Vibrio cholerae by quantitative PCR; pathogenic Escherichia coli by multiplex PCR; Cryptosporidium and Giardia by immunomagnetic separation and direct fluorescent antibody microscopy). Exposure pathways in intervention and control villages were compared and relationships with child diarrhea examined. Human fecal markers were rarely detected in tubewells (2.4%, 95%CI: 0.3-4.5%) and ponds (5.6%, 95%CI: 0.8-10.3%), compared to homes (35.4%, 95%CI: 30.4-40.4%). In tubewells, V. cholerae was the most frequently detected pathogen (19.8%, 95%CI: 14.4-25.2%), followed by Giardia (14.8%, 95%CI: 10.0-19.7%). In ponds, Giardia was most often detected (74.5%, 95%CI: 65.7-83.3%), followed by pathogenic E. coli (48.1%, 95%CI: 34.8-61.5%) and rotavirus (44.4%, 95%CI: 34.2-54.7%). At village-level, prevalence of fecal pathogen detection in community drinking water sources was associated with elevated prevalence of child diarrhea within 6 weeks of testing (RR 2.13, 95%CI: 1.25-3.63) while within homes, higher levels of human and animal fecal marker detection were associated with increased risks of subsequent child diarrhea (P = 0.044 and 0.013, respectively). There was no evidence that the intervention, which increased

  19. CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in human lymphocytes as biomarker of exposure: effect of dioxin exposure and polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duursen, M. van; Sanderson, T.; Berg, M. van den [Inst. for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-09-15

    There are several known genetic polymorphisms of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes. A polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the CYP1A1 gene (CYP1A1 MspI or CYP1A1 m1) is often studied in relation with breast or lung cancer, but little is known about the functional effect of this polymorphism. An amino acid substitution in codon 432 (Val to Leu) of the CYP1B1 gene is associated with a lower catalytic activity of the enzyme. However, the involvement of these polymorphisms on the inducibility of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression is unclear. CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA expression levels can be determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes. This makes them potential candidates for use as biomarker of exposure to environmental compounds. Interindividual variations in mRNA expression patterns, catalytic activity and polymorphisms are very important factors when CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression patterns are used as biomarker of exposure, but little is known about it. Spencer et al. showed a concentration-dependent increase of CYP1B1 mRNA in lymphocytes upon exposure in vitro to 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD), the most potent dioxin. Yet, only a few studies describe the in vivo correlation between polymorphisms, mRNA expression level and exposure to environmental factors. In this study, we wanted to obtain a better insight in the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA expression and enzyme activity in human lymphocytes. We determined the constitutive CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA expression in lymphocytes of ten healthy volunteers and the variability in sensitivity toward enzyme induction by TCDD. Further, the CYP1A1 m1 and CYP1B1 Val432Leu polymorphisms were determined.

  20. Cellular and molecular effects of 1GeV/n iron ion exposure on post-mitotic human neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Peter; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Guida, Peter; Kim, Angela

    During space travel, astronauts will be exposed to high energy, high atomic number (HZE) radiation. The potential for damage to cells of the central nervous system following exposure to HZE particle radiation has been characterized as a potential critical risk. Unfortunately, there are very few working model systems of human neurons and as a result, data describing the effects of HZE radiation on them is scarce. To begin risk assessment studies, we utilized an in vitro model consisting of terminally differentiated, post-mitotic human neurons (hNT cells). Previous studies have shown that transplantation of these cells into numerous rodent models of neurological diseases has resulted in successful mitigation of the related disorders, thereby demonstrating their functional relevance. Following exposure of these cells to 1GeV/n Fe ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, we measured the induction and repair of DNA damage (as revealed by g-H2AX foci), cytotoxicity, gene expression changes, and the induction of apoptosis and its pharmacological reduction. Fluorescence microscopy techniques revealed that there was a dose-dependent induction of g- H2AX foci in hNT cells, with a peak effect 4 hours after exposure (which is significantly longer than for reports using mitotic cells). DNA repair was evident in that the levels of g-H2AX foci were reduced to those in unirradiated cells by 24 hours post-irradiation. Cytotoxicity was also induced in a dose-dependent manner as detected by the fluorescent-based Live/Dead assay. Analysis of the status of the apoptosis-inducing gene p53 showed that the levels of this protein increased significantly 4-8 hours after exposure to Fe ions. By 3 days post-irradiation, annexin V staining demonstrated a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in the hNT cells. Pre-treatment with two different concentrations of the growth factor TGF-b were effective in reducing the levels of Fe ion-induced apoptosis to statistically significant degrees.

  1. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta; Neumann, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR) affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures. PMID:24398983

  2. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta Sokolov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy doses of ionizing radiation (IR affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures.

  3. In vitro Catecholamine Exposure Produces Variable Effects on the B7 Costimulatory Pathway in Human Monocytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicru, A. N.; Crucian, B.; Sams, Clarence; Actor, J. K.; Marshall, G. D., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Catecholamines have been associated with immunomodulation of the adaptive immune system towards a Th2 response in vitro. We therefore examined the role of in vitro epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) exposure on the B7 costimulatory expression of antigen presenting cells (APC) from human monocytic cell lines and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). THP1 monocytic cells and CD14+ cells from normal human PBMC were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and incubated with physiologic stress levels (10(exp -6) - 10(exp -8)M) of EPI or NE for 24 hours. Cells were subsequently stained with CD80 FITC, CD86 PE, and CD14 PC5 antibodies and analyzed by flow cytometry for changes in fluorescence and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Exposure of THP1 to EPI in vitro at concentrations of 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8)M significantly decreased mean CD80 from 42 plus or minus 0.7% to 11 plus or minus 0.44%, 19.1 plus or minus 2.0%, and 30.7 plus or minus 2.1% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). In addition, CD86 expression increased with EPI at 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8) M from 9.2 plus or minus 0.52% to 41 plus or minus 3.8%, 26.4 plus or minus 1.9%, and 15.74 plus or minus 1.8% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). Similar results for mean CD80 and CD86 percent expression were observed for CD14+ cells from PBMC with a sample size of N = 6 and for NE when substituted for EPI. The data show that in vitro exposure to catecholamines significantly decreases %CD86 expression and significantly increases %CD86 expression in THP1 cells and human CD14+ APC. Previous studies have suggested an association between increased CD86 expression and TH2 activity. Thus, these data suggest that immunomodulation by catecholamines results in part by the variable effects of the B7 costimulatory pathway in APC.

  4. A translatable predictor of human radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Lucas

    Full Text Available Terrorism using radiological dirty bombs or improvised nuclear devices is recognized as a major threat to both public health and national security. In the event of a radiological or nuclear disaster, rapid and accurate biodosimetry of thousands of potentially affected individuals will be essential for effective medical management to occur. Currently, health care providers lack an accurate, high-throughput biodosimetric assay which is suitable for the triage of large numbers of radiation injury victims. Here, we describe the development of a biodosimetric assay based on the analysis of irradiated mice, ex vivo-irradiated human peripheral blood (PB and humans treated with total body irradiation (TBI. Interestingly, a gene expression profile developed via analysis of murine PB radiation response alone was inaccurate in predicting human radiation injury. In contrast, generation of a gene expression profile which incorporated data from ex vivo irradiated human PB and human TBI patients yielded an 18-gene radiation classifier which was highly accurate at predicting human radiation status and discriminating medically relevant radiation dose levels in human samples. Although the patient population was relatively small, the accuracy of this classifier in discriminating radiation dose levels in human TBI patients was not substantially confounded by gender, diagnosis or prior exposure to chemotherapy. We have further incorporated genes from this human radiation signature into a rapid and high-throughput chemical ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (CLPA which was able to discriminate radiation dose levels in a pilot study of ex vivo irradiated human blood and samples from human TBI patients. Our results illustrate the potential for translation of a human genetic signature for the diagnosis of human radiation exposure and suggest the basis for further testing of CLPA as a candidate biodosimetric assay.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO TOLUENE DIISOCYANATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVIA ANCA RUSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of human exposure to toluene diisocyanate. Toluene diisocyanate (TDI, an aromatic compound, may be dangerous for human health. Diisocyanates have wide industrial use in the fabrication of flexible and rigid foams, fibers, elastomers, and coatings such as paints and varnishes. Isocyanates are known skin and respiratory sensitizers, and proper engineering controls should be in place to prevent exposure to isocyanate liquid and vapor; exposure to TDI vapors is well documented to increase asthma risk. The study focused on the exposure of workers and nearby populations to toluene diisocyanate in a Polyurethane Foam Factory located in Baia Mare, Romania. Workplace air measurements were performed in different departments of the plant, after sampling either in fixed points or as personal monitoring. Sampling in four different locations of Baia Mare town was carried out, - during and after the foaming process. TDI sampling was performed on silica cartridge followed by GC-MS analysis. TDI concentration at workplace was lower than 0,035 mg/m³, which represents the permissible exposure limit, while in the city the TDI concentration had shown values below 0,20 μg/m³. Health assessment of a group of 49 workers was based on questionnaire interview, determination of TDI antibodies and lung function tests. Data collected until this stage do not show any negative effects of TDI on the employees health. Since this plant had only recently begun operating, continuous workplace and ambient air TDI monitoring, along with workers health surveillance, is deemed necessary.

  6. Human health effects associated with exposure to toxic Cyanobacteria – what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide, as warming water and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. As awareness of toxic cyanobacteria blooms increases, reports of associated human and animal illnesses have also increased, but ...

  7. Early Exposure to Soy Isoflavones and Effects on Reproductive Health: A Review of Human and Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy E. Ward

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Soy isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potential hormonal activity due to their similar chemical structure to 17-β-estradiol. The increasing availability of soy isoflavones throughout the food supply and through use of supplements has prompted extensive research on biological benefits to humans in chronic disease prevention and health maintenance. While much of this research has focused on adult populations, infants fed soy protein based infant formulas are exposed to substantial levels of soy isoflavones, even when compared to adult populations that consume a higher quantity of soy-based foods. Infant exposure, through soy formula, primarily occurs from birth to one year of life, a stage of development that is particularly sensitive to dietary and environmental compounds. This has led investigators to study the potential hormonal effects of soy isoflavones on later reproductive health outcomes. Such studies have included minimal human data with the large majority of studies using animal models. This review discusses key aspects of the current human and animal studies and identifies critical areas to be investigated as there is no clear consensus in this research field.

  8. Early exposure to soy isoflavones and effects on reproductive health: a review of human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsdale, Elsa C; Ward, Wendy E

    2010-11-01

    Soy isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potential hormonal activity due to their similar chemical structure to 17-β-estradiol. The increasing availability of soy isoflavones throughout the food supply and through use of supplements has prompted extensive research on biological benefits to humans in chronic disease prevention and health maintenance. While much of this research has focused on adult populations, infants fed soy protein based infant formulas are exposed to substantial levels of soy isoflavones, even when compared to adult populations that consume a higher quantity of soy-based foods. Infant exposure, through soy formula, primarily occurs from birth to one year of life, a stage of development that is particularly sensitive to dietary and environmental compounds. This has led investigators to study the potential hormonal effects of soy isoflavones on later reproductive health outcomes. Such studies have included minimal human data with the large majority of studies using animal models. This review discusses key aspects of the current human and animal studies and identifies critical areas to be investigated as there is no clear consensus in this research field.

  9. Effects of Exposure to Carbon Dioxide and Human Bioeffluents on Cognitive Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    including proof-reading, addition, subtraction, text typing, neurobehavioral tests, Tsai-Partington task, and d2 attention task. Subjective ratings of comfort and experienced acute health symptoms were collected, physiological responses of subjects were monitored and the saliva samples were collected...... to analyze stress biomarkers. The results show that during exposure to bioeffluents with CO2 reaching 3,000 ppm speed of addition was significantly reduced, subjects responded significantly quicker in redirection task and completed significantly less correct links in Tsai-partington test, which may imply...

  10. Proteins involved in the Vroman effect during exposure of human blood plasma to glass and polyethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turbill, P.; Beugeling, T.; Poot, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The amounts of fibrinogen adsorbed to glass from various human blood plasmas have been measured as a function of time. The plasmas were 11 single donor plasmas, pooled plasma, a single donor high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK)-deficient plasma and HMWK-deficient plasma, which had been reconstitut

  11. The effect of oxythioquinox exposure on normal human mammary epithelial cell gene expression: A microarray analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weston Ainsley

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inter-individual variation in normal human mammary epithelial cells in response to oxythioquinox (OTQ is reported. Gene expression signatures resulting from chemical exposures are generally created from analysis of exposures in rat, mouse or other genetically similar animal models, limiting information about inter-individual variations. This study focused on the effect of inter-individual variation in gene expression signatures. Methods Gene expression was studied in primary normal human mammary epithelial cells (NHMECs derived from four women undergoing reduction mammoplasty [Cooperative Human Tissue Network (National Cancer Institute and National Disease Research Interchange]. Gene transcription in each cell strain was analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (HuGeneFL, Affymetrix™ and changes in the expression of selected genes were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction at extended time points (ABI. DNA microarrays were hybridized to materials prepared from total RNA that was collected after OTQ treatment for 15, 60 and 120 min. RNA was harvested from the vehicle control (DMSO at 120 min. The gene expression profile included all genes altered by at least a signal log ratio (SLR of ± 0.6 and p value ≤ 0.05 in three of four cell strains analyzed. Results RNA species were clustered in various patterns of expression highlighting genes with altered expression in one or more of the cell strains, including metabolic enzymes and transcription factors. Of the clustered RNA species, only 36 were found to be altered at one time point in three or more of the cell strains analyzed (13 up-regulated, 23 down-regulated. Cluster analysis examined the effects of OTQ on the cells with specific p53 polymorphisms. The two strains expressing the major variant of p53 had 83 common genes altered (35 increased, 48 decreased at one or more time point by at least a 0.6 signal log ratio (SLR. The intermediate variant

  12. Effects of exposure to noise and indoor air pollution on human perception and symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witterseh, Thomas; Wargocki, Pawel; Fang, Lei

    1999-01-01

    was modified by playing a recording of ventilation noise. Thirty female subjects, six at a time, occupied the office for 4.4 hours. The subjects assessed the air quality, the noise, and the indoor environment upon entering the office and on six occasions during occupation. Furthermore, SBS symptoms......The objective of the present study was to investigate human perception and SBS symptoms when people are exposed simultaneously to different levels of air pollution and ventilation noise. The air quality in an office was modified by placing or removing a carpet and the background noise level...

  13. Dietary Supplementation with Olive Oil or Fish Oil and Vascular Effects of Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Olive oil (OO) and fish oil (FO) supplements have beneficial effects on endothelial function. Objective: In this study we evaluated the efficacy of...

  14. Dietary Supplementation with Olive Oil or Fish Oil and Vascular Effects of Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Olive oil (OO) and fish oil (FO) supplements have beneficial effects on endothelial function. Objective: In this study we evaluated the efficacy of...

  15. Effect of a retention interval between pre-exposure and conditioning on latent inhibition in humans using a blink conditioning procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Casa Rivas, Luis Gonzalo; Traverso Arcos, Luis Miguel; Márquez Zamora, Raúl

    2010-11-01

    Latent inhibition, retarded learning after pre-exposure to the to-be-conditioned stimulus, was examined using a blink conditioned procedure in humans. Experiment 1 showed that the procedure is suited to inducing the latent inhibition effect. In Experiment 2, the introduction of a 3-minute interval between pre-exposure and conditioning phases attenuated latent inhibition. These results contribute to identify the mechanisms involved in pre-exposure and subsequent conditioning of a stimulus, which is particularly important if we bear in mind that latent inhibition has been used repeatedly as an instrument to analyze the course of attentional processes in normal and pathological populations.

  16. Effects of Long-Term Exposure to 60 GHz Millimeter-Wavelength Radiation on the Genotoxicity and Heat Shock Protein (Hsp Expression of Cells Derived from Human Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Koyama

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal epithelial (HCE-T and human lens epithelial (SRA01/04 cells derived from the human eye were exposed to 60 gigahertz (GHz millimeter-wavelength radiation for 24 h. There was no statistically significant increase in the micronucleus (MN frequency in cells exposed to 60 GHz millimeter-wavelength radiation at 1 mW/cm2 compared with sham-exposed controls and incubator controls. The MN frequency of cells treated with bleomycin for 1 h provided positive controls. The comet assay, used to detect DNA strand breaks, and heat shock protein (Hsp expression also showed no statistically significant effects of exposure. These results indicate that exposure to millimeter-wavelength radiation has no effect on genotoxicity in human eye cells.

  17. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures/ Gezondheidseffecten van lage blootstellingniveaus [International workshop: Influence of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation on human and ecological health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-11-26

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of

  18. Comparison of the effects of continuous and pulsed mobile phone like RF exposure on the human EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perentos, N; Croft, R J; McKenzie, R J; Cvetkovic, D; Cosic, I

    2007-12-01

    It is not clear yet whether Global System for Mobiles (GSM) mobile phone radiation has the ability to interfere with normal resting brain function. There have been reports that GSM exposure increases alpha band power, and does so only when the signal is modulated at low frequencies (Huber, R., Treyer, V., Borbely, A. A., Schuderer, J., Gottselig, J. M., Landolt, H.P., Werth, E., Berthold,T., Kuster, N., Buck, A and Achermann, P. Electromagnetic fields, such as those from mobile phones, alter regional cerebral blood flow and sleep and waking EEG. J Sleep Res 11, 289-295, 2002.) However, as that research employed exposure distributions that are not typical of normal GSM handset usage (deep brain areas were overexposed), it remains to be determined whether a similar result patterning would arise from a more representative exposure. In this fully counterbalanced cross-over design, we recruited 12 participants and tried to replicate the modulation linked post exposure alpha band power increase described above, but with an exposure source (dipole antenna) more closely resembling that of a real GSM handset. Exposures lasted for 15 minutes. No changes to alpha power were found for either modulated or unmodulated radiofrequency fields, and thus we failed to replicate the above results. Possible reasons for this failure to replicate are discussed, with the main reason argued to be the lower and more representative exposure distribution employed in the present study. In addition we investigated the possible GSM exposure related effects on the non-linear features of the resting electroencephalogram using the Approximate Entropy (ApEn) method of analysis. Again, no effect was demonstrated for either modulated or unmodulated radiofrequency exposures.

  19. Human pharmaceuticals in the marine environment: Focus on exposure and biological effects in animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Elena; Franzellitti, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Marine waters have been poorly investigated for the occurrence of pharmaceutical contamination. Recent data confirm that pharmaceuticals occur widely in marine and coastal environments; therefore, assessment of potential risk to marine species needs further efforts. The present study represents the first extensive review of pharmaceutical contamination in marine environments addressing the effects on the marine biota analyzed at the molecular, cellular, and individual levels. Because pharmaceuticals differ from conventional pollutants, being designed to interact with specific physiological pathways at low doses, the most recent evidence on modes of action and physiological alterations on marine animal species are discussed. Data on spatial distributions of pharmaceuticals in waters and sediments, as well as bioaccumulation rates, are also presented. The present review also seeks to expand knowledge of how the quality of coastal and marine environments could be efficiently monitored to anticipate possible health and environmental risks.

  20. The occurrence of hazardous volatile elements and nanoparticles in Bulgarian coal fly ashes and the effect on human health exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luis F.O., E-mail: lfsoliveira@univates.br [Centro Universitario Univates, Pro Reitoria de Pesquisa Estensao e Pos Graduacao, Programa de Pos Graduacao Ambiente e Desenvolvimento (Brazil); Environmental Science and Nanotechnology Department, Catarinense Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development - IPADHC, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); DaBoit, Katia [Department of Environmental Medicine, Catarinense Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development - IPADHC, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Sampaio, Carlos H. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, Bairro Agronomia, CEP: 91501-970, Porto Alegre - RS (Brazil); Jasper, Andre [Centro Universitario Univates, Pro Reitoria de Pesquisa Estensao e Pos Graduacao, Programa de Pos Graduacao Ambiente e Desenvolvimento (Brazil); Andrade, Maria L. [Department of Plant Biology and Soil Science, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Kostova, Irena J. [Sofia University ' St. Kliment Ohridski' , Department of Geology, Paleontology and Fossil Fuels, 15, Tzar Osvoboditel Blvd., 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); and others

    2012-02-01

    Low-rank, high-mineral matter Bulgarian coals were studied using a variety of chemical, optical, and electron beam methods. The larger fly ash carbon phases include charred carbons in contrast to coked carbons present in the fly ashes of bituminous-coal-derived fly ashes. Nanoscale carbons include multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) encapsulating Hg, Se, and As, among other elements. In addition to the glass which dominates the fly ash, relatively coarse 'rock fragments', consisting of an unmelted to partially melted core surrounded by a glassy rim, are present in the fly ash. Nano-scale minerals can contain hazardous elements and, along with metal-bearing multiwalled nanotubes, can be a path for the entry of hazardous particles into the lungs and other organs. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model Bulgarian power plants which have regulated minerals nanoparticles can contain hazardous elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study changes in the level of information about nanominerals importance and the effect on human health exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing information will increase quality if power plants procedures are similar.

  1. No Effects of Acute Exposure to Wi-Fi Electromagnetic Fields on Spontaneous EEG Activity and Psychomotor Vigilance in Healthy Human Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentai, Norbert; Csathó, Árpád; Trunk, Attila; Fiocchi, Serena; Parazzini, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2015-12-01

    Mobile equipment use of wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) signal modulation has increased exponentially in the past few decades. However, there is inconclusive scientific evidence concerning the potential risks associated with the energy deposition in the brain from Wi-Fi and whether Wi-Fi electromagnetism interacts with cognitive function. In this study we investigated possible neurocognitive effects caused by Wi-Fi exposure. First, we constructed a Wi-Fi exposure system from commercial parts. Dosimetry was first assessed by free space radiofrequency field measurements. The experimental exposure system was then modeled based on real geometry and physical characteristics. Specific absorption rate (SAR) calculations were performed using a whole-body, realistic human voxel model with values corresponding to conventional everyday Wi-Fi exposure (peak SAR10g level was 99.22 mW/kg with 1 W output power and 100% duty cycle). Then, in two provocation experiments involving healthy human volunteers we tested for two hypotheses: 1. Whether a 60 min long 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi exposure affects the spectral power of spontaneous awake electroencephalographic (sEEG) activity (N = 25); and 2. Whether similar Wi-Fi exposure modulates the sustained attention measured by reaction time in a computerized psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) (N = 19). EEG data were recorded at midline electrode sites while volunteers watched a silent documentary. In the PVT task, button press reaction time was recorded. No measurable effects of acute Wi-Fi exposure were found on spectral power of sEEG or reaction time in the psychomotor vigilance test. These results indicate that a single, 60 min Wi-Fi exposure does not alter human oscillatory brain function or objective measures of sustained attention.

  2. Detailed diesel exhaust characteristics including particle surface area and lung deposited dose for better understanding of health effects in human chamber exposure studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicka, Aneta; Nilsson, Patrik T.; Rissler, Jenny; Sallsten, Gerd; Xu, Yiyi; Pagels, Joakim H.; Albin, Maria; Österberg, Kai; Strandberg, Bo; Eriksson, Axel; Bohgard, Mats; Bergemalm-Rynell, Kerstin; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Several diesel exhaust (DE) characteristics, comprising both particle and gas phase, recognized as important when linking with health effects, are not reported in human chamber exposure studies. In order to understand effects of DE on humans there is a need for better characterization of DE when performing exposure studies. The aim of this study was to determine and quantify detailed DE characteristics during human chamber exposure. Additionally to compare to reported DE properties in conducted human exposures. A wide battery of particle and gas phase measurement techniques have been used to provide detailed DE characteristics including the DE particles (DEP) surface area, fraction and dose deposited in the lungs, chemical composition of both particle and gas phase such as NO, NO2, CO, CO2, volatile organic compounds (including aldehydes, benzene, toluene) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eyes, nose and throat irritation effects were determined. Exposure conditions with PM1 (<1 μm) mass concentration 280 μg m-3, number concentration 4 × 105 cm-3 and elemental to total carbon fraction of 82% were generated from a diesel vehicle at idling. When estimating the lung deposited dose it was found that using the size dependent effective density (in contrast to assuming unity density) reduced the estimated respiratory dose by 132% by mass. Accounting for agglomerated structure of DEP prevented underestimation of lung deposited dose by surface area by 37% in comparison to assuming spherical particles. Comparison of DE characteristics reported in conducted chamber exposures showed that DE properties vary to a great extent under the same DEP mass concentration and engine load. This highlights the need for detailed and standardized approach for measuring and reporting of DE properties. Eyes irritation effects, most probably caused by aldehydes in the gas phase, as well as nose irritation were observed at exposure levels below current occupational exposure limit

  3. Effects of chronic triclosan exposure upon the antimicrobial susceptibility of 40 ex-situ environmental and human isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledder, R G; Gilbert, P; Willis, C; McBain, A J

    2006-05-01

    Triclosan (TCS) exposure of Escherichia coli selects for tolerant clones, mutated in their enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI). It has been inferred that this phenomenon is widespread amongst bacterial genera and might be associated with resistance to third party agents. Ex-situ, low passage isolates of enteric, human axilla, human oral origin and bacteria isolated from a domestic drain, together with selected type cultures were exposed to escalating concentrations of TCS over 10 passages using a gradient plate technique. One fresh faecal isolate of E. coli was included as a positive control. TCS susceptibility was determined for all strains before and after exposure, whilst enteric isolates were additionally assessed for susceptibility towards chlorhexidine, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, and the oral isolates towards chlorhexidine, tetracycline and metronidazole. Triclosan exposure of E. coli markedly decreased TCS susceptibility. TCS susceptibility also decreased for Klebsiella oxytoca, Aranicola proteolyticus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Susceptibility of the remaining 35 strains to TCS and the other test agents remained unchanged. These data suggest that selection for high level resistance by TCS exposure is not widespread and appears to be confined to certain enteric bacteria, especially E. coli. Change in TCS susceptibility did not affect susceptibility towards chemically unrelated antimicrobials. Acquired high-level TCS resistance is not a widespread phenomenon.

  4. [Human exposure to trihalomethanes in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, M Y; Midio, A F

    1999-08-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbon compounds, some of them recognized as carcinogenic to different animal species can be found in drinking water. Chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform are the most important trihalomethanes found in potable water. They are produced in natural waters during chlorinated desinfection by the halogenation of precursors, specially humic and fulvic compounds. The review, in the MEDLINE covers the period from 1974 to 1998, presents the general aspects of the formation of trihalomethanes, sources of human exposure and their toxicological meaning for exposed organisms: toxicokinetic disposition and spectrum of toxic effects (carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic).

  5. Response of Urban Systems to Climate Change in Europe: Heat Stress Exposure and the Effect on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Catherine; Thomas, Bart; Grommen, Mart

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is driven by global processes such as the global ocean circulation and its variability over time leading to changing weather patterns on regional scales as well as changes in the severity and occurrence of extreme events such as heavy rain- and windstorms, floods, drought, heat waves, etc. The summer 2003 European heat wave was the hottest summer on record in Europe over the past centuries leading to health crises in several countries like France and caused up to 70.000 excess deaths over four months in Central and Western Europe. The main risks induced by global climate change in urbanised areas are considered to be overheating and resulting health effects, increased exposure to flood events, increased damage losses from extreme weather conditions but also shortages in the provision of life-sustaining services. Moreover, the cities themselves create specific or inherent risks and urban adaptation is often very demanding. As most of Europe's inhabitants live in cities, it is of particular relevance to examine the impact of climate variability on urban areas and their populations. The present study focusses on the identification of heat stress variables related to human health and the extraction of this information by processing daily temperature statistics of local urban climate simulations over multiple timeframes of 20 years and three different European cities based on recent, near future and far future global climate predictions. The analyses have been conducted in the framework of the NACLIM FP7 project funded by the European Commission involving local stakeholders such as the cities of Antwerp (Belgium), Berlin (Germany) and Almada (Portugal) represented by different climate and urban characteristics. Apart from the urban-rural temperature increment (urban heat island effect), additional heat stress parameters such as the average number of heat wave days together with their duration and intensities have been covered during this research. In a

  6. The importance of diet on exposure to and effects of persistent organic pollutants on human health in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odland, Jon Øyvind; Deutch, Bente; Hansen, Jens C.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To describe the importance of diet on exposure to and possible health effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Arctic. METHODS: The study is based on a literature review. RESULTS: Minor decreases in POPs and minor increases in Hg levels in Arctic populations in Greenland, Eastern...

  7. Community Engagement in Observational Human Exposure Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although observational human exposure studies do not deliberately expose participants to chemicals or environmental conditions, merely involving people as research participants and conducting research inside homes raises ethical issues. Community engagement offers a promising st...

  8. PARTNERING TO IMPROVE HUMAN EXPOSURE METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods development research is an application-driven scientific area that addresses programmatic needs. The goals are to reduce measurement uncertainties, address data gaps, and improve existing analytical procedures for estimating human exposures. Partnerships have been develop...

  9. Phthalates - widespread occurrence and the effect on male gametes. Part 1. General characteristics, sources and human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyńska, Małgorzata M

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are widely present in human environment. Widespead exposure to those agents, which are compounds of numerous daily use products, is unavoidable. In the current paper following phthalates benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP), di- n-butyl phthalate (DBP), di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) are described. Phthalates mainly enter to the composition of plastic goods, like boxes and containers for storage of foods, toys, medical devices, and also cosmetics, personal care products, as well as paints, vanishes, printing inks. This paper describes the occurence of individual phthalates in the environment (water, air) and in different products. During production, transportation, manufacturing of goods and improper disposal, phthalates released into soil, water and air. For example indoor air included 13 mg/m3 phthalates, where 72 % of all constitutes DEP (2.29 mg/m(3)), BBP (3.97 mg/m(3)) and DEHP (2.43 mg/m(3)). Exposure to phthalates take place mainly by ingestion or inhalation air or through the skin. Presence of phthalates were observed in numerous food products and is connected with migration of those compounds from food storage containers to preserved food. They could mirgate to salivia during sucking and chewing of toys and this way increased exposure to of children. The results of studies regarding to concentration of phthalates in human tissues and excretions are also described. The level of phthalates were measured in numerous of human biological samples. For example, DEHP, DEP and DBP were detected at levels of 5.71 mg/L in blood serum, of 0.30 mg/L in semen and of 0.72 mg/kg in fat samples.

  10. Dioxin exposure of human CD34+ hemopoietic cells induces gene expression modulation that recapitulates its in vivo clinical and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchiolla, Nicola Stefano; Todoerti, Katia; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Servida, Federica; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana; Colombi, Antonio; Cecilia Pesatori, Angela; Neri, Antonino; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2011-04-28

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has a large number of biological effects, including skin, cardiovascular, neurologic diseases, diabetes, infertility, cancers and immunotoxicity. We analysed the in vitro TCDD effects on human CD34+ cells and tested the gene expression modulation by means of microarray analyses before and after TCDD exposure. We identified 257 differentially modulated probe sets, identifying 221 well characterized genes. A large part of these resulted associated to cell adhesion and/or angiogenesis and to transcription regulation. Synaptic transmission and visual perception functions, with the particular involvement of the GABAergic pathway were also significantly modulated. Numerous transcripts involved in cell cycle or cell proliferation, immune response, signal transduction, ion channel activity or calcium ion binding, tissue development and differentiation, female or male fertility or in several metabolic pathways were also affected after dioxin exposure. The transcriptional profile induced by TCDD treatment on human CD34+ cells strikingly reproduces the clinical and biological effects observed in individuals exposed to dioxin and in biological experimental systems. Our data support a role of dioxin in the neoplastic transformation of hemopoietic stem cells and in immune modulation processes after in vivo exposure, as indicated by the epidemiologic data in dioxin accidentally exposed populations, providing a molecular basis for it. In addition, TCDD alters genes associated to glucidic and lipidic metabolisms, to GABAergic transmission or involved in male and female fertility, thus providing a possible explanation of the diabetogenic, dyslipidemic, neurologic and fertility effects induced by TCDD in vivo exposure.

  11. Neurobehavioral effects of developmental methylmercury exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, S.G.; Grant-Webster, K.S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global environmental problem and is listed by the International Program of Chemical Safety as one of the six most dangerous chemicals in the world`s environment. Human exposure to MeHg primarily occurs through the consumption of contaminated food such as fish, although catastrophic exposures due to industrial pollution have occurred. The fetus is particularly sensitive to MeHg exposure and adverse effects on infant development have been associated with levels of exposure that result in few, if any, signs of maternal clinical illness or toxicity. High levels of prenatal exposure in humans result in neurobehavioral effects such as cerebral palsy and severe mental retardation. Prenatal exposure to MeHg in communities with chronic low-level exposure is related to decreased birthweight and early sensorimotor dysfunction such as delayed onset of walking. Neurobehavioral alterations have also been documented in studies with non human primates and rodents. Available information on the developmental neurotoxic effects of MeHg, particularly the neurobehavioral effects, indicates that the fetus and infant are more sensitive to adverse effects of MEHg. It is therefore recommended that pregnant women and women of childbearing age be strongly advised to limit their exposure to potential sources of MeHg. Based on results from human and animal studies on the developmental neurotoxic effects of methylmercury, the accepted reference dose should be lowered to 0.025 to 0.06 MeHg {mu}g/kg/day. Continued research on the neurotoxic effects associated with low level developmental exposure is needed. 107 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, A. Shabestani; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation.

  13. Effects of concurrent caffeine and mobile phone exposure on local target probability processing in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Attila Trunk; Gábor Stefanics; Norbert Zentai; Ivett Bacskay; Attila Felinger; György Thuróczy; István Hernádi

    2015-01-01

    Millions of people use mobile phones (MP) while drinking coffee or other caffeine containing beverages. Little is known about the potential combined effects of MP irradiation and caffeine on cognitive functions. Here we investigated whether caffeine intake and concurrent exposure to Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) MP-like irradiation may interactively influence neuro-cognitive function in an active visual oddball paradigm. In a full factorial experimental design, 25 particip...

  14. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Mølhave, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung...... function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m3 (low) and 400 µg/m3 (high) under controlled environmental conditions.......0007), “irritative body perceptions” (p = 0.0127), “psychological/neurological effects” (p = 0.0075) and “weak inflammatory responses” (p = 0.0003). Furthermore, significant effects (p = 0.0192) on self-reported general mucosa irritation were found. In conclusion, exposure to wood smoke affected symptom rating...

  15. Principles for characterizing the potential human health effects from exposure to nanomaterials: elements of a screening strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai David

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapid proliferation of many different engineered nanomaterials (defined as materials designed and produced to have structural features with at least one dimension of 100 nanometers or less presents a dilemma to regulators regarding hazard identification. The International Life Sciences Institute Research Foundation/Risk Science Institute convened an expert working group to develop a screening strategy for the hazard identification of engineered nanomaterials. The working group report presents the elements of a screening strategy rather than a detailed testing protocol. Based on an evaluation of the limited data currently available, the report presents a broad data gathering strategy applicable to this early stage in the development of a risk assessment process for nanomaterials. Oral, dermal, inhalation, and injection routes of exposure are included recognizing that, depending on use patterns, exposure to nanomaterials may occur by any of these routes. The three key elements of the toxicity screening strategy are: Physicochemical Characteristics, In Vitro Assays (cellular and non-cellular, and In Vivo Assays. There is a strong likelihood that biological activity of nanoparticles will depend on physicochemical parameters not routinely considered in toxicity screening studies. Physicochemical properties that may be important in understanding the toxic effects of test materials include particle size and size distribution, agglomeration state, shape, crystal structure, chemical composition, surface area, surface chemistry, surface charge, and porosity. In vitro techniques allow specific biological and mechanistic pathways to be isolated and tested under controlled conditions, in ways that are not feasible in in vivo tests. Tests are suggested for portal-of-entry toxicity for lungs, skin, and the mucosal membranes, and target organ toxicity for endothelium, blood, spleen, liver, nervous system, heart, and kidney. Non-cellular assessment

  16. Modelling Human Exposure to Chemicals in Food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob W

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to foodborne chemicals is often estimated using the average consumption pattern in the human population. To protect the human population instead of the average individual, however, interindividual variability in consumption behaviour must be taken into account. This report shows how food

  17. Contrasting effects of ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet B exposure on induction of contact sensitivity in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lone; Hansen, Henrik; Barker, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB), in addition to direct effects on DNA, induces immunological changes in the skin that predispose to the development of skin cancer. Whether ultraviolet-A (UVA) induces similar changes is unknown. This effect can be investigated in humans in vivo using epicutaneous antigens...

  18. Assessment of Human Exposure to ENMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; van Tongeren, Martie

    2017-01-01

    Human exposure assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is hampered, among other factors, by the difficulty to differentiate ENM from other nanomaterials (incidental to processes or naturally occurring) and the lack of a single metric that can be used for health risk assessment. It is important that the exposure assessment is carried out throughout the entire life-cycle as releases can occur at the different stages of the product life-cycle, from the synthesis, manufacture of the nano-enable product (occupational exposure) to the professional and consumer use of nano-enabled product (consumer exposure) and at the end of life.Occupational exposure surveys should follow a tiered approach, increasing in complexity in terms of instruments used and sampling strategy applied with higher tiers in order tailor the exposure assessment to the specific materials used and workplace exposure scenarios and to reduce uncertainty in assessment of exposure. Assessment of consumer exposure and of releases from end-of-life processes currently relies on release testing of nano-enabled products in laboratory settings.

  19. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and Human Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Goldhagen, Paul; Friedberg, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Clem, J. M.; Copeland, K.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is of interest, apart from its main concern of aircraft exposures, because it is a principal source of human exposure to radiations with high linear energy transfer (LET). The ionizing radiations of the lower atmosphere near the Earth s surface tend to be dominated by the terrestrial radioisotopes. especially along the coastal plain and interior low lands, and have only minor contributions from neutrons (11 percent). The world average is substantially larger but the high altitude cities especially have substantial contributions from neutrons (25 to 45 percent). Understanding the world distribution of neutron exposures requires an improved understanding of the latitudinal, longitudinal, altitude and spectral distribution that depends on local terrain and time. These issues are being investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical program. This paper will give an overview of human exposures and describe the development of improved environmental models.

  20. Variation in calculated human exposure. Comparison of calculations with seven European human exposure models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes F; ECO

    2003-01-01

    Twenty scenarios, differing with respect to land use, soil type and contaminant, formed the basis for calculating human exposure from soil contaminants with the use of models contributed by seven European countries (one model per country). Here, the human exposures to children and children

  1. Radiation transport modeling and assessment to better predict radiation exposure, dose, and toxicological effects to human organs on long duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, P.; Badhwar, G.; Obot, V.; Wilson, B.; Jejelewo, O.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is very interested in improving its ability to monitor and forecast the radiation levels that pose a health risk to space-walking astronauts as they construct the International Space Station and astronauts that will participate in long-term and deep-space missions. Human exploratory missions to the moon and Mars within the next quarter century, will expose crews to transient radiation from solar particle events which include high-energy galactic cosmic rays and high-energy protons. Because the radiation levels in space are high and solar activity is presently unpredictable, adequate shielding is needed to minimize the deleterious health effects of exposure to radiation. Today, numerous models have been developed and used to predict radiation exposure. Such a model is the Space Environment Information Systems (SPENVIS) modeling program, developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronautics. SPENVIS, which has been assessed to be an excellent tool in characterizing the radiation environment for microelectronics and investigating orbital debris, is being evaluated for its usefulness with determining the dose and dose-equivalent for human exposure. Thus far. the calculations for dose-depth relations under varying shielding conditions have been in agreement with calculations done using HZETRN and PDOSE, which are well-known and widely used models for characterizing the environments for human exploratory missions. There is disagreement when assessing the impact of secondary radiation particles since SPENVIS does a crude estimation of the secondary radiation particles when calculating LET versus Flux. SPENVIS was used to model dose-depth relations for the blood-forming organs. Radiation sickness and cancer are life-threatening consequences resulting from radiation exposure. In space. exposure to radiation generally includes all of the critical organs. Biological and toxicological impacts have been included for discussion along with alternative risk mitigation

  2. Effects of human food grade titanium dioxide nanoparticle dietary exposure on Drosophila melanogaster survival, fecundity, pupation and expression of antioxidant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Boris; Cvetković, Vladimir J; Mitrović, Tatjana Lj

    2016-02-01

    The fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster was exposed to the human food grade of E171 titanium dioxide (TiO2). This is a special grade of TiO2 which is frequently omitted in nanotoxicology studies dealing with TiO2, yet it is the most relevant grade regarding oral exposure of humans. D. melanogaster larvae were exposed to 0.002 mg mL(-1), 0.02 mg mL(-1), 0.2 mg mL(-1), and 2 mg mL(-1) of TiO2 in feeding medium, and the survival, fecundity, pupation time, and expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response were monitored. TiO2 did not affect survival but significantly increased time to pupation (p < 0.001). Fecundity of D. melanogaster was unaffected by the treatment. Expression of the gene for catalase was markedly downregulated by the treatment, while the effect on the downregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 was less pronounced. After four days of dietary exposure TiO2 was present in a significant amount in larvae, but was not transferred to adults during metamorphosis. Two individuals with aberrant phenotype similar to previously described gold nanoparticles induced mutant phenotypes were detected in the group exposed to TiO2. In general, TiO2 showed little toxicity toward D. melanogaster at concentrations relevant to oral exposure of humans.

  3. The potential human health effect(s) of the metal uranium in the environment. Report on the known human health effects associated with the exposure to the metal uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    Concern over the levels of the metal uranium in the environment as a result of industrial activities has been expressed by several Federal and State agencies. This concern is associated with potential human health effects of this metal on kidney function and bone formation. Although limits for the Metal uranium in the environment remain to be set, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently in the process of establishing guidance limits for this metal in water and soil. These limits will be established for both the metal and the associated radioactivity. The suggested limits currently being considered for water and soil are, 20 pCi/liter and 10 pCi/gram wet weight, respectively. For naturally occurring uranium EPA assumes that 1 ug of uranium metal equals 0.67 pCi at equilibrium (i.e. at equilibrium the mass ratio of {sup 234}uranium to {sup 238}uranium is small but their activities are equal). Thus the limits for water and soil on weight basis for the uranium metal would be 30 ug/liter and 15 ug/gram wet weight, respectively. These limits are being established based on the potential increase in cancer death in populations that exceed this limit. Since there does not appear to be a significant correlation between cancer deaths and.uranium metal exposure (see discussion below), these limits will probably be established based on the known association between radionuclides exposure and cancer deaths. The exposure limits for other health effects such as kidney damage and retardation in bone formation apparently are not being considered by EPA.

  4. Zearalenone occurrence and human exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among the mycotoxins zearalenone (ZON) is of interest because of the estrogenic effects that it, and certain of its metabolites possess. The fungi that produce ZON are found worldwide, particularly in cereal grains and derived products. This has prompted many surveys to detect these compounds in com...

  5. Adenovirus-mediated human β-nerve growth factor gene transfer has a protective effect on cochlear spiral ganglion after blast exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether adenovirus-mediated human β-nerve growth factor (Ad-hNGFβ) gene has any protective effect on blast hearing impairment. Methods:Deafness was induced by blast exposure (172. 0 dB) in 30 healthy guinea pigs. On day 7 of blast exposure, Ad-hNGFβ was infused into the perilymphatic space of 20 animals as the study group (hNGFβ group), and artificial perilymph fluid (APF) was infused into the perilymphatic space of the other 10 animals as the control group. At weeks 1, 4 and 8 after blast exposure, the animals were sacrificed and the cochleae were removed for immunohis-tochemical and HE stainings. Results: Expression of Ad-hNGFβ protein was detected in each turn of the cochlea at the 1st week, with almost equal intensity in all turns. At the 4th week, the reactive intensity of the expression of Ad-hNGFβ protein decreased. At the 8th week, no expression was detectable. The results of HE staining showed that the amount of spiral ganglions in hNGFβ group was significantly greater than that of the control group at week 4 (F<0. 01). Conclusion: Ad-hNGFβ can be expressed at a high level and for a relatively long period in the blast impaired cochlea, suggesting that Ad-hNGFβ has a protective effect on cochlear spiral ganglion cells after blast exposure and the efficient gene transfer into cochlea had been achieved without toxicity.

  6. Susceptibility of human populations to environmental exposure to organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undeman, Emma; Brown, Trevor N; Wania, Frank; McLachlan, Michael S

    2010-08-15

    Environmental exposure to organic contaminants is a complex function of environmental conditions, food chain characteristics, and chemical properties. In this study the susceptibility of various human populations to environmental exposure to neutral organic contaminants was compared. An environmental fate model and a linked bioaccumulation model were parametrized to describe ecosystems in different climatic regions (temperate, arctic, tropical, and steppe). The human body burden resulting from constant emissions of hypothetical chemicals was estimated for each region. An exposure susceptibility index was defined as the body burden in the region of interest normalized to the burden of the same chemical in a reference human from the temperate region eating an average diet. For most persistent chemicals emitted to air, the Arctic had the highest susceptibility index (max 520). Susceptibility to exposure was largely determined by the food web properties. The properties of the physical environment only had a marked effect when air or water, not food, was the dominant source of human exposure. Shifting the mode of emission markedly changed the relative susceptibility of the ecosystems in some cases. The exposure arising from chemical use clearly varies between ecosystems, which makes an understanding of ecosystem susceptibility to exposure important for chemicals management.

  7. Human biological monitoring of occupational genotoxic exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Sorsa, M

    1993-01-01

    ) occupational exposure limit value of styrene in ambient air. The consideration of ethical issues in human genetic monitoring is an important but often overlooked aspect. This includes the scientific and preventional relevance of performing a test on individuals, pre- and post study information of donors......Human biological monitoring is a valuable tool for exposure assessment in groups of persons occupationally exposed to genotoxic agents. If the monitoring activity covers genetic material the term genetic monitoring is used. The methods used for genetic monitoring are either substance specific, e...... for and the biomonitoring results should preferentially be linked with accurate ambient air monitoring. In persons occupationally exposed to styrene the endpoints of DNA-damage and DNA-repair in genetic monitoring are methods of choice in exposure situations above the current Danish (25 ppm) or Finnish (20 ppm...

  8. Effects of concurrent caffeine and mobile phone exposure on local target probability processing in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunk, Attila; Stefanics, Gábor; Zentai, Norbert; Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2015-09-23

    Millions of people use mobile phones (MP) while drinking coffee or other caffeine containing beverages. Little is known about the potential combined effects of MP irradiation and caffeine on cognitive functions. Here we investigated whether caffeine intake and concurrent exposure to Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) MP-like irradiation may interactively influence neuro-cognitive function in an active visual oddball paradigm. In a full factorial experimental design, 25 participants performed a simple visual target detection task while reaction time (RT) and electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. Target trials were divided into Low and High probability sets based on target-to-target distance. We analyzed single trial RT and alpha-band power (amplitude) in the pre-target interval. We found that RT was shorter in High vs. Low local probability trials, and caffeine further shortened RT in High probability trials relative to the baseline condition suggesting that caffeine improves the efficiency of implicit short-term memory. Caffeine also decreased pre-target alpha amplitude resulting in higher arousal level. Furthermore, pre-target gamma power positively correlated with RT, which may have facilitated target detection. However, in the present pharmacologically validated study UMTS exposure either alone or in combination with caffeine did not alter RT or pre-stimulus oscillatory brain activity.

  9. Effect of a topical treatment in organotypic culture of human breast skin after exposure to gamma-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gagliano

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The early radiation of epidermal reactions can lead to healing of the lesion or radiation necrosis. There is no general agreement for either the prevention and/or treatment of radiation skin response, also as little is known about the immediate phases of this phenomenon. We investigated the early effects exerted by Healing and Wound Emulsion (HWE on human skin response after ionizing radiation. Epidermal morphology, Heat Shock Protein (HSP 70, and Transforming Growth Factor-b1 (TGF-b1 gene expression were investigated in organotypic human skin cultures undergoing a double dose of gamma-rays (2 Gy. HSP70 gene expression tended to be induced in the HWE group 6 hours after cream administration and was significantly up-regulated after 48 hours, when epidermal morphological alterations were evident. TGF- b1 seems not affected in cream treated samples. HWE may stimulate skin to mount an early defensive response against damage induced by gamma rays.

  10. Controlled human exposures to ambient pollutant particles in susceptible populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghio Andrew J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epidemiologic studies have established an association between exposures to air pollution particles and human mortality and morbidity at concentrations of particles currently found in major metropolitan areas. The adverse effects of pollution particles are most prominent in susceptible subjects, including the elderly and patients with cardiopulmonary diseases. Controlled human exposure studies have been used to confirm the causal relationship between pollution particle exposure and adverse health effects. Earlier studies enrolled mostly young healthy subjects and have largely confirmed the capability of particles to cause adverse health effects shown in epidemiological studies. In the last few years, more studies involving susceptible populations have been published. These recent studies in susceptible populations, however, have shown that the adverse responses to particles appear diminished in these susceptible subjects compared to those in healthy subjects. The present paper reviewed and compared control human exposure studies to particles and sought to explain the "unexpected" response to particle exposure in these susceptible populations and make recommendations for future studies. We found that the causes for the discrepant results are likely multifactorial. Factors such as medications, the disease itself, genetic susceptibility, subject selection bias that is intrinsic to many controlled exposure studies and nonspecificity of study endpoints may explain part of the results. Future controlled exposure studies should select endpoints that are more closely related to the pathogenesis of the disease and reflect the severity of particle-induced health effects in the specific populations under investigation. Future studies should also attempt to control for medications and genetic susceptibility. Using a different study design, such as exposing subjects to filtered air and ambient levels of particles, and assessing the improvement in

  11. Human solvent exposure. Factors influencing the pharmacokinetics and acute toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    exposed to mixtures of solvents experience an increased frequency of work related irritative and neurological symptoms although the exposure has been far below the occupational exposure limits. A series of controlled human exposure studies was carried out. Different groups of persons were exposed...... to the most frequent solvent, toluene. Toluene in alveolar air and the urinary excretion of the metabolites were measured and the acute effects of toluene were assessed by the performance in a series of test of the perceptual and psychomotor functions as well as a standardized registration of annoyance...

  12. Evaluating the effect of human activity patterns on air pollution exposure using an integrated field-based and agent-based modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Beelen, Rob M. J.; de Bakker, Merijn P.; Karssenberg, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Constructing spatio-temporal numerical models to support risk assessment, such as assessing the exposure of humans to air pollution, often requires the integration of field-based and agent-based modelling approaches. Continuous environmental variables such as air pollution are best represented using the field-based approach which considers phenomena as continuous fields having attribute values at all locations. When calculating human exposure to such pollutants it is, however, preferable to consider the population as a set of individuals each with a particular activity pattern. This would allow to account for the spatio-temporal variation in a pollutant along the space-time paths travelled by individuals, determined, for example, by home and work locations, road network, and travel times. Modelling this activity pattern requires an agent-based or individual based modelling approach. In general, field- and agent-based models are constructed with the help of separate software tools, while both approaches should play together in an interacting way and preferably should be combined into one modelling framework, which would allow for efficient and effective implementation of models by domain specialists. To overcome this lack in integrated modelling frameworks, we aim at the development of concepts and software for an integrated field-based and agent-based modelling framework. Concepts merging field- and agent-based modelling were implemented by extending PCRaster (http://www.pcraster.eu), a field-based modelling library implemented in C++, with components for 1) representation of discrete, mobile, agents, 2) spatial networks and algorithms by integrating the NetworkX library (http://networkx.github.io), allowing therefore to calculate e.g. shortest routes or total transport costs between locations, and 3) functions for field-network interactions, allowing to assign field-based attribute values to networks (i.e. as edge weights), such as aggregated or averaged

  13. Large organic aerosols in a human exposure chamber : Applications in occupational dermatology and lung medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to large organic aerosol particles may cause respiratory and skin reactions. The use of human exposure chambers offers possibilities for experimental exposure challenges carried out with patients, in research and for investigations of the effects of exposure on the skin and in the respiratory tract. The present aim was to study the performance of modern human whole-body exposure chambers during generation of large organic particles, and to develop and test new me...

  14. Cadmium and children: exposure and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Zuurbier, Moniek; Naginiene, Rima; van den Hazel, Peter; Stilianakis, Nikolaos; Ronchetti, Roberto; Koppe, Janna G

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium exposure and accumulation in the body start at young age. Exposure routes in children are mainly via food, environmental tobacco smoke and house dust. Excretion from the body is limited. Cadmium accumulation in the kidney is responsible for effects such as nephrotoxicity and osteoporosis which are observed at adult age. Cadmium exposure through inhalation is also associated with lung cancer in adulthood. Although transfer to the neonate through the placenta and through breast milk is limited, teratogenic and developmental effects were observed in experimental animals. The database on human studies involving children is limited, yet effects on motoric and perceptual behaviour in children have been associated with elevated in utero cadmium exposure. In school age children urinary cadmium levels were associated with immune suppressive effects. More studies are needed to confirm these results. Experimental data in vitro and in animals refer to effects of cadmium on the hypothalamus-pituitary axis at different levels. This may lead to disorders of the endocrine and/or immune system. Cadmium exposure at early age should be limited as much as possible to prevent direct effects on children and to prevent accumulation of cadmium which may have serious health effects only becoming manifest at older age.

  15. Ecotoxocological effects of short-term exposure to a human pharmaceutical Verapamil in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Li, Ping; Randak, Tomas

    2010-09-01

    Verapamil (VRP) is a calcium channel blocker that is a highly prescribed compound and commonly present in aquatic environment, but the ecotoxicological effects of this pharmaceutical in fish have not been fully documented. In this study, the toxic effects of VRP were studied in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, by acute static bioassay. In the acute test, the median lethal concentration (LC50, 2.72 mg/L) was evaluated and the behavioral changes were obviously intensified with increasing VRP concentrations. Compared to the control, oxidative stress was observed in fish tissues with different levels after short-term exposure to sublethal concentrations (0.27 and 1.35 mg/L) of VRP. Activities of SOD and GPx in fish brain were induced at 0.27 mg/L VRP, but all the antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx and GR) in fish brain were decreased at 1.35 mg/L VRP. When compared to the control, all the antioxidant enzymes in gill were decreased in both treated groups, but there was no significant change in muscle. Additional, muscle DNA/RNA ratio in fish exposed at 1.35 mg/L VRP was significantly lower than that in the control. Furthermore, through chemometrics of all parameters measured in fish exposed to sublethal VRP concentrations using principal component analysis, two groups with 89.8% of total accumulated variance were distinguished. In short, the physiological and biochemical responses in of fish indicated that VRP-induced environmental stress; but according to VRP residual status in the natural environment, more long-term experiments at lower concentrations will be necessary in the future. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential Response and Priming Dose Effect on the Proteome of Human Fibroblast and Stem Cells Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Monika; Haghdoost, Siamak; Gomolka, Maria; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Dietz, Anne; Kulka, Ulrike; Unger, Kristian; Babini, Gabriele; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Hornhardt, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that a mechanistic understanding of the cellular responses to low dose and dose rate may be valuable in reducing some of the uncertainties involved in current risk estimates for cancer- and non-cancer-related radiation effects that are inherited in the linear no-threshold hypothesis. In this study, the effects of low-dose radiation on the proteome in both human fibroblasts and stem cells were investigated. Particular emphasis was placed on examining: 1. the dose-response relationships for the differential expression of proteins in the low-dose range (40-140 mGy) of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation; and 2. the effect on differential expression of proteins of a priming dose given prior to a challenge dose (adaptive response effects). These studies were performed on cultured human fibroblasts (VH10) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The results from the VH10 cell experiments demonstrated that low-doses of low-LET radiation induced unique patterns of differentially expressed proteins for each dose investigated. In addition, a low priming radiation dose significantly changed the protein expression induced by the subsequent challenge exposure. In the ADSC the number of differentially expressed proteins was markedly less compared to VH10 cells, indicating that ADSC differ in their intrinsic response to low doses of radiation. The proteomic results are further discussed in terms of possible pathways influenced by low-dose irradiation.

  17. Human exposure to organic arsenic species from seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Vivien; Goodale, Britton; Raab, Andrea; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Reimer, Ken; Conklin, Sean; Karagas, Margaret R; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2017-02-15

    Seafood, including finfish, shellfish, and seaweed, is the largest contributor to arsenic (As) exposure in many human populations. In contrast to the predominance of inorganic As in water and many terrestrial foods, As in marine-derived foods is present primarily in the form of organic compounds. To date, human exposure and toxicological assessments have focused on inorganic As, while organic As has generally been considered to be non-toxic. However, the high concentrations of organic As in seafood, as well as the often complex As speciation, can lead to complications in assessing As exposure from diet. In this report, we evaluate the presence and distribution of organic As species in seafood, and combined with consumption data, address the current capabilities and needs for determining human exposure to these compounds. The analytical approaches and shortcomings for assessing these compounds are reviewed, with a focus on the best practices for characterization and quantitation. Metabolic pathways and toxicology of two important classes of organic arsenicals, arsenolipids and arsenosugars, are examined, as well as individual variability in absorption of these compounds. Although determining health outcomes or assessing a need for regulatory policies for organic As exposure is premature, the extensive consumption of seafood globally, along with the preliminary toxicological profiles of these compounds and their confounding effect on assessing exposure to inorganic As, suggests further investigations and process-level studies on organic As are needed to fill the current gaps in knowledge.

  18. Modeling deterministic effects in hematopoietic system caused by chronic exposure to ionizing radiation in large human cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akushevich, Igor V; Veremeyeva, Galina A; Dimov, Georgy P; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Akleyev, Alexander V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2010-09-01

    A new model of the hematopoietic system for humans chronically exposed to ionizing radiation allows for quantitative description of the initial hematopoiesis inhibition and subsequent increase in the risks of late stochastic effects such as leukemia. This model describes the dynamics of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as well as the dynamics of each of the three blood cell types (leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets). The model parameters are estimated from the results of other experiments. They include the steady-state numbers of hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral blood cell lines for an unexposed organism, amplification parameters for each blood cell line, parameters describing the proliferation and apoptosis, parameters of feedback functions regulating the steady-state numbers, and characteristics of radiosensitivity in respect to cell death and non-lethal cell damages. The dynamic model of hematopoiesis is applied to the data on a subcohort of the Techa River residents with hematological measurements (e.g., blood counts) performed in 1950-1956 (which totals to about 3,500 exposed individuals). Among well-described effects observed in these data are the slope values of the dose-effect curves describing the hematopoietic inhibition and the dose rate patterns of the fractions of cytopenic states (e.g., leukopenia, thrombocytopenia). The model has been further generalized by inclusion of the component describing the risk of late stochastic effects. The risks of the development of late effects (such as leukemia) in population groups with specific patterns of early reactions in hematopoiesis (such as leukopenia induced by ionizing radiation) are investigated using simulation studies and compared to data.

  19. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  20. Epidemiology of health effects of radiofrequency exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbom, Anders; Green, Adele; Kheifets, Leeka; Savitz, David; Swerdlow, Anthony

    2004-12-01

    We have undertaken a comprehensive review of epidemiologic studies about the effects of radiofrequency fields (RFs) on human health in order to summarize the current state of knowledge, explain the methodologic issues that are involved, and aid in the planning of future studies. There have been a large number of occupational studies over several decades, particularly on cancer, cardiovascular disease, adverse reproductive outcome, and cataract, in relation to RF exposure. More recently, there have been studies of residential exposure, mainly from radio and television transmitters, and especially focusing on leukemia. There have also been studies of mobile telephone users, particularly on brain tumors and less often on other cancers and on symptoms. Results of these studies to date give no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relation between RF exposure and any adverse health effect. On the other hand, the studies have too many deficiencies to rule out an association. A key concern across all studies is the quality of assessment of RF exposure. Despite the ubiquity of new technologies using RFs, little is known about population exposure from RF sources and even less about the relative importance of different sources. Other cautions are that mobile phone studies to date have been able to address only relatively short lag periods, that almost no data are available on the consequences of childhood exposure, and that published data largely concentrate on a small number of outcomes, especially brain tumor and leukemia.

  1. Progress in Assessing Air Pollutant Risks from In Vitro Exposures: Matching Ozone Dose and Effect in Human Air Way Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro exposures to air pollutants could, in theory, facilitate a rapid and detailed assessment of molecular mechanisms of toxicity. However, it is difficult to ensure that the dose of a gaseous pollutant to cells in tissue culture is similar to that of the same cells during in...

  2. Effectiveness of a New Lead-Shielding Device and Additional Filter for Reducing Staff and Patient Radiation Exposure During Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study Using a Human Phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Yoshiaki; Chida, Koichi; Muroya, Yoshikazu; Utsumi, Yoshiya

    2017-09-18

    Interventional radiology procedures often involve lengthy exposure to fluoroscopy-derived radiation. We therefore devised a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) procedure using a human phantom that proved to protect the patient and physician by reducing the radiation dose. We evaluated a new lead-shielding device and separately attached additional filters (1.0-, 2.0-, and 3.0-mm Al filters and a 0.5-mm Cu filter) during VFSS to reduce the patient's entrance skin dose (ESD). A monitor attached to the human phantom's neck measured the ESD. We also developed another lead shield (VFSS Shielding Box, 1.0-mm Pb equivalent) and tested its efficacy using the human phantom and an ionization chamber radiation survey meter with and without protection from scattered radiation at the physician's position on the phantom. We then measured the scattered radiation (at 90 and 150 cm above the floor) after combining the filters with the VFSS Shielding Box. With the additional filters, the ESD was reduced by 15.4-55.1%. With the VFSS Shielding Box alone, the scattered radiation was reduced by about 10% compared with the dose without additional shielding. With the VFSS Shielding Box and filters combined, the scattered radiation dose was reduced by a maximum of about 44% at the physician's position. Thus, the additional lead-shielding device effectively provided protection from scattered radiation during fluoroscopy. These results indicate that the combined VFSS Shielding Box and filters can effectively reduce the physician's and patient's radiation doses.

  3. Space Radiation and Human Exposures, A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A

    2016-04-01

    The space radiation environment is a complex field comprised primarily of charged particles spanning energies over many orders of magnitude. The principal sources of these particles are galactic cosmic rays, the Sun and the trapped radiation belts around the earth. Superimposed on a steady influx of cosmic rays and a steady outward flux of low-energy solar wind are short-term ejections of higher energy particles from the Sun and an 11-year variation of solar luminosity that modulates cosmic ray intensity. Human health risks are estimated from models of the radiation environment for various mission scenarios, the shielding of associated vehicles and the human body itself. Transport models are used to propagate the ambient radiation fields through realistic shielding levels and materials to yield radiation field models inside spacecraft. Then, informed by radiobiological experiments and epidemiology studies, estimates are made for various outcome measures associated with impairments of biological processes, losses of function or mortality. Cancer-associated risks have been formulated in a probabilistic model while management of non-cancer risks are based on permissible exposure limits. This article focuses on the various components of the space radiation environment and the human exposures that it creates.

  4. The Epigenetic Effects of Prenatal Cadmium Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilahur, Nadia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to the highly toxic and common pollutant cadmium has been associated with adverse effects on child health and development. However, the underlying biological mechanisms of cadmium toxicity remain partially unsolved. Epigenetic disruption due to early cadmium exposure has gained attention as a plausible mode of action, since epigenetic signatures respond to environmental stimuli and the fetus undergoes drastic epigenomic rearrangements during embryogenesis. In the current review, we provide a critical examination of the literature addressing prenatal cadmium exposure and epigenetic effects in human, animal, and in vitro studies. We conducted a PubMed search and obtained eight recent studies addressing this topic, focusing almost exclusively on DNA methylation. These studies provide evidence that cadmium alters epigenetic signatures in the DNA of the placenta and of the newborns, and some studies indicated marked sexual differences for cadmium-related DNA methylation changes. Associations between early cadmium exposure and DNA methylation might reflect interference with de novo DNA methyltransferases. More studies, especially those including environmentally relevant doses, are needed to confirm the toxicoepigenomic effects of prenatal cadmium exposure and how that relates to the observed health effects of cadmium in childhood and later life.

  5. Human reproductive system disturbances and pesticide exposure in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koifman Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of reproductive disturbances in humans and in the wildlife has been reported in the last decade in different countries. Exposure to different chemicals possibly acting in the endocrine system or endocrine disruptors, including pesticides, has been a hypothesis raised to explain the observed changes. This paper aimed to present results of an epidemiological ecologic study carried out to explore population data on pesticides exposure in selected Brazilian states in the eighties and human reproductive outcomes in the nineties. Pearson correlation coefficients were ascertained between available data pesticides sales in eleven states in Brazil in 1985 and selected further reproductive outcomes or their surrogates. Moderate to high correlations were observed to infertility, testis, breast, prostate and ovarian cancer mortality. Despite the restrains of ecologic studies to establish cause-effect relationships, the observed results are in agreement with evidence supporting a possible association between pesticides exposure and the analyzed reproductive outcomes.

  6. Non-Target Effect for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (.01 - 0.2 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28-ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 0.1 Gy were more than one ion traverses a cell showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, Si-28-ions showed no dose response, suggesting a non-targeted effect when less than one ion traversal occurs. Additional findings for Fe-56 will be discussed.

  7. Human cell exposure assays of Bacillus thuringiensis commercial insecticides: production of Bacillus cereus-like cytolytic effects from outgrowth of spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayabali, A F; Seligy, V L

    2000-01-01

    Most contemporary bioinsecticides are derived from scaled-up cultures of Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis (Bti) and kurstaki (Btk), whose particulate fractions contain mostly B. thuringiensis spores (> 10(12)/L) and proteinaceous aggregates, including crystal-like parasporal inclusion bodies (PIB). Based on concerns over relatedness to B. cereus-group pathogens, we conducted extensive testing of B. thuringiensis (BT) products and their subfractions using seven human cell types. The Bti/Btk products generated nonspecific cytotoxicities involving loss in bioreduction, cell rounding, blebbing and detachment, degradation of immunodetectable proteins, and cytolysis. Their threshold dose (Dt approximately equal.5 times 10(-14)% BT product/target cell) equated to a single spore and a target cell half-life (tLD(50)) of approximately 16 hr. At Dts > 10(4), the tLD(50) rapidly shifted to < 4 hr; with antibiotic present, no component, including PIB-related [delta]-endotoxins, was cytolytic up to an equivalent of approximately 10(9 )Dt. The cytolytic agent(s) within the Bti/Btk-vegetative cell exoprotein (VCP) pool is an early spore outgrowth product identical to that of B. cereus and acting possibly by arresting protein synthesis. No cytolytic effects were seen with VCP from B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. These data, including recent epidemiologic work indicate that spore-containing BT products have an inherent capacity to lyse human cells in free and interactive forms and may also act as immune sensitizers. To critically impact at the whole body level, the exposure outcome would have to be an uncontrolled infection arising from intake of Btk/Bti spores. For humans, such a condition would be rare, arising possibly in equally rare exposure scenarios involving large doses of spores and individuals with weak or impaired microbe-clearance capacities and/or immune response systems. PMID:11049810

  8. THE EFFECT OF GAZE ANGLE ON THE EVALUATIONS OF SAR AND TEMPERATURE RISE IN HUMAN EYE UNDER PLANE-WAVE EXPOSURES FROM 0.9 TO 10 GHZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yinliang; Leung, Sai-Wing; Chan, Kwok Hung; Sun, Weinong; Siu, Yun-Ming; Kong, Richard

    2016-12-01

    This article investigates the effect of gaze angle on the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature rise in human eye under electromagnetic exposures from 0.9 to 10 GHz. Eye models in different gaze angles are developed based on biometric data. The spatial-average SARs in eyes are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and the corresponding maximum temperature rises in lens are calculated by the finite-difference method. It is found that the changes in the gaze angle produce a maximum variation of 35, 12 and 20 % in the eye-averaged SAR, peak 10 g average SAR and temperature rise, respectively. Results also reveal that the eye-averaged SAR is more sensitive to the changes in the gaze angle than peak 10 g average SAR, especially at higher frequencies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (pBoron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups.

  10. Recovery of distortion product otoacoustic emissions after a 2-kHz monaural sound-exposure in humans: effects on fine structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Reuter, Karen

    2010-01-01

    A better understanding of the vulnerability of the fine structures of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) after acoustic overexposure may improve the knowledge about DPOAE generation, cochlear damage, and lead to more efficient diagnostic tools. It is studied whether the DPOAE fine...... structures of 16 normal-hearing human subjects are systematically affected after a moderate monaural sound-exposure of 10 min to a 2-kHz tone normalized to an exposure level LEX,8h of 80 dBA. DPOAEs were measured before and in the following 70 min after the exposure. The experimental protocol allowed...

  11. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione exposure of human cultured airway epithelial cells: Ion transport effects and metabolism of butter flavoring agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Eric J.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Shimko, Michael J.; Wells, J.R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Willard, Patsy A.; Case, Shannon L.; Thompson, Janet A.; Fedan, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of butter flavoring by workers in the microwave popcorn industry may result in “popcorn workers' lung.” In previous in vivo studies rats exposed for 6 h to vapor from the flavoring agents, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, acquired flavoring concentration-dependent damage of the upper airway epithelium and airway hyporeactivity to inhaled methacholine. Because ion transport is essential for lung fluid balance, we hypothesized that alterations in ion transport may be an early manifestation of butter flavoring-induced toxicity. We developed a system to expose cultured human bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBEs) to flavoring vapors. NHBEs were exposed for 6 h to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione vapors (25 or ≥60 ppm) and the effects on short circuit current and transepithelial resistance (Rt) were measured. Immediately after exposure to 25 ppm both flavorings reduced Na+ transport, without affecting Cl− transport or Na+,K+-pump activity. Rt was unaffected. Na+ transport recovered 18 h after exposure. Concentrations (100–360 ppm) of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione reported earlier to give rise in vivo to epithelial damage, and 60 ppm, caused death of NHBEs 0 h post-exposure. Analysis of the basolateral medium indicated that NHBEs metabolize diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione to acetoin and 2-hydroxy-3-pentanone, respectively. The results indicate that ion transport is inhibited transiently in airway epithelial cells by lower concentrations of the flavorings than those that result in morphological changes of the cells in vivo or in vitro. PMID:26454031

  12. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione exposure of human cultured airway epithelial cells: Ion transport effects and metabolism of butter flavoring agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Eric J; Goldsmith, W Travis; Shimko, Michael J; Wells, J R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Willard, Patsy A; Case, Shannon L; Thompson, Janet A; Fedan, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-15

    Inhalation of butter flavoring by workers in the microwave popcorn industry may result in “popcorn workers' lung.” In previous in vivo studies rats exposed for 6 h to vapor from the flavoring agents, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, acquired flavoring concentration-dependent damage of the upper airway epithelium and airway hyporeactivity to inhaled methacholine. Because ion transport is essential for lung fluid balance,we hypothesized that alterations in ion transport may be an early manifestation of butter flavoring-induced toxicity.We developed a system to expose cultured human bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBEs) to flavoring vapors. NHBEs were exposed for 6 h to diacetyl or 2,3-pentanedione vapors (25 or ≥ 60 ppm) and the effects on short circuit current and transepithelial resistance (Rt) were measured. Immediately after exposure to 25 ppm both flavorings reduced Na+ transport,without affecting Cl- transport or Na+,K+-pump activity. Rt was unaffected. Na+ transport recovered 18 h after exposure. Concentrations (100-360 ppm) of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione reported earlier to give rise in vivo to epithelial damage, and 60 ppm, caused death of NHBEs 0 h post-exposure. Analysis of the basolateral medium indicated that NHBEs metabolize diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione to acetoin and 2-hydroxy-3-pentanone, respectively. The results indicate that ion transport is inhibited transiently in airway epithelial cells by lower concentrations of the flavorings than those that result in morphological changes of the cells in vivo or in vitro.

  13. Field tests on human tolerance to (LNG) fire radiant heat exposure, and attenuation effects of clothing and other objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Phani K

    2008-09-15

    A series of field tests exposing mannequins clothed with civilian clothing to a 3m x 3m square liquefied natural gas (LNG) pool fire was conducted. Both single layer clothing and double layer clothing were used. The radiant heat flux incident outside the clothing and incident on the skin covered by clothing were measured using wide-angle radiometers, for durations of 100-200 s (per test). The levels of heat flux incident on the clothing were close to 5 kW/m(2). The magnitude of the radiant heat attenuation factor (AF) across the thickness was determined. AF varies between 2 and higher for cotton and polyester clothing (thickness 0.286-1.347 mm); AF value of 6 was measured for 1.347 mm thickness. Single sheet newspaper held about 5 cm in front of mannequins and exposed to incident flux of 5 kW/m(2) resulted in AF of 5, and AF of 8 with double sheets. AF decreases linearly with increasing heat flux values and linearly increases with thickness. The author exposed himself, in normal civilian clothing (of full sleeve cotton/polyester shirt and jean pants), to radiant heat from a LNG fire. The exposure was for several tens of seconds to heat flux levels ranging from 3.5 kW/m(2) to 5(+) kW/m(2) (exposure times from 25s to 97 s at average heat flux values in the 4 kW/m(2) and 5 kW/m(2)range). Occasionally, he was exposed to (as high as) 7 kW/m(2) for durations of several seconds. He did not suffer any unbearable or even severe pain nor did he experience blisters or burns or any other injury on the unprotected skin of his body. The incident heat fluxes on the author were measured by a hand-held radiometer (with digital display) as well as by strapped on wide-angle radiometers connected to a computer. He could withstand the US regulatory criterion of 5 kW/m(2) (for 30 s) without suffering any damage or burns. Temperature measured on author's skin covered by clothing did not rise above the normal body temperature even after 200 s of exposure to 4 kW/m(2) average heat flux.

  14. 镉暴露对人体骨骼影响的研究进展%Research progress on effect of cadmium exposure on human skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雨昕; 李筱薇; 赖建强

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Cadmium is a heavy metal pollutant, it is non-biodegradable in the environment and its half-life within human body is as long as 10~30 years. The skeleton is considered to be the main target organ for cadmium toxicity, and researches had confirmed the correlation between cadmium toxicity and bone mineral density decrease as well as osteoporosis. This paper summarized the research on the effect of cadmium toxicity on human skeleton in different countries. The effect of cadmium exposure on skeleton varied with different target populations, and was especially strong on the elder persons. So the target population should be grouped more reasonable in these kinds of studies. People who not only live in the polluted area but also have high urinary cadmium level should be classified as the high cadmium exposure group. Also, higher calcium intake was the protective factor of bone mineral density. The risk for cadmium exposure on osteoporosis and fractures may be enlarged due to the ignorance of the combined effect on intake of calcium and cadmium exposure. The calcium intake of target population should also be considered in grouping, only in this way we can discuss the real risk of osteoporosis and fractures caused by cadmium exposure.%镉是一种环境重金属污染物,在环境中不能进行生物降解,在人体内半衰期长达10-30年。骨骼是镉的重要靶器官,已有研究证实镉是诱发骨密度降低和骨质疏松症发生的危险因素之一。本文综述了镉暴露对人体骨骼影响的国内外相关文献。结果表明,镉暴露对人体骨骼的影响因目标人群的不同而存在差异,且主要受影响人群为中老年人,因此研究时应对目标人群进行合理分组,将镉污染区内尿镉浓度较高的人群划分为高暴露组较为合适。此外,高钙摄入量是人体骨密度的保护因素,但是目前罕有研究将目标人群的钙摄入量的状况和镉暴露状况相

  15. Asbestos exposure increases human bronchial epithelial cell fibrinolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, T J; Cobb, S M; Gruenert, D C; Peterson, M W

    1993-03-01

    Chronic exposure to asbestos fibers results in fibrotic lung disease. The distal pulmonary epithelium is an early target of asbestos-mediated injury. Local plasmin activity may be important in modulating endoluminal inflammatory responses in the lung. We studied the effects of asbestos exposure on cell-mediated plasma clot lysis as a marker of pericellular plasminogen activation. Exposing human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells to 100 micrograms/ml of asbestos fibers for 24 h resulted in increased plasma clot lysis. Fibrinolytic activity was augmented in a dose-dependent fashion, was not due to secreted protease, and occurred only when there was direct contact between the plasma clot and the epithelial monolayer. Further analysis showed that asbestos exposure increased HBE cell-associated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity in a time-dependent manner. The increased cell-associated PA activity could be removed by acid washing. The increase in PA activity following asbestos exposure required new protein synthesis because it was abrogated by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Therefore, asbestos exposure increases epithelial-mediated fibrinolysis by augmenting expression of uPA activity at the cell surface by mechanisms that require new RNA and protein synthesis. These observations suggest a novel mechanism whereby exposure of the distal epithelium to inhaled particulates may result in a chronic inflammatory response that culminates in the development of fibrotic lung disease.

  16. Chapel Hill bisphenol A expert panel consensus statement: Integration of mechanisms, effects in animals and potential to impact human health at current levels of exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Saal, Frederick S.; Akingbemi, Benson T.; Belcher, Scott M.; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Crain, D. Andrew; Eriksen, Marcus; Farabollini, Francesca; Guillette, Louis J.; Hauser, Russ; Heindel, Jerrold J.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Hunt, Patricia A.; Iguchi, Taisen; Jobling, Susan; Kanno, Jun; Keri, Ruth A.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Laufer, Hans; LeBlanc, Gerald A.; Marcus, Michele; McLachlan, John A.; Myers, John Peterson; Nadal, Angel; Newbold, Retha R.; Olea, Nicolas; Prins, Gail S.; Richter, Catherine A.; Rubin, Beverly S.; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.; Talsness, Chris E.; Vandenbergh, John G.; Vanderberg, Laura N.; Walser-Kuntz, Debby R.; Watson, Cheryl S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Wetherill, Yelena; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This document is a summary statement of the outcome from the meeting: “Bisphenol A: An Examination of the Relevance of Ecological, In vitro and Laboratory Animal Studies for Assessing Risks to Human Health” sponsored by both the NIEHS and NIDCR at NIH/DHHS, as well as the US-EPA and Commonweal on the estrogenic environmental chemical bisphenol A (BPA, 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane; CAS# 80-05-7). The meeting was held in Chapel Hill, NC, 28–30 November 2006 due to concerns about the potential for a relationship between BPA and negative trends in human health that have occurred in recent decades. Examples include increases in abnormal penile/urethra development in males, early sexual maturation in females, an increase in neurobehavioral problems such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism, an increase in childhood and adult obesity and type 2 diabetes, a regional decrease in sperm count, and an increase in hormonally mediated cancers, such as prostate and breast cancers. Concern has been elevated by published studies reporting a relationship between treatment with “low doses” of BPA and many of theses negative health outcomes in experimental studies in laboratory animals as well as in vitro studies identifying plausible molecular mechanisms that could mediate such effects. Importantly, much evidence suggests that these adverse effects are occurring in animals within the range of exposure to BPA of the typical human living in a developed country, where virtually everyone has measurable blood, tissue and urine levels of BPA that exceed the levels produced by doses used in the “low dose” animal experiments.

  17. Fish oil and olive oil supplements attenuate the adverse cardiovascular effects of concentrated ambient air pollution particles exposure in healthy middle-aged adult human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to ambient levels of air pollution increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Advanced age is among the factors associated with susceptibility to the adverse effects of air pollution. Dietary fatty acid supplementation has been shown to decrease cardiovascular ris...

  18. Fish oil and olive oil supplements attenuate the adverse cardiovascular effects of concentrated ambient air pollution particles exposure in healthy middle-aged adult human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to ambient levels of air pollution increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Advanced age is among the factors associated with susceptibility to the adverse effects of air pollution. Dietary fatty acid supplementation has been shown to decrease cardiovascular ris...

  19. Effects of Exposure Imprecision on Estimation of the Benchmark Dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe

    Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose......Environmental epidemiology; exposure measurement error; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; exposure standards; benchmark dose...

  20. Arsenic Exposure and the Induction of Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a metalloid, that is, considered to be a human carcinogen. Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed through drinking water, with consequences ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies, such as skin and lung cancer. Despite well-known arsenic-related health effects, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood; however, the arsenic biotransformation process, which includes methylation changes, is thought to play a key role. This paper explores the relationship of arsenic exposure with cancer development and summarizes current knowledge of the potential mechanisms that may contribute to the neoplastic processes observed in arsenic exposed human populations.

  1. Low-dose energetic protons induce adaptive and bystander effects that protect human cells against DNA damage caused by a subsequent exposure to energetic iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Manuela; De Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W; Azzam, Edouard I

    2015-05-01

    During interplanetary missions, astronauts are exposed to mixed types of ionizing radiation. The low 'flux' of the high atomic number and high energy (HZE) radiations relative to the higher 'flux' of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons makes it highly probable that for any given cell in the body, proton events will precede any HZE event. Whereas progress has been made in our understanding of the biological effects of low-LET protons and high-LET HZE particles, the interplay between the biochemical processes modulated by these radiations is unclear. Here we show that exposure of normal human fibroblasts to a low mean absorbed dose of 20 cGy of 0.05 or 1-GeV protons (LET ∼ 1.25 or 0.2 keV/μm, respectively) protects the irradiated cells (P cellular traversal by radiation with those due to bystander effects in cell populations exposed to mixed radiation fields. They show that protective adaptive responses can spread from cells targeted by low-LET space radiation to bystander cells in their vicinity. The findings are relevant to understanding the health hazards of space travel. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  2. Effects of toluene exposure on signal transduction: toluene reduced the signaling via stimulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, Hirofumi; Haga, Tatsuya; Honma, Takeshi

    2002-07-01

    The organic solvent toluene is used widely in industry and is toxic to the central nervous system (CNS). To clarify the mechanisms of CNS toxicity following toluene exposure, especially with respect to the G protein-coupling of receptors, we determined the effects of toluene on the activation of Gi by stimulating human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We first examined whether toluene affects the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by Gi. The attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was reduced in a medium containing toluene. Next, we determined the effects of toluene on carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding using membrane fractions of CHO cell expressing hm2 receptors. Carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was markedly reduced when assayed using reaction buffers containing toluene. However, carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was essentially unchanged following pretreatment of the cells with a toluene-saturated medium prior to membrane isolation. Toluene pretreatment and the toluene itself did not alter the characteristics of the binding of carbamylcholine and [3H]N-methylscopolamine to hm2 receptors. On the contrary of the effect of toluene for [35S]GTPgammaS binding, the effect of toluene for attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was irreversible. These observations indicate that toluene acts as an inhibitor of the signal transduction via hm2 receptor stimulation in CHO cells, and at least two mechanisms exist in the inhibition mechanisms by toluene.

  3. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.

    1996-01-01

    aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges) and mutation frequency was estimated at a number of loci including the hprt gene and genes involving in cancer development. Blood and urine samples from individuals exposed to urban pollution were collected. Populations exposed through occupational or medical......A coordinated study was carried out on the development, evaluation and application of biomonitoring procedures for populations exposed to environmental genotoxic pollutants. The procedures used involved both direct measurement of DNA or protein damage (adducts) and assessment of second biological...... for detecting carcinogen-induced damage to DNA and proteins, and subsequent biological effects. These methods were validated with the occupational exposures, which showed evidence of DNA and/or protein and/or chromosome damage in workers in a coke oven plant, garage workers exposed to diesel exhaust and workers...

  4. Human exposure to bovine polyomavirus: a zoonosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, J.V.; Gardner, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    A competitive-type solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for the detection of antibody to bovine polyomavirus. Comparison of RIA and counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) results on 273 cattle sera indicated that both techniques were detecting antibody of like specificity. Human sera from 256 blood donors, 219 people recently vaccinated against polio, rubella or rabies, 50 immunosuppressed patients and 472 people with various occupational exposure to cattle were tested for antibody to bovine polyomavirus, the foetal rhesus monkey kidney strain, (anti-FRKV) by RIA. Apart from one blood donor and one of 108 rabies vaccinees only those in close contact with cattle possessed anti-FRKV. Compared with 62 per cent seropositive in the natural hosts, cattle, 71 per cent of veterinary surgeons, 50 per cent of cattle farmers, 40 per cent of abattoir workers, 16 per cent of veterinary institute technical staff and 10 per cent of veterinary students were anti-FRKV positive. Our findings indicate that the theoretical hazard of FRKV infection from undetected contamination of current tissue culture derived vaccines may, in practice, be remote. Proposed wider use of primate kidney cells as substrates for new vaccines may increase this risk.

  5. Skin Exposures & Effects in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH SKIN EXPOSURES & EFFECTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... currently lacking for measuring and assessing skin exposures. Skin Notation (SK) Profiles NIOSH has developed a strategy ...

  6. Progress in human exposure assessment for biocidal products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van

    2004-01-01

    An important shortcoming in our present knowledge required for risk assessment of biocidal products is the assessment of human exposure. This knowledge gap has been filled in a preliminary fashion with the TNsG on human exposure to biocidal products (available from the ECB website). Explicit User gu

  7. Human exposure assessment: Approaches for chemicals (REACH) and biocides (BPD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van; Gerritsen-Ebben, R.

    2008-01-01

    The approaches that are indicated in the various guidance documents for the assessment of human exposure for chemicals and biocides are summarised. This reflects the TNsG (Technical notes for Guidance) version 2: human exposure assessment for biocidal products (1) under the BPD (Biocidal Products Di

  8. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  9. Human performance analysis of industrial radiography radiation exposure events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, W.J.; Hill, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    A set of radiation overexposure event reports were reviewed as part of a program to examine human performance in industrial radiography for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Incident records for a seven year period were retrieved from an event database. Ninety-five exposure events were initially categorized and sorted for further analysis. Descriptive models were applied to a subset of severe overexposure events. Modeling included: (1) operational sequence tables to outline the key human actions and interactions with equipment, (2) human reliability event trees, (3) an application of an information processing failures model, and (4) an extrapolated use of the error influences and effects diagram. Results of the modeling analyses provided insights into the industrial radiography task and suggested areas for further action and study to decrease overexposures.

  10. [Advances on research of human exposure to triclosan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chenye; Chen, Yiming; Zhang, Peiqi; Xiong, Zhezhen; Wang, Caifeng; Tian, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Triclosan, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, was reported to have been widely detected in various human biological samples such as urine, blood and human milk among foreign populations. In China, limited reports have been found on human exposure to triclosan, and the reported urinary triclosan concentrations were significantly lower than that of American populations. Besides, the potential influencing factors still remain unclear regarding human exposure to triclosan, but evidences suggest that those in middle age and with higher household income and higher social class tend to have higher urinary triclosan concentrations. Furthermore, triclosan exposure tend to differ by sex, geography, heredity, metabolism and life style.

  11. Assessing exposure to phthalates - the human biomonitoring approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittassek, Matthias; Koch, Holger Martin; Angerer, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Some phthalates are developmental and reproductive toxicants in animals. Exposure to phthalates is considered to be potentially harmful to human health as well. Based on a comprehensive literature research, we present an overview of the sources of human phthalate exposure and results of exposure assessments with special focus on human biomonitoring data. Among the general population, there is widespread exposure to a number of phthalates. Foodstuff is the major source of phthalate exposure, particularly for the long-chain phthalates such as di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. For short-chain phthalates such as di-n-butyl-phthalate, additional pathways are of relevance. In general, children are exposed to higher phthalate doses than adults. Especially, high exposures can occur through some medications or medical devices. By comparing exposure data with existing limit values, one can also assess the risks associated with exposure to phthalates. Within the general population, some individuals exceed tolerable daily intake values for one or more phthalates. In high exposure groups, (intensive medical care, medications) tolerable daily intake transgressions can be substantial. Recent findings from animal studies suggest that a cumulative risk assessment for phthalates is warranted, and a cumulative exposure assessment to phthalates via human biomonitoring is a major step into this direction.

  12. Respiratory effects of particulate matter air pollution: studies on diesel exhaust, road tunnel, subway and wood smoke exposure in human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehlstedt, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Background: Ambient air pollution is associated with adverse health effects, but the sources and components, which cause these effects is still incompletely understood. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the pulmonary effects of a variety of common air pollutants, including diesel exhaust, biomass smoke, and road tunnel and subway station environments. Healthy non-smoking volunteers were exposed in random order to the specific air pollutants and air/control, during intermittent exercise, followed by bronchoscopy. Methods and results: In study I, exposures were performed with diesel exhaust (DE) generated at transient engine load and air for 1 hour with bronchoscopy at 6 hours post-exposure. Immunohistochemical analyses of bronchial mucosal biopsies showed that DE exposure significantly increased the endothelial adhesion molecule expression of p-selectin and VCAM-1, together with increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophils. In study II, the subjects were exposed for 1 hour to DE generated during idling with bronchoscopy at 6 hours. The bronchial mucosal biopsies showed significant increases in neutrophils, mast cells and lymphocytes together with bronchial wash neutrophils. Additionally, DE exposure significantly increased the nuclear translocation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and phosphorylated c-jun in the bronchial epithelium. In contrast, the phase II enzyme NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) decreased after DE. In study III, the 2-hour exposures took place in a road tunnel with bronchoscopy 14 hours later. The road tunnel exposure significantly increased the total numbers of lymphocytes and alveolar macrophages in BAL, whereas NK cell and CD56+/T cell numbers significantly decreased. Additionally, the nuclear expression of phosphorylated c-jun in the bronchial epithelium was significantly increased after road tunnel exposure. In study IV, the subjects were exposed to metal-rich particulate aerosol for 2 hours at a subway station

  13. Human exposures to parabens in cosmetics - a literature study

    OpenAIRE

    Aarflot, Ragnhild Lønseth

    2013-01-01

    A literature study was performed in order to assess and compare evidence of human exposure to parabens in cosmetics. The focus of the thesis is on human concentrations, the rate of dermal absorption, metabolism and excretion; in order to increase our understanding of human exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals in cosmetics. High detection rates of native and total parabens in blood and urine were identified. GMs of native parabens were lower than total paraben levels in urine as expecte...

  14. Tracking the pathways of human exposure to perfluorocarboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergren, Robin; Cousins, Ian T

    2009-08-01

    Recent analyses of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in human blood sera show that the background-exposed population in industrialized countries worldwide exhibits a narrow concentration range; arithmetic means of published studies range between 2 and 8 microg/L PFOA, with the exception of a few outlier studies. The globally comparable human serum concentrations of PFOA and characteristic dominance of PFOA with respect to other perfluorocarboxylate (PFCA) homologues indicate that exposure pathways of humans differ from those of wildlife, where perfluorononanoate (PFNA) is often the dominant homologue. The observed correlations between perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and PFOA in human serum together with a simultaneous downward time trend of these compounds in human blood sera and blood spots from the year 2000 onward indicate a connection between historical perfluorooctanesulfonyl (POSF) production (phased out by the major manufacturer in 2000-2002) and exposure to both PFOS and PFOA. A comparison of estimated daily intakes to humans based on samples from exposure media (collected post 2000) indicates that food intake is the major contemporary exposure pathway for the background population, whereas drinking water exposure is dominant for populations near sources of contaminated drinking water. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model used to back-calculate daily intakes from serum levels is shown to provide agreement within a factor of 1.5-5.5 of the daily intakes derived from exposure media, which provides further supporting evidence that dietary exposure is a major ongoing exposure pathway of PFOA to the background population.

  15. Biological effects from electromagnetic field exposure and public exposure standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Lennart; Sage, Cindy

    2008-02-01

    During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential health risks from power-frequency fields (extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields; ELF) and from radiofrequency/microwave radiation emissions (RF) from wireless communications. Non-thermal (low-intensity) biological effects have not been considered for regulation of microwave exposure, although numerous scientific reports indicate such effects. The BioInitiative Report is based on an international research and public policy initiative to give an overview of what is known of biological effects that occur at low-intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs) exposure. Health endpoints reported to be associated with ELF and/or RF include childhood leukaemia, brain tumours, genotoxic effects, neurological effects and neurodegenerative diseases, immune system deregulation, allergic and inflammatory responses, breast cancer, miscarriage and some cardiovascular effects. The BioInitiative Report concluded that a reasonable suspicion of risk exists based on clear evidence of bioeffects at environmentally relevant levels, which, with prolonged exposures may reasonably be presumed to result in health impacts. Regarding ELF a new lower public safety limit for habitable space adjacent to all new or upgraded power lines and for all other new constructions should be applied. A new lower limit should also be used for existing habitable space for children and/or women who are pregnant. A precautionary limit should be adopted for outdoor, cumulative RF exposure and for cumulative indoor RF fields with considerably lower limits than existing guidelines, see the BioInitiative Report. The current guidelines for the US and European microwave exposure from mobile phones, for the brain are 1.6 W/Kg and 2 W/Kg, respectively. Since use of mobile phones is associated with an increased risk for brain tumour after 10 years, a new biologically based guideline is warranted. Other health impacts associated with exposure to

  16. Particulate matter from both heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel shipping emissions show strong biological effects on human lung cells at realistic and comparable in vitro exposure conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Oeder

    Full Text Available Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling.To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols.Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses.The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon ("soot". Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification.Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the use of HFO and DF we recommend a

  17. Protective effect of Aronia melanocarpa polyphenols against cadmium-induced disorders in bone metabolism: a study in a rat model of lifetime human exposure to this heavy metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M; Rogalska, Joanna; Galazyn-Sidorczuk, Malgorzata; Jurczuk, Maria; Roszczenko, Alicja; Tomczyk, Michal

    2015-03-05

    It was investigated, in a female rat model of low and moderate lifetime human exposure to cadmium (Cd), whether polyphenols from Aronia melanocarpa berries (chokeberry; AMP) may offer protection from this heavy metal-induced disorders in bone metabolism. For this purpose, numerous indices of bone formation (osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprotegerin) and resorption (carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of type I collagen, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand) in the serum and/or distal femur epiphysis (trabecular bone region), as well as bone mineral status (volumetric bone mineral density of the femur and content of mineral components, including calcium, in the bone tissue at the distal femur epiphysis) were evaluated in female Wistar rats that received a 0.1% aqueous extract of AMP, as the only drinking fluid (prepared from lyophilized extract by Adamed Consumer Healthcare), and/or Cd in diet (1 and 5mg/kg) for 3, 10, 17, and 24 months. Examination of the phytochemical profile of the aronia extract revealed high content of polyphenols (612.40 ± 3.33 mg/g), including anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, phenolic acids, and flavonoids. Among detected compounds anthocyanins were identified as dominating. The exposure to Cd, dose- and duration-dependently, enhanced resorption and inhibited formation of the bone tissue resulting in its decreased mineralization. The administration of AMP under the exposure to 1 and 5 mgCd/kg diet provided important protection from this heavy metal-induced disturbances in the bone turnover and changes in the bone mineral status, and the beneficial impact of polyphenols resulted from their independent action and interaction with Cd. These findings suggest that consumption of Aronia melanocarpa polyphenols may play a role in prevention against female skeleton damage due to chronic exposure to Cd and that chokeberry represents the good natural plant candidate for further investigations of its prophylactic use

  18. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddervold, I S; Bønløkke, J H; Mølhave, L; Massling, A; Jensen, B; Grønborg, T K; Bossi, R; Forchhammer, L; Kjærgaard, S K; Sigsgaard, T

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3 h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m³ (low) and 400 µg/m³ (high) under controlled environmental conditions. The range for PM₂.₅ load observed for single experiments was 165-303 µg/m³ for the low exposure and 205-662 µg/m³ for the high exposure, whereas particle loads during clean air exposure most often were below the detection limit (humans. The knowledge gained in this study on subjective-rated symptoms may be important for understanding human response to wood-smoke exposure.

  19. Effect of two prednisone exposures on mood and declarative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E Sherwood; Beard, Laura; Frol, Alan B; Rush, A John

    2006-07-01

    Corticosteroids are essential for life and an integral part of the stress response. However, in excess, corticosteroids can be associated with a variety of effects on the brain including hippocampal atrophy and even neuronal death, mood changes, and declarative memory impairment. The magnitude of mood change in patients receiving prednisone is reportedly associated with previous lifetime corticosteroid exposure, consistent with a sensitization or kindling process whereby greater effects are observed with repeated exposure. To our knowledge, the effect of multiple corticosteroid exposures on mood and memory has not been previously examined prospectively in animals or humans. In this study, 30 human volunteers, with no history of systemic prescription corticosteroid therapy, were given (in random order using a crossover design) two 3-day exposures of prednisone (60 mg/day) and one of identical placebo, with 11-day washouts between each medication exposure. Before and after each 3-day prednisone/placebo exposure, declarative memory was assessed using different versions of the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) to minimize practice or learning effects, while mood was assessed with the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Young Mania Rating Scale and Internal State Scale. No significant mood changes were found. However, a significant decrease in aspects of RAVLT performance was observed after the first prednisone exposure consistent with a decline in declarative memory performance. The decline in RAVLT performance was significantly smaller after the second prednisone exposure as compared to the initial prednisone exposure. Thus, a second prednisone exposure was associated with an attenuated prednisone-effect on declarative memory. These data suggest tolerance or habituation, rather than sensitization, to prednisone effects on declarative memory during a second exposure. Implications and possible explanations for the findings are discussed.

  20. Nanoparticle exposure biomonitoring: exposure/effect indicator development approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie-Desvergne, C.; Dubosson, M.; Lacombe, M.; Brun, V.; Mossuz, V.

    2015-05-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles (NP) is more and more widespread in various industrial sectors. The inhalation route of exposure is a matter of concern (adverse effects of air pollution by ultrafine particles and asbestos). No NP biomonitoring recommendations or standards are available so far. The LBM laboratory is currently studying several approaches to develop bioindicators for occupational health applications. As regards exposure indicators, new tools are being implemented to assess potentially inhaled NP in non-invasive respiratory sampling (nasal sampling and exhaled breath condensates (EBC)). Diverse NP analytical characterization methods are used (ICP-MS, dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray analysis). As regards effect indicators, a methodology has been developed to assess a range of 29 cytokines in EBCs (potential respiratory inflammation due to NP exposure). Secondly, collaboration between the LBM laboratory and the EDyp team has allowed the EBC proteome to be characterized by means of an LC-MS/MS process. These projects are expected to facilitate the development of individual NP exposure biomonitoring tools and the analysis of early potential impacts on health. Innovative techniques such as field-flow fractionation combined with ICP-MS and single particle-ICPMS are currently being explored. These tools are directly intended to assist occupational physicians in the identification of exposure situations.

  1. In vitro effect of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser exposure on morphology, hydroxyapatite composition and microhardness properties of human dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retna Apsari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was employed as a source of ablation. The fundamental wavelength of the laser is 1064 nm, with pulse duration of 8 nanosecond operates with uniphase mode of TEM00. In the following experiments, dentin samples (without caries and plaque are exposed to pulse laser with Q-switching effect at various energy dose. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on dentin samples using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser exposure. Methods: The laser was operated in repetitive mode with frequency of 10 Hz. The energy dose of the laser was ranging from 13.9 J/cm2, 21.2 J/cm2 and 41.7 J/cm2. The target material comprised of human dentin. The laser was exposed in one mode with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Energy delivered to the target through free beam technique. The exposed human dentin was examined by using x-ray diffraction (XRD and fluoresence scanning electron microscopy for energy dispersive (FESEM-EDAX. Microhardness of human dentin were examined by using microhardness vickers test (MVT. Results: The result obtained showed that the composition of hydroxyapatite of the dentin after exposed by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser are 75.02% to 78.21%, with microhardness of 38.7 kgf/mm2 to 86.6 kgf/mm2. This indicated that exposed pulsed Nd:YAG laser on the human dentin attributed to the phototermal effect. The power density created by the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser enables the heat to produce optical breakdown (melting and hole associated with plasma formation and shock wave propagation, from energy dose of 21.2 J/cm2. From XRD analysis showed that the exposure of Nd:YAG laser did not involve in changing the crystal structure of the dentin, but due to photoablation effect. Conclusion: In conclusion, the application of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser as contactless drills in dentistry should be regarded as an alternative to the classical mechanical technique to improve the quality of the dentin treatment.Latar belakang

  2. Inhale while Dreaming: Human Exposure to Pollutants while Sleeping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsi, Richard; Spilak, Michal; Boor, E., Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Humans spend approximately 1/3 of their total life asleep, typically on a mattress or other bedding. Despite the fact that there is no other location where most of humanity spends more time, this microenvironment has received little attention from the standpoint of human exposure to a wide range ...

  3. Environmental chemical exposures and human epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lifang; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Dong; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Every year more than 13 million deaths worldwide are due to environmental pollutants, and approximately 24% of diseases are caused by environmental exposures that might be averted through preventive measures. Rapidly growing evidence has linked environmental pollutants with epigenetic variations, including changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Environ mental chemicals and epigenetic changes All of these mechanisms are likely to play important roles in disease aetiology, and their modifications due to environmental pollutants might provide further understanding of disease aetiology, as well as biomarkers reflecting exposures to environmental pollutants and/or predicting the risk of future disease. We summarize the findings on epigenetic alterations related to environmental chemical exposures, and propose mechanisms of action by means of which the exposures may cause such epigenetic changes. We discuss opportunities, challenges and future directions for future epidemiology research in environmental epigenomics. Future investigations are needed to solve methodological and practical challenges, including uncertainties about stability over time of epigenomic changes induced by the environment, tissue specificity of epigenetic alterations, validation of laboratory methods, and adaptation of bioinformatic and biostatistical methods to high-throughput epigenomics. In addition, there are numerous reports of epigenetic modifications arising following exposure to environmental toxicants, but most have not been directly linked to disease endpoints. To complete our discussion, we also briefly summarize the diseases that have been linked to environmental chemicals-related epigenetic changes. PMID:22253299

  4. Developmental and reproductive outcomes in humans and animals after glyphosate exposure: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy Lavin; Watson, Rebecca E; DeSesso, John M

    2012-01-01

    Glyphosate is the active ingredient of several widely used herbicide formulations. Glyphosate targets the shikimate metabolic pathway, which is found in plants but not in animals. Despite the relative safety of glyphosate, various adverse developmental and reproductive problems have been alleged as a result of exposure in humans and animals. To assess the developmental and reproductive safety of glyphosate, an analysis of the available literature was conducted. Epidemiological and animal reports, as well as studies on mechanisms of action related to possible developmental and reproductive effects of glyphosate, were reviewed. An evaluation of this database found no consistent effects of glyphosate exposure on reproductive health or the developing offspring. Furthermore, no plausible mechanisms of action for such effects were elucidated. Although toxicity was observed in studies that used glyphosate-based formulations, the data strongly suggest that such effects were due to surfactants present in the formulations and not the direct result of glyphosate exposure. To estimate potential human exposure concentrations to glyphosate as a result of working directly with the herbicide, available biomonitoring data were examined. These data demonstrated extremely low human exposures as a result of normal application practices. Furthermore, the estimated exposure concentrations in humans are >500-fold less than the oral reference dose for glyphosate of 2 mg/kg/d set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA 1993). In conclusion, the available literature shows no solid evidence linking glyphosate exposure to adverse developmental or reproductive effects at environmentally realistic exposure concentrations.

  5. The mere exposure effect for visual image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazuya; Yagi, Yoshihiko; Sato, Nobuya

    2017-08-30

    Mere exposure effect refers to a phenomenon in which repeated stimuli are evaluated more positively than novel stimuli. We investigated whether this effect occurs for internally generated visual representations (i.e., visual images). In an exposure phase, a 5 × 5 dot array was presented, and a pair of dots corresponding to the neighboring vertices of an invisible polygon was sequentially flashed (in red), creating an invisible polygon. In Experiments 1, 2, and 4, participants visualized and memorized the shapes of invisible polygons based on different sequences of flashed dots, whereas in Experiment 3, participants only memorized positions of these dots. In a subsequent rating phase, participants visualized the shape of the invisible polygon from allocations of numerical characters on its vertices, and then rated their preference for invisible polygons (Experiments 1, 2, and 3). In contrast, in Experiment 4, participants rated the preference for visible polygons. Results showed that the mere exposure effect appeared only when participants visualized the shape of invisible polygons in both the exposure and rating phases (Experiments 1 and 2), suggesting that the mere exposure effect occurred for internalized visual images. This implies that the sensory inputs from repeated stimuli play a minor role in the mere exposure effect. Absence of the mere exposure effect in Experiment 4 suggests that the consistency of processing between exposure and rating phases plays an important role in the mere exposure effect.

  6. Prenatal Exposure to Progesterone Affects Sexual Orientation in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, June M; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Sanders, Stephanie A

    2017-07-01

    Prenatal sex hormone levels affect physical and behavioral sexual differentiation in animals and humans. Although prenatal hormones are theorized to influence sexual orientation in humans, evidence is sparse. Sexual orientation variables for 34 prenatally progesterone-exposed subjects (17 males and 17 females) were compared to matched controls (M age = 23.2 years). A case-control double-blind design was used drawing on existing data from the US/Denmark Prenatal Development Project. Index cases were exposed to lutocyclin (bioidentical progesterone = C21H30O2; M W : 314.46) and no other hormonal preparation. Controls were matched on 14 physical, medical, and socioeconomic variables. A structured interview conducted by a psychologist and self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data on sexual orientation, self-identification, attraction to the same and other sex, and history of sexual behavior with each sex. Compared to the unexposed, fewer exposed males and females identified as heterosexual and more of them reported histories of same-sex sexual behavior, attraction to the same or both sexes, and scored higher on attraction to males. Measures of heterosexual behavior and scores on attraction to females did not differ significantly by exposure. We conclude that, regardless of sex, exposure appeared to be associated with higher rates of bisexuality. Prenatal progesterone may be an underappreciated epigenetic factor in human sexual and psychosexual development and, in light of the current prevalence of progesterone treatment during pregnancy for a variety of pregnancy complications, warrants further investigation. These data on the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous progesterone also suggest a potential role for natural early perturbations in progesterone levels in the development of sexual orientation.

  7. Effects of exposure to gradient magnetic fields emitted by nuclear magnetic resonance devices on clonogenic potential and proliferation of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Camisa, Vincenzo; Leone, Lucia; Pinto, Rosanna; Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Giorda, Ezio; Carsetti, Rita; Zaffina, Salvatore; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Teofili, Luciana; Grassi, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates effects of gradient magnetic fields (GMFs) emitted by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices on hematopoietic stem cells. Field measurements were performed to assess exposure to GMFs of staff working at 1.5 T and 3 T MRI units. Then an exposure system reproducing measured signals was realized to expose in vitro CD34+ cells to GMFs (1.5 T-protocol and 3 T-protocol). CD34+ cells were obtained by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting from six blood donors and three MRI-exposed workers. Blood donor CD34+ cells were exposed in vitro for 72 h to 1.5 T or 3 T-protocol and to sham procedure. Cells were then cultured and evaluated in colony forming unit (CFU)-assay up to 4 weeks after exposure. Results showed that in vitro GMF exposure did not affect cell proliferation but instead induced expansion of erythroid and monocytes progenitors soon after exposure and for the subsequent 3 weeks. No decrease of other clonogenic cell output (i.e., CFU-granulocyte/erythroid/macrophage/megakaryocyte and CFU-granulocyte/macrophage) was noticed, nor exposed CD34+ cells underwent the premature exhaustion of their clonogenic potential compared to sham-exposed controls. On the other hand, pilot experiments showed that CD34+ cells exposed in vivo to GMFs (i.e., samples from MRI workers) behaved in culture similarly to sham-exposed CD34+ cells, suggesting that other cells and/or microenvironment factors might prevent GMF effects on hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Accordingly, GMFs did not affect the clonogenic potential of umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells exposed in vitro together with the whole mononuclear cell fraction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effects of ethanol exposure on nervous system development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Gregory J; Zhang, Chengjin; Ojiaku, Princess; Bell, Vanessa; Devkota, Shailendra; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) is a teratogen that adversely affects nervous system development in a wide range of animal species. In humans numerous congenital abnormalities arise as a result of fetal alcohol exposure, leading to a spectrum of disorders referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). These abnormalities include craniofacial defects as well as neurological defects that affect a variety of behaviors. These human FASD phenotypes are reproduced in the rodent central nervous system (CNS) following prenatal ethanol exposure. While the study of ethanol effects on zebrafish development has been more limited, several studies have shown that different strains of zebrafish exhibit differential susceptibility to ethanol-induced cyclopia, as well as behavioral deficits. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of ethanol on CNS development also appear to be shared between rodent and zebrafish. Thus, zebrafish appear to recapitulate the observed effects of ethanol on human and mouse CNS development, indicating that zebrafish can serve as a complimentary developmental model system to study the molecular basis of FASD. Recent studies examining the effect of ethanol exposure on zebrafish nervous system development are reviewed, with an emphasis on attempts to elucidate possible molecular pathways that may be impacted by developmental ethanol exposure. Recent work from our laboratories supports a role for perturbed extracellular matrix function in the pathology of ethanol exposure during zebrafish CNS development. The use of the zebrafish model to assess the effects of ethanol exposure on adult nervous system function as manifested by changes in zebrafish behavior is also discussed.

  9. Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post-exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post-exposure prophylaxis among doctors in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. ... of PEP policy in the hospital. The level of knowledge concerning the high-risk fluid and three drugs used in PEP is high.

  10. Effects of tissue conductivity and electrode area on internal electric fields in a numerical human model for ELF contact current exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarao, H.; Kuisti, H.; Korpinen, L.; Hayashi, N.; Isaka, K.

    2012-05-01

    Contact currents flow through the human body when a conducting object with different potential is touched. There are limited reports on numerical dosimetry for contact current exposure compared with electromagnetic field exposures. In this study, using an anatomical human adult male model, we performed numerical calculation of internal electric fields resulting from 60 Hz contact current flowing from the left hand to the left foot as a basis case. Next, we performed a variety of similar calculations with varying tissue conductivity and contact area, and compared the results with the basis case. We found that very low conductivity of skin and a small electrode size enhanced the internal fields in the muscle, subcutaneous fat and skin close to the contact region. The 99th percentile value of the fields in a particular tissue type did not reliably account for these fields near the electrode. In the arm and leg, the internal fields for the muscle anisotropy were identical to those in the isotropy case using a conductivity value longitudinal to the muscle fibre. Furthermore, the internal fields in the tissues abreast of the joints such as the wrist and the elbow, including low conductivity tissues, as well as the electrode contact region, exceeded the ICNIRP basic restriction for the general public with contact current as the reference level value.

  11. Parabens as Urinary Biomarkers of Exposure in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Xiaoyun; Bishop, Amber M.; Reidy, John A; Needham, Larry L.; Calafat, Antonia M

    2006-01-01

    Background Parabens appear frequently as antimicrobial preservatives in cosmetic products, in pharmaceuticals, and in food and beverage processing. In vivo and in vitro studies have revealed weak estrogenic activity of some parabens. Widespread use has raised concerns about the potential human health risks associated with paraben exposure. Objectives Assessing human exposure to parabens usually involves measuring in urine the conjugated or free species of parabens or their metabolites. In ani...

  12. Developing a Salivary Antibody Multiplex Immunoassay to Measure Human Exposure to Environmental Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The etiology and impacts of human exposure to environmental pathogens are of major concern worldwide and, thus, the ability to assess exposure and infections using cost effective, high-throughput approaches would be indispensable. The principal objective of this work is to devel...

  13. Effect of exposure to lead on reproduction in male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasek, M.; Kostial, K.

    1987-09-01

    The objective of present study was to determine the effect of chronic oral exposure to different levels of lead on male reproductive performance since oral exposure data are more relevant to human environmental exposure. Additionally, most previous results have been obtained after parenteral administration of lead. These experiments were performed on rats by using the incidence of pregnancy to assess male fertility and litter size and pup weight as indicators of the lead effect on perinatal development. Similar parameters were used in reproduction studies by other authors.

  14. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  15. Neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects of pesticide exposures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, L.; Beseler, C.; Bouchard, M.F.; Bellinger, D.C.; Colosio, C.; Grandjean, P.; Harari, R.; Kootbodien, T.; Kromhout, H.; Little, F.; Meijster, T.; Moretto, A.; Rohlman, D.S.; Stallones L.

    2012-01-01

    The association between pesticide exposure and neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects is an area of increasing concern. This symposium brought together participants to explore the neurotoxic effects of pesticides across the lifespan. Endpoints examined included neurobehavioral, affective and

  16. Neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects of pesticide exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    London, Leslie; Beseler, Cheryl; Bouchard, Maryse F

    2012-01-01

    The association between pesticide exposure and neurobehavioral and neurodevelopmental effects is an area of increasing concern. This symposium brought together participants to explore the neurotoxic effects of pesticides across the lifespan. Endpoints examined included neurobehavioral, affective ...

  17. Structural change of human hair induced by mercury exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xueqing; Du, Rong; Li, Yufeng; Li, Bai; Cai, Quan; Mo, Guang; Gong, Yu; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2013-10-01

    Mercury is one of the most hazardous pollutants in the environment. In this paper, the structural change of human hair induced by mercury exposure was studied. Human hair samples were, respectively, collected from the normal Beijing area and the Hg-contaminated Wanshan area of the Guizhou Province, China. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy was used to detect the element contents. A small angle X-ray scattering technique was used to probe the structural change. Three reflections with 8.8, 6.7, and 4.5 nm spacing were compared between the normal and the Hg-contaminated hair samples. The results confirm that the 4.5 nm reflection is from the ordered fibrillar structure of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in proteoglycan (PG) that composes the matrix around the intermediate filaments. The increase of Ca content makes the regular oriented fibrillar structure of GAG transform to a random oriented one, broadening the angular extent of the reflection with 4.5 nm spacing. However, overdose Hg makes the core proteins where the ordered fibrils of GAG are attached become coiled, which destroys the ordered arrangements of fibrillar GAG in PG, resulting in the disappearance of the reflections with 4.5 nm spacing. The disappearance of the 4.5 nm reflection can be used as a bioindicator of overdose Hg contamination to the human body. A supercoiled-coil model of hair nanoscale structure and a possible mechanism of mercury effect in human hair are proposed in this paper.

  18. Human exposure to pulsed fields in the frequency range from 6 to 100 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Morimoto, Ryota; Heinonen, Juhani; Jokela, Kari; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-09-01

    Restrictions on human exposure to electromagnetic waves at frequencies higher than 3-10 GHz are defined in terms of the incident power density to prevent excessive temperature rise in superficial tissue. However, international standards and guidelines differ in their definitions of how the power density is interpreted for brief exposures. This study investigated how the temperature rise was affected by exposure duration at frequencies higher than 6 GHz. Far-field exposure of the human face to pulses shorter than 10 s at frequencies from 6 to 100 GHz was modelled using the finite-difference time-domain method. The bioheat transfer equation was used for thermal modelling. We investigated the effects of frequency, polarization, exposure duration, and depth below the skin surface on the temperature rise. The results indicated limitations in the current human exposure guidelines and showed that radiant exposure, i.e. energy absorption per unit area, can be used to limit temperature rise for pulsed exposure. The data are useful for the development of human exposure guidelines at frequencies higher than 6 GHz.

  19. Cadmium and children : Exposure and health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeters, G.; Hond, E. Den; Zuurbier, M.; Naginiene, R.; Hazel, P.J. van den; Stilianakis, N.; Ronchetti, R.; Koppe, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium exposure and accumulation in the body start at young age. Exposure routes in children are mainly via food, environmental tobacco smoke and house dust. Excretion from the body is limited. Cadmium accumulation in the kidney is responsible for effects such as nephrotoxicity and osteoporosis

  20. Cadmium and children : Exposure and health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeters, G.; Hond, E. Den; Zuurbier, M.; Naginiene, R.; Hazel, P.J. van den; Stilianakis, N.; Ronchetti, R.; Koppe, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium exposure and accumulation in the body start at young age. Exposure routes in children are mainly via food, environmental tobacco smoke and house dust. Excretion from the body is limited. Cadmium accumulation in the kidney is responsible for effects such as nephrotoxicity and osteoporosis whi

  1. Effects of exposure of blood hemoglobin to nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, H.; Mohler, J.G.

    1985-08-01

    The effect of oxygen exposure on nitrosythemoglobin of whole human blood or its buffered solution has been determined. The amount of methemoglobin formed was determined by anaerobic modification of the Evelyn-Malloy method: 59% of the total hemoglobin of whole blood was oxidized to methemoglobin in the first 15 min of the oxygen exposure and 78% of the total hemoglobin was oxidized after 120 min of oxygen exposure. Similar results were obtained when nitrosylhemoglobin buffered solutions were exposed to the oxygen of the air. A comparison of the present in vitro results with these obtained by injecting nitric oxide into the rat peritoneal cavity and its implications are discussed.

  2. Sampling strategy for estimating human exposure pathways to consumer chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Papadopoulou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to consumer chemicals has become a worldwide concern. In this work, a comprehensive sampling strategy is presented, to our knowledge being the first to study all relevant exposure pathways in a single cohort using multiple methods for assessment of exposure from each exposure pathway. The selected groups of chemicals to be studied are consumer chemicals whose production and use are currently in a state of transition and are; per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs, traditional and “emerging” brominated flame retardants (BFRs and EBFRs, organophosphate esters (OPEs and phthalate esters (PEs. Information about human exposure to these contaminants is needed due to existing data gaps on human exposure intakes from multiple exposure pathways and relationships between internal and external exposure. Indoor environment, food and biological samples were collected from 61 participants and their households in the Oslo area (Norway on two consecutive days, during winter 2013-14. Air, dust, hand wipes, and duplicate diet (food and drink samples were collected as indicators of external exposure, and blood, urine, blood spots, hair, nails and saliva as indicators of internal exposure. A food diary, food frequency questionnaire (FFQ and indoor environment questionnaire were also implemented. Approximately 2000 samples were collected in total and participant views on their experiences of this campaign were collected via questionnaire. While 91% of our participants were positive about future participation in a similar project, some tasks were viewed as problematic. Completing the food diary and collection of duplicate food/drink portions were the tasks most frequent reported as “hard”/”very hard”. Nevertheless, a strong positive correlation between the reported total mass of food/drinks in the food record and the total weight of the food/drinks in the collection bottles was observed, being an indication of accurate performance

  3. HExpoChem: a systems biology resource to explore human exposure to chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Kalhauge, Christian Gram

    2013-01-01

    of computational biology approaches are needed to assess the health risks of chemical exposure. Here we present HExpoChem, a tool based on environmental chemicals and their bioactivities on human proteins with the objective of aiding the qualitative exploration of human exposure to chemicals. The chemical......Summary: Humans are exposed to diverse hazardous chemicals daily. Although an exposure to these chemicals is suspected to have adverse effects on human health, mechanistic insights into how they interact with the human body are still limited. Therefore, acquisition of curated data and development......–protein interactions have been enriched with a quality-scored human protein–protein interaction network, a protein–protein association network and a chemical–chemical interaction network, thus allowing the study of environmental chemicals through formation of protein complexes and phenotypic outcomes enrichment...

  4. Effects of Ambient Air Pollution Exposure on Olfaction: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Gaurav S.; Suh, Helen H.; Pinto, Jayant M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Olfactory dysfunction affects millions of people worldwide. This sensory impairment is associated with neurodegenerative disease and significantly decreased quality of life. Exposure to airborne pollutants has been implicated in olfactory decline, likely due to the anatomic susceptibility of the olfactory nerve to the environment. Historically, studies have focused on occupational exposures, but more recent studies have considered effects from exposure to ambient air pollutants. Objectives: To examine all relevant human data evaluating a link between ambient pollution exposure and olfaction and to review supporting animal data in order to examine potential mechanisms for pollution-associated olfactory loss. Methods: We identified and reviewed relevant articles from 1950 to 2015 using PubMed and Web of Science and focusing on human epidemiologic and pathophysiologic studies. Animal studies were included only to support pertinent data on humans. We reviewed findings from these studies evaluating a relationship between environmental pollutant exposure and olfactory function. Results: We identified and reviewed 17 articles, with 1 additional article added from a bibliography search, for a total of 18 human studies. There is evidence in human epidemiologic and pathologic studies that increased exposure to ambient air pollutants is associated with olfactory dysfunction. However, most studies have used proxies for pollution exposure in small samples of convenience. Human pathologic studies, with supporting animal work, have also shown that air pollution can contact the olfactory epithelium, translocate to the olfactory bulb, and migrate to the olfactory cortex. Pollutants can deposit at each location, causing direct damage and disruption of tissue morphology or inducing local inflammation and cellular stress responses. Conclusions: Ambient air pollution may impact human olfactory function. Additional studies are needed to examine air pollution

  5. Parameter variation effects on temperature elevation in a steady-state, one-dimensional thermal model for millimeter wave exposure of one- and three-layer human tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanezaki, Akio; Shirai, Hiroshi [Chuo University, 1-13-27 Kasuga, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8551 (Japan); Hirata, Akimasa; Watanabe, Soichi, E-mail: ahirata@nitech.ac.j [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2010-08-21

    The present study describes theoretical parametric analysis of the steady-state temperature elevation in one-dimensional three-layer (skin, fat and muscle) and one-layer (skin only) models due to millimeter-wave exposure. The motivation of this fundamental investigation is that some variability of warmth sensation in the human skin has been reported. An analytical solution for a bioheat equation was derived by using the Laplace transform for the one-dimensional human models. Approximate expressions were obtained to investigate the dependence of temperature elevation on different thermal and tissue thickness parameters. It was shown that the temperature elevation on the body surface decreases monotonically with the blood perfusion rate, heat conductivity and heat transfer from the body to air. Also revealed were the conditions where maximum and minimum surface temperature elevations were observed for different thermal and tissue thickness parameters. The surface temperature elevation in the three-layer model is 1.3-2.8 times greater than that in the one-layer model. The main reason for this difference is attributed to the adiabatic nature of the fat layer. By considering the variation range of thermal and tissue thickness parameters which causes the maximum and minimum temperature elevations, the dominant parameter influencing the surface temperature elevation was found to be the heat transfer coefficient between the body surface and air.

  6. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE INDUCES EXPOSURE OF FIBRINOGEN RECEPTORS ON HUMAN PLATELETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于希春; 吴其夏

    1995-01-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the exposure of platelet fibrinogen receptors was investigated.The results showed that:1)LPS increased the binding of fibrinogen-gold complexes to platelets and the labels were primarily limited to shape-changed platelets;2)LPS caused a dose-dependent rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in platelets;3)LPS induced the activation of platelet protein kinase C(PKC) and the phosphorylation of glycoprotein llla (GP llla) which was inhibited by H-7.All these results suggest that stimulation of platelets with LPS causes a conformational change in glycoprotein llb/Illa (GPllb/llla) through platelet shape change and/or phosphorylation of GPllla via PKC,which serves to expose the fibrinogen binding sites of GPllb/llla on human platelets.

  7. Human reproductive system disturbances and pesticide exposure in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Koifman; Rosalina Jorge Koifman; Armando Meyer

    2002-01-01

    The observation of reproductive disturbances in humans and in the wildlife has been reported in the last decade in different countries. Exposure to different chemicals possibly acting in the endocrine system or endocrine disruptors, including pesticides, has been a hypothesis raised to explain the observed changes. This paper aimed to present results of an epidemiological ecologic study carried out to explore population data on pesticides exposure in selected Brazilian states in the eighties ...

  8. Developing human health exposure scenarios for petroleum substances under REACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.; De Wilde, P.; Maksimainen, K.; Margary, A.; Money, C.; Pizzella, G.; Svanehav, T.; Tsang, W.; Urbanus, J.; Rohde, A.

    2012-12-15

    This report describes the approaches that were adopted by CONCAWE to prepare the human exposure estimates in the chemical safety assessments of the REACH registration dossiers for petroleum substances based on all applicable regulatory guidance. Separate exposure estimates were developed for workers and for consumers and included inhalation and dermal routes. The complex nature of petroleum substances required various scientifically justified refinements of the regulatory guidance.

  9. Health Effects of Exposures to Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... database Top of Page Effects of Other Mercury Compounds High exposure to inorganic mercury may result in damage to the gastrointestinal tract, the nervous system, and the kidneys. Both inorganic and organic mercury are absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and ...

  10. Health effects of prenatal radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Pamela M; Fletcher, Stacy

    2010-09-01

    Pregnant women are at risk of exposure to nonionizing and ionizing radiation resulting from necessary medical procedures, workplace exposure, and diagnostic or therapeutic interventions before the pregnancy is known. Nonionizing radiation includes microwave, ultrasound, radio frequency, and electromagnetic waves. In utero exposure to nonionizing radiation is not associated with significant risks; therefore, ultrasonography is safe to perform during pregnancy. Ionizing radiation includes particles and electromagnetic radiation (e.g., gamma rays, x-rays). In utero exposure to ionizing radiation can be teratogenic, carcinogenic, or mutagenic. The effects are directly related to the level of exposure and stage of fetal development. The fetus is most susceptible to radiation during organogenesis (two to seven weeks after conception) and in the early fetal period (eight to 15 weeks after conception). Noncancer health effects have not been detected at any stage of gestation after exposure to ionizing radiation of less than 0.05 Gy (5 rad). Spontaneous abortion, growth restriction, and mental retardation may occur at higher exposure levels. The risk of cancer is increased regardless of the dose. When an exposure to ionizing radiation occurs, the total fetal radiation dose should be estimated and the mother counseled about the potential risks so that she can make informed decisions about her pregnancy management.

  11. Human dermal exposure to galaxolide from personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, P; Cruz, A; Santos, L; Alves, A

    2013-06-01

    Musks are synthetic fragrances applied on personal care and household products as fixatives, by retarding the release of other fragrances with higher volatility. Galaxolide is the most used polycyclic musk since the 90th decade, and it has been detected in several environmental and biological matrices, particularly in human tissues and fluids. For exposure assessment purposes, large-monitoring data need to be obtained and rapid but reliable analytical techniques are requested. The main objective of this study is to develop and validate a new and fast analytical methodology to quantify galaxolide in personal care products and to apply this method to real matrices like skin care products (creams and lotions), shower products (soap bar), hair care products (shampoo and hair conditioner) and oral care products (toothpaste), to evaluate the human dermal exposure risk. A dispersive solid-phase extraction is proposed, using QuEChERS methodology, followed by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Some extraction parameters were studied, like the ratio of sample/solvent amounts, the homogenization time, the salt addition effect and the used sorbents. The validation parameters of the developed method were the following: a linearity range of 0.005-1.002 mg kg⁻¹ sample, a limit of detection of 0.001 mg kg⁻¹ sample, repeatability between 0.7% and 11.3% (variation coefficient of six standard injections), an intermediate precision of 2.5% (variation coefficient of six independent analysis of the same sample), mean recoveries ranging from 65% (soap bar) to 95% (body cream) and 3% of global uncertainty in most of the working range. The time of analysis, including the extraction steps, is 60 min, allowing a throughput of 4 samples h⁻¹ . Galaxolide was detected in all of the seven analysed products in concentrations ranging from 0.04 ± 0.01 mg kg⁻¹ sample (toothpaste) to 280.78 ± 8.19 mg kg⁻¹ sample (perfumed body cream), which may correspond to a significant estimated

  12. Human exposure to endocrine disruptors and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidou, M; Maravelias, C; Spiliopoulou, C

    2009-09-01

    Endocrine system is one of the most sensitive communication networks of the human body which influences all aspects of human health and well-being, including reproductive potential, cognitive functions, thyroid and metabolism, digestion and hormonal balance. In recent years basic laboratory research has been focused on the potential relationship between environmental contaminants and cellular endocrine function. Environmental contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment, alter endocrine physiology and produce endocrine disruption without acting as classic toxicants. These endocrine disruptors (EDCs) are lipophilic and stored for long periods of time in the adipose tissue. Maternal exposure to EDCs during pregnancy and lactation has as a result the exposure of the fetus and neonate through placenta and breast milk. It has been recognized that human milk is the best natural food for neonates providing immunologic, developmental and practical advantages throughout childhood. However, contamination of human milk by the presence of environmental toxicants is widespread through the past decades due to inadequately controlled pollution. Persistent pesticides, chemical solvents and others tend to invade slowly the environment, to bioaccumulate in the food chain and to have long half-lives in animals and humans. During the past fifteen years, the scientific interest has been focused on xenoestrogens, i.e.,environmental chemicals with estrogen disrupting activity. Certain adverse health and reproductive outcomes are attributed to these chemicals in wildlife, in laboratory animals, as well as in humans. Although most toxic agents are hazardous in high doses, the human health risks associated with EDCs concern exposure to low doses. The human health risks that may be associated with these low-level but constant exposures are still largely unknown and highly controversial. In this paper, we review available data on environmental chemicals present in breast milk that may

  13. A systematic review of the human body burden of e-waste exposure in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingbin; Li, Jinhui

    2014-07-01

    As China is one of the countries facing the most serious pollution and human exposure effects of e-waste in the world, much of the population there is exposed to potentially hazardous substances due to informal e-waste recycling processes. This report reviews recent studies on human exposure to e-waste in China, with particular focus on exposure routes (e.g. dietary intake, inhalation, and soil/dust ingestion) and human body burden markers (e.g. placenta, umbilical cord blood, breast milk, blood, hair, and urine) and assesses the evidence for the association between such e-waste exposure and the human body burden in China. The results suggest that residents in the e-waste exposure areas, located mainly in the three traditional e-waste recycling sites (Taizhou, Guiyu, and Qingyuan), are faced with a potential higher daily intake of these pollutants than residents in the control areas, especially via food ingestion. Moreover, pollutants (PBBs, PBDEs, PCBs, PCDD/Fs, and heavy metals) from the e-waste recycling processes were all detectable in the tissue samples at high levels, showing that they had entered residents' bodies through the environment and dietary exposure. Children and neonates are the groups most sensitive to the human body effects of e-waste exposure. We also recorded plausible outcomes associated with exposure to e-waste, including 7 types of human body burden. Although the data suggest that exposure to e-waste is harmful to health, better designed epidemiological investigations in vulnerable populations, especially neonates and children, are needed to confirm these associations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Perspectives for integrating human and environmental exposure assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciffroy, P; Péry, A R R; Roth, N

    2016-10-15

    Integrated Risk Assessment (IRA) has been defined by the EU FP7 HEROIC Coordination action as "the mutual exploitation of Environmental Risk Assessment for Human Health Risk Assessment and vice versa in order to coherently and more efficiently characterize an overall risk to humans and the environment for better informing the risk analysis process" (Wilks et al., 2015). Since exposure assessment and hazard characterization are the pillars of risk assessment, integrating Environmental Exposure assessment (EEA) and Human Exposure assessment (HEA) is a major component of an IRA framework. EEA and HEA typically pursue different targets, protection goals and timeframe. However, human and wildlife species also share the same environment and they similarly inhale air and ingest water and food through often similar overlapping pathways of exposure. Fate models used in EEA and HEA to predict the chemicals distribution among physical and biological media are essentially based on common properties of chemicals, and internal concentration estimations are largely based on inter-species (i.e. biota-to-human) extrapolations. Also, both EEA and HEA are challenged by increasing scientific complexity and resources constraints. Altogether, these points create the need for a better exploitation of all currently existing data, experimental approaches and modeling tools and it is assumed that a more integrated approach of both EEA and HEA may be part of the solution. Based on the outcome of an Expert Workshop on Extrapolations in Integrated Exposure Assessment organized by the HEROIC project in January 2014, this paper identifies perspectives and recommendations to better harmonize and extrapolate exposure assessment data, models and methods between Human Health and Environmental Risk Assessments to support the further development and promotion of the concept of IRA. Ultimately, these recommendations may feed into guidance showing when and how to apply IRA in the regulatory decision

  15. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    OpenAIRE

    Jolyon H Hendry; Simon, Steven L.; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2009-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations li...

  16. Scanning electron microscopy study of the effect of the brushing time on the human tooth dentin after exposure to acidic softdrinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwoni, Eri; Choi, Samjin; Cheong, Youjin; Park, Ki-Ho; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2012-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the abrasive and erosive potential of the brushing time on the dentin surface eroded by acidic soft drinks to suggest an optimized toothbrushing start time after the consumption of cola (pH 2.52) in children. Thirty-six non-carious primary central incisors were assigned to 12 experimental groups (n = 3) based on the erosive and abrasive treatment protocols. Cola exposure was used as the erosive treatment. Three brushing durations (5, 15, and 30 sec) and four brushing start times (immediately, 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min) after an erosive pre-treatment were used for the abrasive treatment. Toothbrushing after exposure to acidic soft drinks led to an increase in the open-tubule fraction and microstructural changes. Toothbrushing immediately after the erosive pre-treatment showed the largest abrasive and erosive potential on the dentin whereas that 60 and 120 min after the pre-treatment showed the least abrasive and erosive potential on the dentin. Toothbrushing for both 60 and 120 min after the pre-treatment showed similar erosive and abrasive potentials on the dentin. The brushing duration showed no effect on the erosive and abrasive potential on the dentin. Therefore, to achieve the desired tooth surface cleaning and less surface lesion on the dentin surface, toothbrushing should be performed at least 1 hour after cola consumption. Three-minute brushing after cola consumption is sufficient to prevent dental lesions, and prolonged brushing can irritate the gingival tissues.

  17. Effects of dielectric values of human body on specific absorption rate following 430, 800, and 1200 MHz RF exposure to ingestible wireless device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L S; Meng, Max Q-H; Hu, Chao

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the compliance of ingestible wireless device (IWD) within safety guidelines, the SAR, and near fields of IWD in two realistic human body models, whose dielectric values are increased from the original by +/-10% and +/- 20% are studied using the finite-difference time-domain method. The radiation characteristics of the IWD in the human body models with changed and unchanged dielectric values are compared. Simulations are carried out at 13 scenarios where the IWD is placed at center positions of abdomens in the two models at the operation frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. Results show that variation of radiation intensity near the surface of abdomen is around 2.5, 2.6, and 3.5 dB within 20% variation of dielectric values corresponding to the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. Electric fields in the anterior of the human body models are higher than those in the posterior for all scenarios. SAR values increase with the increase of conductivities of human body tissues, and usually decrease with the increase of relative permittivities of human body tissues. The effect of the dielectric values of human body on SAR is orientation-, human-body-, and frequency-dependent. A variation up to 20% in conductivities and relative permittivities alone or simultaneously always causes a SAR variation less than 10%, 20%, and 30% at the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. As far as the compliance of safety was concerned, the IWD was safe to be used at the input power less than 12.6, 9.3, and 8.4 mW, according to the IEEE safety standards at the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively.

  18. National Surveillance of Occupational Exposure to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Ricketts

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In September 1985, a prospective study was initiated to monitor the occurrence of occupational exposures to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected blood and body fluids in Canada. This program was coordinated by the Federal Centre for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS (now the Division of HIV/AIDS Epidemiology at the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control. The objective was to determine the risk to workers of acquiring HIV infection as a result of exposure to HIV-infected blood and other body fluids. To be eligible, a worker must have sustained a documented parenteral, mucous membrane or skin contact exposure to blood or body fluids from an HIV-infected person. A baseline specimen was collected within a week of the exposure and then at six weeks, 12 weeks, six months and 12 months. Information concerning the type of exposure, precautions used and post exposure treatment was submitted to the Federal Centre for AIDS on standard data collection forms. All information was anonymous, identified only by a code number. Guidelines for counselling an exposed employee were provided with enrollment material. As of July 29, 1991, 414 employees have been included in the study. Two hundred and thirty-seven of the 414 exposures (57% were needlestick injuries of which 167 (70% were sustained by nurses. Other exposures consisted of open wound contamination, eye splashes, scalpel wounds and skin contact with blood and body fluids. To date, there have been no seroconversions among workers enrolled in the surveillance program.

  19. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K.; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air–liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products. PMID:25046638

  20. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-10-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air-liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products.

  1. Mixtures of endocrine disrupting contaminants modelled on human high end exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Kortenkamp, A.; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2012-01-01

    in vivo endocrine disrupting effects and information about human exposures was available, including phthalates, pesticides, UV‐filters, bisphenol A, parabens and the drug paracetamol. The mixture ratio was chosen to reflect high end human intakes. To make decisions about the dose levels for studies...... though each individual chemical is present at low, ineffective doses, but the effects of mixtures modelled based on human intakes have not previously been investigated. To address this issue for the first time, we selected 13 chemicals for a developmental mixture toxicity study in rats where data about...... in the rat, we employed the point of departure index (PODI) approach, which sums up ratios between estimated exposure levels and no‐observed‐adverse‐effect‐level (NOAEL) values of individual substances. For high end human exposures to the 13 selected chemicals, we calculated a PODI of 0.016. As only a PODI...

  2. Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Freire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Disaster risk is not fully characterized without taking into account vulnerability and population exposure. Assessment of earthquake risk in urban areas would benefit from considering the variation of population distribution at more detailed spatial and temporal scales, and from a more explicit integration of this improved demographic data with existing seismic hazard maps. In the present work, "intelligent" dasymetric mapping is used to model population dynamics at high spatial resolution in order to benefit the analysis of spatio-temporal exposure to earthquake hazard in a metropolitan area. These night- and daytime-specific population densities are then classified and combined with seismic intensity levels to derive new spatially-explicit four-class-composite maps of human exposure. The presented approach enables a more thorough assessment of population exposure to earthquake hazard. Results show that there are significantly more people potentially at risk in the daytime period, demonstrating the shifting nature of population exposure in the daily cycle and the need to move beyond conventional residence-based demographic data sources to improve risk analyses. The proposed fine-scale maps of human exposure to seismic intensity are mainly aimed at benefiting visualization and communication of earthquake risk, but can be valuable in all phases of the disaster management process where knowledge of population densities is relevant for decision-making.

  3. Human exposure to emissions from building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Hauschildt, P.; Pejtersen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives. Reactions to emissions from building matrials were studied in a climate chamber as part of an intervention study in an office building. New and existing flooring materials were compared with regard to comfort and health.Methods. Twenty subjects were exposed four times for six hours...... effects by linoleum and carpet used and that changing to vinyl flooring may reduce these....

  4. [Health effects of environmental noise exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röösli, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In the EU 27 countries about 100 million persons are exposed to road traffic noise above 55 dB (LDEN) according to the European Environment Agency. Exposure to railway noise affects 16 million individuals, aircraft noise 4 million and industry noise 1 million persons. Although the proportion of people reporting to be annoyed by noise exposure is substantial, health effects of noise is rarely an issue in general practitioners' consultations. According to stress models chronic noise exposure results in an increased allostatic load by direct physiological responses as well as psychological stress responses including sleep disturbances. In relation to acute and chronic noise exposure an increase of blood pressure was observed in epidemiological studies. An association between ischemic heart diseases and noise exposure was observed in various studies. However, the data is less consistent for other cardiovascular diseases and for cognitive effects in children. The association between metabolic syndrome and noise has rarely been investigated so far. Recently an association between road traffic noise and diabetes was observed in a Danish cohort study. Given the plausibility for a noise effect, general practitioners should consider noise exposure in patients with increased cardiometabolic risk.

  5. Human disease resulting from exposure to electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David O

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) include everything from cosmic rays through visible light to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electricity. While the high frequency fields have sufficient energy to cause cancer, the question of whether there are human health hazards associated with communication radiofrequency (RF) EMFs and those associated with use of electricity remains controversial. The issue is more important than ever given the rapid increase in the use of cell phones and other wireless devices. This review summarizes the evidence stating that excessive exposure to magnetic fields from power lines and other sources of electric current increases the risk of development of some cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, and that excessive exposure to RF radiation increases risk of cancer, male infertility, and neurobehavioral abnormalities. The relative impact of various sources of exposure, the great range of standards for EMF exposure, and the costs of doing nothing are also discussed.

  6. Human convective boundary layer and its impact on personal exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan

    People spend most of their time indoors and they are constantly exposed to pollution that affects their health, comfort and productivity. Due to strong economic and environmental pressures to reduce building energy consumption, low air velocity design is gaining popularity; hence buoyancy flows...... differences in pollution concentration mean that personal exposure, rather than average space concentration, determines the risk of elevated exposure. Current room air distribution design practice does not take into account the air movement induced by the thermal flows from occupants, which often results...... in inaccurate exposure prediction. This highlights the importance of a detailed understanding of the complex air movements that take place in the vicinity of the human body and their impact on personal exposure. The two objectives of the present work are: (i) to examine the extent to which the room air...

  7. Assessing Sources of Human Methylmercury Exposure Using Stable Mercury Isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Miling; Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D

    2014-01-01

    Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new...... method for discerning MeHg exposure sources. We characterized Hg isotope fractionation between humans and their diets using hair samples from Faroese whalers exposed to MeHg predominantly from pilot whales. We observed an increase of 1.75‰ in δ(202)Hg values between pilot whale muscle tissue and Faroese...... whalers' hair but no mass-independent fractionation. We found a similar offset in δ(202)Hg between consumed seafood and hair samples from Gulf of Mexico recreational anglers who are exposed to lower levels of MeHg from a variety of seafood sources. An isotope mixing model was used to estimate individual...

  8. Traditional goat husbandry may substantially contribute to human toxoplasmosis exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raising goats in settings that are highly contaminated with oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii may contribute significantly to human exposure to this zoonotic parasite. Increasing consumption of young goats in Romania, where goats are typically reared in backyards that are also home to cats (the definitiv...

  9. Biocides Steering Group on human exposure assessment: A preliminary report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    In a project granted by DG XI of the European Commission, it is attempted to collate experimental and theoretical data on human (workers and consumers) exposure assessment to biocidal products, and to outline the methodology for sampling and measurement. On the basis of the available evidence, appro

  10. Experimental effects of exposure to pornography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Malamuth, Neil N

    2015-01-01

    Using a randomly selected community sample of 200 Danish young adult men and women in a randomized experimental design, the study investigated the effects of a personality trait (agreeableness), past pornography consumption, and experimental exposure to non-violent pornography on attitudes suppor...... the hierarchical confluence model of sexual aggression and the media literature on affective engagement and priming effects.......Using a randomly selected community sample of 200 Danish young adult men and women in a randomized experimental design, the study investigated the effects of a personality trait (agreeableness), past pornography consumption, and experimental exposure to non-violent pornography on attitudes...

  11. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

    2011-01-07

    Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

  12. Electronic cigarettes: human health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), users and non-users are exposed to the aerosol and product constituents. This is a review of published data on the human health effects of exposure to e-cigarettes and their components. Literature searches were conducted through September 2013 using multiple electronic databases. Forty-four articles are included in this analysis. E-cigarette aerosols may contain propylene glycol, glycerol, flavourings, other chemicals and, usually, nicotine. Aerosolised propylene glycol and glycerol produce mouth and throat irritation and dry cough. No data on the effects of flavouring inhalation were identified. Data on short-term health effects are limited and there are no adequate data on long-term effects. Aerosol exposure may be associated with respiratory function impairment, and serum cotinine levels are similar to those in traditional cigarette smokers. The high nicotine concentrations of some products increase exposure risks for non-users, particularly children. The dangers of secondhand and thirdhand aerosol exposure have not been thoroughly evaluated. Scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes is limited. While e-cigarette aerosol may contain fewer toxicants than cigarette smoke, studies evaluating whether e-cigarettes are less harmful than cigarettes are inconclusive. Some evidence suggests that e-cigarette use may facilitate smoking cessation, but definitive data are lacking. No e-cigarette has been approved by FDA as a cessation aid. Environmental concerns and issues regarding non-user exposure exist. The health impact of e-cigarettes, for users and the public, cannot be determined with currently available data.

  13. Human response to combined indoor environment exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn

    2002-01-01

    Most thermal comfort standards and guidelines presume sedentary, light activity and a neutral overall thermal sensation when predicting local thermal discomfort. In addition, current standards specify criteria for separate aspects of the indoor environment, e.g. thermal climate, air quality or no...... thermal discomfort factors were observed. Limited evidence was found of significant interactions between different aspects of the indoor environment. Only for the effect of air temperature and air humidity on sensory air quality were well-estabished relationships available.......Most thermal comfort standards and guidelines presume sedentary, light activity and a neutral overall thermal sensation when predicting local thermal discomfort. In addition, current standards specify criteria for separate aspects of the indoor environment, e.g. thermal climate, air quality...

  14. Probabilistic integrated risk assessment of human exposure risk to environmental bisphenol A pollution sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Keng-Yen; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Chio, Chia-Pin; Liao, Chung-Min

    2016-10-01

    Environmental bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been linked to a variety of adverse health effects such as developmental and reproductive issues. However, establishing a clear association between BPA and the likelihood of human health is complex yet fundamentally uncertain. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential exposure risks from environmental BPA among Chinese population based on five human health outcomes, namely immune response, uterotrophic assay, cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and behavior change. We addressed these health concerns by using a stochastic integrated risk assessment approach. The BPA dose-dependent likelihood of effects was reconstructed by a series of Hill models based on animal models or epidemiological data. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model that allows estimation of urinary BPA concentration from external exposures. Here we showed that the daily average exposure concentrations of BPA and urinary BPA estimates were consistent with the published data. We found that BPA exposures were less likely to pose significant risks for infants (0-1 year) and adults (male and female >20 years) with human long-term BPA susceptibility in relation to multiple exposure pathways, and for informing the public of the negligible magnitude of environmental BPA pollution impacts on human health.

  15. Biomarkers of nanomaterial exposure and effect: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Manno, Maurizio; Schulte, Paul A.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have induced a widespread production and application of nanomaterials. As a consequence, an increasing number of workers are expected to undergo exposure to these xenobiotics, while the possible hazards to their health remain not being completely understood. In this context, biological monitoring may play a key role not only to identify potential hazards from and to evaluate occupational exposure to nanomaterials, but also to detect their early biological effects to better assess and manage risks of exposure in respect of the health of workers. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide a critical evaluation of potential biomarkers of nanomaterial exposure and effect investigated in human and animal studies. Concerning exposure biomarkers, internal dose of metallic or metal oxide nanoparticle exposure may be assessed measuring the elemental metallic content in blood or urine or other biological materials, whereas specific molecules may be carefully evaluated in target tissues as possible biomarkers of biologically effective dose. Oxidative stress biomarkers, such as 8-hydroxy-deoxy-guanosine, genotoxicity biomarkers, and inflammatory response indicators may also be useful, although not specific, as biomarkers of nanomaterial early adverse health effects. Finally, potential biomarkers from "omic" technologies appear to be quite innovative and greatly relevant, although mechanistic, ethical, and practical issues should all be resolved before their routine application in occupational settings could be implemented. Although all these findings are interesting, they point out the need for further research to identify and possibly validate sensitive and specific biomarkers of exposure and effect, suitable for future use in occupational biomonitoring programs. A valuable contribution may derive from the studies investigating the biological behavior of nanomaterials and the factors influencing their toxicokinetics and reactivity. In

  16. Tumor promotion by exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields below exposure limits for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchl, Alexander; Klose, Melanie; Grote, Karen; Wilhelm, Adalbert F X; Spathmann, Oliver; Fiedler, Thomas; Streckert, Joachim; Hansen, Volkert; Clemens, Markus

    2015-04-17

    The vast majority of in vitro and in vivo studies did not find cancerogenic effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF), i.e. emitted by mobile phones and base stations. Previously published results from a pilot study with carcinogen-treated mice, however, suggested tumor-promoting effects of RF-EMF (Tillmann et al., 2010). We have performed a replication study using higher numbers of animals per group and including two additional exposure levels (0 (sham), 0.04, 0.4 and 2 W/kg SAR). We could confirm and extend the originally reported findings. Numbers of tumors of the lungs and livers in exposed animals were significantly higher than in sham-exposed controls. In addition, lymphomas were also found to be significantly elevated by exposure. A clear dose-response effect is absent. We hypothesize that these tumor-promoting effects may be caused by metabolic changes due to exposure. Since many of the tumor-promoting effects in our study were seen at low to moderate exposure levels (0.04 and 0.4 W/kg SAR), thus well below exposure limits for the users of mobile phones, further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Our findings may help to understand the repeatedly reported increased incidences of brain tumors in heavy users of mobile phones.

  17. Effect of electromagnetic field exposure on the reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gye, Myung Chan; Park, Chan Jin

    2012-03-01

    The safety of human exposure to an ever-increasing number and diversity of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources both at work and at home has become a public health issue. To date, many in vivo and in vitro studies have revealed that EMF exposure can alter cellular homeostasis, endocrine function, reproductive function, and fetal development in animal systems. Reproductive parameters reported to be altered by EMF exposure include male germ cell death, the estrous cycle, reproductive endocrine hormones, reproductive organ weights, sperm motility, early embryonic development, and pregnancy success. At the cellular level, an increase in free radicals and [Ca(2+)]i may mediate the effect of EMFs and lead to cell growth inhibition, protein misfolding, and DNA breaks. The effect of EMF exposure on reproductive function differs according to frequency and wave, strength (energy), and duration of exposure. In the present review, the effects of EMFs on reproductive function are summarized according to the types of EMF, wave type, strength, and duration of exposure at cellular and organism levels.

  18. Electromagnetic field occupational exposure: non-thermal vs. thermal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, M; Zaryabova, V; Ivanova, M

    2013-06-01

    There are a variety of definitions for "non-thermal effects" included in different international standards. They start by the simple description that they are "effects of electromagnetic energy on a body that are not heat-related effects", passing through the very general definition related to low-level effects: "biological effects ascribed to exposure to low-level electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields, i.e. at or below the corresponding dosimetric reference levels in the frequency range covered in this standard (0 Hz-300 GHz)", and going to the concrete definition of "the stimulation of muscles, nerves, or sensory organs, vertigo or phosfenes". Here, we discuss what kind of effect does the non-thermal one has on human body and give data of measurements in different occupations with low-frequency sources of electromagnetic field such as electric power distribution systems, transformers, MRI systems and : video display units (VDUs), whereas thermal effects should not be expected. In some of these workplaces, values above the exposure limits could be found, nevertheless that they are in the term "non-thermal effects" on human body. Examples are workplaces in MRI, also in some power plants. Here, we will not comment on non-thermal effects as a result of RF or microwave exposure because there are not proven evidence about the existance of such effects and mechanisms for them are not clear.

  19. Biomonitoring of the mycotoxin Zearalenone: current state-of-the art and application to human exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mally, Angela; Solfrizzo, Michele; Degen, Gisela H

    2016-06-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN), a mycotoxin with high estrogenic activity in vitro and in vivo, is a widespread food contaminant that is commonly detected in maize, wheat, barley, sorghum, rye and other grains. Human exposure estimates based on analytical data on ZEN occurrence in various food categories and food consumption data suggest that human exposure to ZEN and modified forms of ZEN may be close to or even exceed the tolerable daily intake (TDI) derived by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for some consumer groups. Considering the inherent uncertainties in estimating dietary intake of ZEN that may lead to an under- or overestimation of ZEN exposure and consequently human risk and current lack of data on vulnerable consumer groups, there is a clear need for more comprehensive and reliable exposure data to refine ZEN risk assessment. Human biomonitoring (HBM) is increasingly being recognized as an efficient and cost-effective way of assessing human exposure to food contaminants, including mycotoxins. Based on animal and (limited) human data on the toxicokinetics of ZEN, it appears that excretion of ZEN and its major metabolites may present suitable biomarkers of ZEN exposure. In view of the limitations of available dietary exposure data on ZEN and its modified forms, the purpose of this review is to provide an overview of recent studies utilizing HBM to monitor and assess human exposure to ZEN. Considerations are given to animal and human toxicokinetic data relevant to HBM, analytical methods, and available HBM data on urinary biomarkers of ZEN exposure in different cohorts.

  20. Three dimensional visualisation of human facial exposure to solar ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio

    2007-01-01

    A three dimensional computer model of the human face has been developed to represent solar ultraviolet exposures recorded by dosimeter measurements on a manikin headform under low cloud conditions and various solar zenith angles. Additionally, polysulfone dosimeters have been successfully miniaturised to provide the detailed measurements required across the face. The headform used in this research was scanned at 709 individual locations to make a wireframe mesh consisting of 18 vertical contours and 49 horizontal contours covering half the manikin's frontal facial topography. Additionally, the back of the headform and neck have also been scanned at 576 locations. Each scanned location has been used as a viable dosimeter position on the headform and represents a grid intersection point on the developed computer wireframe. A series of exposures recorded by dosimeters have been translated into three dimensional exposure ratio maps, representing ambient solar ultraviolet exposure. High dosimeter density has allowed for the development of individual topographic contour models which take into account complex variation in the face and improve upon previously employed techniques which utilise fewer dosimeters to interpolate exposure across facial contours. Exposure ratios for solar zenith angle ranges of 0 degrees -30 degrees, 30 degrees -50 degrees, and 50 degrees -80 degrees have been developed.

  1. Effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light exposure with different correlated color temperatures (CCTs) on human lens epithelial cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chen; Li, Xiuyi; Tong, Jianping; Gu, Yangshun; Shen, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Cataract is the major cause for legal blindness in the world. Oxidative stress on the lens epithelial cells (hLECs) is the most important factor in cataract formation. Cumulative light-exposure from widely used light-emitting diodes (LEDs) may pose a potential oxidative threat to the lens epithelium, due to the high-energy blue light component in the white-light emission from diodes. In the interest of perfecting biosafety standards for LED domestic lighting, this study analyzed the photobiological effect of white LED light with different correlated color temperatures (CCTs) on cultured hLECs. The hLECs were cultured and cumulatively exposed to multichromatic white LED light with CCTs of 2954, 5624, and 7378 K. Cell viability of hLECs was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. DNA damage was determined by alkaline comet assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were quantified by flow cytometry. Compared with 2954 and 5624 K LED light, LED light having a CCT of 7378 K caused overproduction of intracellular ROS and severe DNA damage, which triggered G2 /M arrest and apoptosis. These results indicate that white LEDs with a high CCT could cause significant photobiological damage to hLECs. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Parabens as Urinary Biomarkers of Exposure in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaoyun; Bishop, Amber M.; Reidy, John A.; Needham, Larry L.; Calafat, Antonia M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Parabens appear frequently as antimicrobial preservatives in cosmetic products, in pharmaceuticals, and in food and beverage processing. In vivo and in vitro studies have revealed weak estrogenic activity of some parabens. Widespread use has raised concerns about the potential human health risks associated with paraben exposure. Objectives Assessing human exposure to parabens usually involves measuring in urine the conjugated or free species of parabens or their metabolites. In animals, parabens are mostly hydrolyzed to p-hydroxybenzoic acid and excreted in the urine as conjugates. Still, monitoring urinary concentrations of p-hydroxybenzoic acid is not necessarily the best way to assess exposure to parabens. p-Hydroxybenzoic acid is a nonspecific biomarker, and the varying estrogenic bioactivities of parabens require specific biomarkers. Therefore, we evaluated the use of free and conjugated parent parabens as new biomarkers for human exposure to these compounds. Results We measured the urinary concentrations of methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, butyl (n- and iso-), and benzyl parabens in a demographically diverse group of 100 anonymous adults. We detected methyl and n-propyl parabens at the highest median concentrations (43.9 ng/mL and 9.05 ng/mL, respectively) in nearly all (> 96%) of the samples. We also detected other parabens in more than half of the samples (ethyl, 58%; butyl, 69%). Most important, however, we found that parabens in urine appear predominantly in their conjugated forms. Conclusions The results, demonstrating the presence of urinary conjugates of parabens in humans, suggest that such conjugated parabens could be used as exposure biomarkers. Additionally, the fact that conjugates appear to be the main urinary products of parabens may be important for risk assessment. PMID:17185273

  3. Gene expression signatures that predict radiation exposure in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly K Dressman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The capacity to assess environmental inputs to biological phenotypes is limited by methods that can accurately and quantitatively measure these contributions. One such example can be seen in the context of exposure to ionizing radiation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have made use of gene expression analysis of peripheral blood (PB mononuclear cells to develop expression profiles that accurately reflect prior radiation exposure. We demonstrate that expression profiles can be developed that not only predict radiation exposure in mice but also distinguish the level of radiation exposure, ranging from 50 cGy to 1,000 cGy. Likewise, a molecular signature of radiation response developed solely from irradiated human patient samples can predict and distinguish irradiated human PB samples from nonirradiated samples with an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 85%, and specificity of 94%. We further demonstrate that a radiation profile developed in the mouse can correctly distinguish PB samples from irradiated and nonirradiated human patients with an accuracy of 77%, sensitivity of 82%, and specificity of 75%. Taken together, these data demonstrate that molecular profiles can be generated that are highly predictive of different levels of radiation exposure in mice and humans. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that this approach, with additional refinement, could provide a method to assess the effects of various environmental inputs into biological phenotypes as well as providing a more practical application of a rapid molecular screening test for the diagnosis of radiation exposure.

  4. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  5. Prolonged exposure to acetaminophen reduces testosterone production by the human fetal testis in a xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Driesche, Sander; Macdonald, Joni; Anderson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life, although the factors responsible for suppressing fetal testosterone remain largely unknown. Protracted use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism in sons......, but effects on fetal testosterone production have not been demonstrated. We used a validated xenograft model to expose human fetal testes to clinically relevant doses and regimens of acetaminophen. Exposure to a therapeutic dose of acetaminophen for 7 days significantly reduced plasma testosterone (45......% reduction; P = 0.025) and seminal vesicle weight (a biomarker of androgen exposure; 18% reduction; P = 0.005) in castrate host mice bearing human fetal testis xenografts, whereas acetaminophen exposure for just 1 day did not alter either parameter. Plasma acetaminophen concentrations (at 1 hour after...

  6. Current issues in human lead exposure and regulation of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J M; Elias, R W; Grant, L D

    1993-01-01

    Concern about lead as a significant public health problem has increased as epidemiological and experimental evidence has mounted regarding adverse health effects at successively lower levels of lead exposure. This concern has led to downward revision of criteria for acceptable blood lead concentrations to the 10 micrograms/dL mark now designated by EPA as a target level for regulatory development and enforcement/clean-up purposes. Much progress has been made in reducing lead exposures during the past 10-15 years, with marked declines evident both in air lead and blood lead concentrations in parallel to the phase-down of lead in gasoline and notable decreases in food lead exposure due to elimination of lead soldered cans by U.S. food processors. With the lessening of exposure from these sources, the importance of other components of multimedia exposure pathways has grown and stimulated increasing regulatory attention and abatement efforts to reduce health risks associated with lead exposure from drinking water, from lead-based paint, and from household dust and soil contaminated by deteriorating paint, smelter emissions, or various other sources. Increasing attention is also being accorded to reduction of occupational lead exposures (including those related to lead abatement activities), with particular concern for protection of men and women during their reproductive years.

  7. Human arsenic exposure and risk assessment at the landscape level: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasreen Islam; Owens, Gary; Bruce, David; Naidu, Ravi

    2009-04-01

    Groundwater contaminated with arsenic (As), when extensively used for irrigation, causes potentially long term detrimental effects to the landscape. Such contamination can also directly affect human health when irrigated crops are primarily used for human consumption. Therefore, a large number of humans are potentially at risk worldwide due to daily As exposure. Numerous previous studies have been severely limited by small sample sizes which are not reliably extrapolated to large populations or landscapes. Human As exposure and risk assessment are no longer simple assessments limited to a few food samples from a small area. The focus of more recent studies has been to perform risk assessment at the landscape level involving the use of biomarkers to identify and quantify appropriate health problems and large surveys of human dietary patterns, supported by analytical testing of food, to quantify exposure. This approach generates large amounts of data from a wide variety of sources and geographic information system (GIS) techniques have been used widely to integrate the various spatial, demographic, social, field, and laboratory measured datasets. With the current worldwide shift in emphasis from qualitative to quantitative risk assessment, it is likely that future research efforts will be directed towards the integration of GIS, statistics, chemistry, and other dynamic models within a common platform to quantify human health risk at the landscape level. In this paper we review the present and likely future trends of human As exposure and GIS application in risk assessment at the landscape level.

  8. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration.

  9. Physiological responses to exposure to carbon dioxide and human bioeffluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    different cognitive tasks and assessed their comfort and acute health symptoms. Besides, the following were determined: heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation of blood, respiration rate, minute ventilation rate, nasal peak flow, forced expiratory volume, and the end-tidal CO2 pressure (ETCO2). Saliva...... with bioeffluents, the performance of Tsai-Partington test was reduced, and diastolic blood pressure and alpha-amylase increased after exposure compared with their levels before exposure, which may suggest higher arousal/stress. During exposure to CO2 without bioeffluents, the performance of Tsai-Partington test...... also was lower, which may suggest higher stress/arousal, too. However, no effects on blood pressure and alpha-amylase were seen for this exposure....

  10. Linearity of dose-response relationships for human carcinogenic exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.H. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    The shape of dose-response relationships is a critical factor in considering cancer risks for the work place and environmental exposure to carcinogens. Markedly different risk estimates result from assumptions of linearity versus sublinear and threshold assumptions. This paper presents evidence that the relationship between the relative risk of development of cancer and the dose rate to carcinogenic exposures is frequently linear with no evidence for thresholds. Dose-response relationships from four studies of asbestos and lung cancer were examined, all of which were consistent with a linear relationship. Analysis of the relationship between the relative risk of lung cancer and exposure to nickel in a smelter study, selected because of relatively good exposure data, demonstrated a close agreement with a linear relationship. The relationship between the level of arsenic in drinking wter and the prevalence of skin cancer also was linear for males in the highest prevalence age group in Taiwan, although there was some evidence of sublinearity for females and younger persons. Also, the relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the relative risk of lung cancer was very close to linear in many studies. The analysis of these and other studies involving human exposure to carcinogens provides empirical evidence for linearity when the response variable is a rate ratio measure, rather than a risk difference measure. Linearity in dose-response is biologically plausible, without invoking a one-hit model. Except in special circumstances. the epidemiological evidence supports linear extrapolation of cancer relative risks.

  11. Tobacco and Pregnancy: Overview of exposures and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    This opening paper will review the epidemiology of the impact of cigarette smoking and other forms of tobacco exposure on human development. Sources of exposure described include cigarettes and other forms of smoked tobacco, secondhand (environmental) tobacco smoke, several forms...

  12. Exposure assessment in studies on health effects of traffic exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setaelae, S. [Association for the Pulmonary Disabled, Helsinki (Finland); Jaakkola, J.J.K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Public Health

    1995-12-31

    A main source of outdoor air pollution is road traffic, which produces a complex mixture of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile hydrocarbons, airborne particles and some other compounds. Traffic exhaust affects also the concentrations of ozone and other photo chemical oxidants. In earlier studies those components have had remarkable health effects. Several studies on occupational exposure to automobile exhaust have been published and several studies have been observed an association between both outdoor and indoor pollutant levels and health outcomes. However, there are only a few epidemiological studies in which traffic exhaust, a complex mixture, has been studied in its entirety. During recent years, interesting epidemiological studies of the health effects of this complex mixture have been published. Human exposure assessment for traffic exhaust can be categorized according to the environment of exposure (indoors, outdoors, in-traffic) or to the method of exposure assessment (direct or indirect methods). In this presentation the methods are further categorized into (1) traffic activity, (2) air concentration measurements, and (3) dispersion models, in order to better understand the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. The objective of this presentation is to make a critical review of exposure assessments in the epidemiological studies on health effects of traffic exhaust. (author)

  13. Effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures on brain development and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Danielle E; Thorn, Robert J; Passarelli, Emily A; Kapoor, Mrinal; LoPiccolo, Mary K; Richendrfer, Holly A; Colwill, Ruth M; Creton, Robbert

    2015-04-01

    Cyclosporine, a calcineurin inhibitor, is successfully used as an immunosuppressant in transplant medicine. However, the use of this pharmaceutical during pregnancy is concerning since calcineurin is thought to play a role in neural development. The risk for human brain development is difficult to evaluate because of a lack of basic information on the sensitive developmental times and the potentially pleiotropic effects on brain development and behavior. In the present study, we use zebrafish as a model system to examine the effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures. Early embryonic exposures reduced the size of the eyes and brain. Late embryonic exposures did not affect the size of the eyes or brain, but did lead to substantial behavioral defects at the larval stages. The cyclosporine-exposed larvae displayed a reduced avoidance response to visual stimuli, low swim speeds, increased resting, an increase in thigmotaxis, and changes in the average distance between larvae. Similar results were obtained with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506, suggesting that most, but not all, effects on brain development and behavior are mediated by calcineurin inhibition. Overall, the results show that cyclosporine can induce either structural or functional brain defects, depending on the exposure window. The observed functional brain defects highlight the importance of quantitative behavioral assays when evaluating the risk of developmental exposures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pesticides: an update of human exposure and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Pesticides are a family of compounds which have brought many benefits to mankind in the agricultural, industrial, and health areas, but their toxicities in both humans and animals have always been a concern. Regardless of acute poisonings which are common for some classes of pesticides like organophosphoruses, the association of chronic and sub-lethal exposure to pesticides with a prevalence of some persistent diseases is going to be a phenomenon to which global attention has been attracted. In this review, incidence of various malignant, neurodegenerative, respiratory, reproductive, developmental, and metabolic diseases in relation to different routes of human exposure to pesticides such as occupational, environmental, residential, parental, maternal, and paternal has been systematically criticized in different categories of pesticide toxicities like carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, pulmonotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, and metabolic toxicity. A huge body of evidence exists on the possible role of pesticide exposures in the elevated incidence of human diseases such as cancers, Alzheimer, Parkinson, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, asthma, bronchitis, infertility, birth defects, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, diabetes, and obesity. Most of the disorders are induced by insecticides and herbicides most notably organophosphorus, organochlorines, phenoxyacetic acids, and triazine compounds.

  15. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with Increased respiratory morbiditses and susceptibility to Infections Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet Its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known ‘the greater Mexico City area was the pri...

  16. Risk of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: A case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanxin; Li, Qi; Wang, Hui; Wang, Bin; Wang, Xilong; Ren, Aiguo; Tao, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can cause adverse effects on human health. The relative contributions of their two major intake routes (diet and inhalation) to population PAH exposure are still unclear. We modeled the contributions of diet and inhalation to the overall PAH exposure of the population of Beijing in China, and assessed their human incremental lifetime cancer risks (ILCR) using a Mont Carlo simulation approach. The results showed that diet accounted for about 85% of low-molecular-weight PAH (L-PAH) exposure, while inhalation accounted for approximately 57% of high-molecular-weight PAH (H-PAH) exposure of the Beijing population. Meat and cereals were the main contributors to dietary PAH exposure. Both gaseous- and particulate-phase PAHs contributed to L-PAH exposure through inhalation, whereas exposure to H-PAHs was mostly from the particulate-phase. To reduce the cancer incidence of the Beijing population, more attention should be given to inhaled particulate-phase PAHs with considerable carcinogenic potential.

  17. A review of human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kun; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Gosens, Jorrit; Xu, Li; Li, Qiushuang; Wang, Lin; Liu, Shijie

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews recent studies on human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in China, with particular focus on external exposure routes (e.g. diet and dust ingestion, inhalation of air) and internal doses based on biomonitoring studies of PBDEs (e.g. breast milk, blood and hair). PBDE concentrations reported for fish samples collected from electronic waste (e-waste) recycling sites, PBDE manufacturing sites, local markets in selected cities and estuarine areas in China have been compiled. House dust has been a significant contributor to human exposure to PBDEs in many countries. This is especially true for toddlers, who are exposed to significantly higher doses of PBDEs than adults. Infants are also exposed to high levels of PBDEs via breast-feeding. The general population's inhalation exposure to PBDEs from household products is likely a less significant source into the indoor environment. In addition, the contribution of several exposure pathways to PBDEs among various age groups was analyzed. We found that house dust contributed most to the daily exposure to PBDEs for both toddlers and adults in urban areas of China. Furthermore, workers and residents in and around electronic recycling and PBDE manufacturing sites are exposed to the highest PBDE levels among all populations studied thus far. For the occupationally exposed populations, BDE209 was the dominant congener, in most cases. Rigorous pollution prevention and occupational protection measures are needed in China to mitigate potential health effects associated with PBDE exposures.

  18. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  19. Potential Role of Pet Cats As a Sentinel Species for Human Exposure to Flame Retardants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Henríquez-Hernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flame retardants are a wide group of chemicals used by the industry to avoid combustion of materials. These substances are commonly found in plastics, electronic equipment, fabrics, and in many other everyday articles. Subsequently, ubiquitous environmental contamination by these common chemical is frequently reported. In the present study, we have evaluated the level of exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs, and organophosphorous flame retardants (OPFRs in pet cats through the analysis of their serum. We also analyzed the level exposure to such chemicals in a series of 20 cat owners, trying to disclose the role of pet cats as sentinel species of human exposure to FRs. Our results showed that PCBs, banned 40 years ago, showed the lowest levels of exposure, followed by BDEs—banned recently. Congeners PCB-138 and PCB-180 were detected in ≥50% of the series, while BDE-47 was detected in near 90% of the pet cats. On the other hand, the highest levels were that of OPFRs, whose pattern of detection was similar to that observed in humans, thus suggesting a potential role of cats as a sentinel species for human exposure to these currently used FRs. Six out of 11 OPFRs determined [2-ethylhexyldiphenyl phosphate, tributylphosphate, triisobutylphosphate, triphenylphosphate, tris (2-chloroethyl phosphate, and tris (2-chloroisopropyl phosphate] were detected in 100% of the samples. It will be interesting to perform future studied aimed to elucidating the potential toxicological effects of these highly detected chemicals both, in cats and humans.

  20. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-04

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  1. Health Effects of Noise Exposure in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Environmental noise exposure, such as road traffic noise and aircraft noise, is associated with a range of health outcomes in children. Children demonstrate annoyance responses to noise, and noise is also related to lower well-being and stress responses, such as increased levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Noise does not cause more serious mental health problems, but there is growing evidence for an association with increased hyperactivity symptoms. Studies also suggest that noise might cause changes in cardiovascular functioning, and there is some limited evidence for an effect on low birth weight. There is robust evidence for an effect of school noise exposure on children's cognitive skills such as reading and memory, as well as on standardised academic test scores. Environmental noise does not usually reach levels that are likely to affect children's hearing; however, increasing use of personal electronic devices may leave some children exposed to harmful levels of noise.

  2. A comparative study on non-confluent and confluent human malignant brain cancer metabolic response to He-Ne laser exposures: evidence for laser enhanced cellular production of H2O2 and laser induced bystander effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2009-02-01

    Continuous wave He-Ne laser exposures (Intensity = 35 mW/cm2, λ=632.8nm, Fluence range: 1J/cm2 to 50 J/cm2) on non-confluent and fully confluent human malignant glioblastoma cells was found to increase the cellular production levels of H2O2. Modulations in the cellular metabolic activity were detected (through the MTS assay) three days after the laser irradiation. The metabolic activity was found to be dependent on the laser fluence for both cell growth conditions. Furthermore, three days after the laser exposure, the potential laser induced "bystander" effect was tested through the transfer of growth media from laser irradiated cells onto non-irradiated cells. After two additional days of incubation (5 days post exposure), the non-laser irradiated cells grown under the non-confluent condition were found to have a significant increase in their metabolic activities, whereas minimal to null response was found for the fully confluent condition. For cells grown under the non-confluent conditions, modulations in the metabolic activities in the non-irradiated cells were found to be laser fluence dependent from the initial laser exposed cells treatment conditions. The results herein support the hypothesis of an important role for light enhanced cellular H2O2 generation to yield bio-modulatory effects locally and at a distance. The classical "bi-phasic" modulation response of cells to light irradiation is hypothesized to depend upon the quantity of light enhanced H2O2 molecules generated from the mitochondria and the number of cells which interact with the H2O2 molecules.

  3. Exposure Order Effects and Advertising Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Oksana Loginova

    2008-01-01

    This paper applies the theories of exposure order effects, developed in the psychology literature, to an industrial organization model to explore their role in advertising competition. There are two firms and infinitely many identical consumers. The firms produce a homogeneous product and distribute their brands through a common retailer. Consumers randomly arrive at the retailer and buy their most preferred brands. The order in which a consumer sees the advertising messages affects his brand...

  4. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    To establish a relevant in vitro model for systems toxicology-based mechanistic assessment of environmental stressors such as cigarette smoke (CS), we exposed human organotypic bronchial epithelial tissue cultures at the air liquid interface (ALI) to various CS doses. Previously, we compared in vitro gene expression changes with published human airway epithelia in vivo data to assess their similarities. Here, we present a follow-up evaluation of these in vitro transcriptomics data, using comp...

  5. Exposure to Carbon Nanotube Material: Assessment of Nanotube Cytotoxicity Using Human Keratinocyte Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Castranova, Vincent; Kisin, Elena R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Murray, Ashley R.; Gandelsman, Vadim Z.; Maynard, Andrew; Baron, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are new members of carbon allotropes similar to fullerenes and graphite. Because of their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are important for novel applications in the electronics, aerospace, and computer industries. Exposure to graphite and carbon materials has been associated with increased incidence of skin diseases, such as carbon fiber dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, and naevi. We investigated adverse effects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) using a cell culture of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). After 18 h of exposure of HaCaT to SWCNT, oxidative stress and cellular toxicity were indicated by formation of free radicals, accumulation of peroxidative products, antioxidant depletion, and loss of cell viability. Exposure to SWCNT also resulted in ultrastructural and morphological changes in cultured skin cells. These data indicate that dermal exposure to unrefined SWCNT may lead to dermal toxicity due to accelerated oxidative stress in the skin of exposed workers.

  6. Human aflatoxin exposure in Kenya, 2007: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yard, Ellen E.; Daniel, Johnni H.; Lewis, Lauren S.; Rybak, Michael E.; Paliakov, Ekaterina M.; Kim, Andrea A.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Bunnell, Rebecca; Abudo, Mamo Umuro; Akhwale, Willis; Breiman, Robert F.; Sharif, Shahnaaz K.

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins contaminate approximately 25% of agricultural products worldwide. They can cause liver failure and liver cancer. Kenya has experienced multiple aflatoxicosis outbreaks in recent years, often resulting in fatalities. However, the full extent of aflatoxin exposure in Kenya has been unknown. Our objective was to quantify aflatoxin exposure across Kenya. We analysed aflatoxin levels in serum specimens from the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey – a nationally representative, cross-sectional serosurvey. KAIS collected 15,853 blood specimens. Of the 3180 human immunodeficiency virus-negative specimens with ≥1 mL sera, we randomly selected 600 specimens stratified by province and sex. We analysed serum specimens for aflatoxin albumin adducts by using isotope dilution MS/MS to quantify aflatoxin B1-lysine, and normalised with serum albumin. Aflatoxin concentrations were then compared by demographic, socioeconomic and geographic characteristics. We detected serum aflatoxin B1-lysine in 78% of serum specimens (range = Aflatoxin exposure did not vary by sex, age group, marital status, religion or socioeconomic characteristics. Aflatoxin exposure varied by province (p aflatoxin exposure is a public health problem throughout Kenya, and it could be substantially impacting human health. Wide-scale, evidence-based interventions are urgently needed to decrease exposure and subsequent health effects. PMID:23767939

  7. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are asso...

  8. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are asso...

  9. GLI3 Links Environmental Arsenic Exposure and Human Fetal Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F. Winterbottom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although considerable evidence suggests that in utero arsenic exposure affects children's health, these data are mainly from areas of the world where groundwater arsenic levels far exceed the World Health Organization limit of 10 μg/L. We, and others, have found that more common levels of in utero arsenic exposure may also impact children's health. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression of key developmental genes in fetal placenta in a birth cohort of women using unregulated water supplies in a US region with elevated groundwater arsenic. We identified several genes whose expression associated with maternal arsenic exposure in a fetal sex-specific manner. In particular, expression of the HEDGEHOG pathway component, GLI3, in female placentae was both negatively associated with arsenic exposure and positively associated with infant birth weight. This suggests that modulation of GLI3 in the fetal placenta, and perhaps in other fetal tissues, contributes to arsenic's detrimental effects on fetal growth. We showed previously that arsenic-exposed NIH3T3 cells have reduced GLI3 repressor protein. Together, these studies identify GLI3 as a key signaling node that is affected by arsenic, mediating a subset of its effects on developmental signaling and fetal health.

  10. GLI3 Links Environmental Arsenic Exposure and Human Fetal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Emily F; Fei, Dennis L; Koestler, Devin C; Giambelli, Camilla; Wika, Eric; Capobianco, Anthony J; Lee, Ethan; Marsit, Carmen J; Karagas, Margaret R; Robbins, David J

    2015-06-01

    Although considerable evidence suggests that in utero arsenic exposure affects children's health, these data are mainly from areas of the world where groundwater arsenic levels far exceed the World Health Organization limit of 10 μg/L. We, and others, have found that more common levels of in utero arsenic exposure may also impact children's health. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression of key developmental genes in fetal placenta in a birth cohort of women using unregulated water supplies in a US region with elevated groundwater arsenic. We identified several genes whose expression associated with maternal arsenic exposure in a fetal sex-specific manner. In particular, expression of the HEDGEHOG pathway component, GLI3, in female placentae was both negatively associated with arsenic exposure and positively associated with infant birth weight. This suggests that modulation of GLI3 in the fetal placenta, and perhaps in other fetal tissues, contributes to arsenic's detrimental effects on fetal growth. We showed previously that arsenic-exposed NIH3T3 cells have reduced GLI3 repressor protein. Together, these studies identify GLI3 as a key signaling node that is affected by arsenic, mediating a subset of its effects on developmental signaling and fetal health.

  11. Acrolein and Human Disease: Untangling the Knotty Exposure Scenarios Accompanying Several Diverse Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Philip C

    2017-01-17

    Acrolein is a highly toxic electrophile that participates in many diseases, yet efforts to delineate its precise mechanistic contributions to specific conditions are complicated by its wide distribution within human environments. This Perspective develops the proposal that due to its mixed status as environmental pollutant, metabolic byproduct, and endotoxicant which forms via ubiquitous pathophysiological processes, many diseases likely involve acrolein released from multiple sources. Although the category boundaries are indistinct, at least four identifiable exposure scenarios are identifiable. First, in some syndromes, such as those accompanying chronic or acute intoxication with smoke, whatever role acrolein plays in disease pathogenesis mainly traces to exogenous sources such as the combustion of tobacco or other organic matter. A second exposure category involves xenobiotics that undergo metabolism within the body to release acrolein. Still other health conditions, however, involve acrolein that forms via several endogenous pathways, some of which are activated upon intoxication with xenobiotics (i.e., Exposure Category 3), while still others accompany direct physical trauma to body tissues (Exposure Category 4). Further complicating efforts to clarify the role of endogenous acrolein in human disease is the likelihood that many such syndromes are complex phenomena that resemble "chemical mixture exposures" by involving multiple toxic substances simultaneously. This Perspective contends that while recent decades have witnessed much progress in describing the deleterious effects of acrolein at the cellular and molecular levels, more work is needed to define the contributions of different acrolein sources to "real-world" health conditions in human subjects.

  12. Development of an effective dose coefficient database using a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate exposure dose for the usage of NORM-added consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Jaekook; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Chang, Byung-Uck; Min, Chul Hee

    2017-11-01

    After the Fukushima accident in Japan, the Korean Government implemented the "Act on Protective Action Guidelines Against Radiation in the Natural Environment" to regulate unnecessary radiation exposure to the public. However, despite the law which came into effect in July 2012, an appropriate method to evaluate the equivalent and effective doses from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in consumer products is not available. The aim of the present study is to develop and validate an effective dose coefficient database enabling the simple and correct evaluation of the effective dose due to the usage of NORM-added consumer products. To construct the database, we used a skin source method with a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For the validation, the effective dose was compared between the database using interpolation method and the original MC method. Our result showed a similar equivalent dose across the 26 organs and a corresponding average dose between the database and the MC calculations of database with sufficient accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 纳洛酮浓度及作用时间对人离体精子活力的影响%Effects of naloxone concentration and exposure time on human sperm motility in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许波; 王志萍; 王雁娟; 胡毅平; 王丽君; 汪小海

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究纳洛酮浓度及作用时间对人离体精子运动活力的影响.方法 选择人精液20份,上游法优化处理后随机分为对照组(1份)和纳洛酮组(5份).纳洛酮组分别观测4个时间点(0.5h、1h、3h、5h)及5个浓度水平(10-3mol/L、10-4mol/L、10-5 mol/L、10-6 mol/L、10-8mol/L)纳洛酮对精子活力的影响,精子运动功能采用计算机辅助精子分析系统分析.结果 10-8~10-3mol/L纳洛酮作用于精子0.5~5h后,精子活力由无显著变化到显著升高,后显著下降,其变化趋势符合抛物曲线.精子活力效能随作用时间的延长成上升趋势.结论 纳洛酮对人离体精子运动的作用是双向型的,即低浓度对精子运动无影响,稍高浓度显著兴奋精子运动,高浓度可抑制精子运动或产生制动效应.%Objective To study the effects of naloxone concentration and exposure time on human sperm motility in vitro. Methods Sperm samples were collected from 20 healthy men by masturbation.technique and divided into the control group(1 aliquot) and the naloxone group(5 aliquots). Sperm motility in vitro were detected using computer-assisted sperm analysis(CASA) under different concentration of naloxone (10-8~ 10-3 mol/L) and exposure time (0.5~5h). Results Sperm motility was gradually increased and then gradually decreased under the concentration of naloxone (10-8~10-3 mol/L) and different exposure time (0.5~5h). The change trend showed the characteristic of parabola curve. Under same concentration of naloxone, the efficacy was enhanced in parallel with exposure time. Conclusion Naloxone showed dual effects on sperm motility under lower doses incubation and high doses incubation.

  14. Statistical Methods for the Evaluation of Health Effects of Prenatal Mercury Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Keiding, Niels; Grandjean, Philippe;

    2002-01-01

    Environmental epidemiology; Structural equation; Exposure measurement error; multiple endpoints; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; Exposure standards; Benchmark dose......Environmental epidemiology; Structural equation; Exposure measurement error; multiple endpoints; effect of prenatal mercury exposure; Exposure standards; Benchmark dose...

  15. Exposure to phthalates affects calcium handling and intercellular connectivity of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Gillum Posnack

    Full Text Available The pervasive nature of plastics has raised concerns about the impact of continuous exposure to plastic additives on human health. Of particular concern is the use of phthalates in the production of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC products. Di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP is a commonly used phthalate ester plasticizer that imparts flexibility and elasticity to PVC products. Recent epidemiological studies have reported correlations between urinary phthalate concentrations and cardiovascular disease, including an increased risk of high blood pressure and coronary risk. Yet, there is little direct evidence linking phthalate exposure to adverse effects in human cells, including cardiomyocytes.The effect of DEHP on calcium handling was examined using monolayers of gCAMP3 human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, which contain an endogenous calcium sensor. Cardiomyocytes were exposed to DEHP (5 - 50 μg/mL, and calcium transients were recorded using a Zeiss confocal imaging system. DEHP exposure (24 - 72 hr had a negative chronotropic and inotropic effect on cardiomyocytes, increased the minimum threshold voltage required for external pacing, and modified connexin-43 expression. Application of Wy-14,643 (100 μM, an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, did not replicate DEHP's effects on calcium transient morphology or spontaneous beating rate.Phthalates can affect the normal physiology of human cardiomyocytes, including DEHP elicited perturbations in cardiac calcium handling and intercellular connectivity. Our findings call for additional studies to clarify the extent by which phthalate exposure can alter cardiac function, particularly in vulnerable patient populations who are at risk for high phthalate exposure.

  16. Environmental pathways and human exposure to manganese in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADIR HERMES

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of environmental pathways and human exposure to Manganese (Mn in Southern Brazil was performed using two steps. The first step consisted of taking water samples from the surface of the Pardinho River. The average results from this technique showed a significant increase of pollutants, including increased levels of Mn, above the environmentally acceptable standard recommended by the Brazilian National Environment Council. Additionally, 64 soil samples were taken from areas with and without agricultural activity. Many results were above the mean crust and did not indicate significant differences of Mn levels between the sampled areas. For the second step, 12 families were selected and assessed for exposure to Mn in a region with high levels of Mn in the soil. Most of the analyzed foods contained amounts of Mn above the reference values, indicating that food can be an important source of exposure. The Mn content from the hair of most subjects studied was also high compared to reference values from non-exposed populations. Although the contamination appeared to come from a natural origin, the results found in the present study showed that the Mn levels present in the Pardinho River Basin are a relevant public health issue.

  17. New approach for assessing human perfluoroalkyl exposure via hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Andreia; Jacobs, Griet; Vanermen, Guido; Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years hair has been increasingly used as alternative matrix in human biomonitoring (HBM) of environmental pollutants. Sampling advantages and time integration of exposure assessment seems the most attractive features of hair matrix. In the current study, a novel miniaturized method was developed and validated for measuring 15 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluoro n-butanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA), perfluoro n-hexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluoro n-heptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluor n-octanoic acid (PFOA), perfluoro n-nonanoic acid (PFNA), perfluoro tetradecanoic acid (PFTeDA), perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluoro pentane sulfonic acid (PFPeS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluoroheptane sulfonic acid (PFHpS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorononane sulfonic acid (PFNS), perfluorodecane sulfonic acid (PFDS) and perfluorododecane sulfonic acid (PFDoS) in human hair by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). After extraction using ethyl acetate, dispersive ENVI-Carb was used for clean-up. Good intra- and inter-day precision for low (LQ 5 ng/g hair) and high spike (HQ 15n g/g) levels were achieved (in general RSD hair and 3-13 pg/g hair, respectively. The method limit of quantification (LOQm) ranged between 6 and 301 pg/g hair. The PFAS levels were measured in 30 human hair samples indicating that the levels are low (14-1534 pg/g hair). Some PFAS were not present in any hair sample (e.g. PFHpA, PFTeDA, PFNA, PFPeS, PFHpS, PFOS and PFNS), while other PFAS were frequently detected (PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS, PFDS and PFDoS) in human hair. Although levels in general were low, there is evidence of higher human exposure to some analytes, such as PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS, and PFDoS. The current study shows that hair is a suitable alternative non-invasive matrix for exposure assessment of PFAS.

  18. Effect of Occupational Cadmium Exposure on Parathyroid Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Beshir, Safia; Shahy, Eman M; Shaheen, Weam

    2016-06-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is used in many industries. High-level exposure is associated with severe kidney and bone damage. This study investigates the possible effect of occupational cadmium exposure on parathyroid gland and some minerals in workers. Environmental air monitoring of cadmium was done. Serum and urine cadmium levels, kidney function, some minerals, and plasma parathormone were estimated in the studied groups. The exposed workers had significantly higher Cd concentration in serum and urine than controls. The mean levels of plasma parathyroid hormone, serum phosphorus and magnesium were significantly lower among the exposed group. However, the mean levels of serum creatinine and calcium were significantly higher in the same group when compared to referents. There was a significant positive correlation between Cd concentration in the serum and urine for the exposed group. The biological Cd exposure indices correlated positively with serum calcium and negatively with plasma PTH level. The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints, bone ache, joint pain and muscle spasm were more prevalent among the exposed workers compared with the controls with odds ratio 4.316, 3.053 and 3.103 respectively. Occupational cadmium exposure has an adverse effect on PTH level and serum human minerals.

  19. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Kesic

    Full Text Available Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2, whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI. Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility.

  20. Climate change, ozone depletion and the impact on ultraviolet exposure of human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diffey, Brian [Regional Medical Physics Department, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle NE4 6BE (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-07

    For 30 years there has been concern that anthropogenic damage to the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer will lead to an increase of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface, with a consequent adverse impact on human health, especially to the skin. More recently, there has been an increased awareness of the interactions between ozone depletion and climate change (global warming), which could also impact on human exposure to terrestrial UV. The most serious effect of changing UV exposure of human skin is the potential rise in incidence of skin cancers. Risk estimates of this disease associated with ozone depletion suggest that an additional peak incidence of 5000 cases of skin cancer per year in the UK would occur around the mid-part of this century. Climate change, which is predicted to lead to an increased frequency of extreme temperature events and high summer temperatures, will become more frequent in the UK. This could impact on human UV exposure by encouraging people to spend more time in the sun. Whilst future social trends remain uncertain, it is likely that over this century behaviour associated with climate change, rather than ozone depletion, will be the largest determinant of sun exposure, and consequent impact on skin cancer, of the UK population. (topical review)

  1. Climate change, ozone depletion and the impact on ultraviolet exposure of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffey, Brian

    2004-01-07

    For 30 years there has been concern that anthropogenic damage to the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer will lead to an increase of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the Earth's surface, with a consequent adverse impact on human health, especially to the skin. More recently, there has been an increased awareness of the interactions between ozone depletion and climate change (global warming), which could also impact on human exposure to terrestrial UV. The most serious effect of changing UV exposure of human skin is the potential rise in incidence of skin cancers. Risk estimates of this disease associated with ozone depletion suggest that an additional peak incidence of 5000 cases of skin cancer per year in the UK would occur around the mid-part of this century. Climate change, which is predicted to lead to an increased frequency of extreme temperature events and high summer temperatures, will become more frequent in the UK. This could impact on human UV exposure by encouraging people to spend more time in the sun. Whilst future social trends remain uncertain, it is likely that over this century behaviour associated with climate change, rather than ozone depletion, will be the largest determinant of sun exposure, and consequent impact on skin cancer, of the UK population.

  2. Health effects assessment of exposure to particles from wood smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Elsa; Dybdahl, M. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, National Food Institute, Dept. of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, Soeborg (Denmark)); Larsen, Poul Bo (Danish Environmental Protection Agency, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-07-01

    The number of residential wood burning devices has increased in Denmark during the latest years and it has been estimated that there in 2005 were about 551,000 wood stoves and about 48,000 wood boilers in Denmark. This has resulted in an increased exposure of the general Danish population to pollutants associated with residential wood smoke. New Danish monitoring results on particulate matter (PM) in ambient air have shown elevated PM levels in areas with many wood stoves, particularly during wintertime when wood burning is common. Due to the size distribution of wood smoke particles essentially all will be contained in the PM{sub 2.5} fraction. It has been estimated that about 17,665 tonnes PM{sub 2.5} per year (2005) in Denmark come from residential wood combustion. Therefore, there is an increasing concern that adverse human health effects might be associated with the increased exposure to residential wood smoke. This project has been set up in order to review the scientific literature concerning adverse health effects of pollutants associated with residential wood smoke with the main focus on particulate matter and to quantify and evaluate, if possible, the impact on human health of the increased exposure to particles in residential wood smoke. (au)

  3. Human exposure to arsenic in groundwater from Lahore district, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Mehwish; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined As concentrations in healthy volunteers from three different age groups (children, adults and old age) residing in Lahore, Pakistan to gain insight into arsenic exposure to humans via drinking water. The results revealed that the concentrations of As were significantly (p<0.05) different among different sites, while non significant trends were observed among different age classes. As concentrations in blood and nails samples showed a significant (p<0.05) positive correlation. The mean concentrations of As were higher in nails samples (1.43μg/g) followed by blood samples (1.15μg/L); urine samples (0.82μg/l) and hair samples (0.74μg/g) based on all sites. The antioxidants enzyme activities in blood samples showed a significant (p<0.01) decrease with the increase in As concentrations. The result suggests that urgent action is needed to prevent further human exposure to As.

  4. Digital music exposure reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Prell, C. G.; Dell, S.; Hensley, B.; Hall, J. W.; Campbell, K. C. M.; Antonelli, P. J.; Green, G. E.; Miller, J. M.; Guire, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives One of the challenges for evaluating new otoprotective agents for potential benefit in human populations is availability of an established clinical paradigm with real world relevance. These studies were explicitly designed to develop a real-world digital music exposure that reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal hearing human subjects. Design Thirty-three subjects participated in studies that measured effects of digital music player use on hearing. Subjects selected either rock or pop music, which was then presented at 93–95 (n=10), 98–100 (n=11), or 100–102 (n=12) dBA in-ear exposure level for a period of four hours. Audiograms and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured prior to and after music exposure. Post-music tests were initiated 15 min, 1 hr 15 min, 2 hr 15 min, and 3 hr 15 min after the exposure ended. Additional tests were conducted the following day and one week later. Results Changes in thresholds after the lowest level exposure were difficult to distinguish from test-retest variability; however, TTS was reliably detected after higher levels of sound exposure. Changes in audiometric thresholds had a “notch” configuration, with the largest changes observed at 4 kHz (mean=6.3±3.9dB; range=0–13 dB). Recovery was largely complete within the first 4 hours post-exposure, and all subjects showed complete recovery of both thresholds and DPOAE measures when tested 1-week post-exposure. Conclusions These data provide insight into the variability of TTS induced by music player use in a healthy, normal-hearing, young adult population, with music playlist, level, and duration carefully controlled. These data confirm the likelihood of temporary changes in auditory function following digital music player use. Such data are essential for the development of a human clinical trial protocol that provides a highly powered design for evaluating novel therapeutics in human clinical trials. Care must be

  5. Human exposure to soil contaminants in subarctic Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Stephanie Reyes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical contaminants in the Canadian subarctic present a health risk with exposures primarily occurring via the food consumption. Objective: Characterization of soil contaminants is needed in northern Canada due to increased gardening and agricultural food security initiatives and the presence of known point sources of pollution. Design: A field study was conducted in the western James Bay Region of Ontario, Canada, to examine the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (ΣDDT, other organochlorines, and metals/metalloids in potentially contaminated agriculture sites. Methods: Exposure pathways were assessed by comparing the estimated daily intake to acceptable daily intake values. Ninety soil samples were collected at random (grid sampling from 3 plots (A, B, and C in Fort Albany (on the mainland, subarctic Ontario, Canada. The contaminated-soil samples were analysed by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Results: The range of ΣDDT in 90 soil samples was below the limit of detection to 4.19 mg/kg. From the 3 soil plots analysed, Plot A had the highest ΣDDT mean concentration of 1.12 mg/kg, followed by Plot B and Plot C which had 0.09 and 0.01 mg/kg, respectively. Concentrations of other organic contaminants and metals in the soil samples were below the limit of detection or found in low concentrations in all plots and did not present a human health risk. Conclusions: Exposure analyses showed that the human risk was below regulatory thresholds. However, the ΣDDT concentration in Plot A exceeded soil guidelines set out by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment of 0.7 mg/kg, and thus the land should not be used for agricultural or recreational purposes. Both Plots B and C were below threshold limits, and this land can be used for agricultural purposes.

  6. Sustained induction of cytochrome P4501A1 in human hepatoma cells by co-exposure to benzo[a]pyrene and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole underlies the synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gábelová, Alena, E-mail: alena.gabelova@savba.sk [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Poláková, Veronika [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Prochazka, Gabriela [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kretová, Miroslava; Poloncová, Katarína; Regendová, Eva; Luciaková, Katarína [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Segerbäck, Dan [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    To gain a deeper insight into the potential interactions between individual aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture, several benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) binary mixtures were studied. The biological activity of the binary mixtures was investigated in the HepG2 and WB-F344 liver cell lines and the Chinese hamster V79 cell line that stably expresses the human cytochrome P4501A1 (hCYP1A1). In the V79 cells, binary mixtures, in contrast to individual carcinogens, caused a significant decrease in the levels of micronuclei, DNA adducts and gene mutations, but not in cell survival. Similarly, a lower frequency of micronuclei and levels of DNA adducts were found in rat liver WB-F344 cells treated with a binary mixture, regardless of the exposure time. The observed antagonism between B[a]P and DBC may be due to an inhibition of Cyp1a1 expression because cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC showed a decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA levels. In human liver HepG2 cells exposed to binary mixtures for 2 h, a reduction in micronuclei frequency was also found. However, after a 24 h treatment, synergism between B[a]P and DBC was determined based on DNA adduct formation. Accordingly, the up-regulation of CYP1A1 expression was detected in HepG2 cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC. Our results show significant differences in the response of human and rat cells to B[a]P:DBC mixtures and stress the need to use multiple experimental systems when evaluating the potential risk of environmental pollutants. Our data also indicate that an increased expression of CYP1A1 results in a synergistic effect of B[a]P and DBC in human cells. As humans are exposed to a plethora of noxious chemicals, our results have important implications for human carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • B[a]P:DBC mixtures were less genotoxic in V79MZh1A1 cells than B[a]P and DBC alone. • An antagonism between B[a]P and DBC was determined in rat liver WB-F344 cells. • The inhibition of CYP1a1 expression by B[a]P:DBC mixture

  7. Does exposure prediction bias health-effect estimation?: The relationship between confounding adjustment and exposure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalu, Matthew; Dominici, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    In environmental epidemiology, we are often faced with 2 challenges. First, an exposure prediction model is needed to estimate the exposure to an agent of interest, ideally at the individual level. Second, when estimating the health effect associated with the exposure, confounding adjustment is needed in the health-effects regression model. The current literature addresses these 2 challenges separately. That is, methods that account for measurement error in the predicted exposure often fail to acknowledge the possibility of confounding, whereas methods designed to control confounding often fail to acknowledge that the exposure has been predicted. In this article, we consider exposure prediction and confounding adjustment in a health-effects regression model simultaneously. Using theoretical arguments and simulation studies, we show that the bias of a health-effect estimate is influenced by the exposure prediction model, the type of confounding adjustment used in the health-effects regression model, and the relationship between these 2. Moreover, we argue that even with a health-effects regression model that properly adjusts for confounding, the use of a predicted exposure can bias the health-effect estimate unless all confounders included in the health-effects regression model are also included in the exposure prediction model. While these results of this article were motivated by studies of environmental contaminants, they apply more broadly to any context where an exposure needs to be predicted.

  8. Effects of acute electromagnetic fields exposure on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity during resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bin; Shao, Qing; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin; Wu, Tongning

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of acute radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. We designed a controllable LTE-related EMF exposure environment at 2.573 GHz and performed the 30 min real/sham exposure experiments on human brain under the safety limits. The resting state fMRI signals were collected before and after EMF exposure. Then voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity method was utilized to evaluate the acute effects of LTE EMF exposure on the homotopic functional connectivity between two human hemispheres. Based on our previous research, we further demonstrated that the 30 min short-term LTE EMF exposure would modulate the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity in resting state around the medial frontal gyrus and the paracentral lobule during the real exposure.

  9. Short GSM mobile phone exposure does not alter human auditory brainstem response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuróczy György

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are about 1.6 billion GSM cellular phones in use throughout the world today. Numerous papers have reported various biological effects in humans exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones. The aim of the present study was to advance our understanding of potential adverse effects of the GSM mobile phones on the human hearing system. Methods Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR was recorded with three non-polarizing Ag-AgCl scalp electrodes in thirty young and healthy volunteers (age 18–26 years with normal hearing. ABR data were collected before, and immediately after a 10 minute exposure to 900 MHz pulsed electromagnetic field (EMF emitted by a commercial Nokia 6310 mobile phone. Fifteen subjects were exposed to genuine EMF and fifteen to sham EMF in a double blind and counterbalanced order. Possible effects of irradiation was analyzed by comparing the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after genuine/sham EMF exposure. Results Paired sample t-test was conducted for statistical analysis. Results revealed no significant differences in the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after 10 minutes of genuine/sham EMF exposure. Conclusion The present results suggest that, in our experimental conditions, a single 10 minute exposure of 900 MHz EMF emitted by a commercial mobile phone does not produce measurable immediate effects in the latency of auditory brainstem waves I, III and V.

  10. Maternal exposure to diluted diesel engine exhaust alters placental function and induces intergenerational effects in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentino, Sarah A; Tarrade, Anne; Aioun, Josiane; Mourier, Eve; Richard, Christophe; Dahirel, Michèle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Fournier, Natalie; Aubrière, Marie-Christine; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Camous, Sylvaine; Guinot, Marine; Charlier, Madia; Aujean, Etienne; Al Adhami, Hala; Fokkens, Paul H; Agier, Lydiane; Boere, John A; Cassee, Flemming R; Slama, Rémy; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airborne pollution is a rising concern in urban areas. Epidemiological studies in humans and animal experiments using rodent models indicate that gestational exposure to airborne pollution, in particular diesel engine exhaust (DE), reduces birth weight, but effects depend on exposure

  11. Tumorigenic effects in Wistar rats orally administered benzo[a] pyrene for two years (gavage studies). Implications for human cancer risks associated with oral exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese ED; Muller JJA; Mohn GR; Dortant PM; Wester PW; LEO; LPI; CSR

    2002-01-01

    Humans are exposed via the environment and via food to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), mixtures considered carcinogenic by IARC. A quantitative cancer risk assessment for oral exposure is hampered by the absence of adequate data. The need for experimental data is substantiated by the fact th

  12. Health effects assessment of chemical exposures: ARIES methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, L; Montero, M.; Rabago, I.; Vidania, R.

    1995-07-01

    In this work, we present ARIES* update: a system designed in order to facilitate the human health effects assessment produced by accidental release of toxic chemicals. The first version of ARIES was developed in relation to 82/501/EEC Directive about mayor accidents in the chemical industry. So, the first aim was the support of the effects assessment derived for the chemicals included into this directive. From this establishment, it was considered acute exposures for high concentrations. In this report, we present the actual methodology for considering other type of exposures, such as environmental and occupational. Likewise other versions, the methodology comprises two approaches: quantitative and qualitative assessments. Quantitative assessment incorporates the mathematical algorithms useful to evaluate the effects produced by the most important routes of exposure: inhalation, ingestion, eye contact and skin absorption, in a short, medium and long term. It has been included models that realizes an accurate quantification of doses, effects,... and so on, such as simple approaches when the available information is not enough. Qualitative assessment, designed in order to complement or replace the previous one, is incorporated into an informatics system, developed in Clipper. It executes and displays outstanding and important toxicological information of about 100 chemicals. This information comes from ECDIN (Environmental Chemicals Data and Information Network) database through a collaboration with JRC-ISPRA working group. (Author) 24 refs.

  13. Human exposure to soil contamination: a qualitative and quantitative analysis towards proposals for human toxicological intervention values (partly revised edition)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg R van den; LBG

    1994-01-01

    In view of a revision of the Dutch Soil Protection act, proposals are presented in this report for human toxicologically based intervention values for soil and groundwater, calculated from human toxicological guideline values and human exposure. To this purpose the exposure model CSOIL is presented

  14. Biomolecular Effects of Cold Plasma Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Bolshakov, Alexander A.; Chan, Suzanne L.; Stevens, Ramsey D.; Khare, Bishun N.; Meyyappan, M.; Trent, Jonathan D.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of cold plasma exposure on Deinococcus radiodurans, plasmid DNA and model proteins were assessed using microbiological, spectrometric and biochemical techniques. Exposure of D. radiodurans, an extremely radiation resistant microbe, to O2 plasma (less than or equal to 25 W, approx. 45 mTorr, 90 min) yielded a approx. 99.999 % sterilization and the sterilization rate was increased approx. 10-fold at 100 W and 500 mTorr. AFM images shows that the exposed cells are significantly deformed and possess 50-70 nm concavities. IR analysis indicates the chemical degradation of lipids, proteins and carotenoids of the cell wall and membrane. Intracellular damage was indicated by major absorbance loss at 1245, 1651 and 1538/cm corresponding to degradation of DNA and proteins, respectively. Biochemical experiments demonstrate that plasmas induce strand scissions and crosslinking of plasmid DNA, and reduction of enzyme activity; the degradation is power dependent with total sample loss occurring in 60 s at 200 W and 500 mTorr. Emission spectroscopy shows that D. radiodurans is volatilized into CO2, CO, N2 and H2O confirming the removal of biological matter from contaminated surfaces. The O2 plasma impacts several cellular components predominantly through chemical degradation by atomic oxygen. A CO2, plasma, however, was not effective at degrading D. radiodurans, revealing the importance of plasma composition, which has implications for planetary protection and the contamination of Mars.

  15. A model of human nasal epithelial cells adapted for direct and repeated exposure to airborne pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Achard, Sophie; Loret, Thomas; Desauziers, Valérie; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie

    2014-08-17

    Airway epithelium lining the nasal cavity plays a pivotal role in respiratory tract defense and protection mechanisms. Air pollution induces alterations linked to airway diseases such as asthma. Only very few in vitro studies to date have succeeded in reproducing physiological conditions relevant to cellular type and chronic atmospheric pollution exposure. We therefore, set up an in vitro model of human Airway Epithelial Cells of Nasal origin (hAECN) close to real human cell functionality, specifically adapted to study the biological effects of exposure to indoor gaseous pollution at the environmental level. hAECN were exposed under air-liquid interface, one, two, or three-times at 24 h intervals for 1 h, to air or formaldehyde (200 μg/m(3)), an indoor air gaseous pollutant. All experiments were ended at day 4, when both cellular viability and cytokine production were assessed. Optimal adherence and confluence of cells were obtained 96 h after cell seeding onto collagen IV-precoated insert. Direct and repeated exposure to formaldehyde did not produce any cellular damage or IL-6 production change, although weak lower IL-8 production was observed only after the third exposure. Our model is significantly better than previous ones due to cell type and the repeated exposure protocol.

  16. Effects of Acute Exposures to Carbon Dioxide upon Cognitive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, V. E.; Scully, R. R.; Alexander, D. J.; Lam, C. W.; Young, M.; Satish, U.; Basner, M.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) originates from human metabolism and typically remains about 10-fold higher in concentration on the International Space Station (ISS) than at the earth's surface. There have been recurring complaints by crew members of episodes of "mental viscosity" adversely affecting their performance, and there is evidence from the ISS that associates CO2 levels with reports of headaches by crewmembers. Consequently, flight rules have been employed to control CO2 below 3 mm Hg, which is well below the existing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) of 10 mm Hg for 24-hour exposures, and 5.3 mm Hg for exposures of 7 to 180 days. Headaches, while sometime debilitating themselves, are also symptoms that can provide evidence that physiological defense mechanisms have been breached, and there is evidence that CO2 has effects at levels below the threshold for headaches. This concern appears to be substantiated in reports that CO2 at concentrations below 2 mm Hg substantially reduced some cognitive functions that are associated with the ability to make complex decisions in conditions that are characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity, and delayed feedback. These are conditions that could be encountered by crews in off-nominal situations or during the first missions beyond low earth orbit. Therefore, we set out to determine if decision-making under volatile, uncertain, confusing and ambiguous circumstances, where feedback is delayed or absent, is correlated with low levels of CO2 during acute exposures (several hours) in crew-like subjects and to determine if additional cognitive domains are sensitive to concentrations of CO2 at, or below, current ISS levels by using a test battery that is currently available onboard ISS. We enrolled 22 volunteers (8 females, 14 males) between the ages of 30-55 (38.8 +/- 7.0) years whose training and professional experience reflect that of the astronaut corps. Subjects were divided among 4 study

  17. Effective post-exposure treatment of Ebola infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Feldmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola viruses are highly lethal human pathogens that have received considerable attention in recent years due to an increasing re-emergence in Central Africa and a potential for use as a biological weapon. There is no vaccine or treatment licensed for human use. In the past, however, important advances have been made in developing preventive vaccines that are protective in animal models. In this regard, we showed that a single injection of a live-attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vector expressing the Ebola virus glycoprotein completely protected rodents and nonhuman primates from lethal Ebola challenge. In contrast, progress in developing therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infections has been much slower and there is clearly an urgent need to develop effective post-exposure strategies to respond to future outbreaks and acts of bioterrorism, as well as to treat laboratory exposures. Here we tested the efficacy of the vesicular stomatitis virus-based Ebola vaccine vector in post-exposure treatment in three relevant animal models. In the guinea pig and mouse models it was possible to protect 50% and 100% of the animals, respectively, following treatment as late as 24 h after lethal challenge. More important, four out of eight rhesus macaques were protected if treated 20 to 30 min following an otherwise uniformly lethal infection. Currently, this approach provides the most effective post-exposure treatment strategy for Ebola infections and is particularly suited for use in accidentally exposed individuals and in the control of secondary transmission during naturally occurring outbreaks or deliberate release.

  18. Comparison study of the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in human blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Loewenson, R. (Univ. of Zimbabwe (South Africa))

    1989-10-01

    Although exposure to DDT (2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl1)1,1,1,-trichloroethane) is not normally associated with fatality or chronic adverse effects to human life, it is a known hazard to the ecosystem. Blood levels of DDT and some of its derivatives have been used to assess extent of exposure or the body load of DDT in humans. In experimental studies, ingestion of DDT has been associated with reduced liver stores of vitamin A, and increased serum levels of vitamin A. The same study also revealed a significant correlation of vitamin A and DDE serum levels. Generally an increase in excreted 17-B-hydroxycortisone has been associated with DDT exposure. Increased excretion of 6-B-hydroxycortisol has been noted in workers who were involved in the formulation of DDT. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivities of some indices of DDT exposure in humans. The indices which were compared are serum vitamin A and DDE levels and urinary 17-B-hydroxycortisol.

  19. Potential health effects of exposure to carcinogenic compounds in incense smoke in temple workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navasumrit, Panida; Arayasiri, Manasawee; Hiang, Ohmar May Tin; Leechawengwongs, Manoon; Promvijit, Jeerawan; Choonvisase, Suppachai; Chantchaemsai, Samroeng; Nakngam, Netnapa; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2008-05-09

    Incense smoke is a potential hazard to human health due to various airborne carcinogens emitted from incense burning. This study aimed to evaluate the potential health effects of exposure to benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incense smoke in temple workers. Exposure and health risks were assessed through the measurement of ambient exposure as well as through the use of biomarkers of exposure and early biological effects. Ambient air measurement showed that incense burning generates significantly higher levels of airborne benzene (Pincense burning may increase health risk for the development of cancer in temple workers.

  20. The Influence of the Environment and Clothing on Human Exposure to Ultraviolet Light

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Liu; Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objection The aim of this study is to determine the effect of clothing and the environment on human exposure to ultraviolet light. Methods The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensity was measured, and air quality parameters were recorded in 2014 in Beijing, China. Three types of clothing (white polyester cloth, pure cotton white T-shirt, and pure cotton black T-shirt) were individually placed on a mannequin. The ultraviolet (ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B) light intensi...

  1. Mercury Human Exposure in Populations Living Around Lake Tana (Ethiopia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiba, G; Abebe, G; Bravo, Andrea G; Ermias, D; Staffan, Ǻ; Bishop, K

    2017-02-01

    A survey carried out in Lake Tana in 2015 found that Hg levels in some fish species exceeded internationally accepted safe levels for fish consumption. The current study assesses human exposure to Hg through fish consumption around the Lake Tana. Of particular interest was that a dietary intake of fishes is currently a health risk for Bihar Dar residents and anglers. Hair samples were collected from three different groups: anglers, college students and teachers, and daily laborers. A questionary includes gender, age, weight, activity. Frequency of fish consumption and origin of the eaten fish were completed by each participant. Mercury concentrations in hair were significantly higher (P value mercury and age associated with mercury concentration in scalp hair. Mercury concentrations in the hair of men were on average twice the value of the women. Also, users of skin lightening soap on a daily basis had 2.5 times greater mercury in scalp hair than non-users. Despite the different sources of mercury exposure mentioned above, the mercury concentrations of the scalp hair of participants of this study were below levels deemed to pose a threat to health.

  2. Human exposure to fipronil from dogs treated with frontline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, K A; Canerdy, T D; Keller, R J; Atieh, B H; Doss, R B; Gupta, R C

    2002-10-01

    This investigation determined fipronil residues on gloves worn while petting dogs after Frontline application. Frontline contains 9.8% fipronil, which controls fleas and ticks on dogs for at least 30 d. Frontline (1.34 ml) was applied topically on adult household dogs and gloves worn for 5 min during pettingwere collected 24 hr and 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 w post-Frontline application for fipronil residue determinations using GC/MS. The highest concentration of fipronil (589.3 +/- 205.7ppm) was detected 24 h after Frontline application and was undetectable in the gloves collected at 5w. Repeated exposure to such contamination can pose human health risks.

  3. Lead Exposure Induces Telomere Instability in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Pottier

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb is an important environmental contaminant due to its widespread use over many centuries. While it affects primarily every organ system of the body, the most pernicious effects of Pb are on the central nervous system leading to cognitive and behavioral modification. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms responsible for Pb toxicity remain poorly understood. Recent work has suggested that Pb exposure may have consequences on chromosomal integrity as it was shown that Pb exposure leads to the generation of γH2Ax foci, a well-established biomarker for DNA double stranded break (DSB formation. As the chromosomal localization of γH2Ax foci plays an important role in determining the molecular mechanism responsible for their formation, we examined the localization of Pb-induced foci with respect to telomeres. Indeed, short or dysfunctional telomeres (uncapped or damaged telomeres may be recognized as DSB by the DNA repair machinery, leading to "telomere-Induced Foci" (TIFs. In the current study, we show that while Pb exposure did not increase intra-chromosomal foci, it significantly induced TIFs, leading in some cases, to chromosomal abnormalities including telomere loss. The evidence suggests that these chromosomal abnormalities are likely due to perturbation of telomere replication, in particular on the lagging DNA strand. We propose a mechanism by which Pb exposure leads to the loss of telomere maintenance. As numerous studies have demonstrated a role for telomere maintenance in brain development and tissue homeostasis, our results suggest a possible mechanism for lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  4. Evaluation of the reactivity of exhaust from various biodiesel blends as a measure of possible oxidative effects: A concern for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenuga, Adeniyi A; Wright, Monica E; Atkinson, Dean B

    2016-03-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major constituent of ambient air pollution and are associated with various adverse health effects, posing a major safety and public health concern in ambient and occupational environments. The effects of DEP from various biodiesel blends on biological systems was investigated using glutathione (GSH) as a marker of possible oxidative effects, based on the decrease in the concentration of GSH at physiological pH. The fluorophoric agent 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) was used as a selective probe of GSH in the presence of any likely interferents via fluorescence detection. Three different polar solvents (acetonitrile, methanol and water) were used to extract DEP generated during the combustion of different biodiesel blends (5%-99%). Oxidation of GSH to the disulfide (GSSG) was confirmed using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A decrease in the concentration of GSH was observed in the presence of DEP extracts from all of the biodiesel blends studied, with reaction rates that depend on the biodiesel blend. Interestingly the reactivity peaked at 50% biodiesel (B50) rather than decreasing monotonically with increased biodiesel content, as was expected. Organic solvent DEP extracts showed wider variations in reactivity with GSH, with methanol extracts giving the largest decrease in GSH concentrations. This may imply a more organic nature of the oxidants in the biodiesel exhaust. It is therefore important to consider ways of reducing concentrations of organic components in biodiesel exhaust that can cause different toxic activity before any blend is offered as a preferred alternative to petroleum diesel fuel.

  5. Effect of pre-exposure of human erythrocytes to oxidants on the haemolytic activity of Sticholysin II. A comparison between peroxynitrite and hypochlorous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celedón, Gloria; González, Gustavo; Lissi, Eduardo; Cerda, Tania; Bascuñant, Denisse; Lepeley, Marcia; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, Maria E; Alvarez, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Stichodactyla heliantus II (St II) is a haemolytic toxin whose activity depends of the characteristics of red blood cells (RBC). Among the factors that may tune the response of the RBC to the toxin activity stand the oxidative status of the cell. This study investigates how pre-oxidation of RBC modifies St II activity employing two oxidants, peroxynitrite and hypochlorous acid. Results show that peroxynitrite-treated RBC are more resistant to St II activity. On the other hand, hypochlorous acid-treated RBC become more susceptible to St II. This contrasting behaviour of both oxidants is related to the modifications elicited in RBC by both oxidant agents. Peroxynitrite does not modify RBC osmotic fragility but reduces anion transport through band 3 protein. This effect, together with an increase in K+ efflux, can explain the increased resistance to the toxin activity. On the other hand, results obtained with hypochlorous acid can be explained in terms of a disruption of the membrane organization without the compensating effect of a reduction in band 3-mediated anion transport. The present results, obtained employing the effect of a model haemolytic toxin on RBC, emphasize the specificity of the RBC response to different endogenous oxidative agents.

  6. Effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, G.A.; Browning, N.; Cohen, M.J.; Bromley, R.L.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Kalayjian, L.A.; Kanner, A.; Liporace, J.D.; Pennell, P.B.; Privitera, M.; Loring, D.W.; Labiner, David; Moon, Jennifer; Sherman, Scott; Combs Cantrell, Deborah T.; Silver, Cheryl; Goyal, Monisha; Schoenberg, Mike R.; Pack, Alison; Palmese, Christina; Echo, Joyce; Meador, Kimford J.; Loring, David; Pennell, Page; Drane, Daniel; Moore, Eugene; Denham, Megan; Epstein, Charles; Gess, Jennifer; Helmers, Sandra; Henry, Thomas; Motamedi, Gholam; Flax, Erin; Bromfield, Edward; Boyer, Katrina; Dworetzky, Barbara; Cole, Andrew; Halperin, Lucila; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Barkley, Gregory; Moir, Barbara; Harden, Cynthia; Tamny-Young, Tara; Lee, Gregory; Cohen, Morris; Penovich, Patricia; Minter, Donna; Moore, Layne; Murdock, Kathryn; Liporace, Joyce; Wilcox, Kathryn; Kanner, Andres; Nelson, Michael N.; Rosenfeld, William; Meyer, Michelle; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Mawer, George; Kini, Usha; Martin, Roy; Privitera, Michael; Bellman, Jennifer; Ficker, David; Baade, Lyle; Liow, Kore; Baker, Gus; Booth, Alison; Bromley, Rebecca; Casswell, Miranda; Barrie, Claire; Ramsay, Eugene; Arena, Patricia; Kalayjian, Laura; Heck, Christianne; Padilla, Sonia; Miller, John; Rosenbaum, Gail; Wilensky, Alan; Constantino, Tawnya; Smith, Julien; Adab, Naghme; Veling-Warnke, Gisela; Sam, Maria; O'Donovan, Cormac; Naylor, Cecile; Nobles, Shelli; Santos, Cesar; Holmes, Gregory L.; Druzin, Maurice; Morrell, Martha; Nelson, Lorene; Finnell, Richard; Yerby, Mark; Adeli, Khosrow; Wells, Peter; Browning, Nancy; Blalock, Temperance; Crawford, Todd; Hendrickson, Linda; Jolles, Bernadette; Kunchai, Meghan Kelly; Loblein, Hayley; Ogunsola, Yinka; Russell, Steve; Winestone, Jamie; Wolff, Mark; Zaia, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine outcomes at age 4.5 years and compare to earlier ages in children with fetal antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure. Methods: The NEAD Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on AED monotherapy (1999–2004) to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across 4 commonly used AEDs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate). The primary outcome is IQ at 6 years of age. Planned analyses were conducted using Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID at age 2) and Differential Ability Scale (IQ at ages 3 and 4.5). Results: Multivariate intent-to-treat (n = 310) and completer (n = 209) analyses of age 4.5 IQ revealed significant effects for AED group. IQ for children exposed to valproate was lower than each other AED. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) were carbamazepine 106 (102–109), lamotrigine 106 (102–109), phenytoin 105 (102–109), valproate 96 (91–100). IQ was negatively associated with valproate dose, but not other AEDs. Maternal IQ correlated with child IQ for children exposed to the other AEDs, but not valproate. Age 4.5 IQ correlated with age 2 BSID and age 3 IQ. Frequency of marked intellectual impairment diminished with age except for valproate (10% with IQ <70 at 4.5 years). Verbal abilities were impaired for all 4 AED groups compared to nonverbal skills. Conclusions: Adverse cognitive effects of fetal valproate exposure persist to 4.5 years and are related to performances at earlier ages. Verbal abilities may be impaired by commonly used AEDs. Additional research is needed. PMID:22491865

  7. A hazardous substance exposure prevention rating method for intervention needs assessment and effectiveness evaluation: the Small Business Exposure Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapp Amy L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims This paper describes the refinement and adaptation to small business of a previously developed method for systematically prioritizing needs for intervention on hazardous substance exposures in manufacturing worksites, and evaluating intervention effectiveness. Methods We developed a checklist containing six unique sets of yes/no variables organized in a 2 × 3 matrix of exposure potential versus exposure protection at three levels corresponding to a simplified hierarchy of controls: materials, processes, and human interface. Each of the six sets of indicator variables was reduced to a high/moderate/low rating. Ratings from the matrix were then combined to generate an exposure prevention 'Small Business Exposure Index' (SBEI Summary score for each area. Reflecting the hierarchy of controls, material factors were weighted highest, followed by process, and then human interface. The checklist administered by an industrial hygienist during walk-through inspection (N = 149 manufacturing processes/areas in 25 small to medium-sized manufacturing worksites. One area or process per manufacturing department was assessed and rated. A second hygienist independently assessed 36 areas to evaluate inter-rater reliability. Results The SBEI Summary scores indicated that exposures were well controlled in the majority of areas assessed (58% with rating of 1 or 2 on a 6-point scale, that there was some room for improvement in roughly one-third of areas (31% of areas rated 3 or 4, and that roughly 10% of the areas assessed were urgently in need of intervention (rated as 5 or 6. Inter-rater reliability of EP ratings was good to excellent (e.g., for SBEI Summary scores, weighted kappa = 0.73, 95% CI 0.52–0.93. Conclusion The SBEI exposure prevention rating method is suitable for use in small/medium enterprises, has good discriminatory power and reliability, offers an inexpensive method for intervention needs assessment and effectiveness evaluation, and

  8. Quantifying human exposure to air pollution - moving from static monitoring to spatio-temporally resolved personal exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E

    2013-01-01

    results from multifaceted relationships and interactions between environmental and human systems, adding complexity to the assessment process. Traditionally, approaches to quantify human exposure have relied on pollutant concentrations from fixed air quality network sites and static population...... distributions. New developments in sensor technology now enable us to monitor personal exposure to air pollutants directly while people are moving through their activity spaces and varying concentration fields. The literature review on which this paper is based on reflects recent developments in the assessment...... for the integrated assessment of human exposure to air pollutants taking into account latest technological capabilities and contextual information. Highlights ? We review and discuss recent developments and advances of research into personal exposure to air pollution. ? We emphasise the importance of personal...

  9. Exposure effects on music preference and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, I; Gaudreau, D; Bonnel, A M

    1998-09-01

    In three experiments, the effects of exposure to melodies on their subsequent liking and recognition were explored. In each experiment, the subjects first listened to a set of familiar and unfamiliar melodies in a study phase. In the subsequent test phase, the melodies were repeated, along with a set of distractors matched in familiarity. Half the subjects were required to rate their liking of each melody, and half had to identify the melodies they had heard earlier in the study phase. Repetition of the studied melodies was found to increase liking of the unfamiliar melodies in the affect task and to be best for detection of familiar melodies in the recognition task (Experiments 1, 2, and 3). These memory effects were found to fade at different time delays between study and test in the affect and recognition tasks, with the latter leading to the most persistent effects (Experiment 2). Both study-to-test changes in melody timbre and manipulation of study tasks had a marked impact on recognition and little influence on liking judgments (Experiment 3). Thus, all manipulated variables were found to dissociate the memory effects in the two tasks. The results are consistent with the view that memory effects in the affect and recognition tasks pertain to the implicit and explicit forms of memory, respectively. Part of the results are, however, at variance with the literature on implicit and explicit memory in the auditory domain. Attribution of these differences to the use of musical material is discussed.

  10. Oxidatively damaged DNA and its repair after experimental exposure to wood smoke in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Barregard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Particulate matter from wood smoke may cause health effects through generation of oxidative stress with resulting damage to DNA. We investigated oxidatively damaged DNA and related repair capacity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and measured the urinary excretion of repair products...... after controlled short-term exposure of human volunteers to wood smoke. Thirteen healthy adults were exposed first to clean air and then to wood smoke in a chamber during 4h sessions, 1 week apart. Blood samples were taken 3h after exposure and on the following morning, and urine was collected after...... chromatography with mass spectrometry. The morning following exposure to wood smoke the PBMC levels of SB were significantly decreased and the mRNA levels of hOGG1 significantly increased. FPG sites, hOGG1 activity, expression of hNUDT1 and hHO1, urinary excretion of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua did not change...

  11. A test chamber for experimental hydrogen fluoride exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J; Eduard, W; Nilsen, T; Skogland, M; Boe, J

    1997-07-01

    An inhalation chamber was built to perform experimental studies with hydrogen fluoride (HF), other gases, and particulate matter. The present study sought to describe a new gas delivery system and the distribution and concentration of HF gas in the chamber. The aluminum chamber has a volume of 19.2 m3 and a variable ventilation rate of about 1 to 10 air changes per hour. The negative pressure difference between the chamber and outside air can be regulated from 0 to 300 Pa. HF was fed at concentrations of up to 4000 mg/m3 directly into the ventilation duct feeding the chamber through openings with diameters as small as 50 microns, oriented opposite to the airflow. Gas flow was varied from about 0.1 dm3/min at a pressure of 4 atm. The dilution factor of HF concentration from cylinder to chamber was on the order of 10(3) to 10(4). The standard deviation (SD) of the HF concentrations at a fixed measurement point during a 1-hour test was typically 0.05 mg/m3 at a time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of 2.66 mg/m3. The SD of the TWA HF concentrations at six locations in the chamber was typically 0.05 mg/m3 and 0.29 mg/m3 at 0.61 and 3.46 mg/m3, respectively. Human exposure could be predicted from calculations based on ventilation data, gas flow, and observed ratio between calculated and measured concentrations. When the target exposure concentration was 1.5 mg/m3, the measured mean exposure concentration was typically 1.54 mg/m3 (range: 1.4-1.7 mg/m3, SD 0.09 mg/m3, n = 8). The chamber is well-suited for inhalation studies in humans. Chamber atmosphere was controlled and has proved to be stable and homogeneous, even in tests with HF, a highly reactive gas in the class of superacids.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso; Babisch, Wolfgang; Basner, Mathias

    2014-04-01

    The role of noise as an environmental pollutant and its impact on health are being increasingly recognized. Beyond its effects on the auditory system, noise causes annoyance and disturbs sleep, and it impairs cognitive performance. Furthermore, evidence from epidemiologic studies demonstrates that environmental noise is associated with an increased incidence of arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Both observational and experimental studies indicate that in particular night-time noise can cause disruptions of sleep structure, vegetative arousals (e.g. increases of blood pressure and heart rate) and increases in stress hormone levels and oxidative stress, which in turn may result in endothelial dysfunction and arterial hypertension. This review focuses on the cardiovascular consequences of environmental noise exposure and stresses the importance of noise mitigation strategies for public health.

  13. Dermal absorption and skin damage following hydrofluoric acid exposure in an ex vivo human skin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Kilo, Sonja; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Korinth, Gintautas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-04-25

    The wide industrial use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) poses a high risk for accidental dermal exposure. Despite local and systemic hazards associated with HF, information on percutaneous penetration and tissue damage is rare. In the present ex vivo study, the dermal absorption of HF (detected in terms of fluoride ions) was quantified and the skin damaging potential as a function of concentration and exposure duration was assessed. Percutaneous penetration of HF (c=5, 30, and 50%) at 3 exposure durations (3, 5, and 10 min) was investigated in a static diffusion cell model using freshly excised human skin. Alterations of skin were histologically evaluated. HF rapidly penetrated through skin under formation of a considerable intradermal reservoir (∼ 13-67% of total absorbed fluoride). Histologically, epidermal alterations were detected already after exposure to 5% HF for 3 min. The degree of skin damage increased with rising concentration and exposure duration leading to coagulation necrosis. For HF concentrations of ≥ 30%, skin damage progressed into deeper skin layers. Topically applied HF concentration was the principal parameter determining HF induced skin effects. The intradermal HF retention capacity associated with progression and prolongation of HF induced skin effects must be considered in the review of skin decontamination procedures.

  14. Digital music exposure reliably induces temporary threshold shift in normal-hearing human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Prell, Colleen G; Dell, Shawna; Hensley, Brittany; Hall, James W; Campbell, Kathleen C M; Antonelli, Patrick J; Green, Glenn E; Miller, James M; Guire, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges for evaluating new otoprotective agents for potential benefit in human populations is the availability of an established clinical paradigm with real-world relevance. These studies were explicitly designed to develop a real-world digital music exposure that reliably induces temporary threshold shift (TTS) in normal-hearing human subjects. Thirty-three subjects participated in studies that measured effects of digital music player use on hearing. Subjects selected either rock or pop music, which was then presented at 93 to 95 (n = 10), 98 to 100 (n = 11), or 100 to 102 (n = 12) dBA in-ear exposure level for a period of 4 hr. Audiograms and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured before and after music exposure. Postmusic tests were initiated 15 min, 1 hr 15 min, 2 hr 15 min, and 3 hr 15 min after the exposure ended. Additional tests were conducted the following day and 1 week later. Changes in thresholds after the lowest-level exposure were difficult to distinguish from test-retest variability; however, TTS was reliably detected after higher levels of sound exposure. Changes in audiometric thresholds had a "notch" configuration, with the largest changes observed at 4 kHz (mean = 6.3 ± 3.9 dB; range = 0-14 dB). Recovery was largely complete within the first 4 hr postexposure, and all subjects showed complete recovery of both thresholds and DPOAE measures when tested 1 week postexposure. These data provide insight into the variability of TTS induced by music-player use in a healthy, normal-hearing, young adult population, with music playlist, level, and duration carefully controlled. These data confirm the likelihood of temporary changes in auditory function after digital music-player use. Such data are essential for the development of a human clinical trial protocol that provides a highly powered design for evaluating novel therapeutics in human clinical trials. Care must be taken to fully inform potential subjects in

  15. Human mercury exposure and adverse health effects in the Amazon: a review Exposição humana ao mercúrio e efeitos adversos à saúde na Amazônia: uma revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. S. Passos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines issues of human mercury (Hg exposure and adverse health effects throughout the Amazon region. An extensive review was conducted using bibliographic indexes as well as secondary sources. There are several sources of Hg (mining, deforestation, reservoirs, and exposure takes place through inhalation or from fish consumption. There is a wide range of exposure, with mean hair-Hg levels above 15µg/g in several Amazonian communities, placing them among the highest reported levels in the world today. Dietary Hg intake has been estimated in the vicinity of 1-2µg/kg/day, considerably higher than the USEPA RfD of 0.1µg/kg/day or the World Health Organization recommendation of 0.23µg/kg/day. Neurobehavioral deficits and, in some cases, clinical signs have been reported both for adults and children in relation to Hg exposure in several Amazonian countries. There is also some evidence of cytogenetic damage, immune alterations, and cardiovascular toxicity. Since fish provide a highly nutritious food source, there is an urgent need to find realistic and feasible solutions that will reduce exposure and toxic risk, while maintaining healthy traditional dietary habits and preserving this unique biodiversity.Este artigo examina questões sobre exposição humana ao mercúrio (Hg e seus efeitos adversos à saúde na Amazônia, com base em extensa revisão da literatura. Diferentes bioindicadores revelam uma ampla faixa de exposição, com teores médios de Hg em cabelo acima de 15µg/g em diversas comunidades amazônicas, situando-as dentre as mais expostas no mundo atualmente. Taxas de ingestão diária de Hg foram estimadas em alguns estudos e situam-se entre 1-2µg/kg/dia, consideravelmente acima das doses de referência estabelecidas pela USEPA (0,1µg/kg/dia ou pela OMS (0,23µg/kg/dia. Déficits neurocomportamentais e, em alguns casos, sinais clínicos relacionados à exposição mercurial têm sido relatados tanto em adultos quanto em

  16. Guide to the evaluation of human exposure to noise from large wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.; Grosveld, F.

    1982-01-01

    Guidance for evaluating human exposure to wind turbine noise is provided and includes consideration of the source characteristics, the propagation to the receiver location, and the exposure of the receiver to the noise. The criteria for evaluation of human exposure are based on comparisons of the noise at the receiver location with the human perception thresholds for wind turbine noise and noise-induced building vibrations in the presence of background noise.

  17. Developmental exposure to estrogen alters differentiation and epigenetic programming in a human fetal prostate xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia M Saffarini

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure.

  18. Affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness for public speaking anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Craske, Michelle G; Lieberman, Matthew D; Hur, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Exposure is an effective treatment for anxiety but many patients do not respond fully. Affect labeling (labeling emotional experience) attenuates emotional responding. The current project examined whether affect labeling enhances exposure effectiveness in participants with public speaking anxiety. Participants were randomized to exposure with or without affect labeling. Physiological arousal and self-reported fear were assessed before and after exposure and compared between groups. Consistent with hypotheses, participants assigned to Affect Labeling, especially those who used more labels during exposure, showed greater reduction in physiological activation than Control participants. No effect was found for self-report measures. Also, greater emotion regulation deficits at baseline predicted more benefit in physiological arousal from exposure combined with affect labeling than exposure alone. The current research provides evidence that behavioral strategies that target prefrontal-amygdala circuitry can improve treatment effectiveness for anxiety and these effects are particularly pronounced for patients with the greatest deficits in emotion regulation.

  19. USEtox human exposure and toxicity factors for comparative assessment of toxic emissions in life cycle analysis: sensitivity to key chemical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark; Henderson, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this paper is to provide science-based consensus and guidance for health effects modelling in comparative assessments based on human exposure and toxicity. This aim is achieved by i) describing the USEtoxTM exposure and toxicity models representing consensus and recommended...... modelling practice, ii) identifying key mechanisms influencing human exposure and toxicity effects of chemical emissions, iii) extending substance coverage. Methods The methods section of this paper contains a detailed documentation of both the human exposure and toxic effects models of USEtox......TM, to determine impacts on human health per kg substance emitted in different compartments. These are considered as scientific consensus and therefore recommended practice for comparative toxic impact assessment. The framework of the exposure model is described in details including the modelling of each exposure...

  20. Perinatal dioxin exposure and later effects--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Tusscher, Gavin W; Koppe, Janna G

    2004-03-01

    Negative effects of perinatal exposure to background levels of dioxins and PCBs in Europe and the USA have been documented. Four facets of development are reviewed in this paper: 1. Brain development and thyroid hormone metabolism. 2. Hepatic effects. 3. Hematopoietic system effects. 4. Lung function. Effects on IQ and behaviour have been documented in children on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Non-dioxin-like PCBs, measured in maternal and cord blood and current plasma samples have been implicated. Interference with thyroid hormone metabolism in the mother, in the foetus and in the newborn baby could be responsible for these effects on brain development. During early gestation the foetus is completely dependent on maternal thyroxine (T4). Lower T4 levels in the mother, caused by dioxins and PCBs, might negatively influence (early) brain development. It is plausible that the intrauterine dependency on maternal T4 and the high T4 need shortly after birth makes both these periods vulnerable for environmental influences. Effects of dioxin exposure on thyroid hormone metabolism have been described in the period shortly after birth. These effects are no longer found after two years of age indicating a transient effect. In animal studies, in utero exposure has led to effects on brain development due to abnormal induction of liver enzymes. This induction resulted in lower testosterone and estrogen levels, interfering with brain development in the vulnerable period of language development and the development of visuo-spatial abilities. In humans this developmental period occurs around the thirtieth week of pregnancy. Follow-up studies in puberty and adolescence of the different cohorts studied is necessary to evaluate these negative influences. Damaging effects on the liver found shortly after birth have proven to be transient. Effects on the haematopoietic system are clear immediately after birth, for instance on white blood cells and thrombocytes. An increase in

  1. Nanogold – Biological effects and occupational exposure levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Świdwińska-Gajewska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanogold has different properties and biological activity compared to metallic gold. It can be applied in many fields, such as medicine, laboratory diagnostics and electronics. Studies on laboratory animals show that nanogold can be absorbed by inhalation and ingestion. It can penetrate deep into the epidermis and dermis, but there is no evidence that it is absorbed through the skin. Gold nanoobjects accumulate mainly in the liver and spleen, but they can also reach other internal organs. Nanogold can cross the blood–brain and blood–placenta barriers. Toxicokinetics of nanogold depends on the particle size, shape and surface charge. In animals exposure to gold nanoparticles via inhalation induces slight changes in the lungs. Exposure to nanogold by the oral route does not cause adverse health effects in rodents. In animals after injection of gold nanoobjects changes in the liver and lungs were observed. Nanogold induced genotoxic effects in cells, but not in animals. No adverse effects on the fetus or reproduction were found. There are no carcinogenicity studies on gold nanoparticles. The mechanism of toxicity may be related to the interaction of gold nanoobjects with proteins and DNA, and it leads to the induction of oxidative stress and genetic material damage. The impact of nanostructures on human health has not yet been fully understood. The person, who works with nanomaterials should exercise extreme caution and apply existing recommendations on the evaluation of nanoobjects exposure. The risk assessment should be the basis for taking appropriate measures to limit potential exposure to nanometals, including nanogold. Med Pr 2017;68(4:545–556

  2. Bisphenol-A exposure and gene expression in human luteinized membrana granulosa cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Abdallah; Israel, Ariel; Combelles, Catherine M H; Adir, Michal; Racowsky, Catherine; Hauser, Russ; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Machtinger, Ronit

    2017-02-01

    chemical for 48 h only. Thus, the effects of BPA on the human follicle might be underestimated. As BPA exposure is ubiquitous, understanding the effects of the chemical on the ovary, specifically in women of reproductive age, has public health significance. The clinical evidence to date points to an association between BPA exposure and impaired IVF outcome, although not all studies have shown negative effects. Our study adds valuable mechanistic information showing that exposure to BPA alters granulosa cell gene expression at high and supra-physiological doses. This study was supported by grant number 1936/12 from the ISF. The authors have nothing to disclose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Effect of electromagnetic field exposure on the reproductive system

    OpenAIRE

    Gye, Myung Chan; Park, Chan Jin

    2012-01-01

    The safety of human exposure to an ever-increasing number and diversity of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources both at work and at home has become a public health issue. To date, many in vivo and in vitro studies have revealed that EMF exposure can alter cellular homeostasis, endocrine function, reproductive function, and fetal development in animal systems. Reproductive parameters reported to be altered by EMF exposure include male germ cell death, the estrous cycle, reproductive endocrine h...

  4. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB

  5. Carcinogenicity and other health effects of acrylonitrile with reference to occupational exposure limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, H

    2000-04-01

    The occupational exposure limit for acrylonitrile (AN) has been set by many organizations on the basis of its carcinogenicity. However, recent epidemiological studies do not afford evidence supporting the hypothesis that AN is carcinogenic to humans. Review of the 18 published cohort studies revealed that, although there is not adequate evidence in humans for carcinogenicity of AN, the possibility of a causal association between high exposure to AN and lung cancer in humans cannot be excluded. It was pointed out that carcinogenic potential of AN may be weak, if any, to humans, and the current occupational exposure limit (OEL) for AN of 2 ppm was evaluated as appropriate in view of AN exposure levels reported by epidemiological studies. Based also on review of the literature on health effects other than carcinogenicity, it was concluded that the current OEL for AN is a reasonable value and there is no need for a revision at present.

  6. Modulation of human alveolar macrophage properties by ozone exposure in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S.; Madden, M.C.; Newman, S.L.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S. (ABB Environmental Services, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1991-09-15

    The authors have investigated changes in human alveolar macrophage (HAM) function after exposure in vitro to ozone (O3). The functions studied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host defense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Exposure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-dependent increase in release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important modulator of inflammation, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particulate immune complexes was decreased by O3, we found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Superoxide (O2-) production in response to phorbol ester was reduced after exposure of HAM to O3 while the basal O2- release in response to plastic adherence was not affected. Growth inhibition of the opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not affected by O3 exposure. The production of inflammatory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, compared to controls, O3- exposed HAM produced significantly lower levels of these cytokines when stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of proteins made by HAM following in vitro exposure to O3 identified 11 proteins whose rate of synthesis was significantly altered. Thus, these studies show that exposure to O3 alters the functional competence of HAM. While there is a minimal effect on protein expression or synthesis, the responses of HAM to particulate immune complexes, to bacterial LPS, and to PMA are impaired. The release of arachidonic acid and PGE2 suggest that the effect of O3 is primarily targeted to the HAM cell membrane. These changes may ultimately result in increased susceptibility to inhaled infectious agents in the O3-exposed individual.

  7. Human exposure to piroplasms in Central and Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Gabrielli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A serosurvey has been conducted in Northern and Central Italy to investigate the presence in humans of antibodies against zoonotic Babesia and Theileria species. The study focused on a total of 432 volunteers, of which 290 were persistently exposed to tick bites because of their jobs (forester employees, livestock keepers, veterinary practitioners, farmers and hunters and 142 resident in the same area less frequently exposed. An indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT for humans was used to detect antibodies to Babesia microti, IFAT tests for veterinary use were modified to detect reactivity to Babesia bovis, Babesia canis and Theileria equi. A laboratory-derived ELISA was employed to detect antibodies to Babesia divergens. Both reactive and 10 negative sera were analysed against plasmodial antigens to evaluate possible aspecificity. A high reactivity to piroplasm antigens was found, showing significant difference between the sera of the two groups of volunteers (24% vs 7.0%; p<0.001. No cross-reactivity was observed, while each professional group showed reactivity that would fit with the professional risk exposure. In particular, a high reactivity to B. microti and B. divergens antigens was observed in foresters and hunters (32% and 12%, respectively. This is the first report on the human seroreactivity to piroplasms in Italy; it also provides additional epidemiological information on these tick-borne zoonoses in Europe. Our findings suggest the possible occurrence of piroplasm infections in Italy and alert physicians to consider these otherwise neglected parasitic diseases when dealing with any febrile illness, especially in subjects exposed to tick bites.

  8. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles effects iron absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron trans...

  9. Radiation exposure from depleted uranium: The radiation bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Rivas, Rafael; Tesoro, Leonard; Kovalenko, Gregor; Kovaric, Nikola; Pavlovic, Peter; Brenner, David

    2017-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. In vivo studies have also demonstrated that DU is leukemogenic and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha particle) and chemical (metal) component but is generally considered a chemical biohazard. Studies have shown that alpha particle radiation does play a role in DU's toxic effects. Evidence has accumulated that non-irradiated cells in the vicinity of irradiated cells can have a response to ionization events. The purpose of this study was to determine if these "bystander effects" play a role in DU's toxic and neoplastic effects using HOS cells. We investigated the bystander responses between DU-exposed cells and non-exposed cells by co-culturing the two equal populations. Decreased cell survival and increased neoplastic transformation were observed in the non-DU exposed cells following 4 or 24h co-culture. In contrast Ni (II)- or Cr(VI)- exposed cells were unable to alter those biological effects in non-Ni(II) or non-Cr(VI) exposed co-cultured cells. Transfer experiments using medium from the DU-exposed and non-exposed co-cultured cells was able to cause adverse biological responses in cells; these results demonstrated that a factor (s) is secreted into the co-culture medium which is involved in this DU-associated bystander effect. This novel effect of DU exposure could have implications for radiation risk and for health risk assessment associated with DU exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A flexible matrix-based human exposure assessment framework suitable for LCA and CAA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Ernstoff, Alexi; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    of near-and far-field pathways and helps to understand the contribution of individual pathways to overall human exposure in various product application contexts. When combined with toxicity information this approach is a resourceful way to inform LCA and CAA and minimize human exposure to toxic chemicals......Humans can be exposed to chemicals via near-field exposure pathways (e.g. through consumer product use) and far-field exposure pathways (e.g. through environmental emissions along product life cycles). Pathways are often complex where chemicals can transfer directly from products to humans during...... use or exchange between near-and far-field compartments until sub -fractions reach humans via inhalation, ingestion or dermal uptake. Currently, however, multimedia exposure models mainly focus on far-field exposure pathways. Metrics and modeling approaches used in far-field, emission-based models...

  11. Effects in Plant Populations Resulting from Chronic Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, Stanislav A.; Volkova, Polina Yu.; Vasiliyev, Denis V.; Dikareva, Nina S.; Oudalova, Alla A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Human industrial activities have left behind a legacy of ecosystems strongly impacted by a wide range of contaminants, including radionuclides. Phyto-toxic effects of acute impact are well known, but the consequences of long-term chronic exposure to low pollutant concentrations is neither well understood nor adequately included in risk assessments. To understand effects of real-world contaminant exposure properly we must pay attention to what is actually going on in the field. However, for many wildlife groups and endpoints, there are no, or very few, studies that link accumulation, chronic exposure and biological effects in natural settings. To fill the gaps, results of field studies carried out on different plant species (winter rye and wheat, spring barley, oats, Scots pine, wild vetch, crested hair-grass) in various radioecological situations (nuclear weapon testing, the Chernobyl accident, uranium and radium processing) to investigate effects of long-term chronic exposure to radionuclides are discussed. Because each impacted site developed in its own way due to a unique history of events, the experience from one case study is rarely directly applicable to another situation. In spite of high heterogeneity in response, we have detected several general patterns. Plant populations growing in areas with relatively low levels of pollution are characterized by the increased level of both cytogenetic alterations and genetic diversity. Accumulation of cellular alterations may afterward influence biological parameters important for populations such as health and reproduction. Presented data provide evidence that in plant populations inhabiting heavily contaminated territories cytogenetic damage were accompanied by decrease in reproductive ability. In less contaminated sites, because of the scarcity of data available, it is impossible to establish exactly the relationship between cytogenetic effects and reproductive ability. Radioactive contamination of the plants

  12. Mutagenic potential assessment associated with human exposure to natural radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alexandre Endres; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Oliveira Galvão, Marcos Felipe; Garcia, Anuska Conde Fagundes Soares; do Amaral, Viviane Souza; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Campos, Thomas Ferreira da Costa; Panosso, Renata; Quinelato, Antônio Luiz; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo

    2017-01-01

    Lucrécia city, known to harbor a high cancer rate, is located in a semiarid region characterized by the presence of mineral reservoirs, facing a high exposure to metal and natural radioactivity. The present study aimed to assess the environmental scenario at a semiarid region located in Northeastern Brazil. Metal concentration, alpha and beta radiation, and cyanobacteria content in tap water along with indoor radon and gamma emitters (U, K and Th) concentrations were measured. In addition, mutagenic and nuclear instability effects were assessed using buccal micronucleus cytome assay. The study included five samplings corresponding to a period between 2007 and 2009. Drinking water from Lucrécia city presented levels of Mn, Ni and Cr along with cyanobacteria in concentrations one to four times higher than regulatory guidelines considered. Furthermore, high levels of all the tested radionuclides were found. A high percentage of the houses included in this study presented indoor radon concentrations over 100 Bq m(-3). The mean annual effective dose from Lucrécia houses was six times higher than observed in a control region. The levels of exposure in most of the Lucrécia houses were classified as middle to high. A significant mutagenic effect, represented as an increase of micronuclei (MN) frequency and nuclear abnormalities as nuclear buds (NB), binucleated cells (BN), and pyknotic cells (PYC) were found. The results obtained highlight the role of high background radioactivity on the observed mutagenic effect and could help to explain the exacerbated cancer rate reported in this locality.

  13. Exposure to CB-153 and p,p'-DDE and human sperm chromatin integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rignell-Hydbom, A.; Rylander, L.; Joensson, B.A.G.; Hagmar, L. [Dept. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Giwercman, A. [Fertility Centre, Malmoe Univ. hospital (Sweden); Spano, M. [Section of Toxicology and Biomedical Sciences, ENEA Casaccia Research Centre, Rome (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    In Sweden, the consumption of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea (off the Swedish east coast) is the single most important source of exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs). Fishermen from the east coast have averagely higher plasma levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and total POP derived TEQ in plasma than both west coast fishermen and men from the general population. Dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), a relevant biomarker for POP is still present in relatively high serum concentrations in men consuming fish from the Baltic Sea. Several studies have shown that POPs are capable of interfering with reproductive and endocrine function in animals. Human studies have shown that exposure to PCBs and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) has a negative effect on male reproductive function, and especially sperm motility seems vulnerable. However, studies relating to human sperm genetic integrity are few. The aim of the study was to investigate whether exposure to POP using 2,2',4,4',5,5'- hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and p,p'-DDE as biomarkers, are associated with sperm chromatin integrity. In order to ensure a sufficient variation in POP exposure fishermen from both the Swedish east (''more exposed'') and west coasts (''less exposed'') formed the study base.

  14. Human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls at toxic waste sites: investigations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehr-Green, P.A.; Welty, E.; Burse, V.W.

    1988-11-01

    Beginning in 1982, environmental and population data were evaluated from waste sites contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Pilot exposure assessment studies were conducted at 12 sites where risks of human exposure were thought to be greatest. Serum PCB levels in persons at highest risk of nonoccupationally related exposures (because of their self-reported frequencies and types of activities in contaminated areas) at 10 sites were within background ranges, even though environmental contamination levels as high as 2.5 parts per billion (ppb) in monitoring well water samples and 330,000 ppb in soil samples were measured. At the 2 remaining sites, elevated serum levels were found in these high-risk persons, which require further evaluation by community surveys. These results illustrate that, despite elevated environmental contaminant levels, unless uptake of chemicals above background exposure levels can be demonstrated, adverse health effects cannot be attributed to waste site chemicals. However, health risks due to background exposure levels, as well as in populations with elevated PCB body burdens need further study.

  15. ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO GRASS POLLEN IN DENMARK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Hertel, Ole; Herbert, Rob

    Objectives: Exposure to pollen is typically assessed using data collected at fixed roof-top monitoring stations, which give a general picture of airborne pollen concentrations over a wide region. Actual exposure levels can be obtained through personal exposure monitoring. This is typically done u...

  16. Understanding Specific Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on Brain Structure in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiangchuan; Coles, Claire D.; Lynch, Mary E; Hu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is associated with various adverse effects on human brain and behavior. Recently, neuroimaging studies have begun to identify PAE effects on specific brain structures. Investigation of such specific PAE effects is important for understanding the teratogenic mechanism of PAE on human brain, which is critical for differentiating PAE from other disorders. In this structural MRI study with young adults, PAE effects on the volumes of automatically segmented cortical...

  17. ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. Therefore, the US EPA set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 ?g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 mg/kg/day (10 mg...

  18. In vitro exposure of human chondrocytes to pulsed electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Nicolin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs on the proliferation and survival of matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI®-derived cells was studied to ascertain the healing potential of PEMFs. MACI-derived cells were taken from cartilage biopsies 6 months after surgery and cultured. No dedifferentiation towards the fibroblastic phenotype occurred, indicating the success of the surgical implantation. The MACI-derived cultured chondrocytes were exposed to 12 h/day (short term or 4 h/day (long term PEMFs exposure (magnetic field intensity, 2 mT; frequency, 75 Hz and proliferation rate determined by flow cytometric analysis. The PEMFs exposure elicited a significant increase of cell number in the SG2M cell cycle phase. Moreover, cells isolated from MACI® scaffolds showed the presence of collagen type II, a typical marker of chondrocyte functionality. The results show that MACI® membranes represent an optimal bioengineering device to support chondrocyte growth and proliferation in surgical implants. The surgical implant of MACI® combined with physiotherapy is suggested as a promising approach for a faster and safer treatment of cartilage traumatic lesions.

  19. Climate Change Impacts on Environmental and Human Exposure to Mercury in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundseth, Kyrre; Pacyna, Jozef M.; Banel, Anna; Pacyna, Elisabeth G.; Rautio, Arja

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews information from the literature and the EU ArcRisk project to assess whether climate change results in an increase or decrease in exposure to mercury (Hg) in the Arctic, and if this in turn will impact the risks related to its harmful effects. It presents the state-of-the art of knowledge on atmospheric mercury emissions from anthropogenic sources worldwide, the long-range transport to the Arctic, and it discusses the likely environmental fate and exposure effects on population groups in the Arctic under climate change conditions. The paper also includes information about the likely synergy effects (co-benefits) current and new climate change polices and mitigation options might have on mercury emissions reductions in the future. The review concludes that reductions of mercury emission from anthropogenic sources worldwide would need to be introduced as soon as possible in order to assure lowering the adverse impact of climate change on human health. Scientific information currently available, however, is not in the position to clearly answer whether climate change will increase or decrease the risk of exposure to mercury in the Arctic. New research should therefore be undertaken to model the relationships between climate change and mercury exposure. PMID:25837201

  20. A changing climate: impacts on human exposures to O3 using an integrated modeling methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting the impacts of changing climate on human exposure to air pollution requires future scenarios that account for changes in ambient pollutant concentrations, population sizes and distributions, and housing stocks. An integrated methodology to model changes in human exposu...

  1. Developmental and behavioral effects of postnatal amitraz exposure in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Palermo-Neto

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of postnatal amitraz exposure on physical and behavioral parameters were studied in Wistar rats, whose lactating dams received the pesticide (10 mg/kg orally on days 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16 and 19 of lactation; control dams received distilled water (1 ml/kg on the same days. A total of 18 different litters (9 of them control and 9 experimental born after a 21-day gestation were used. The results showed that the median effective time (ET50 for fur development, eye opening, testis descent and onset of the startle response were increased in rats postnatally exposed to amitraz (2.7, 15.1, 21.6 and 15.3 days, respectively compared to those of the control pups (1.8, 14.0, 19.9 and 12.9 days, respectively. The ages of incisor eruption, total unfolding of the external ears, vaginal and ear opening and the time taken to perform the grasping hindlimb reflex were not affected by amitraz exposure. Pups from dams treated with amitraz during lactation took more time (in seconds to perform the surface righting reflex on postnatal days (PND 3 (25.0 ± 2.0, 4 (12.3 ± 1.2 and 5 (8.7 ± 0.9 in relation to controls (10.6 ± 1.2; 4.5 ± 0.6 and 3.4 ± 0.4, respectively; the climbing response was not changed by amitraz. Postnatal amitraz exposure increased spontaneous motor activity of male and female pups in the open-field on PND 16 (140 ± 11 and 17 (124 ± 12, and 16 (104 ± 9, 17 (137 ± 9 and 18 (106 ± 8, respectively. Data on spontaneous motor activity of the control male and female pups were 59 ± 11 and 69 ± 10 for days 16 and 17 and 49 ± 9, 48 ± 7 and 56 ± 7 for days 16, 17 and 18, respectively. Some qualitative differences were also observed in spontaneous motor behavior; thus, raising the head, shoulder and pelvis matured one or two days later in the amitraz-treated offspring. Postnatal amitraz exposure did not change locomotion and rearing frequencies or immobility time in the open-field on PND 30, 60 and 90. The present findings indicate

  2. Forecasting human exposure to atmospheric pollutants in Portugal - A modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, C.; Sá, E.; Monteiro, A.; Ferreira, J.; Miranda, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    indoors (leisure activities like shopping areas, gym, theatre/cinema and restaurants). The results show how this developed modelling system can be useful to anticipate air pollution episodes and to estimate their effects on human health on a long-term basis. The two metropolitan areas of Porto and Lisbon are identified as the most critical ones in terms of air pollution effects on human health over Portugal in a long-term as well as in a short-term perspective. The coexistence of high concentration values and high population density is the key factor for these stressed areas. Regarding the 50% emission reduction scenario, the model results are significantly different for both pollutants: there is a small overall reduction in the individual exposure values of PM 10 (<10 μg m -3 h), but for O 3, in contrast, there is an extended area where exposure values increase with emission reduction. This detailed knowledge is a prerequisite for the development of effective policies to reduce the foreseen adverse impact of air pollution on human health and to act on time.

  3. Human urinary mutagenicity after wood smoke exposure during traditional temazcal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Alexandra S; Lemieux, Christine L; Yousefi, Paul; Ruiz-Mercado, Ilse; Lam, Nicholas L; Orellana, Carolina Romero; White, Paul A; Smith, Kirk R; Holland, Nina

    2014-09-01

    In Central America, the traditional temazcales or wood-fired steam baths, commonly used by many Native American populations, are often heated by wood fires with little ventilation, and this use results in high wood smoke exposure. Urinary mutagenicity has been previously employed as a non-invasive biomarker of human exposure to combustion emissions. This study examined the urinary mutagenicity in 19 indigenous Mayan families from the highlands of Guatemala who regularly use temazcales (N = 32), as well as control (unexposed) individuals from the same population (N = 9). Urine samples collected before and after temazcal exposure were enzymatically deconjugated and extracted using solid-phase extraction. The creatinine-adjusted mutagenic potency of urine extracts was assessed using the plate-incorporation version of the Salmonella mutagenicity assay with strain YG1041 in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation. The post-exposure mutagenic potency of urine extracts were, on average, 1.7-fold higher than pre-exposure samples (P temazcal use (P temazcal were positively associated with urinary mutagenic potency (i.e. P temazcal use contributes to increased excretion of conjugated mutagenic metabolites. Moreover, urinary mutagenic potency is correlated with other metrics of exposure (i.e. exhaled CO, duration of exposure). Since urinary mutagenicity is a biomarker associated with genetic damage, temazcal use may therefore be expected to contribute to an increased risk of DNA damage and mutation, effects associated with the initiation of cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society.

  4. Stimulus threat and exposure context modulate the effect of mere exposure on approach behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Young

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mere-exposure research has found that initially neutral objects made familiar are preferred relative to novel objects. Recent work extends these preference judgments into the behavioral domain by illustrating that mere exposure prompts approach-oriented behavior toward familiar stimuli. However, no investigations have examined the effect of mere exposure on approach-oriented behavior toward threatening stimuli. The current work examines this issue and also explores how exposure context interacts with stimulus threat to influence behavioral tendencies. In two experiments participants were presented with both mere-exposed and novel stimuli and approach speed was assessed. In the first experiment, when stimulus threat was presented in a homogeneous format (i.e., participants viewed exclusively neutral or threatening stimuli, mere-exposure potentiated approach behaviors for both neutral and threatening stimuli. However, in the second experiment, in which stimulus threat was presented in a heterogeneous fashion (i.e., participants viewed both neutral and threatening stimuli, mere exposure facilitated approach only for initially neutral stimuli. These results suggest that mere-exposure effects on approach behaviors are highly context sensitive and depend on both stimulus valence and exposure context. Further implications of these findings for the mere-exposure literature are discussed.

  5. LC-MS/MS-based multibiomarker approaches for the assessment of human exposure to mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf

    2013-07-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic fungal secondary metabolites that frequently contaminate food and feed worldwide, and hence represent a major hazard for food and feed safety. To estimate human exposure arising from contaminated food, so-called biomarker approaches have been developed as a complementary biomonitoring tool besides traditional food analysis. The first methods based on radioimmunoassays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays as well as on liquid chromatography were developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s for the carcinogenic aflatoxins and in the last two decades further tailor-made methods for some major mycotoxins have been published. Since 2010, there has been a clear trend towards the development and application of multianalyte methods based on liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for assessment of mycotoxin exposure made possible by the increased sensitivity and selectivity of modern mass spectrometry instrumentation and sophisticated sample cleanup approaches. With use of these advanced methods, traces of mycotoxins and relevant breakdown and conjugation products can be quantified simultaneously in human urine as so-called biomarkers and can be used to precisely describe the real exposure, toxicokinetics, and bioavailability of the toxins present. In this article, a short overview and comparison of published multibiomarker methods focusing on the determination of mycotoxins and relevant excretion products in human urine is presented. Special attention is paid to the main challenges when analyzing these toxic food contaminants in urine, i.e., very low analyte concentrations, appropriate sample preparation, matrix effects, and a lack of authentic, NMR-confirmed calibrants and reference materials. Finally, the progress in human exposure assessment studies facilitated by these analytical methods is described and an outlook on probable developments and possibilities is presented.

  6. Effects of Drilling Fluid Exposure to Oil and Gas Workers Presented with Major Areas of Exposure and Exposure Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Broni-Bediako

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drilling fluid is any fluid which is circulated through a well in order to remove cuttings from a wellbore. They are used broadly in the oil and gas industry, on exploration rigs, and are critical to ensuring a safe and productive oil or gas well. During drilling, a large volume of fluids are circulated through the well and into open, partially enclosed or completely enclosed systems at elevated temperatures. When these drilling fluids are agitated during circulating process there is significant potential for chemical exposure to workers and subsequent health effects. This study seeks to identify major areas of drilling fluid exposure and health hazard associated with the use of drilling fluid. The study also presents some challenges in setting drilling fluid exposure standard which has always not been given the same attention or concern as effects and risk management of drilling fluid. Some exposure indicators are also presented.

  7. Assessment of the Effects of Acute and Repeated Exposure to Blast Overpressure in Rodents: Towards a Greater Understanding of Blast and the Potential Ramifications for Injury in Humans Exposed to Blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thomas Ahlers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI resulting from exposure to improvised explosive devices (IEDs has fueled a requirement to develop animals models that mirror this condition using exposure to blast overpressure (BOP. En route to developing a model of repeated exposure to BOP we sought to initially characterize the effects of acute BOP exposure in rodents, focusing specifically on the levels of BOP exposure that produced clinical mTBI symptoms. We first measured BOP effects on gross motor function on a balance beam. Separate groups of unanesthetized rats were exposed (in different orientations to 40 kPa, 75 kPa and 120 kPa BOP exposure inside a pneumatically driven shock tube. Results demonstrated that rats exposed to 120 kPa demonstrated transient alterations or loss of consciousness indicated by a transient loss of righting and by increased latencies on the balance beam. The 120 kPa exposure was the threshold for overt pathology for acute BOP exposure with approximately 30% of rats presenting with evidence of subdural hemorrhage and cortical contusions. All animals exposed to 120 kPa BOP manifested evidence of significant pulmonary hemorrhage. Anterograde memory deficits were observed in rats exposed to 75 kPa facing the BOP wave and rats exposed to 120 kPa in the lateral (side orientation. We next assessed repeated exposure to either lateral or frontal 40 kPa BOP in anesthetized rats, once per day for 12 days. Results showed that repeated exposure in the frontal, but not side, orientation to the BOP wave produced a transitory learning deficit on a Morris water maze (MWM task as shown by significantly longer latencies to reach the submerged platform in the second and third blocks of a four block session. Implications of these data are discussed in relation to the manifestation of mTBI in military personnel exposed to IEDs. Finally, we suggest that there are multiple types of brain injury from blast.

  8. [Investigation on the migration and biologic effects of nano FeOx powders under the exposure of extremely low frequency altering electric magnetic field in human heptoma-bearing nude mice in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hui-Xiang; Dai, Zhen-Yu; Sun, Ming-Zhong

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the mechanism and biologic effects of 37 nm magnetic nano FeOx powders (MNPs) on human hepatoma-bearing nude mice. 37 nm MNPs were prepared by coprecipitation methods and then injected into human hepatoma (Bel-7402) bearing-nude mice through the tail vein. After injection of MNPs, the mice were first exposed under static magnetic field and then treated under extremely low frequency altering-electric magnetic field directing to the tumor area. The migration and trafficking of MNPs were determined by MMR. Tumor growth was monitored with calipers every 5 days and tumor volume was calculated on the basis of three-dimensioned measurements. The apoptosis of tumor cells was analyzed by flow cytometry analysis. The expressions of apoptosis-associated proteins Bcl-2, Bax and HSP27 were determined using western-blot analysis. Static magnetic field could direct the migration and trafficking of MNPs to the tumor site with a higher ratio of 98.9%. Extremely Low Frequency Electric-Magnetic Field (EMF) treatment could inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells and prolong the survive time of tumor-bearing mice injected with MNPs. In addition, the survival time of tumor-bearing mice and percentages of prohibition on tumor cell growth were 27.4+/-0.7 days and 37.5+/-0.8% (F = 0.005, P is less than to 0.05), respectively. The results of flow cytometry analyses showed that about 18.1+/-0.6% (F = 0.030, P is less than to 0.05) of tumor cells were induced into early apoptosis. Furthermore, expressions of apoptosis-associated proteins Bcl-2 and Bax were significantly induced by MNPs under EMF treatment. The ratio of Bcl/Bax in both MNPs and EMF treatment group was 0.07+/-0.01, which was much lower than that of control group (0.23+/-0.02) (F = 0.016, P is less than to 0.05). Heat shock protein-27 (Hsp-27) was not significantly induced in different treatment groups. Injection of MNPs with EMF exposure on human hepatoma-bearing nude mice could significantly prolong the

  9. Health effect from EMF exposure of Korea population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. S.; Cho, Y. S.; Lee, J. T.; Yup, M. J.; Hong, J. H. [Institute of Environmental and Industrrial Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    This study on health effect from EMF exposure was performed from June 2001 to April 2002 to compare changes in melatonin levels in urine of 40 subjects during their normal sleeping hours, to evaluate heart rate, ST segment in ventricular, and ventricular premature beat for cardiac function, to evaluate microwave exposure from cellular phones which may have a potential influence on the electro physiologic function of human brain, and each 20 subjects in occupational and non-occupational group measured personal 24-h continual exposure, using EMDEX(for 40-800Hz, Enertech Consultant, Inc.). An urine samples for analysis of melatonin excretion level were collected 1 times a day(immediately after wake-up) for five days from each subjects and analyzed by radioimmunoassay, HRV-test for relationship between heart rate and EMF exposure was performed heart rate beat using Holter for subjects, and double EEG-test were performed in 10 long-term users of the cellularphones when using and not using them, and a single EEG-test in 10 short-term users of the cellular phones. Each EEG-recording took 40 min consisting of 30 min filed exposure and 10 min measurement. And We estimated the economic value of the potential damage of electromagnetic radiation from cellular phone, and the willingness to pay of people for the study of the radiation damage led by the government, by applying contingent variation method. The results of this study were followed; 1. Personal exposure assessment 2. We showed not significant difference for the subjective average melatonin levels between occupational and non- occupational groups exposed to electromagnetic fields. 3. We showed no difference in the awake EEGs in terms of spectral power density measures between long-term users and short-term users of cellular phones. 4. We found that the economic value of the potential damage by the radiation for a typical cellular phone user is about 20,000 won per year and he would be willing to pay about 1,800 won

  10. Potential exposure levels and health effects of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, A H; Munshi, A A; Goodman, A K

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to assess the potential exposure levels and pursuant public health implications of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill. This site received ash from a single incinerator without pollution control devices from 1954-1973. Soil was sampled for 10 heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodioxin and furan congeners, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Soil concentrations for these substances were converted to estimates of exposure, health effects, and/or cancer risk by the application of a general exposure model and exposure/effect and exposure/risk models for specific substances. The results of soil analysis and modeling indicate that the level of lead detected on the site was considerably above the recommended levels of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and may lead to an elevated blood lead level in exposed children above that currently defining a case of lead poisoning. The potential for health effects resulting from exposure to other substances measured in the soil on this site is considered to be small, and no significant increased cancer risk is expected. Comparison of levels of various substances obtained at this site with levels obtained in fresh bottom ash in other studies suggests that these results may be applicable to exposures from other municipal incinerator bottom ash landfills.

  11. Risk assessment of human health from exposure to the discharged ballast water after full-scale electrolysis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nahui; Wang, Yidan; Xue, Junzeng; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Qiong; Liu, Liang; Wu, Huixian; Hu, Kefeng

    2016-06-01

    The presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) releasing from ballast water management systems (BWMS) can cause a possible adverse effects on humans. The objectives of this study were to compute the Derived No Effect Levels (DNELs) for different exposure scenarios and to compare these levels with the exposure levels from the measured DBPs in treated ballast water. The risk assessment showed that when using animal toxicity data, all the DNELs values were approximately 10(3)-10(12) times higher than the exposure levels of occupational and general public exposure scenarios, indicating the level of risk was low (risk characterization ratios (RCRs) risk of adverse effects on human were significant. This implies that there are apparent discrepancies between risk characterization from animal and human data, which may affect the overall results. We therefore recommend that when appropriate, human data should be used in risk assessment as much as possible, although human data are very limited. Moreover, more appropriate assessment factors can be considered to be employed in estimating the DNELs for human when the animal data is selected as the dose descriptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adverse effects in adulthood resulting from low-level dioxin exposure in juvenile zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tracie R; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    There is strong evidence indicating that disease in adult humans stems from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. A problem in identifying environmental factors is that subacute exposures during early life are often unnoticed, or exposures are variable among a diverse population. This leads to a confusing pattern in adulthood. An additional problem in following exposure effects in humans is the length of time needed to study outcomes spanning a human generation. We have recently developed a zebrafish model for studying the effects of sublethal juvenile exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin). Although the initial exposure produces no effect at the time, we find skeletal and reproductive defects in adulthood and into subsequent generations. The short generation time of zebrafish along with the ability to maintain large cohorts of exposed individuals and their offspring allows us to overcome variation in exposure and genetic background. Here we describe progress in studying TCDD as an endocrine and developmental disruptor, and our results showing adult consequences of early exposure.

  13. Exposure to titanium dioxide and other metallic oxide nanoparticles induces cytotoxicity on human neural cells and fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C K Lai

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available James C K Lai1, Maria B Lai1, Sirisha Jandhyam1, Vikas V Dukhande1, Alok Bhushan1, Christopher K Daniels1, Solomon W Leung21Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, and Biomedical Research Institute; 2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering and Biomedical Research Institute, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID, USAAbstract: The use of titanium dioxide (TiO2 in various industrial applications (eg, production of paper, plastics, cosmetics, and paints has been expanding thereby increasing the occupational and other environmental exposure of these nanoparticles to humans and other species. However, the health effects of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles have not been systematically assessed even though recent studies suggest that such exposure induces inflammatory responses in lung tissue and cells. Because the effects of such nanoparticles on human neural cells are unknown, we have determined the putative cytotoxic effects of these nanoparticles on human astrocytes-like astrocytoma U87 cells and compared their effects on normal human fibroblasts. We found that TiO2 micro- and nanoparticles induced cell death on both human cell types in a concentration-related manner. We further noted that zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles were the most effective, TiO2 nanoparticles the second most effective, and magnesium oxide (MgO nanoparticles the least effective in inducing cell death in U87 cells. The cell death mechanisms underlying the effects of TiO2 micro- and nanoparticles on U87 cells include apoptosis, necrosis, and possibly apoptosis-like and necrosis-like cell death types. Thus, our findings may have toxicological and other pathophysiological implications on exposure of humans and other mammalian species to metallic oxide nanoparticles.Keywords: cytotoxicity of titanium dioxide micro- and nanoparticles, cytotoxicity of zinc oxide and magnesium oxide nanoparticles, human neural cells

  14. A review of adverse pregnancy outcomes and formaldehyde exposure in human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J J; Ness, R; Tyl, R W; Krivanek, N; Esmen, N A; Hall, T A

    2001-08-01

    We examine the potential for reproductive and developmental effects from formaldehyde exposure. Formaldehyde is unlikely to reach the reproductive system in humans in concentrations sufficient to cause damage since it is rapidly metabolized and detoxified upon contact with the respiratory tract. While there are effects seen in in vitro studies or after injection, there is little evidence of reproductive or developmental toxicity in animal studies under exposure levels and routes relevant to humans. Most of the epidemiology studies examined spontaneous abortion and showed some evidence of increased risk (meta-relative risk=1.4, 95% CI 0.9-2.1). We found evidence of reporting biases and publication biases among the epidemiology studies and when these biases were taken into account, we found no evidence of increased risk of spontaneous abortion among workers exposed to formaldehyde (meta-relative risk=0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.0). The small number of studies on birth defects, low birth weight, and infertility among formaldehyde workers; the limitations in the design of these studies; and the inconsistent findings across these studies make it difficult to draw conclusions from the epidemiology data alone. However, information from experimental studies and studies of metabolism indicate reproductive impacts are unlikely at formaldehyde exposures levels observed in the epidemiology studies.

  15. ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO GRASS POLLEN IN DENMARK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Hertel, Ole; Herbert, Rob

    Objectives: Exposure to pollen is typically assessed using data collected at fixed roof-top monitoring stations, which give a general picture of airborne pollen concentrations over a wide region. Actual exposure levels can be obtained through personal exposure monitoring. This is typically done...... using a suction sampler worn on the chest or lapel that measures breathing zone concentration; a more useful exposure parameter for pollen allergy sufferers is the amount of pollen inhaled, i.e. the dose. The objective of this study was to investigate how well monitoring station data reflect actual...... exposure, something that is currently not well understood. Methods: Exposure samples were collected during the 2011 grass pollen season in an area of abundant unmaintained grass coverage close to the centre of Aarhus, Denmark. Sampling was performed at two-hourly intervals between 12:00 and 20:00 on 14...

  16. Immunomodulation of human monocytes following exposure to Lutzomyia intermedia saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barral Aldina

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sand fly saliva contains potent and complex pharmacologic molecules that are able to modulate the host's hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune systems. In this study, we evaluated the effects of salivary gland sonicate (SGS of Lutzomyia intermedia, the natural vector of Leishmania braziliensis, on monocytes obtained from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of healthy volunteers. We investigated the effects of sand fly saliva on cytokine production and surface molecule expression of LPS-stimulated human monocytes uninfected or infected with L. braziliensis. Results Pre-treatment of non-infected human monocytes with L. intermedia SGS followed by LPS-stimulation led to a significant decrease in IL-10 production accompanied by a significant increase in CD86, CD80, and HLA-DR expression. Pre-treatment with SGS followed by LPS stimulation and L. braziliensis infection led to a significant increase in TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 production without significant alterations in co-stimulatory molecule expression. However, pre-treatment with L. intermedia SGS did not result in significant changes in the infection rate of human monocytes. Conclusion Our data indicate that L. intermedia saliva is able to modulate monocyte response, and, although this modulation is dissociated from enhanced infection with L. braziliensis, it may be associated with successful parasitism.

  17. Secretion of interferon gamma from human immune cells is altered by exposure to tributyltin and dibutyltin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Shanieek; Reid, Jacqueline; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) are widespread environmental contaminants found in food, beverages, and human blood samples. Both of these butyltins (BTs) interfere with the ability of human natural killer (NK) cells to lyse target cells and alter secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) from human immune cells in vitro. The capacity of BTs to interfere with secretion of other pro-inflammatory cytokines has not been examined. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a modulator of adaptive and innate immune responses, playing an important role in overall immune competence. This study shows that both TBT and DBT alter secretion of IFNγ from human immune cells. Peripheral blood cell preparations that were increasingly reconstituted were used to determine if exposures to either TBT or DBT affected IFNγ secretion and how the makeup of the cell preparation influenced that effect. IFNγ secretion was examined after 24 h, 48 h, and 6 day exposures to TBT (200 - 2.5 nM) and DBT (5 - 0.05 µM) in highly enriched human NK cells, a monocyte-depleted preparation of PBMCs, and monocyte-containing PBMCs. Both BTs altered IFNγ secretion from immune cells at most of the conditions tested (either increasing or decreasing secretion). However, there was significant variability among donors as to the concentrations and time points that showed changes as well as the baseline secretion of IFNγ. The majority of donors showed an increase in IFNγ secretion in response to at least one concentration of TBT or DBT at a minimum of one length of exposure.

  18. Acute Meteorite Dust Exposure and Pulmonary Inflammation - Implications for Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Kaur, J.; Smirnov, A.; Galdanes, K.; Schoonen, M. A. A.; Chen, L. C.; Tsirka, S. E.; Gordon, T.

    2017-01-01

    The previous manned missions to the Moon represent milestones of human ingenuity, perseverance, and intellectual curiosity. However, one of the major ongoing concerns is the array of hazards associated with lunar surface dust. Not only did the dust cause mechanical and structural integrity issues with the suits, the dust 'storm' generated upon reentrance into the crew cabin caused "lunar hay fever" and "almost blindness [1-3]" (Figure 1). It was further reported that the allergic response to the dust worsened with each exposure [4]. The lack of gravity exacerbated the exposure, requiring the astronauts to wear their helmet within the module in order to avoid breathing the irritating particles [1]. Due to the prevalence of these high exposures, the Human Research Roadmap developed by NASA identifies the Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure as an area of concern [5]. Extended human exploration will further increase the probability of inadvertent and repeated exposures to celestial dusts. Going forward, hazard assessments of celestial dusts will be determined through sample return efforts prior to astronaut deployment. Studies on the lunar highland regolith indicate that the dust is not only respirable but also reactive [2, 6-9], and previous studies concluded that it is moderately toxic; generating a greater response than titanium oxide but a lower response than quartz [6]. The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the surface of the dust has been implicated. However, there is actually little data related to physicochemical characteristics of particulates and pulmonary toxicity, especially as it relates to celestial dust exposure. As a direct response to this deficit, the present study evaluates the role of a particulate's innate geochemical features (e.g., bulk chemistry, internal composition, morphology, size, and reactivity) in generating adverse toxicological responses in vitro and in vivo. This highly interdisciplinary

  19. Pulmonary Inflammatory Responses To Acute Meteorite Dust Exposures - Implications For Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Kaur, J.; Smirnov, A.; Galdanes, K.; Schoonen, M. A. A.; Chen, L. C.; Tsirka, S. E.; Gordon, T.

    2017-01-01

    The previous manned missions to the Moon represent milestones of human ingenuity, perseverance, and intellectual curiosity. However, one of the major ongoing concerns is the array of hazards associated with lunar surface dust. Not only did the dust cause mechanical and structural integrity issues with the suits, the dust 'storm' generated upon reentrance into the crew cabin caused "lunar hay fever" and "almost blindness" (Figure 1). It was further reported that the allergic response to the dust worsened with each exposure. The lack of gravity exacerbated the exposure, requiring the astronauts to wear their helmet within the module in order to avoid breathing the irritating particles. Due to the prevalence of these high exposures, the Human Research Roadmap developed by NASA identifies the Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure as an area of concern. Extended human exploration will further increase the probability of inadvertent and repeated exposures to celestial dusts. Going forward, hazard assessments of celestial dusts will be determined through sample return efforts prior to astronaut deployment. Studies on the lunar highland regolith indicate that the dust is not only respirable but also reactive, and previous studies concluded that it is moderately toxic; generating a greater response than titanium oxide but a lower response than quartz. The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the surface of the dust has been implicated. However, there is actually little data related to physicochemical characteristics of particulates and pulmonary toxicity, especially as it relates to celestial dust exposure. As a direct response to this deficit, the present study evaluates the role of a particulate's innate geochemical features (e.g., bulk chemistry, internal composition, morphology, size, and reactivity) in generating adverse toxicological responses in vitro and in vivo. This highly interdisciplinary study evaluates the relative

  20. Human Rights Engagement and Exposure: New Scales to Challenge Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jane; Abell, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Advancing human rights is a core competency of U.S. social work education; yet, human rights attitudes and behaviors have never been measured in the social work literature. Thus, this article describes the development and initial validation of two scales, Human Rights Engagement in Social Work (HRESW) and Human Rights Exposure in…

  1. Human Rights Engagement and Exposure: New Scales to Challenge Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jane; Abell, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Advancing human rights is a core competency of U.S. social work education; yet, human rights attitudes and behaviors have never been measured in the social work literature. Thus, this article describes the development and initial validation of two scales, Human Rights Engagement in Social Work (HRESW) and Human Rights Exposure in…

  2. Bisphenol A in supermarket receipts and its exposure to human in Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shao-You; Chang, Wen-Jing; Sojinu, Samuel O; Ni, Hong-Gang

    2013-08-01

    Paper receipt has been documented as one major source of bisphenol A (BPA) for human exposure but little has been done by researchers to elaborate the potential health risk caused by handling paper receipt up to date. In the present study, BPA was analyzed in 42 supermarket receipts collected from Shenzhen, China. BPA was detected in all samples at concentrations ranging from 2.58 to 14.7mgg(-1). In most cases, the total amount of BPA on the receipt was at least one thousand times the amount found in the epoxy lining of a food can, another controversial use of the chemical. The estimated daily intakes (EDI) of BPA via handling of supermarket receipt ranged from 2 to 347μgday(-1) (mean, 40.4μgday(-1)) for a supermarket cashier and from 0.24 to 3.98μgday(-1) (mean, 0.69μgday(-1)) for general population. Based on the cumulative probability distribution of the calculated daily exposure to BPA via handling supermarket receipt, the EDI at the 0.1th and 1th percentile for supermarket cashier and general population, were already larger than 100ng (kgbw)(-1)day(-1), while at the 0.2th and 71th percentile, the EDI for both populations reached 1000ng (kgbw)(-1)day(-1). Considering the adverse endocrine disruptive effects of BPA and the dosage exposure level (from tens to hundreds ng (kgbw)(-1)day(-1)), human exposure to BPA in Shenzhen deserves more attention. Sensitivity analysis result showed that the handling time and frequency of supermarket receipts are the most important variables that contributed to most of the total variance of exposure.

  3. Impact of Hot and Cold Exposure on Human Skeletal Muscle Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Roksana B.; Shute, Robert J.; Heesch, Matthew W.S.; La Salle, D. Taylor; Bubak, Matthew P.; Dinan, Nicholas E.; Laursen, Terence L.; Slivka, Dustin R.

    2017-01-01

    Many human diseases lead to a loss of skeletal muscle metabolic function and mass. Local and environmental temperature can modulate the exercise-stimulated response of several genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and skeletal muscle function in a human model. However, the impact of environmental temperature, independent of exercise, has not been addressed in a human model. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of exposure to hot, cold, and room temperature conditions on skeletal muscle gene expression related to mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle mass. METHODS Recreationally trained male subjects (n=12) had muscle biopsies taken from the vastus lateralis before and after 3 h exposure to hot (33 °C), cold (7 °C), or room temperature (20 °C) conditions. RESULTS Temperature had no effect on most of the genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis, myogenesis, or proteolysis (p > 0.05). Core temperature was significantly higher in hot and cold environments compared to room temperature (37.2 ± 0.1 °C, p = 0.001; 37.1 ± 0.1 °C, p = 0.013; 36.9 ± 0.1 °C, respectively). Whole body oxygen consumption was also significantly higher in hot and cold compared to room temperature (0.38 ± 0.01 L·min−1, p < 0.001; 0.52 ± 0.03 L·min−1, p < 0.001; 0.35 ± 0.01 L·min−1, respectively). CONCLUSIONS These data show that acute temperature exposure alone does not elicit significant changes in skeletal muscle gene expression. When considered in conjunction with previous research, exercise appears to be a necessary component to observe gene expression alterations between different environmental temperatures in humans. PMID:28177744

  4. Human responses to carbon dioxide, a follow-up study at recommended exposure limits in non-industrial environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    To extend the results of a previous study on the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) and bioeffluents on humans, the new study reported in this paper was carried out. The purpose of this study was to examine, whether exposure to CO2 at 5000 ppm would cause sensory discomfort, evoke acute health...... was added to the supply air to create an exposure condition with CO2 at 5000 ppm (the measured exposure level was ca. 4900 ppm). Ten healthy college-age students were exposed twice to each of the two conditions for 2.5 h in a design balanced for order of presentation. The raised CO2 concentration had...

  5. Neurobehavioural Effects of Hypergravity Exposure in CD-1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Daniela; Francia, Nadia; Aloe, Luigi; Enrico, Alleva

    The effects of spaceflight on the nervous system physiology could have important implications for the prolonged stay outside Earth's gravitational field. In this view, both ground-based and space research using animal models represent useful tools to investigate the impact of gravity (hypergravity, microgravity and weightlessness) on the nervous system and behaviour. Data coming from these studies, besides acquisition of knowledge relevant for spaceflights and pro-longed permanence of both humans and animals in space, could provide insight into basic bio-logical phenomena underlying the plasticity of the nervous system and its adaptive responses to a changing environment. Most ground experiments employing animal models use the paradigm of hypergravity exposure with the expectation that behavioural and physiological reactions to this environment might help to explain reactions to the microgravity challenge faced by or-biting animals. An overview of ground-based experiments set up to investigate the effects of changes of gravitational environment on the neurobehavioural responses of CD-1 mouse will be reported, and will illustrate the short-, medium-and long-term behavioural and neurobiological consequences of hypergravity exposure both at adulthood and during early and late postnatal development. Moreover, since mother-pup interaction is critical for the survival and the devel-opment of neonatal rodents, especially in an extreme environment such as that of space, we characterized, exploiting ethological methods, changes in maternal behaviour of CD-1 outbred mouse dams exposed to mild hypergravity. The results of these experiments will be discussed.

  6. Human fetal testis Leydig cell disruption by exposure to the pesticide dieldrin at low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Paul A; Abramovich, David R; Haites, Neva E; Cash, Phillip; Groome, Nigel P; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Murray, Tessa J; Lea, Richard G

    2007-11-01

    Declining human reproductive health over the last 60 years has been proposed to be due to effects of environmental chemicals, especially endocrine disrupting compounds, on fetal development. We investigated whether a model pesticide, dieldrin, at concentrations within both maternal circulation and environmental ranges (1 pmol/l = 0.0004 p.p.b. = 380.9 pg/l), could disrupt the human fetal testis. Human fetal testes were collected during the second trimester, a critical period of male sexual differentiation (development and masculinization). Testis explants were cultured for 24 h in the presence and absence of LH (10-1000 IU LH/l) and dieldrin (1 pmol and 1 nmol/l). Endocrine, immunohistological and proteome characteristics of the tissues were investigated. Exposure to dieldrin reduced LH-induced testosterone secretion (P Dieldrin altered proteins associated with cancer, apoptosis, transcription and development. Wnt-2b was reduced 3-fold and immunolocalized to Leydig and Sertoli cells. Dieldrin also reversed some LH-induced changes in protein expression, supporting the conclusion that Leydig cell function is at risk from environmental chemicals. Our findings indicate that exposure to very low, biologically relevant, concentrations of environmental chemicals could affect the fetal human Leydig cell, reducing testosterone secretion and potentially leading to subtle dysregulation of reproductive development and adult fecundity.

  7. Occurrence and human exposure of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhui; Shi, Yali; Gao, Lihong; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2015-11-01

    As an emerging group of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, parabens have attracted growing attention due to their potential effects on human health. In the present study, the occurrence and distribution of eight parabens, four chlorinated parabens, and their common hydrolysis product, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), were investigated in 39 swimming pools in Beijing, China. Methyl paraben and propyl paraben were the predominant compounds in swimming pools, accounting for 91.2 % of the total parabens. It is noteworthy that octyl paraben, a paraben with longer chain, was firstly detected in this study. There were several factors affecting the levels of parabens among the 39 swimming pools. The concentrations of parabens and chlorinated derivatives detected in indoor pools (144 ng L(-1)) were roughly 20-fold higher than those in outdoor pools (6.78 ng L(-1)). Hotel pools appear to present higher level of target compounds (361 ng L(-1)) than that in health club (228 ng L(-1)), municipal (130 ng L(-1)), school (75.6 ng L(-1)), and community pools (63.0 ng L(-1)). Moreover, the level of these compounds in pools during weekends (174 ng L(-1)) was much higher than that during weekdays (52.3 ng L(-1)). The dynamics of target compounds were also investigated to provide a general trend of the level of parabens in a school indoor swimming pool during a 14-week period. Human exposure assessment was conducted to estimate the potential risk of exposure to parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in swimming pools. Considering the total exposure dose of multiple parabens, human exposure to parabens from the water of swimming pools is negligible. However, the threat of these parabens to children in swimming pool should be concerned.

  8. Predicting pulmonary fibrosis in humans after exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monita; Nikota, Jake; Halappanavar, Sabina; Castranova, Vincent; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-07-01

    The increased production and use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a diverse array of consumer, medical, and industrial applications have raised concerns about potential human exposure to these materials in the workplace and ambient environments. Inhalation is a primary route of exposure to MWCNTs, and the existing data indicate that they are potentially hazardous to human health. While a 90-day rodent inhalation test (e.g., OECD Test No. 413: subchronic inhalation toxicity: 90-day study or EPA Health Effects Test Guidelines OPPTS 870.3465 90-day inhalation toxicity) is recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics for MWCNTs (and other CNTs) if they are to be commercially produced (Godwin et al. in ACS Nano 9:3409-3417, 2015), this test is time and cost-intensive and subject to scientific and ethical concerns. As a result, there has been much interest in transitioning away from studies on animals and moving toward human-based in vitro and in silico models. However, given the multiple mechanisms of toxicity associated with subchronic exposure to inhaled MWCNTs, a battery of non-animal tests will likely be needed to evaluate the key endpoints assessed by the 90-day rodent study. Pulmonary fibrosis is an important adverse outcome related to inhalation exposure to MWCNTs and one that the non-animal approach should be able to assess. This review summarizes the state-of-the-science regarding in vivo and in vitro toxicological methods for predicting MWCNT-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Does D-cycloserine enhance exposure therapy for anxiety disorders in humans? A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Rodrigues

    Full Text Available The treatment of anxiety is on the edge of a new era of combinations of pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions. A new wave of translational research has focused on the use of pharmacological agents as psychotherapy adjuvants using neurobiological insights into the mechanism of the action of certain psychological treatments such as exposure therapy. Recently, d-cycloserine (DCS an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis has been applied to enhance exposure-based treatment for anxiety and has proved to be a promising, but as yet unproven intervention. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of DCS in the enhancement of exposure therapy in anxiety disorders. A systematic review/meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic searches were conducted in the databases ISI-Web of Science, Pubmed and PsycINFO. We included only randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with humans, focusing on the role of DCS in enhancing the action of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. We identified 328 references, 13 studies were included in our final sample: 4 on obsessive-compulsive disorder, 2 on panic disorder, 2 on social anxiety disorder, 2 on posttraumatic stress disorder, one on acrophobia, and 2 on snake phobia. The results of the present meta-analysis show that DCS enhances exposure therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders (Cohen d =  -0.34; CI: -0.54 to -0.14, facilitating the specific process of extinction of fear. DCS seems to be effective when administered at a time close to the exposure therapy, at low doses and a limited number of times. DCS emerges as a potential new therapeutic approach for patients with refractory anxiety disorders that are unresponsive to the conventional treatments available. When administered correctly, DCS is a promising strategy for augmentation of CBT and could reduce health care costs, drop-out rates and bring faster relief to patients.

  10. Physiological responses to exposure to carbon dioxide and human bioeffluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Present paper describes physiological responses as a result of exposures to CO2 (between 500 ppm to 3,000 ppm) with and without bioeffluents. Twenty-five subjects participated. They were exposed in the climate chamber for 255 minutes in groups of five at a time. During exposure, they performed di...

  11. Limiting criteria for human exposure to low humidity indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David; Fang, Lei; Meyer, H.;

    2002-01-01

    % RH. The subjects performed simulated office work throughout each exposure. Building Related Symptom (BRS) intensity was reported on visual-analogue scales. Tests of eye, nose and skin function were applied. In these short exposures subjective discomfort, though significantly increased by low humidity...

  12. Novel Insights in the Regulation of Phosphatidylserine Exposure in Human Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro C. Wesseling

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In previous publications we were able to demonstrate the exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS in the outer membrane leaflet after activation of red blood cells (RBCs by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, phorbol-12 myristate-13acetate (PMA, or 4-bromo-A23187 (A23187. It has been concluded that three different mechanisms are responsible for the PS exposure in human RBCs: (i Ca2+-stimulated scramblase activation (and flippase inhibition by A23187, LPA, and PMA; (ii PKCα activation by LPA and PMA; and (iii enhanced lipid flip flop caused by LPA. Further studies aimed to elucidate interconnections between the increased Ca2+ content, scramblase- and PKCα-activation. In addition, the role of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel (Gardos channel activity in the process of PS exposure needs to be investigated. Methods: The intracellular Ca2+ content and the PS exposure of RBCs have been investigated after treatment with LPA (2.5 µM, PMA (6 µM, or A23187 (2 µM. Fluo-4 and annexin V-FITC has been used to detect intracellular Ca2+ content and PS exposure, respectively. Both parameters (Ca2+ content, PS exposure were studied using flow cytometry. Inhibitors of the scramblase, the PKCα, and the Gardos channel have been applied. Results: The percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure after activation with LPA, PMA, or A23187 is significantly reduced after inhibition of the scramblase using the specific inhibitor R5421 as well as after the inhibition of the PKCα using chelerythrine chloride or calphostin C. The inhibitory effect is more pronounced when the scramblase and the PKCα are inhibited simultaneously. Additionally, the inhibition of the Gardos channel using charybdotoxin resulted in a significant reduction of the percentage of RBCs showing PS exposure under all conditions measured. Similar results were obtained when the Gardos channel activity was suppressed by increased extracellular K+ content. Conclusion: PS exposure is mediated by the Ca2

  13. Mere exposure and the endowment effect on consumer decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Gail; Nelson, Carolyn; Srzentic, Tamara; King, Ryan

    2007-03-01

    Previous researchers (e.g., J. A. Bargh, 1992, 2002) demonstrated the importance of nonconscious processes on consumer choice behavior. Using an advertisement, the authors determined the effect of two nonconscious processes--the mere exposure effect, which increases object preference by increasing consumer exposure to an object, and the endowment effect, which increases object valuation by providing consumer possession of an object--on consumer behavior. Although the mere exposure effect and endowment effect did not produce an interaction, they produced independent effects. The endowment effect increased object valuation but not object preference. The mere exposure effect increased object preference but not object valuation. Thus, at the unconscious level, an increase in object preference does not lead to an increase in object valuation, nor does an increase in object valuation lead to an increase in object preference. The authors discuss the importance of developing measures of unconscious process in advertising effectiveness.

  14. The response of human nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures to repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talikka, Marja; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Mathis, Carole; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Merg, Celine; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Florian; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is linked to the development of respiratory diseases, and there is a need to understand the mechanisms whereby CS causes damage. Although animal models have provided valuable insights into smoking-related respiratory tract damage, modern toxicity testing calls for reliable in vitro models as alternatives for animal experimentation. We report on a repeated whole mainstream CS exposure of nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures that mimic the morphological, physiological, and molecular attributes of the human respiratory tract. Despite the similar cellular staining and cytokine secretion in both tissue types, the transcriptomic analyses in the context of biological network models identified similar and diverse biological processes that were impacted by CS-exposed nasal and bronchial cultures. Our results demonstrate that nasal and bronchial tissue cultures are appropriate in vitro models for the assessment of CS-induced adverse effects in the respiratory system and promising alternative to animal experimentation.

  15. Radon exposure of the skin: I. Biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M W [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Radon progeny can plate out on skin and give rise to exposure of the superficial epidermis from alpha emitters Po-218 (7.7 MeV, range {approx}66 {mu}m) and Po-214 (6 MeV, range {approx}44 {mu}m). Dose rates from beta/gamma emitters Pb-214 and Bi-214 are low and only predominate at depths in excess of the alpha range. This paper reviews the evidence for a causal link between exposure from radon and its progeny, and deterministic and stochastic biological effects in human skin. Radiation induced skin effects such as ulceration and dermal atrophy, which require irradiation of the dermis, are ruled out for alpha irradiation from radon progeny because the target cells are considerably deeper than the range of alpha particles. They have not been observed in man or animals. Effects such as erythema and acute epidermal necrosis have been observed in a few cases of very high dose alpha particle exposures in man and after acute high dose exposure in animals from low energy beta radiations with similar depth doses to radon progeny. The required skin surface absorbed doses are in excess of 100 Gy. Such effects would require extremely high levels of radon progeny. They would involve quite exceptional circumstances, way outside the normal range of radon exposures in man. There is no definitive identification of the target cells for skin cancer induction in animals or man. The stem cells in the basal layer which maintain the epidermis are the most plausible contenders for target cells. The majority of these cells are near the end of the range of radon progeny alpha particles, even on the thinnest body sites. The nominal depth of these cells, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), is 70 {mu}m. There is evidence however that some irradiation of the hair follicles and/or the deeper dermis, as well as the inter-follicular epidermis, is also necessary for skin cancer induction. Alpha irradiation of rodent skin that is restricted to the

  16. Clinical Exposure Boost Predictions by Integrating Cytochrome P450 3A4-Humanized Mouse Studies With PBPK Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Heimbach, Tycho; Scheer, Nico; Barve, Avantika; Li, Wenkui; Lin, Wen; He, Handan

    2016-04-01

    NVS123 is a poorly water-soluble protease 56 inhibitor in clinical development. Data from in vitro hepatocyte studies suggested that NVS123 is mainly metabolized by CYP3A4. As a consequence of limited solubility, NVS123 therapeutic plasma exposures could not be achieved even with high doses and optimized formulations. One approach to overcome NVS123 developability issues was to increase plasma exposure by coadministrating it with an inhibitor of CYP3A4 such as ritonavir. A clinical boost effect was predicted by using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. However, initial boost predictions lacked sufficient confidence because a key parameter, fraction of drug metabolized by CYP3A4 (fmCYP3A4), could not be estimated with accuracy on account of disconnects between in vitro and in vivo preclinical data. To accurately estimate fmCYP3A4 in human, an in vivo boost effect study was conducted using CYP3A4-humanized mouse model which showed a 33- to 56-fold exposure boost effect. Using a top-down approach, human fmCYP3A4 for NVS123 was estimated to be very high and included in the human PBPK modeling to support subsequent clinical study design. The combined use of the in vivo boost study in CYP3A4-humanized mouse model mice along with PBPK modeling accurately predicted the clinical outcome and identified a significant NVS123 exposure boost (∼42-fold increase) with ritonavir.

  17. Cardiovascular change during encoding predicts the nonconscious mere exposure effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Sandra L; Toscano, William B; Cowings, Patricia S; Gabrieli, John D E

    2014-01-01

    These studies examined memory encoding to determine whether the mere exposure effect could be categorized as a form of conceptual or perceptual implicit priming and, if it was not conceptual or perceptual, whether cardiovascular psychophysiology could reveal its nature. Experiment 1 examined the effects of study phase level of processing on recognition, the mere exposure effect, and word identification implicit priming. Deep relative to shallow processing improved recognition but did not influence the mere exposure effect for nonwords or word identification implicit priming for words. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the effect of study-test changes in font and orientation, respectively, on the mere exposure effect and word identification implicit priming. Different study-test font and orientation reduced word identification implicit priming but had no influence on the mere exposure effect. Experiments 4 and 5 developed and used, respectively, a cardiovascular psychophysiological implicit priming paradigm to examine whether stimulus-specific cardiovascular reactivity at study predicted the mere exposure effect at test. Blood volume pulse change at study was significantly greater for nonwords that were later preferred than for nonwords that were not preferred at test. There was no difference in blood volume pulse change for words at study that were later either identified or not identified at test. Fluency effects, at encoding or retrieval, are an unlikely explanation for these behavioral and cardiovascular findings. The relation of blood volume pulse to affect suggests that an affective process that is not conceptual or perceptual contributes to the mere exposure effect.

  18. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies.

  19. Estrogen Effects after a Crush Muscle Injury and Acute Exposure to Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    et al. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia increases the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion in humans. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2003...AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2015-0007 Estrogen Effects after a Crush Muscle Injury and Acute Exposure to Hypobaric Hypoxia Dr. Barbara St...after a Crush Muscle Injury and Acute Exposure to Hypobaric Hypoxia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA7014-10-2-0001 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  20. Resistance to asbestos-induced apoptosis with continuous exposure to crocidolite on a human T cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Megumi [Department of Biofunctional Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Chen, Ying [Division of Pneumoconiosis, School of Public Health, China Medical University, 92 North 2nd, Heping District, Shenyang 110001 (China); Kumagai-Takei, Naoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hayashi, Hiroaki [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hatayama, Tamayo; Miyahara, Naomi; Katoh, Minako [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Juni-ichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumitsu [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Otsuki, Takemi, E-mail: takemi@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have been investigating the immunological effects of asbestos. The establishment of a low-dose and continuously exposed human T cell line, HTLV-1 immortalized MT-2, to chrysotile (CB) revealed reduction of CXCR3 chemokine receptor and production of IFN-{gamma} that caused a decline of tumor immunity. These effects were coupled with upregulation of IL-10, TGF-{beta}, and BCL-2 in asbestos-exposed patients. To observe the immunological effects of crocidolite (CR) on human T cells, a trial to establish a low-dose and continuously exposed model was conducted and compared with a previously reported CB-exposed model (MT-2CB). Transient exposure of MT-2 original cells to CB or CR induced a similar level of apoptosis and growth inhibition. The establishment of a continuously exposed subline to CR (MT-2CR) revealed resistance against CR-induced apoptosis and upregulation of the BCL-2/BAX ratio similar to that recorded for MT-2CB. Both sublines showed reduced production of IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha}, and IL-6 with increased IL-10. cDNA microarray with network/pathway analyses focusing on transcription factors revealed that many similar factors related to cell proliferation were involved following continuous exposure to asbestos in both MT-2CB and MT-2CR. These results indicate that both CB and CR fibers affect human T cells with similar degrees even though the carcinogenic activity of these substances differs due to their chemical and physical forms. Trials to identify early detection markers for asbestos exposure or the occurrence of asbestos-inducing malignancies using these findings may lead to the development of clinical tools for asbestos-related diseases and chemoprevention that modifies the reduced tumor immunity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of effects of chrysotile and crocidolite on human T cell was done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both fibers caused apoptosis of T cells by transient exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells

  1. The effect of exposure to nanoparticles and nanomaterials on the mammalian epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, M I; Valdés, A; Fernández, A F; Torrecillas, R; Fraga, M F

    Human exposure to nanomaterials and nanoparticles is increasing rapidly, but their effects on human health are still largely unknown. Epigenetic modifications are attracting ever more interest as possible underlying molecular mechanisms of gene-environment interactions, highlighting them as potential molecular targets following exposure to nanomaterials and nanoparticles. Interestingly, recent research has identified changes in DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and noncoding RNAs in mammalian cells exposed to nanomaterials and nanoparticles. However, the challenge for the future will be to determine the molecular pathways driving these epigenetic alterations, the possible functional consequences, and the potential effects on health.

  2. Reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects of triclosan: Population exposure, present evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Feng; Tian, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Triclosan has been used as a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for over 40 years worldwide. Increasing reports indicate frequent detection and broad exposure to triclosan in the natural environment and the human body. Current laboratory studies in various species provide strong evidence for its disrupting effects on the endocrine system, especially reproductive hormones. Multiple modes of action have been suggested, including disrupting hormone metabolism, displacing hormones from hormone receptors and disrupting steroidogenic enzyme activity. Although epidemiological studies on its effects in humans are mostly negative but conflicting, which is typical of much of the early evidence on the toxicity of EDCs, overall, the evidence suggests that triclosan is an EDC. This article reviews human exposure to triclosan, describes the current evidence regarding its reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects, and discusses potential mechanisms to provide insights for further study on its endocrine-disrupting effects in humans.

  3. Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Phthalates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laurie A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review of literature is to examine the association of phthalate exposure with development. Phthalates are chemical compounds used in poly-vinyl chloride, PVC; vinyl flooring, cosmetics, shampoo, air fresheners, soft plastic items, intravenous tubing, food packaging and wraps, textiles, paints, cleaning products and detergents.…

  4. Iron decreases biological effects of ozone exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTEXT: Ozone (0(3)) exposure is associated with a disruption of iron homeostasis and increased availability of this metal which potentially contributes to an oxidative stress and biologicaleffects. OBJECTIVE: We tested the postulate that increased concentrations of iron in c...

  5. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Human exposure to acrolein: Time-dependence and individual variation in eye irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Anna-Sara; Lind, Nina

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the time dependence on sensory irritation detection following exposure to threshold levels of acrolein, in humans. The exposures occurred in an exposure chamber and the subjects were breathing fresh air through a mask that covered the nose and mouth. All participants participated in four exposure conditions, of which three consisted of a mixture of acrolein and heptane and one of only heptane. Exposure to acrolein at a concentration half of the TLV-C lead to sensory irritation. The perceived sensory irritation resulted in both increased detectability and sensory irritation after about 6.8min of exposure in 58% of the participants. The study confirm the previously suggested LOAEL of about 0.34mg/m(3) for eye irritation due to acrolein exposure. The sensory irritation was still significant 10min after exposure. These results have implications for risk assessment and limit setting in occupational hygiene.

  7. Shocking Results on the Adverse Effects of CO2 Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is released in large quantities from humans while they live and work in spacecraft or work outside the spacecraft during extravehicular activity (EVA). Removal of this anthropogenic pollutant requires major resources, and these resources increase dramatically as the levels of CO2 set to protect human health and performance are reduced. The current Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration of CO2 aboard the ISS is 0.7% or 5.3 mmHg; however, according to Chits (mission action requests), NASA and its international partners have agreed to control CO2 levels to less than 4 mmHg. In the meantime, retrospective investigations attempting to associate crew symptoms with elevated CO2 levels over the life if the International Space Station (ISS) are underway to determine if this level is sufficient to protect against health and performance decrements. Anecdotal reports suggest that crewmembers are not able to perform complex tasks as readily in spaceflight as they were able during ground-based training. While physiological effects of CO2 have been studied for many decades, it is only recently that the effects of CO2 on higher reasoning capabilities have been studied. The initial results are shocking. For example, one study published in the respected journal Environmental Health Perspectives showed obvious adverse effects of CO2 exposures on higher reasoning at 1.9 mmHg. The implications and limitations of this study are paramount in determining future CO2 SMACs for human spaceflight, both aboard the ISS and in exploration-class missions. Key Words: carbon dioxide, spacecraft, air quality, toxic effects

  8. Cognitive effects of radiation emitted by cellular phones: the influence of exposure side and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Roy; Eliyahu, Ilan; Hareuveny, Ronen; Margaliot, Menachem; Meiran, Nachshon

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the time dependence effects of exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitted by standard GSM cellular phones on the cognitive functions of humans. A total of 48 healthy right-handed male subjects performed a spatial working memory task (that required either a left-hand or a right-hand response) while being exposed to one of two GSM phones placed at both sides of the head. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was exposed to one of three exposure conditions: left-side of the head, right-side, or sham-exposure. The experiment consisted of 12 blocks of trials. Response times (RTs) and accuracy of the responses were recorded. It was found that the average RT of the right-hand responses under left-side exposure condition was significantly longer than those of the right-side and sham-exposure groups averaged together during the first two time blocks. These results confirmed the existence of an effect of exposure on RT, as well as the fact that exposure duration (together with the responding hand and the side of exposure) may play an important role in producing detectable RFR effects on performance. Differences in these parameters might be the reason for the failure of certain studies to detect or replicate RFR effects. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Effect of dioxin exposure on aromatase expression in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lan; Leung, Lai K

    2008-05-15

    Because of their persistence in the environment dioxins are one of the most concerned classes of carcinogens. Displaying both pro- and anti-agonistic properties to some hormone receptors, the pollutants are also known to be endocrine disruptors. Humans can be exposed to this pollutant through contaminated food, air, drinking water, etc. The female hormone estrogen may initiate various physiological functions, and excessive exposure to this hormone is a documented risk factor for carcinogenesis. Cyp19 (aromatase) catalyses the last step of estrogen biosynthesis, while cyp1a1 can hydroxylate and deactivate the hormone. In the present study, we investigated the effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) on aromatase expression in the brain and adipose tissue in ovariectomized Sprague Dawley rats. Female rats were given 2.5 microg/kg TCDD p.o. before and after ovariectomy. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis indicated that pre-ovariectomy administration of TCDD could significantly reduce aromatase expression in the brain but increase the expression in the adipose tissue. In addition, increased plasma estrogen level and uterine weight were observed in these rats. These parameters did not change in rats with post-ovariectomy TCDD treatment. Our results suggested that the timing of exposure to the toxicant could determine the estrogenicity of TCDD. No correlation between cyp1a1 and cyp19 expression was observed.

  10. Assessing human exposure risk to cadmium through inhalation and seafood consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yun-Ru; Chen, Wei-Yu [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liao, Chung-Min, E-mail: cmliao@ccms.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei10617, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trophically available fraction in seafood and bioaccessibility is linked. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human health risk to Cd can via inhalation and seafood consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Female had the higher Cd accumulation in urine and blood than male. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoking is a major determinant of human Cd intake. - Abstract: The role of cadmium (Cd) bioaccessibility in risk assessment is less well studied. The aim of this study was to assess human health risk to Cd through inhalation and seafood consumption by incorporating bioaccessibility. The relationships between trophically available Cd and bioaccessibility were constructed based on available experimental data. We estimated Cd concentrations in human urine and blood via daily intake from seafood consumption and inhalation based on a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. A Hill-based dose-response model was used to assess human renal dysfunction and peripheral arterial disease risks for long-term Cd exposure. Here we showed that fish had higher bioaccessibility ({approx}83.7%) than that of shellfish ({approx}73.2%) for human ingestion. Our results indicated that glomerular and tubular damage among different genders and smokers ranged from 18.03 to 18.18%. Our analysis showed that nonsmokers had 50% probability of peripheral arterial disease level exceeding from 3.28 to 8.80%. Smoking populations had 2-3 folds higher morbidity risk of peripheral arterial disease than those of nonsmokers. Our study concluded that the adverse effects of Cd exposure are exacerbated when high seafood consumption coincides with cigarette smoking. Our work provides a framework that could more accurately address risk dose dependency of Cd hazard.

  11. Campylobacter fetus infections in humans : exposure and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Bergen, Marcel A P; Blaser, Martin J; Tauxe, Robert V; Newell, Diane G; van Putten, Jos P M

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus can cause intestinal illness and, occasionally, severe systemic infections. Infections mainly affect persons at higher risk, including elderly and immunocompromised individuals and those with occupational exposure to infected animals. Outbreaks are infrequent but have provided in

  12. Climate change impacts on human exposures to air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an abstract for a presentations at the Annual Conference of the International Society on Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. This presentation will serve as an introduction to the symposium.

  13. Pesticide Flow Analysis to Assess Human Exposure in Greenhouse Flower Production in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. Binder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area.

  14. Pesticide flow analysis to assess human exposure in greenhouse flower production in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R

    2013-03-25

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area.

  15. Chronic exposure to rifaximin causes hepatic steatosis in pregnane X receptor-humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W; Tanaka, Naoki; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2012-10-01

    Rifaximin, a nonsystemic antibiotic that exhibits low gastrointestinal absorption, is a potent agonist of human pregnane X receptor (PXR), which contributes to its therapeutic efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease. To investigate the effects of long-term administration of rifaximin on the liver, PXR-humanized mice were administered rifaximin for 6 months; wild-type and Pxr-null mice were treated in parallel as controls. Histological analysis revealed time-dependent intense hepatocellular fatty degeneration and increased hepatic triglycerides in PXR-humanized mice and not in wild-type and Pxr-null mice. After long-term treatment, PXR target genes were induced in small intestine and liver, with significant up-regulation in the expression of hepatic genes related to triglyceride synthesis and lipid accumulation. However, no significant hepatic accumulation of rifaximin was found, even after 6 months of treatment, in PXR-humanized mice. Genes in the small intestine that are involved in the uptake of fatty acids and triglycerides were induced along with increased triglyceride accumulation in intestinal epithelial cells of PXR-humanized mice; this was not observed in wild-type and Pxr-null mice. These findings suggest that long-term administration of rifaximin could lead to PXR-dependent hepatocellular fatty degeneration as a result of activation of genes involved in lipid uptake, thus indicating a potential adverse effect of rifaximin on liver function after long-term exposure.

  16. Nonvisual responses to light exposure in the human brain during the circadian night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Fabien; Peigneux, Philippe; Fuchs, Sonia; Verhaeghe, Stéphane; Laureys, Steven; Middleton, Benita; Degueldre, Christian; Del Fiore, Guy; Vandewalle, Gilles; Balteau, Evelyne; Poirrier, Robert; Moreau, Vincent; Luxen, André; Maquet, Pierre; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2004-10-26

    The brain processes light information to visually represent the environment but also to detect changes in ambient light level. The latter information induces non-image-forming responses and exerts powerful effects on physiology such as synchronization of the circadian clock and suppression of melatonin. In rodents, irradiance information is transduced from a discrete subset of photosensitive retinal ganglion cells via the retinohypothalamic tract to various hypothalamic and brainstem regulatory structures including the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, the master circadian pacemaker. In humans, light also acutely modulates alertness, but the cerebral correlates of this effect are unknown. We assessed regional cerebral blood flow in 13 subjects attending to auditory and visual stimuli in near darkness following light exposures (>8000 lux) of different durations (0.5, 17, 16.5, and 0 min) during the biological night. The bright broadband polychromatic light suppressed melatonin and enhanced alertness. Functional imaging revealed that a large-scale occipito-parietal attention network, including the right intraparietal sulcus, was more active in proportion to the duration of light exposures preceding the scans. Activity in the hypothalamus decreased in proportion to previous illumination. These findings have important implications for understanding the effects of light on human behavior.

  17. Linking exposure to environmental pollutants with biological effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Autrup, Herman; Møller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution has been associated with cancer. Ambient air contains a complex mixture of toxics, including particulate matter (PM) and benzene. Carcinogenic effects of PM may relate both to the content of PAH and to oxidative DNA damage generated by transition metals, benzene......, metabolism and inflammation. By means of personal monitoring and biomarkers of internal dose, biologically effective dose and susceptibility, it should be possible to characterize individual exposure and identify air pollution sources with relevant biological effects. In a series of studies, individual....... With respect to exposure to PM, biomarkers of oxidative damage showed significant positive association with the individual exposure. Thus, 8-oxodG in lymphocyte DNA and markers of oxidative damage to lipids and protein in plasma associated with PM(2.5) exposure. Several types of DNA damage showed seasonal...

  18. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  19. Adverse health effects of ethylene oxide and occupational exposure limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, K

    1984-01-01

    The proposed revision of the US standard for occupational exposure to ethylene oxide has recently been topical and controversial. Most of the recent experimental and epidemiological evidence of health effects, which provoked lowering the permissible exposure limit, appears to be unreliable and insufficient for risk assessment.

  20. Neuropsychological effects of exposure to naphtha among automotive workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R F; Robins, T G; Proctor, S; Echeverria, D; Rocskay, A S

    1994-02-01

    The association between exposure to naphtha and neurobehavioural measures was examined prospectively over one year among workers employed at an automotive plant that used naphtha to calibrate fuel injectors. The neurobehavioural tests included those that assess mood, basic intelligence, and functioning of the cerebral frontal lobes and limbic system and were designed so that acute, reversible, and chronic effects of solvent exposure could be assessed. Participants were 248 workers in June 1988, and the testing was repeated on 185 of these workers in 1989. Concentrations of naphtha at the plant ranged from six to 709 mg/m3, although exposure was greater in 1988 than in 1989. Duration of exposure for individual subjects ranged from 0.8 to 7.3 years. Cross sectional data analyses showed significant associations between level of exposure to naphtha and slower timed scores on trails A, and greater reports of negative affective symptoms on profile of mood states scales in 1988 but not 1989. Threshold model analyses of the 1989 data showed an association between score on visual reproductions immediate recall and daily exposure to naphtha at or above 1050 h x mg/m3. Models of chronic exposure showed no associations between chronic exposure and negative neurobehavioural outcome. Results suggest that naphtha produces mild acute reversible effects on function of the central nervous system at or above daily exposures of 540 h x mg/m3 (approximately 90 ppm/h).

  1. Deoxynivalenol Exposure in Norway, Risk Assessments for Different Human Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundheim, Leif; Lillegaard, Inger Therese; Fæste, Christiane Kruse; Brantsæter, Anne-Lise; Brodal, Guro; Eriksen, Gunnar Sundstøl

    2017-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most common mycotoxin in Norwegian cereals, and DON is detected in most samples of crude cereal grain and cereal food commodities such as flour, bran, and oat flakes. The Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety assessed the risk for adverse effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) in different age groups of the domestic population. This review presents the main results from the risk assessment, supplemented with some recently published data. Impairment of the immune system together with reduced feed intake and weight gain are the critical effects of DON in experimental animals on which the current tolerable daily intake was established. Based on food consumption and occurrence data, the mean exposure to DON in years with low and high levels of DON in the flour, respectively, were in the range of or up to two times the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) in 1-year-old infants and 2-year-old children. In years with high mean DON concentration, the high (95th-percentile) exposure exceeded the TDI by up to 3.5 times in 1-, 2- , 4-, and 9-year-old children. The assessment concluded that exceeding the TDI in infants and children is of concern. The estimated dietary DON intakes in adolescent and adult populations are in the range of the TDI or below, and are not a health concern. Acute human exposure to DON is not of concern in any age group. PMID:28165414

  2. Deoxynivalenol Exposure in Norway, Risk Assessments for Different Human Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Sundheim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is the most common mycotoxin in Norwegian cereals, and DON is detected in most samples of crude cereal grain and cereal food commodities such as flour, bran, and oat flakes. The Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety assessed the risk for adverse effects of deoxynivalenol (DON in different age groups of the domestic population. This review presents the main results from the risk assessment, supplemented with some recently published data. Impairment of the immune system together with reduced feed intake and weight gain are the critical effects of DON in experimental animals on which the current tolerable daily intake was established. Based on food consumption and occurrence data, the mean exposure to DON in years with low and high levels of DON in the flour, respectively, were in the range of or up to two times the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI in 1-year-old infants and 2-year-old children. In years with high mean DON concentration, the high (95th-percentile exposure exceeded the TDI by up to 3.5 times in 1-, 2- , 4-, and 9-year-old children. The assessment concluded that exceeding the TDI in infants and children is of concern. The estimated dietary DON intakes in adolescent and adult populations are in the range of the TDI or below, and are not a health concern. Acute human exposure to DON is not of concern in any age group.

  3. Human Infection with MERS Coronavirus after Exposure to Infected Camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Memish, Ziad A.; Cotten, Matthew; Meyer, Benjamin; Simon J Watson; Alsahafi, Abdullah J.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Corman, Victor Max; Sieberg, Andrea; Makhdoom, Hatem Q.; Assiri, Abdullah; Al Masri, Malaki; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Beer, Martin; Müller, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species transmission. Camels may act as a direct source of human MERS-CoV infection.

  4. Photosensitized rose Bengal-induced phototoxicity on human melanoma cell line under natural sunlight exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastav, Ajeet K; Mujtaba, Syed Faiz; Dwivedi, Ashish; Amar, Saroj K; Goyal, Shruti; Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari N; Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2016-03-01

    Rose Bengal (RB) is an anionic water-soluble xanthene dye, which used for many years to assess eye cornea and conjunctiva damage. RB showed strong absorption maxima (λmax) under visible light followed by UV-B and UV-A. RB under sunlight exposure showed a time-dependent photodegradation. Our results show that photosensitized RB generates (1)O2 via Type-II photodynamic pathway and induced DNA damage under sunlight/UV-R exposure. 2'dGuO degradation, micronuclei formation, and single- and double-strand breakage were the outcome of photogenotoxicity caused by RB. Quenching studies with NaN3 advocate the involvement of (1)O2 in RB photogenotoxicity. RB induced linoleic acid photoperoxidation, which was parallel to (1)O2-mediated DNA damage. Oxidative stress in A375 cell line (human melanoma cell line) was detected through DCF-DA assay. Photosensitized RB decreased maximum cellular viability under sunlight followed by UV-B and UV-A exposures. Apoptosis was detected as a pattern of cell death through the increased of caspase-3 activity, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and PS translocation through inner to outer plasma membrane. Increased cytosolic levels of Bax also advocate the apoptotic cell death. We propose a p53-mediated apoptosis via increased expression of Bax gene and protein. Thus, the exact mechanism behind RB phototoxicity was the involvement of (1)O2, which induced oxidative stress-mediated DNA and membrane damage, finally apoptotic cell death under natural sunlight exposure. The study suggests that after the use of RB, sunlight exposure may avoid to prevent from its harmful effects. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Multi-platform metabolomics assays for human lung lavage fluids in an air pollution exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Izabella; Karimpour, Masoumeh; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Wu, Junfang; Unosson, Jon; Bosson, Jenny A; Blomberg, Anders; Pourazar, Jamshid; Sandström, Thomas; Behndig, Annelie F; Trygg, Johan; Nording, Malin L

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomics protocols are used to comprehensively characterize the metabolite content of biological samples by exploiting cutting-edge analytical platforms, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) assays, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. We have developed novel sample preparation procedures combined with GC-MS, LC-MS, and NMR metabolomics profiling for analyzing bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 15 healthy volunteers following exposure to biodiesel exhaust and filtered air. Our aim was to investigate the responsiveness of metabolite profiles in the human lung to air pollution exposure derived from combustion of biofuels, such as rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel, which are increasingly being promoted as alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Our multi-platform approach enabled us to detect the greatest number of unique metabolites yet reported in BW and BAL fluid (82 in total). All of the metabolomics assays indicated that the metabolite profiles of the BW and BAL fluids differed appreciably, with 46 metabolites showing significantly different levels in the corresponding lung compartments. Furthermore, the GC-MS assay revealed an effect of biodiesel exhaust exposure on the levels of 1-monostearylglycerol, sucrose, inosine, nonanoic acid, and ethanolamine (in BAL) and pentadecanoic acid (in BW), whereas the LC-MS assay indicated a shift in the levels of niacinamide (in BAL). The NMR assay only identified lactic acid (in BW) as being responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Our findings demonstrate that the proposed multi-platform approach is useful for wide metabolomics screening of BW and BAL fluids and can facilitate elucidation of metabolites responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract illustrating the study workflow. NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, LC-TOFMS Liquid chromatography-Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry, GC Gas

  6. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  7. Human internal and external exposure to PBDEs - A review of levels and sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Thomsen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    ingest more dust than adults. Infants are also exposed to PBDEs via breast milk. Internal human exposure has generally been found to be one order of magnitude larger in North America than in Europe and Asia. These differences cannot solely be explained by the dietary intake as meat products are the only......This paper reviews the existing literature on human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), with particular focus on external exposure routes (e.g. dust, diet, and air) and the resulting internal exposure to PBDEs (e.g. breast milk and blood). Being lipophilic and persistent organic...... compounds, PBDEs accumulate in lipid-rich tissues. Consequently, food items like fish from high trophic levels or lipid-rich oils have been found to contain relatively high concentrations of PBDEs, thus presenting an important exposure pathway to humans. The presence of PBDEs in various products of everyday...

  8. Effects of Impulsive Pile-Driving Exposure on Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Brandon M; Carlson, Thomas J; Halvorsen, Michele B; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    Six species of fishes were tested under aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions to answer several key questions regarding the effects of exposure to impulsive pile driving. The issues addressed included which sound levels lead to the onset of barotrauma injuries, how these levels differ between fishes with different types of swim bladders, the recovery from barotrauma injuries, and the potential effects exposure might have on the auditory system. The results demonstrate that the current interim criteria for pile-driving sound exposures are 20 dB or more below the actual sound levels that result in the onset of physiological effects on fishes.

  9. A Review of Human Health and Ecological Risks due to CO2 Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepple, R. P.; Benson, S. M.

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the human health and ecological consequences of exposure to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the context of geologic carbon sequestration. The purpose of this effort is to provide a baseline of information to guide future efforts in risk assessment for CO2 sequestration. Scenarios for hazardous CO2 exposure include surface facility leaks, leaks from abandoned or aging wells, and leakage from geologic CO2 storage structures. Amounts of carbon in various reservoirs, systems, and applications were summarized, and the levels of CO2 encountered in nature and everyday life were compared along with physiologically relevant concentrations. Literature pertaining to CO2 occupational exposure limits, regulations, monitoring, and ecological consequences was reviewed. The OSHA, NIOSH, and ACGIH occupational exposure standards are 0.5% CO2 averaged over a 40 hour week, 3% average for a short-term (15 minute) exposure, and 4% as the maximum instantaneous limit considered immediately dangerous to life and health. All three conditions must be satisfied at all times. Any detrimental effects of low-level CO2 exposure are reversible, including the long-term metabolic compensation required by chronic exposure to 3% CO2. Breathing rate doubles at 3% CO2 and is four times the normal rate at 5% CO2. According to occupational exposure and controlled atmosphere research into CO2 toxicology, CO2 is hazardous via direct toxicity at levels above 5%, concentrations not encountered in nature outside of volcanic settings and water-logged soils. Small leaks do not present any danger to people unless the CO2 does not disperse quickly enough through atmospheric mixing but accumulates instead in depressions and confined spaces. These dangers are the result of CO2 being more dense than air. Carbon dioxide is regulated for diverse purposes but never as a toxic substance. Catastrophic incidents involving large amounts and/or rapid release of CO2 such as Lake

  10. 40 CFR 26.1203 - Prohibition of research involving intentional exposure of any human subject who is a pregnant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... intentional exposure of any human subject who is a pregnant woman (and therefore her fetus), a nursing woman... Exposure of Human Subjects who are Children or Pregnant or Nursing Women § 26.1203 Prohibition of research involving intentional exposure of any human subject who is a pregnant woman (and therefore her fetus),...

  11. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in foodstuffs: human exposure through the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocio, A; Llobet, J M; Domingo, J L; Corbella, J; Teixidó, A; Casas, C

    2003-05-07

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in a variety of materials, including synthetic polymers and textiles. Although these chemicals have been detected in environmental samples and human tissues, there is little information about human exposure to PBDEs through the diet. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of PBDEs in a number of food samples acquired in Catalonia (Spain) during 2000. The dietary intake of PBDEs was estimated for the general population living in this Spanish region. The highest PBDE concentrations were found in oils and fats, fish and shellfish, meat and meat products, and eggs, while the lowest levels corresponded to fruits, vegetables, and tubers. The dietary intake of PBDEs for an adult male was 97.3 ng/day (assuming not detected (ND) = (1)/(2) limit of detection (LOD)) or 81.9 ng/day (assuming ND = 0) The greatest contribution to these values corresponded to fish and shellfish, with approximately one-third of the total intake. TetraBDEs and pentaBDEs were the homologues showing the highest percentages of contribution to the sum of total PBDEs. The comparison of the current dietary intake with the suggested lowest observed adverse effect level value of 1 mg/kg/day for the most sensitive endpoints for toxic effects of PBDEs results in a safety factor over 5 orders of magnitude in relation to PBDE exposure from food.

  12. Assessment of human body influence on exposure measurements of electric field in indoor enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; García, Jorge; Ramos, Victoria; Blas, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Personal exposure meters (PEMs) used for measuring exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) are typically used in epidemiological studies. As is well known, these measurement devices cause a perturbation of real EMF exposure levels due to the presence of the human body in the immediate proximity. This paper aims to model the alteration caused by the body shadow effect (BSE) in motion conditions and in indoor enclosures at the Wi-Fi frequency of 2.4 GHz. For this purpose, simulation techniques based on ray-tracing have been carried out, and their results have been verified experimentally. A good agreement exists between simulation and experimental results in terms of electric field (E-field) levels, and taking into account the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the spatial distribution of amplitude. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test provides a P-value greater than 0.05, in fact close to 1. It has been found that the influence of the presence of the human body can be characterized as an angle of shadow that depends on the dimensions of the indoor enclosure. The CDFs show that the E-field levels in indoor conditions follow a lognormal distribution in the absence of the human body and under the influence of BSE. In conclusion, the perturbation caused by BSE in PEMs readings cannot be compensated for by correction factors. Although the mean value is well adjusted, BSE causes changes in CDF that would require improvements in measurement protocols and in the design of measuring devices to subsequently avoid systematic errors.

  13. Probabilistic estimation of residential air exchange rates for population-based human exposure modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are a key determinant in the infiltration of ambient air pollution indoors. Population-based human exposure models using probabilistic approaches to estimate personal exposure to air pollutants have relied on input distributions from AER meas...

  14. The Exposure Advantage: Early Exposure to a Multilingual Environment Promotes Effective Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Samantha P; Liberman, Zoe; Keysar, Boaz; Kinzler, Katherine D

    2015-07-01

    Early language exposure is essential to developing a formal language system, but may not be sufficient for communicating effectively. To understand a speaker's intention, one must take the speaker's perspective. Multilingual exposure may promote effective communication by enhancing perspective taking. We tested children on a task that required perspective taking to interpret a speaker's intended meaning. Monolingual children failed to interpret the speaker's meaning dramatically more often than both bilingual children and children who were exposed to a multilingual environment but were not bilingual themselves. Children who were merely exposed to a second language performed as well as bilingual children, despite having lower executive-function scores. Thus, the communicative advantages demonstrated by the bilinguals may be social in origin, and not due to enhanced executive control. For millennia, multilingual exposure has been the norm. Our study shows that such an environment may facilitate the development of perspective-taking tools that are critical for effective communication. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. MODELING ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS: ACCOUNTING FOR FATIGUE AND EPOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled Individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized val...

  16. Exposure to perfluorinated compounds and human semen quality in arctic and European populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Gunnar; Jönsson, B A G; Lindh, C H

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been suspected to adversely affect human reproductive health. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between PFC exposure and male semen quality....

  17. In vivo plasma concentration for lindane after 6 hour exposure in human skin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset is a time course description of lindane disappearance in blood plasma after dermal exposure in human volunteers. This dataset is associated with the...

  18. MODELING ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS: ACCOUNTING FOR FATIGUE AND EPOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled Individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized val...

  19. A SIMPLE COLORIMETRIC METHOD TO DETECT BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MICROCYSTINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxic cyanobacteria are contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins are some of the most commonly detected toxins. Biological evidence of human exposure may be difficult to obtain due to limitations associated with cost, laboratory capacity, analytic support, and exp...

  20. Groundwater: Quality Levels and Human Exposure, SW Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola Adeyemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater serves as a source of freshwater for agricultural, industrial and domestic purposes and it accounts for about 42%, 27% and 36% respectively. As it remains the only source of all-year-round supply of freshwater globally, it is of vital importance as regards water security, human survival and sustainable agriculture. The main goal of this study is to identify the main cause-effect relationship between human activities and the state of groundwater quality using a communication tool (the DPSIR Model; Drivers, Pressures, State, Impact and Response. A total of twenty-one samples were collected from ten peri-urban communities scattered across three conterminous Local Government Areas in Southwestern Nigeria. Each of the groundwater samples was tested for twelve parameters - total dissolved solids, pH, bicarbonate, chloride, lead, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, sulphate, magnesium and total suspended solids. The study revealed that the concentrations of DO and Pb were above threshold limits, while pH and N were just below the threshold and others elements were within acceptable limits based on Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality and Nigeria Standard for Drinking Water Quality. The study revealed that groundwater quality levels from the sampled wells are under pressure leading to reduction in the amount of freshwater availability. This is a first-order setback in achieving access to freshwater as a sustainable development goal across Less Developed Communities (LDCs globally. To combat this threat, there is the need for an integrated approach in response towards groundwater conservation and sustainability by all stakeholders.

  1. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  2. Ultrasonication and the quality of human milk: variation of power and time of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Lukas; Lai, Ching Tat; Hartmann, Peter E

    2012-08-01

    Donor human milk is pasteurized to prevent the potential risk of the transmission of pathogens to preterm infants. Currently, Holder pasteurization (human milk held at 62·5°C for 30 min) is used in most human milk banks, but has the disadvantage that it results in excessive inactivation of important bioactive components. Power-ultrasound (20-100 kHz) is an emerging technology for the preservation of foods and could be an alternative method for the treatment of human milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different ultrasound settings on the elimination of Escherichia coli and the retention of bile salt stimulated lipase (BSSL) activity. Ultrasonication with a constant power decreased Esch. coli viability exponentially over time until the processing temperature increased to sub-pasteurization level to between 51·4 and 58·5°C, then a log10 1·3 decrease was observed (Phuman milk using high ultrasound power over a short exposure time to ensure that the temperature remains below the critical level for protein denaturation. Alternatively, the use of lower power settings such as the 26 W used in the present studies would require a cooling system to ensure the human milk BSSL was protected against temperature denaturation.

  3. The Lunar Environment: Determining the Health Effects of Exposure to Moon Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen

    2007-01-01

    The moon's surface is covered with a thin layer of fine, charged, reactive dust capable of layer of fine, charged, reactive dust capable of capable of entering habitats and vehicle compartments, where it can result in crewmember health problems. NASA formed the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to study the effects of exposure to Lunar Dust on human health. To date, no scientifically defensible toxicological studies have been performed on lunar dusts, specifically the determination of exposure limits and their affect on human health. The multi-center LADTAG (Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicology center LADTAG (Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicology Advisory Group) was formed in response to the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Office s (OCHMO) request to develop recommendations for defining risk (OCHMO) request to develop recommendations for defining risk defining risk criteria for human lunar dust exposure.

  4. Neurodevelopmental effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Ruiz, Naymee J; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-03-01

    Many studies investigating cognitive outcomes in children of women with epilepsy report an increased risk of mental impairment. Verbal scores on neuropsychometric measures may be selectively more involved. While a variety of factors contribute to the cognitive problems of children of women with epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a major role. The mechanisms by which AEDs affect neurodevelopmental outcomes remain poorly defined. Animal models suggest that AED-induced apoptosis, altered neurotransmitter environment, and impaired synaptogenesis are some of the mechanisms responsible for cognitive and behavioral teratogenesis. AEDs that are known to induce apoptosis, such as valproate, appear to affect children's neurodevelopment in a more severe fashion. Fetal valproate exposure has dose-dependent associations with reduced cognitive abilities across a range of domains, and these appear to persist at least until the age of 6. Some studies have shown neurodevelopmental deficiencies associated with the use of phenobarbital and possibly phenytoin. So far, most of the investigations available suggest that fetal exposures to lamotrigine or levetiracetam are safer with regard to cognition when compared with other AEDs. Studies on carbamazepine show contradictory results, but most information available suggests that major poor cognitive outcomes should not be attributed to this medication. Overall, children exposed to polytherapy prenatally appear to have worse cognitive and behavioral outcomes compared with children exposed to monotherapy, and with the unexposed. There is an increase risk of neurodevelopmental deficits when polytherapy involves the use of valproate versus other agents.

  5. Co-exposure to nickel and cobalt chloride enhances cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Eshan; Lynch, Christine; Ruff, Victoria; Reynolds, Mindy

    2012-02-01

    Nickel and cobalt are heavy metals found in land, water, and air that can enter the body primarily through the respiratory tract and accumulate to toxic levels. Nickel compounds are known to be carcinogenic to humans and animals, while cobalt compounds produce tumors in animals and are probably carcinogenic to humans. People working in industrial and manufacturing settings have an increased risk of exposure to these metals. The cytotoxicity of nickel and cobalt has individually been demonstrated; however, the underlying mechanisms of co-exposure to these heavy metals have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effect of exposure of H460 human lung epithelial cells to nickel and cobalt, both alone and in combination, on cell survival, apoptotic mechanisms, and the generation of reactive oxygen species and double strand breaks. For simultaneous exposure, cells were exposed to a constant dose of 150 μM cobalt or nickel, which was found to be relatively nontoxic in single exposure experiments. We demonstrated that cells exposed simultaneously to cobalt and nickel exhibit a dose-dependent decrease in survival compared to the cells exposed to a single metal. The decrease in survival was the result of enhanced caspase 3 and 7 activation and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Co-exposure increased the production of ROS and the formation of double strand breaks. Pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine alleviated the toxic responses. Collectively, this study demonstrates that co-exposure to cobalt and nickel is significantly more toxic than single exposure and that toxicity is related to the formation of ROS and DSB. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    Passive humans (sitting or standing) might well be present on flooring-systems, footbridges or other structures that carry humans. An active croud of people might generate structural vibrations, and these might be problematic. The passive crowd of people, however, will interact with the structural...

  7. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury Quick Facts Health Effects of Mercury Exposure What is Elemental Mercury? Elemental (metallic) mercury is the shiny, silver-gray metal found in thermometers, barometers, and thermostats and other ...

  8. Effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.; Linder, G.; Nichols, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    We compared population estimates, body mass, movement, and blood chemistry of small mammals between conventionally tilled and no-till cornfields in Maryland and Pennsylvania to evaluate the effects of tillage practices and carbofuran exposure on small mammals.

  9. Use of population exposure frequency distributions to simulate effects of policy interventions on NO2 exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulopoulou, C.; Ashmore, M. R.; Terry, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Health effects of air pollution on individuals depend on their personal exposure, but few modelling tools are available which can predict how the distribution of personal exposures within a city will change in response to policies to reduce emissions both indoors and outdoors. We describe a new probabilistic modelling framework (INDAIR-2/EXPAIR), which provides predictions of the personal exposure frequency distribution (PEFD) across a city to assess the effects of both reduced emissions from home sources and reduced roadside concentrations on population exposure. The model uses a national time activity database, which gives the percentage of each population group in different residential and non-residential micro-environments, and links this, for the home, to predictions of concentrations from a three-compartment model, and for non-residential microenvironments to empirical indoor/outdoor ratios. This paper presents modelled PEFDs for NO2 in the city of Leicester, for children, the elderly, and office workers, comparing results in different seasons and on different days of the week. While the mean NO2 population exposure was close to, or below the urban background concentration, the 95%ile of the PEFD was well above the urban background concentration. The relationship between both mean and 95%ile PEFD and urban background concentrations was strongly influenced by air exchange rate. The 24 h mean PEFD showed relative small differences between the population groups, with both removal of home sources and reductions of roadside concentrations on roads with a high traffic density having similar effects in reducing mean exposure. In contrast, the 1 h maximum of the PEFD was significantly higher for children and the elderly than for office workers, and showed a much greater response to reduced home emissions in these groups. The results demonstrate the importance of understanding the dynamics of NO2 exposure at a population level within different groups, if the benefits

  10. The human placenta--an alternative for studying foetal exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myren, Maja; Mose, Tina; Mathiesen, Line;

    2007-01-01

    , and though its main task is to act as a barrier and transport nutrients and oxygen to the foetus, many foreign compounds are transported across the placenta to some degree and may therefore influence the unborn child. Foetal exposures to environmental and medicinal products may have impact on the growth...

  11. 18. Adduct detection in human monitoring for carcinogen exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Determination of the covalently bound products (adducts) of carcinogens with DNA or proteins may be used for the monitoring of exposure to these compounds. Protein adducts are generally stable and are not enzymatically repaired, and the use of these for cxposure monitoring is normally carried out with globin or albumin, because

  12. EFFECTS OF ACUTE PYRETHROID EXPOSURE ON THERMOREGULATION IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides produce acute neurotoxicity in mammals. According to the FQPA mandate, the USEPA is required to consider the risk of cumulative toxicity posed to humans through exposure to pyrethroid mixtures. Thermoregulatory response (TR) is being used to determine if t...

  13. Risk assessment of arsenic and other metals via atmospheric particles, and effects of atmospheric exposure and other demographic factors on their accumulations in human scalp hair in urban area of Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minjuan; Chen, Xunwen; Shao, Dingding; Zhao, Yinge; Wang, Wei; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-01

    Eighty-eight scalp hair samples were collected from Guangzhou (GZ) urban population (15-65 years) to investigate the accumulation of As and other metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Sb, Hg and Pb). Demographic information, including body weight, height, age, gender, habits of smoking and drinking, types of drinking water, duration of stay in GZ, days of stay in GZ per year (days/year), and hours spent in indoor environment per day (h/day), were also recorded during hair sampling to refine the uncertainty of risk assessment derived from exposures to elements via dust and airborne particles. No significant non-carcinogenic risk was found. However, the cancer risks of Cr and As for both ingestion and inhalation exceeded the most tolerable regulated level (1.0×10(-6)). The environmental exposures to urban dust and airborne particles were observed significantly correlated to accumulations of Cd (R=0.306, p=0.005) and Ni (R=0.333, p=0.002) in scalp hair. Furthermore, the hair burden of elements was also significantly (pfactor influencing As speciation in human scalp hair. However, habits of smoking and alcohol drinking as well as types of drinking water were not identified as the significant influencing factors on any element (p>0.05).

  14. Statistical perturbations in personal exposure meters caused by the human body in dynamic outdoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Begoña; Blas, Juan; Lorenzo, Rubén M; Fernández, Patricia; Abril, Evaristo J

    2011-04-01

    Personal exposure meters (PEM) are routinely used for the exposure assessment to radio frequency electric or magnetic fields. However, their readings are subject to errors associated with perturbations of the fields caused by the presence of the human body. This paper presents a novel analysis method for the characterization of this effect. Using ray-tracing techniques, PEM measurements have been emulated, with and without an approximation of this shadowing effect. In particular, the Global System for Mobile Communication mobile phone frequency band was chosen for its ubiquity and, specifically, we considered the case where the subject is walking outdoors in a relatively open area. These simulations have been contrasted with real PEM measurements in a 35-min walk. Results show a good agreement in terms of root mean square error and E-field cumulative distribution function (CDF), with a significant improvement when the shadowing effect is taken into account. In particular, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test provides a P-value of 0.05 when considering the shadowing effect, versus a P-value of 10⁻¹⁴ when this effect is ignored. In addition, although the E-field levels in the absence of a human body have been found to follow a Nakagami distribution, a lognormal distribution fits the statistics of the PEM values better than the Nakagami distribution. As a conclusion, although the mean could be adjusted by using correction factors, there are also other changes in the CDF that require particular attention due to the shadowing effect because they might lead to a systematic error. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. FDTD Computation of Human Eye Exposure to Ultra-wideband Electromagnetic Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Simicevic, Neven

    2007-01-01

    With an increase in the application of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic pulses in the communications industry, radar, biotechnology and medicine, comes an interest in UWB exposure safety standards. Despite an increase of the scientific research on bioeffects of exposure to non-ionizing UWB pulses, characterization of those effects is far from complete. A numerical computational approach, such as a finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method, is required to visualize and understand the complexity of broadband electromagnetic interactions. The FDTD method has almost no limits in the description of the geometrical and dispersive properties of the simulated material, it is numerically robust and appropriate for current computer technology. In this paper, a complete calculation of exposure of the human eye to UWB electromagnetic pulses in the frequency range of 3.1-10.6, 22-29, and 57-64 GHz is performed. Computation in this frequency range required a geometrical resolution of the eye of $\\rm 0.1 \\: mm$ and an...

  16. Manganese exposure induces α-synuclein aggregation in the frontal cortex of non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verina, Tatyana; Schneider, Jay S; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2013-03-13

    Aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) in the brain is a defining pathological feature of neurodegenerative disorders classified as synucleinopathies. They include Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Occupational and environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) is associated with a neurological syndrome consisting of psychiatric symptoms, cognitive impairment and parkinsonism. In this study, we examined α-syn immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex of Cynomolgus macaques as part of a multidisciplinary assessment of the neurological effects produced by exposure to moderate levels of Mn. We found increased α-syn-positive cells in the gray matter of Mn-exposed animals, typically observed in pyramidal and medium-sized neurons in deep cortical layers. Some of these neurons displayed loss of Nissl staining with α-syn-positive spherical aggregates. In the white matter we also observed α-syn-positive glial cells and in some cases α-syn-positive neurites. These findings suggest that Mn exposure promotes α-syn aggregation in neuronal and glial cells that may ultimately lead to degeneration in the frontal cortex gray and white matter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Mn-induced neuronal and glial cell α-syn accumulation and aggregation in the frontal cortex of non-human primates.

  17. Phenolic acid metabolites as biomarkers for tea- and coffee-derived polyphenol exposure in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jonathan M; Chan, Shin Yee; Puddey, Ian B; Devine, Amanda; Wattanapenpaiboon, Naiyana; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Lukito, Widjaja; Burke, Valerie; Ward, Natalie C; Prince, Richard L; Croft, Kevin D

    2004-02-01

    Tea and coffee are rich in polyphenols with a variety of biological activities. Many of the demonstrated activities are consistent with favourable effects on the risk of chronic diseases. 4-O-methylgallic acid (4OMGA) and isoferulic acid are potential biomarkers of exposure to polyphenols derived from tea and coffee respectively. 4OMGA is derived from gallic acid in tea, and isoferulic acid is derived from chlorogenic acid in coffee. Our major objective was to explore the relationships of tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid in human subjects. The relationships of long-term usual (111 participants) and contemporaneously recorded current (344 participants) tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid were assessed in two populations. 4OMGA was related to usual (r 0.50, Pcoffee intake. Overall, our present results are consistent with the proposal that 4OMGA is a good biomarker for black tea-derived polyphenol exposure, but isoferulic acid may be of limited usefulness as a biomarker for coffee-derived polyphenol exposure.

  18. Framework to determine the effectiveness of dietary exposure mitigation to chemical contaminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels, van der H.J.; Edwards, S.; Kennedy, M.; O'Hagan, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Scholz, G.; Steinberg, P.; Tennant, D.; Chiodini, A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure the food safety, risk managers may implement measures to reduce human exposure to contaminants via food consumption. The evaluation of the effect of a measure is often an overlooked step in risk analysis process. The aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for

  19. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  20. The effect of chronic ammonia exposure on acute phase proteins, immunoglobulin and cytokines in laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia is a potential health hazard to both humans and animals, causing systemic low-grade inflammation based on its levels and durations. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of 45 weeks of exposure to 30 ppm NH3 on the concentrations of acute phase proteins, immunoglobulins and c...

  1. Framework to determine the effectiveness of dietary exposure mitigation to chemical contaminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels, van der H.J.; Edwards, S.; Kennedy, M.; O'Hagan, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Scholz, G.; Steinberg, P.; Tennant, D.; Chiodini, A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure the food safety, risk managers may implement measures to reduce human exposure to contaminants via food consumption. The evaluation of the effect of a measure is often an overlooked step in risk analysis process. The aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for deter

  2. Hormesis [Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (Belle)] and Dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Thong, Haw-Yueh; Maibach, Howard I.

    2008-01-01

    Hormesis, or biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE), is characterized by nonmonotonic dose response which is biphasic, displaying opposite effects at low and high dose. Its occurrence has been documented across a broad range of biological models and diverse type of exposure. Since hormesis appears to be a relatively common phenomenon in many areas, the objective of this review is to explore its occurrence related to dermatology and its public health and risk assessment implication....

  3. Ex vivo exposure to gaseous pollutants of air passages and human and animal pulmonary vessels: effect on the reactivity and cell signalling; Exposition ex vivo aux polluants gazeux des voies aeriennes et de vaisseaux pulmonaires humains et animaux: effet sur la reactivite et la signalisation cellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyvelin, J.M.

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of this work have been to characterize effects of exposure to several pollutants on the reactivity of air passages, to study the action mechanisms of pollutants on the smooth muscle cell of air passages, to characterize the calcic signalling of the human bronchi smooth muscle in order to identify the pollutants cell targets, to look for others pollutants cell targets. This work contributes to a better knowledge of air pollution effects, by underlining the additive character of pollutants. It allows a better knowledge of cell mechanisms implied in the pollutants effects. Then, it notices the existence of other cell types, the pulmonary arterial myocyte, sensitive to pollutants exposure and that can be implied in the respiratory health degradation. (N.C.)

  4. TRPA1 insensitivity of human sural nerve axons after exposure to lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Reginald J; Ginsberg, Lionel; Jadoon, Saqiba; Orrell, Richard W; Bhattacharjee, Anupam

    2013-09-01

    TRPA1 is an ion channel of the TRP family that is expressed in some sensory neurons. TRPA1 activity provokes sensory symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, such as pain and paraesthesia. We have used a grease gap method to record axonal membrane potential and evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) in vitro from human sural nerves and studied the effects of mustard oil (MO), a selective activator of TRPA1. Surprisingly, we failed to demonstrate any depolarizing response to MO (50, 250 μM) in any human sural nerves. There was no effect of MO on the A wave of the ECAP, but the C wave was reduced at 250 μM. In rat saphenous nerve fibres MO (50, 250 μM) depolarized axons and reduced the C wave of the ECAP but had no effect on the A wave. By contrast, both human and rat nerves were depolarized by capsaicin (0.5 to 5 μM) or nicotine (50 to 200 μM). Capsaicin caused a profound reduction in C fibre conduction in both species but had no effect on the amplitude of the A component. Lidocaine (30 mM) depolarized rat saphenous nerves acutely, and when rat nerves were pretreated with 30 mM lidocaine to mimic the exposure of human nerves to local anaesthetic during surgery, the effects of MO were abolished whilst the effects of capsaicin were unchanged. This study demonstrates that the local anaesthetic lidocaine desensitizes TRPA1 ion channels and indicates that it may have additional mechanisms for treating neuropathic pain that endure beyond simple sodium channel blockade.

  5. Additional human exposure information for gasoline substance risk assessment (period 2002-2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomer, R.; Carter, M.; Dmytrasz, B.; Mulari, M.; Pizzella, G.; Roth, S.; Van de Sandt, P.

    2009-06-15

    This report provides an update on human exposure information for gasoline-related activities for which previous assessments had suggested that exposure was either elevated or highly variable or available data were considered out-of-date. In addition data are presented for several activities for which no information had been available previously. The occupational exposures activities described in this report include railcar loading, refinery maintenance, laboratory operations, aviation gasoline refuelling, gasoline pump maintenance and repair, gasoline pump calibration, and the operation of gasoline-powered gardening equipment. In addition, general public exposure levels are described, particularly relating to residency near service stations.

  6. Pupil response and the subliminal mere exposure effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanae Yoshimoto

    Full Text Available The subliminal mere exposure effect (SMEE is the phenomenon wherein people tend to prefer patterns they have repeatedly observed without consciously identifying them. One popular explanation for the SMEE is that perceptual fluency within exposed patterns is misattributed to a feeling of preference for those patterns. Assuming that perceptual fluency is negatively correlated with the amount of mental effort needed to analyze perceptual aspects of incoming stimuli, pupil diameter should associate with SMEE strength since the former is known to reflect mental effort. To examine this hypothesis, we measured participants' pupil diameter during exposure to subthreshold stimuli. Following exposure, a preference test was administered. Average pupil diameter throughout exposure was smaller when the SMEE was induced than when the SMEE was not induced. This supports the hypothesis that increasing perceptual fluency during mere exposure modulates autonomic nervous responses, such as pupil diameter, and eventually leads to preference.

  7. Renal effects of naphtha exposure among automotive workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocskay, A Z; Robins, T G; Schork, M A; Echeverria, D; Proctor, S P; White, R F

    1993-06-01

    As part of a study on health effects of naphtha exposure, the association between naphtha exposure and urinary excretion of total protein, albumin, beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (beta-NAG), and beta 2-microglobulin was assessed prospectively over 1 year among workers at an automotive plant that used naphtha to calibrate fuel injectors. Participants consisted of 248 workers who provided spot urine samples in June 1988 among whom 181 workers provided specimens again in June 1989. Naphtha air concentrations at the plant ranged from 6 to 790 mg/m3 and the length of exposure ranged from 0.8 to 7.3 years. In both 1988 and 1989, the overall distribution of the four measures of renal function appeared consistent with that of an unexposed population. In cross-sectional analyses, there were no statistically significant associations in the expected direction between cumulative or recent naphtha exposure and the measures of renal function. In longitudinal analyses, the change in beta-NAG was positively associated with the change in recent naphtha exposure (P = .009). The effect of the naphtha exposure during 1 workweek was assessed among 17 workers who provided urine samples Monday preshift, Monday postshift, and Friday postshift. No associations were found. The results of this study do not provide strong evidence of naphtha-associated renal effects at these levels of exposure.

  8. Lung tumors in mice induced by "whole-life" inorganic arsenic exposure at human-relevant doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalkes, Michael P; Qu, Wei; Tokar, Erik J; Kissling, Grace E; Dixon, Darlene

    2014-08-01

    In mice, inorganic arsenic in the drinking water in the parts per million range via the dam during in utero life or with whole-life exposure is a multi-site carcinogen in the offspring. However, human arsenic exposure is typically in the parts per billion (ppb) range. Thus, we studied "whole-life" inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in mice at levels more relevant to humans. Breeder male and female CD1 mice were exposed to 0, 50, 500 or 5,000 ppb arsenic (as sodium arsenite) in the drinking water for 3 weeks prior to breeding, during pregnancy and lactation, and after weaning (at week 3) groups of male and female offspring (initial n = 40) were exposed for up to 2 years. Tumors were assessed in these offspring. Arsenic exposure had no effect on pregnant dam weights or water consumption, litter size, offspring birthweight or weight at weaning compared to control. In male offspring mice, arsenic exposure increased (p ppb group (51 %) and 500-ppb group (54 %), but not at 5,000-ppb group (28 %) compared to control (22 %). These arsenic-induced bronchiolo-alveolar tumors included increased (p ppb group (27 %) compared to controls (8 %). An increase (p ppb group compared to control (11 %) occurred in female offspring. Thus, in CD1 mice whole-life arsenic exposure induced lung tumors at human-relevant doses (i.e., 50 and 500 ppb).

  9. Lung Tumors in Mice Induced by “Whole Life” Inorganic Arsenic Exposure at Human Relevant Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Tokar, Erik J.; Kissling, Grace E.; Dixon, Darlene

    2014-01-01

    In mice, inorganic arsenic in the drinking water in the parts per million (ppm) range via the dam during in utero life or with whole life exposure is a multi-site carcinogen in the offspring. However, human arsenic exposure is typically in the parts per billion (ppb) range. Thus, we studied “whole life” inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in mice at levels more relevant to humans. Breeder male and female CD1 mice were exposed to 0, 50, 500 or 5000 ppb arsenic (as sodium arsenite) in the drinking water for three weeks prior to breeding, during pregnancy and lactation, and after weaning (at week 3) groups of male and female offspring (initial n = 40) were exposed for up to 2 years. Tumors were assessed in these offspring. Arsenic exposure had no effect on pregnant dam weights or water consumption, litter size, offspring birth weight, or weight at weaning compared to control. In male offspring mice, arsenic exposure increased (p ppb (51%) and 500 ppb (54%), but not at 5000 ppb (28%) compared to control (22%). These arsenic-induced bronchiolo-alveolar tumors included increased (p ppb (27%) compared to controls (8%). An increase (p ppb group compared to control (11%) occurred in female offspring. Thus, in CD1 mice whole life arsenic exposure induced lung tumors at human relevant doses (i.e. 50 and 500 ppb). PMID:25005685

  10. Neuroendocrine mediated effects of electromagnetic-field exposure: possible role of the pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B W; Stevens, R G; Anderson, L E

    1989-01-01

    Reports from recent epidemiological studies have suggested a possible association between extremely low frequency (ELF; including 50- or 60-Hz) electric- and magnetic-field exposure, and increased risk of certain cancers, depression, and miscarriage. ELF field-induced pineal gland dysfunction is a possible etiological factor in these effects. Work in our laboratory and elsewhere has shown that ELF electromagnetic-field exposure can alter the normal circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis and release in the pineal gland. Consequences of reduced or inappropriately timed melatonin release on the endocrine, neuronal, and immune systems are discussed. Laboratory data linking ELF field exposure to changes in pineal circadian rhythms in both animals and humans are reviewed. The authors suggest that the pineal gland, in addition to being a convenient locus for measuring dyschronogenic effects of ELF field exposure, may play a central role in biological response to these fields via alterations in the melatonin signal.

  11. Methylmercury exposure and adverse cardiovascular effects in Faroese whalingmen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Anna L; Weihe, Pál; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2009-01-01

    consumption of pilot whale meat. METHODS: We assessed exposure levels from mercury analysis of toenails and whole blood (obtained at the time of clinical examination), and a hair sample collected 7 years previously. Outcome measures included heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), common carotid...... intima-media thickness (IMT), and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP). We carried out multiple regression and structural equation model (SEM) analyses to determine the confounder-adjusted effect of mercury exposure. Taking into account correlations among related measures, we categorized exposure...... widely and had a geometric mean of 2.0 microg/g; hair concentrations averaged about 3-fold higher. Mercury exposure was significantly associated with increased BP and IMT. This effect was reflected by SEMs, but mercury in toenails tended to be the best effect predictor. CONCLUSIONS: The results support...

  12. Assessment of human exposure to fumonisin B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, M. de; Egmond, H.P. van; Nauta, M.; Rombouts, F.M.; Notermans, S.H.W.

    1998-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 is currently regarded as the most significant mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. It has carcinogenic properties and may play a role in the etiology of human esophageal cancer. The human population is exposed to fumonisin B1 primarily by intake of fumonisin B1-contaminated maize. Maize

  13. Changes in human pluripotent stem cell gene expression after genotoxic stress exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent heterogeneous populations, including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), endogenous plastic somatic cells, and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Human ESCs are derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, and they are characterized by the abilities to self-renew indefinitely, and to give rise to all cell types of embryonic lineage (pluripotency) under the guidance of the appropriate chemical, mechanical and environmental cues. The combination of these critical features is unique to hESCs, and set them apart from other human cells. The expectations are high to utilize hESCs for treating injuries and degenerative diseases; for modeling of complex illnesses and development; for screening and testing of pharmacological products; and for examining toxicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and potential carcinogenic effects of a variety of environmental factors, including ionizing radiation (IR). Exposures to genotoxic stresses, such as background IR, are unavoidable; moreover, IR is widely used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in medicine on a routine basis. One of the key outcomes of cell exposures to IR is the change in gene expression, which may underlie the ultimate hESCs fate after such a stress. However, gaps in our knowledge about basic biology of hESCs impose a serious limitation to fully realize the potential of hESCs in practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence of alterations in gene expression in human pluripotent stem cells after genotoxic stress, and to discuss strategies for future research in this important area. PMID:25426256

  14. Changes in human pluripotent stem cell gene expression after genotoxic stress exposures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mykyta; V; Sokolov; Ronald; D; Neumann

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells(h PSCs) represent heterogeneous populations, including induced pluripotent stem cells(i PSCs), endogenous plastic somatic cells, and embryonic stem cells(ESCs). Human ESCs are derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, and they are characterized by the abilities to self-renew indefinitely, and to give rise to all cell types of embryonic lineage(pluripotency) under the guidance of the appropriate chemical, mechanical and environmental cues. The combination of these critical features is unique to h ESCs, and set them apart from other human cells. The expectations are high to utilize h ESCs for treating injuries and degenerative diseases; for modeling of complex illnesses and development; for screening and testing of pharmacological products; and for examining toxicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and potential carcinogenic effects of a variety of environmental factors, including ionizing radiation(IR). Exposures to genotoxic stresses, such as background IR, are unavoidable; moreover, IR is widely used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in medicine on a routine basis. One of the key outcomes of cell exposures to IR is the change in gene expression, which may underlie the ultimate h ESCs fate after such a stress. However, gaps in our knowledge about basic biology of h ESCs impose a serious limitation to fully realize the potential of h ESCs in practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence of alterations in gene expression in human pluripotent stem cells after genotoxic stress, and to discuss strategies for future research in this important area.

  15. Human Exposure to Herpesvirus B–Seropositive Macaques, Bali, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Gregory A.; Schillaci, Michael A.; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a “monkey forest” (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B. PMID:12141963

  16. Human exposure to herpesvirus B-seropositive macaques, Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Gregory A; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Schillaci, Michael A; Suaryana, Komang Gde; Putra, Artha; Fuentes, Agustin; Henkel, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Herpesvirus B (Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1) has been implicated as the cause of approximately 40 cases of meningoencephalitis affecting persons in direct or indirect contact with laboratory macaques. However, the threat of herpesvirus B in nonlaboratory settings worldwide remains to be addressed. We investigated the potential for exposure to herpesvirus B in workers at a "monkey forest" (a temple that has become a tourist attraction because of its monkeys) in Bali, Indonesia. In July 2000, 105 workers at the Sangeh Monkey Forest in Central Bali were surveyed about contact with macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nearly half of those interviewed had either been bitten or scratched by a macaque. Prevalence of injury was higher in those who fed macaques. Serum from 31 of 38 Sangeh macaques contained antibodies to herpesvirus B. We conclude that workers coming into contact with macaques at the Sangeh Monkey Forest are at risk for exposure to herpesvirus B.

  17. Critical elements for human health risk assessment of less than lifetime exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraets, Liesbeth; Nijkamp, Monique M; Ter Burg, Wouter

    2016-11-01

    Less than lifetime exposure has confronted risk assessors as to how to interpret the risks for human health in case a chronic health-based limit is exceeded. Intermittent, fluctuating and peak exposures do not match with the basis of the chronic limit values possibly leading to conservative outcomes. This paper presents guidance on how to deal with human risk assessment of less than lifetime exposure. Important steps to be considered are characterization of the human exposure situation, evaluation whether the human less than lifetime exposure scenario corresponds to a non-chronic internal exposure: toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic considerations, and, finally, re-evaluation of the risk assessment. Critical elements for these steps are the mode of action, Haber's rule, and toxicokinetics (ADME) amongst others. Previous work for the endpoints non-genotoxic carcinogenicity and developmental toxicity is included in the guidance. The guidance provides a way to consider the critical elements, without setting default factors to correct for the less than lifetime exposure in risk assessment.

  18. Novel Human Radiation Exposure Biomarker Panel Applicable for Population Triage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazan, Jose G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Polly; Balog, Robert; D' Andrea, Annalisa; Shaler, Thomas; Lin, Hua; Lee, Shirley; Harrison, Travis [SRI International, Menlo Park, California (United States); Shura, Lei; Schoen, Lucy; Knox, Susan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Cooper, David E., E-mail: david.cooper@sri.com [SRI International, Menlo Park, California (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To identify a panel of radiation-responsive plasma proteins that could be used in a point-of-care biologic dosimeter to detect clinically significant levels of ionizing radiation exposure. Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation using radiation therapy (RT) with either total lymphoid irradiation or fractionated total body irradiation were eligible. Plasma was examined from patients with potentially confounding conditions and from normal individuals. Each plasma sample was analyzed for a panel of 17 proteins before RT was begun and at several time points after RT exposure. Paired and unpaired t tests between the dose and control groups were performed. Conditional inference trees were constructed based on panels of proteins to compare the non-RT group with the RT group. Results: A total of 151 patients (62 RT, 41 infection, 48 trauma) were enrolled on the study, and the plasma from an additional 24 healthy control individuals was analyzed. In comparison with to control individuals, tenascin-C was upregulated and clusterin was downregulated in patients receiving RT. Salivary amylase was strongly radiation responsive, with upregulation in total body irradiation patients and slight downregulation in total lymphoid irradiation patients compared with control individuals. A panel consisting of these 3 proteins accurately distinguished between irradiated patients and healthy control individuals within 3 days after exposure: 97% accuracy, 0.5% false negative rate, 2% false positive rate. The accuracy was diminished when patients with trauma, infection, or both were included (accuracy, 74%-84%; false positive rate, 14%-33%, false negative rate: 8%-40%). Conclusions: A panel of 3 proteins accurately distinguishes unirradiated healthy donors from those exposed to RT (0.8-9.6 Gy) within 3 days of exposure. These findings have significant implications in terms of triaging individuals in the case of nuclear or other

  19. Trait and state anxiety reduce the mere exposure effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Sandra L; Gabrieli, John D E

    2015-01-01

    The mere exposure effect refers to an affective preference elicited by exposure to previously unfamiliar items. Although it is a well-established finding, its mechanism remains uncertain, with some positing that it reflects affective processes and others positing that it reflects perceptual or motor fluency with repeated items. Here we examined whether individual differences in trait and state anxiety, which have been associated with the experience of emotion, influence the mere exposure effect. Participants' trait (Study 1) and state (Study 2) anxiety were characterized with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Greater trait and state anxiety correlated with greater negative affect and lesser positive affect. In both experiments, greater anxiety was associated with a reduced mere exposure effect. Measures of fluency (response times at study and test) were unrelated to the mere exposure effect. These findings support the role of affective processes in the mere exposure effect, and offer a new insight into the nature of anxiety such that anxiety is associated with a reduced experience of positive affect typically associated with familiarity.

  20. Trait and state anxiety reduce the mere exposure effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L Ladd

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mere exposure effect refers to an affective preference elicited by exposure to previously unfamiliar items. Although it is a well-established finding, its mechanism remains uncertain, with some positing that it reflects affective processes and others positing that it reflects perceptual or motor fluency with repeated items. Here we examined whether individual differences in trait and state anxiety, which have been associated with the experience of emotion, influence the mere exposure effect. Participants’ trait (Study 1 and state (Study 2 anxiety were characterized with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Greater trait and state anxiety correlated with greater negative affect and lesser positive affect. In both experiments, greater anxiety was associated with a reduced mere exposure effect. Measures of fluency (response times at study and test were unrelated to the mere exposure effect. These findings support the role of affective processes in the mere exposure effect, and offer a new insight into the nature of anxiety such that anxiety is associated with a reduced experience of positive affect typically associated with familiarity.

  1. Analysis of the Exposure Levels and Potential Biologic Effects of the PAVE PAWS Radar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    purported effects of microwave exposure, cataract induction is the only irreversible alteration repgted to have occurred in humans as a result of accidental ...Czerski12 ) described the cases of two long-term radar technicians wh2 were accidentally exposed to microwave power densities of 30-70 mW/cmZ. These power...of the children had never revealed a harmful effect. OTHER EFFECTS There is no evidence of significant microwave-induced immunologic, cerebrovascular

  2. [Occupational exposure to wood dust. Health effects and exposure limit values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, M; Goldberg, M; Luce, D

    2002-04-01

    This article presents a review of the health effects of occupational exposure to wood dusts and of the data that could be used for setting occupational exposure limits for this nuisance. The causal role of wood dust in the onset of sinonasal cancers is solidly established by numerous epidemiological studies, and the magnitude of the risk is particularly high for adenocarcinoma induced by exposure to hardwood dust. However, no current data allows to rule out the carcinogenic role of softwood dusts and, in the view of protecting the health of the workers, it does not seem relevant to distinguish these two types of wood. Various impairments of the lung function have been frequently associated with exposure to both 'allergenic' and 'non-allergenic' wood dusts and may occur at very low concentrations. According to the SUMER 94 and CAREX studies, about 200 000 workers are currently exposed to wood dusts in France (about 1% of the working population between 1990 and 1994). When taking into account full professional careers, the percentage of workers having been occupationally exposed can be estimated to be about 15% for men and 5% for women. Measurements performed in France between 1987 and 2000 show that exposure levels are high, about 50% of the samplings being over 1mg/m(3) (actual TWA in France). Although the studies present limits, particularly for the quantitative assessment of individual exposure levels, it seems that nonmalignant effects are susceptible to arise at the level of 1mg/m(3); a limit value of 0.5mg/m(3) would credibly allow to protect exposed workers from most of the risks of nonmalignant pulmonary effects. However, it is impossible to assure that this value will avoid the induction of sinonasal cancer, even if this level is certainly lower than the levels to which the cases of sinonasal cancers published in the literature were exposed.

  3. Modeling of road traffic noise and estimated human exposure in Fulton County, Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jeong C; Park, Tae H; Ko, Joon H; Chang, Seo I; Kim, Minho; Holt, James B; Mehdi, Mohammed R

    2011-11-01

    Environmental noise is a major source of public complaints. Noise in the community causes physical and socio-economic effects and has been shown to be related to adverse health impacts. Noise, however, has not been actively researched in the United States compared with the European Union countries in recent years. In this research, we aimed at modeling road traffic noise and analyzing human exposure in Fulton County, Georgia, United States. We modeled road traffic noise levels using the United States Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Traffic Noise Model implemented in SoundPLAN®. After analyzing noise levels with raster, vector and façade maps, we estimated human exposure to high noise levels. Accurate digital elevation models and building heights were derived from Light Detection And Ranging survey datasets and building footprint boundaries. Traffic datasets were collected from the Georgia Department of Transportation and the Atlanta Regional Commission. Noise level simulation was performed with 62 computers in a distributed computing environment. Finally, the noise-exposed population was calculated using geographic information system techniques. Results show that 48% of the total county population [N=870,166 residents] is potentially exposed to 55 dB(A) or higher noise levels during daytime. About 9% of the population is potentially exposed to 67 dB(A) or higher noises. At nighttime, 32% of the population is expected to be exposed to noise levels higher than 50 dB(A). This research shows that large-scale traffic noise estimation is possible with the help of various organizations. We believe that this research is a significant stepping stone for analyzing community health associated with noise exposures in the United States.

  4. Induction of apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure of resistive barrier cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Anderson, Heather; Gonzales, Xavier F

    2014-03-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ambient temperature ionized gas, is gaining extensive interest as a promising addition to anti-tumor therapy primarily due to the ability to generate and control delivery of electrons, ions, excited molecules, UV photons, and reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to a specific site. The heterogeneous composition of CAP offers the opportunity to mediate several signaling pathways that regulate tumor cells. Consequently, the array of CAP generated products has limited the identification of the mechanisms of action on tumor cells. The aim of this work is to assess the cell death response of human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure to CAP generated RNS by utilizing a novel resistive barrier discharge system that primarily produces RNS. The effect of variable treatments of CAP generated RNS was tested in THP-1 cell (human monocytic leukemia cell line), a model for hematological malignancy. The number of viable cells was evaluated with erythrosine-B staining, while apoptosis and necrosis was assessed by endonuclease cleavage observed by agarose gel electrophoresis and detection of cells with the exclusionary dye propidium iodide and fluorescently labeled annexin-V by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Our observations indicate that treatment dosage levels of 45 s of exposure to CAP emitted RNS-induced apoptotic cell death and for higher dosage conditions of ≥50 s of exposure to CAP induced necrosis. Overall the results suggest that CAP emitted RNS play a significant role in the anti-tumor potential of CAP.

  5. Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and ADHD on Adaptive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Ashley L.; Glass, Leila; Crocker, Nicole; Deweese, Benjamin N.; Coles, Claire D.; Kable, Julie A.; May, Philip A.; Kalberg, Wendy O.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Riley, Edward P.; Mattson, Sarah N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heavy prenatal alcohol exposure and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are associated with adaptive behavior deficits. The present study examined the interaction between these two factors on parent ratings of adaptive behavior. Methods As part of a multisite study, primary caregivers of 317 children (8–16y, M=12.38) completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II (VABS-II). Four groups of subjects were included: children with prenatal alcohol exposure with (AE+, n = 82) and without ADHD (AE−, n = 34), children with ADHD (ADHD, n = 71), and control children (CON, n = 130). VABS-II domain scores (Communication, Daily Living Skills, Socialization) were examined using separate 2 (Alcohol Exposure [AE]) × 2 (ADHD diagnosis) between-subjects ANCOVAs. Results There were significant main effects of AE (p VABS-II domains; alcohol-exposed children had lower scores than children without prenatal alcohol exposure and children with ADHD had lower scores than those without ADHD. There was a significant AE × ADHD interaction effect for Communication [F (1, 308) = 7.49, p = .007, partial η2 =.024], but not Daily Living Skills or Socialization domains (ps > .27). Follow up analyses in the Communication domain indicated the effects of ADHD were stronger in comparison subjects (ADHD vs. CON) than exposed subjects (AE+ vs. AE−) and the effects of alcohol exposure were stronger in subjects without ADHD (AE− vs. CON) than in subjects with ADHD (AE+ vs. ADHD). Conclusion As found previously, both prenatal alcohol exposure and ADHD increase adaptive behavior deficits in all domains. However, these two factors interact to cause the greatest impairment in children with both prenatal alcohol exposure and ADHD for communication abilities. These results further demonstrate the deleterious effects of prenatal alcohol exposure and broadens our understanding of how ADHD exacerbates behavioral outcomes in this population. PMID:24655090

  6. Human brain derived cells respond in a type-specific manner after exposure to urban particulate matter (PM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Arezoo; Daher, Nancy; Solaimani, Parrisa; Mendoza, Kriscelle; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM), a component of urban air pollution, may cause adverse effects in the brain. Although the exact mechanisms involved are unknown, both oxidative and inflammatory responses have been reported. Since the main route of exposure to particulate matter is through inhalation, there is a potential for compounds to directly enter the brain and alter normal cellular function. Enhancement in both oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory markers has been observed in neurodegenerative disorders and PM-induced potentiation of these events may accelerate the disease process. The objective of this pilot study was to use normal human brain cells, a model system which has not been previously used, to assess cell-type-specific responses after exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP). Human microglia, neurons, and astrocytes were grown separately or as co-cultures and then exposed to aqueous