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Sample records for human excision nuclease

  1. Genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Wang, Haoyi; Kiani, Samira; Lai, Christine S; Gao, Qing; Cassady, John P; Cost, Gregory J; Zhang, Lei; Santiago, Yolanda; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zeitler, Bryan; Cherone, Jennifer M; Meng, Xiangdong; Hinkley, Sarah J; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-07-07

    Targeted genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells is a prerequisite for exploiting their full potential. Such genetic manipulations can be achieved using site-specific nucleases. Here we engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) for five distinct genomic loci. At all loci tested we obtained human embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) clones carrying transgenic cassettes solely at the TALEN-specified location. Our data suggest that TALENs employing the specific architectures described here mediate site-specific genome modification in human pluripotent cells with similar efficiency and precision as do zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs).

  2. Genome Editing in Human Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. This unit describes protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases.

  3. GENOME EDITING IN HUMAN CELLS USING CRISPR/CAS NUCLEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. Here we describe protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 Endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases. PMID:26423589

  4. Targeted genome editing in human cells using CRISPR/Cas nucleases and truncated guide RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanfang; Reyon, Deepak; Joung, J Keith

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases have recently emerged as a robust genome-editing platform that functions in a wide range of organisms. To reduce off-target effects of these nucleases, we developed and validated a modified system that uses truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs). The use of tru-gRNAs leads to decreases in off-target effects and does not generally compromise the on-target efficiencies of these genome-editing nucleases. In this chapter, we describe guidelines for identifying potential tru-gRNA target sites and protocols for measuring the on-target efficiencies of CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases in human cells.

  5. A library of TAL effector nucleases spanning the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsub; Kweon, Jiyeon; Kim, Annie; Chon, Jae Kyung; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hye Joo; Kim, Sojung; Lee, Choongil; Jeong, Euihwan; Chung, Eugene; Kim, Doyoung; Lee, Mi Seon; Go, Eun Mi; Song, Hye Jung; Kim, Hwangbeom; Cho, Namjin; Bang, Duhee; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) can be readily engineered to bind specific genomic loci, enabling the introduction of precise genetic modifications such as gene knockouts and additions. Here we present a genome-scale collection of TALENs for efficient and scalable gene targeting in human cells. We chose target sites that did not have highly similar sequences elsewhere in the genome to avoid off-target mutations and assembled TALEN plasmids for 18,740 protein-coding genes using a high-throughput Golden-Gate cloning system. A pilot test involving 124 genes showed that all TALENs were active and disrupted their target genes at high frequencies, although two of these TALENs became active only after their target sites were partially demethylated using an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase. We used our TALEN library to generate single- and double-gene-knockout cells in which NF-κB signaling pathways were disrupted. Compared with cells treated with short interfering RNAs, these cells showed unambiguous suppression of signal transduction.

  6. Genetic engineering of human ES and iPS cells using TALE nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Wang, Haoyi; Kiani, Samira; Lai, Christine S.; Gao, Qing; Cassady, John P.; Cost, Gregory J.; Zhang, Lei; Santiago, Yolanda; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zeitler, Bryan; Cherone, Jennifer M.; Meng, Xiangdong; Hinkley, Sarah J; Rebar, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells is a prerequisite for exploiting their full potential. Such genetic manipulations can be achieved using site-specific nucleases. Here we engineered transcription activator–like effector nucleases (TALENs) for five distinct genomic loci. At all loci tested we obtained human embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) clones carrying transgenic cassettes solely at the TALEN-specified location. Our data suggest that T...

  7. Molecular cloning of the human excision repair gene ERCC-6.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Troelstra (Christine); H. Odijk (Hanny); J. de Wit (Jan); A. Westerveld (Andries); L.H. Thompson; D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-sensitive, nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line UV61 was used to identify and clone a correcting human gene, ERCC-6. UV61, belonging to rodent complementation group 6, is only moderately UV sensitive in comparison with mutant lines in groups 1 to 5

  8. Glycoengineering of Human Cell Lines Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Gene Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography is a powerful technique for isolation of glycoproteins carrying a specific glycan structure of interest. However, the enormous diversity of glycans present on the cell surface, as well as on individual proteins, makes it difficult to isolate an entire glycoproteome...... with one or even a series of lectins. Here we present a technique to generate cell lines with homogenous truncated O-glycans using zinc finger nuclease gene targeting. Because of their simplified O-glycoproteome, the cells have been named SimpleCells. Glycoproteins from SimpleCells can be isolated...... in a single purification step by lectin chromatography performed on a long lectin column. This protocol describes Zinc finger nuclease gene targeting of human cells to simplify the glycoproteome, as well as lectin chromatography and isolation of glycopeptides from total cell lysates of SimpleCells....

  9. [Retarded excision of pyrimidine dimers in human unstimulated lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snopov, S A; Roza, L; de Gruijl, F R

    2006-01-01

    Using immuno-labelling of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in nuclei of peripheral lymphocytes after their UVC-irradiation and cultivation, we have found that within the first four hours of cultivation the CPD-specific fluorescent signal from cell nuclei increased. Earlier, a similar increase in binding of antibody specific for pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts to undenatured DNA isolated from UV-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary cells was reported (Mitchell et al., 1986). Our experiments showed that nucleotide excision repair enzyme might induce such of DNA modification in lymphocyte nuclei that increased specific antibody binding to DNA fragments with lesions. We suggest that enzymatic formation of open structures in DNA predominated qualitatively over dual-incision and excision of these fragments, and resulted in the enhanced exposure of the pyrimidine dimers in nuclei to specific antibodies. The results evidence that nucleotid excision repair in unstimualted human lymphocytes being deficient in dual incision and removal of UV-induced DNA lesions appear to be capable of performing chromatin relaxation and pre-incision uncoiling of DNA fragments with lesions.

  10. Targeted genome engineering using designer nucleases: State of the art and practical guidance for application in human pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Merkert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the last years numerous publications successfully applied sequence specific designer nucleases for genome editing in human PSCs. However, despite this abundance of reports together with the rapid development and improvement accomplished with the technology, it is still difficult to choose the optimal methodology for a specific application of interest. With focus on the most suitable approach for specific applications, we present a practical guidance for successful gene editing in human PSCs using designer nucleases. We discuss experimental considerations, limitations and critical aspects which will guide the investigator for successful implementation of this technology.

  11. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable tools to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger.

  12. Targeting human microRNA genes using engineered Tal-effector nucleases (TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruozhen Hu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have quickly emerged as important regulators of mammalian physiology owing to their precise control over the expression of critical protein coding genes. Despite significant progress in our understanding of how miRNAs function in mice, there remains a fundamental need to be able to target and edit miRNA genes in the human genome. Here, we report a novel approach to disrupting human miRNA genes ex vivo using engineered TAL-effector (TALE proteins to function as nucleases (TALENs that specifically target and disrupt human miRNA genes. We demonstrate that functional TALEN pairs can be designed to enable disruption of miRNA seed regions, or removal of entire hairpin sequences, and use this approach to successfully target several physiologically relevant human miRNAs including miR-155*, miR-155, miR-146a and miR-125b. This technology will allow for a substantially improved capacity to study the regulation and function of miRNAs in human cells, and could be developed into a strategic means by which miRNAs can be targeted therapeutically during human disease.

  13. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  14. Generation and genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells using designed zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sivaprakash; London, Viktoriya; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William; Civin, Curt; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan

    2013-02-15

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have become powerful tools to deliver a targeted double-strand break at a pre-determined chromosomal locus in order to insert an exogenous transgene by homology-directed repair. ZFN-mediated gene targeting was used to generate both single-allele chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5)-modified human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and biallele CCR5-modified hiPSCs from human lung fibroblasts (IMR90 cells) and human primary cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNCs) by site-specific insertion of stem cell transcription factor genes flanked by LoxP sites into the endogenous CCR5 locus. The Oct4 and Sox2 reprogramming factors, in combination with valproic acid, induced reprogramming of human lung fibroblasts to form CCR5-modified hiPSCs, while 5 factors, Oct4/Sox2/Klf4/Lin28/Nanog, induced reprogramming of CBMNCs. Subsequent Cre recombinase treatment of the CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs resulted in the removal of the Oct4 and Sox2 transgenes. Further genetic engineering of the single-allele CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs was achieved by site-specific addition of the large CFTR transcription unit to the remaining CCR5 wild-type allele, using CCR5-specific ZFNs and a donor construct containing tdTomato and CFTR transgenes flanked by CCR5 homology arms. CFTR was expressed efficiently from the endogenous CCR5 locus of the CCR5-modified tdTomato/CFTR hiPSCs. These results suggest that it might be feasible to use ZFN-evoked strategies to (1) generate precisely targeted genetically well-defined patient-specific hiPSCs, and (2) then to reshape their function by targeted addition and expression of therapeutic genes from the CCR5 chromosomal locus for autologous cell-based transgene-correction therapy to treat various recessive monogenic human diseases in the future.

  15. Iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil through excised human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B N; Jayaswal, S B

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ionization, current density and penetration enhancers on the iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) through excised human stratum corneum (HSC). The iontophoretic (cathodal) transport of 5-FU was assessed in vitro at three physiologically relevant pH values of 5.0, 7.4 and 8.0, at various levels of current density ranging between 0.15 to 0.98 mA/cm2, and in the presence of suitable penetration enhancers, namely Azone(®) (AZ), lauryl alcohol (LA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM). The steady-state flux at constant current density (0.47 mA/cm(2)) was increased by approximately 19, 10 and 27 fold at pH 5, 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. The effect of current density at pH 7.4 exhibited a linear correlation between current density and steady-state flux (r = 0.98, p = 0.002), which indicates the potential of iontophoresis for controlled transdermal delivery of 5-FU. The combination of cathodal iontophoresis with IPM produced an additive enhancement which may be attributed to aggravated skin perturbation effect and increased skin conductivity. Other enhancers such as AZ and LA produced negative or no further enhancement respectively, when used in conjunction with cathodal iontophoresis. It may be therefore concluded that pH and current density play critical role during iontophoretic delivery of 5-FU, and combination of a chemical penetration enhancer and iontophoresis can not be always viewed as a synergistic strategy which should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis for each drug candidate/enhancer combination.

  16. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  17. Terahertz pulsed imaging of freshly excised human colonic tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Caroline B; Gibson, Adam P [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, Anthony; Wallace, Vincent P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia); Reese, George; Tekkis, Paris [Division of Surgery, Chelsea and Westminster Campus, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Goldin, Robert [Centre for Pathology, Imperial College London, St Mary' s Campus, London (United Kingdom); O' Kelly, P S [TeraView Ltd, Platinum Building, St John' s Innovation Park, Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0WS (United Kingdom); Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma, E-mail: c.reid@medphys.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong)

    2011-07-21

    We present the results from a feasibility study which measures properties in the terahertz frequency range of excised cancerous, dysplastic and healthy colonic tissues from 30 patients. We compare their absorption and refractive index spectra to identify trends which may enable different tissue types to be distinguished. In addition, we present statistical models based on variations between up to 17 parameters calculated from the reflected time and frequency domain signals of all the measured tissues. These models produce a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 77% in distinguishing between healthy and all diseased tissues and a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 71% in distinguishing between dysplastic and healthy tissues. The contrast between the tissue types was supported by histological staining studies which showed an increased vascularity in regions of increased terahertz absorption.

  18. Human KIAA1018/FAN1 nuclease is a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenju Lai; Kaishun Hu; Yuanzhong Wu; Jianjun Tang; Yi Sang; Jingying Cao; Tiebang Kang

    2012-01-01

    A recently identified protein,FAN1 (FANCD2-associated nuclease 1,previously known as KIAA1018),is a novel nuclease associated with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 that is required for cellular resistance against DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agents.The mechanisms of FAN1 regulation have not yet been explored.Here,we provide evidence that FAN1 is degraded during mitotic exit,suggesting that FAN1 may be a mitotic substrate of the anaphase-promoting cyclosome complex (APC/C).Indeed,.Cdh1,but not Cdc20,was capable of regulating the protein level of FAN1 through the KEN box and the D-box.Moreover,the up- and down-regulation of FAN1 affected the progression to mitotic exit.Collectively,these data suggest that FAN1 may be a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1 that plays a key role during mitotic e xit.

  19. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holkers, M.; Maggio, I.; Liu, J.; Janssen, J.M.; Miselli, F; Mussolino, C.; Recchia, A; Cathomen, T.; Goncalves, M. A. F. V.

    2012-01-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehi...

  20. Engineering HIV-resistant human CD4+ T cells with CXCR4-specific zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Wilen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 entry requires the cell surface expression of CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptors on host cells. Individuals homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 polymorphism do not express CCR5 and are protected from infection by CCR5-tropic (R5 virus strains. As an approach to inactivating CCR5, we introduced CCR5-specific zinc-finger nucleases into human CD4+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer, but the need to protect cells from virus strains that use CXCR4 (X4 in place of or in addition to CCR5 (R5X4 remains. Here we describe engineering a pair of zinc finger nucleases that, when introduced into human T cells, efficiently disrupt cxcr4 by cleavage and error-prone non-homologous DNA end-joining. The resulting cells proliferated normally and were resistant to infection by X4-tropic HIV-1 strains. CXCR4 could also be inactivated in ccr5Δ32 CD4+ T cells, and we show that such cells were resistant to all strains of HIV-1 tested. Loss of CXCR4 also provided protection from X4 HIV-1 in a humanized mouse model, though this protection was lost over time due to the emergence of R5-tropic viral mutants. These data suggest that CXCR4-specific ZFNs may prove useful in establishing resistance to CXCR4-tropic HIV for autologous transplant in HIV-infected individuals.

  1. Cloning and characterization of the human DNA-excision repair gene ERCC-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Michel)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIt is the aim of the work described in this thesis to isolate and characterize human genes involved DNA excision repair. This will facilitate the understanding of the mechanism of this repair process whereas it also provides an important step to better understand the relationship

  2. Cloning and characterization of the human DNA-excision repair gene ERCC-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Michel)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractIt is the aim of the work described in this thesis to isolate and characterize human genes involved DNA excision repair. This will facilitate the understanding of the mechanism of this repair process whereas it also provides an important step to better understand the relationship between

  3. Studies on percutaneous penetration of chemicals - Impact of storage conditions for excised human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Schneider, Désirée; Göen, Thomas; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2013-03-01

    According to international guidelines skin penetration experiments can be carried out using freshly excised or frozen stored skin. However, this recommendation refers to data obtained in experiments with human cadaver skin. In our study, the percutaneous penetration of the occupationally relevant chemicals anisole, cyclohexanone and 1,4-dioxane was investigated for freshly excised as well as for 4 and 30 days at -20°C stored human skin using the diffusion cell technique. As indicator for the impairment of skin barrier by freezing cholesterol dissolution was determined in the solvents in exposure chambers of diffusion cells. Considering the percutaneously penetrated amounts, the following ranking was determined: 1,4-dioxane>anisole>cyclohexanone (decline to a factor of 5.9). The differences of fluxes between freshly excised and frozen stored skin (4 and 30 days) were not significant (p>0.05). Cholesterol dissolved from the skin indicates no significant differences between freshly excised and frozen stored skin. This study shows that freezing of human skin for up to 30 days does not alter the skin barrier function and the permeability of chemicals.

  4. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Daniel F Voytas; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific geno...

  5. Generation of GFP Reporter Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using AAVS1 Safe Harbor Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongquan; Rao, Mahendra; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-05-16

    Generation of a fluorescent GFP reporter line in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides enormous potentials in both basic stem cell research and regenerative medicine. A protocol for efficiently generating such an engineered reporter line by gene targeting is highly desired. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a new class of artificial restriction enzymes that have been shown to significantly promote homologous recombination by >1000-fold. The AAVS1 (adeno-associated virus integration site 1) locus is a "safe harbor" and has an open chromatin structure that allows insertion and stable expression of transgene. Here, we describe a step-by-step protocol from determination of TALENs activity, hiPSC culture, and delivery of a donor into AAVS1 targeting site, to validation of targeted integration by PCR and Southern blot analysis using hiPSC line, and a pair of open-source AAVS1 TALENs.

  6. Human Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (Tudor-SN) protein modulates the kinetics of AGTR1-3'UTR granule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjie; Shi, Xuebin; Fu, Xue; Ge, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, Chao; Yang, Xi; Silvennoinen, Olli; Yao, Zhi; He, Jinyan; Wei, Minxin; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-13

    Human Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (Tudor-SN) interacts with the G3BP protein and is recruited into stress granules (SGs), the main type of discrete RNA-containing cytoplasmic foci structure that is formed under stress conditions. Here, we further demonstrate that Tudor-SN binds and co-localizes with AGTR1-3'UTR (3'-untranslated region of angiotensin II receptor, type 1 mRNA) into SG. Tudor-SN plays an important role in the assembly of AGTR1-3'UTR granules. Moreover, endogenous Tudor-SN knockdown can decrease the recovery kinetics of AGTR1-3'UTR granules. Collectively, our data indicate that Tudor-SN modulates the kinetics of AGTR1-3'UTR granule formation, which provides an additional biological role of Tudor-SN in RNA metabolism during stress. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficient Designer Nuclease-Based Homologous Recombination Enables Direct PCR Screening for Footprintless Targeted Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Merkert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs via customized designer nucleases has been shown to be significantly more efficient than conventional gene targeting, but still typically depends on the introduction of additional genetic selection elements. In our study, we demonstrate the efficient nonviral and selection-independent gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Our high efficiencies of up to 1.6% of gene-targeted hiPSCs, accompanied by a low background of randomly inserted transgenes, eliminated the need for antibiotic or fluorescence-activated cell sorting selection, and allowed the use of short donor oligonucleotides for footprintless gene editing. Gene-targeted hiPSC clones were established simply by direct PCR screening. This optimized approach allows targeted transgene integration into safe harbor sites for more predictable and robust expression and enables the straightforward generation of disease-corrected, patient-derived iPSC lines for research purposes and, ultimately, for future clinical applications.

  8. Targeted gene addition in human epithelial stem cells by zinc-finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccio, Andrea; Miselli, Francesca; Lombardo, Angelo; Marconi, Alessandra; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Pincelli, Carlo; Maruggi, Giulietta; Del Rio, Marcela; Naldini, Luigi; Larcher, Fernando; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies showed that autologous transplantation of epidermis derived from genetically modified epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) leads to long-term correction of inherited skin adhesion defects. These studies were based on potentially genotoxic retroviral vectors. We developed an alternative gene transfer strategy aimed at targeting a "safe harbor" locus, the adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), by zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced homologous recombination (HR). Delivery of AAVS1-specific ZFNs and a GFP-expressing HR cassette by integration-defective lentiviral (LV) vectors (IDLVs) or adenoviral (Ad) vectors resulted in targeted gene addition with an efficiency of > 20% in a human keratinocyte cell line, > 10% in immortalized keratinocytes, and < 1% in primary keratinocytes. Deep sequencing of the AAVS1 locus showed that ZFN-induced double-strand breaks are mostly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in primary cells, indicating that poor induction of the HR-dependent DNA repair pathway may be a significant limitation for targeted gene integration. Skin equivalents derived from unselected keratinocyte cultures coinfected with a GFP-IDLV and a ZFN-Ad vector were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. GFP-positive clones were observed in all grafts up to 18 weeks post-transplantation. By histological and molecular analysis, we were able to demonstrate highly efficient targeting of the AAVS1 locus in human repopulating EpSCs.

  9. Highly efficient gene targeting of expressed and silent genes in human ESCs and iPSCs using zinc finger nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Soldner, Frank; Beard, Caroline; Gao, Qing; Mitalipova, Maisam; DeKelver, Russell C.; Katibah, George E.; Amora, Ranier; Boydston, Elizabeth A.; Zeitler, Bryan; Meng, Xiangdong; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs) are powerful tools for biomedical research. Realizing the full potential of these cells requires efficient genetic modification. However, techniques to generate cell type specific lineage reporters as well as reliable tools to disrupt, repair or overexpress genes by gene targeting are inefficient at best and thus are not routinely used. Here we report the highly efficient targeting of three genes in human pluripotent cells using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) mediated genome editing. First, using ZFNs specific for the OCT4 locus we generated OCT4-eGFP reporter cells to monitor the pluripotent state of hESCs. Secondly, we inserted a transgene into the AAVS1 locus to generate a robust drug-inducible overexpression system in hESCs. Finally, we targeted the PITX3 gene, demonstrating that ZFNs can be used to generate reporter cells by targeting non-expressed genes in hESCs and hiPSCs. PMID:19680244

  10. Efficient targeting of expressed and silent genes in human ESCs and iPSCs using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Soldner, Frank; Beard, Caroline; Gao, Qing; Mitalipova, Maisam; DeKelver, Russell C; Katibah, George E; Amora, Ranier; Boydston, Elizabeth A; Zeitler, Bryan; Meng, Xiangdong; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2009-09-01

    Realizing the full potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) requires efficient methods for genetic modification. However, techniques to generate cell type-specific lineage reporters, as well as reliable tools to disrupt, repair or overexpress genes by gene targeting, are inefficient at best and thus are not routinely used. Here we report the highly efficient targeting of three genes in human pluripotent cells using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated genome editing. First, using ZFNs specific for the OCT4 (POU5F1) locus, we generated OCT4-eGFP reporter cells to monitor the pluripotent state of hESCs. Second, we inserted a transgene into the AAVS1 locus to generate a robust drug-inducible overexpression system in hESCs. Finally, we targeted the PITX3 gene, demonstrating that ZFNs can be used to generate reporter cells by targeting non-expressed genes in hESCs and hiPSCs.

  11. Genome engineering with targetable nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Current technology enables the production of highly specific genome modifications with excellent efficiency and specificity. Key to this capability are targetable DNA cleavage reagents and cellular DNA repair pathways. The break made by these reagents can produce localized sequence changes through inaccurate nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), often leading to gene inactivation. Alternatively, user-provided DNA can be used as a template for repair by homologous recombination (HR), leading to the introduction of desired sequence changes. This review describes three classes of targetable cleavage reagents: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs). As a group, these reagents have been successfully used to modify genomic sequences in a wide variety of cells and organisms, including humans. This review discusses the properties, advantages, and limitations of each system, as well as the specific considerations required for their use in different biological systems.

  12. Protein analysis through Western blot of cells excised individually from human brain and muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, A O; Bruns, L; Prassler, C; Masliah, E; Klopstock, T; Bender, A

    2012-06-15

    Comparing protein levels from single cells in tissue has not been achieved through Western blot. Laser capture microdissection allows for the ability to excise single cells from sectioned tissue and compile an aggregate of cells in lysis buffer. In this study we analyzed proteins from cells excised individually from brain and muscle tissue through Western blot. After we excised individual neurons from the substantia nigra of the brain, the accumulated surface area of the individual cells was 120,000, 24,000, 360,000, 480,000, 600,000 μm2. We used an optimized Western blot protocol to probe for tyrosine hydroxylase in this cell pool. We also took 360,000 μm2 of astrocytes (1700 cells) and analyzed the specificity of the method. In muscle we were able to analyze the proteins of the five complexes of the electron transport chain through Western blot from 200 human cells. With this method, we demonstrate the ability to compare cell-specific protein levels in the brain and muscle and describe for the first time how to visualize proteins through Western blot from cells captured individually. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human lactoferrin efficiently targeted into caprine beta-lactoglobulin locus with transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To create genetically modified goat as a biopharming source of recombinant human lacotoferrin (hLF with transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Methods TALENs and targeting vector were transferred into cultured fibroblasts to insert hLF cDNA in the goat beta-lactoglobulin (BLG locus with homology-directed repair. The gene targeted efficiency was checked using sequencing and TE7I assay. The bi-allelic gene targeted colonies were isolated and confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, and used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Results The targeted efficiency for BLG gene was approximately 10%. Among 12 Bi-allelic gene targeted colonies, five were used in first round SCNT and 4 recipients (23% were confirmed pregnant at 30 d. In second round SCNT, 7 (53%, 4 (31%, and 3 (23% recipients were confirmed to be pregnant by ultrasound on 30 d, 60 d, and 90 d. Conclusion This finding signifies the combined use of TALENs and SCNT can generate bi-allelic knock-in fibroblasts that can be cloned in a fetus. Therefore, it might lay the foundation for transgenic hLF goat generation and possible use of their mammary gland as a bioreactor for large-scale production of recombinant hLF.

  14. TALE nucleases: tailored genome engineering made easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni

    2012-10-01

    Custom-made designer nucleases have evolved into an indispensable platform to precisely alter complex genomes for basic research, biotechnology, synthetic biology, or human gene therapy. In this review we describe how transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have rapidly developed into a chief technology for targeted genome editing in different model organisms as well as human stem cells. We summarize the technological background and provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art of TALENs with regard to activity and specificity of these nucleases for targeted genome engineering.

  15. ADVANCED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATIONS: I. HIGH FIELD IMAGING OF EXCISED HUMAN LESIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkar, Robert; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N.; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Batjer, H. Hunt; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Awad, Issam A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that structural details would be revealed in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) through the use of high field magnetic resonance (MR) and confocal microscopy, which have not been described previously. The structural details of CCMs excised from human patients were sought by examination with high field MR imaging, and correlated with confocal microscopy of the same specimens. Novel features of CCM structure are outlined, including methodological limitations, venues for future research and possible clinical implications. Methods CCM lesions excised from four patients were fixed in 2% paraformaldehyde and subjected to high resolution MR imaging at 9.4 or 14.1 Tesla by spin-echo and gradient recalled echo methods. Histological validation of angioarchitecture was conducted on thick sections of CCM lesions using fluorescent probes to endothelium under confocal microscopy. Results Images of excised human CCM lesions were acquired with proton density-weighted, T1-weighted, T2-weighted spin echo and T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo MR. These images revealed large “bland” regions with thin walled caverns, and “honeycombed” regions with notable capillary proliferation and smaller caverns surrounding larger caverns. Proliferating capillaries and caverns of various sizes were also associated with the wall of apparent larger blood vessels in the lesions. Similar features were confirmed within thick sections of CCMs by confocal microscopy. MR relaxation times in different regions of interest suggested the presence of different states of blood breakdown products in areas with apparent angiogenic proliferative activity. Conclusions The high field MR imaging techniques demonstrate novel features of CCM angioarchitecture, visible at near histological resolution, including regions with apparently different biologic activity. These preliminary observations will motivate future research, correlating lesion biologic and clinical activity with

  16. Transfection of the cloned human excision repair gene ERCC-1 to UV-sensitive CHO mutants only corrects the repair defect in complementation group 2 mutants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J.H. Janssen; J. de Wit (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.H. Thompson; D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe human DNA-excision repair gene ERCC-1 is cloned by its ability to correct the excision-repair defect of the ultraviolet light- and mitomycin-C-sensitive CHO mutant cell line 43-3B. This mutant is assigned to complementation group 2 of the excision-repair-deficient CHO mutants. In ord

  17. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  18. Characterization of Nuclease Activity in Human Seminal Plasma and its Relationship to Semen Parameters, Sperm DNA Fragmentation and Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; García-Peiró, Agustí; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María José; Navarro, Joaquima; Benet, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Some studies have shown that complementary biomarkers are needed in semen analysis to provide a more accurate diagnosis for couples with infertility problems. To our knowledge no study has been done to determine the relationships among nuclease activity in seminal plasma, semen parameters, sperm DNA fragmentation and male infertility. A total of 94 semen samples were collected according to WHO 2010 semen analysis parameters. Samples were analyzed using the single radial enzyme diffusion method for nuclease activity in seminal plasma, and alkaline and neutral Comet assay for sperm DNA fragmentation. Samples were obtained from 11 fertile donors with proven fertility, 17 patients with normozoospermia in an infertile couple, and 16 patients with asthenozoospermia, 19 with teratozoospermia, 21 with asthenoteratozoospermia and 10 with azoospermia. Nuclease activity analyzed in seminal plasma was higher in patients than in controls. It correlated with sperm motility and morphology, and sperm DNA fragmentation measured by the alkaline Comet assay. No correlation with sperm DNA fragmentation was measured by the neutral Comet assay. ROC curves to determine male infertility revealed 0.658 sensitivity, 0.727 specificity and 0.705 cm(2) AUC for the single radial enzyme diffusion method, 0.918, 1 and 0.994 cm(2) for the alkaline Comet assay, and 0.917, 0.250 and 0.373 cm(2), respectively, for the neutral Comet assay. Nuclease activity in seminal plasma corrected by sperm count is a good variable to predict male infertility. Results indicate that it could be a useful complementary parameter for male infertility diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nucleotide excision repair is not induced in human embryonic lung fibroblasts treated with environmental pollutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Rossner

    Full Text Available The cellular response to genotoxic treatment depends on the cell line used. Although tumor cell lines are widely used for genotoxicity tests, the interpretation of the results may be potentially hampered by changes in cellular processes caused by malignant transformation. In our study we used normal human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 cells and tested their response to treatment with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P and extractable organic matter (EOM from ambient air particles <2.5 µm (PM2.5 collected in two Czech cities differing in levels and sources of air pollution. We analyzed multiple endpoints associated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs including the levels of bulky DNA adducts and the nucleotide excision repair (NER response [expression of XPE, XPC and XPA genes on the level of mRNA and proteins, unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS]. EOMs were collected in the winter and summer of 2011 in two Czech cities with different levels and sources of air pollution. The effects of the studied compounds were analyzed in the presence (+S9 and absence (-S9 of the rat liver microsomal S9 fraction. The levels of bulky DNA adducts were highest after treatment with B[a]P, followed by winter EOMs; their induction by summer EOMs was weak. The induction of both mRNA and protein expression was observed, with the most pronounced effects after treatment with B[a]P (-S9; the response induced by EOMs from both cities and seasons was substantially weaker. The expression of DNA repair genes was not accompanied by the induction of UDS activity. In summary, our results indicate that the tested compounds induced low levels of DNA damage and affected the expression of NER genes; however, nucleotide excision repair was not induced.

  20. XPC and human homologs of RAD23: intracellular localization and relationship to other nucleotide excision repair complexes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); A.P.M. Eker (André); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); C.E. Visser (Cécile); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); C. Masutani (Chikahide); F. Hanaoka (Fumio); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe xeroderma pigmentosum syndrome complementation group C (XP-C) is due to a defect in the global genome repair subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The XPC protein is complexed with HHR23B, one of the two human homologs of the yeast NER protein, RAD23 (Masutani at al. (1994)

  1. Surgical excision for recurrent herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) anogenital infection in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Folasade; Shaver, Aaron; Raffanti, Stephen

    2017-05-15

    Recurrent anogenital herpes simplex virus infections are common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of whom approximately 5% develop resistance to acyclovir. We present a case of a 49-year-old man with HIV who had an 8-year history of recurrent left inguinal herpes simplex virus type 2 ulcerations. He initially responded to oral acyclovir, but developed resistance to acyclovir and eventually foscarnet. The lesion progressed to a large hypertrophic mass that required surgical excision, which led to resolution without recurrences. Our case highlights the importance of surgical excision as a treatment option in refractory herpes simplex virus anogenital infections.

  2. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-04-02

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes.

  3. Cytoarchitecture of the human cerebral cortex: MR microscopy of excised specimens at 9.4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatterpekar, Girish M; Naidich, Thomas P; Delman, Bradley N; Aguinaldo, Juan G; Gultekin, S Humayun; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Drayer, Burton P; Fayad, Zahi A

    2002-09-01

    The laminar patterns displayed by MR microscopy (MRM) form one basis for the classification of the cytoarchitectonic areas (Brodmann areas). It is plausible that in the future MRM may depict Brodmann areas directly, and not only by inference from gross anatomic location. Our purpose was to depict the laminar cytoarchitecture of excised, formalin-fixed specimens of human cerebral cortex by use of 9.4-T MR and to correlate MR images with histologic stains of the same sections. Formalin-fixed samples of human sensory isocortex (calcarine, Heschl's, and somatosensory cortices), motor isocortex (hand motor area of M1), polar isocortex (frontal pole), allocortex (hippocampal formation), and transitional periallocortex (retrosplenial cortex) were studied by MRM at 9.4 T with intermediate-weighted pulse sequences for a total overnight acquisition time of 14 hours 17 minutes for each specimen. The same samples were then histologically analyzed to confirm the MR identification of the cortical layers. Curves representing the change in MR signal intensity across the cortex were generated to display the signal intensity profiles for each type of cortex. High-field-strength MR imaging at a spatial resolution of 78 x 78 x 500 micro m resolves the horizontal lamination of isocortex, allocortex, and periallocortex and displays specific intracortical structures such as the external band of Baillarger. The signal intensity profiles demonstrate the greatest hypointensity at the sites of maximum myelin concentration and maximum cell density and show gradations of signal intensity inversely proportional to varying cell density. MRM at 9.4 T depicts important aspects of the cytoarchitecture of normal formalin-fixed human cortex.

  4. Genome Editing in Rats Using TALE Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Ménoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thinard, Reynald; Savignard, Chloé; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important animal model to understand gene function and model human diseases. Since recent years, the development of gene-specific nucleases has become important for generating new rat models of human diseases, to analyze the role of genes and to generate human antibodies. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases efficiently create gene-specific knockout rats and lead to the possibility of gene targeting by homology-directed recombination (HDR) and generating knock-in rats. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout and knock-in rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  5. Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Tobacco Smoke Condensate Inhibits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Holcomb

    Full Text Available Exposure to tobacco smoke is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Although the DNA damaging properties of tobacco smoke have been well documented, relatively few studies have examined its effect on DNA repair pathways. This is especially true for the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway which recognizes and removes many structurally diverse DNA lesions, including those introduced by chemical carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on NER in human lung cells. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, a surrogate for tobacco smoke, on the NER pathway in two different human lung cell lines; IMR-90 lung fibroblasts and BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. To measure NER, we employed a slot-blot assay to quantify the introduction and removal of UV light-induced 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. We find a dose-dependent inhibition of 6-4 photoproduct repair in both cell lines treated with CSC. Additionally, the impact of CSC on the abundance of various NER proteins and their respective RNAs was investigated. The abundance of XPC protein, which is required for functional NER, is significantly reduced by treatment with CSC while the abundance of XPA protein, also required for NER, is unaffected. Both XPC and XPA RNA levels are modestly reduced by CSC treatment. Finally, treatment of cells with MG-132 abrogates the reduction in the abundance of XPC protein produced by treatment with CSC, suggesting that CSC enhances proteasome-dependent turnover of the protein that is mediated by ubiquitination. Together, these findings indicate that tobacco smoke can inhibit the same DNA repair pathway that is also essential for the removal of some of the carcinogenic DNA damage introduced by smoke itself, increasing the DNA damage burden of cells exposed to tobacco smoke.

  6. Metal inhibition of human alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase activityin base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Guliaev, Anton B.; Hang, Bo

    2006-02-28

    Cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}), nickel (Ni{sup 2+}) and cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) are human and/or animal carcinogens. Zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) is not categorized as a carcinogen, and rather an essential element to humans. Metals were recently shown to inhibit DNA repair proteins that use metals for their function and/or structure. Here we report that the divalent ions Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} can inhibit the activity of a recombinant human N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) toward a deoxyoligonucleotide with ethenoadenine (var epsilonA). MPG removes a variety of toxic/mutagenic alkylated bases and does not require metal for its catalytic activity or structural integrity. At concentrations starting from 50 to 1000 {micro}M, both Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} showed metal-dependent inhibition of the MPG catalytic activity. Ni{sup 2+} also inhibited MPG, but to a lesser extent. Such an effect can be reversed with EDTA addition. In contrast, Co{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} did not inhibit the MPG activity in the same dose range. Experiments using HeLa cell-free extracts demonstrated similar patterns of inactivation of the var epsilonA excision activity by the same metals. Binding of MPG to the substrate was not significantly affected by Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} at concentrations that show strong inhibition of the catalytic function, suggesting that the reduced catalytic activity is not due to altered MPG binding affinity to the substrate. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with Zn{sup 2+} showed that the MPG active site has a potential binding site for Zn{sup 2+}, formed by several catalytically important and conserved residues. Metal binding to such a site is expected to interfere with the catalytic mechanism of this protein. These data suggest that inhibition of MPG activity may contribute to metal genotoxicity and depressed repair of alkylation damage by metals in vivo.

  7. Biological and biomedical applications of engineered nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunzhi; Xiao, Li; Li, Alice S S; Zhang, Xu; Sirois, Pierre; Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai

    2013-09-01

    The development of engineered nucleases is the fruit of a new technological approach developed in the last two decades which has led to significant benefits on genome engineering, particularly on gene therapy. These applications enable efficient and specific genetic modifications via the induction of a double-strand break (DSB) in a specific genomic target sequence, followed by the homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. In addition to the application on gene modification in cells and intact organisms, a number of recent papers have reported that this gene editing technology can be applied effectively to human diseases. With the promising data obtained using engineered endonucleases in gene therapy, it appears reasonable to expect that more diseases could be treated and even be cured in this new era of individualized medicine. This paper first brief introduces the development of engineered nucleases with a special emphasis on zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs), and then takes CCR5-based gene therapy as an example to discuss the therapeutic applications of engineered nucleases.

  8. Concise review: putting a finger on stem cell biology: zinc finger nuclease-driven targeted genetic editing in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Joseph; Lako, Majlinda

    2011-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) encompassing human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have a wide appeal for numerous basic biology studies and for therapeutic applications because of their potential to give rise to almost any cell type in the human body and immense ability to self-renew. Much attention in the stem cell field is focused toward the study of gene-based anomalies relating to the causative affects of human disease and their correction with the potential for patient-specific therapies using gene corrected hiPSCs. Therefore, the genetic manipulation of stem cells is clearly important for the development of future medicine. Although successful targeted genetic engineering in hPSCs has been reported, these cases are surprisingly few because of inherent technical limitations with the methods used. The development of more robust and efficient means by which to achieve specific genomic modifications in hPSCs has far reaching implications for stem cell research and its applications. Recent proof-of-principle reports have shown that genetic alterations with minimal toxicity are now possible through the use of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and the inherent DNA repair mechanisms within the cell. In light of recent comprehensive reviews that highlight the applications, methodologies, and prospects of ZFNs, this article focuses on the application of ZFNs to stem cell biology, discussing the published work to date, potential problems, and future uses for this technology both experimentally and therapeutically.

  9. Stable enhanced green fluorescent protein expression after differentiation and transplantation of reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells generated by AAVS1 transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Cerbini, Trevor; San, Hong; Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Guokai; Rao, Mahendra S; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell lines with tissue-specific or ubiquitous reporter genes are extremely useful for optimizing in vitro differentiation conditions as well as for monitoring transplanted cells in vivo. The adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus has been used as a "safe harbor" locus for inserting transgenes because of its open chromatin structure, which permits transgene expression without insertional mutagenesis. However, it is not clear whether targeted transgene expression at the AAVS1 locus is always protected from silencing when driven by various promoters, especially after differentiation and transplantation from hiPS cells. In this paper, we describe a pair of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that enable more efficient genome editing than the commercially available zinc finger nuclease at the AAVS1 site. Using these TALENs for targeted gene addition, we find that the cytomegalovirus-immediate early enhancer/chicken β-actin/rabbit β-globin (CAG) promoter is better than cytomegalovirus 7 and elongation factor 1α short promoters in driving strong expression of the transgene. The two independent AAVS1, CAG, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) hiPS cell reporter lines that we have developed do not show silencing of EGFP either in undifferentiated hiPS cells or in randomly and lineage-specifically differentiated cells or in teratomas. Transplanting cardiomyocytes from an engineered AAVS1-CAG-EGFP hiPS cell line in a myocardial infarcted mouse model showed persistent expression of the transgene for at least 7 weeks in vivo. Our results show that high-efficiency targeting can be obtained with open-source TALENs and that careful optimization of the reporter and transgene constructs results in stable and persistent expression in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  11. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. mechanistic insights

    OpenAIRE

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A.; Rodrigue, Garry R.; Fitch, J. Patrick; David M Wilson

    2002-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts conside...

  12. Human GEN1 and the SLX4-associated nucleases MUS81 and SLX1 are essential for the resolution of replication-induced Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Elizabeth; Kim, Yonghwan; Lach, Francis P; Kottemann, Molly C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2013-10-17

    Holliday junctions (HJs), the DNA intermediates of homologous recombination, need to be faithfully processed in order to preserve genome integrity. In human cells, the BLM helicase complex promotes nonnucleolytic dissolution of double HJs. In vitro, HJs may be nucleolytically processed by MUS81-EME1, GEN1, and SLX4-SLX1. Here, we exploit human SLX4-null cells to examine the requirements for HJ resolution in vivo. Lack of BLM and SLX4 or GEN1 and SLX4 is synthetically lethal in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, and lethality is a consequence of dysfunctional mitosis proceeding in the presence of unprocessed HJs. Thus, GEN1 activity cannot be substituted for the SLX4-associated nucleases, and one of the HJ resolvase activities, either of those associated with SLX4 or with GEN1, is required for cell viability, even in the presence of BLM. In vivo HJ resolution depends on both SLX4-associated MUS81-EME1 and SLX1, suggesting that they are acting in concert in the context of SLX4. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human GEN1 and the SLX4-Associated Nucleases MUS81 and SLX1 Are Essential for the Resolution of Replication-Induced Holliday Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Garner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Holliday junctions (HJs, the DNA intermediates of homologous recombination, need to be faithfully processed in order to preserve genome integrity. In human cells, the BLM helicase complex promotes nonnucleolytic dissolution of double HJs. In vitro, HJs may be nucleolytically processed by MUS81-EME1, GEN1, and SLX4-SLX1. Here, we exploit human SLX4-null cells to examine the requirements for HJ resolution in vivo. Lack of BLM and SLX4 or GEN1 and SLX4 is synthetically lethal in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, and lethality is a consequence of dysfunctional mitosis proceeding in the presence of unprocessed HJs. Thus, GEN1 activity cannot be substituted for the SLX4-associated nucleases, and one of the HJ resolvase activities, either of those associated with SLX4 or with GEN1, is required for cell viability, even in the presence of BLM. In vivo HJ resolution depends on both SLX4-associated MUS81-EME1 and SLX1, suggesting that they are acting in concert in the context of SLX4.

  14. In situ genetic correction of the sickle cell anemia mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells using engineered zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiano, Vittorio; Maeder, Morgan L; Angstman, James F; Haddad, Bahareh; Khayter, Cyd; Yeo, Dana T; Goodwin, Mathew J; Hawkins, John S; Ramirez, Cherie L; Batista, Luis F Z; Artandi, Steven E; Wernig, Marius; Joung, J Keith

    2011-11-01

    The combination of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and targeted gene modification by homologous recombination (HR) represents a promising new approach to generate genetically corrected, patient-derived cells that could be used for autologous transplantation therapies. This strategy has several potential advantages over conventional gene therapy including eliminating the need for immunosuppression, avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis by therapeutic vectors, and maintaining expression of the corrected gene by endogenous control elements rather than a constitutive promoter. However, gene targeting in human pluripotent cells has remained challenging and inefficient. Recently, engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been shown to substantially increase HR frequencies in human iPSCs, raising the prospect of using this technology to correct disease causing mutations. Here, we describe the generation of iPSC lines from sickle cell anemia patients and in situ correction of the disease causing mutation using three ZFN pairs made by the publicly available oligomerized pool engineering method (OPEN). Gene-corrected cells retained full pluripotency and a normal karyotype following removal of reprogramming factor and drug-resistance genes. By testing various conditions, we also demonstrated that HR events in human iPSCs can occur as far as 82 bps from a ZFN-induced break. Our approach delineates a roadmap for using ZFNs made by an open-source method to achieve efficient, transgene-free correction of monogenic disease mutations in patient-derived iPSCs. Our results provide an important proof of principle that ZFNs can be used to produce gene-corrected human iPSCs that could be used for therapeutic applications.

  15. Base excision repair activities differ in human lung cancer cells and corresponding normal controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karahalil, Bensu; Bohr, Vilhelm A; De Souza-Pinto, Nadja C

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is thought to play a role in carcinogenesis by causing mutations, and indeed accumulation of oxidized DNA bases has been observed in samples obtained from tumors but not from surrounding tissue within the same patient. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway...... for the repair of oxidized modifications both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. In order to ascertain whether diminished BER capacity might account for increased levels of oxidative DNA damage in cancer cells, the activities of BER enzymes in three different lung cancer cell lines and their non......-cancerous counterparts were measured using oligonucleotide substrates with single DNA lesions to assess specific BER enzymes. The activities of four BER enzymes, OGG1, NTH1, UDG and APE1, were compared in mitochondrial and nuclear extracts. For each specific lesion, the repair activities were similar among the three...

  16. A simplified technique for in situ excision of cornea and evisceration of retinal tissue from human ocular globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Camposampiero, Davide; Karali, Marianthi; Ponzin, Diego; Salvalaio, Gianni

    2012-06-12

    Enucleation is the process of retrieving the ocular globe from a cadaveric donor leaving the rest of the globe undisturbed. Excision refers to the retrieval of ocular tissues, especially cornea, by cutting it separate from the ocular globe. Evisceration is the process of removing the internal organs referred here as retina. The ocular globe consists of the cornea, the sclera, the vitreous body, the lens, the iris, the retina, the choroid, muscles etc (Suppl. Figure 1). When a patient is suffering from corneal damage, the cornea needs to be removed and a healthy one must be transplanted by keratoplastic surgeries. Genetic disorders or defects in retinal function can compromise vision. Human ocular globes can be used for various surgical procedures such as eye banking, transplantation of human cornea or sclera and research on ocular tissues. However, there is little information available on human corneal and retinal excision, probably due to the limited accessibility to human tissues. Most of the studies describing similar procedures are performed on animal models. Research scientists rely on the availability of properly dissected and well-conserved ocular tissues in order to extend the knowledge on human eye development, homeostasis and function. As we receive high amount of ocular globes out of which approximately 40% (Table 1) of them are used for research purposes, we are able to perform huge amount of experiments on these tissues, defining techniques to excise and preserve them regularly. The cornea is an avascular tissue which enables the transmission of light onto the retina and for this purpose should always maintain a good degree of transparency. Within the cornea, the limbus region, which is a reservoir of the stem cells, helps the reconstruction of epithelial cells and restricts the overgrowth of the conjunctiva maintaining corneal transparency and clarity. The size and thickness of the cornea are critical for clear vision, as changes in either of them

  17. Visible to near-infrared refractive properties of freshly-excised human-liver tissues: marking hepatic malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannios, Panagiotis; Toutouzas, Konstantinos G.; Matiatou, Maria; Stasinos, Konstantinos; Konstadoulakis, Manousos M.; Zografos, George C.; Moutzouris, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    The refractive index is an optical constant that plays a significant role in the description of light-matter interactions. When it comes to biological media, refraction is understudied despite recent advances in the field of bio-optics. In the present article, we report on the measurement of the refractive properties of freshly excised healthy and cancerous human liver samples, by use of a prism-coupling technique covering the visible and near-infrared spectral range. Novel data on the wavelength-dependent complex refractive index of human liver tissues are presented. The magnitude of the real and imaginary part of the refractive index is correlated with hepatic pathology. Notably, the real index contrast is pointed out as a marker of discrimination between normal liver tissue and hepatic metastases. In view of the current progress in optical biosensor technologies, our findings may be exploited for the development of novel surgical and endoscopic tools. PMID:27297034

  18. Nucleases isolated from Chelidonium majus L. milky sap can induce apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells but not in Chinese Hamster Ovary CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wołuń-Cholewa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Milky sap isolated from Chelidonium majus L. (Greater Celandine serves as a rich source of various biologically active substances such as alkaloids, flavonoids and phenolic acids. Previous research showed that the activity of Ch. majus milky sap may depend also on the presence of biologically active proteins. The goal of this study was to evaluate the biological effect of two nucleases isolated from Ch. majus milk sap, CMN1 of 20 kDa and CMN2 of 36 kDa, on HeLa and CHO tumour cell lines. Both studied nucleases together with other proteins in the sap of the plant are involved in stress and defence reactions against different pathogens. After 48 h incubation of CMN1 and CMN2 only with HeLa cells, the dependence between the number of apoptotic lesions and the concentration of applied nuclease was observed. The highest proapoptotic activity was induced by 13.3 ng/ml concentration of CMN2 collected in May (62 +/- 3% HeLa cells were apoptotic. Moreover, the proportion of necrotic cells in all concentrations of the nucleases and both cell lines was relatively low (1-8 +/- 0.5%. In summary, results of this study show that purified nucleases CMN1 and CMN2 isolated from Ch. majus milky sap exhibit apoptotic activity in HeLa tumour cell line, but not in CHO cells, without inflammatory reaction.

  19. Nucleases isolated from Chelidonium majus L. milky sap can induce apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells but not in Chinese Hamster Ovary CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Robert; Wołuń-Cholewa, Maria; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Milky sap isolated from Chelidonium majus L. (Greater Celandine) serves as a rich source of various biologically active substances such as alkaloids, flavonoids and phenolic acids. Previous research showed that the activity of Ch. majus milky sap may depend also on the presence of biologically active proteins. The goal of this study was to evaluate the biological effect of two nucleases isolated from Ch. majus milk sap, CMN1 of 20 kDa and CMN2 of 36 kDa, on HeLa and CHO tumour cell lines. Both studied nucleases together with other proteins in the sap of the plant are involved in stress and defence reactions against different pathogens. After 48 h incubation of CMN1 and CMN2 only with HeLa cells, the dependence between the number of apoptotic lesions and the concentration of applied nuclease was observed. The highest proapoptotic activity was induced by 13.3 ng/ml concentration of CMN2 collected in May (62 +/- 3% HeLa cells were apoptotic). Moreover, the proportion of necrotic cells in all concentrations of the nucleases and both cell lines was relatively low (1-8 +/- 0.5%). In summary, results of this study show that purified nucleases CMN1 and CMN2 isolated from Ch. majus milky sap exhibit apoptotic activity in HeLa tumour cell line, but not in CHO cells, without inflammatory reaction.

  20. Generation of GFAP::GFP astrocyte reporter lines from human adult fibroblast-derived iPS cells using zinc-finger nuclease technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping-Wu; Haidet-Phillips, Amanda M; Pham, Jacqueline T; Lee, Youngjin; Huo, Yuqing; Tienari, Pentti J; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are instrumental to major brain functions, including metabolic support, extracellular ion regulation, the shaping of excitatory signaling events and maintenance of synaptic glutamate homeostasis. Astrocyte dysfunction contributes to numerous developmental, psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The generation of adult human fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided novel opportunities to study mechanisms of astrocyte dysfunction in human-derived cells. To overcome the difficulties of cell type heterogeneity during the differentiation process from iPSCs to astroglial cells (iPS astrocytes), we generated homogenous populations of iPS astrocytes using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) driven by the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter was inserted into the safe harbor adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus in disease and control-derived iPSCs. Astrocyte populations were enriched using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) and after enrichment more than 99% of iPS astrocytes expressed mature astrocyte markers including GFAP, S100β, NFIA and ALDH1L1. In addition, mature pure GFP-iPS astrocytes exhibited a well-described functional astrocytic activity in vitro characterized by neuron-dependent regulation of glutamate transporters to regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. Engraftment of GFP-iPS astrocytes into rat spinal cord grey matter confirmed in vivo cell survival and continued astrocytic maturation. In conclusion, the generation of GFAP::GFP-iPS astrocytes provides a powerful in vitro and in vivo tool for studying astrocyte biology and astrocyte-driven disease pathogenesis and therapy.

  1. Transcription-induced CAG repeat contraction in human cells is mediated in part by transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H

    2007-09-01

    Expansions of CAG repeat tracts in the germ line underlie several neurological diseases. In human patients and mouse models, CAG repeat tracts display an ongoing instability in neurons, which may exacerbate disease symptoms. It is unclear how repeats are destabilized in nondividing cells, but it cannot involve DNA replication. We showed previously that transcription through CAG repeats induces their instability (Y. Lin, V. Dion, and J. H. Wilson, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13:179-180). Here, we present a genetic analysis of the link between transcription-induced repeat instability and nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. We show that short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CSB, a component specifically required for transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER), and knockdowns of ERCC1 and XPG, which incise DNA adjacent to damage, stabilize CAG repeat tracts. These results suggest that TC-NER is involved in the pathway for transcription-induced CAG repeat instability. In contrast, knockdowns of OGG1 and APEX1, key components involved in base excision repair, did not affect repeat instability. In addition, repeats are stabilized by knockdown of transcription factor IIS, consistent with a requirement for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to backtrack from a transcription block. Repeats also are stabilized by knockdown of either BRCA1 or BARD1, which together function as an E3 ligase that can ubiquitinate arrested RNAPII. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which stabilizes repeats, confirms proteasome involvement. We integrate these observations into a tentative pathway for transcription-induced CAG repeat instability that can account for the contractions observed here and potentially for the contractions and expansions seen with human diseases.

  2. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. Mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Rodrigue, Garry R; Fitch, J Patrick; Wilson, David M

    2002-04-15

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polbeta-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polbeta-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity.

  3. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Shukla

    Full Text Available DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC. Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40-60% for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER and mismatch repair (MMR. Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of human global and transcription-coupled excision repair of UV damage at single-nucleotide resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera; Selby, Christopher P; Lieb, Jason D; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-05-01

    We developed a method for genome-wide mapping of DNA excision repair named XR-seq (excision repair sequencing). Human nucleotide excision repair generates two incisions surrounding the site of damage, creating an ∼30-mer. In XR-seq, this fragment is isolated and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. We used XR-seq to produce stranded, nucleotide-resolution maps of repair of two UV-induced DNA damages in human cells: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs]. In wild-type cells, CPD repair was highly associated with transcription, specifically with the template strand. Experiments in cells defective in either transcription-coupled excision repair or general excision repair isolated the contribution of each pathway to the overall repair pattern and showed that transcription-coupled repair of both photoproducts occurs exclusively on the template strand. XR-seq maps capture transcription-coupled repair at sites of divergent gene promoters and bidirectional enhancer RNA (eRNA) production at enhancers. XR-seq data also uncovered the repair characteristics and novel sequence preferences of CPDs and (6-4)PPs. XR-seq and the resulting repair maps will facilitate studies of the effects of genomic location, chromatin context, transcription, and replication on DNA repair in human cells.

  5. Deaths from neoplasms and detection of radionuclides in excised human lungs in the Eordea Basin, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichletidis, Lazaros T; Tsiotsios, Ioannis; Gavriilidis, Agapios; Chloros, Diamantis; Konstantinidis, Theodoros; Psarrakos, Kiriakos; Koufogiannis, Dimitrios; Siountas, Anastasios; Filippou, Dimitrios

    2003-12-01

    Lignite contains various trace-metal natural radioactive contaminants. In the Eordea Basin, the most important lignite field in Greece, the authors conducted a proportional mortality ratio (PMR) study that compared the mortality rates of individuals who lived in the basin vs. a control group who resided in the city of Kilkis, over a 30-yr period. The following information was used in the study: (a) municipal registrations of deaths from neoplasms during the period from 1971 to 2000, and (b) detection of radioactive substances in samples obtained from excised lungs of individuals living in Eordea Basin who suffered from neoplasm. The corresponding registrations of deaths from neoplasm of the inhabitants of Kilkis, a city located outside the Eordea Basin, formed the control group. A diachronic increase of the PMR was detected as a result of neoplasms and, particularly, as a result of lung cancer in Eordea Basin. However, the above ratio did not exceed the corresponding PMR recorded in Kilkis. In 20 lung samples obtained from patients who had lived in Eordea Basin, and in 19 lung samples from patients in Kilkis, the activity of the radionuclides of uranium and thorium radioactive decay series, potassium-40, and cesium-137 was not higher than expected. No statistically significant difference was found between the inhabitants of the 2 regions, thus it was concluded that the increase in respiratory-system neoplasms was likely associated with the high prevalence of smoking among the regions' inhabitants. In future studies, a longer observation period and examination of more cases will be necessary to further investigate a possible association between radionuclides and lung neoplasms in the Eordea Basin.

  6. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  7. Molecular characterization of the human excision repair gene ERCC-1: cDNA cloning and aminoacid homology with the yeast DNA repair gene RAD10.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. de Wit (Jan); H. Odijk (Hanny); A. Westerveld (Andries); A. Yasui (Akira); M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe human excision repair gene ERCC-7 was cloned after DNA mediated gene transfer to the CHO mutant 43-38, which is sensitive to ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C. We describe the cloning and sequence analysis of the ERCC-7 cDNA and partial characterization of the gene. ERCC.1 has a size

  8. Transient correction of excision repair defects in fibroblasts of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups by microinjection of crude human cell extract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Vermeulen (Wim); P. Osseweijer; A.J.R. de Jonge; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractCrude extracts from human cells were microinjected into the cytoplasm of cultured fibroblasts from 9 excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups. The level of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured to determine the effect of the extract on the re

  9. Mutation detection using Surveyor nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Peter; Shandilya, Harini; D'Alessio, James M; O'Connor, Kevin; Durocher, Jeffrey; Gerard, Gary F

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a simple and flexible mutation detection technology for the discovery and mapping of both known and unknown mutations. This technology is based on a new mismatch-specific DNA endonuclease from celery, Surveyor nuclease, which is a member of the CEL nuclease family of plant DNA endonucleases. Surveyor nuclease cleaves with high specificity at the 3' side of any mismatch site in both DNA strands, including all base substitutions and insertion/deletions up to at least 12 nucleotides. Surveyor nuclease technology involves four steps: (i) PCR to amplify target DNA from both mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (ii) hybridization to form heteroduplexes between mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (iii) treatment of annealed DNA with Surveyor nuclease to cleave heteroduplexes; and (iv) analysis of digested DNA products using the detection/separation platform of choice. The technology is highly sensitive, detecting rare mutants present at as low as 1 in 32 copies. Unlabeled Surveyor nuclease digestion products can be analyzed using conventional gel electrophoresis or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while end labeled digestion products are suitable for analysis by automated gel or capillary electrophoresis. The entire protocol can be performed in less than a day and is suitable for automated and high-throughput procedures.

  10. Use of zinc-finger nucleases to knock out the WAS gene in K562 cells: a human cellular model for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel G. Toscano

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the WAS gene cause Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS, which is characterized by eczema, immunodeficiency and microthrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASP in lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role on megakaryocyte (MK development is poorly understood. In order to develop a human cellular model that mimics the megakaryocytic-derived defects observed in WAS patients we used K562 cells, a well-known model for study of megakaryocytic development. We knocked out the WAS gene in K562 cells using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN pair targeting the WAS intron 1 and a homologous donor DNA that disrupted WASP expression. Knockout of WASP on K562 cells (K562WASKO cells resulted in several megakaryocytic-related defects such as morphological alterations, lower expression of CD41ɑ, lower increments in F-actin polymerization upon stimulation, reduced CD43 expression and increased phosphatidylserine exposure. All these defects have been previously described either in WAS-knockout mice or in WAS patients, validating K562WASKO as a cell model for WAS. However, K562WASPKO cells showed also increased basal F-actin and adhesion, increased expression of CD61 and reduced expression of TGFβ and Factor VIII, defects that have never been described before for WAS-deficient cells. Interestingly, these phenotypic alterations correlate with different roles for WASP in megakaryocytic differentiation. All phenotypic alterations observed in K562WASKO cells were alleviated upon expression of WAS following lentiviral transduction, confirming the role of WASP in these phenotypes. In summary, in this work we have validated a human cellular model, K562WASPKO, that mimics the megakaryocytic-related defects found in WAS-knockout mice and have found evidences for a role of WASP as regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation. We propose the use of K562WASPKO cells as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the megakaryocytic-related defects observed in WAS

  11. Interference of Co-amplified nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences on the determination of human mtDNA heteroplasmy by Using the SURVEYOR nuclease and the WAVE HS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Li, Shiue-Li; Hsu, Wei-Chien; Tang, Petrus

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity and high-throughput mutation detection techniques are useful for screening the homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but might be susceptible to interference from nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs) co-amplified during polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we first evaluated the platform of SURVEYOR Nuclease digestion of heteroduplexed DNA followed by the detection of cleaved DNA by using the WAVE HS System (SN/WAVE-HS) for detecting human mtDNA variants and found that its performance was slightly better than that of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). The potential interference from co-amplified NUMTs on screening mtDNA heteroplasmy when using these 2 highly sensitive techniques was further examined by using 2 published primer sets containing a total of 65 primer pairs, which were originally designed to be used with one of the 2 techniques. We confirmed that 24 primer pairs could amplify NUMTs by conducting bioinformatic analysis and PCR with the DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Using mtDNA extracted from the mitochondria of human 143B cells and a cybrid line with the nuclear background of 143B-ρ0 cells, we demonstrated that NUMTs could affect the patterns of chromatograms for cell DNA during SN-WAVE/HS analysis of mtDNA, leading to incorrect judgment of mtDNA homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status. However, we observed such interference only in 2 of 24 primer pairs selected, and did not observe such effects during DHPLC analysis. These results indicate that NUMTs can affect the screening of low-level mtDNA variants, but it might not be predicted by bioinformatic analysis or the amplification of DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Therefore, using purified mtDNA from cultured cells with proven purity to evaluate the effects of NUMTs from a primer pair on mtDNA detection by using PCR-based high-sensitivity methods prior to the use of a primer pair in real studies would be a more practical strategy.

  12. Interference of Co-amplified nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences on the determination of human mtDNA heteroplasmy by Using the SURVEYOR nuclease and the WAVE HS system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Chuan Yen

    Full Text Available High-sensitivity and high-throughput mutation detection techniques are useful for screening the homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, but might be susceptible to interference from nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs co-amplified during polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In this study, we first evaluated the platform of SURVEYOR Nuclease digestion of heteroduplexed DNA followed by the detection of cleaved DNA by using the WAVE HS System (SN/WAVE-HS for detecting human mtDNA variants and found that its performance was slightly better than that of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC. The potential interference from co-amplified NUMTs on screening mtDNA heteroplasmy when using these 2 highly sensitive techniques was further examined by using 2 published primer sets containing a total of 65 primer pairs, which were originally designed to be used with one of the 2 techniques. We confirmed that 24 primer pairs could amplify NUMTs by conducting bioinformatic analysis and PCR with the DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Using mtDNA extracted from the mitochondria of human 143B cells and a cybrid line with the nuclear background of 143B-ρ0 cells, we demonstrated that NUMTs could affect the patterns of chromatograms for cell DNA during SN-WAVE/HS analysis of mtDNA, leading to incorrect judgment of mtDNA homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status. However, we observed such interference only in 2 of 24 primer pairs selected, and did not observe such effects during DHPLC analysis. These results indicate that NUMTs can affect the screening of low-level mtDNA variants, but it might not be predicted by bioinformatic analysis or the amplification of DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Therefore, using purified mtDNA from cultured cells with proven purity to evaluate the effects of NUMTs from a primer pair on mtDNA detection by using PCR-based high-sensitivity methods prior to the use of a primer pair in real studies would be a more practical

  13. A high excision potential of TALENs for integrated DNA of HIV-based lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Hirotaka; Kanemura, Yuka; Misawa, Naoko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    DNA-editing technology has made it possible to rewrite genetic information in living cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus, an integrated form of viral complementary DNA in host chromosomes, could be a potential target for this technology. We recently reported that HIV proviral DNA could be excised from the chromosomal DNA of HIV-based lentiviral DNA-transduced T cells after multiple introductions of a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 endonuclease system targeting HIV long terminal repeats (LTR). Here, we generated a more efficient strategy that enables the excision of HIV proviral DNA using customized transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the same HIV LTR site. A single transfection of TALEN-encoding mRNA, prepared from in vitro transcription, resulted in more than 80% of lentiviral vector DNA being successfully removed from the T cell lines. Furthermore, we developed a lentiviral vector system that takes advantage of the efficient proviral excision with TALENs and permits the simple selection of gene-transduced and excised cells in T cell lines.

  14. A high excision potential of TALENs for integrated DNA of HIV-based lentiviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Ebina

    Full Text Available DNA-editing technology has made it possible to rewrite genetic information in living cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV provirus, an integrated form of viral complementary DNA in host chromosomes, could be a potential target for this technology. We recently reported that HIV proviral DNA could be excised from the chromosomal DNA of HIV-based lentiviral DNA-transduced T cells after multiple introductions of a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9 endonuclease system targeting HIV long terminal repeats (LTR. Here, we generated a more efficient strategy that enables the excision of HIV proviral DNA using customized transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs targeting the same HIV LTR site. A single transfection of TALEN-encoding mRNA, prepared from in vitro transcription, resulted in more than 80% of lentiviral vector DNA being successfully removed from the T cell lines. Furthermore, we developed a lentiviral vector system that takes advantage of the efficient proviral excision with TALENs and permits the simple selection of gene-transduced and excised cells in T cell lines.

  15. Generation of mastitis resistance in cows by targeting human lysozyme gene to β-casein locus using zinc-finger nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Yongsheng; Tian, Yuchen; Yu, Yuan; Gao, Mingqing; Hu, Guangdong; Su, Feng; Pan, Shaohui; Luo, Yan; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Mastitis costs the dairy industry billions of dollars annually and is the most consequential disease of dairy cattle. Transgenic cows secreting an antimicrobial peptide demonstrated resistance to mastitis. The combination of somatic cell gene targeting and nuclear transfer provides a powerful method to produce transgenic animals. Recent studies found that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) stimulated the integration of exogenous DNA stret...

  16. Interference of Co-Amplified Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Sequences on the Determination of Human mtDNA Heteroplasmy by Using the SURVEYOR Nuclease and the WAVE HS System

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiu-Chuan Yen; Shiue-Li Li; Wei-Chien Hsu; Petrus Tang

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity and high-throughput mutation detection techniques are useful for screening the homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but might be susceptible to interference from nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs) co-amplified during polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we first evaluated the platform of SURVEYOR Nuclease digestion of heteroduplexed DNA followed by the detection of cleaved DNA by using the WAVE HS System (SN/WAVE-HS) for detectin...

  17. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC and neural stem cell (NSC lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Cerbini

    Full Text Available Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs. The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated CLYBL targeting enables enhanced transgene expression and one-step generation of dual reporter human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and neural stem cell (NSC) lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbini, Trevor; Funahashi, Ray; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Park, Kyeyoon; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Zou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%-58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells.

  19. Origins of Programmable Nucleases for Genome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Carroll, Dana

    2016-02-27

    Genome engineering with programmable nucleases depends on cellular responses to a targeted double-strand break (DSB). The first truly targetable reagents were the zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) showing that arbitrary DNA sequences could be addressed for cleavage by protein engineering, ushering in the breakthrough in genome manipulation. ZFNs resulted from basic research on zinc finger proteins and the FokI restriction enzyme (which revealed a bipartite structure with a separable DNA-binding domain and a non-specific cleavage domain). Studies on the mechanism of cleavage by 3-finger ZFNs established that the preferred substrates were paired binding sites, which doubled the size of the target sequence recognition from 9 to 18bp, long enough to specify a unique genomic locus in plant and mammalian cells. Soon afterwards, a ZFN-induced DSB was shown to stimulate homologous recombination in cells. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that are based on bacterial TALEs fused to the FokI cleavage domain expanded this capability. The fact that ZFNs and TALENs have been used for genome modification of more than 40 different organisms and cell types attests to the success of protein engineering. The most recent technology platform for delivering a targeted DSB to cellular genomes is that of the RNA-guided nucleases, which are based on the naturally occurring Type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas9 system. Unlike ZFNs and TALENs that use protein motifs for DNA sequence recognition, CRISPR-Cas9 depends on RNA-DNA recognition. The advantages of the CRISPR-Cas9 system-the ease of RNA design for new targets and the dependence on a single, constant Cas9 protein-have led to its wide adoption by research laboratories around the world. These technology platforms have equipped scientists with an unprecedented ability to modify cells and organisms almost at will, with wide-ranging implications across biology and medicine. However, these nucleases have also been shown to cut

  20. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  1. Generation and functional analysis of zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathomen, Toni; Segal, David J; Brondani, Vincent; Müller-Lerch, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The recent development of artificial endonucleases with tailored specificities has opened the door for a wide range of new applications, including the correction of mutated genes directly in the chromosome. This kind of gene therapy is based on homologous recombination, which can be stimulated by the creation of a targeted DNA double-strand break (DSB) near the site of the desired recombination event. Artificial nucleases containing zinc finger DNA-binding domains have provided important proofs of concept, showing that inserting a DSB in the target locus leads to gene correction frequencies of 1-18% in human cells. In this paper, we describe how zinc finger nucleases are assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and present two methods to assess these custom nucleases quickly in vitro and in a cell-based recombination assay.

  2. A TALE nuclease architecture for efficient genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey C; Tan, Siyuan; Qiao, Guijuan; Barlow, Kyle A; Wang, Jianbin; Xia, Danny F; Meng, Xiangdong; Paschon, David E; Leung, Elo; Hinkley, Sarah J; Dulay, Gladys P; Hua, Kevin L; Ankoudinova, Irina; Cost, Gregory J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Zhang, H Steve; Holmes, Michael C; Zhang, Lei; Gregory, Philip D; Rebar, Edward J

    2011-02-01

    Nucleases that cleave unique genomic sequences in living cells can be used for targeted gene editing and mutagenesis. Here we develop a strategy for generating such reagents based on transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins from Xanthomonas. We identify TALE truncation variants that efficiently cleave DNA when linked to the catalytic domain of FokI and use these nucleases to generate discrete edits or small deletions within endogenous human NTF3 and CCR5 genes at efficiencies of up to 25%. We further show that designed TALEs can regulate endogenous mammalian genes. These studies demonstrate the effective application of designed TALE transcription factors and nucleases for the targeted regulation and modification of endogenous genes.

  3. Nuclease-mediated double-strand break (DSB) enhancement of small fragment homologous recombination (SFHR) gene modification in human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, R Geoffrey; Suzuki, Shingo; Gruenert, Dieter C

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in methods to specifically modify genomic DNA using sequence-specific endonucleases and donor DNA have opened the door to a new therapeutic paradigm for cell and gene therapy of inherited diseases. Sequence-specific endonucleases, in particular transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs), have been coupled with polynucleotide small/short DNA fragments (SDFs) to correct the most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, a 3-base-pair deletion at codon 508 (delF508), in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The studies presented here describe the generation of candidate TALENs and their co-transfection with wild-type (wt) CFTR-SDFs into CF-iPS cells homozygous for the delF508 mutation. Using an allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR)-based cyclic enrichment protocol, clonal populations of corrected CF-iPS cells were isolated and expanded.

  4. Expanded activity of dimer nucleases by combining ZFN and TALEN for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Smith, Cory; Cheng, Linzhao

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to precisely and efficiently edit mammalian and plant genomes has been significantly improved in recent years, partially due to increasing use of designer nucleases that recognize a pre-determined DNA sequence, make a specific DNA double-strand break, and stimulate gene targeting. A pair of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that recognize two adjacent unique DNA sequences dimerize through the fused FokI nuclease domain and cut in the middle of target DNA sequences. We report here that increasing the length of recognition DNA sequences by TALENs or ZFNs does not necessarily translate to a higher efficiency or specificity. We also discover that one subunit of ZFNs and one subunit of TALENs can form a pair of hybrid nucleases with expanded specificity at two diverse targets, and stimulate gene targeting in multiple cell types including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with improved efficiency.

  5. Cre/loxP-mediated excision of a neomycin resistance expression unit from an integrated retroviral vector increases long terminal repeat-driven transcription in human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernex, C; Dubreuil, P; Mannoni, P; Bagnis, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses are currently the most attractive vehicles for gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. Retroviral vectors often contain an easily selectable marker gene in addition to the gene of interest. However, the presence and selection for expression of the selectable gene often result in a significant reduction of the expression of the gene of interest in the transduced cells. In order to circumvent this problem, we have developed a Cre/loxP recombination system for specific excision of the selectable expression unit from integrated retroviruses. A retroviral vector, containing both a neomycin resistance expression unit flanked by loxP sites and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor cDNA, was used to transduce the human hematopoietic K-562 cell line. Four transduced cell clones were then superinfected with a retrovirus containing a Cre recombinase expression unit. Molecular analyses of 30 doubly transduced subclones showed a strict correlation between cre expression and loxP-flanked selectable cassette excision, thus implying that Cre recombinase activity is very efficient in a retroviral context. Moreover, the excision of the selectable cassette results in a significant increase of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor transcription driven by the retroviral promoter. PMID:9311833

  6. Copper complexes as chemical nucleases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil R Chakravarty; Pattubala A N Reddy; Bidyut K Santra; Anitha M Thomas

    2002-08-01

    Redox active mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. The complexes have planar N-donor heterocyclic bases like 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq) and dipyridophenazine (dppz) ligands that are suitable for intercalation to B-DNA. Complexes studied for nuclease activity have the formulations [Cu(dpq)2(H2O)] (ClO4)2.H2O (1), [{CuL(H2O)}2(-ox)](ClO4)2 (L = bpy, 2; phen, 3; dpq, 4; and dppz, 5) and [Cu(L)(salgly)] (L = bpy, 6; phen, 7; dpq, 8; and dppz, 9), where salgly is a tridentate Schiff base obtained from the condensation of glycine and salicylaldehyde. The dpq complexes are efficient DNA binding and cleavage active species. The dppz complexes show good binding ability but poor nuclease activity. The cleavage activity of the bis-dpq complex is significantly higher than the bis-phen complex of copper(II). The nuclease activity is found to be dependent on the intercalating nature of the complex and on the redox potential of the copper(II)/copper(I) couple. The ancillary ligand plays a significant role in binding and cleavage activity.

  7. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  8. Quantitative Microplate Assay for Real-Time Nuclease Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Jonas; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the phenomenon of nucleases exposing oligonucleotide phosphate backbones to phosphatases we present a novel quantitative method for kinetics of nuclease catalysis. Inorganic phosphate released from nuclease products by phosphatases could be quantified in real-time by a fluorescent sensor of inorganic phosphate. Two different nucleases were employed, showing the versatility of this assay for multiple turnover label-free nuclease studies.

  9. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  10. A potential diagnostic application of magnetization transfer contrast: an in vitro NMR study of excised human thyroid tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicott, C.; Goode, A. W.

    1998-03-01

    A series of freshly excised thyroid tissues was analysed using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and then subjected to routine histo-pathology examination. Whilst simple values for normal tissue and goitre are not significantly different, the degree of intra-subject and variability is shown to be an indicator of benign thyroid disease. Using data collected from an inversion-recovery sequence performed with and without magnetization transfer, a magnetization transfer rate constant was calculated for each tissue sample. These data suggest that this parameter may provide in vivo discrimination between follicular cancer and follicular adenoma.

  11. A potential diagnostic application of magnetization transfer contrast: an in vitro NMR study of excised human thyroid tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callicott, C. [The Clinical Physics Group, The Royal Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Goode, A.W. [The Academic Surgical Unit, The Royal Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-03-01

    A series of freshly excised thyroid tissues was analysed using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and then subjected to routine histo-pathology examination. Whilst simple T{sub l} values for normal tissue and goitre are not significantly different, the degree of intra-subject T{sub l} and T{sub ls} variability is shown to be an indicator of benign thyroid disease. Using data collected from an inversion-recovery sequence performed with and without magnetization transfer, a magnetization transfer rate constant was calculated for each tissue sample. These data suggest that this parameter may provide in vivo discrimination between follicular cancer and follicular adenoma. (author)

  12. Identification of a nuclear-localized nuclease from wheat cells undergoing programmed cell death that is able to trigger DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology on nuclei from human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Fernando; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2006-08-01

    PCD (programmed cell death) in plants presents important morphological and biochemical differences compared with apoptosis in animal cells. This raises the question of whether PCD arose independently or from a common ancestor in plants and animals. In the present study we describe a cell-free system, using wheat grain nucellar cells undergoing PCD, to analyse nucleus dismantling, the final stage of PCD. We have identified a Ca2+/Mg2+ nuclease and a serine protease localized to the nucleus of dying nucellar cells. Nuclear extracts from nucellar cells undergoing PCD triggered DNA fragmentation and other apoptotic morphology in nuclei from different plant tissues. Inhibition of the serine protease did not affect DNA laddering. Furthermore, we show that the nuclear extracts from plant cells triggered DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology in nuclei from human cells. The inhibition of the nucleolytic activity with Zn2+ or EDTA blocked the morphological changes of the nucleus. Moreover, nuclear extracts from apoptotic human cells triggered DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology in nuclei from plant cells. These results show that degradation of the nucleus is morphologically and biochemically similar in plant and animal cells. The implication of this finding on the origin of PCD in plants and animals is discussed.

  13. Low Prevalence of Oral and Nasal Human Papillomavirus in Employees Performing CO2-laser Evaporation of Genital Warts or Loop Electrode Excision Procedure of Cervical Dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Norrbom, Christina; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission during laser vaporisation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure is controversial. An oral rinse, a nasal swabs, history of HPV related diseases and data on HPV exposure were collected from 287 employees at departments of dermato......-venerology and gynaecology in Denmark. A mucosal HPV type was found among 5.8% of employees with experience of laser treatment of genital warts as compared to 1.7% of those with no experience (p = 0.12). HPV prevalence was not higher in employees participating in electrosurgical treatment or cryotherapy of genital warts......, or loop electrode excision procedure compared with those who did not. HPV 6 or 11 were not detected in any samples. Hand warts after the age of 24 years was more common among dermatology than among non-dermatology personnel (18% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.03). Mucosal HPV types are infrequent in the oral and nasal...

  14. Detoxification of olefinic epoxides and nucleotide excision repair of epoxide-mediated DNA damage: Insights from animal models examining human sensitivity to 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Herring, Stacy M; Hallberg, Lance M; Galbert, Lori A; Masters, Oscar E; Ammenheuser, Marinel M; Xie, Jingwu; Friedberg, Errol C; Lloyd, R Stephen; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Ward, Jonathan B

    2007-03-20

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a well-documented mutagen and carcinogen in rodents and is currently classified as a probable carcinogen in humans. Studies investigating workers exposed to BD indicate that, in some plants, there may be an increased genetic risk, and that polymorphisms in biotransformation and DNA repair proteins may modulate genetic susceptibility. To investigate the role of genetic polymorphisms in microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) or nucleotide excision repair (NER) in contributing to the mutagenicity of BD, we conducted a series of experiments in which mice lacking mEH or NER activity were exposed to BD by inhalation or to the reactive epoxide metabolites of BD (epoxybutene-EB or diepoxybutane-DEB) by i.p. injection. Genetic susceptibility was measured using the Hprt cloning assay. Both deficient strains of mouse were significantly more sensitive to the mutagenic effects of BD and the injected epoxides. These studies provide support for the critical role that mEH plays in the biotransformation of BD, and the role that NER plays in maintaining genomic integrity following exposure to BD. Additional studies are needed to examine the importance of base excision repair (BER) in maintaining genomic integrity, the differential formation of DNA and protein adducts in deficient strains, and the potential for enhanced sensitivity to BD genotoxicity in mice either lacking or deficient in both biotransformation and DNA repair activity.

  15. Designed nucleases for targeted genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junwon; Chung, Jae-Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Hyongbum

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome-editing technology using designed nucleases has been evolving rapidly, and its applications are widely expanding in research, medicine and biotechnology. Using this genome-modifying technology, researchers can precisely and efficiently insert, remove or change specific sequences in various cultured cells, micro-organisms, animals and plants. This genome editing is based on the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs), repair of which modifies the genome through nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). In addition, designed nickase-induced generation of single-strand breaks can also lead to precise genome editing through HDR, albeit at relatively lower efficiencies than that induced by nucleases. Three kinds of designed nucleases have been used for targeted DSB formation: zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases derived from the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system. A growing number of researchers are using genome-editing technologies, which have become more accessible and affordable since the discovery and adaptation of CRISPR-Cas9. Here, the repair mechanism and outcomes of DSBs are reviewed and the three types of designed nucleases are discussed with the hope that such understanding will facilitate applications to genome editing.

  16. Delivery methods for site-specific nucleases: Achieving the full potential of therapeutic gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Shui, Sai-Lan

    2016-12-28

    The advent of site-specific nucleases, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, provides researchers with the unprecedented ability to manipulate genomic sequences. These nucleases are used to create model cell lines, engineer metabolic pathways, produce transgenic animals and plants, perform genome-wide functional screen and, most importantly, treat human diseases that are difficult to tackle by traditional medications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to improving the efficiency and specificity of nucleases for clinical applications. However, safe and efficient delivery methods remain the major obstacle for therapeutic gene editing. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on nuclease delivery methods, highlight their impact on the outcomes of gene editing and discuss the potential of different delivery approaches for therapeutic gene editing.

  17. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  18. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhong, Juan; Guo, Xiaogang; Tian, Weihua; Zhang, Quanjun; Cui, Fenggong; Li, Li; Newsome, Philip N; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  19. Alzheimer’s Disease-Associated Neurotoxic Peptide Amyloid-Β Impairs Base Excision Repair in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Forestier

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the leading cause of dementia in developed countries. It is characterized by two major pathological hallmarks, one of which is the extracellular aggregation of the neurotoxic peptide amyloid-β (Aβ, which is known to generate oxidative stress. In this study, we showed that the presence of Aβ in a neuroblastoma cell line led to an increase in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage. Unexpectedly, a concomitant decrease in basal level of base excision repair, a major route for repairing oxidative DNA damage, was observed at the levels of both gene expression and protein activity. Moreover, the addition of copper sulfate or hydrogen peroxide, used to mimic the oxidative stress observed in AD-affected brains, potentiates Aβ-mediated perturbation of DNA damage/repair systems in the “Aβ cell line”. Taken together, these findings indicate that Aβ could act as double-edged sword by both increasing oxidative nuclear/mitochondrial damage and preventing its repair. The synergistic effects of increased ROS production, accumulated DNA damage and impaired DNA repair could participate in, and partly explain, the massive loss of neurons observed in Alzheimer’s disease since both oxidative stress and DNA damage can trigger apoptosis.

  20. [TALE nuclease engineering and targeted genome modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Xiao, An; Huang, Peng; Wang, Wei-Ye; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Artificial designer nucleases targeting specific DNA sequences open up a new field for reverse genetics study. The rapid development of engineered endonucleases (EENs) enables targeted genome modification theoretically in any species. The construction of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is simpler with higher specificity and less toxicity than zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Here, we summarized the recent progresses and prospects of TALEN technology, with an emphasis on its structure, function, and construction strategies, as well as a collection of species and genes that have been successfully modified by TALENs, especially the application in zebrafish.

  1. Gene knockout using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) reveals that human NDUFA9 protein is essential for stabilizing the junction between membrane and matrix arms of complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, David A; Formosa, Luke E; Wijeyeratne, Xiaonan W; Nguyen, Thanh N; Ryan, Michael T

    2013-01-18

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) represent a promising approach for targeted knock-out of genes in cultured human cells. We used TALEN-technology to knock out the nuclear gene encoding NDUFA9, a subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I in HEK293T cells. Screening for the knock-out revealed a mixture of NDUFA9 cell clones that harbored partial deletions of the mitochondrial N-terminal targeting signal but were still capable of import. A cell line lacking functional copies of both NDUFA9 alleles resulted in a loss of NDUFA9 protein expression, impaired assembly of complex I, and cells incapable of growth in galactose medium. Cells lacking NDUFA9 contained a complex I subcomplex consisting of membrane arm subunits but not marker subunits of the matrix arm. Re-expression of NDUFA9 restored the defects in complex I assembly. We conclude that NDUFA9 is involved in stabilizing the junction between membrane and matrix arms of complex I, a late assembly step critical for complex I biogenesis and activity.

  2. MegaTevs: single-chain dual nucleases for efficient gene disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfs, Jason M; DaSilva, Matthew; Meister, Sarah E; Wang, Xu; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Edgell, David R

    2014-07-01

    Targeting gene disruptions in complex genomes relies on imprecise repair by the non-homologous end-joining DNA pathway, creating mutagenic insertions or deletions (indels) at the break point. DNA end-processing enzymes are often co-expressed with genome-editing nucleases to enhance the frequency of indels, as the compatible cohesive ends generated by the nucleases can be precisely repaired, leading to a cycle of cleavage and non-mutagenic repair. Here, we present an alternative strategy to bias repair toward gene disruption by fusing two different nuclease active sites from I-TevI (a GIY-YIG enzyme) and I-OnuI E2 (an engineered meganuclease) into a single polypeptide chain. In vitro, the MegaTev enzyme generates two double-strand breaks to excise an intervening 30-bp fragment. In HEK 293 cells, we observe a high frequency of gene disruption without co-expression of DNA end-processing enzymes. Deep sequencing of disrupted target sites revealed minimal processing, consistent with the MegaTev sequestering the double-strand breaks from the DNA repair machinery. Off-target profiling revealed no detectable cleavage at sites where the I-TevI CNNNG cleavage motif is not appropriately spaced from the I-OnuI binding site. The MegaTev enzyme represents a small, programmable nuclease platform for extremely specific genome-engineering applications.

  3. Hemangioma excision (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hemangioma is a non-cancerous (benign) growth of blood vessels. They are the most common benign blood vessel ( ... time and occasionally with medication. Large or disfiguring hemangiomas may require surgical excision.

  4. Hemangioma excision - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100114.htm Hemangioma excision - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 3 out of 3 Overview Hemangiomas are the most common type of benign blood- ...

  5. The formation of catalytically competent enzyme-substrate complex is not a bottleneck in lesion excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N A; Kiryutin, A S; Kuznetsova, A A; Panov, M S; Barsukova, M O; Yurkovskaya, A V; Fedorova, O S

    2017-04-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) protects DNA from alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. AAG flips out the damaged nucleotide from the double helix of DNA and catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond to release the damaged base. To understand better, how the step of nucleotide eversion influences the overall catalytic process, we performed a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of AAG interaction with specific DNA-substrates, 13-base pair duplexes containing in the 7th position 1-N6-ethenoadenine (εA), hypoxanthine (Hx), and the stable product analogue tetrahydrofuran (F). The combination of the fluorescence of tryptophan, 2-aminopurine, and 1-N6-ethenoadenine was used to record conformational changes of the enzyme and DNA during the processes of DNA lesion recognition, damaged base eversion, excision of the N-glycosidic bond, and product release. The thermal stability of the duplexes characterized by the temperature of melting, Tm, and the rates of spontaneous opening of individual nucleotide base pairs were determined by NMR spectroscopy. The data show that the relative thermal stability of duplexes containing a particular base pair in position 7, (Tm(F/T) < Tm(εA/T) < Tm(Hx/T) < Tm(A/T)) correlates with the rate of reversible spontaneous opening of the base pair. However, in contrast to that, the catalytic lesion excision rate is two orders of magnitude higher for Hx-containing substrates than for substrates containing εA, proving that catalytic activity is not correlated with the stability of the damaged base pair. Our study reveals that the formation of the catalytically competent enzyme-substrate complex is not the bottleneck controlling the catalytic activity of AAG.

  6. Role of the nuclease of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in dispersal of organisms from biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Christine; Chande, Aroon; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ketterer, Margaret; Shao, Jian; Gotoh, Kenji; Foster, Eric; Hunt, Jason; O'Brien, Erin; Apicella, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) forms biofilms in the middle ear during human infection. The biofilm matrix of NTHI contains extracellular DNA. We show that NTHI possesses a potent nuclease, which is a homolog of the thermonuclease of Staphylococcus aureus. Using a biofilm dispersal assay, studies showed a biofilm dispersal pattern in the parent strain, no evidence of dispersal in the nuclease mutant, and a partial return of dispersion in the complemented mutant. Quantitative PCR of mRNA from biofilms from a 24-h continuous flow system demonstrated a significantly increased expression of the nuclease from planktonic organisms compared to those in the biofilm phase of growth (P < 0.042). Microscopic analysis of biofilms grown in vitro showed that in the nuclease mutant the nucleic acid matrix was increased compared to the wild-type and complemented strains. Organisms were typically found in large aggregates, unlike the wild-type and complement biofilms in which the organisms were evenly dispersed throughout the biofilm. At 48 h, the majority of the organisms in the mutant biofilm were dead. The nuclease mutant formed a biofilm in the chinchilla model of otitis media and demonstrated a propensity to also form similar large aggregates of organisms. These studies indicate that NTHI nuclease is involved in biofilm remodeling and organism dispersal.

  7. Enhanced gene disruption by programmable nucleases delivered by a minicircle vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, A-B K; Ramakrishna, S; Song, M; Kim, H

    2014-11-01

    Targeted genetic modification using programmable nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is of great value in biomedical research, medicine and biotechnology. Minicircle vectors, which lack extraneous bacterial sequences, have several advantages over conventional plasmids for transgene delivery. Here, for the first time, we delivered programmable nucleases into human cells using transient transfection of a minicircle vector and compared the results with those obtained using a conventional plasmid. Surrogate reporter assays and T7 endonuclease analyses revealed that cells in the minicircle vector group displayed significantly higher mutation frequencies at the target sites than those in the conventional plasmid group. Quantitative PCR and reverse transcription-PCR showed higher vector copy number and programmable nuclease transcript levels, respectively, in 293T cells after minicircle versus conventional plasmid vector transfection. In addition, tryphan blue staining and flow cytometry after annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed that cell viability was also significantly higher in the minicircle group than in the conventional plasmid group. Taken together, our results show that gene disruption using minicircle vector-mediated delivery of ZFNs and TALENs is a more efficient, safer and less toxic method than using a conventional plasmid, and indicate that the minicircle vector could serve as an advanced delivery method for programmable nucleases.

  8. Human ribosomal protein S3 interacts with DNA base excision repair proteins hAPE/Ref-1 and hOGG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Vijay; Wang, Mu; Deutsch, Walter A

    2004-11-09

    The human ribosomal protein S3 (hS3) possesses associated activities that suggest alternative roles beyond its participation in protein translation. For example, it is capable of cleaving apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) DNA via a beta-elimination reaction, an activity that is missing in partially purified extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum group-D fibroblasts. In a recent study, we showed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) that hS3 also has a very high apparent binding affinity for 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and AP sites in DNA. Using the same SPR technology, it is shown here that hS3 positively interacts with the human base excision repair (BER) enzymes N-glycosylase/AP lyase OGG1 and APE/Ref-1. Using a DNA substrate that allows for the detection of 8-oxoG repair, we also show that hOGG1 N-glycosylase activity becomes increasingly more robust in the presence of hS3. Human S3 was found to co-immunoprecipitate with both hOGG1 and APE/Ref-1, indicating that these proteins physically interact with one another. These results raise the possibility that hS3 not only functions as a ribosomal protein but, in addition, may influence repair activities at sites of DNA damage.

  9. Safety evaluation of nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okado, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2016-02-01

    Nuclease P1 has been widely used in the food industry to enhance or create flavor. One commercial source of this enzyme is Penicillium citrinum, an anamorphic mesophilic fungus with a long history of safe use in Europe and Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of ribonucleases. Given the intended use in food for human consumption, and noting its potential presence at trace levels in finished products, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames and chromosome aberration assay, an in vivo rat erythrocyte micronucleus assay and a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats were conducted. No mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames assay. Equivocal activity in the chromosome aberration assay was not replicated in the micronucleus assay at doses of up to 1007 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day. Following oral administration of nuclease P1 at dosages of 10.1, 101 or 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day to Sprague-Dawley rats, no adverse effects on any study parameter were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day. The results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use in food production of nuclease P1 produced from P. citrinum.

  10. Editing livestock genomes with site-specific nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Daniel F; Tan, Wenfang; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a major transformation in our ability to precisely manipulate the genomes of animals. Efficiencies of introducing precise genetic alterations in large animal genomes have improved 100000-fold due to a succession of site-specific nucleases that introduce double-strand DNA breaks with a specificity of 10(-9). Herein we describe our applications of site-specific nucleases, especially transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to engineer specific alterations in the genomes of pigs and cows. We can introduce variable changes mediated by non-homologous end joining of DNA breaks to inactive genes. Alternatively, using homology-directed repair, we have introduced specific changes that support either precise alterations in a gene's encoded polypeptide, elimination of the gene or replacement by another unrelated DNA sequence. Depending on the gene and the mutation, we can achieve 10%-50% effective rates of precise mutations. Applications of the new precision genetics are extensive. Livestock now can be engineered with selected phenotypes that will augment their value and adaption to variable ecosystems. In addition, animals can be engineered to specifically mimic human diseases and disorders, which will accelerate the production of reliable drugs and devices. Moreover, animals can be engineered to become better providers of biomaterials used in the medical treatment of diseases and disorders.

  11. Follow-up strategies after treatment (large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ)) for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN): Impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Esther; Lopes, Alberto D; Bryant, Andrew; Bekkers, Ruud; Galaal, Khadra

    2015-01-06

    Development of cancer of the cervix is a multi-step process as before cervical cancer develops, cervical cells undergo changes and become abnormal. These abnormalities are called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and are associated with increased risk of subsequent invasive cancer of the cervix. Oncogenic high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV), the causative agent of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions, is present in up to one-third of women following large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) treatment and is associated with increased risk of residual disease and disease recurrence. HPV testing may serve as a surveillance tool for identifying women at higher risk of recurrence. High-risk human papillomavirus testing will enable us to identify women at increased risk of residual or recurrent CIN and therefore will allow us to offer closer surveillance and early treatment, when indicated. • To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of hrHPV testing after large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) treatment• To determine optimal follow-up management strategies following LLETZ treatment according to hrHPV status We searched the Cochrane Gynacological Cancer Review Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed and PsycINFO up to August 2013. We searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies, and we contacted experts in the field. We searched for randomised control trials (RCTs) that compared follow-up management strategies following LLETZ treatment for CIN. Two review authors independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. No trials were found; therefore no data were analysed. The search identified 813 references on MEDLINE, 418 on EMBASE, 22 on CINAHL, 666 on PubMed, 291 on PsycINFO and

  12. Is the Oxidative DNA Damage Level of Human Lymphocyte Correlated with the Antioxidant Capacity of Serum or the Base Excision Repair Activity of Lymphocyte?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A random screening of human blood samples from 24 individuals of nonsmoker was conducted to examine the correlation between the oxidative DNA damage level of lymphocytes and the antioxidant capacity of serum or the base excision repair (BER activity of lymphocytes. The oxidative DNA damage level was measured with comet assay containing Fpg/Endo III cleavage, and the BER activity was estimated with a modified comet assay including nuclear extract of lymphocytes for enzymatic cleavage. Antioxidant capacity was determined with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. We found that though the endogenous DNA oxidation levels varied among the individuals, each individual level appeared to be steady for at least 1 month. Our results indicate that the oxidative DNA damage level is insignificantly or weakly correlated with antioxidant capacity or BER activity, respectively. However, lymphocytes from carriers of Helicobacter pylori (HP or Hepatitis B virus (HBV tend to give higher levels of oxidative DNA damage (P<0.05. Though sera of this group of individuals show no particular tendency with reduced antioxidant capacity, the respective BER activities of lymphocytes are lower in average (P<0.05. Thus, reduction of repair activity may be associated with the genotoxic effect of HP or HBV infection.

  13. The impact of surgical excisions on human gastric slow wave conduction, defined by high-resolution electrical mapping and in-silico modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Hameed, Ahmer; Angeli, Timothy R.; Lahr, Christopher; Abell, Thomas L.; Cheng, Leo K.; O’Grady, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric contractions are coordinated by slow waves, generated by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Gastric surgery affects slow wave conduction, potentially contributing to post-operative gastric dysfunction. However, the impact of gastric cuts on slow waves has not been comprehensively evaluated. This study aimed to define consequences of surgical excisions on gastric slow waves by applying high-resolution (HR) electrical mapping and in-silico modeling. Methods Patients undergoing gastric stimulator implantation (n=10) underwent full-thickness stapled excisions (25×15 mm, distal corpus) for histological evaluation, enabling HR mapping (256 electrodes; 36cm2) over and adjacent to excisions. A biophysically-based in-silico model of bi-directionally coupled ICC networks was developed and applied to investigate the underlying conduction mechanisms and importance of excision orientation. Results Normal gastric slow waves propagated aborally (3.0±0.2 cycles/min). Excisions induced complete conduction block and wavelets that rotated around blocks, then propagated rapidly circumferentially distal to blocks (8.5±1.2 vs normal 3.6±0.4 mm s−1; ppropagating gastric wavefronts distal to excisions. Excisions were associated with complex dysrhythmias in 5 patients: retrograde propagation (3/10), ectopics (3/10), functional blocks (2/10) and collisions (1/10). Simulations demonstrated conduction anisotropy emerged from bidirectional coupling within ICC layers and showed transverse incision length and orientation correlated to degree of conduction distortion. Conclusions Orienting incisions in the longitudinal gastric axis causes least disruption to electrical conduction and motility. However, if transverse incisions are made, a homeostatic mechanism of gastric conduction anisotropy compensates by restoring aborally-propagating wavefronts. Complex dysrhythmias accompanying excisions could modify post-operative recovery in susceptible patients. PMID:26251163

  14. The impact of surgical excisions on human gastric slow wave conduction, defined by high-resolution electrical mapping and in silico modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, P; Hameed, A; Angeli, T R; Lahr, C; Abell, T L; Cheng, L K; O'Grady, G

    2015-10-01

    Gastric contractions are coordinated by slow waves, generated by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Gastric surgery affects slow wave conduction, potentially contributing to postoperative gastric dysfunction. However, the impact of gastric cuts on slow waves has not been comprehensively evaluated. This study aimed to define consequences of surgical excisions on gastric slow waves by applying high-resolution (HR) electrical mapping and in silico modeling. Patients undergoing gastric stimulator implantation (n = 10) underwent full-thickness stapled excisions (25 × 15 mm, distal corpus) for histological evaluation, enabling HR mapping (256 electrodes; 36 cm(2) ) over and adjacent to excisions. A biophysically based in silico model of bidirectionally coupled ICC networks was developed and applied to investigate the underlying conduction mechanisms and importance of excision orientation. Normal gastric slow waves propagated aborally (3.0 ± 0.2 cpm). Excisions induced complete conduction block and wavelets that rotated around blocks, then propagated rapidly circumferentially distal to the blocks (8.5 ± 1.2 vs normal 3.6 ± 0.4 mm/s; p propagating gastric wavefronts distal to excisions. Excisions were associated with complex dysrhythmias in five patients: retrograde propagation (3/10), ectopics (3/10), functional blocks (2/10), and collisions (1/10). Simulations demonstrated conduction anisotropy emerged from bidirectional coupling within ICC layers and showed transverse incision length and orientation correlated with the degree of conduction distortion. Orienting incisions in the longitudinal gastric axis causes least disruption to electrical conduction and motility. However, if transverse incisions are made, a homeostatic mechanism of gastric conduction anisotropy compensates by restoring aborally propagating wavefronts. Complex dysrhythmias accompanying excisions could modify postoperative recovery in susceptible patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Ishida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs, and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9, hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9.

  16. SplitAx: A novel method to assess the function of engineered nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axton, Richard A.; Haideri, Sharmin S.; Lopez-Yrigoyen, Martha; Taylor, Helen A.; Forrester, Lesley M.

    2017-01-01

    Engineered nucleases have been used to generate knockout or reporter cell lines and a range of animal models for human disease. These new technologies also hold great promise for therapeutic genome editing. Current methods to evaluate the activity of these nucleases are time consuming, require extensive optimization and are hampered by readouts with low signals and high background. We have developed a simple and easy to perform method (SplitAx) that largely addresses these issues and provides a readout of nuclease activity. The assay involves splitting the N-terminal (amino acid 1–158) coding region of GFP and an out-of-frame of C-terminal region with a nuclease binding site sequence. Following exposure to the test nuclease, cutting and repair by error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) restores the reading frame resulting in the production of a full length fluorescent GFP protein. Fluorescence can also be restored by complementation between the N-terminal and C-terminal coding sequences in trans. We demonstrate successful use of the SplitAx assay to assess the function of zinc finger nucleases, CRISPR hCAS9 and TALENS. We also test the activity of multiple gRNAs in CRISPR/hCas9/D10A systems. The zinc finger nucleases and guide RNAs that showed functional activity in the SplitAx assay were then used successfully to target the endogenous AAVS1, SOX6 and Cfms loci. This simple method can be applied to other unrelated proteins such as ZsGreen1 and provides a test system that does not require complex optimization. PMID:28212417

  17. Targeted mutagenesis in the malaria mosquito using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidler, Andrea L; Terenzi, Olivier; Soichot, Julien; Levashina, Elena A; Marois, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae, the main mosquito vector of human malaria, is a challenging organism to manipulate genetically. As a consequence, reverse genetics studies in this disease vector have been largely limited to RNA interference experiments. Here, we report the targeted disruption of the immunity gene TEP1 using transgenic expression of Transcription-Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and the isolation of several TEP1 mutant A. gambiae lines. These mutations inhibited protein production and rendered TEP1 mutants hypersusceptible to Plasmodium berghei. The TALEN technology opens up new avenues for genetic analysis in this disease vector and may offer novel biotechnology-based approaches for malaria control.

  18. Targeted mutagenesis in the malaria mosquito using TALE nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Smidler

    Full Text Available Anopheles gambiae, the main mosquito vector of human malaria, is a challenging organism to manipulate genetically. As a consequence, reverse genetics studies in this disease vector have been largely limited to RNA interference experiments. Here, we report the targeted disruption of the immunity gene TEP1 using transgenic expression of Transcription-Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs, and the isolation of several TEP1 mutant A. gambiae lines. These mutations inhibited protein production and rendered TEP1 mutants hypersusceptible to Plasmodium berghei. The TALEN technology opens up new avenues for genetic analysis in this disease vector and may offer novel biotechnology-based approaches for malaria control.

  19. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  20. Targeting DNA double-strand breaks with TAL effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Michelle; Cermak, Tomas; Doyle, Erin L; Schmidt, Clarice; Zhang, Feng; Hummel, Aaron; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2010-10-01

    Engineered nucleases that cleave specific DNA sequences in vivo are valuable reagents for targeted mutagenesis. Here we report a new class of sequence-specific nucleases created by fusing transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease. Both native and custom TALE-nuclease fusions direct DNA double-strand breaks to specific, targeted sites.

  1. Multi-frequency characterization of the speed of sound and attenuation coefficient for longitudinal transmission of freshly excised human skulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Sin, Vivian W.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    For medical applications of ultrasound inside the brain, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the apparent density of skull bone and its corresponding speed of sound and attenuation coefficient. Although there have been previous studies exploring this phenomenon, there is still a need to extend the measurements to cover more of the clinically relevant frequency range. The results of measurements of the longitudinal speed of sound and attenuation coefficient are presented for specimens of human calvaria. The study was performed for the frequencies of 0.27, 0.836, 1.402, 1.965 and 2.525 MHz. Specimens were obtained from fresh cadavers through a protocol with the Division of Anatomy of the University of Toronto. The protocol was approved by the Research Ethics Board of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The specimens were mounted in polycarbonate supports that were marked for stereoscopic positioning. Computer tomography (CT) scans of the skulls mounted on their supports were performed, and a three-dimensional skull surface was reconstructed. This surface was used to guide a positioning system to ensure the normal sound incidence of an acoustic signal. This signal was produced by a focused device with a diameter of 5 cm and a focal length of 10 cm. Measurements of delay in time of flight were carried out using a needle hydrophone. Measurements of effective transmitted energy were carried out using a radiation force method with a 10 µg resolution scale. Preliminary functions of speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, both of which are related to apparent density, were established using a multi-layer propagation model that takes into account speed of sound, density and thickness of the layer. An optimization process was executed from a large set of random functions and the best functions were chosen for those ones that closest reproduced the experimental observations. The final functions were obtained after a second pass of the optimization

  2. Chemical Biology Approaches to Genome Editing: Understanding, Controlling, and Delivering Programmable Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Johnny H; Davis, Kevin M; Liu, David R

    2016-01-21

    Programmable DNA nucleases have provided scientists with the unprecedented ability to probe, regulate, and manipulate the human genome. Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 system (CRISPR-Cas9) represent a powerful array of tools that can bind to and cleave a specified DNA sequence. In their canonical forms, these nucleases induce double-strand breaks at a DNA locus of interest that can trigger cellular DNA repair processes that disrupt or replace genes. The fusion of these programmable nucleases with a variety of other protein domains has led to a rapidly growing suite of tools for activating, repressing, visualizing, and modifying loci of interest. Maximizing the usefulness and therapeutic relevance of these tools, however, requires precisely controlling their activity and specificity to minimize potentially toxic side effects arising from off-target activities. This need has motivated the application of chemical biology principles and methods to genome-editing proteins, including the engineering of variants of these proteins with improved or altered specificities, and the development of genetic, chemical, optical, and protein delivery methods that control the activity of these agents in cells. Advancing the capabilities, safety, effectiveness, and therapeutic relevance of genome-engineering proteins will continue to rely on chemical biology strategies that manipulate their activity, specificity, and localization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A.; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J.; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI Nucleases (RFNs) that recognize extended sequences and can edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. The cleavage activity of an RFN depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation and therefore show improved specificities relative to wi...

  4. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A.; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J.; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI Nucleases (RFNs) that recognize extended sequences and can edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. The cleavage activity of an RFN depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation and therefore show improved specificities relative to wi...

  5. Recurrence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women treated by means of electrosurgical excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Russomano

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected women have higher incidence, prevalence, persistence and recurrence of pre-invasive cervical lesions (CIN II or III. The aim here was to investigate the risk of recurrence of CIN II/III among HIV-infected women (HIV+ and uninfected women in a cohort treated by means of large-loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cohort study conducted at Instituto Fernandes Figueira/Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (IFF/Fiocruz. METHODS: 60 HIV+ and 209 HIV-negative patients were included in a cohort for follow-up after undergoing LLETZ to treat CIN II/III. A histopathological diagnosis of CIN II/III during the follow-up was taken to constitute recurrence. The following possible confounding variables were assessed: age at treatment and at end of follow-up; histological grade of intraepithelial disease treated; surgical margin involvement; adequacy of colposcopy during the follow-up; CD4+ lymphocyte count; HIV viral load; and type of antiretroviral therapy. RESULTS: Among the 60 HIV+ women, six showed recurrent disease during the follow-up. However, among the 209 HIV-negative women, seven showed a new precursor lesion. The relative risk of disease recurrence in the HIV+ women was 4.21 (95% CI = 1.42 to 12.43. The Kaplan-Meyer curve showed that the risk of recurrence was significantly higher among HIV+ women (log-rank test: P = 0.0111. CONCLUSION: The HIV+ women in our cohort presented a risk of CIN II/III recurrence at least 42% higher than among the HIV-negative women. These patients should form part of a rigorous screening and follow-up protocol for identification and appropriate treatment of cervical cancer precursor lesions.

  6. Identification of off-target cleavage sites of zinc finger nucleases and TAL effector nucleases using predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Eli J; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Using engineered nucleases, such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), to make targeted genomic modifications has become a common technique to create new model organisms and custom cell lines, and has shown great promise for disease treatment. However, these nucleases have the potential for off-target cleavage that could confound interpretation of experimental results and be detrimental for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a method to test for nuclease cleavage at potential off-target sites predicted by bioinformatics models.

  7. Radio-adaptive response of base excision repair genes and proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprani, Sneh M; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-09-01

    Radio-adaptive response is a mechanism whereby a low-dose exposure (priming dose) induces resistance to a higher dose (challenging dose) thus significantly reducing its detrimental effects. Radiation-induced DNA damage gets repaired through various DNA repair pathways in human cells depending upon the type of lesion. The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs radiation-induced base damage, abasic sites and single-strand breaks in cellular DNA. In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the involvement of BER genes and proteins in the radio-adaptive response in human resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Venous blood samples were collected from 20 randomly selected healthy male individuals with written informed consent. PBMC were isolated and irradiated at a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed 4h later with a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy (primed cells). Quantitation of DNA damage was done using the alkaline comet assay immediately and expression profile of BER genes and proteins were studied 30 min after the challenging dose using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively. The overall result showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction of DNA damage in terms of percentage of DNA in tail (%T) with a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4 h. Twelve individuals showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction in %T whereas eight individuals showed marginal reduction in DNA damage that was not statistically significant. However, at the transcriptional level, BER genes such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation in both groups. Significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation was also observed at the protein level for OGG1, APE1, MBD4, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells. Up-regulation of some BER genes and proteins such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells of resting PBMC is suggestive of active involvement of the BER pathway in radio-adaptive response.

  8. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio- skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); A. Raams (Anja); M.C. Silengo; N. Wijgers (Nils); L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); A.R. Robinson (Andria Rasile); G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two

  9. First reported patient with human ERCC1 deficiency has cerebro-oculo-facio- skeletal syndrome with a mild defect in nucleotide excision repair and severe developmental failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); A. Raams (Anja); M.C. Silengo; N. Wijgers (Nils); L.J. Niedernhofer (Laura); A.R. Robinson (Andria Rasile); G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) is a genome caretaker mechanism responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA lesions, most notably ultraviolet photodimers. Inherited defects in NER result in profound photosensitivity and the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or two proge

  10. Donor plasmid design for codon and single base genome editing using zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Davis, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, CompoZr zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has matured to the point that a user-defined double strand break (DSB) can be placed at virtually any location in the human genome within 50 bp of a desired site. Such high resolution ZFN engineering is well within the conversion tract limitations demarcated by the mammalian DNA repair machinery, resulting in a nearly universal ability to create point mutations throughout the human genome. Additionally, new architectures for targeted nuclease engineering have been rapidly developed, namely transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas systems, further expanding options for placement of DSBs. This new capability has created a need to explore the practical limitations of delivering plasmid-based information to the sites of chromosomal double strand breaks so that nuclease-donor methods can be widely deployed in fundamental and therapeutic research. In this chapter, we explore a ZFN-compatible donor design in the context of codon changes at an endogenous locus encoding the human RSK2 kinase.

  11. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclease-based editing strategies, and challenges that are specific to various applications of the TALEN technology. We review examples of applying TALENs for studying gene function and regulation, generating disease models, and developing gene therapies. The current status of genome editing and future directions for other uses of these technologies are also discussed.

  12. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Ousterout, David G.; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclea...

  13. Genome editing with engineered nucleases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Osakabe, Keishi

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of successful 'genome editing' now exist. Genome editing uses engineered nucleases as powerful tools to target specific DNA sequences to edit genes precisely in the genomes of both model and crop plants, as well as a variety of other organisms. The DNA-binding domains of zinc finger (ZF) proteins were the first to be used as genome editing tools, in the form of designed ZF nucleases (ZFNs). More recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), as well as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system, which utilizes RNA-DNA interactions, have proved useful. A key step in genome editing is the generation of a double-stranded DNA break that is specific to the target gene. This is achieved by custom-designed endonucleases, which enable site-directed mutagenesis via a non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway and/or gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) to occur efficiently at specific sites in the genome. This review provides an overview of recent advances in genome editing technologies in plants, and discusses how these can provide insights into current plant molecular biology research and molecular breeding technology.

  14. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  15. A guide to genome engineering with programmable nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyongbum; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Programmable nucleases - including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) derived from the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system - enable targeted genetic modifications in cultured cells, as well as in whole animals and plants. The value of these enzymes in research, medicine and biotechnology arises from their ability to induce site-specific DNA cleavage in the genome, the repair (through endogenous mechanisms) of which allows high-precision genome editing. However, these nucleases differ in several respects, including their composition, targetable sites, specificities and mutation signatures, among other characteristics. Knowledge of nuclease-specific features, as well as of their pros and cons, is essential for researchers to choose the most appropriate tool for a range of applications.

  16. Excise Tax Rates On Packs Of Cigarettes PDF Slides

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current excise tax rates on packs of cigarettes slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found...

  17. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  18. Modulation of DNA base excision repair during neuronal differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Ferrarelli, Leslie K

    2013-01-01

    Neurons are terminally differentiated cells with a high rate of metabolism and multiple biological properties distinct from their undifferentiated precursors. Previous studies showed that nucleotide excision DNA repair is downregulated in postmitotic muscle cells and neurons. Here, we characterize...... DNA damage susceptibility and base excision DNA repair (BER) capacity in undifferentiated and differentiated human neural cells. The results show that undifferentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells are less sensitive to oxidative damage than their differentiated counterparts, in part because...

  19. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  20. Retraction: 'Dose-dependent dual effect of HTLV-1 tax oncoprotein on p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair in human T-cells' by Yana Schavinsky-Khrapunsky, Esther Priel and Mordechai Aboud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The above article, published online on 4 October 2007 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), and in Volume 122, pp. 305-316, has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Professor Peter Lichter, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed as the bands in Figs 1, 2, 5 and 6 appear to have been manipulated. Schavinsky-Khrapunsky, Y., Priel, E. and Aboud, M. (2008), Dose-dependent dual effect of HTLV-1 tax oncoprotein on p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair in human T-cells. Int. J. Cancer, 122: 305-316. doi:10.1002/ijc.23091. © 2017 UICC.

  1. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugith Babu Badugu

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11 plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR. Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11 that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11. Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N. PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium.

  2. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badugu, Sugith Babu; Nabi, Shaik Abdul; Vaidyam, Pratap; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11) plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR). Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11) that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11). Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N). PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium.

  3. Genome Editing in Mice Using TALE Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Benedikt; Brandl, Christina; Ortiz, Oskar; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Gene engineering for generating targeted mouse mutants is a key technology for biomedical research. Using TALENs as sequence-specific nucleases to induce targeted double-strand breaks, the mouse genome can be directly modified in zygotes in a single step without the need for embryonic stem cells. By embryo microinjection of TALEN mRNAs and targeting vectors, knockout and knock-in alleles can be generated fast and efficiently. In this chapter we provide protocols for the application of TALENs in mouse zygotes.

  4. Cross-talk between nucleotide excision and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in the mechanism of action of antitumor trabectedin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Ana B; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Marco, Esther; Gago, Federico; Moreno, Sergio

    2006-08-15

    Trabectedin (Yondelis) is a potent antitumor drug that has the unique characteristic of killing cells by poisoning the DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The basis for the NER-dependent toxicity has not yet been elucidated but it has been proposed as the major determinant for the drug's cytotoxicity. To study the in vivo mode of action of trabectedin and to explore the role of NER in its cytotoxicity, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model system. Treatment of S. pombe wild-type cells with trabectedin led to cell cycle delay and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, indicating that the drug causes DNA damage in vivo. DNA damage induced by the drug is mostly caused by the NER protein, Rad13 (the fission yeast orthologue to human XPG), and is mainly repaired by homologous recombination. By constructing different rad13 mutants, we show that the DNA damage induced by trabectedin depends on a 46-amino acid region of Rad13 that is homologous to a DNA-binding region of human nuclease FEN-1. More specifically, an arginine residue in Rad13 (Arg961), conserved in FEN1 (Arg314), was found to be crucial for the drug's cytotoxicity. These results lead us to propose a model for the action of trabectedin in eukaryotic cells in which the formation of a Rad13/DNA-trabectedin ternary complex, stabilized by Arg961, results in cell death.

  5. High-frequency genome editing using ssDNA oligonucleotides with zinc-finger nucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fuqiang; Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Huang, Yuping

    2011-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have enabled highly efficient gene targeting in multiple cell types and organisms. Here we describe methods for using simple ssDNA oligonucleotides in tandem with ZFNs to efficiently produce human cell lines with three distinct genetic outcomes: (i) targeted point...... mutation, (ii) targeted genomic deletion of up to 100 kb and (iii) targeted insertion of small genetic elements concomitant with large genomic deletions....

  6. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This in...

  7. Mislocalization of XPF-ERCC1 nuclease contributes to reduced DNA repair in XP-F patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwaar Ahmad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is caused by defects in the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway. NER removes helix-distorting DNA lesions, such as UV-induced photodimers, from the genome. Patients suffering from XP exhibit exquisite sun sensitivity, high incidence of skin cancer, and in some cases neurodegeneration. The severity of XP varies tremendously depending upon which NER gene is mutated and how severely the mutation affects DNA repair capacity. XPF-ERCC1 is a structure-specific endonuclease essential for incising the damaged strand of DNA in NER. Missense mutations in XPF can result not only in XP, but also XPF-ERCC1 (XFE progeroid syndrome, a disease of accelerated aging. In an attempt to determine how mutations in XPF can lead to such diverse symptoms, the effects of a progeria-causing mutation (XPF(R153P were compared to an XP-causing mutation (XPF(R799W in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant XPF harboring either mutation was purified in a complex with ERCC1 and tested for its ability to incise a stem-loop structure in vitro. Both mutant complexes nicked the substrate indicating that neither mutation obviates catalytic activity of the nuclease. Surprisingly, differential immunostaining and fractionation of cells from an XFE progeroid patient revealed that XPF-ERCC1 is abundant in the cytoplasm. This was confirmed by fluorescent detection of XPF(R153P-YFP expressed in Xpf mutant cells. In addition, microinjection of XPF(R153P-ERCC1 into the nucleus of XPF-deficient human cells restored nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Intriguingly, in all XPF mutant cell lines examined, XPF-ERCC1 was detected in the cytoplasm of a fraction of cells. This demonstrates that at least part of the DNA repair defect and symptoms associated with mutations in XPF are due to mislocalization of XPF-ERCC1 into the cytoplasm of cells, likely due to protein misfolding. Analysis of these patient cells therefore reveals a novel mechanism to potentially

  8. TALE nucleases and next generation GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific and adaptable DNA binding domains are essential modules to develop genome engineering technologies for crop improvement. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) proteins are used to provide a highly specific and adaptable DNA binding modules. TALE chimeric nucleases (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in vitro and in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammalian and plant cells. The genomic DSBs can be generated at predefined and user-selected loci and repaired by either the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology dependent repair (HDR). Thus, TALENs can be used to achieve site-specific gene addition, stacking, deletion or inactivation. TALE-based genome engineering tools should be powerful to develop new agricultural biotechnology approaches for crop improvement. Here, we discuss the recent research and the potential applications of TALENs to accelerate the generation of genomic variants through targeted mutagenesis and to produce a non-transgenic GM crops with the desired phenotype.

  9. TALE nucleases and next generation GM crops.

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-04-01

    Site-specific and adaptable DNA binding domains are essential modules to develop genome engineering technologies for crop improvement. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) proteins are used to provide a highly specific and adaptable DNA binding modules. TALE chimeric nucleases (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in vitro and in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammalian and plant cells. The genomic DSBs can be generated at predefined and user-selected loci and repaired by either the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology dependent repair (HDR). Thus, TALENs can be used to achieve site-specific gene addition, stacking, deletion or inactivation. TALE-based genome engineering tools should be powerful to develop new agricultural biotechnology approaches for crop improvement. Here, we discuss the recent research and the potential applications of TALENs to accelerate the generation of genomic variants through targeted mutagenesis and to produce a non-transgenic GM crops with the desired phenotype.

  10. Okazaki fragment maturation: nucleases take centre stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Binghui Shen

    2011-01-01

    Completion of lagging strand DNA synthesis requires processing of up to 50 million Okazaki fragments per cell cycle in mammalian cells. Even in yeast, the Okazaki fragment maturation happens approximately a million times during a singte round of DNA replication. Therefore, efficient processing of Okazaki fragments is vital for DNA replication and cell proliferation. During this process,primase-synthesized RNA/DNA primers are removed, and Okazaki fragments are joined into an intact lagging strand DNA. The processing of RNA/DNA primers requires a group of structure-specific nucleases typified by flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1). Here, we summarize the distinct roles of these nucleases in different pathways for removal of RNA/DNA primers. Recent findings reveal that Okazaki fragment maturation is highly coordinated. The dynamic interactions of polymerase δ, FEN1 and DNA ligase I with proliferating cell nuclear antigen allow these enzymes to act sequentially during Okazaki fragment maturation. Such protein-protein interactions may be regulated by post-translational modifications. We also discuss studies using mutant mouse models that suggest two distinct cancer etiological mechanisms arising from defects in different steps of Okazaki fragment maturation.Mutations that affect the efficiency of RNA primer removal may result in accumulation of unligated nicks and DNA double-strand breaks. These DNA strand breaks can cause varying forms of chromosome aberrations, contributing to development of cancer that associates with aneuploidy and gross chromosomal rearrangement. On the other hand, mutations that impair editing out of polymerase o incorporation errors result in cancer displaying a strong mutator phenotype.

  11. Probing isoform-specific functions of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases using zinc finger nuclease glycoengineered SimpleCells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Kong, Yun;

    2012-01-01

    NAc-Ts are largely unavailable. We recently introduced SimpleCells, i.e., human cell lines made deficient in O-glycan extension by zinc finger nuclease targeting of a key gene in O-glycan elongation (Cosmc), which allows for proteome-wide discovery of O-glycoproteins. Here we have extended the SimpleCell concept...

  12. Structural characterization of the virulence factor nuclease A from Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Andrea F; Gaudu, Philippe; Pedersen, Lars C

    2014-11-01

    The group B pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae commonly populates the human gut and urogenital tract, and is a major cause of infection-based mortality in neonatal infants and in elderly or immunocompromised adults. Nuclease A (GBS_NucA), a secreted DNA/RNA nuclease, serves as a virulence factor for S. agalactiae, facilitating bacterial evasion of the human innate immune response. GBS_NucA efficiently degrades the DNA matrix component of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which attempt to kill and clear invading bacteria during the early stages of infection. In order to better understand the mechanisms of DNA substrate binding and catalysis of GBS_NucA, the high-resolution structure of a catalytically inactive mutant (H148G) was solved by X-ray crystallography. Several mutants on the surface of GBS_NucA which might influence DNA substrate binding and catalysis were generated and evaluated using an imidazole chemical rescue technique. While several of these mutants severely inhibited nuclease activity, two mutants (K146R and Q183A) exhibited significantly increased activity. These structural and biochemical studies have greatly increased our understanding of the mechanism of action of GBS_NucA in bacterial virulence and may serve as a foundation for the structure-based drug design of antibacterial compounds targeted to S. agalactiae.

  13. Down-regulation of the Nucleotide Excision Repair gene XPG as a new mechanism of drug resistance in human and murine cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geroni Cristina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance is one of the major obstacles limiting the activity of anticancer agents. Activation of DNA repair mechanism often accounts for increase resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Results We present evidence that nemorubicin, a doxorubicin derivative currently in clinical evaluation, acts through a mechanism of action different from classical anthracyclines, requiring an intact nucleotide excision repair (NER system to exert its activity. Cells made resistant to nemorubicin show increased sensitivity to UV damage. We have analysed the mechanism of resistance and discovered a previously unknown mechanism resulting from methylation-dependent silencing of the XPG gene. Restoration of NER activity through XPG gene transfer or treatment with demethylating agents restored sensitivity to nemorubicin. Furthermore, we found that a significant proportion of ovarian tumors present methylation of the XPG promoter. Conclusions Methylation of a NER gene, as described here, is a completely new mechanism of drug resistance and this is the first evidence that XPG gene expression can be influenced by an epigenetic mechanism. The reported methylation of XPG gene could be an important determinant of the response to platinum based therapy. In addition, the mechanism of resistance reported opens up the possibility of reverting the resistant phenotype using combinations with demethylating agents, molecules already employed in the clinical setting.

  14. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arildo Nerys-Junior

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double- strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity.

  15. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C; Braga-Dias, Luciene P; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Atila D; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-03-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity.

  16. Editing the Plasmodium vivax Genome, Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes Barros, Roberto R.; Straimer, Judith; Sa, Juliana M; Salzman, Rebecca E.; Melendez-Muniz, Viviana A.; Mu, Jianbing; David A Fidock; Thomas E. Wellems

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of malaria morbidity worldwide yet has remained genetically intractable. To stably modify this organism, we used zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which take advantage of homology-directed DNA repair mechanisms at the site of nuclease action. Using ZFNs specific to the gene encoding P. vivax dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr), we transfected blood specimens from Saimiri boliviensis monkeys infected with the pyrimethamine (Pyr)–susceptible Chesson strain with a ZFN ...

  17. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modifications. We applied TALE nucleases and donor DNA microinjection into zygotes to generate HDR-modified rats with large new sequences introduced into three different loci with high efficiency (0.62%-5.13% of microinjected zygotes). Two of these loci (Rosa26 and Hprt1) are known to allow robust and reproducible transgene expression and were targeted for integration of a GFP expression cassette driven by the CAG promoter. GFP-expressing embryos and four Rosa26 GFP rat lines analyzed showed strong and widespread GFP expression in most cells of all analyzed tissues. The third targeted locus was Ighm, where we performed successful exon exchange of rat exon 2 for the human one. At all three loci we observed HDR only when using linear and not circular donor DNA. Mild hypothermic (30°C) culture of zygotes after microinjection increased HDR efficiency for some loci. Our study demonstrates that TALE nuclease and donor DNA microinjection into rat zygotes results in efficient and reproducible targeted donor integration by HDR. This allowed creation of genetically modified rats in a work-, cost-, and time-effective manner.

  18. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Topkar, Ved V; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2015-07-23

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome-editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-seq analysis. In addition, we identify and characterize another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also find that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities.

  19. The C. elegans apoptotic nuclease NUC-1 is related in sequence and activity to mammalian DNase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, C J; Evans, C J; Bill, B R; Otsuka, A J; Aguilera, R J

    2000-07-11

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuc-1 gene has previously been implicated in programmed cell death due to the presence of persistent undegraded apoptotic DNA in nuc-1 mutant animals. In this report, we describe the cloning and characterization of nuc-1, which encodes an acidic nuclease with significant sequence similarity to mammalian DNase II. Database searches performed with human DNase II protein sequence revealed a significant similarity with the predicted C. elegans C07B5.5 ORF. Subsequent analysis of crude C. elegans protein extracts revealed that wild-type animals contained a potent endonuclease activity with a cleavage preference similar to DNase II, while nuc-1 mutant worms demonstrated a marked reduction in this nuclease activity. Sequence analysis of C07B5.5 DNA and mRNA also revealed that nuc-1(e1392), but not wild-type animals contained a nonsense mutation within the CO7B5.5 coding region. Furthermore, nuc-1 transgenic lines carrying the wild-type C07B5.5 locus demonstrated a complete complementation of the nuc-1 mutant phenotype. Our results therefore provide compelling evidence that the C07B5.5 gene encodes the NUC-1 apoptotic nuclease and that this nuclease is related in sequence and activity to DNase II.

  20. Lumbar disc excision through fenestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lumbar disc herniation often causes sciatica. Many different techniques have been advocated with the aim of least possible damage to other structures while dealing with prolapsed disc surgically in the properly selected and indicated cases. Methods : Twenty six patients with clinical symptoms and signs of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc having radiological correlation by MRI study were subjected to disc excision by interlaminar fenestration method. Results : The assessment at follow-up showed excellent results in 17 patients, good in 6 patients, fair in 2 patients and poor in 1 patient. The mean preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scores were 9.34 ±0.84 and 2.19 ±0.84 on scale of 0-10 respectively. These were statistically significant (p value< 0.001, paired t test. No significant complications were recorded. Conclusion : Procedures of interlaminar fenestration and open disc excision under direct vision offers sufficient adequate exposure for lumbar disc excision with a smaller incision, lesser morbidity, shorter convalescence, early return to work and comparable overall results in the centers where recent laser and endoscopy facilities are not available.

  1. The Integration and Excision of CTnDOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Margaret M; Gardner, Jeffrey F

    2015-04-01

    Bacteroides species are one of the most prevalent groups of bacteria present in the human colon. Many strains carry large, integrated elements including integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). One such ICE is CTnDOT, which is 65 kb in size and encodes resistances to tetracycline and erythromycin. CTnDOT has been increasing in prevalence in Bacteroides spp., and is now found in greater than 80% of natural isolates. In recent years, CTnDOT has been implicated in the spread of antibiotic resistance among gut microbiota. Interestingly, the excision and transfer of CTnDOT is stimulated in the presence of tetracycline. The tyrosine recombinase IntDOT catalyzes the integration and excision reactions of CTnDOT. Unlike the well-characterized lambda Int, IntDOT tolerates heterology in the overlap region between the sites of cleavage and strand exchange. IntDOT also appears to have a different arrangement of active site catalytic residues. It is missing one of the arginine residues that is conserved in other tyrosine recombinases. The excision reaction of CTnDOT is complex, involving excision proteins Xis2c, Xis2d, and Exc, as well as IntDOT and a Bacteroides host factor. Xis2c and Xis2d are small, basic proteins like other recombination directionality factors (RDFs). Exc is a topoisomerase; however, the topoisomerase function is not required for the excision reaction. Exc has been shown to stimulate excision frequencies when there are mismatches in the overlap regions, suggesting that it may play a role in resolving Holliday junctions (HJs) containing heterology. Work is currently under way to elucidate the complex interactions involved with the formation of the CTnDOT excisive intasomes.

  2. Hybrid nanosensor for colorimetric and ultrasensitive detection of nuclease contaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Paola; Valentini, Paola; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Nucleases are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade DNA or RNA, thus they can prejudice the good outcome of molecular biology experiments involving nucleic acids. We propose a colorimetric test for the naked-eye detection of nuclease contaminations. The system uses an hybrid nanosensor, based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with DNA probes. Our assay is rapid, instrument-free, simple and low-cost. Moreover, it reaches sensitivity equal or better than those of commercial kits, and presents a lot of advantageous aspects. Therefore, it is very competitive, with a real market potential. This test will be relevant in routine process monitoring in scientific laboratories, and in quality control in clinical laboratories and industrial processes, allowing the simultaneous detection of nucleases with different substrate specificities and large-scale screening.

  3. Targeting base excision repair as a sensitization strategy in radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vens, C.; Begg, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular DNA repair determines survival after ionizing radiation. Human tumors commonly exhibit aberrant DNA repair since they drive mutagenesis and chromosomal instability. Recent reports have shown alterations in the base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) pathways in huma

  4. Genome Modification of Pluripotent Cells by Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Interest is increasing in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) as a tool to introduce targeted double-strand breaks into the large genomes of human and animal cell lines. The produced DNA lesions stimulate DNA repair pathways, error-prone but dominant non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and accurate but less occurring homology-directed repair (HDR), and as a result targeted genes can be modified. Here, we describe a modified Golden-Gate cloning method for generating TALENs and also details for targeting genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. The protocol described here can be used for modifying the genome of a broad range of pluripotent cell lines.

  5. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne;

    2009-01-01

    , it is evident that proteins from the different DNA repair pathways interact [Y. Wang, D. Cortez, P. Yazdi, N. Neff, S.J. Elledge, J. Qin, BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 927-939; M. Christmann, M......DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA.......T. Tomicic, W.P. Roos, B. Kaina, Mechanisms of human DNA repair: an update, Toxicology 193 (2003) 3-34; N.B. Larsen, M. Rasmussen, L.J. Rasmussen, Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA repair: similar pathways? Mitochondrion 5 (2005) 89-108]. Protein interactions are not only important for function, but also...

  6. Design of artificial nucleases and studies of their interaction with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JingJing; SHAO Ying; WEI Li; LI Ying; SHENG Xin; LIU Fang; LU GuoYuan

    2009-01-01

    The design of artificial nucleases and nuclease mimics has attracted extensive attention and made great progress due to their significant scientific meanings and potential application in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. This paper reviews recent progress in the investigation of artificial nuclease, including "bifunctional cooperative catalysis", "dinuclear synergistic catalysis", "metal-free catalysis", and especially, the studies of aza-crown ethers as artificial nucleases and their interaction with DNA.

  7. Design of artificial nucleases and studies of their interaction with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The design of artificial nucleases and nuclease mimics has attracted extensive attention and made great progress due to their significant scientific meanings and potential application in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. This paper reviews recent progress in the investigation of artificial nuclease,including "bifunctional cooperative catalysis","dinuclear synergistic catalysis","metal-free catalysis" ,and especially,the studies of aza-crown ethers as artificial nucleases and their interaction with DNA.

  8. Endoscopic excision of cheek lipomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyon, Jai-Kyong; Park, Bum-Jin; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Cha, Myung-Kyu; Lim, So-Young; Bang, Sa-Ik; Oh, Kap-Sung

    2008-10-01

    Although the removal of forehead and brow benign tumors using an endoscopic technique has proven to be valuable, the efficacy of an endoscopic excision for cheek masses is unclear. A retrospective review was performed on 8 patients with a lipoma (7) and a foreign body granuloma (1) located at the cheek region. There were 7 men and 1 woman with a mean age of 34.8 years (range, 22-54 years). All the excisional procedures were performed with an endoscope through 2 small incisions, one on the hair-bearing sideburns and the other behind the earlobe. The masses varied from 0.7 x 0.7 cm to 4.0 x 3.0 cm in size. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications, and no recurrence was detected after a 5- to 61-month follow-up. An endoscopically assisted excision of cheek lipomas is an effective procedure and might be a good alternative to the more conventional procedures.

  9. Crystal structures of two eukaryotic nucleases involved in RNA metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    the protein specifically recognizes ribonucleotides and their bases and the importance of specific divalent ions for the binding of these. Both Pop2p and Rrp6p belong to the family of DEDD nucleases with the active sites of the two proteins containing these four acidic residues as well as two divalent cations...

  10. Generation of myostatin B knockout yellow catfish (Tachysurus fulvidraco) using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhangji; Ge, Jiachun; Xu, Zhiqiang; Dong, Xiaohua; Cao, Shasha; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-06-01

    Myostatin (Mstn), a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, plays an inhibiting role in mammalian muscle growth. Mammals like human, cattle, mouse, sheep, and dog carrying null alleles of Mstn display a double-muscle phenotype. Mstn is conserved in fish; however, little is known whether the fish with mutated mstn display a similar phenotype to mammals because of the lack of mutant fish with mstn null alleles. Previously, we knocked out one of the duplicated copies of myostatin gene (mstna) in yellow catfish using zinc-finger nucleases. In this study, we report the identification of the second myostatin gene (mstnb) and knockout of mstnb in yellow catfish. The gene comprises three exons. It is predicted to encode 373 amino acid residues. The predicted protein exhibits 59.3% identity with yellow catfish Mstna and 57.3% identity with human MSTN. Employing TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nucleases) technology, we obtained two founders (from four randomly selected founders) of yellow catfish carrying the mutated mstnb gene in their germ cells. Totally, six mutated alleles of mstnb were obtained from the founders. Among the six alleles, four are nonframeshift and two are frameshift mutation. The frameshift mutated alleles include mstnb(nju22), an 8 bp deletion, and mstnb(nju24), a complex type of mutation comprising a 7 bp deletion and a 12 bp insertion. They are predicted to encode function null Mstnb. Our results will help to understand the roles of mstn genes in fish growth.

  11. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Xuefeng; Wright, David A; Carpenter, Susan; Spalding, Martin H; Weeks, Donald P; Yang, Bing

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  12. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T; Huang, S; Zhao, XF; Wright, DA; Carpenter, S; Spalding, MH; Weeks, DP; Yang, B

    2011-08-08

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  13. Excise Tax Rates On Packs Of Cigarettes PowerPoint Slides

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current cigarette excise tax rates on packs of cigarettes slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PDF version can be found...

  14. Efficient generation of targeted and controlled mutational events in porcine cells using nuclease-directed homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James R; Santos, Rafael M N; Martens, Gregory R; Ladowski, Joseph M; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Li, Ping; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-05-15

    Nuclease-based genome editing has rapidly sped the creation of new models of human disease. These techniques also hold great promise for the future of clinical xenotransplantation and cell-based therapies for cancer or immunodeficient pathology. However, to fully realize the potential of nuclease editing tools, the efficiency and precision of their application must be optimized. The object of this study was to use nonintegrating selection and nuclease-directed homologous recombination to efficiently control the genetic modification of the porcine genome. Clustered randomly integrating spaced palindromic repeats and associated Cas9 protein (CRISPR/Cas9)-directed mutagenesis with a single-guide RNA target was designed to target the alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase locus (GGTA1) of the porcine genome. A vector expressing a single-guide RNA, Cas9 protein, and green fluorescent protein was used to increase plasmid-delivered mutational efficiency when coupled with fluorescence sorting. Single and double-strand DNA oligonucleotides with a restriction site replacing the start codon were created with variable homology lengths surrounding the mutational event site. Finally, a transgene construct was flanked with 50 base pairs of homology directed immediately 5' to a nuclease cut site. These products were introduced to cells with a constant concentration of CRISPR/cas9 vector. Phenotype-specific mutational efficiency was measured by flow cytometer. Controlled homologous insertion was measured by Sanger sequence, restriction enzyme digest and flow cytometry. Expression of a fluorescence protein on the Cas9 vector functioned as a nonintegrating selection marker. Selection by this marker increased phenotype-silencing mutation rates from 3.5% to 82% (P = 0.0002). Insertion or deletion mutation increased from 11% to 96% (P = 0.0007). Co-transfection with homologous DNA oligonucleotides increased the aggregate phenotype-silencing mutation rates up to 22% and increased biallelic

  15. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D.; Clark, Jr., Arthur D.; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V.; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Jones, Roger A.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Arnold, Eddy (Rutgers); (Clark); (NCI)

    2011-11-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  16. Zinc Finger Nuclease induced DNA double stranded breaks and rearrangements in MLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, To Uyen [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Ho, Bay; Shih, Shyh-Jen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Vaughan, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.vaughan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► A Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) targeting a leukemogenic hot spot for rearrangement in MLL is created. ► The novel ZFN efficiently cleaves MLL exon 13. ► Despite MLL cleavage and evidence of mis-repair, no leukemogenic translocations were produced. ► MLL cleavage alone is insufficient to generate leukemogenic translocations. - Abstract: Radiation treatment or chemotherapy has been linked with a higher risk of secondary cancers such as therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (tAML). Several of these cancers have been shown to be correlated to the introduction of double stranded breaks (DSB) and rearrangements within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. We used Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) to introduce precise cuts within MLL to examine how a single DNA DSB might lead to chromosomal rearrangements. A ZFN targeting exon 13 within the Breakpoint Cluster Region of MLL was transiently expressed in a human lymphoblast cell line originating from a CML patient. Although FISH analysis showed ZFN DSB at this region increased the rate of MLL fragmentation, we were unable to detect leukemogenic rearrangements or translocations via inverse PCR. Interestingly, gene fragmentation as well as small interstitial deletions, insertions and base substitutions increased with the inhibition of DNA-PK, suggesting repair of this particular DSB is linked to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although mis-repair of DSBs may be necessary for the initiation of leukemogenic translocations, a MLL targeted DNA break alone is insufficient.

  17. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing.

  18. Evaluation of 5 ' nuclease assay for detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angen, Øystein; Jensen, J.; Lavritsen, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    Sequence detection by the 5' nuclease TaqMan assay uses online detection of internal fluorogenic probes in closed PCR tubes. Primers and probe were chosen from a part of the omlA gene common to all serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, which gave an amplicon of 92 bp, The test was evaluated...... with 73 lung isolates and 120 tonsil isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae as well as with a collection of reference strains. By using a C-t value (cycle number in which the fluorescence exceeds the threshold defined by the software) of 30 as the cutoff limit, the 5' nuclease assay represents a test with 100......, nonspecific reactions appeared when testing dilutions of DNA templates or pure cultures of A. pleuropneumoniae, as well as when testing tonsil scrapings from specific-pathogen-free herds. The diagnostic sensitivity, as evaluated with 586 tonsil scrapings from animals infected with A. pleuropneumoniae...

  19. Editing the Plasmodium vivax genome, using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Straimer, Judith; Sa, Juliana M; Salzman, Rebecca E; Melendez-Muniz, Viviana A; Mu, Jianbing; Fidock, David A; Wellems, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of malaria morbidity worldwide yet has remained genetically intractable. To stably modify this organism, we used zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which take advantage of homology-directed DNA repair mechanisms at the site of nuclease action. Using ZFNs specific to the gene encoding P. vivax dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr), we transfected blood specimens from Saimiri boliviensis monkeys infected with the pyrimethamine (Pyr)-susceptible Chesson strain with a ZFN plasmid carrying a Pyr-resistant mutant pvdhfr sequence. We obtained Pyr-resistant parasites in vivo that carried mutant pvdhfr and additional silent mutations designed to confirm editing. These results herald the era of stable P. vivax genetic modifications.

  20. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  1. Designing and testing the activities of TAL effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanni; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have rapidly developed into a powerful tool for genome editing. To avoid labor-intensive and time-consuming experimental screening for active TALENs, a scoring system can help select optimal target sites. Here we describe a procedure to design active TALENs using a scoring system named Scoring Algorithm for Predicted TALEN Activity (SAPTA) and a method to test the activity of individual and pairs of TALENs.

  2. The Effect of Micrococcal Nuclease Digestion on Nucleosome Positioning Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Ryun Chung; Ilona Dunkel; Franziska Heise; Christian Linke; Sylvia Krobitsch; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E.; Sperling, Silke R; Martin Vingron

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent mod...

  3. Binding of the human nucleotide excision repair proteins XPA and XPC/HR23B to the 5R-thymine glycol lesion and structure of the cis-(5R,6S) thymine glycol epimer in the 5′-GTgG-3′ sequence: destabilization of two base pairs at the lesion site

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kyle L.; Roginskaya, Marina; Zou, Yue; Altamirano, Alvin; Basu, Ashis K.; Stone, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The 5R thymine glycol (5R-Tg) DNA lesion exists as a mixture of cis-(5R,6S) and trans-(5R,6R) epimers; these modulate base excision repair. We examine the 7:3 cis-(5R,6S):trans-(5R,6R) mixture of epimers paired opposite adenine in the 5′-GTgG-3′ sequence with regard to nucleotide excision repair. Human XPA recognizes the lesion comparably to the C8-dG acetylaminoflourene (AAF) adduct, whereas XPC/HR23B recognition of Tg is superior. 5R-Tg is processed by the Escherichia coli UvrA and UvrABC p...

  4. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNAfootprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L.; Yin, Yadong; Gerion, Daniele; Kunchakarra, Siri; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Jett, Stephen D.; Bear, David G.; Alivisatos, Paul; Lee, Luke P.

    2006-08-15

    We have constructed a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA length changes and perform DNA footprinting. The ruler was created by tethering double-stranded DNA to single Au nanoparticles. The scattering spectra of Au-DNA nanoconjugates showed red-shifted peak plasmon resonance wavelength dependent on DNA length, which can be measured with sub-nanometer axial resolution, averaging {approx}1.24 nm peak wavelength shift per DNA base pair. The spectra of individual Au-DNA nanoconjugates in the presence of nuclease showed a time-resolved dependence on the reaction dynamics, allowing quantitative, kinetic and real-time measurement of nuclease activity. The ruler was further developed into a new DNA footprinting platform. We showed the specific binding of a protein to DNA and the accurate mapping of its footprint. This work promises a very fast and convenient platform for mapping DNA-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other DNA size-based methods.

  5. Base excision repair in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnez-Lima Lucymara F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage can be induced by a large number of physical and chemical agents from the environment as well as compounds produced by cellular metabolism. This type of damage can interfere with cellular processes such as replication and transcription, resulting in cell death and/or mutations. The low frequency of mutagenesis in cells is due to the presence of enzymatic pathways which repair damaged DNA. Several DNA repair genes (mainly from bacteria, yeasts and mammals have been cloned and their products characterized. The high conservation, especially in eukaryotes, of the majority of genes related to DNA repair argues for their importance in the maintenance of life on earth. In plants, our understanding of DNA repair pathways is still very poor, the first plant repair genes having only been cloned in 1997 and the mechanisms of their products have not yet been characterized. The objective of our data mining work was to identify genes related to the base excision repair (BER pathway, which are present in the database of the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST Project. This search was performed by tblastn program. We identified sugarcane clusters homologous to the majority of BER proteins used in the analysis and a high degree of conservation was observed. The best results were obtained with BER proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana. For some sugarcane BER genes, the presence of more than one form of mRNA is possible, as shown by the occurrence of more than one homologous EST cluster.

  6. Engineering designer transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) by REAL or REAL-Fast assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyon, Deepak; Khayter, Cyd; Regan, Maureen R; Joung, J Keith; Sander, Jeffry D

    2012-10-01

    Engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are broadly useful tools for performing targeted genome editing in a wide variety of organisms and cell types including plants, zebrafish, C. elegans, rat, human somatic cells, and human pluripotent stem cells. Here we describe detailed protocols for the serial, hierarchical assembly of TALENs that require neither PCR nor specialized multi-fragment ligations and that can be implemented by any laboratory. These restriction enzyme and ligation (REAL)-based protocols can be practiced using plasmid libraries and user-friendly, Web-based software that both identifies target sites in sequences of interest and generates printable graphical guides that facilitate assembly of TALENs. With the described platform of reagents, protocols, and software, researchers can easily engineer multiple TALENs within 2 weeks using standard cloning techniques.

  7. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  8. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by sexual contact, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes, syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]). Speculum: An instrument used to hold open the walls of the ...

  9. Current and future delivery systems for engineered nucleases: ZFN, TALEN and RGEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Ain, Qurrat; Chung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2015-05-10

    Gene therapy by engineered nucleases is a genetic intervention being investigated for curing the hereditary disorders by targeting selected genes with specific nucleotides for establishment, suppression, abolishment of a function or correction of mutation. Here, we review the fast developing technology of targeted genome engineering using site specific programmable nucleases zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like nucleases (TALENs) and cluster regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR associated proteins (CRISPR/Cas) based RNA-guided DNA endonucleases (RGENs) and their different characteristics including pros and cons of genome modifications by these nucleases. We have further discussed different types of delivery methods to induce gene editing, novel development in genetic engineering other than nucleases and future prospects.

  10. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  11. Improved Somatic Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs)

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Finola E.; Deepak Reyon; Sander, Jeffry D.; Sarah A Martinez; Blackburn, Jessica S; Cyd Khayter; Ramirez, Cherie L.; J Keith Joung; Langenau, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebra...

  12. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Lans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER plays an essential role in many organisms across life domains to preserve and faithfully transmit DNA to the next generation. In humans, NER is essential to prevent DNA damage-induced mutation accumulation and cell death leading to cancer and aging. NER is a versatile DNA repair pathway that repairs many types of DNA damage which distort the DNA helix, such as those induced by solar UV light. A detailed molecular model of the NER pathway has emerged from in vitro and live cell experiments, particularly using model systems such as bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cell cultures. In recent years, the versatility of the nematode C. elegans to study DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms including NER has become increasingly clear. In particular, C. elegans seems to be a convenient tool to study NER during the UV response in vivo, to analyze this process in the context of a developing and multicellular organism, and to perform genetic screening. Here, we will discuss current knowledge gained from the use of C. elegans to study NER and the response to UV-induced DNA damage.

  13. Intra and extracellular nuclease production by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Adlane V. B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra and extracellular nuclease production by strains of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans was estimated using a modified DNAse test agar and cell-free extract assays. Differences in the production of nucleases by A. niger and A. nidulans were observed. These observations suggest that the DNAse test agar can be helpful for a quick screening for some types of nucleases in filamentous fungi. The assays using cell-free extracts can also be useful for initial characterization of other types of nucleases.

  14. Non-viral delivery of genome-editing nucleases for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Glass, Z A; Xu, Q

    2016-12-01

    Manipulating the genetic makeup of mammalian cells using programmable nuclease-based genome-editing technology has recently evolved into a powerful avenue that holds great potential for treating genetic disorders. There are four types of genome-editing nucleases, including meganucleases, zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat-associated nucleases such as Cas9. These nucleases have been harnessed to introduce precise and specific changes of the genome sequence at virtually any genome locus of interest. The therapeutic relevance of these genome-editing technologies, however, is challenged by the safe and efficient delivery of nuclease into targeted cells. Herein, we summarize recent advances that have been made on non-viral delivery of genome-editing nucleases. In particular, we focus on non-viral delivery of Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins for genome editing. In addition, the future direction for developing non-viral delivery of programmable nucleases for genome editing is discussed.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 1 December 2016; doi:10.1038/gt.2016.72.

  15. Nucleotide excision repair in the test tube.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe eukaryotic nucleotide excision-repair pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, an achievement that should hasten the full enzymological characterization of this highly complex DNA-repair pathway.

  16. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Sahin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  17. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Caner; Turker, Mesut; Celasun, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  18. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed.

  19. Site-specific genome editing in Plasmodium falciparum using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straimer, Judith; Lee, Marcus C S; Lee, Andrew H; Zeitler, Bryan; Williams, April E; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Llinás, Manuel; Urnov, Fyodor D; Fidock, David A

    2012-10-01

    Malaria afflicts over 200 million people worldwide, and its most lethal etiologic agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is evolving to resist even the latest-generation therapeutics. Efficient tools for genome-directed investigations of P. falciparum-induced pathogenesis, including drug-resistance mechanisms, are clearly required. Here we report rapid and targeted genetic engineering of this parasite using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that produce a double-strand break in a user-defined locus and trigger homology-directed repair. Targeting an integrated egfp locus, we obtained gene-deletion parasites with unprecedented speed (2 weeks), both with and without direct selection. ZFNs engineered against the parasite gene pfcrt, responsible for escape under chloroquine treatment, rapidly produced parasites that carried either an allelic replacement or a panel of specified point mutations. This method will enable a diverse array of genome-editing approaches to interrogate this human pathogen.

  20. Identity of zinc finger nucleases with specificity to herpes simplex virus type II genomic DNA: novel HSV-2 vaccine/therapy precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex type II (HSV-2 is a member of the family herpesviridae. Human infection with this double stranded linear DNA virus causes genital ulcerative disease and existing treatment options only serve to resolve the symptomatology (ulcers associated with active HSV-2 infection but do not eliminate latent virus. As a result, infection with HSV-2 follows a life-long relapsing (active versus latent course. On the basis of a primitive bacterium anti-phage DNA defense, the restriction modification (R-M system, we previously identified the Escherichia coli restriction enzyme (REase EcoRII as a novel peptide to excise or irreversibly disrupt latent HSV-2 DNA from infected cells. However, sequences of the site specificity palindrome of EcoRII 5'-CCWGG-3' (W = A or T are equally present within the human genome and are a potential source of host-genome toxicity. This feature has limited previous HSV-2 EcoRII based therapeutic models to microbicides only, and highlights the need to engineer artificial REases (zinc finger nucleases-ZFNs with specificity to HSV-2 genomic-DNA only. Herein, the therapeutic-potential of zinc finger arrays (ZFAs and ZFNs is identified and modeled, with unique specificity to the HSV-2 genome. Methods and results Using the whole genome of HSV-2 strain HG52 (Dolan A et al.,, and with the ZFN-consortium's CoDA-ZiFiT software pre-set at default, more than 28,000 ZFAs with specificity to HSV-2 DNA were identified. Using computational assembly (through in-silico linkage to the Flavobacterium okeanokoites endonuclease Fok I of the type IIS class, 684 ZFNs with specificity to the HSV-2 genome, were constructed. Graphic-analysis of the HSV-2 genome-cleavage pattern using the afore-identified ZFNs revealed that the highest cleavage-incidence occurred within the 30,950 base-pairs (~between the genomic context coordinates 0.80 and 1.00 at the 3' end of the HSV-2 genome. At approximately 3,095 bp before and after the

  1. Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) Hybrid Nucleases for Genome Engineering Application

    KAUST Repository

    Wibowo, Anjar

    2011-06-06

    Gene targeting is a powerful genome engineering tool that can be used for a variety of biotechnological applications. Genomic double-strand DNA breaks generated by engineered site-specific nucleases can stimulate gene targeting. Hybrid nucleases are composed of DNA binding module and DNA cleavage module. Zinc Finger Nucleases were used to generate double-strand DNA breaks but it suffers from failures and lack of reproducibility. The transcription activator–like effectors (TALEs) from plant pathogenic Xanthomonas contain a unique type of DNA-binding domain that bind specific DNA targets. The purpose of this study is to generate novel sequence specific nucleases by fusing a de novo engineered Hax3 TALE-based DNA binding domain to a FokI cleavage domain. Our data show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence and create double-strand DNA breaks in vitro. We also show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease is capable of generating double-strand DNA breaks in its target sequence in vivo, when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TALE-based hybrid nucleases can be tailored to bind a user-selected DNA sequence and generate site-specific genomic double-strand DNA breaks. TALE-based hybrid nucleases hold much promise as powerful molecular tools for gene targeting applications.

  2. Genome editing using FACS enrichment of nuclease-expressing cells and indel detection by amplicon analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonowski, Lindsey A; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Riaz, Anjum;

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes methods for increasing and evaluating the efficiency of genome editing based on the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated 9) system, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs...

  3. Characterization of a novel non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaobo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermostable enzymes from thermophiles have attracted extensive studies. In this investigation, a nuclease-encoding gene (designated as GBSV1-NSN was obtained from a thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1 for the first time. Results After recombinant expression in Escherichia coli, the purified GBSV1-NSN exhibited non-specific nuclease activity, being able to degrade various nucleic acids, including RNA, single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA that was circular or linear. Based on sequence analysis, the nuclease shared no homology with any known nucleases, suggesting that it was a novel nuclease. The characterization of the recombinant GBSV1-NSN showed that its optimal temperature and pH were 60°C and 7.5, respectively. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity was inhibited by enzyme inhibitors or detergents, such as ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, citrate, dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, guanidine hydrochloride, urea and SDS. In contrast, the nuclease activity was enhanced by TritonX-100, Tween-20 or chaps to approximately 124.5% – 141.6%. The Km of GBSV1-NSN nuclease was 231, 61 and 92 μM, while its kcat was 1278, 241 and 300 s-1 for the cleavage of dsDNA, ssDNA and RNA, respectively. Conclusion Our study, therefore, presented a novel thermostable non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage and its overexpression and purification for scientific research and applications.

  4. Positive and Negative Regulation of Poly(A) Nuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangus, David A.; Evans, Matthew C.; Agrin, Nathan S.; Smith, Mandy; Gongidi, Preetam; Jacobson, Allan

    2004-01-01

    PAN, a yeast poly(A) nuclease, plays an important nuclear role in the posttranscriptional maturation of mRNA poly(A) tails. The activity of this enzyme is dependent on its Pan2p and Pan3p subunits, as well as the presence of poly(A)-binding protein (Pab1p). We have identified and characterized the associated network of factors controlling the maturation of mRNA poly(A) tails in yeast and defined its relevant protein-protein interactions. Pan3p, a positive regulator of PAN activity, interacts with Pab1p, thus providing substrate specificity for this nuclease. Pab1p also regulates poly(A) tail trimming by interacting with Pbp1p, a factor that appears to negatively regulate PAN. Pan3p and Pbp1p both interact with themselves and with the C terminus of Pab1p. However, the domains required for Pan3p and Pbp1p binding on Pab1p are distinct. Single amino acid changes that disrupt Pan3p interaction with Pab1p have been identified and define a binding pocket in helices 2 and 3 of Pab1p's carboxy terminus. The importance of these amino acids for Pab1p-Pan3p interaction, and poly(A) tail regulation, is underscored by experiments demonstrating that strains harboring substitutions in these residues accumulate mRNAs with long poly(A) tails in vivo. PMID:15169912

  5. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    OpenAIRE

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and ra...

  6. Proximal clavicle excision: an analysis of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acus, R W; Bell, R H; Fisher, D L

    1995-01-01

    Medial clavicle excision has been reported by several authors, but few cases are documented, and long-term follow-up information is lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term results of medial clavicle excision in regard to function, pain, cosmesis, and complications. Fifteen patients ranging in age from 18 to 64 years (average 43 years) were evaluated an average of 4.6 years (range 1 to 14 years) after proximal clavicle excision. The indications for excision were unstable anterior subluxation/dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint (four cases), unstable posterior dislocation (one case), sternoclavicular osteoarthritis (nine cases), and proximal clavicle osteomyelitis (one case). An average of 2.9 cm of the medial clavicle was excised (range 1 to 4 cm). Fourteen of the 15 patients received significant relief of pain. On a strict grading scale four patients had an excellent result, five a good result, four a fair result, and two a poor result. Regeneration of the clavicle appeared to contribute to a poor result. No operative complications occurred. These findings aid our understanding of surgical options and outcome in the treatment of sternoclavicular joint disease.

  7. Control of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Martínez-Rubio, Roser; Martí, Miguel; Chen, John; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Penadés, José R

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are a group of related 15-17 kb mobile genetic elements that commonly carry genes for superantigen toxins and other virulence factors. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain phages and their efficient encapsidation into specific small-headed phage-like infectious particles. Previous work demonstrated that chromosomal integration depends on the SaPI-encoded recombinase, Int. However, although involved in the process, Int alone was not sufficient to mediate efficient SaPI excision from chromosomal sites, and we expected that SaPI excision would involve an Xis function, which could be encoded by a helper phage or by the SaPI, itself. Here we report that the latter is the case. In vivo recombination assays with plasmids in Escherichia coli demonstrate that SaPI-coded Xis is absolutely required for recombination between the SaPI att(L) and att(R) sites, and that both sites, as well as their flanking SaPI sequences, are required for SaPI excision. Mutational analysis reveals that Xis is essential for efficient horizontal SaPI transfer to a recipient strain. Finally, we show that the master regulator of the SaPI life cycle, Stl, blocks expression of int and xis by binding to inverted repeats present in the promoter region, thus controlling SaPI excision.

  8. Nucleotide excision repair in differentiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wees, Caroline van der [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Jansen, Jacob [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarse, Arnoud van der [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Zeeland, Albert van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: l.mullenders@lumc.nl

    2007-01-03

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the principal pathway for the removal of a wide range of DNA helix-distorting lesions and operates via two NER subpathways, i.e. global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Although detailed information is available on expression and efficiency of NER in established mammalian cell lines, little is known about the expression of NER pathways in (terminally) differentiated cells. The majority of studies in differentiated cells have focused on repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4-photoproducts (6-4PP) because of the high frequency of photolesions at low level of toxicity and availability of sensitive technologies to determine photolesions in defined regions of the genome. The picture that emerges from these studies is blurred and rather complex. Fibroblasts and terminally differentiated myocytes of the rat heart display equally efficient GGR of 6-4PP but poor repair of CPD due to the absence of p48 expression. This repair phenotype is clearly different from human terminal differentiated neurons. Furthermore, both cell types were found to carry out TCR of CPD, thus mimicking the repair phenotype of established rodent cell lines. In contrast, in intact rat spermatogenic cells repair was very inefficient at the genome overall level and in transcriptionally active genes indicating that GGR and TCR are non-functional. Also, non-differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit low levels of NER after UV irradiation. However, the mechanisms that lead to low NER activity are clearly different: in differentiated spermatogenic cells differences in chromatin compaction and sequestering of NER proteins may underlie the lack of NER activity in pre-meiotic cells, whereas in non-differentiated ES cells NER is impaired by a strong apoptotic response.

  9. Rapid mutation of endogenous zebrafish genes using zinc finger nucleases made by Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Foley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs form the basis of a broadly applicable tool for highly efficient genome modification. ZFNs are artificial restriction endonucleases consisting of a non-specific nuclease domain fused to a zinc finger array which can be engineered to recognize specific DNA sequences of interest. Recent proof-of-principle experiments have shown that targeted knockout mutations can be efficiently generated in endogenous zebrafish genes via non-homologous end-joining-mediated repair of ZFN-induced DNA double-stranded breaks. The Zinc Finger Consortium, a group of academic laboratories committed to the development of engineered zinc finger technology, recently described the first rapid, highly effective, and publicly available method for engineering zinc finger arrays. The Consortium has previously used this new method (known as OPEN for Oligomerized Pool ENgineering to generate high quality ZFN pairs that function in human and plant cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that OPEN can also be used to generate ZFNs that function efficiently in zebrafish. Using OPEN, we successfully engineered ZFN pairs for five endogenous zebrafish genes: tfr2, dopamine transporter, telomerase, hif1aa, and gridlock. Each of these ZFN pairs induces targeted insertions and deletions with high efficiency at its endogenous gene target in somatic zebrafish cells. In addition, these mutations are transmitted through the germline with sufficiently high frequency such that only a small number of fish need to be screened to identify founders. Finally, in silico analysis demonstrates that one or more potential OPEN ZFN sites can be found within the first three coding exons of more than 25,000 different endogenous zebrafish gene transcripts. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, our study nearly triples the total number of endogenous zebrafish genes successfully modified using ZFNs (from three to eight and suggests that OPEN

  10. Gene Editing With CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-Directed Nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetschman, Thomas; Georgieva, Teodora

    2017-03-03

    Genetic engineering of model organisms and cultured cells has for decades provided important insights into the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular development and disease. In the past few years the development of several nuclease systems has broadened the range of model/cell systems that can be engineered. Of these, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system has become the favorite for its ease of application. Here we will review this RNA-guided nuclease system for gene editing with respect to its usefulness for cardiovascular studies and with an eye toward potential therapy. Studies on its off-target activity, along with approaches to minimize this activity will be given. The advantages of gene editing versus gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, including the breadth of species and cell types to which it is applicable, will be discussed. We will also cover its use in iPSC for research and possible therapeutic purposes; and we will review its use in muscular dystrophy studies where considerable progress has been made toward dystrophin correction in mice. The CRISPR/Ca9s system is also being used for high-throughput screening of genes, gene regulatory regions, and long noncoding RNAs. In addition, the CRISPR system is being used for nongene-editing purposes such as activation and inhibition of gene expression, as well as for fluorescence tagging of chromosomal regions and individual mRNAs to track their cellular location. Finally, an approach to circumvent the inability of post-mitotic cells to support homologous recombination-based gene editing will be presented. In conclusion, applications of the CRISPR/Cas system are expanding at a breath-taking pace and are revolutionizing approaches to gain a better understanding of human diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Intraoral excision of large submental dermoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Bhatnagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual dermoids are the rarest forms of craniofacial dermoids mostly seen in young individuals. Excision of large and deep submental dermoid is generally done via extraoral approach scarring the most prominent part of the face, which can lead to post operative scar hypertrophy and hyperpigmentation especially in non-Caucasian races. Presence of such scars leads to adverse psychological effects in young individuals. Excision via intraoral route, although technically demanding, can be simplified using basic principles of plastic surgery leading to optimal aesthetic outcome with least downtime. We excised a large sublingual dermoid extending deep to the mylohyoid muscle through intraoral approach with excellent cosmetic results. Clinicians dealing with such lesions should keep these principals in their armamentarium when dealing with this rare subset of cases.

  12. p53 Gene repair with zinc finger nucleases optimised by yeast 1-hybrid and validated by Solexa sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Herrmann

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs. We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation 'hotspots'. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci.

  13. p53 Gene Repair with Zinc Finger Nucleases Optimised by Yeast 1-Hybrid and Validated by Solexa Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Frank; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Baumstark, Rebecca; Fajardo-Sanchez, Emmanuel; Cotterell, James; Minoche, André; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Isalan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt) p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs). We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation ‘hotspots’. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci. PMID:21695267

  14. Excised Abdominoplasty Material as a Systematic Plastic Surgical Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Erol Demirseren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving a level of technical skill and confidence in surgical operations is the main goal of plastic surgical training. Operating rooms were accepted as the practical teaching venues of the traditional apprenticeship model. However, increased patient population, time, and ethical and legal considerations made preoperation room practical work a must for plastic surgical training. There are several plastic surgical teaching models and simulators which are very useful in preoperation room practical training and the evaluation of plastic surgery residents. The full thickness skin with its vascular network excised in abdominoplasty procedures is an easily obtainable real human tissue which could be used as a training model in plastic surgery.

  15. Genome editing using artificial site-specific nucleases in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish is a model vertebrate suitable for genetic analysis. Forward genetic analysis via chemical mutagenesis screening has established a variety of zebrafish mutants that are defective in various types of organogenesis, and the genes responsible for the individual mutants have been identified from genome mapping. On the other hand, reverse genetic analysis via targeted gene disruption using embryonic stem (ES) cells (e.g., knockout mouse) can uncover gene functions by investigating the phenotypic effects. However, this approach is mostly limited to mice among the vertebrate models because of the difficulty in establishing ES cells. Recently, new gene targeting technologies, such as the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems, have been developed: that can directly introduce genome modifications at the targeted genomic locus. Here, we summarize these new and powerful genome editing techniques for the study of zebrafish.

  16. The effect of micrococcal nuclease digestion on nucleosome positioning data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ryun Chung

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase. Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent models for nucleosome positioning. As a consequence we see a need to re-evaluate whether the DNA sequence is a major determinant of nucleosome positioning in vivo. More generally, our results show that data generated after MNase digestion of chromatin requires a matched control experiment in order to determine nucleosome positions.

  17. The effect of micrococcal nuclease digestion on nucleosome positioning data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ho-Ryun; Dunkel, Ilona; Heise, Franziska; Linke, Christian; Krobitsch, Sylvia; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E; Sperling, Silke R; Vingron, Martin

    2010-12-29

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent models for nucleosome positioning. As a consequence we see a need to re-evaluate whether the DNA sequence is a major determinant of nucleosome positioning in vivo. More generally, our results show that data generated after MNase digestion of chromatin requires a matched control experiment in order to determine nucleosome positions.

  18. Genome editing in plant cells by zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinthal, Dan; Tovkach, Andriy; Zeevi, Vardit; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2010-06-01

    Gene targeting is a powerful tool for functional gene studies. However, only a handful of reports have been published describing the successful targeting of genome sequences in model and crop plants. Gene targeting can be stimulated by induction of double-strand breaks at specific genomic sites. The expression of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can induce genomic double-strand breaks. Indeed, ZFNs have been used to drive the replacement of native DNA sequences with foreign DNA molecules, to mediate the integration of the targeted transgene into native genome sequences, to stimulate the repair of defective transgenes, and as site-specific mutagens in model and crop plant species. This review introduces the principles underlying the use of ZFNs for genome editing, with an emphasis on their recent use for plant research and biotechnology.

  19. Automated 5 ' nuclease PCR assay for identification of Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Ahrens, Peter; Rådström, P.

    2000-01-01

    A simple and ready-to-go test based on a 5' nuclease (TaqMan) PCR technique was developed for identification of presumptive Salmonella enterica isolates. The results were compared with those of conventional methods. The TaqMan assay was evaluated for its ability to accurately detect 210 S. enterica...... isolates, including 100 problematic "rough" isolates. An internal positive control was designed to use the same Salmonella primers for amplification of a spiked nonrelevant template (116 bp) in the sample tube. The PCR test correctly identified all the Salmonella strains by resulting in positive end...... Salmonella strains tested resulted in positive FAM and TET signals. In addition, it was found that the complete PCR mixture, predispensed in microwell plates, could be stored for up to 3 months at -20 degrees C, Thus, the diagnostic TaqMan assay developed can be a useful and simple alternative method...

  20. Uracil Excision for Assembly of Complex Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2015-01-01

    Despite decreasing prices on synthetic DNA constructs, higher-order assembly of PCR-generated DNA continues to be an important exercise in molecular and synthetic biology. Simplicity and robustness are attractive features met by the uracil excision DNA assembly method, which is one of the most in...

  1. Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-04-24

    Future therapeutic use of engineered site-directed nucleases, like zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), relies on safe and effective means of delivering nucleases to cells. In this study, we adapt lentiviral vectors as carriers of designer nuclease proteins, providing efficient targeted gene disruption in vector-treated cell lines and primary cells. By co-packaging pairs of ZFN proteins with donor RNA in 'all-in-one' lentiviral particles, we co-deliver ZFN proteins and the donor template for homology-directed repair leading to targeted DNA insertion and gene correction. Comparative studies of ZFN activity in a predetermined target locus and a known nearby off-target locus demonstrate reduced off-target activity after ZFN protein transduction relative to conventional delivery approaches. Additionally, TALEN proteins are added to the repertoire of custom-designed nucleases that can be delivered by protein transduction. Altogether, our findings generate a new platform for genome engineering based on efficient and potentially safer delivery of programmable nucleases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01911.001.

  2. Barley aleurone cell death is not apoptotic: characterization of nuclease activities and DNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, A; Bethke, P C; Jones, R L

    1999-11-01

    Barley aleurone cells undergo programmed cell death (PCD) when exposed to gibberellic acid (GA), but incubation in abscisic acid (ABA) prevent PCD. We tested the hypothesis that PCD in aleurone cells occurs by apoptosis, and show that the hallmark of apoptosis, namely DNA cleavage into 180 bp fragments, plasma membrane blebbing, and the formation of apoptotic bodies do not occur when aleurone cells die. We show that endogenous barley aleurone nucleases and nucleases present in enzymes used for protoplast preparation degrade aleurone DNA and that DNA degradation by these nucleases is rapid and can result in the formation of 180 bp DNA ladders. Methods are described that prevent DNA degradation during isolation from aleurone layers or protoplasts. Barley aleurone cells contain three nucleases whose activities are regulated by GA and ABA. CA induction and ABA repression of nuclease activities correlate with PCD in aleurone cells. Cells incubated in ABA remain alive and do not degrade their DNA, but living aleurone cells treated with GA accumulate nucleases and hydrolyze their nuclear DNA. We propose that barley nucleases play a role in DNA cleavage during aleurone PCD.

  3. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leśniewicz Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed.

  4. Broad specificity profiling of TALENs results in engineered nucleases with improved DNA-cleavage specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilinger, John P; Pattanayak, Vikram; Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith; Liu, David R

    2014-04-01

    Although transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) can be designed to cleave chosen DNA sequences, TALENs have activity against related off-target sequences. To better understand TALEN specificity, we profiled 30 unique TALENs with different target sites, array length and domain sequences for their abilities to cleave any of 10(12) potential off-target DNA sequences using in vitro selection and high-throughput sequencing. Computational analysis of the selection results predicted 76 off-target substrates in the human genome, 16 of which were accessible and modified by TALENs in human cells. The results suggest that (i) TALE repeats bind DNA relatively independently; (ii) longer TALENs are more tolerant of mismatches yet are more specific in a genomic context; and (iii) excessive DNA-binding energy can lead to reduced TALEN specificity in cells. Based on these findings, we engineered a TALEN variant that exhibits equal on-target cleavage activity but tenfold lower average off-target activity in human cells.

  5. The contribution of homology arms to nuclease-assisted genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Oliver; Tsurkan, Sarah; Fu, Jun; Klink, Barbara; Rump, Andreas; Obst, Mandy; Kranz, Andrea; Schröck, Evelin; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2017-07-27

    Designer nucleases like CRISPR/Cas9 enable fluent site-directed damage or small mutations in many genomes. Strategies for their use to achieve more complex tasks like regional exchanges for gene humanization or the establishment of conditional alleles are still emerging. To optimize Cas9-assisted targeting, we measured the relationship between targeting frequency and homology length in targeting constructs using a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase assay in mouse embryonic stem cells. Targeting frequency with supercoiled plasmids improved steeply up to 2 kb total homology and continued to increase with even longer homology arms, thereby implying that Cas9-assisted targeting efficiencies can be improved using homology arms of 1 kb or greater. To humanize the Kmt2d gene, we built a hybrid mouse/human targeting construct in a bacterial artificial chromosome by recombineering. To simplify the possible outcomes, we employed a single Cas9 cleavage strategy and best achieved the intended 42 kb regional exchange with a targeting construct including a very long homology arm to recombine ∼42 kb away from the cleavage site. We recommend the use of long homology arm targeting constructs for accurate and efficient complex genome engineering, particularly when combined with the simplifying advantages of using just one Cas9 cleavage at the genome target site. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Loop electrosurgical excision procedure for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: how much excision is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, T; El-Sugi, R; Hicks-Boucher, W; Weberpals, J; Faught, W

    2013-08-01

    This is a retrospective observational study to compare outcomes in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) treated with loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) using combined ectocervical/endocervical resection vs ectocervical resection alone. We demonstrated that additional endocervical resection during loop electrosurgical excision procedure did not significantly lower the risk of subsequent recurrence compared with ectocervical resection alone, in the treatment of CIN. With current published data supporting subsequent increased adverse effects of LEEP on future obstetrical outcomes, endocervical excision should be applied selectively. We recommend that additional endocervical excision should be reserved only for patients with a strong suspicion of underlying endocervical canal involvement based on colposcopic assessment or in patients with unsatisfactory colposcopy, where it is essential to evaluate the endocervical canal.

  7. Brown recluse spider bites. A comparison of early surgical excision versus dapsone and delayed surgical excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, R S; Altenbern, D P; Lynch, J B; King, L E

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective study, 31 patients with brown recluse spider bites were treated by either immediate surgical excision or with the leukocyte inhibitor, dapsone, followed by delayed surgical excision. Patients were matched for age, gender, and lesion size and were excluded if the typical history and physical findings were not present. In patients treated with immediate surgical excision (N = 14), delayed wound healing (N = 5) and objectional scarring (N = 7) were common complications. However, pretreatment treatment with dapsone reduced the incidence of wound complications (N = 1) and objectional scarring (N = 1) (p less than 0.05), while reducing the need for surgical excision (N = 1). There were no severe drug reactions due to dapsone, although one patient had persistent G.I. upset. Pretreatment with dapsone not only reduced surgical complications but also improved the outcome of patients bitten by the brown recluse spider. PMID:4051613

  8. Removal of misincorporated ribonucleotides from prokaryotic genomes: an unexpected role for nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Vaisman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stringent steric exclusion mechanisms limit the misincorporation of ribonucleotides by high-fidelity DNA polymerases into genomic DNA. In contrast, low-fidelity Escherichia coli DNA polymerase V (pol V has relatively poor sugar discrimination and frequently misincorporates ribonucleotides. Substitution of a steric gate tyrosine residue with alanine (umuC_Y11A reduces sugar selectivity further and allows pol V to readily misincorporate ribonucleotides as easily as deoxynucleotides, whilst leaving its poor base-substitution fidelity essentially unchanged. However, the mutability of cells expressing the steric gate pol V mutant is very low due to efficient repair mechanisms that are triggered by the misincorporated rNMPs. Comparison of the mutation frequency between strains expressing wild-type and mutant pol V therefore allows us to identify pathways specifically directed at ribonucleotide excision repair (RER. We previously demonstrated that rNMPs incorporated by umuC_Y11A are efficiently removed from DNA in a repair pathway initiated by RNase HII. Using the same approach, we show here that mismatch repair and base excision repair play minimal back-up roles in RER in vivo. In contrast, in the absence of functional RNase HII, umuC_Y11A-dependent mutagenesis increases significantly in ΔuvrA, uvrB5 and ΔuvrC strains, suggesting that rNMPs misincorporated into DNA are actively repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER in vivo. Participation of NER in RER was confirmed by reconstituting ribonucleotide-dependent NER in vitro. We show that UvrABC nuclease-catalyzed incisions are readily made on DNA templates containing one, two, or five rNMPs and that the reactions are stimulated by the presence of mispaired bases. Similar to NER of DNA lesions, excision of rNMPs proceeds through dual incisions made at the 8(th phosphodiester bond 5' and 4(th-5(th phosphodiester bonds 3' of the ribonucleotide. Ribonucleotides misinserted into DNA can therefore be

  9. Is BAC Transgenesis Obsolete? State of the Art in the Era of Designer Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Beil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA constructs based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs are frequently used to generate transgenic animals as they reduce the influence of position effects and allow predictable expression patterns for genes whose regulatory sequences are not fully identified. Despite these advantages BAC transgenics suffer from drawbacks such as complicated vector construction, low efficiency of transgenesis, and some remaining expression variegation. The recent development of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs has resulted in new transgenic techniques which do not have the drawbacks associated with BAC transgenesis. Initial reports indicate that such designer nucleases (DNs allow the targeted insertion of transgenes into endogenous loci by direct injection of the targeting vector and mRNA/DNA encoding the predesigned nucleases into oocytes. This results in the transgene being inserted at a specific locus in the mouse genome, thus circumventing the drawbacks associated with BAC transgenesis.

  10. 75 FR 9359 - Drawback of Internal Revenue Excise Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... Parts 113 and 191 RIN 1505-AC18 Drawback of Internal Revenue Excise Tax AGENCY: Customs and Border... Regulations to: preclude the filing of a substitution drawback claim for internal revenue excise tax paid on imported merchandise in situations where no excise tax was paid upon the substituted merchandise or...

  11. [Local excision of giant rectal polypoid neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimitan, Andrea; Burza, Antonio; Basile, Ursula; Saputo, Serena; Mingazzini, Pietro; Stipa, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Local excision is the best therapeutic option for giant adenomas of the rectum. Parks technique for lower rectal lesions and the T.E.M. technique for lesions localised in the middle and upper rectum offer exceptionally good exposure, allowing radical excision in the case of early low-risk T1 adenocarcinomas (well or moderately differentiated [G1/2] without lymphovascular invasion [L0]). From July 1987 to March 2006, 224 patients were treated by local excision for rectal lesions in our department. In 48 patients (21.4%) a large sessile benign lesion was diagnosed preoperatively. In 3 patients with a preoperative diagnosis of severe dysplasia (Tis) final pathology showed adenoma and for this reason they were included in our study group. A total of 51 patients with giant preoperative benign lesions were treated by local excision (Parks technique, T.E.M. or both). Twenty-five (49%) patients had a definitive diagnosis of adenocarcinoma: in situ (pTis) in 22 patients (88%), pT1 in 2 patients (8%) and pT2 in 1 patient (4%). In 26 patients (51%) the diagnosis was adenoma. The overall local recurrence rate was 9.8% (5/51); the recurrence rate was 7.6% (2/26) for adenomas and 12% (3/25) for carcinomas. The median hospital stay was 7 days (range 3-39). There was no operative mortality. Giant sessile polypoid lesions localized in the middle and upper rectum are best treated with T.E.M., while Parks technique is a good option in lower rectal tumours. These techniques, if correctly indicated and well performed, offer great advantages in terms of safety and radicality. In our experience the operative mortality was nil and the morbidity and recurrence rates were low.

  12. Uracil Excision for Assembly of Complex Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2015-01-01

    inexpensive technologies available. Here, we describe four different protocols for uracil excision-based DNA editing: one for simple manipulations such as site-directed mutagenesis, one for plasmid-based multigene assembly in Escherichia coli, one for one-step assembly and integration of single or multiple...... genes into the genome, and a standardized assembly pipeline using benchmarked oligonucleotides for pathway assembly and multigene expression optimization....

  13. High-fidelity CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with no detectable genome-wide off-target effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Pattanayak, Vikram; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Joung, J Keith

    2016-01-28

    CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations. Existing strategies for reducing genome-wide off-target effects of the widely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) are imperfect, possessing only partial or unproven efficacies and other limitations that constrain their use. Here we describe SpCas9-HF1, a high-fidelity variant harbouring alterations designed to reduce non-specific DNA contacts. SpCas9-HF1 retains on-target activities comparable to wild-type SpCas9 with >85% of single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) tested in human cells. Notably, with sgRNAs targeted to standard non-repetitive sequences, SpCas9-HF1 rendered all or nearly all off-target events undetectable by genome-wide break capture and targeted sequencing methods. Even for atypical, repetitive target sites, the vast majority of off-target mutations induced by wild-type SpCas9 were not detected with SpCas9-HF1. With its exceptional precision, SpCas9-HF1 provides an alternative to wild-type SpCas9 for research and therapeutic applications. More broadly, our results suggest a general strategy for optimizing genome-wide specificities of other CRISPR-RNA-guided nucleases.

  14. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; George H Silva; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly us...

  15. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embr...

  16. Polyplex-induced cytosolic nuclease activation leads to differential transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Rahul; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Wu, Gordon S-H; Shakya, Anisha; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2013-08-01

    Cytosolic nucleases have been proposed to play an important role in limiting the effectiveness of polyplex-based gene delivery agents. In order to explore the effect of cell membrane disruption on nuclease activation, nuclease activity upon polyplex uptake and localization, and nuclease activity upon gene expression, we employed an oligonucleotide molecular beacon (MB). The MB was incorporated as an integral part of the polymer/DNA polyplex, and two-color flow cytometry experiments were performed to explore the relationship of MB cleavage with propidium iodide (PI) uptake, protein expression, and polyplex uptake. In addition, confocal fluorescence microcopy was performed to examine both polyplex and cleaved MB localization. The impact of cell membrane disruption was also probed using whole-cell patch clamp measurement of the plasma membrane's electrical conductance. Differential activation of cytosolic nuclease was observed with substantial activity for B-PEI and G5 PAMAM dendrimer (G5), less cleavage for jetPEI, and little activity for L-PEI. jetPEI and L-PEI exhibited substantially greater transgene expression, consistent with the lower amounts of MB oligonucleotide cleavage observed. Cytosolic nuclease activity, although dependent on the choice of polymer employed, was not related to the degree of cell plasma membrane disruption that occurred as measured by PI uptake or whole-cell patch clamp.

  17. Multidirectional Vector Excision Leads to Better Outcomes than Traditional Elliptical Excision of Facial Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Il Oh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The elliptical excision is the standard method of removing benign skin lesions,such as congenital melanocytic nevi. This technique allows for primary closure, with little to nodog-ear deformity, but may sacrifice normal tissue adjacent to the lesion, resulting in scarswhich are unnecessarily long. This study was designed to compare the predicted results ofelliptical excision with those resulting from our excision technique.Methods Eighty-two patients with congenital melanocytic nevus on the face were prospectivelystudied. Each lesion was examined and an optimal ellipse was designed and marked onthe skin. After an incision on one side of the nevus margin, subcutaneous undermining wasperformed in the appropriate direction. The skin flap was pulled up and approximated alongseveral vectors to minimize the occurrence of dog-ear deformity.Results Overall, the final wound length was 21.1% shorter than that achieved by ellipticalexcision. Only 8.5% of the patients required dog-ear repair. There was no significant distortionof critical facial structures. All of the scars were deemed aesthetically acceptable based ontheir Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale scores.Conclusions When compared to elliptical excision, our technique appears to minimize dogeardeformity and decrease the final wound length. This technique should be considered analternative method for excision of facial nevi.

  18. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection.

  19. Evolution and mutagenesis of the mammalian excision repair gene ERCC-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. van den Tol; P. Warmerdam (Peter); H. Odijk (Hanny); D.N. Meijer (Dies); A. Westerveld (Andries); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe human DNA excision repair protein ERCC-1 exhibits homology to the yeast RADIO repair protein and its longer C-terminus displays similarity to parts of the E.coli repair proteins uvrA and uvrC. To study the evolution of this 'mosaic' ERCC-1 gene we have isolated the mouse homologue.

  20. 203 SINGLE-STEP GENE EDITING OF 3 XENOANTIGENS IN PORCINE FIBROBLASTS USING PROGRAMMABLE NUCLEASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perota, A; Lagutina, I; Quadalti, C; Duchi, R; Turini, P; Crotti, G; Colleoni, S; Conchon, S; Concordet, J-P; Lazzari, G; Soulillou, J-P; Galli, C

    2016-01-01

    Programmable nucleases (ZFN, Tal Effector Nucleases, and CRISPR) opened a new era for mammal genome editing, in particular for the pigs used for xenotransplantation. Multiple gene editing events are required both for knockout (KO) of xenoantigens and for targeted integration of human protective genes (Perota et al. 2016 J. Genet. Genomics 43, 233-23). The objective of the present work was to edit selected pig lines to KO the enzymes coding for the most relevant xenoantigens (i.e. GGTA1, CMAH, and B4GalNT2), combining Talens and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies to magnetic beads selection (Li et al. 2013 Xenotransplantation 22, 20-31). Primary porcine adult fibroblasts were transfected using Nucleofector (V-024 program). In a single reaction 2×10(6) fibroblasts were co-transfected using 2 different sets of TALENS (4μg/set) specific for CMAH (Conchon et al., 2013) and GGTA1 (Perota et al., 2015) genes together with B4GalNT2-specific CRISPR/Cas9 expression vector (2μg; pX330-B4GalNT2; Estrada et al., 2015). Eight days post-transfection (DPT), Gal-/- cells were selected initially using biotin-conjugated IB4 lectin (Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA) and magnetic beads (Dynabeads M-280, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). The selected cells were then plated on 150-mm Petri dishes (200 cells/dish) and cultured for 10 days. Selected colonies were expanded for PCR analysis and cryopreserved for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). All colonies were analysed by PCR for CMAH gene and their resulting products were digested with HindIII (HindIII-RFLP). Colonies that lost wild-type HindIII as a consequence of Talens effected deletion were PCR characterised for GGTA1, selecting those that had detectable Indels after gel electrophoresis and finally analysed by PCR for B4GalNT2. All PCR products were validated by sequencing for all the 3 genes of interest (TopoTA, Thermo Fisher Scientific). Selected colonies were used as nuclear donors for SCNT (Lagutina et al., 2006). Eight DPT we

  1. LEM-3 - A LEM domain containing nuclease involved in the DNA damage response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Dittrich

    Full Text Available The small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays a spectrum of DNA damage responses similar to humans. In order to identify new DNA damage response genes, we isolated in a forward genetic screen 14 new mutations conferring hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. We present here our characterization of lem-3, one of the genes identified in this screen. LEM-3 contains a LEM domain and a GIY nuclease domain. We confirm that LEM-3 has DNase activity in vitro. lem-3(lf mutants are hypersensitive to various types of DNA damage, including ionizing radiation, UV-C light and crosslinking agents. Embryos from irradiated lem-3 hermaphrodites displayed severe defects during cell division, including chromosome mis-segregation and anaphase bridges. The mitotic defects observed in irradiated lem-3 mutant embryos are similar to those found in baf-1 (barrier-to-autointegration factor mutants. The baf-1 gene codes for an essential and highly conserved protein known to interact with the other two C. elegans LEM domain proteins, LEM-2 and EMR-1. We show that baf-1, lem-2, and emr-1 mutants are also hypersensitive to DNA damage and that loss of lem-3 sensitizes baf-1 mutants even in the absence of DNA damage. Our data suggest that BAF-1, together with the LEM domain proteins, plays an important role following DNA damage - possibly by promoting the reorganization of damaged chromatin.

  2. Chromatin remodelling complex RSC promotes base excision repair in chromatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Wioletta; Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is a conserved DNA repair system required to maintain genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis in all eukaryotic cells. Nevertheless, how BER operates in vivo (i.e. in the context of chromatin) is poorly understood. We have investigated the role of an essential ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) in BER of intact yeast cells. We show that depletion of STH1, the ATPase subunit of RSC, causes enhanced sensitivity to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and results in a substantial inhibition of BER, at the GAL1 locus and in the genome overall. Consistent with this observation, the DNA in chromatin is less accessible to micrococcal nuclease digestion in the absence of RSC. Quantitative PCR results indicate that repair deficiency in STH1 depleted cells is not due to changes in the expression of BER genes. Collectively, our data indicates the RSC complex promotes efficient BER in chromatin. These results provide, for the first time, a link between ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling and BER in living cells.

  3. Sandwiched zinc-finger nucleases demonstrating higher homologous recombination rates than conventional zinc-finger nucleases in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomoaki; Mori, Koichi; Tobimatsu, Takamasa; Sera, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    We previously reported that our sandwiched zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), in which a DNA cleavage domain is inserted between two artificial zinc-finger proteins, cleave their target DNA much more efficiently than conventional ZFNs in vitro. In the present study, we compared DNA cleaving efficiencies of a sandwiched ZFN with those of its corresponding conventional ZFN in mammalian cells. Using a plasmid-based single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK293 cells, we confirmed that the sandwiched ZFN induced homologous recombination more efficiently than the conventional ZFN; reporter activation by the sandwiched ZFN was more than eight times that of the conventional one. Western blot analysis showed that the sandwiched ZFN was expressed less frequently than the conventional ZFN, indicating that the greater DNA-cleaving activity of the sandwiched ZFN was not due to higher expression of the sandwiched ZFN. Furthermore, an MTT assay demonstrated that the sandwiched ZFN did not have any significant cytotoxicity under the DNA-cleavage conditions. Thus, because our sandwiched ZFN cleaved more efficiently than its corresponding conventional ZFN in HEK293 cells as well as in vitro, sandwiched ZFNs are expected to serve as an effective molecular tool for genome editing in living cells.

  4. Self-quenched covalent fluorescent dye-nucleic acid conjugates as polymeric substrates for enzymatic nuclease assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hagstrom, James E; Budker, Vladimir G

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescent method is described for assessing nuclease activity. The technique is based on the preparation of quenched fluorophore-nucleic acid covalent conjugates and their subsequent dequenching due to degradation by nucleases. The resulting fluorescence increase can be measured by a spectrofluorometer and exhibits subpicogram per milliliter sensitivity level for RNase A and low picogram per milliliter level for DNase I. The method is adaptable for quantitative nuclease inhibitor testing.

  5. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: Role of wide local excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raashid Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to study the outcome of surgical treatment of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Materials and Methods: This study included 45 patients both retrospective and prospective from December 1995 to December 2010. Results: Out of 45 patients, 30 were males and 15 females with the male to female ratio of 2:1. Mean age of presentation was 38.4 + 13.2 years. Commonest mode of presentation was raised firm multinodular lesion with fixity to overlying skin. Site distribution was 42.22% trunk, 57.88% extremities and head and neck. None of the patients had lymph node involvement All patients underwent wide local excision. On histological examination, 8 patients had positive margins. Overall recurrence rate was 22.22%. (please clarify what is the difference between the rate of recurrence following surgery and the overall recurrence rate Only 2 patients developed metastasis to lungs in the course of their follow-up. Out of 45 patients, 35 remained recurrence free over a varying period of 5 months to 13 years (mean 68 months. Ten patients developed one or more local recurrences. Average time from initial treatment to recurrence was 32 months. All patients with recurrent tumors were subjected to salvage treatment, i.e., re-excision. Average recurrence-free period was 36 + 44 months within a mean follow-up of 68 months. Conclusion: Because of the potential of local recurrence, therapy for DFSP should be directed toward adequate local excision of the primary lesion. Minimal resection should include a surrounding margin, comprising 3-cm margin of normal skin and removal of underlying deep fascia. Compromising on margins invites higher chances of local recurrence.

  6. Cloning and characterization of a novel nuclease from shrimp hepatopancreas, and prediction of its active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W Y; Liaw, S H; Liao, T H

    2000-03-15

    Approximately 95% of the amino acid sequence of a shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) nuclease was derived from protease-digested peptides. A 1461-base cDNA for the nuclease was amplified and sequenced with degenerate primers based on the amino acid sequence and then specific primers by 3' and 5' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). It contains an open reading frame encoding a putative 21-residue signal peptide and a 381-residue mature protein. The N-terminus of the enzyme is pyroglutamate, deduced from composition and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS analyses, and confirmed by a glutamine residue in the cDNA sequence. The enzyme has 11 Cys residues, forming five intramolecular disulphides. The eleventh Cys residue was linked to a thiol compound with an estimated molecular mass of between 500 and 700 Da. A sequence similarity search revealed no homologous proteins but residues 205-255 shared a conserved active-site motif within a distinct group of nucleases. His(211) in this conserved motif was shown to be very important in catalysis by site-specific modification with (14)C-labelled iodoacetate. The shrimp nuclease, previously designated DNase I, does indeed possess a low level of hydrolytic activity towards RNA in the presence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). The conservation of functionally important residues during distant evolution might imply that the catalytic mechanisms are similar in these nucleases, which should be classified in one subfamily. Finally, an active-site structure for shrimp nuclease was proposed on the basis of published structural data and the results of mutational and biochemical analyses of Serratia nuclease.

  7. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism required for cellular resistance against UV light and toxic chemicals such as those found in tobacco smoke. In living cells, NER efficiently detects and removes DNA lesions within the large nuclear macromolecular complex called...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER. © 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel...

  8. DNA Oxidation Profiles of Copper Phenanthrene Chemical Nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molphy, Zara; Slator, Creina; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Kellett, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The deleterious effects of metal-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems can be seen in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ageing, and neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand however, targeted ROS production in the vicinity of nucleic acids - as demonstrated by metal-activated bleomycin - has paved the way for ROS-active chemotherapeutic drug development. Herein we report mechanistic investigations into the oxidative nuclease activity and redox properties of copper(II) developmental therapeutics [Cu(DPQ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPQ-Phen), [Cu(DPPZ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPPZ-Phen), and [{Cu(phen)2}2(μ-terph)](terph) (Cu-Terph), with results being compared directly to Sigman’s reagent [Cu(phen)2]2+ throughout (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DPQ = dipyridoquinoxaline; DPPZ = dipyridophenazine). Oxidative DNA damage was identified at the minor groove through use of surface bound recognition elements of methyl green, netropsin, and [Co(NH3)6]Cl3 that functioned to control complex accessibility at selected regions. ROS-specific scavengers and stabilisers were employed to identify the cleavage process, the results of which infer hydrogen peroxide produced metal-hydroxo or free hydroxyl radicals (•OH) as the predominant species. The extent of DNA damage owing to these radicals was then quantified through 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) lesion detection under ELISA protocol with the overall trend following Cu-DPQ-Phen > Cu-Terph > Cu-Phen > Cu-DPPZ. Finally, the effects of oxidative damage on DNA replication processes were investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) where amplification of 120 base pair DNA sequences of varying base content were inhibited - particularly along A-T rich chains - through oxidative damage of the template strands.

  9. DNA Oxidation Profiles of Copper Phenanthrene Chemical Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara eMolphy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious effects of metal-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS in biological systems can be seen in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ageing, and neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand however, targeted ROS production in the vicinity of nucleic acids – as demonstrated by metal-activated bleomycin – has paved the way for ROS-active chemotherapeutic drug development. Herein we report mechanistic investigations into the oxidative nuclease activity and redox properties of copper(II developmental therapeutics [Cu(DPQ(phen]2+ (Cu-DPQ-Phen, [Cu(DPPZ(phen]2+ (Cu-DPPZ-Phen, and [{Cu(phen2}2(μ-terph](terph (Cu-Terph, with results being compared directly to Sigman’s reagent [Cu(phen2]2+ throughout (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DPQ = dipyridoquinoxaline; DPPZ = dipyridophenazine. Oxidative DNA damage was identified at the minor groove through use of surface bound recognition elements of methyl green, netropsin, and [Co(NH36]Cl3 that functioned to control complex accessibility at selected regions. ROS-specific scavengers and stabilisers were employed to identify the cleavage process, the results of which infer hydrogen peroxide produced metal-hydroxo or free hydroxyl radicals (•OH as the predominant species. The extent of DNA damage owing to these radicals was then quantified through 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG lesion detection under ELISA protocol with the overall trend following Cu-DPQ-Phen > Cu-Terph > Cu-Phen > Cu-DPPZ. Finally, the effects of oxidative damage on DNA replication processes were investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR where amplification of 120 base pair DNA sequences of varying base content were inhibited – particularly along A-T rich chains – through oxidative damage of the template strands.

  10. DNA base excision repair nanosystem engineering: model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, B A

    2005-01-01

    DNA base damage results from a combination of endogenous sources, (normal metabolism, increased metabolism due to obesity, stress from diseases such as arthritis and diabetes, and ischemia) and the environment (ingested toxins, ionizing radiation, etc.). If unrepaired DNA base damage can lead to diminished cell function, and potentially diseases and eventually mutations that lead to cancer. Sophisticated DNA repair mechanisms have evolved in all living cells to preserve the integrity of inherited genetic information and transcriptional control. Understanding a system like DNA repair is greatly enhanced by using engineering methods, in particular modeling interactions and using predictive simulation to analyze the impact of perturbations. We describe the use of such a "nanosystem engineering" approach to analyze the DNA base excision repair pathway in human cells, and use simulation to predict the impact of varying enzyme concentration on DNA repair capacity.

  11. Eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair: from understanding mechanisms to influencing biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah C Shuck; Emily A Short; John J Turchi

    2008-01-01

    Repair of bulky DNA adducts by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway is one of the more versatile DNA repair pathways for the removal of DNA lesions. There are two subsets of the NER pathway, global genomic-NER (GG-NER) and transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER), which differ only in the step involving recognition of the DNA lesion. Following recognition of the damage, the sub-pathways then converge for the incision/excision steps and subsequent gap filling and ligation steps. This review will focus on the GGR sub-pathway of NER while the TCR sub-pathway will be covered in another article in this issue. The ability of the NER pathway to repair a wide array of adducts stems, in part, from the mechanisms involved in the initial recognition step of the damaged DNA and results in NER impacting an equally wide array of human physiological responses and events. In this review, the impact of NER on carcinogenesis, neurological function, sensitivity to environmental factors and sensitivity to cancer therapeutics will be discussed. The knowledge generated in our understanding of the NER pathway over the past 40 years has resulted from advances in the fields of animal model systems, mammalian genetics and in vitro biochemistry, as well as from reconstitution studies and structural analyses of the proteins and enzymes that participate in this pathway. Each of these avenues of research has contributed significantly to our understanding of how the NER pathway works and how alterations in NER activity, both positive and negative, influence human biology.

  12. Endoscopic-assisted excision of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kishore Chandra; Kumar, Ashwini; Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Jain, Disha

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma involving the bilateral paranasal sinuses, which was excised using an endoscopic-assisted transfacial approach. A patient presented with nasal swelling and left-sided nasal obstruction, epistaxis, and diplopia. Examination revealed broadening of the nasal dorsum with a fleshy pink mass in both nasal cavities. Computed tomographic scan showed a mass involving the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses on both sides. The tumor was diagnosed as group C esthesioneuroblastoma. The mass was excised by bilateral medial maxillectomy and bilateral frontoethmoidectomy. Using a 0 degrees endoscope, the attachment of the tumor to the cribriform plate was identified and resected using a motordrill. On Waroff staining, Hispathology slides suggested esthesioneuroblastoma. The patient was asymptomatic for 1 year, following which he developed infection of the nasal cavity for which he had no form of treatment. He subsequently developed maggots in the nasal cavity after which he died. An endoscopic resection of the cribriform plate from the nasal cavity without a formal craniofacial resection can be safely performed with oncologic safety.

  13. Thoracoscopic excision of mediastinal cysts in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Prashant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Thoracoscopy offers great advantages when compared with open surgery in terms of postoperative pain and pulmonary complications. Considering the benign nature of most of the mediastinal cysts, thoracoscopy is safe and feasible with minimal morbidity. The purpose of this article is to review our experience with four cases of mediastinal cysts resected successfully within a period of one year by thoracoscopy. Materials and Methods:The cases of mediastinal cysts operated by thoracoscopic excision in K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai from November 2005 to December 2006 were reviewed. The age varied from six months to 10 years. The patients presented with respiratory distress or recurrent lower respiratory tract infection. All patients underwent Chest X-ray and CT scan thorax to delineate the location of the cyst and its relationship with adjacent vital structures. Two patients had anterior and two had posterior mediastinal cyst. The ports were placed depending on the location of the cyst on the CT scan, following the principles of triangularization. The cysts were excised mainly by blunt dissection. Results: All the patients were successfully managed by thoracoscopic surgery. None of them had intraoperative complications. Dissection in patient with history of recurrent respiratory tract infection was difficult because of adhesions. Intercostal drain was removed within 48hrs and the patients were discharged on the fourth postoperative day. Conclusions: Thoracoscopy in mediastinal cysts is a safe and effective procedure with low morbidity and a shorter hospital stay.

  14. Nuclease-mediated genome editing: At the front-line of functional genomics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Woltjen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered endonucleases is rapidly becoming a staple method in developmental biology studies. Engineered nucleases permit random or designed genomic modification at precise loci through the stimulation of endogenous double-strand break repair. Homology-directed repair following targeted DNA damage is mediated by co-introduction of a custom repair template, allowing the derivation of knock-out and knock-in alleles in animal models previously refractory to classic gene targeting procedures. Currently there are three main types of customizable site-specific nucleases delineated by the source mechanism of DNA binding that guides nuclease activity to a genomic target: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). Among these genome engineering tools, characteristics such as the ease of design and construction, mechanism of inducing DNA damage, and DNA sequence specificity all differ, making their application complementary. By understanding the advantages and disadvantages of each method, one may make the best choice for their particular purpose.

  15. Improving lambda red genome engineering in Escherichia coli via rational removal of endogenous nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Mosberg

    Full Text Available Lambda Red recombineering is a powerful technique for making targeted genetic changes in bacteria. However, many applications are limited by the frequency of recombination. Previous studies have suggested that endogenous nucleases may hinder recombination by degrading the exogenous DNA used for recombineering. In this work, we identify ExoVII as a nuclease which degrades the ends of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA oligonucleotides and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA cassettes. Removing this nuclease improves both recombination frequency and the inheritance of mutations at the 3' ends of ssDNA and dsDNA. Extending this approach, we show that removing a set of five exonucleases (RecJ, ExoI, ExoVII, ExoX, and Lambda Exo substantially improves the performance of co-selection multiplex automatable genome engineering (CoS-MAGE. In a given round of CoS-MAGE with ten ssDNA oligonucleotides, the five nuclease knockout strain has on average 46% more alleles converted per clone, 200% more clones with five or more allele conversions, and 35% fewer clones without any allele conversions. Finally, we use these nuclease knockout strains to investigate and clarify the effects of oligonucleotide phosphorothioation on recombination frequency. The results described in this work provide further mechanistic insight into recombineering, and substantially improve recombineering performance.

  16. Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmasry, Moustafa; Steinvall, Ingrid; Thorfinn, Johan; Abdelrahman, Islam; Olofsson, Pia; Sjoberg, Folke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%). Methods: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group). Results: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups. Conclusion: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome. PMID:28123862

  17. Precise excision of transposons and point mutations induced by chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina OYu; Mirskaya, E E; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaya, A G

    1992-11-01

    The ability of 23 chemicals (carcinogens and non-carcinogens) to induce precise excision of Tn10 and point mutations was studied in experiments with a single strain. The mutation assay was shown to detect a wider spectrum of genotoxic agents than the assay of Tn10 precise excision. The latter was induced only by potent SOS mutagens, which is in accordance with data on the SOS dependence of the induction of precise excision of Tn10. The precise excision assay as an additional test contributing to the knowledge of particular features of the action of a tested mutagen is discussed. The induction of precise excision of Tn10 by pyrene (and its failure to induce point mutations in this strain) demonstrates the value of using the transposon excision assay in cases of 'problem' mutagens.

  18. Surgical Excision of Multiple Penile Syringomas With Scrotal Flap Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Penile syringomas are rare lesions usually occurring in isolation. We report the excision and reconstruction of multiple synchronous penile shaft syringomas with local scrotal flaps. Methods: We report a rare case of excision of multiple penile syringomas and reconstruction with scrotal flaps in a 29-year-old man. Results: Penile syringomas were excised and reconstructed with scrotal flaps in a single-stage procedure. Conclusions: In addition to providing wound coverage, this recon...

  19. Multiple-turnover cleavage of double-stranded DNA by sandwiched zinc-finger nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Yusuke; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Doi, Norio; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    To refine zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology, we constructed a sandwiched ZFN, in which a DNA cleavage enzyme was sandwiched with two artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs). Because the sandwiched ZFN is designed to cleave the DNA between the two AZP-binding sites, the sandwiched ZFN is expected to bind preferentially to a DNA substrate rather than to cleavage products and thereby cleave it with multiple turnovers. To prove the concept, we sandwiched a staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), which cleaves DNA as a monomer, between two 3-finger AZPs. The AZP-sandwiched SNase cleaved large amounts of dsDNA site-specifically. Such multiple-turnover cleavage was not observed with control nucleases that possess a single AZP.

  20. Conjunctival spheroid degeneration. Recurrence after excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M S

    1982-06-01

    After excision of part of the conjunctiva in 15 eyes (14 subjects) due to spheroid degeneration, the author noticed only fairly small, varying numbers of autofluorescent and colourless spheroids-after an observation period of 18 months, only 6% of autofluorescent and 13% of colourless bodies were observed compared to the number before biopsy. Around the biopsy site only a few spheroids were seen, with a non-significant tendency to increase in number of the colourless bodies. In the cornea the band-shaped keratopathy had aggravated, with the formation of a small number of large, autofluorescent spheroids. A pinguecula recurred in a mild degree only in 3 out of 13 cases within 18 months.

  1. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair through ubiquitination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Audesh Bhat; Wei Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most versatile DNA-repair pathway in all organisms.While bacteria require only three proteins to complete the incision step of NER,eukaryotes employ about 30 proteins to complete the same step.Here we summarize recent studies demonstrating that ubiquitination,a post-translational modification,plays critical roles in regulating the NER activity either dependent on or independent of ubiquitin-proteolysis.Several NER components have been shown as targets of ubiquitination while others are actively involved in the ubiquitination process.We argue through this analysis that ubiquitination serves to coordinate various steps of NER and meanwhile connect NER with other related pathways to achieve the efficient global DNA-damage response.

  2. Transposase-Mediated Excision, Conjugative Transfer, and Diversity of ICE6013 Elements in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansevere, Emily A; Luo, Xiao; Park, Joo Youn; Yoon, Sunghyun; Seo, Keun Seok; Robinson, D Ashley

    2017-04-15

    ICE6013 represents one of two families of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) identified in the pan-genome of the human and animal pathogen Staphylococcus aureus Here we investigated the excision and conjugation functions of ICE6013 and further characterized the diversity of this element. ICE6013 excision was not significantly affected by growth, temperature, pH, or UV exposure and did not depend on recA The IS30-like DDE transposase (Tpase; encoded by orf1 and orf2) of ICE6013 must be uninterrupted for excision to occur, whereas disrupting three of the other open reading frames (ORFs) on the element significantly affects the level of excision. We demonstrate that ICE6013 conjugatively transfers to different S. aureus backgrounds at frequencies approaching that of the conjugative plasmid pGO1. We found that excision is required for conjugation, that not all S. aureus backgrounds are successful recipients, and that transconjugants acquire the ability to transfer ICE6013 Sequencing of chromosomal integration sites in serially passaged transconjugants revealed a significant integration site preference for a 15-bp AT-rich palindromic consensus sequence, which surrounds the 3-bp target site that is duplicated upon integration. A sequence analysis of ICE6013 from different host strains of S. aureus and from eight other species of staphylococci identified seven divergent subfamilies of ICE6013 that include sequences previously classified as a transposon, a plasmid, and various ICEs. In summary, these results indicate that the IS30-like Tpase functions as the ICE6013 recombinase and that ICE6013 represents a diverse family of mobile genetic elements that mediate conjugation in staphylococci.IMPORTANCE Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) encode the abilities to integrate into and excise from bacterial chromosomes and plasmids and mediate conjugation between bacteria. As agents of horizontal gene transfer, ICEs may affect bacterial evolution. ICE6013 represents one

  3. Multispot array combined with S1 nuclease-mediated elimination of unpaired nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Dong Min; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    The accurate detection of mismatched base pairs is critical to many DNA hybridization-based applications in basic research and diagnostics. We herein demonstrate that mismatched DNAs on a multispot array can be accurately detected in a multiplexed way by employing the S1 nuclease-based mismatched......-target duplex. This technique of performing S1 nuclease-mediated cleavage on a multispot array offers high specificity and high-throughput detection of mismatched DNAs. It is expected that this assay system will prove useful for single-assay genotyping and/or the diagnosis of various diseases and pathogens....

  4. GUIDEseq: a bioconductor package to analyze GUIDE-Seq datasets for CRISPR-Cas nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lihua Julie; Lawrence, Michael; Gupta, Ankit; Pagès, Hervé; Kucukural, Alper; Garber, Manuel; Wolfe, Scot A

    2017-05-15

    Genome editing technologies developed around the CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease system have facilitated the investigation of a broad range of biological questions. These nucleases also hold tremendous promise for treating a variety of genetic disorders. In the context of their therapeutic application, it is important to identify the spectrum of genomic sequences that are cleaved by a candidate nuclease when programmed with a particular guide RNA, as well as the cleavage efficiency of these sites. Powerful new experimental approaches, such as GUIDE-seq, facilitate the sensitive, unbiased genome-wide detection of nuclease cleavage sites within the genome. Flexible bioinformatics analysis tools for processing GUIDE-seq data are needed. Here, we describe an open source, open development software suite, GUIDEseq, for GUIDE-seq data analysis and annotation as a Bioconductor package in R. The GUIDEseq package provides a flexible platform with more than 60 adjustable parameters for the analysis of datasets associated with custom nuclease applications. These parameters allow data analysis to be tailored to different nuclease platforms with different length and complexity in their guide and PAM recognition sequences or their DNA cleavage position. They also enable users to customize sequence aggregation criteria, and vary peak calling thresholds that can influence the number of potential off-target sites recovered. GUIDEseq also annotates potential off-target sites that overlap with genes based on genome annotation information, as these may be the most important off-target sites for further characterization. In addition, GUIDEseq enables the comparison and visualization of off-target site overlap between different datasets for a rapid comparison of different nuclease configurations or experimental conditions. For each identified off-target, the GUIDEseq package outputs mapped GUIDE-Seq read count as well as cleavage score from a user specified off-target cleavage score prediction

  5. The application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases for genome editing in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Peishan; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful model system for biomedical research in the past decades, however, the efficient genetic tools are still demanding for gene knockout, knock-in or conditional gene mutations. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that comprise a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain fused to a FokI nuclease domain facilitate the targeted genome editing in various cell types or organisms. Here we summarize the recent progresses and protocols using TALENs in C. elegans that generate gene mutations and knock-ins in the germ line and the conditional gene knockout in somatic tissues.

  6. Mouse Spermatozoa Contain a Nuclease that Is Activated by Pretreatment with EGTA and Subsequent Calcium Incubation

    OpenAIRE

    Boaz, Segal M.; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W. Steven

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into ~50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl2 and CaCl2 in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl2 alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl2 had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by EGTA to digest...

  7. Defining and improving the genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2016-05-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases are a transformative technology for biology, genetics and medicine owing to the simplicity with which they can be programmed to cleave specific DNA target sites in living cells and organisms. However, to translate these powerful molecular tools into safe, effective clinical applications, it is of crucial importance to carefully define and improve their genome-wide specificities. Here, we outline our state-of-the-art understanding of target DNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases, methods to determine and improve their specificities, and key considerations for how to evaluate and reduce off-target effects for research and therapeutic applications.

  8. Investigation and improvement of DNA cleavage models of polyamide + Cu(II nuclease + OOH- ligands bound to DNA

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    Wang Yan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper nucleases as a famous class of artificial metallonucleases have attracted considerable interest in relation to their diverse potentials not only as therapeutic agents but also in genomic researches. Copper nucleases present high efficient oxidative cleavage of DNA, in which DNA strand scission occurs generally after hydrogen atom abstracted from a sugar moiety. In order to achieve the selective cleavage of DNA sequences by copper nucleases, the DNA specific recognition agents of the Dervan-type hairpin and cyclic polyamides can be considered as proper carriers of copper nucleases. Investigation of the DNA cleavage selectivity of copper nucleases assisted by the hairpin and cyclic polyamides at the molecular level has not yet been elucidated. Results We carried out a series of molecular dynamics simulations for the nuclease [Cu(BPA]2+ or [Cu(IDB]2+ bound to the hairpin/cyclic polyamide and associated with DNA to investigate the selective DNA cleavage properties of Cu(II-based artificial nucleases. The simulated results demonstrate that the DNA cleavage selectivity of the two nucleases assisted by the hairpin polyamide is improved efficiently. The [Cu(BPA]2+ or [Cu(IDB]2+ nuclease with a substrate OOH- bound to the hairpin polyamide can be stably located at the minor groove of DNA, and possibly abstracts H atom from the sugar of DNA. However, the DNA cleavage properties of the two nucleases assisted by the cyclic polyamide are significantly poor due to the rigidity of linking region between the cyclic polyamide and nuclease. With introduction of the flexible linker -CH2CH2CH2NH2, the modified cyclic polyamide can assist the two copper nucleases to improve the selective DNA cleavage properties efficiently. Conclusion A flexible linker and a proper binding site of the polyamide-type recognition agents play an important role in improving the DNA cleavage selectivity of copper nucleases. Current investigations provide an

  9. Enhanced cleavage of double-stranded DNA by artificial zinc-finger nuclease sandwiched between two zinc-finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Yusuke; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Doi, Norio; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2008-11-25

    To enhance DNA cleavage by zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), we sandwiched a DNA cleavage enzyme with two artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs). Because the DNA between the two AZP-binding sites is cleaved, the AZP-sandwiched nuclease is expected to bind preferentially to a DNA substrate rather than to cleavage products and thereby cleave it with multiple turnovers. To demonstrate the concept, we sandwiched a staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), which cleaves DNA as a monomer, between two three-finger AZPs. The AZP-sandwiched SNase cleaved large amounts of dsDNA site-specifically. Such multiple-turnover cleavage was not observed with nucleases that possess a single AZP. Thus, AZP-sandwiched nucleases will further refine ZFN technology.

  10. Surveyor Nuclease: a new strategy for a rapid identification of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations in patients with respiratory chain defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Procaccio, Vincent; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique

    2005-06-01

    Molecular analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a critical step in diagnosis and genetic counseling of respiratory chain defects. No fast method is currently available for the identification of unknown mtDNA point mutations. We have developed a new strategy based on complete mtDNA PCR amplification followed by digestion with a mismatch-specific DNA endonuclease, Surveyor Nuclease. This enzyme, a member of the CEL nuclease family of plant DNA endonucleases, cleaves double-strand DNA at any mismatch site including base substitutions and small insertions/deletions. After digestion, cleavage products are separated and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The size of the digestion products indicates the location of the mutation, which is then confirmed and characterized by sequencing. Although this method allows the analysis of 2 kb mtDNA amplicons and the detection of multiple mutations within the same fragment, it does not lead to the identification of homoplasmic base substitutions. Homoplasmic pathogenic mutations have been described. Nevertheless, most homoplasmic base substitutions are neutral polymorphisms while deleterious mutations are typically heteroplasmic. Here, we report that this method can be used to detect mtDNA mutations such as m.3243A>G tRNA(Leu) and m.14709T>C tRNA(Glu) even when they are present at levels as low as 3% in DNA samples derived from patients with respiratory chain defects. Then, we tested five patients suffering from a mitochondrial respiratory chain defect and we identified a variant (m.16189T>C) in two of them, which was previously associated with susceptibility to diabetes and cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, this method can be effectively used to rapidly and completely screen the entire human mitochondrial genome for heteroplasmic mutations and in this context represents an important advance for the diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases.

  11. P element excision in drosophila melanogaster and related drosophilids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The frequency of P element excision and the structure of the resulting excision products were determined in three drosophilid species, Drosophila melanogaster, D. virilis, and Chymomyza procnemis. A transient P element mobility assay was conducted in the cells of developing insect embryos, but unlik...

  12. Effects of burn wound excision on bacterial colonization and invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Herndon, DN

    2003-01-01

    Rates of survival after thermal injury have improved in the past two decades, and rates of wound infections and sepsis have decreased during the same period. Early excision has been advocated as one of the major factors, but its safety and efficacy and the exact timing of burn excision are still und

  13. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed signal excision software: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1992-05-01

    The Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) signal excision software is a set of programs that provide real-time processing functions for the excision of interfering tones from a live spread-spectrum signal as well as off-line functions for the analysis of the effectiveness of the excision technique. The processing functions provided by the ASPT signal excision software are real-time adaptive filtering of live data, storage to disk, and file sorting and conversion. The main off-line analysis function is bit error determination. The purpose of the software is to measure the effectiveness of an adaptive filtering algorithm to suppress interfering or jamming signals in a spread spectrum signal environment. A user manual for the software is provided, containing information on the different software components available to perform signal excision experiments: the real-time excision software, excision host program, file processing utilities, and despreading and bit error rate determination software. In addition, information is presented describing the excision algorithm implemented, the real-time processing framework, the steps required to add algorithms to the system, the processing functions used in despreading, and description of command sequences for post-run analysis of the data.

  14. Laparoscopic vs open total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, SO; Grond, AJK; Pierie, JPE; Hoff, C; Wiggers, T; Meijerink, WJHJ

    Background: Next to surgical margins, yield of lymph nodes, and length of bowel resected, macroscopic completeness of mesorectal excision may serve as another quality control of total mesorectal excision (TME). In this study, the macroscopic completeness of laparoscopic TME was evaluated. Methods: A

  15. Processing of 3'-Phosphoglycolate-Terminated DNA Double-StrandBreaks by Artemis Nuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povrik, Lawrence F.; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J.; Yannone, Steven M.

    2005-10-01

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis functions on oxidatively modified double-strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3{prime}-hydroxyl or 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3{prime} overhangs (>9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3{prime}-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted selective Artemis-mediated trimming of a single 3{prime}-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3{prime} overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was dependent upon Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase, and ATP. Together, these data suggest that Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3{prime} overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3{prime} to the cleavage site. Shorter 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis, but much less efficiently. Consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of Artemis, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to X-rays, bleomycin and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated double-strand breaks. Collectively, these results suggest that 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate termini and/or specific classes of DNA ends that arise from such blocked termini are relevant Artemis substrates in vivo.

  16. Zebrafish foxP2 zinc finger nuclease mutant has normal axon pathfinding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Xing

    Full Text Available foxP2, a forkhead-domain transcription factor, is critical for speech and language development in humans, but its role in the establishment of CNS connectivity is unclear. While in vitro studies have identified axon guidance molecules as targets of foxP2 regulation, and cell culture assays suggest a role for foxP2 in neurite outgrowth, in vivo studies have been lacking regarding a role for foxP2 in axon pathfinding. We used a modified zinc finger nuclease methodology to generate mutations in the zebrafish foxP2 gene. Using PCR-based high resolution melt curve analysis (HRMA of G0 founder animals, we screened and identified three mutants carrying nonsense mutations in the 2(nd coding exon: a 17 base-pair (bp deletion, an 8bp deletion, and a 4bp insertion. Sequence analysis of cDNA confirmed that these were frameshift mutations with predicted early protein truncations. Homozygous mutant fish were viable and fertile, with unchanged body morphology, and no apparent differences in CNS apoptosis, proliferation, or patterning at embryonic stages. There was a reduction in expression of the known foxP2 target gene cntnap2 that was rescued by injection of wild-type foxP2 transcript. When we examined axon pathfinding using a pan-axonal marker or transgenic lines, including a foxP2-neuron-specific enhancer, we did not observe any axon guidance errors. Our findings suggest that foxP2 is not necessary for axon pathfinding during development.

  17. Zinc-finger nuclease mediated disruption of Rag1 in the LEW/Ztm rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zschemisch Nils-Holger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN represented an innovative method for the genome manipulation in vertebrates. ZFN introduced targeted DNA double strand breaks (DSB and initiated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ after pronuclear or cytoplasmatic microinjection into zygotes. Resulting frame shift mutations led to functional gene ablations in zebra fish, mice, pigs and also in laboratory rats. Therefore, we targeted the rat Rag1 gene essential for the V(DJ recombination within the immunoglobulin production process and for the differentiation of mature B and T lymphocytes to generate an immunodeficient rat model in the LEW/Ztm strain. Results After microinjection of Rag1 specific ZFN mRNAs in 623 zygotes of inbred LEW/Ztm rats 59 offspring were born from which one carried a 4 bp deletion. This frame shift mutation led to a premature stop codon and a subsequently truncated Rag1 protein confirmed by the loss of the full-length protein in Western Blot analysis. Truncation of the Rag1 protein was characterized by the complete depletion of mature B cells. The remaining T cell population contained mature CD4+/CD3+/TCRαβ+ as well as CD8+/CD3+/TCRαβ+ positive lymphocytes accompanied by a compensatory increase of natural killer cells in the peripheral blood. Reduction of T cell development in Rag1 mutant rats was associated with a hypoplastic thymus that lacked follicular structures. Histological evaluation also revealed the near-complete absence of lymphocytes in spleen and lymph nodes in the immunodeficient Rag1 mutant rat. Conclusion The Rag1 mutant rat will serve as an important model for transplantation studies. Furthermore, it may be used as a model for reconstitution experiments related to the immune system, particularly with respect to different populations of human lymphocytes, natural killer cells and autoimmune phenomena.

  18. Efficient immunoglobulin gene disruption and targeted replacement in rabbit using zinc finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Flisikowska

    Full Text Available Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM(+ and IgG(+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields.

  19. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka using custom-designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44-100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1(Δ7/Δ7) fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics.

  20. The Versajet water dissector: a new tool for tangential excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B; Hunter, Sue; Heimbach, David M; Engrav, Loren H; Honari, Shari; Gallery, Ellen; Kiriluk, Diane-Marie; Gibran, Nicole S

    2005-01-01

    Goulian and Watson knives work well for tangential burn excision on large flat areas. They do not work well in small areas and in areas with a three-dimensional structure. The Versajet Hydrosurgery System (Smith and Nephew, Key Largo, FL) is a new waterjet-powered surgical tool designed for wound excision. The small size of the cutting nozzle and the ability to easily maneuver the water dissector into small spaces makes it a potentially useful tool for excision of burns of the eyelids, digits and web spaces. The Versajet Hydrosurgery System contains a power console that propels saline through a handheld cutting device. This stream of pressurized saline functions as a knife. We have used the Versajet for burn excision in 44 patients. Although there is a learning curve for both surgeons using and operating room staff setting up the device, the Versajet provides a relatively facile method for excision of challenging aesthetic and functional areas.

  1. Alar base reduction: the boomerang-shaped excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2011-04-01

    A boomerang-shaped alar base excision is described to narrow the nasal base and correct the excessive alar flare. The boomerang excision combined the external alar wedge resection with an internal vestibular floor excision. The internal excision was inclined 30 to 45 degrees laterally to form the inner limb of the boomerang. The study included 46 patients presenting with wide nasal base and excessive alar flaring. All cases were followed for a mean period of 18 months (range, 8 to 36 months). The laterally oriented vestibular floor excision allowed for maximum preservation of the natural curvature of the alar rim where it meets the nostril floor and upon its closure resulted in a considerable medialization of alar lobule, which significantly reduced the amount of alar flare and the amount of external alar excision needed. This external alar excision measured, on average, 3.8 mm (range, 2 to 8 mm), which is significantly less than that needed when a standard vertical internal excision was used ( P < 0.0001). Such conservative external excisions eliminated the risk of obliterating the natural alar-facial crease, which did not occur in any of our cases. No cases of postoperative bleeding, infection, or vestibular stenosis were encountered. Keloid or hypertrophic scar formation was not encountered; however, dermabrasion of the scars was needed in three (6.5%) cases to eliminate apparent suture track marks. The boomerang alar base excision proved to be a safe and effective technique for narrowing the nasal base and elimination of the excessive flaring and resulted in a natural, well-proportioned nasal base with no obvious scarring. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  2. Early zygote-specific nuclease in mitochondria of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yohsuke; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Nomura, Hideo; Sasaki, Narie; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2005-11-01

    The active, selective digestion of mtDNA from one parent is a possible molecular mechanism for the uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. In Physarum polycephalum, mtDNA is packed by DNA-binding protein Glom, which packs mtDNA into rod-shaped mt-nucleoids. After the mating, mtDNA from one parent is selectively digested, and the Glom began to disperse. Dispersed Glom was retained for at least 6 h after mtDNA digestion, but disappeared completely by about 12 h after mixing two strains. We identified two novel nucleases using DNA zymography with native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE. One is a Ca2+-dependent, high-molecular-weight nuclease complex (about 670 kDa), and the other is a Mn2+-dependent, high-molecular-weight nuclease complex (440-670 kDa); the activity of the latter was detected as a Mn2+-dependent, 13-kDa DNase band on SDS-PAGE. All mitochondria isolated from myxamoebae had mt-nucleoids, whereas half of the mitochondria isolated from the zygotes at 12 h after mixing had lost the mt-nucleoids. The activity of the Mn2+-dependent nuclease in the isolated mitochondria was detected at least 8 h after mixing of two strains. The timing and localization of the Mn2+-dependent DNase activity matched the selective digestion of mtDNA.

  3. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Finola E; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Martinez, Sarah A; Blackburn, Jessica S; Khayter, Cyd; Ramirez, Cherie L; Joung, J Keith; Langenau, David M

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  4. Tudor domain proteins in protozoan parasites and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum tudor staphylococcal nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Manzar J; Korde, Reshma; Singh, Shivani; Mohmmed, Asif; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, V S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2008-04-01

    RNA-binding proteins play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In eukaryotic cells, a multitude of RNA-binding proteins with several RNA-binding domains/motifs have been described. Here, we show the existence of two Tudor domain containing proteins, a survival of motor neuron (SMN)-like protein and a Staphylococcus aureus nuclease homologue referred to as TSN, in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites. Activity analysis shows that Plasmodium falciparum TSN (PfTSN) possesses nuclease activity and Tudor domain is the RNA-binding domain. A specific inhibitor of micrococcal nucleases, 3',5'-deoxythymidine bisphosphate (pdTp) inhibits the nuclease as well as RNA-binding activities of the protein. PfTSN shows a predominant nuclear localization. Treatment of P. falciparum with pdTp, inhibited in vitro growth of both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum, while a four fold concentration of pdTp did not have any significant effect on the mammalian cell line, Huh-7D12. Altogether, these results suggest that PfTSN is an essential enzyme in the parasite's life cycle.

  5. PNA-based artificial nucleases as antisense and anti-miRNA oligonucleotide agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglione, M; Milano, G; Chambery, A; Moggio, L; Romanelli, A; Messere, A

    2011-08-01

    Because of its interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) has attracted major attention in molecular biology, for diagnostics purposes and development of biosensors. PNAs have become candidates for gene therapeutic drugs in ANTISENSE (AO) strategy with favorable in vivo biochemical properties. Recently, antisense PNA oligonucleotides have been described in anti-miRNA approach (AMO). We propose PNA-based nucleases as AO and AMO agents. We report the design, synthesis and characterization of two kinds of artificial nucleases composed of a PEG-PNA-PEG domain conjugated to HGG·Cu (A) and DETA (B) as well known cleavage sites. Qualitative (MALDI-TOF) and quantitative (HTS) assays were planned to study nuclease activity of constructs A and B on RNA-3'-FAM target sequence. The results have highlighted the best performance of nuclease B and the relevance of the PEG spacer, in particular for conjugate A, in terms of efficiency of the cleavage, suggesting that conjugates A and B also act as potential antisense and anti-miRNA agents.

  6. Orchestrating the nucleases involved in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengerová, Blanka; Wang, Anderson T; McHugh, Peter J

    2011-12-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) pose a significant threat to genomic and cellular integrity by blocking essential cellular processes, including replication and transcription. In mammalian cells, much ICL repair occurs in association with DNA replication during S phase, following the stalling of a replication fork at the block caused by an ICL lesion. Here, we review recent work showing that the XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease and the hSNM1A exonuclease act in the same pathway, together with SLX4, to initiate ICL repair, with the MUS81-EME1 fork incision activity becoming important in the absence of the XPF-SNM1A-SLX4-dependent pathway. Another nuclease, the Fanconi anemia-associated nuclease (FAN1), has recently been implicated in the repair of ICLs, and we discuss the possible ways in which the activities of different nucleases at the ICL-stalled replication fork may be coordinated. In relation to this, we briefly speculate on the possible role of SLX4, which contains XPF and MUS81- interacting domains, in the coordination of ICL repair nucleases.

  7. Multicomponent synthesis of artificial nucleases and their RNase and DNase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V. Gulevich

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of new, artificial ribonucleases containing two amino acid residues connected by an aliphatic linker has been developed. Target molecules were synthesized via a catalytic three-component Ugi reaction from aliphatic diisocyanides. Preliminary investigations proved unspecific nuclease activity of the new compounds towards single-stranded RNA and double-stranded circular DNA.

  8. CLONING, SEQUENCING, AND EXPRESSION OF BACILLUS-SUBTILIS GENES INVOLVED IN ATP-DEPENDENT NUCLEASE SYNTHESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOISTRA, J; VENEMA, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-

  9. Base Sequence Context Effects on Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqin Cai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of the genome when damaged by bulky DNA lesions, since inefficient repair can cause mutations and human diseases notably cancer. The structural properties of DNA lesions that determine their relative susceptibilities to NER are therefore of great interest. As a model system, we have investigated the major mutagenic lesion derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, 10S (+-trans-anti-B[a]P-2-dG in six different sequence contexts that differ in how the lesion is positioned in relation to nearby guanine amino groups. We have obtained molecular structural data by NMR and MD simulations, bending properties from gel electrophoresis studies, and NER data obtained from human HeLa cell extracts for our six investigated sequence contexts. This model system suggests that disturbed Watson-Crick base pairing is a better recognition signal than a flexible bend, and that these can act in concert to provide an enhanced signal. Steric hinderance between the minor groove-aligned lesion and nearby guanine amino groups determines the exact nature of the disturbances. Both nearest neighbor and more distant neighbor sequence contexts have an impact. Regardless of the exact distortions, we hypothesize that they provide a local thermodynamic destabilization signal for repair.

  10. A High Excision Potential of TALENs for Integrated DNA of HIV-Based Lentiviral Vector

    OpenAIRE

    Hirotaka Ebina; Yuka Kanemura; Naoko Misawa; Tetsushi Sakuma; Tomoko Kobayashi; Takashi Yamamoto; Yoshio Koyanagi

    2015-01-01

    DNA-editing technology has made it possible to rewrite genetic information in living cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus, an integrated form of viral complementary DNA in host chromosomes, could be a potential target for this technology. We recently reported that HIV proviral DNA could be excised from the chromosomal DNA of HIV-based lentiviral DNA-transduced T cells after multiple introductions of a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 endonuc...

  11. Lingual Thyroid Excision with Transoral Robotic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Ersoy Callıoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic thyroid gland may be detected at any place between foramen caecaum and normal thyroid localization due to inadequacy of the embryological migration of the thyroid gland. It has a prevalence varying between 1/10.000 and 1/100000 in the community. Usually follow-up without treatment is preferred except for obstructive symptoms, bleeding, and suspicion of malignity. Main symptoms are dysphagia, dysphonia, bleeding, dyspnea, and obstructive sleep apnea. In symptomatic cases, the first described method in surgical treatment is open approach since it is a region difficult to have access to. However, this approach has an increased risk of morbidity and postoperative complications. Transoral robotic surgery, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure, has advantages such as larger three-dimensional point of view and ease of manipulation due to robotic instruments. In this report, a case at the age of 49 who presented to our clinic with obstructive symptoms increasing within the last year and was found to have lingual thyroid and underwent excision of ectopic thyroid tissue by da Vinci surgical system is presented.

  12. Complete mesocolic excision: Techniques and outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikoletta; Dimitriou; John; Griniatsos

    2015-01-01

    Complete mesocolic excision(CME) for the treatment of colon cancer was first introduced in the West in 2008. The first aim of this procedure is to remove the afflicted colon and its accessory lymphovascular supply by resecting the colon and mesocolon in an intact envelope of visceral peritoneum, which holds potentiallyinvolved lymph nodes. The second component of CME is a central vascular tie to remove completely all lymph nodes in the central(vertical) direction. In its original iteration, CME was performed via laparotomy, although many centers preferentially perform laparoscopic surgery, with its associated benefits and similar oncolo-gical outcomes, as the standard treatment for colonic cancer. Here, we present the surgical techniques for CME in open and laparoscopic surgery, as well as the surgical, pathological and oncological outcomes of the procedure that are available to date. Because there are no randomized control trials comparing CME to "standard" colon surgery, the principles underlying CME seem anatomical and logical, and the results published from the Far East, reporting an 80% 5-year survival rate for Stage III cancer, should guide us.

  13. Mouse spermatozoa contain a nuclease that is activated by pretreatment with EGTA and subsequent calcium incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Segal M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W Steven

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into approximately 50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl(2) and CaCl(2) in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl(2) alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl(2) had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) to digest the sperm DNA by SDD. Spermatozoa were extracted with salt and dithiothreitol to remove protamines and then incubated with EGTA. Next, the EGTA was removed and divalent cations were added. We found that Mn(2+), Ca(2+), or Zn(2+) could each activate SDD in spermatozoa but Mg(2+) could not. When the reaction was slowed by incubation on ice, EGTA pretreatment followed by incubation in Ca(2+) elicited the reversible fragmentation of sperm DNA evident in SCF. When the reactions were then incubated at 37 degrees C they progressed to the more complete degradation of DNA by SDD. EDTA could also be used to activate the nuclease, but required a higher concentration than EGTA. This EGTA-activatable nuclease activity was found in each fraction of the vas deferens plasma: in the spermatozoa, in the surrounding fluid, and in the insoluble components in the fluid. These results suggest that this sperm nuclease is regulated by a mechanism that is sensitive to EGTA, possibly by removing inhibition of a calcium binding protein.

  14. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Seper

    Full Text Available The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  15. The extracellular nuclease Dns and its role in natural transformation of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokesch, Melanie; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2008-11-01

    Free extracellular DNA is abundant in many aquatic environments. While much of this DNA will be degraded by nucleases secreted by the surrounding microbial community, some is available as transforming material that can be taken up by naturally competent bacteria. One such species is Vibrio cholerae, an autochthonous member of estuarine, riverine, and marine habitats and the causative agent of cholera, whose competence program is induced after colonization of chitin surfaces. In this study, we investigate how Vibrio cholerae's two extracellular nucleases, Xds and Dns, influence its natural transformability. We show that in the absence of Dns, transformation frequencies are significantly higher than in its presence. During growth on a chitin surface, an increase in transformation efficiency was found to correspond in time with increasing cell density and the repression of dns expression by the quorum-sensing regulator HapR. In contrast, at low cell density, the absence of HapR relieves dns repression, leading to the degradation of free DNA and to the abrogation of the transformation phenotype. Thus, as cell density increases, Vibrio cholerae undergoes a switch from nuclease-mediated degradation of extracellular DNA to the uptake of DNA by bacteria induced to a state of competence by chitin. Taken together, these results suggest the following model: nuclease production by low-density populations of V. cholerae might foster rapid growth by providing a source of nucleotides for the repletion of nucleotide pools. In contrast, the termination of nuclease production by static, high-density populations allows the uptake of intact DNA and coincides with a phase of potential genome diversification.

  16. Nucleotide Excision Repair Protein Levels vis-à -vis Anticancer Drug Resistance in 60 Human Tumor Cell Lines%人肿瘤细胞核苷酸切除修复蛋白表达与抗癌药耐药的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈忠平; AretiMALAPETSA

    2002-01-01

    Background & Objective: Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multi-enzyme DNA repair system in eukaryotes. Several NER genes in this system including XPA, XPB, ERCC1, and ERCC2 (XPD) have been implicated in anticancer drug resistance in human tumor cells. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the expression of NER protein and the drug-resistance of human tumor cell lines. Methods: In this study, The authors assessed the levels of the above mentioned proteins, by utilizing Western blot analysis, in the USA National Cancer Institute (NCI) panel of 60 human tumor cell lines and correlated to the cytotoxicity patterns of 170 compounds that constitute the standard agent (SA) database. Results: The ERCC1, XPB, and XPD protein expression patterns yielded significant negative Pearson correlations with 13, 17, and 32 out of the 170 compounds, respectively (P < 0.05). XPA produced a random assortment of negative and positive correlations and did not appear to confer an overall resistance or sensitivity to these drugs. Protein expression was also compared with a pre-defined categorisation of the standard agents into six mechanism-of-action (MOA) groups resulting in an inverse association between XPD and alkylating agent sensitivity. Conclusion: Our present data demonstrate that XPD protein levels correlate with resistance to alkylating agents in human tumor cell lines, suggesting that XPD plays an important role in the development of this resistance.%背景与目的:核苷酸切除修复(Nucleotide excision repair,NER)是真核细胞中的DNA修复多酶系统,它可能与人肿瘤细胞对抗癌药的耐药有关.本实验将探讨NER蛋白(XPA,XPB,XPD和ERCC1)的表达与人肿瘤细胞耐药的关系.方法:采用western blot检测美国国家癌症研究所(National Cancer Institute,NCI)用于抗癌药筛选的60株人肿瘤细胞的ERCC1,XPA,XPB XPD表达,并与170种抗癌药物的细胞毒试验结果进行相关性分析.结果:ERCC1,XPB

  17. Non-transgenic genome modifications in a hemimetabolous insect using zinc-finger and TAL effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takahito; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Horch, Hadley W; Hamaguchi, Naoya; Nakamura, Taro; Bando, Tetsuya; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Hemimetabolous, or incompletely metamorphosing, insects are phylogenetically relatively basal and comprise many pests. However, the absence of a sophisticated genetic model system, or targeted gene-manipulation system, has limited research on hemimetabolous species. Here we use zinc-finger nuclease and transcription activator-like effector nuclease technologies to produce genetic knockouts in the hemimetabolous insect Gryllus bimaculatus. Following the microinjection of mRNAs encoding zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases into cricket embryos, targeting of a transgene or endogenous gene results in sequence-specific mutations. Up to 48% of founder animals transmit disrupted gene alleles after zinc-finger nucleases microinjection compared with 17% after microinjection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Heterozygous offspring is selected using mutation detection assays that use a Surveyor (Cel-I) nuclease, and subsequent sibling crosses create homozygous knockout crickets. This approach is independent from a mutant phenotype or the genetic tractability of the organism of interest and can potentially be applied to manage insect pests using a non-transgenic strategy.

  18. The large terminase DNA packaging motor grips DNA with its ATPase domain for cleavage by the flexible nuclease domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Brendan J.; Hayes, Janelle A.; Stone, Nicholas P.; Xu, Rui-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Many viruses use a powerful terminase motor to pump their genome inside an empty procapsid shell during virus maturation. The large terminase (TerL) protein contains both enzymatic activities necessary for packaging in such viruses: the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) that powers DNA translocation and an endonuclease that cleaves the concatemeric genome at both initiation and completion of genome packaging. However, how TerL binds DNA during translocation and cleavage remains mysterious. Here we investigate DNA binding and cleavage using TerL from the thermophilic phage P74-26. We report the structure of the P74-26 TerL nuclease domain, which allows us to model DNA binding in the nuclease active site. We screened a large panel of TerL variants for defects in binding and DNA cleavage, revealing that the ATPase domain is the primary site for DNA binding, and is required for nuclease activity. The nuclease domain is dispensable for DNA binding but residues lining the active site guide DNA for cleavage. Kinetic analysis of DNA cleavage suggests flexible tethering of the nuclease domains during DNA cleavage. We propose that interactions with the procapsid during DNA translocation conformationally restrict the nuclease domain, inhibiting cleavage; TerL release from the capsid upon completion of packaging unlocks the nuclease domains to cleave DNA. PMID:28082398

  19. Comparison of T7E1 and surveyor mismatch cleavage assays to detect mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-07

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

  20. The Strategy of Excise Taxation of Tobacco Products in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasichnyi Mykola D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at disclosing and improving approaches to the development of a strategy of excise tax policy in Ukraine, taking into account the foreign experience of harmonizing tax legislation in this sphere. An analysis of the implementation of the EU directives on the regulation of the minimum excise tax liability for the payment of excise taxes on tobacco products in the countries with transformational economies has been carried out. It has been found that, in cases of excessive tax pressure, the equilibrium of the market is disrupted, its shadow component is growing, and the overall economic efficiency level decreases. It has been determined that for the period of 2007-2016 the availability index for cigarettes in Ukraine decreased 2,3 times, which in some way demotivated their consumption. However, the change in the approach of calculation of ad valorem rate for the excise tax and introduction of the excise tax on the sub-excise goods sold by the retailers led to manipulative actions by the major actors in the market concerning the price of cigarettes, which impacted both the increase in the availability of cigarettes in 2016 and the decline in budget revenues. Regulation of the minimum excise duty is the most effective instrument of fiscal policy to achieve goals in the area of limitation of smoking.

  1. Wound Complications and Perineal Pain After Extralevator Versus Standard Abdominoperineal Excision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colov, Emilie Palmgren; Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extralevator abdominoperineal excision was introduced as an alternative to conventional abdominoperineal excision for low rectal cancers. The perineal dissection is more extensive with extralevator abdominoperineal excision and leaves a greater defect. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study...

  2. 77 FR 43157 - Disregarded Entities and the Indoor Tanning Services Excise Tax; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Excise Tax; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correcting amendment... qualified subchapter S subsidiaries) and the indoor tanning services excise tax. DATES: This correction is... Employment taxes, Estate taxes, Excise taxes, Gift taxes, Income taxes, Penalties, Reporting...

  3. 77 FR 37806 - Disregarded Entities and the Indoor Tanning Services Excise Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... Services Excise Tax AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final and temporary... (including qualified subchapter S subsidiaries) and the indoor tanning services excise tax. These regulations affect disregarded entities responsible for collecting the indoor tanning services excise tax and...

  4. Nasal base narrowing: the combined alar base excision technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the combined alar base excision technique in narrowing the nasal base and correcting excessive alar flare. The study included 60 cases presenting with a wide nasal base and excessive alar flaring. The surgical procedure combined an external alar wedge resection with an internal vestibular floor excision. All cases were followed up for a mean of 32 (range, 12-144) months. Nasal tip modification and correction of any preexisting caudal septal deformities were always completed before the nasal base narrowing. The mean width of the external alar wedge excised was 7.2 (range, 4-11) mm, whereas the mean width of the sill excision was 3.1 (range, 2-7) mm. Completing the internal excision first resulted in a more conservative external resection, thus avoiding any blunting of the alar-facial crease. No cases of postoperative bleeding, infection, or keloid formation were encountered, and the external alar wedge excision healed with an inconspicuous scar that was well hidden in the depth of the alar-facial crease. Finally, the risk of notching of the alar rim, which can occur at the junction of the external and internal excisions, was significantly reduced by adopting a 2-layered closure of the vestibular floor (P = .01). The combined alar base excision resulted in effective narrowing of the nasal base with elimination of excessive alar flare. Commonly feared complications, such as blunting of the alar-facial crease or notching of the alar rim, were avoided by using simple modifications in the technique of excision and closure.

  5. The mitochondrial housekeeping gene 16S is inappropriate as an internal standard in comparative studies of rare mitochondrial transcripts using S1-nuclease protection assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ebert

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of rare mitochondrial transcripts derived from the L-strand of the mitochondrial genome requires a sensitive method such as the S1-nuclease protection assay. We examined whether the ribosomal mitochon­drial transcript 16S is suitable as an internal standard in a multiplex S1-nuclease protection assay for the measurement of different mitochondrial transcripts. For reliable quantification of rare mitochondrial transcripts with the RNase protection assay, a minimum of 2 μg of total RNA is necessary. Standard curves of 16S RNA produced with total RNA from human kidney, liver, brain, and a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y revealed dose-response relationships that were saturated already at less than 0.5 μg of total RNA. Therefore, 16S is inappropriate as an internal standard for analyzing mitochondrial transcripts with RNase protection assays when more than 0.5 μg of total RNA have to be analyzed.

  6. Relativistic MHD and excision: formulation and initial tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, David; Hirschmann, Eric W; Millward, R Steven [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2006-08-21

    A new algorithm for solving the general relativistic MHD equations is described in this paper. We design our scheme to incorporate black hole excision with smooth boundaries, and to simplify solving the combined Einstein and MHD equations with AMR. The fluid equations are solved using a finite difference convex ENO method. Excision is implemented using overlapping grids. Elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning techniques allow for maximum flexibility in choosing coordinate systems, and we compare both methods for a standard problem. Numerical results of standard test problems are presented in two-dimensional flat space using excision, overlapping grids and elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning.

  7. Relativistic MHD and black hole excision: Formulation and initial tests

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, D; Millward, R S; Hirschmann, Eric W; Neilsen, David

    2006-01-01

    A new algorithm for solving the general relativistic MHD equations is described in this paper. We design our scheme to incorporate black hole excision with smooth boundaries, and to simplify solving the combined Einstein and MHD equations with AMR. The fluid equations are solved using a finite difference Convex ENO method. Excision is implemented using overlapping grids. Elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning techniques allow for maximum flexibility in choosing coordinate systems, and we compare both methods for a standard problem. Numerical results of standard test problems are presented in two-dimensional flat space using excision, overlapping grids, and elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning.

  8. Laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaalp, Cüneyt; Soyer, Vural; Ersan, Veysel; Aydın, Cemalettin; Karagül, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Congenital choledochal cysts are rare in adults. Due to the risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma, the current standard of care is complete excision of the cyst and reconstruction with hepaticojejunostomy. So far, more than 200 laparoscopic resections have been reported in adults, the majority being from Far Eastern countries over the last five years. Herein, the technique of laparoscopic type I choledochal cyst excision and hepaticojejunostomy is presented in a 37-year-old male with an accompanying video. The advantages of laparoscopic surgery are applicable for choledochal cyst excision as well. We believe that teamwork, expertise on intracorporeal suturing and hepatobiliary surgery are central issues for this operation.

  9. Surgical excision of acne keloidalis nuchae with secondary intention healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, V; Langtry, J A A

    2008-01-01

    Acne keloidalis nuchae (AKN) is a chronic scarring folliculitis that presents clinically as follicular papules and pustules. These can coalesce into firm hypertrophic plaques and nodules on the nape of the neck, most commonly affecting young adult men. Treatment includes topical steroids/antibiotics and oral antibiotics, but often has disappointing results. Surgical approaches include excision with primary closure or skin grafting, and hair-removal lasers. Another surgical approach is excision with secondary intention healing. This can result in good cosmesis with little or no recurrence. We report two men with AKN where treatment by excision with secondary intention was successful.

  10. TALE核酸酶介导的基因组定点修饰技术%Genome Targeting Modification Technology Based on TALE Nuclease Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昕; 张志强; 张智英

    2012-01-01

    TALE核酸酶(TALE nucleases,TALENs)是继锌指核酸酶(zinc-finger nucleases,ZFNs)技术以来的另一种能够对基因组进行高效定点修饰的新技术.TALENs技术是基于植物病原体黄单胞菌(Xanthomonas)分泌的一种转录激活子样效应因子(transcription activator - like effectors,TALEs)而设计和构建的.TALEs蛋白是由N端分泌信号、中央DNA结合域、1个核定位信号和C端激活域构成;TALE核酸酶是将TALE蛋白中的DNA结合域与FokI核酸内切酶的切割域融合,设计和构建的能在特定位点产生双链断裂的TALENs.研究结果显示,人工构建的TALENs能够对动植物细胞的基因组进行高度特异和高效的修饰.TALENs的活性在酵母、植物和哺乳动物包括人的细胞中已经相继得到验证.本文介绍了TALENs的结构特点、作用原理、构建方法和双链断裂的修复机制及其在动植物细胞基因组定点修饰中的应用,剖析了该技术可能存在的问题,展望了TALENs应用前景.%TALE nuclease (TALENs) is another new technology to specifically and effectively modify genome following zinc figure nuclease technology established. TALEN technology is based on the discovery of TALEs(transcription activator - like effectors) secreted by plant pathogen Xanthomonas. TALEs have specific structural features, including the N-terminal secretion signal, a DNA binding domain, a nuclease localization signal and acidic activation domain at the C-terminus of the protein. The DNA binding domain of TALEs fused to the Fokl cleavage domain can be used to generate chimeric nuclease (TALENs) that bind to the DNA and create double strand breaks (DSBs). It has been demonstrated that artificial TALENs can specifically and effectively modify genome. The activities of TALENs have been tested in yeast, plant and mammalian cells including human cells. This review summarizes the structure of TALEs protein and its mechanism of functions and the assembly method of

  11. Scientific opinion addressing the safety assessment of plants developed using Zinc Finger Nuclease 3 and other Site-Directed Nucleases with similar function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The European Commission requested that the EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms deliver a scientific opinion related to risk assessment of plants developed using the zinc finger nuclease 3 technique (ZFN-3 which allows the integration of gene(s in a predefined insertion site in the genome of the recipient species. Since other nucleases with a similar function to ZFN are considered in this opinion the term site-directed nuclease 3 (SDN-3 is used to describe the technique rather than ZFN-3 specifically. The EFSA GMO Panel considers that its guidance documents are applicable for the evaluation of food and feed products derived from plants developed using the SDN-3 technique and for performing an environmental risk assessment. However, on a case-by-case basis lesser amounts of event specific data may be needed for the risk assessment of plants developed using the SDN-3 technique. The EFSA GMO Panel compared the hazards associated with plants produced by the SDN-3 technique with those obtained by conventional plant breeding techniques and by currently used transgenesis. With respect to the genes introduced, the SDN-3 technique does not differ from transgenesis or from the other genetic modification techniques currently used, and can be used to introduce transgenes, intragenes or cisgenes. The main difference between the SDN-3 technique and transgenesis is that the insertion of DNA is targeted to a predefined region of the genome. Therefore, the SDN-3 technique can minimise hazards associated with the disruption of genes and/or regulatory elements in the recipient genome. Whilst the SDN-3 technique can induce off-target changes in the genome of the recipient plant these would be fewer than those occurring with most mutagenesis techniques. Furthermore, where such changes occur they would be of the same types as those produced by conventional breeding techniques.

  12. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  13. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair by nuclear lamin b1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Butin-Israeli

    Full Text Available The nuclear lamins play important roles in the structural organization and function of the metazoan cell nucleus. Recent studies on B-type lamins identified a requirement for lamin B1 (LB1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in normal diploid cells. In order to further investigate the function of LB1 in proliferation, we disrupted its normal expression in U-2 OS human osteosarcoma and other tumor cell lines. Silencing LB1 expression induced G1 cell cycle arrest without significant apoptosis. The arrested cells are unable to mount a timely and effective response to DNA damage induced by UV irradiation. Several proteins involved in the detection and repair of UV damage by the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway are down-regulated in LB1 silenced cells including DDB1, CSB and PCNA. We propose that LB1 regulates the DNA damage response to UV irradiation by modulating the expression of specific genes and activating persistent DNA damage signaling. Our findings are relevant to understanding the relationship between the loss of LB1 expression, DNA damage signaling, and replicative senescence.

  14. Circumareolar Incision‑subdermal Tunneling Dissection for Excision ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017 Nigerian Journal of Surgery | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Excision of ... superficial fascia with circumareolar incision, subdermal cone‑wise dissection was made to ..... Technical advances in skin sparing mastectomy. Int.

  15. Technical points of total laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Shao-cheng; SHI Xian-jie; WANG Hong-guang; LU Fang; LIANG Yu-rong; LUO Ying; JI Wen-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Choledochal cyst excision and biliary enteric reconstruction constitute the best therapy for choledochal cyst.And laparoscopy is currently used to cure this disease now.Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 34 cases of total laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision between January 2007 and August 2011.All patients underwent in vitro Roux-en-Y hepatoenterostomy.Results All 34 patients underwent successful total laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision.The operation time was 200-360 minutes.The duration of hospital stay was 3-7 days.Follow-up observations lasted 1-56 months.One patient developed an anastomotic stoma stricture,but no other cases had postoperative complications.No patients died.Conclusion Total laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision is safe and feasible.

  16. Cloning, comparative mapping, and RNA expression of the mouse homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair gene RAD23.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Spek (Peter); C.E. Visser (Cécile); F. Hanaoka (Fumio); B. Smit (Bep); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 gene is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Two human homologs of RAD23, HHR23A and HHR23B (HGMW-approved symbols RAD23A and RAD23B), were previously isolated. The HHR23B protein is complexed with the protein defective in the cancer-prone

  17. Genotypic and antimicrobial characterisation of Propionibacterium acnes isolates from surgically excised lumbar disc herniations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rollason, Jess; McDowell, Andrew; Albert, Hanne B

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic skin commensal Propionibacterium acnes is an underestimated cause of human infections and clinical conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for the bacterium in lumbar disc herniation and infection. To further investigate this, five biopsy samples were surgically excised...... from each of 64 patients with lumbar disc herniation. P. acnes and other bacteria were detected by anaerobic culture, followed by biochemical and PCR-based identification. In total, 24/64 (38%) patients had evidence of P. acnes in their excised herniated disc tissue. Using recA and mAb typing methods...... isolate collection (63%) suggests that the role of P. acnes in lumbar disc herniation should not be readily dismissed....

  18. Dysplastic lesions of the cervix evolution after conservative excision

    OpenAIRE

    G. Costăchescu; Alina Melinte-Popescu

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the evolution of dysplastic lesions after conservative excision treatment (Large Loop Excision Transformation Zone – LLETZ and conization). METHODS: We performed an observational study on a group of 332 patients, diagnosed and treated for cervical dysplasia at „Cuza Vodă” Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic Hospital Suceava between 2006 and 2011. RESULTS: High grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) accounted for 88 patients (26.5%), low grade cervical squamous ...

  19. Excision of Mucocele Using Diode Laser in Lower Lip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Subramaniam; Ramkumar, Lakshmi; Malathi, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    Mucoceles are nonneoplastic cystic lesions of major and minor salivary glands which result from the accumulation of mucus. These lesions are most commonly seen in children. Though usually these lesions can be treated by local surgical excision, in our case, to avoid intraoperative surgical complications like bleeding and edema and to enable better healing, excision was done using a diode laser in the wavelength of 940 nm. PMID:28097026

  20. ASPT software source code: ASPT signal excision software package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliament, Hugh

    1992-08-01

    The source code for the ASPT Signal Excision Software Package which is part of the Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) is presented. The source code covers the programs 'excision', 'ab.out', 'd0.out', 'bd1.out', 'develop', 'despread', 'sorting', and 'convert'. These programs are concerned with collecting data, filtering out interference from a spread spectrum signal, analyzing the results, and developing and testing new filtering algorithms.

  1. Genomic island excisions in Bordetella petrii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levillain Erwan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the members of the genus Bordetella B. petrii is unique, since it is the only species isolated from the environment, while the pathogenic Bordetellae are obligately associated with host organisms. Another feature distinguishing B. petrii from the other sequenced Bordetellae is the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements including several large genomic regions with typical characteristics of genomic islands collectively known as integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs. These elements mainly encode accessory metabolic factors enabling this bacterium to grow on a large repertoire of aromatic compounds. Results During in vitro culture of Bordetella petrii colony variants appear frequently. We show that this variability can be attributed to the presence of a large number of metastable mobile genetic elements on its chromosome. In fact, the genome sequence of B. petrii revealed the presence of at least seven large genomic islands mostly encoding accessory metabolic functions involved in the degradation of aromatic compounds and detoxification of heavy metals. Four of these islands (termed GI1 to GI3 and GI6 are highly related to ICEclc of Pseudomonas knackmussii sp. strain B13. Here we present first data about the molecular characterization of these islands. We defined the exact borders of each island and we show that during standard culture of the bacteria these islands get excised from the chromosome. For all but one of these islands (GI5 we could detect circular intermediates. For the clc-like elements GI1 to GI3 of B. petrii we provide evidence that tandem insertion of these islands which all encode highly related integrases and attachment sites may also lead to incorporation of genomic DNA which originally was not part of the island and to the formation of huge composite islands. By integration of a tetracycline resistance cassette into GI3 we found this island to be rather unstable and to be lost from

  2. Teaching elliptical excision skills to novice medical students: A randomized controlled study comparing low- and high-fidelity bench models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Denadai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The search for alternative and effective forms of training simulation is needed due to ethical and medico-legal aspects involved in training surgical skills on living patients, human cadavers and living animals. Aims : To evaluate if the bench model fidelity interferes in the acquisition of elliptical excision skills by novice medical students. Materials and Methods: Forty novice medical students were randomly assigned to 5 practice conditions with instructor-directed elliptical excision skills′ training (n = 8: didactic materials (control; organic bench model (low-fidelity; ethylene-vinyl acetate bench model (low-fidelity; chicken legs′ skin bench model (high-fidelity; or pig foot skin bench model (high-fidelity. Pre- and post-tests were applied. Global rating scale, effect size, and self-perceived confidence based on Likert scale were used to evaluate all elliptical excision performances. Results : The analysis showed that after training, the students practicing on bench models had better performance based on Global rating scale (all P 0.05 between the groups that trained on bench models. The magnitude of the effect (basic cutaneous surgery skills′ training was considered large (>0.80 in all measurements. Conclusion : The acquisition of elliptical excision skills after instructor-directed training on low-fidelity bench models was similar to the training on high-fidelity bench models; and there was a more substantial increase in elliptical excision performances of students that trained on all simulators compared to the learning on didactic materials.

  3. A nuclease that mediates cell death induced by DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingfei; An, Ran; Umanah, George K.; Park, Hyejin; Nambiar, Kalyani; Eacker, Stephen M.; Kim, BongWoo; Bao, Lei; Harraz, Maged M.; Chang, Calvin; Chen, Rong; Wang, Jennifer E.; Kam, Tae-In; Jeong, Jun Seop; Xie, Zhi; Neifert, Stewart; Qian, Jiang; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition or genetic deletion of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is protective against toxic insults in many organ systems. The molecular mechanisms underlying PARP-1–dependent cell death involve release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and its translocation to the nucleus, which results in chromatinolysis. We identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a PARP-1–dependent AIF-associated nuclease (PAAN). AIF was required for recruitment of MIF to the nucleus, where MIF cleaves genomic DNA into large fragments. Depletion of MIF, disruption of the AIF-MIF interaction, or mutation of glutamic acid at position 22 in the catalytic nuclease domain blocked MIF nuclease activity and inhibited chromatinolysis, cell death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity, and focal stroke. Inhibition of MIF's nuclease activity is a potential therapeutic target for diseases caused by excessive PARP-1 activation. PMID:27846469

  4. Generation of knockout rats with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoji Mashimo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the rat is extensively used as a laboratory model, the inability to utilize germ line-competent rat embryonic stem (ES cells has been a major drawback for studies that aim to elucidate gene functions. Recently, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs were successfully used to create genome-specific double-stranded breaks and thereby induce targeted gene mutations in a wide variety of organisms including plants, drosophila, zebrafish, etc. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here on ZFN-induced gene targeting of the rat interleukin 2 receptor gamma (Il2rg locus, where orthologous human and mouse mutations cause X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (X-SCID. Co-injection of mRNAs encoding custom-designed ZFNs into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes yielded genetically modified offspring at rates greater than 20%, which possessed a wide variety of deletion/insertion mutations. ZFN-modified founders faithfully transmitted their genetic changes to the next generation along with the severe combined immune deficiency phenotype. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The efficient and rapid generation of gene knockout rats shows that using ZFN technology is a new strategy for creating gene-targeted rat models of human diseases. In addition, the X-SCID rats that were established in this study will be valuable in vivo tools for evaluating drug treatment or gene therapy as well as model systems for examining the treatment of xenotransplanted malignancies.

  5. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Comeron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1 genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2 identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3 screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  6. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  7. Generation of Knockout Rats with X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (X-SCID) Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Tomoji; Takizawa, Akiko; Voigt, Birger; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the rat is extensively used as a laboratory model, the inability to utilize germ line-competent rat embryonic stem (ES) cells has been a major drawback for studies that aim to elucidate gene functions. Recently, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) were successfully used to create genome-specific double-stranded breaks and thereby induce targeted gene mutations in a wide variety of organisms including plants, drosophila, zebrafish, etc. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here on ZFN-induced gene targeting of the rat interleukin 2 receptor gamma (Il2rg) locus, where orthologous human and mouse mutations cause X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (X-SCID). Co-injection of mRNAs encoding custom-designed ZFNs into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes yielded genetically modified offspring at rates greater than 20%, which possessed a wide variety of deletion/insertion mutations. ZFN-modified founders faithfully transmitted their genetic changes to the next generation along with the severe combined immune deficiency phenotype. Conclusions and Significance The efficient and rapid generation of gene knockout rats shows that using ZFN technology is a new strategy for creating gene-targeted rat models of human diseases. In addition, the X-SCID rats that were established in this study will be valuable in vivo tools for evaluating drug treatment or gene therapy as well as model systems for examining the treatment of xenotransplanted malignancies. PMID:20111598

  8. Genome editing: a robust technology for human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Pandian; Song, Minjung; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells comprise induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells, which have tremendous potential for biological and therapeutic applications. The development of efficient technologies for the targeted genome alteration of stem cells in disease models is a prerequisite for utilizing stem cells to their full potential. Genome editing of stem cells is possible with the help of synthetic nucleases that facilitate site-specific modification of a gene of interest. Recent advances in genome editing techniques have improved the efficiency and speed of the development of stem cells for human disease models. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated system are powerful tools for editing DNA at specific loci. Here, we discuss recent technological advances in genome editing with site-specific nucleases in human stem cells.

  9. Tudor Staphylococcal Nuclease (Tudor-SN) Participates in Small Ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) Assembly via Interacting with Symmetrically Dimethylated Sm Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjie; Zhao, Xiujuan; Zhu, Yu; He, Jinyan; Shao, Jie; Su, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Saarikettu, Juha; Silvennoinen, Olli; Yao, Zhi; Yang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Human Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (Tudor-SN) is composed of four tandem repeats of staphylococcal nuclease (SN)-like domains, followed by a tudor and SN-like domain (TSN) consisting of a central tudor flanked by two partial SN-like sequences. The crystal structure of the tudor domain displays a conserved aromatic cage, which is predicted to hook methyl groups. Here, we demonstrated that the TSN domain of Tudor-SN binds to symmetrically dimethylarginine (sDMA)-modified SmB/B′ and SmD1/D3 core proteins of the spliceosome. We demonstrated that this interaction ability is reduced by the methyltransferase inhibitor 5-deoxy-5-(methylthio)adenosine. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that the conserved amino acids (Phe-715, Tyr-721, Tyr-738, and Tyr-741) in the methyl-binding cage of the TSN domain are required for Tudor-SN-SmB interaction. Furthermore, depletion of Tudor-SN affects the association of Sm protein with snRNAs and, as a result, inhibits the assembly of uridine-rich small ribonucleoprotein mediated by the Sm core complex in vivo. Our results reveal the molecular basis for the involvement of Tudor-SN in regulating small nuclear ribonucleoprotein biogenesis, which provides novel insight related to the biological activity of Tudor-SN. PMID:22493508

  10. Au nanoparticles/hollow molybdenum disulfide microcubes based biosensor for microRNA-21 detection coupled with duplex-specific nuclease and enzyme signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Hong-Lei; Huang, Ke-Jing; Chen, Ying-Xu; Fang, Lin-Xia; Jia, Meng-Pei

    2017-03-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for detecting microRNAs is fabricated based on hollow molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) microcubes. Duplex-specific nuclease, enzyme and electrochemical-chemical-chemical redox cycling are used for signal amplification. Hollow MoS2 microcubes constructed by ultrathin nanosheets are synthesized by a facile template-assisted strategy and used as supporting substrate. For biosensor assembling, biotinylated ssDNA capture probes are first immobilized on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs)/MoS2 modified electrode in order to combine with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase (SA-ALP). When capture probes hybridize with miRNAs, duplex-specific nuclease cleaves the formative duplexes. At the moment, the biotin group strips from the electrode surface and SA-ALP is incapacitated to attach onto electrode. Then, ascorbic acids induce the electrochemical-chemical-chemical redox cycling to produce electrochemical response in the presence of ferrocene methanol and tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine. Under optimum conditions, the proposed biosensor shows a good linear relationship between the current variation and logarithm of the microRNAs concentration ranging from 0.1fM to 0.1pM with a detection limit of 0.086fM (S/N=3). Furthermore, the biosensor is successfully applied to detect target miRNA-21 in human serum samples.

  11. Engineering customized TALE nucleases (TALENs) and TALE transcription factors by fast ligation-based automatable solid-phase high-throughput (FLASH) assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyon, Deepak; Maeder, Morgan L; Khayter, Cyd; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Foley, Jonathan E; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2013-07-01

    Customized DNA-binding domains made using transcription activator-like effector (TALE) repeats are rapidly growing in importance as widely applicable research tools. TALE nucleases (TALENs), composed of an engineered array of TALE repeats fused to the FokI nuclease domain, have been used successfully for directed genome editing in various organisms and cell types. TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs), consisting of engineered TALE repeat arrays linked to a transcriptional regulatory domain, have been used to up- or downregulate expression of endogenous genes in human cells and plants. This unit describes a detailed protocol for the recently described fast ligation-based automatable solid-phase high-throughput (FLASH) assembly method. FLASH enables automated high-throughput construction of engineered TALE repeats using an automated liquid handling robot or manually using a multichannel pipet. Using the automated approach, a single researcher can construct up to 96 DNA fragments encoding TALE repeat arrays of various lengths in a single day, and then clone these to construct sequence-verified TALEN or TALE-TF expression plasmids in a week or less. Plasmids required for FLASH are available by request from the Joung lab (http://eGenome.org). This unit also describes improvements to the Zinc Finger and TALE Targeter (ZiFiT Targeter) web server (http://ZiFiT.partners.org) that facilitate the design and construction of FLASH TALE repeat arrays in high throughput.

  12. Non-transgenic genome modifications in a hemimetabolous insect using zinc-finger and TAL effector nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, T; Ochiai, H.; Sakuma, T.; Horch, HW; Hamaguchi, N.; Nakamura, T.; Bando, T.; Ohuchi, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Noji, S; Mito, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hemimetabolous, or incompletely metamorphosing, insects are phylogenetically relatively basal and comprise many pests. However, the absence of a sophisticated genetic model system, or targeted gene-manipulation system, has limited research on hemimetabolous species. Here we use zinc-finger nuclease and transcription activator-like effector nuclease technologies to produce genetic knockouts in the hemimetabolous insect Gryllus bimaculatus. Following the microinjection of mRNAs encoding zinc-fi...

  13. Comparison of T7E1 and Surveyor Mismatch Cleavage Assays to Detect Mutations Triggered by Engineered Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops form...

  14. megaTALs: a rare-cleaving nuclease architecture for therapeutic genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissel, Sandrine; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Adey, Andrew; Gouble, Agnès; Duchateau, Philippe; Shendure, Jay; Stoddard, Barry L; Certo, Michael T; Baker, David; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    Rare-cleaving endonucleases have emerged as important tools for making targeted genome modifications. While multiple platforms are now available to generate reagents for research applications, each existing platform has significant limitations in one or more of three key properties necessary for therapeutic application: efficiency of cleavage at the desired target site, specificity of cleavage (i.e. rate of cleavage at 'off-target' sites), and efficient/facile means for delivery to desired target cells. Here, we describe the development of a single-chain rare-cleaving nuclease architecture, which we designate 'megaTAL', in which the DNA binding region of a transcription activator-like (TAL) effector is used to 'address' a site-specific meganuclease adjacent to a single desired genomic target site. This architecture allows the generation of extremely active and hyper-specific compact nucleases that are compatible with all current viral and nonviral cell delivery methods.

  15. Studies on a Novel Minor-groove Targeting Artificial Nuclease: Synthesis and DNA Binding Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nucleases play an important role in molecular biology, for example, in DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as a novel tool for the selective inhibition of gene expressions and also as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this article, the synthesis of a novel minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, an oligopyrrol-containing compound, has been reported. It was found that this novel compound can bind DNA in AT-rich minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by using UV-Vis and CD. It is indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of DNA from 80. 4 C to 84. 4 ℃ and that it possesses a high binding constant value(Kb = 3.05×104 L/mol).

  16. Studies of interaction between a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Fen

    2007-04-01

    Nuclease plays an important role in molecular biology, such as DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as new tool in the selective inhibition of gene expression and as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this paper, a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, oligopyrrol-containing peptide, was reported. It was found that this new compound can bind DNA in AT-riched minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) methods. It was indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of oligomer DNA from 51.8 to 63.5 °C and possesses large binding constant ( Kb = 8.83 × 10 4 L/mol).

  17. Detection of Phaeocystis globosa using sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay (NPA-SH)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN Yu; MI Tiezhu; YU Zhigang

    2008-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel is one of the common harmful algae species in coastal waters of the southeastern China. In this study, sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay (NPA-SH) was used to qualitatively and quantitatively detect P. globosa. Results showed that this method had good applicability and validity in analyzing the samples from laboratory cultures and from fields. The linear regression equation for P. globosa was obtained, and the lowest detection number of cells was 1.8×104 cells. Statistics showed that there was no distinct difference between the results of detecting the microalgae by NPA-SH and traditional microscopy. This technique has good reliability, accuracy, and can give a remarkably high sample processing rate. Sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay will provide an efficient alternative to microscopic method for monitoring and investigating the bloom of P. globosa.

  18. Efficient gene targeting of the Rosa26 locus in mouse zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparek, Petr; Krausova, Michaela; Haneckova, Radka; Kriz, Vitezslav; Zbodakova, Olga; Korinek, Vladimir; Sedlacek, Radislav

    2014-11-03

    Gene targeting in mice mainly employs homologous recombination (HR) in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Although it is a standard way for production of genetically modified mice, the procedure is laborious and time-consuming. This study describes targeting of the mouse Rosa26 locus by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We employed TALEN-assisted HR in zygotes to introduce constructs encoding TurboRFP and TagBFP fluorescent proteins into the first intron of the Rosa26 gene, and in this way generated two transgenic mice. We also demonstrated that these Rosa26-specific TALENs exhibit high targeting efficiency superior to that of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) specific for the same targeting sequence. Moreover, we devised a reporter assay to assess TALENs activity and specificity to improve the quality of TALEN-assisted targeting.

  19. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-05-10

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embryos. We also provide details for detection of somatic and germ line transmitted mutations. And finally, we briefly describe establishment of knockout Xenopus lines. This protocol will facilitate broader applications of TALENs in studies of Xenopus biology.

  20. The SNM1/Pso2 family of ICL repair nucleases: from yeast to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Emma; Sengerová, Blanka; McHugh, Peter J

    2010-07-01

    Efficient interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair in yeast depends on the Pso2/Snm1 protein. Pso2 is a member of the highly conserved metallo-beta-lactamase structural family of nucleases. Mammalian cells possess three SNM1/Pso2 related proteins, SNM1A, SNM1B/Apollo, and SNM1C/Artemis. Evidence that SNM1A and SNM1B contribute to ICL repair is mounting, whereas Artemis appears to primarily contribute to non-ICL repair pathways, particularly some double-strand break repair events. Yeast Pso2 and all three mammalian SNM1-family proteins have been shown to possess nuclease activity. Here, we review the biochemical, genetic, and cellular evidence for the SNM1 family as DNA repair factors, focusing on ICL repair.

  1. A simple molecular beacon with duplex-specific nuclease amplification for detection of microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingcun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhao, Likun; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Zhengping

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene activity, promoting or inhibiting cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with many diseases. Therefore, it is essential to establish a simple, rapid and sensitive miRNA detection method. In this paper, based on a simple molecular beacon (MB) and duplex-specific nuclease (DSN), we developed a target recycling amplification method for miRNA detection. By controlling the number of stem bases to 5, the MB probe used in this method can be prevented from hydrolysis by DSN without special modification. This assay is direct and simple to quantitatively detect miRNA with high sensitivity and specificity. The MB probe design provides a new strategy for nuclease-based amplification reaction.

  2. Use of Site-Specifically Tethered Chemical Nucleases to Study Macromolecular Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Srabani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a complex macromolecular reaction multiple changes in molecular conformation and interactions with ligands may occur. X-ray crystallography may provide only a limited set of snapshots of these changes. Solution methods can augment such structural information to provide a more complete picture of a macromolecular reaction. We analyzed the changes in protein conformation and protein:nucleic acid interactions which occur during transcription initiation by using a chemical nuclease tethered to cysteines introduced site-specifically into the RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 (T7 RNAP. Changes in cleavage patterns as the polymerase steps through transcription reveal a series of structural transitions which mediate transcription initiation. Cleavage by tethered chemical nucleases is seen to be a powerful method for revealing the conformational dynamics of macromolecular reactions, and has certain advantages over cross-linking or energy transfer approaches.

  3. Midcell recruitment of the DNA uptake and virulence nuclease, EndA, for pneumococcal transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu J Bergé

    Full Text Available Genetic transformation, in which cells internalize exogenous DNA and integrate it into their chromosome, is widespread in the bacterial kingdom. It involves a specialized membrane-associated machinery for binding double-stranded (ds DNA and uptake of single-stranded (ss fragments. In the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, this machinery is specifically assembled at competence. The EndA nuclease, a constitutively expressed virulence factor, is recruited during competence to play the key role of converting dsDNA into ssDNA for uptake. Here we use fluorescence microscopy to show that EndA is uniformly distributed in the membrane of noncompetent cells and relocalizes at midcell during competence. This recruitment requires the dsDNA receptor ComEA. We also show that under 'static' binding conditions, i.e., in cells impaired for uptake, EndA and ComEA colocalize at midcell, together with fluorescent end-labelled dsDNA (Cy3-dsDNA. We conclude that midcell clustering of EndA reflects its recruitment to the DNA uptake machinery rather than its sequestration away from this machinery to protect transforming DNA from extensive degradation. In contrast, a fraction of ComEA molecules were located at cell poles post-competence, suggesting the pole as the site of degradation of the dsDNA receptor. In uptake-proficient cells, we used Cy3-dsDNA molecules enabling expression of a GFP fusion upon chromosomal integration to identify transformed cells as GFP producers 60-70 min after initial contact between DNA and competent cells. Recording of images since initial cell-DNA contact allowed us to look back to the uptake period for these transformed cells. Cy3-DNA foci were thus detected at the cell surface 10-11 min post-initial contact, all exclusively found at midcell, strongly suggesting that active uptake of transforming DNA takes place at this position in pneumococci. We discuss how midcell uptake could influence homology search, and the likelihood that

  4. Factors Influencing the DNA Nuclease Activity of Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, and Copper Chelates

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Reichfield, Jared; Cowan, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A library of complexes that included iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates of cyclam, cyclen, DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, tripeptide GGH, tetrapeptide KGHK, NTA, and TACN was evaluated for DNA nuclease activity, ascorbate consumption, superoxide and hydroxyl radical generation, and reduction potential under physiologically relevant conditions. Plasmid DNA cleavage rates demonstrated by combinations of each complex and biological coreactants were quantified by gel electrophoresis, yielding second-or...

  5. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding reg...

  6. The history and market impact of CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    van Erp, Paul B. G.; Bloomer, Gary; Wilkinson, Royce; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-01-01

    The interface between viruses and their hosts’ are hot spots for biological and biotechnological innovation. Bacteria use restriction endonucleases to destroy invading DNA, and industry has exploited these enzymes for molecular cut-and-paste reactions that are central to many recombinant DNA technologies. Today, another class of nucleases central to adaptive immune systems that protect bacteria and archaea from invading viruses and plasmids are blazing a similar path from basic science to pro...

  7. Site-Specific Editing of the Plasmodium falciparum Genome Using Engineered Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Straimer, Judith; Lee, Marcus CS; Lee, Andrew H.; Zeitler, Bryan; Williams, April E.; Pearl, Jocelynn R.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Llinás, Manuel; Urnov, Fyodor D; David A Fidock

    2012-01-01

    Malaria afflicts over 200 million people worldwide and its most lethal etiologic agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is evolving to resist even the latest-generation therapeutics. Efficient tools for genome-directed investigations of P. falciparum pathogenesis, including drug resistance mechanisms, are clearly required. Here we report rapid and targeted genetic engineering of this parasite, using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that produce a double-strand break in a user-defined locus and trigger hom...

  8. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finola E Moore

    Full Text Available Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  9. The structural biochemistry of Zucchini implicates it as a nuclease in piRNA biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J; Haase, Astrid D; Knott, Simon R; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Hannon, Gregory J

    2012-11-08

    PIWI-family proteins and their associated small RNAs (piRNAs) act in an evolutionarily conserved innate immune mechanism to provide essential protection for germ-cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations comprise a molecular definition of transposons, which permits them to distinguish transposons from host genes and selectively silence them. piRNAs can be generated in two distinct ways, forming either primary or secondary piRNAs. Primary piRNAs come from discrete genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters, and seem to be derived from long, single-stranded precursors. The biogenesis of primary piRNAs involves at least two nucleolytic steps. An unknown enzyme cleaves piRNA cluster transcripts to generate monophosphorylated piRNA 5' ends. piRNA 3' ends are probably formed by exonucleolytic trimming, after a piRNA precursor is loaded into its PIWI partner. Secondary piRNAs arise during the adaptive 'ping-pong' cycle, with their 5' termini being formed by the activity of PIWIs themselves. A number of proteins have been implicated genetically in primary piRNA biogenesis. One of these, Drosophila melanogaster Zucchini, is a member of the phospholipase-D family of phosphodiesterases, which includes both phospholipases and nucleases. Here we produced a dimeric, soluble fragment of the mouse Zucchini homologue (mZuc; also known as PLD6) and show that it possesses single-strand-specific nuclease activity. A crystal structure of mZuc at 1.75 Å resolution indicates greater architectural similarity to phospholipase-D family nucleases than to phospholipases. Together, our data suggest that the Zucchini proteins act in primary piRNA biogenesis as nucleases, perhaps generating the 5' ends of primary piRNAs.

  10. Enhancement of nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum YL104 immobilized on activated carbon filter sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Ren, Hengfei; Li, Zhenjian; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Yong; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of current methods for industrial production of the enzyme nuclease P1 is limited. In this study, we sought to improve fermentation methods for the production of nuclease P1. An immobilized fermentation system using an activated carbon filter sponge as a carrier was used for the production of nuclease P1. In an airlift internal loop reactor (ALR), the fermentation performance of three different fermentation modes, including free-cell fermentation, repeated-batch fermentation, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentation, were compared. The fermentation kinetics in the fermentation broth of the three fermentation modes, including dissolved oxygen (DO), pH value, cell concentration, residual sugar concentration, and enzyme activity, were tested. The productivity of semi-continuous immobilized fermentation reached 8.76 U/mL/h, which was 33.3 and 80.2% higher than that of repeated-batch fermentation and free-cell fermentation, respectively. The sugar consumption of free-cell, repeated-batch, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentations was 41.2, 30.8, and 25.9 g/L, respectively. These results showed that immobilized-cell fermentation by using Penicillium citrinum with activated carbon filter sponge in an ALR was advantageous for nuclease P1 production, especially in the semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode. In spite of the significant improvement in nuclease P1 production in semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode, the specific activity of nuclease P1 was almost equal among the three fermentation modes.

  11. Differential diagnosis and management of giant fibroadenoma: comparing excision with reduction mammoplasty incision and excision with inframammary incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugburo, Andrew O; Olajide, Thomas O; Fadeyibi, Idowu O; Mofikoya, Bolaji O; Lawal, Abdulrazzaq O; Osinowo, Adedapo O

    2012-10-01

    Giant fibroadenoma (GFA) may present with breast asymmetry and can be excised with an inframammary incision (IFI) or reduction mammoplasty incision (RMI). This study investigated the clinical presentation and compared excision with the IFI and RMI. All patients with benign breast tumours greater than 5 cm underwent core needle biopsy and a histopathological diagnosis. All confirmed GFA had their clinical details documented and randomised into two groups for excision with an IFI or RMI. Twenty-two patients were studied. The age range was 12-46 years, mean 21.18 ± 2.22 years. The patients were divided into two groups: a juvenile group (n = 16) (73%) aged 12-18 years, mean age 14.06 ± 0.42 years, and a perimenopausal group (n = 5) aged 28-46 years. The juvenile group showed cyclic increases in breast size monthly with menstruation while the perimenopausal showed an initial slow growth of 6-24 months followed by a rapid growth. Fifteen patients (68%) had excision biopsy with IMI and seven patients with RMI. Seven of the patients treated with IFI had minimal preoperative asymmetry and satisfactory aesthetic outcome. Among the patients with severe preoperative asymmetry treated with IFI (n = 8) and RMI (n = 7), those treated with IFI had persistent postoperative skin redundancy and asymmetry, which was not found in those treated with RMI. In conclusion, for patients with significant asymmetry, excision with the IFI was associated with persistent asymmetry while excision with RMI was associated with restoration of symmetry.

  12. Plant genome editing by novel tools: TALEN and other sequence specific nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprink, Thorben; Metje, Janina; Hartung, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Genome editing technologies using sequence specific nucleases (SSNs) became a tremendously powerful and precise tool for reverse genetic approaches and applied biology. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in particular, consisting of a free designable DNA binding domain and a nuclease, have been exploited today by a huge number of approaches in many different organisms. The convenience of designing the DNA binding domain and straightforward protocols for their assembly, as well as the broad number of applications in different scientific fields made it Natures method of the year 2011. TALENs act as molecular scissors by introducing double strand breaks (DSBs) to the DNA at a given location. The DSBs are subsequently repaired by the cell itself using different repair pathways such as non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). These mechanisms can lead to deletions, insertions, replacements or larger chromosomal rearrangements. By offering a template DNA it is possible to channel the repair in direction of HR. In this article we review the recent findings in the field of SSN approaches with emphasis on plants.

  13. Bioinformatics analysis of a non-specific nuclease from Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Hua; Tang, Zhen-Xing; Fang, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Shi, Lu-E

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the physical and chemical characteristics, biological structure and function of a non-specific nuclease from Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica (Y. NSN) found in our group were studied using multiple bioinformatics approaches. The results showed that Y. NSN had 283 amino acids, a weight of 30,692.5 ku and a certain hydrophilic property. Y. NSN had a signal peptide, no transmembrane domains and disulphide bonds. Cleavage site in Y. NSN was between pos. 23 and 24. The prediction result of the secondary structure showed Y. NSN was a coil structure-based protein. The ratio of α-helix, β-folded and random coil were 18.73%, 16.96% and 64.31%, respectively. Active sites were pos. 124, 125, 127, 157, 165 and 169. Mg(2+) binding site was pos. 157. Substrate binding sites were pos. 124, 125 and 169. The analysis of multisequencing alignment and phylogenetic tree indicated that Y. NSN shared high similarity with the nuclease from Y. enterocolitica subsp. enterocolitica 8081. The enzyme activity results showed that Y. NSN was a nuclease with good thermostability.

  14. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities.

  15. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathaniel M; Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F; Douches, David S

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  16. Digital PCR to assess gene-editing frequencies (GEF-dPCR) mediated by designer nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Ulrike; Hauber, Ilona; Fehse, Boris

    2016-03-01

    Genome editing using designer nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases is an emerging technology in basic and applied research. Whereas the application of editing tools, namely CRISPR-Cas9, has recently become very straightforward, quantification of resulting gene knockout rates still remains a bottleneck. This is particularly true if the product of a targeted gene is not easily detectable. To address this problem, we devised a novel gene-editing frequency digital PCR (GEF-dPCR) technique. GEF-dPCR exploits two differently labeled probes that are placed within one amplicon at the gene-editing target site to simultaneously detect wild-type and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-affected alleles. Taking advantage of the principle of dPCR, this enables concurrent quantification of edited and wild-type alleles in a given sample. We propose that our method is optimal for the monitoring of gene-edited cells in vivo, e.g., in clinical settings. Here we describe preparation, design of primers and probes, and setup and analysis of GEF-dPCR. The setup of GEF-dPCR requires up to 2 weeks (depending on the starting point); once the dPCR has been established, the protocol for sample analysis takes <1 d.

  17. Geminivirus-mediated genome editing in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. using sequence-specific nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel M Butler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated systems (Cas for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via nonhomologous end-joining has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1 gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held both point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and an approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  18. Application of a 5 ' nuclease assay for detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in fecal samples from pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindecrona, R. H.; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Andersen, P. H.;

    2002-01-01

    fecal samples derived from a herd known to be free from infection with L. intracellularis all tested negative, with a Ct value of 40. By using a Ct value of 36 as the cutoff limit, the detection limit of the assay was 1 L. intracellularis cell per PCR tube. In conclusion, the 5' nuclease assay that has...... of immunohistochemistry (IM) on ileal sections of the same animals. There was 91% agreement between the results of IM and the 5' nuclease assay. In the 5' nuclease assay, 111 (54%) of the pigs tested positive for L. intracellularis infection, with a mean cycle threshold (Ct) value of 27.2, whereas 98 (48%) of the pigs...... tested positive by IM. On average, the Ct and DeltaRn values for the positive samples were 27.2 (standard deviation [SD], 3.7) and 1.6 (SD, 0.7), respectively. A Ct value of 27.2 corresponds to a fecal excretion of approximately 10(7) L. intracellularis cells per g of feces. Furthermore, a total of 40...

  19. Applications of genome editing by programmable nucleases to the metabolic engineering of secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Costa, Marina C; Enguita, Francisco J

    2017-01-10

    Genome engineering is a branch of modern biotechnology composed of a cohort of protocols designed to construct and modify a genotype with the main objective of giving rise to a desired phenotype. Conceptually, genome engineering is based on the so called genome editing technologies, a group of genetic techniques that allow either to delete or to insert genetic information in a particular genomic locus. Ten years ago, genome editing tools were limited to virus-driven integration and homologous DNA recombination. However, nowadays the uprising of programmable nucleases is rapidly changing this paradigm. There are two main families of modern tools for genome editing depending on the molecule that controls the specificity of the system and drives the editor machinery to its place of action. Enzymes such as Zn-finger and TALEN nucleases are protein-driven genome editors; while CRISPR system is a nucleic acid-guided editing system. Genome editing techniques are still not widely applied for the design of new compounds with pharmacological activity, but they are starting to be considered as promising tools for rational genome manipulation in biotechnology applications. In this review we will discuss the potential applications of programmable nucleases for the metabolic engineering of secondary metabolites with biological activity.

  20. Efficient homologous recombination-mediated genome engineering in zebrafish using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jimann; Chen, Jiakun; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-10-01

    Custom-designed nucleases afford a powerful reverse genetic tool for direct gene disruption and genome modification in vivo. Among various applications of the nucleases, homologous recombination (HR)-mediated genome editing is particularly useful for inserting heterologous DNA fragments, such as GFP, into a specific genomic locus in a sequence-specific fashion. However, precise HR-mediated genome editing is still technically challenging in zebrafish. Here, we establish a GFP reporter system for measuring the frequency of HR events in live zebrafish embryos. By co-injecting a TALE nuclease and GFP reporter targeting constructs with homology arms of different size, we defined the length of homology arms that increases the recombination efficiency. In addition, we found that the configuration of the targeting construct can be a crucial parameter in determining the efficiency of HR-mediated genome engineering. Implementing these modifications improved the efficiency of zebrafish knock-in generation, with over 10% of the injected F0 animals transmitting gene-targeting events through their germline. We generated two HR-mediated insertion alleles of sox2 and gfap loci that express either superfolder GFP (sfGFP) or tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) in a spatiotemporal pattern that mirrors the endogenous loci. This efficient strategy provides new opportunities not only to monitor expression of endogenous genes and proteins and follow specific cell types in vivo, but it also paves the way for other sophisticated genetic manipulations of the zebrafish genome.

  1. 29 CFR 779.262 - Excise taxes at the retail level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excise taxes at the retail level. 779.262 Section 779.262... Coverage Excise Taxes § 779.262 Excise taxes at the retail level. (a) Federal excise taxes are imposed at the retail level on highway vehicle fuels other than gasoline under the provisions of 26 U.S.C....

  2. Defects in Base Excision Repair Sensitize Cells to Manganese in S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne P. Stephenson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn is essential for normal physiologic functioning; therefore, deficiencies and excess intake of manganese can result in disease. In humans, prolonged exposure to manganese causes neurotoxicity characterized by Parkinson-like symptoms. Mn2+ has been shown to mediate DNA damage possibly through the generation of reactive oxygen species. In a recent publication, we showed that Mn induced oxidative DNA damage and caused lesions in thymines. This study further investigates the mechanisms by which cells process Mn2+-mediated DNA damage using the yeast S. cerevisiae. The strains most sensitive to Mn2+ were those defective in base excision repair, glutathione synthesis, and superoxide dismutase mutants. Mn2+ caused a dose-dependent increase in the accumulation of mutations using the CAN1 and lys2-10A mutator assays. The spectrum of CAN1 mutants indicates that exposure to Mn results in accumulation of base substitutions and frameshift mutations. The sensitivity of cells to Mn2+ as well as its mutagenic effect was reduced by N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and Mg2+. These data suggest that Mn2+ causes oxidative DNA damage that requires base excision repair for processing and that Mn interferes with polymerase fidelity. The status of base excision repair may provide a biomarker for the sensitivity of individuals to manganese.

  3. Developmentally programmed excision of internal DNA sequences in Paramecium aurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratias, A; Bétermier, M

    2001-01-01

    The development of a new somatic nucleus (macronucleus) during sexual reproduction of the ciliate Paramecium aurelia involves reproducible chromosomal rearrangements that affect the entire germline genome. Macronuclear development can be induced experimentally, which makes P. aurelia an attractive model for the study of the mechanism and the regulation of DNA rearrangements. Two major types of rearrangements have been identified: the fragmentation of the germline chromosomes, followed by the formation of the new macronuclear chromosome ends in association with imprecise DNA elimination, and the precise excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs). All IESs identified so far are short, A/T rich and non-coding elements. They are flanked by a direct repeat of a 5'-TA-3' dinucleotide, a single copy of which remains at the macronuclear junction after excision. The number of these single-copy sequences has been estimated to be around 60,000 per haploid genome. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic determinants of IES elimination in P. aurelia, the analysis of excision products, and the tightly regulated timing of excision throughout macronuclear development. Several models for the molecular mechanism of IES excision will be discussed in relation to those proposed for DNA elimination in other ciliates.

  4. Evaluation of TCR Gene Editing Achieved by TALENs, CRISPR/Cas9, and megaTAL Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Mark J; Webber, Beau R; Knipping, Friederike; Lonetree, Cara-lin; Tennis, Nicole; DeFeo, Anthony P; McElroy, Amber N; Starker, Colby G; Lee, Catherine; Merkel, Sarah; Lund, Troy C; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Jensen, Michael C; Voytas, Daniel F; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Gabriel, Richard; Hippen, Keli L; Miller, Jeffrey S; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Tolar, Jakub; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-03-01

    Present adoptive immunotherapy strategies are based on the re-targeting of autologous T-cells to recognize tumor antigens. As T-cell properties may vary significantly between patients, this approach can result in significant variability in cell potency that may affect therapeutic outcome. More consistent results could be achieved by generating allogeneic cells from healthy donors. An impediment to such an approach is the endogenous T-cell receptors present on T-cells, which have the potential to direct dangerous off-tumor antihost reactivity. To address these limitations, we assessed the ability of three different TCR-α-targeted nucleases to disrupt T-cell receptor expression in primary human T-cells. We optimized the conditions for the delivery of each reagent and assessed off-target cleavage. The megaTAL and CRISPR/Cas9 reagents exhibited the highest disruption efficiency combined with low levels of toxicity and off-target cleavage, and we used them for a translatable manufacturing process to produce safe cellular substrates for next-generation immunotherapies.

  5. Genomic editing of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells using zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Krymskaya, Ludmila; Wang, Jianbin; Henley, Jill; Rao, Anitha; Cao, Lan-Feng; Tran, Chy-Anh; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Gardner, Agnes; Gonzalez, Nancy; Kim, Kenneth; Liu, Pei-Qi; Hofer, Ursula; Lopez, Evan; Gregory, Philip D; Liu, Qing; Holmes, Michael C; Cannon, Paula M; Zaia, John A; DiGiusto, David L

    2013-06-01

    The HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 is a validated target for HIV/AIDS therapy. The apparent elimination of HIV-1 in a patient treated with an allogeneic stem cell transplant homozygous for a naturally occurring CCR5 deletion mutation (CCR5(Δ32/Δ32)) supports the concept that a single dose of HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells can provide disease protection. Given the low frequency of naturally occurring CCR5(Δ32/Δ32) donors, we reasoned that engineered autologous CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) could be used for AIDS therapy. We evaluated disruption of CCR5 gene expression in HSPCs isolated from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-mobilized adult blood using a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding a CCR5-specific pair of zinc finger nucleases (CCR5-ZFN). Our results demonstrate that CCR5-ZFN RNA and protein expression from the adenoviral vector is enhanced by pretreatment of HSPC with protein kinase C (PKC) activators resulting in >25% CCR5 gene disruption and that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway is responsible for this activity. Importantly, using an optimized dose of PKC activator and adenoviral vector we could generate CCR5-modified HSPCs which engraft in a humanized mouse model (albeit at a reduced level) and support multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data establish the basis for improved approaches exploiting adenoviral vector delivery in the modification of HSPCs.

  6. Generation of PPARγ mono-allelic knockout pigs via zinc-finger nucleases and nuclear transfer cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongshan Yang; Jiangtian Tian; Feng Li; Jifeng Zhang; Lin Chang; Duanqing Pei; Y Eugene Chen; Liangxue Lai; Huaqiang Yang; Wei Li; Bentian Zhao; Zhen Ouyang; Zhaoming Liu; Yu Zhao; Nana Fan; Jun Song

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has revolutionized the field of mouse genetics and allowed for the analysis of diverse aspects of gene function in vivo.For more than two decades,researchers have been actively searching for ES cells from large animals such as pigs and cattle.Unfortunately,to date,no ES cell lines from large animals have passed the crucial test of germ line contribution.The sole method of gene targeting to date in these species remains somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) combined with DNA homologous recombination (HR).Due to the limited proliferation competency and extremely low frequency of HR in somatic cells (less than 10-6),this process is highly inefficient and only a few successful examples have been achieved,even though enrichment strategies such as positivenegative marker selection,promoter-trap and adenoassociated viral delivery were previously used [1-3].The low efficiency of gene targeting in cultured somatic cells is the main barrier for gene targeting in large animals.Recently,zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing.The success of ZFN technology for gene targeting in fruit flies,zebra fish,rodents as well as human cell lines encouraged us to establish a high-efficiency gene-targeting platform in large animals such as pigs [4-8].

  7. Efficient genome engineering by targeted homologous recombination in mouse embryos using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Daniel; Peters, Annika; Wirtz, Tristan; Mai, Maren; Ackermann, Justus; Thabet, Yasser; Schmidt, Jürgen; Weighardt, Heike; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Schultze, Joachim L; Beyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mouse models by introducing transgenes using homologous recombination is critical for understanding fundamental biology and pathology of human diseases. Here we investigate whether artificial transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-powerful tools that induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations-can be combined with a targeting vector to induce homologous recombination for the introduction of a transgene in embryonic stem cells and fertilized murine oocytes. We describe the generation of a conditional mouse model using TALENs, which introduce double-strand breaks at the genomic locus of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 in combination with a large 14.4 kb targeting template vector. We report successful germline transmission of this allele and demonstrate its recombination in primary cells in the presence of Cre-recombinase. These results suggest that TALEN-assisted induction of DNA double-strand breaks can facilitate homologous recombination of complex targeting constructs directly in oocytes.

  8. An efficient antiviral strategy for targeting hepatitis B virus genome using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jieliang; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Junyu; Wang, Fan; Wu, Min; Chen, Cuncun; Zheng, Ye; Peng, Xiuhua; Li, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that can cause chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in humans. Current therapies for CHB infection are limited in efficacy and do not target the pre-existing viral genomic DNA, which are present in the nucleus as a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) form. The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) are newly developed enzymes that can cleave sequence-specific DNA targets. Here, TALENs targeting the conserved regions of the viral genomic DNA among different HBV genotypes were constructed. The expression of TALENs in Huh7 cells transfected with monomeric linear full-length HBV DNA significantly reduced the viral production of HBeAg, HBsAg, HBcAg, and pgRNA, resulted in a decreased cccDNA level and misrepaired cccDNAs without apparent cytotoxic effects. The anti-HBV effect of TALENs was further demonstrated in a hydrodynamic injection-based mouse model. In addition, an enhanced antiviral effect with combinations of TALENs and interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment was observed and expression of TALENs restored HBV suppressed IFN-stimulated response element-directed transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that TALENs can specifically target and successfully inactivate the HBV genome and are potently synergistic with IFN-α, thus providing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating CHB infection.

  9. Flexor Tendon Ruptures After Distal Scaphoid Excision for Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Mitchell, Charles H; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Distal scaphoid excision is one treatment option for osteoarthritis of the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint following failure of conservative measures. Potential complications of this procedure include injury to the carpal ligaments, cartilage, and radial artery. A single case was identified by the senior author, and the medical record was reviewed for surgical notes, progress notes, and radiographs. A 68-year-old male sustained ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus to the index finger 3 years following a distal scaphoid excision for symptomatic STT osteoarthritis. He required a flexor tendon reconstruction using the remaining FDS tendon for graft incorporated with a Pulvertaft weave. His midcarpal pain continued after recovery of his index finger function, eventually requiring a 4-corner fusion of the wrist. Flexor tendon rupture is a previously unreported complication of distal scaphoid excision for STT arthritis.

  10. Management of Recurrent Stricture Formation after Transverse Vaginal Septum Excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridhima Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A transverse vaginal septum (TVS is a rare obstructing anomaly, caused due to improper fusion of Müllerian ducts and urogenital sinus during embryogenesis. Case. A 15-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea. She had multiple congenital anomalies. Initial examination and imaging investigation revealed the presence of a unicornuate uterus and a TVS. The TVS was excised; however the patient was unable to perform vaginal dilation postoperatively leading to recurrent stricture formation. She underwent multiple surgeries for excision of the stricture. The patient was eventually evaluated every day in the clinic until she was able to demonstrate successful vaginal dilatation in the presence of a clinician. Summary and Conclusion. Properly guided regular and intensive vaginal dilation after TVS excision may decrease the need of reoperations due to recurrent stricture formation.

  11. Management of Recurrent Stricture Formation after Transverse Vaginal Septum Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Bozzay, Joseph D; Williams, David L; DePond, Robert T; Gantt, Pickens A

    2015-01-01

    Background. A transverse vaginal septum (TVS) is a rare obstructing anomaly, caused due to improper fusion of Müllerian ducts and urogenital sinus during embryogenesis. Case. A 15-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea. She had multiple congenital anomalies. Initial examination and imaging investigation revealed the presence of a unicornuate uterus and a TVS. The TVS was excised; however the patient was unable to perform vaginal dilation postoperatively leading to recurrent stricture formation. She underwent multiple surgeries for excision of the stricture. The patient was eventually evaluated every day in the clinic until she was able to demonstrate successful vaginal dilatation in the presence of a clinician. Summary and Conclusion. Properly guided regular and intensive vaginal dilation after TVS excision may decrease the need of reoperations due to recurrent stricture formation.

  12. Cephalosporins inhibit human metallo β-lactamase fold DNA repair nucleases SNM1A and SNM1B/apollo† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: General experimental procedures and supplementary figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc00529b Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Y.; Brem, Jürgen; Pettinati, Ilaria; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Gileadi, Opher

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) are involved in resistance to β-lactam antibiotics including cephalosporins. Human SNM1A and SNM1B are MBL superfamily exonucleases that play a key role in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links, which are induced by antitumour chemotherapeutics, and are therefore targets for cancer chemosensitization. We report that cephalosporins are competitive inhibitors of SNM1A and SNM1B exonuclease activity; both the intact β-lactam and their hydrolysed products are active. This discovery provides a lead for the development of potent and selective SNM1A and SNM1B inhibitors. PMID:27121860

  13. AUXIN AND GROWTH OF EXCISED ROOTS OF Bryophyllum calycinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1969-10-01

    Exogenous auxin (alpha-naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid, or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) was essential for the growth of single excised root tips of Bryophyllum calycinum in 50 ml of a mineral salt-sucrose medium supplemented with vitamins. Large inocula with a dry weight of 2.0 mg or more grew with no auxin added to the medium. Evidence for the synthesis of auxin by the excised roots grown from the larger inocula is presented. Leaching of auxin from single root tips cultivated in 15 or 50 ml of basal medium is considered to account for their failure to grow.

  14. Local Excision for the Treatment of Penile Verrucous Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Dong In; Choi, Sang Kyu; Kim, Soon Heum; Kim, Cheol Keun; Chung, Hong; Kim, Hong Sup

    2017-07-01

    Penile verrucous carcinoma is known for its favorable biologic behavior and lack of metastatic potential. For preservation of function, treatment has been focused on partial penectomy. Despite partial penectomy for preservation of minimal functional and aesthetic aspects, patients have experienced psychosexual problems. A 73-year-old man had a cauliflower-like verrucous carcinoma on the penile glans and coronary sulcus diagnosed by using excisional biopsy. He underwent degloving excision to save the penile shaft and glans penis. Surgical margin was 3 mm. He had been tumor-free at the 2-year follow-up. For maximum preservation of the functional and aesthetic aspects, we recommend degloving excision.

  15. Local Excision for the Treatment of Penile Verrucous Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong In Jo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Penile verrucous carcinoma is known for its favorable biologic behavior and lack of metastatic potential. For preservation of function, treatment has been focused on partial penectomy. Despite partial penectomy for preservation of minimal functional and aesthetic aspects, patients have experienced psychosexual problems. A 73-year-old man had a cauliflower-like verrucous carcinoma on the penile glans and coronary sulcus diagnosed by using excisional biopsy. He underwent degloving excision to save the penile shaft and glans penis. Surgical margin was 3 mm. He had been tumor-free at the 2-year follow-up. For maximum preservation of the functional and aesthetic aspects, we recommend degloving excision.

  16. An Intracellular Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerase Is Required for Folding and Activity of the Staphylococcus aureus Secreted Virulence Factor Nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemels, Richard E; Cech, Stephanie M; Meyer, Nikki M; Burke, Caleb A; Weiss, Andy; Parks, Anastacia R; Shaw, Lindsey N; Carroll, Ronan K

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that relies on a large repertoire of secreted and cell wall-associated proteins for pathogenesis. Consequently, the ability of the organism to cause disease is absolutely dependent on its ability to synthesize and successfully secrete these proteins. In this study, we investigate the role of peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) on the activity of the S. aureus secreted virulence factor nuclease (Nuc). We identify a staphylococcal cyclophilin-type PPIase (PpiB) that is required for optimal activity of Nuc. Disruption of ppiB results in decreased nuclease activity in culture supernatants; however, the levels of Nuc protein are not altered, suggesting that the decrease in activity results from misfolding of Nuc in the absence of PpiB. We go on to demonstrate that PpiB exhibits PPIase activity in vitro, is localized to the bacterial cytosol, and directly interacts with Nuc in vitro to accelerate the rate of Nuc refolding. Finally, we demonstrate an additional role for PpiB in S. aureus hemolysis and demonstrate that the S. aureus parvulin-type PPIase PrsA also plays a role in the activity of secreted virulence factors. The deletion of prsA leads to a decrease in secreted protease and phospholipase activity, similar to that observed in other Gram-positive pathogens. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that PPIases play an important role in the secretion of virulence factors in S. aureus IMPORTANCE: Staphylococcus aureus is a highly dangerous bacterial pathogen capable of causing a variety of infections throughout the human body. The ability of S. aureus to cause disease is largely due to an extensive repertoire of secreted and cell wall-associated proteins, including adhesins, toxins, exoenzymes, and superantigens. These virulence factors, once produced, are typically transported across the cell membrane by the secretory (Sec) system in a denatured state. Consequently

  17. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emin, David, E-mail: emin@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Akhtari, Massoud [Semple Institutes for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ellingson, B. M. [Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mathern, G. W. [Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  18. "The lobbying strategy is to keep excise as low as possible" - tobacco industry excise taxation policy in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasovsky Konstantin S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco taxes are one of the most effective ways to reduce tobacco use. Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs claim they wish to develop and secure excise systems that benefit both governments and the profitability of the companies themselves. The objective of the paper is to use the case of Ukraine, with its inconsistent history of excise tax changes in 1992-2008, to explore tobacco industry taxation strategies and tactics, and their implications for governmental revenues. Methods Details of tobacco industry policy on tobacco taxation in Ukraine were obtained by searching tobacco industry internal documents and various published reports. Results Even before entering the market in Ukraine, TTCs had made efforts to change the excise system in the country. In 1993-1994, TTCs lobbied the Ukrainian Government, and succeeded in achieving a lowering in tobacco tax. This, however, did not produce revenue increase they promised the Government. In 1996-1998, Ukrainian authorities increased excise several times, ignoring the wishes of TTCs, caused significant growth in revenue. Due to TTCs lobbying activities in 1999-2007 the tax increases were very moderate and it resulted in increased tobacco consumption in Ukraine. In 2008, despite the TTCs position, excise rates were increased twice and it was very beneficial for revenues. Conclusions The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control includes provisions both on tobacco taxation policy and on protection of public health policy from vested interests of tobacco industry. This paper provides arguments why tobacco taxation policy should also be protected from vested interests of tobacco industry. TTCs taxation strategy appears to be consistent: keep excise as low as possible. Apparent conflicts between TTCs concerning tax structures often hide their real aim to change tax structures for competing interests without increasing total tax incidence. Governments, that aim to reduce levels of

  19. "The lobbying strategy is to keep excise as low as possible" - tobacco industry excise taxation policy in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovsky, Konstantin S

    2010-08-31

    Tobacco taxes are one of the most effective ways to reduce tobacco use. Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) claim they wish to develop and secure excise systems that benefit both governments and the profitability of the companies themselves. The objective of the paper is to use the case of Ukraine, with its inconsistent history of excise tax changes in 1992-2008, to explore tobacco industry taxation strategies and tactics, and their implications for governmental revenues. Details of tobacco industry policy on tobacco taxation in Ukraine were obtained by searching tobacco industry internal documents and various published reports. Even before entering the market in Ukraine, TTCs had made efforts to change the excise system in the country. In 1993-1994, TTCs lobbied the Ukrainian Government, and succeeded in achieving a lowering in tobacco tax. This, however, did not produce revenue increase they promised the Government. In 1996-1998, Ukrainian authorities increased excise several times, ignoring the wishes of TTCs, caused significant growth in revenue. Due to TTCs lobbying activities in 1999-2007 the tax increases were very moderate and it resulted in increased tobacco consumption in Ukraine. In 2008, despite the TTCs position, excise rates were increased twice and it was very beneficial for revenues. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control includes provisions both on tobacco taxation policy and on protection of public health policy from vested interests of tobacco industry. This paper provides arguments why tobacco taxation policy should also be protected from vested interests of tobacco industry. TTCs taxation strategy appears to be consistent: keep excise as low as possible. Apparent conflicts between TTCs concerning tax structures often hide their real aim to change tax structures for competing interests without increasing total tax incidence. Governments, that aim to reduce levels of tobacco use, should not allow tobacco companies to influence the

  20. Protein switches identified from diverse insertion libraries created using S1 nuclease digestion of supercoiled-form plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullman, Jennifer; Guntas, Gurkan; Dumont, Matthew; Ostermeier, Marc

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that S1 nuclease converts supercoiled plasmid DNA to unit-length, linear dsDNA through the creation of a single, double-stranded break in a plasmid molecule. These double-stranded breaks occur not only in the origin of replication near inverted repeats but also at a wide variety of locations throughout the plasmid. S1 nuclease exhibits this activity under conditions typically employed for the nuclease's single-stranded nuclease activity. Thus, S1 nuclease digestion of plasmid DNA, unlike analogous digestion with DNaseI, effectively halts after the first double-stranded break. This property makes easier the construction of large domain insertion libraries in which the goal is to insert linear DNA at a variety of locations throughout a plasmid. We used this property to create a library in which a circularly permuted TEM1 β-lactamase gene was inserted throughout a plasmid containing the gene encoding Escherichia coli ribose binding protein. Gene fusions that encode allosteric switch proteins in which ribose modulates β-lactamase catalytic activity were isolated from this library using a combination of a genetic selection and a screen.

  1. Selection-independent generation of gene knockout mouse embryonic stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Osiak

    Full Text Available Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10(-6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs. Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells.

  2. Selection-independent generation of gene knockout mouse embryonic stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10(-6). In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells.

  3. ZFN-Site searches genomes for zinc finger nuclease target sites and off-target sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iseli Christian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs are man-made restriction enzymes useful for manipulating genomes by cleaving target DNA sequences. ZFNs allow therapeutic gene correction or creation of genetically modified model organisms. ZFN specificity is not absolute; therefore, it is essential to select ZFN target sites without similar genomic off-target sites. It is important to assay for off-target cleavage events at sites similar to the target sequence. Results ZFN-Site is a web interface that searches multiple genomes for ZFN off-target sites. Queries can be based on the target sequence or can be expanded using degenerate specificity to account for known ZFN binding preferences. ZFN off-target sites are outputted with links to genome browsers, facilitating off-target cleavage site screening. We verified ZFN-Site using previously published ZFN half-sites and located their target sites and their previously described off-target sites. While we have tailored this tool to ZFNs, ZFN-Site can also be used to find potential off-target sites for other nucleases, such as TALE nucleases. Conclusions ZFN-Site facilitates genome searches for possible ZFN cleavage sites based on user-defined stringency limits. ZFN-Site is an improvement over other methods because the FetchGWI search engine uses an indexed search of genome sequences for all ZFN target sites and possible off-target sites matching the half-sites and stringency limits. Therefore, ZFN-Site does not miss potential off-target sites.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Nuc2 is a functional, surface-attached extracellular nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowski, Megan R; Crosby, Heidi A; Hernandez, Frank J; Malone, Cheryl L; McNamara, James O; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that causes a diverse range of acute and chronic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the secreted nuclease (Nuc) enzyme is a virulence factor in multiple models of infection, and in vivo expression of nuc has facilitated the development of an infection imaging approach based on Nuc-activatable probes. Interestingly, S. aureus strains encode a second nuclease (Nuc2) that has received limited attention. With the growing interest in bacterial nucleases, we sought to characterize Nuc2 in more detail through localization, expression, and biochemical studies. Fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase localization approaches using Nuc2-GFP and Nuc2-PhoA fusions, respectively, demonstrated that Nuc2 is membrane bound with the C-terminus facing the extracellular environment, indicating it is a signal-anchored Type II membrane protein. Nuc2 enzyme activity was detectable on the S. aureus cell surface using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, and in time courses, both nuc2 transcription and enzyme activity peaked in early logarithmic growth and declined in stationary phase. Using a mouse model of S. aureus pyomyositis, Nuc2 activity was detected with activatable probes in vivo in nuc mutant strains, demonstrating that Nuc2 is produced during infections. To assess Nuc2 biochemical properties, the protein was purified and found to cleave both single- and double-stranded DNA, and it exhibited thermostability and calcium dependence, paralleling the properties of Nuc. Purified Nuc2 prevented biofilm formation in vitro and modestly decreased biomass in dispersal experiments. Altogether, our findings confirm that S. aureus encodes a second, surface-attached and functional DNase that is expressed during infections and displays similar biochemical properties to the secreted Nuc enzyme.

  5. Use of designer nucleases for targeted gene and genome editing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Donald P; Spalding, Martin H; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    The ability to efficiently inactivate or replace genes in model organisms allowed a rapid expansion of our understanding of many of the genetic, biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms that support life. With the advent of new techniques for manipulating genes and genomes that are applicable not only to single-celled organisms, but also to more complex organisms such as animals and plants, the speed with which scientists and biotechnologists can expand fundamental knowledge and apply that knowledge to improvements in medicine, industry and agriculture is set to expand in an exponential fashion. At the heart of these advancements will be the use of gene editing tools such as zinc finger nucleases, modified meganucleases, hybrid DNA/RNA oligonucleotides, TAL effector nucleases and modified CRISPR/Cas9. Each of these tools has the ability to precisely target one specific DNA sequence within a genome and (except for DNA/RNA oligonucleotides) to create a double-stranded DNA break. DNA repair to such breaks sometimes leads to gene knockouts or gene replacement by homologous recombination if exogenously supplied homologous DNA fragments are made available. Genome rearrangements are also possible to engineer. Creation and use of such genome rearrangements, gene knockouts and gene replacements by the plant science community is gaining significant momentum. To document some of this progress and to explore the technology's longer term potential, this review highlights present and future uses of designer nucleases to greatly expedite research with model plant systems and to engineer genes and genomes in major and minor crop species for enhanced food production.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Nuc2 is a functional, surface-attached extracellular nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan R Kiedrowski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that causes a diverse range of acute and chronic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the secreted nuclease (Nuc enzyme is a virulence factor in multiple models of infection, and in vivo expression of nuc has facilitated the development of an infection imaging approach based on Nuc-activatable probes. Interestingly, S. aureus strains encode a second nuclease (Nuc2 that has received limited attention. With the growing interest in bacterial nucleases, we sought to characterize Nuc2 in more detail through localization, expression, and biochemical studies. Fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase localization approaches using Nuc2-GFP and Nuc2-PhoA fusions, respectively, demonstrated that Nuc2 is membrane bound with the C-terminus facing the extracellular environment, indicating it is a signal-anchored Type II membrane protein. Nuc2 enzyme activity was detectable on the S. aureus cell surface using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay, and in time courses, both nuc2 transcription and enzyme activity peaked in early logarithmic growth and declined in stationary phase. Using a mouse model of S. aureus pyomyositis, Nuc2 activity was detected with activatable probes in vivo in nuc mutant strains, demonstrating that Nuc2 is produced during infections. To assess Nuc2 biochemical properties, the protein was purified and found to cleave both single- and double-stranded DNA, and it exhibited thermostability and calcium dependence, paralleling the properties of Nuc. Purified Nuc2 prevented biofilm formation in vitro and modestly decreased biomass in dispersal experiments. Altogether, our findings confirm that S. aureus encodes a second, surface-attached and functional DNase that is expressed during infections and displays similar biochemical properties to the secreted Nuc enzyme.

  7. Ultrafast solvation dynamics at internal site of staphylococcal nuclease investigated by site-directed mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Guang-yu, Gao; Wei, Wang; Shu-feng, Wang; Zhong, Dongping; Qi-huang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is essential for protein activities. To study internal solvation of protein, site-directed mutagenesis is applied. Intrinsic fluorescent probe, tryptophan, is inserted into desired position inside protein molecule for ultrafast spectroscopic study. Here we review this unique method for protein dynamics researches. We introduce the frontiers of protein solvation, site-directed mutagenesis, protein stability and characteristics, and the spectroscopic methods. Then we present time-resolved spectroscopic dynamics of solvation dynamics inside caves of active sites. The studies are carried out on a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease. The solvation at internal sites of the caves indicate clear characteristics of local environment. These solvation behaviors correlated to the enzyme activity directly.

  8. Zinc finger nuclease technology: A stable tool for high efficiency transformation in bloodstream form T. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Gabriela; Kangussu-Marcolino, Monica M; Doiron, Nicholas; Käser, Sandro; de Assis Burle-Caldas, Gabriela; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Teixeira, Santuza M; Roditi, Isabel

    2017-02-20

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the generation of knockout mutants is relatively easy compared to other organisms as transfection methods are well established. These methods have their limitations, however, when it comes to the generation of genome-wide libraries that require a minimum of several hundred thousand transformants. Double-strand breaks with the meganuclease ISce-I dramatically increase transformation efficiency, but are not widely in use as cell lines need to be generated de novo before each transfection. Here we show that zinc finger nucleases are a robust and stable tool that can enhance transformation in bloodstream forms by more than an order of magnitude.

  9. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs): a highly efficient and versatile tool for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) have recently emerged as a revolutionary genome editing tool in many different organisms and cell types. The site-specific chromosomal double-strand breaks introduced by TALENs significantly increase the efficiency of genomic modification. The modular nature of the TALE central repeat domains enables researchers to tailor DNA recognition specificity with ease and target essentially any desired DNA sequence. Here, we comprehensively review the development of TALEN technology in terms of scaffold optimization, DNA recognition, and repeat array assembly. In addition, we provide some perspectives on the future development of this technology.

  10. Nucleotide excision repair syndromes: molecular basis and clinical symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bootsma (Dirk); G. Weeda (Geert); W. Vermeulen (Wim); H. van Vuuren; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P.J. van der Spek (Peter)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe phenotypic consequences of a nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect in man are apparent from three distinct inborn diseases characterized by hypersensitivity of the skin to ultraviolet light and a remarkable clinical and genetic heterogeneity. These are the prototype repair

  11. Nucleotide excision repair of DNA: The very early history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2011-07-15

    This article, taken largely from the book Correcting the Blueprint of Life: An Historical Account of the Discovery of DNA Repair Mechanisms, summarizes the very early history of the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Base excision repair of 8-oxoG in dinucleosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Menoni (Hervé); M.S. Shukla (Manu Shubhdarshan); V. Gerson (Véronique); S. Dimitrov (Stefan); D. Angelov (Dimitar)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn this work we have studied the effect of chromatin structure on the base excision repair (BER) efficiency of 8-oxoG. As a model system we have used precisely positioned dinucleosomes assembled with linker histone H1. A single 8-oxoG was inserted either in the linker or the core particl

  13. Elbow joint kinematics after excision of the radial head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Lund; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of the radial head to elbow joint kinematics was studied in 7 osteoligamentous elbow preparations. During unloaded flexion and extension, radial head excision induced a maximum varus displacement of 1.6 degrees with 20 degrees of joint flexion and a maximum external rotation of 3...

  14. 76 FR 46677 - Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services Excise Taxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 49 RIN 1545-BJ40 Indoor Tanning Services; Cosmetic Services Excise Taxes AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of public hearing...

  15. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  16. Excise Taxes and the Price Elasticity of Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Ralph C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Points out that, although the analysis of the imposition of an excise tax is widely used in economics courses, the consequences of a change in the tax rate are different and ignored. This article presents an effective way to teach about such a change. (GG)

  17. Excise Taxes and the Price Elasticity of Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Ralph C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Points out that, although the analysis of the imposition of an excise tax is widely used in economics courses, the consequences of a change in the tax rate are different and ignored. This article presents an effective way to teach about such a change. (GG)

  18. Probing isoform-specific functions of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases using zinc finger nuclease glycoengineered SimpleCells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Kong, Yun; Steentoft, Catharina; Nudelman, Aaron S; Pedersen, Nis B; Wandall, Hans H; Mandel, Ulla; Bennett, Eric P; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik

    2012-06-19

    Our knowledge of the O-glycoproteome [N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) type] is highly limited. The O-glycoproteome is differentially regulated in cells by dynamic expression of a subset of 20 polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts), and methods to identify important functions of individual GalNAc-Ts are largely unavailable. We recently introduced SimpleCells, i.e., human cell lines made deficient in O-glycan extension by zinc finger nuclease targeting of a key gene in O-glycan elongation (Cosmc), which allows for proteome-wide discovery of O-glycoproteins. Here we have extended the SimpleCell concept to include proteome-wide discovery of unique functions of individual GalNAc-Ts. We used the GalNAc-T2 isoform implicated in dyslipidemia and the human HepG2 liver cell line to demonstrate unique functions of this isoform. We confirm that GalNAc-T2-directed site-specific O-glycosylation inhibits proprotein activation of the lipase inhibitor ANGPTL3 in HepG2 cells and further identify eight O-glycoproteins exclusively glycosylated by T2 of which one, ApoC-III, is implicated in dyslipidemia. Our study supports an essential role for GalNAc-T2 in lipid metabolism, provides serum biomarkers for GalNAc-T2 enzyme function, and validates the use of GALNT gene targeting with SimpleCells for broad discovery of disease-causing deficiencies in O-glycosylation. The presented glycoengineering strategy opens the way for proteome-wide discovery of functions of GalNAc-T isoforms and their role in congenital diseases and disorders.

  19. The optimal time for early excision in major burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangman, Pornprom; Sullivan, Stephen R; Honari, Shari; Engrav, Lorenz H; Heimbach, David M; Gibran, Nicole S

    2006-01-01

    Early excision and grafting (E&G) drastically changed burn care in America by reducing morbidity, mortality and hospital length of stay (LOS). The present study was intended to determine whether an optimal time window exists between resuscitation and wound sepsis for the first E&G in a patient with a large burn. The authors conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted between January 1994 and December 2000 with > or = 40% TBSA burns and at least 1 E&G procedure. Patients were grouped according to the day of their first operation. Patients allowed to heal indeterminate burns prior to excision and grafting of deep partial or full thickness burns were grouped as > or = d7 and were excluded from the present study. The authors correlated the time of first excision with infection, mortality and LOS. Seventy-five patients were identified and 12 patients allowed to heal indeterminate burn prior to excision and grafting of deep partial or full thickness burns were excluded. Sixty-three remaining patients included 51 males and 12 females. Mean burn size was 49% of total body surface area (TBSA) (44% deep partial or full thickness) and the mean age was 36 years. There were 61 flame (2 combined with electrical injuries), 1 scald and 1 chemical burn. Twelve died (19%) and 52 patients developed 121 infections. Whereas there was no statistical difference in mortality for patients operated on different days (p > 0.2), 60% of patients operated within the first 48 hours after injury died; this was not significant due to a small patient number The present data suggest that patients who undergo early excision and grafting within seven days following a major burn > or = 40% TBSA have equivalent infection or mortality rates regardless of when the first operation occurs between post burn day(PBD) 2 and PBD 7 (p > 0.2).

  20. Structure of fructans from excised leaves of New Zealand flax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, I M; Cairns, A J; Furneaux, R H

    2001-07-01

    The accumulation of total water-soluble carbohydrate, and specifically sucrose and fructan, by excised leaves of Phormium tenax and P. cookianum (family Phormiaceae J. G. Agardh, order Asparagales) was investigated. Total water-soluble carbohydrate content of excised leaves of P. tenax and P. cookianum increased during 48 h of continuous illumination at an average rate of 1.3 and 0.9 mg g(-1) fresh weight leaf per hour, respectively. The sucrose content of excised leaves increased throughout the experimental period. The fructan content of excised leaves of P. tenax increased slightly throughout the experimental period, whilst that of P. cookianum was variable and showed no overall change. Chemical and spectroscopic analysis of the fructans obtained from the two Phormium species showed that they were similar to each other and contained mostly 1-linked and terminal fructofuranosyl (Fruf) residues, together with smaller amounts of 6-linked Fruf, 1,6-branched Fruf, terminal and 6-linked glucopyranosyl residues. Separation of the fructans by thin-layer and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography revealed the presence of a complex mixture of fructo-oligosaccharides and higher molecular weight fructan. The branched structure of the fructans isolated from excised leaves of Phormium resembles that of fructans and fructo-oligosaccharides isolated from some related species within the order Asparagales (Agave vera cruz, Cordyline australis and Urginea maritima), but is distinct from the linear structure of fructans from others (Allium cepa and Asparagus officinalis). The structural heterogeniety of fructans within both the order Asparagales and superorder Liliiflorae may be a useful chemotaxonomic aid.

  1. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Breast Cancer Cells in Patient Blood with Nuclease-Activated Probe Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kruspe

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A challenge for circulating tumor cell (CTC-based diagnostics is the development of simple and inexpensive methods that reliably detect the diverse cells that make up CTCs. CTC-derived nucleases are one category of proteins that could be exploited to meet this challenge. Advantages of nucleases as CTC biomarkers include: (1 their elevated expression in many cancer cells, including cells implicated in metastasis that have undergone epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition; and (2 their enzymatic activity, which can be exploited for signal amplification in detection methods. Here, we describe a diagnostic assay based on quenched fluorescent nucleic acid probes that detect breast cancer CTCs via their nuclease activity. This assay exhibited robust performance in distinguishing breast cancer patients from healthy controls, and it is rapid, inexpensive, and easy to implement in most clinical labs. Given its broad applicability, this technology has the potential to have a substantive impact on the diagnosis and treatment of many cancers.

  2. Characterization of S1 nuclease sensitive site at transcription initiation region of Attacus ricini rDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明亮; 赵慕钧; 靳嘉瑞; 李载平

    1997-01-01

    A single-stranded S1 nuclease hypersensitive site which contains a d(AT)18 sequence structure locat-ed in the 5 -non transcription spacer of silkworm A . ricini ribosomal RNA gene has been reported[1] Using starved-refed silkworms, another S1 nuclease sensitive site was found existing in the rDNA chromatin, while under merely starving, this S1 sensitive site disappeared[2] . Recently this inducible S1 sensitive site has been further determined. It consists of a d(GT)10-d(AT)10 special DNA sequence at the transcription initiation region, and shows a behavior of ease in DNA-unwinding, indicating that S1 nuclease sensitive sites may have an important function in the regulation of rDNA transcription and replication.

  3. TAL effector nucleases induce mutations at a pre-selected location in the genome of primary barley transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach; Starker, Colby G; Christian, Michelle; Voytas, Daniel F; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holme, Inger Bæksted

    2013-10-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) enable targeted mutagenesis in a variety of organisms. The primary advantage of TALENs over other sequence-specific nucleases, namely zinc finger nucleases and meganucleases, lies in their ease of assembly, reliability of function, and their broad targeting range. Here we report the assembly of several TALENs for a specific genomic locus in barley. The cleavage activity of individual TALENs was first tested in vivo using a yeast-based, single-strand annealing assay. The most efficient TALEN was then selected for barley transformation. Analysis of the resulting transformants showed that TALEN-induced double strand breaks led to the introduction of short deletions at the target site. Additional analysis revealed that each barley transformant contained a range of different mutations, indicating that mutations occurred independently in different cells.

  4. An Mrr-family nuclease motif in the single polypeptide restriction-modification enzyme LlaGI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel M; Josephsen, Jytte; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2009-11-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of the putative nuclease domain of the single polypeptide restriction-modification enzyme LlaGI reveals amino acid motifs characteristic of the Escherichia coli methylated DNA-specific Mrr endonuclease. Using mutagenesis, we examined the role of the conserved residues in both DNA translocation and cleavage. Mutations in those residues predicted to play a role in DNA hydrolysis produced enzymes that could translocate on DNA but were either unable to cleave the polynucleotide track or had reduced nuclease activity. Cleavage by LlaGI is not targeted to methylated DNA, suggesting that the conserved motifs in the Mrr domain are a conventional sub-family of the PD-(D/E)XK superfamily of DNA nucleases.

  5. Coincident resection at both ends of random, γ-induced double-strand breaks requires MRX (MRN, Sae2 (Ctp1, and Mre11-nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Westmoreland

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resection is an early step in homology-directed recombinational repair (HDRR of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Resection enables strand invasion as well as reannealing following DNA synthesis across a DSB to assure efficient HDRR. While resection of only one end could result in genome instability, it has not been feasible to address events at both ends of a DSB, or to distinguish 1- versus 2-end resections at random, radiation-induced "dirty" DSBs or even enzyme-induced "clean" DSBs. Previously, we quantitatively addressed resection and the role of Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 complex (MRX at random DSBs in circular chromosomes within budding yeast based on reduced pulsed-field gel electrophoretic mobility ("PFGE-shift". Here, we extend PFGE analysis to a second dimension and demonstrate unique patterns associated with 0-, 1-, and 2-end resections at DSBs, providing opportunities to examine coincidence of resection. In G2-arrested WT, Δrad51 and Δrad52 cells deficient in late stages of HDRR, resection occurs at both ends of γ-DSBs. However, for radiation-induced and I-SceI-induced DSBs, 1-end resections predominate in MRX (MRN null mutants with or without Ku70. Surprisingly, Sae2 (Ctp1/CtIP and Mre11 nuclease-deficient mutants have similar responses, although there is less impact on repair. Thus, we provide direct molecular characterization of coincident resection at random, radiation-induced DSBs and show that rapid and coincident initiation of resection at γ-DSBs requires MRX, Sae2 protein, and Mre11 nuclease. Structural features of MRX complex are consistent with coincident resection being due to an ability to interact with both DSB ends to directly coordinate resection. Interestingly, coincident resection at clean I-SceI-induced breaks is much less dependent on Mre11 nuclease or Sae2, contrary to a strong dependence on MRX complex, suggesting different roles for these functions at "dirty" and clean DSB ends. These approaches apply to resection at

  6. Coincident resection at both ends of random, γ-induced double-strand breaks requires MRX (MRN, Sae2 (Ctp1, and Mre11-nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Westmoreland

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resection is an early step in homology-directed recombinational repair (HDRR of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Resection enables strand invasion as well as reannealing following DNA synthesis across a DSB to assure efficient HDRR. While resection of only one end could result in genome instability, it has not been feasible to address events at both ends of a DSB, or to distinguish 1- versus 2-end resections at random, radiation-induced "dirty" DSBs or even enzyme-induced "clean" DSBs. Previously, we quantitatively addressed resection and the role of Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 complex (MRX at random DSBs in circular chromosomes within budding yeast based on reduced pulsed-field gel electrophoretic mobility ("PFGE-shift". Here, we extend PFGE analysis to a second dimension and demonstrate unique patterns associated with 0-, 1-, and 2-end resections at DSBs, providing opportunities to examine coincidence of resection. In G2-arrested WT, Δrad51 and Δrad52 cells deficient in late stages of HDRR, resection occurs at both ends of γ-DSBs. However, for radiation-induced and I-SceI-induced DSBs, 1-end resections predominate in MRX (MRN null mutants with or without Ku70. Surprisingly, Sae2 (Ctp1/CtIP and Mre11 nuclease-deficient mutants have similar responses, although there is less impact on repair. Thus, we provide direct molecular characterization of coincident resection at random, radiation-induced DSBs and show that rapid and coincident initiation of resection at γ-DSBs requires MRX, Sae2 protein, and Mre11 nuclease. Structural features of MRX complex are consistent with coincident resection being due to an ability to interact with both DSB ends to directly coordinate resection. Interestingly, coincident resection at clean I-SceI-induced breaks is much less dependent on Mre11 nuclease or Sae2, contrary to a strong dependence on MRX complex, suggesting different roles for these functions at "dirty" and clean DSB ends. These approaches apply to resection at

  7. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah;

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function...... of proteins required for BER or proteins that regulate BER have been consistently associated with neurological dysfunction and disease in humans. Recent studies suggest that DNA lesions in the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments and the cellular response to those lesions have a profound effect on cellular...... energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease....

  8. 76 FR 52862 - Time for Payment of Certain Excise Taxes, and Quarterly Excise Tax Payments for Small Alcohol...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ..., Surety bonds, Virgin Islands, Warehouses. 27 CFR Part 40 Cigars and cigarettes, Claims, Electronic fund... excise tax on distilled spirits, wine, beer, tobacco products, and cigarette papers and tubes, and... products, and cigarette papers and tubes. TTB's responsibilities include promulgating regulations...

  9. 76 FR 3502 - Time for Payment of Certain Excise Taxes, and Quarterly Excise Tax Payments for Small Alcohol...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ..., wine, beer, tobacco products, and cigarette papers and tubes, and also reissues temporary regulations... of distilled spirits, wine, beer, tobacco products, and cigarette papers and tubes. TTB's... method for payment of the applicable excise taxes. See 26 U.S.C. 5061 pertaining to distilled...

  10. Medium optimization for nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum in solid-state fermentation using polyurethane foam as inert carrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Y.; Knol, W.; Smits, J.P.; Bol, J.

    1996-01-01

    A solid-state fermentation system, using polyurethane foam as an inert carrier, was used for the production of nuclease P1 by Penicillium citrinum. Optimization of nuclease P1 production was carried out using a synthetic liquid medium. After a two-step medium optimization using a fractional factoria

  11. Medium optimization for nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum in solid-state fermentation using polyurethane foam as inert carrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Y.; Knol, W.; Smits, J.P.; Bol, J.

    1996-01-01

    A solid-state fermentation system, using polyurethane foam as an inert carrier, was used for the production of nuclease P1 by Penicillium citrinum. Optimization of nuclease P1 production was carried out using a synthetic liquid medium. After a two-step medium optimization using a fractional

  12. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O.; Baek, Eun J.; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-01-01

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine. PMID:26078220

  13. Simultaneous screening and validation of effective zinc finger nucleases in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs have been successfully used for genome modification in various cell types and species. However, construction of an effective ZFN remained challenging. Previous studies all focused on obtaining specific zinc finger proteins (ZFPs first via bacterial 2-hybrid approach, and then fusing selected ZFPs to FokI nuclease domain. These assembled ZFNs have high rate of failing to cleave target sites in vivo. In this study, we developed a simultaneous screening and validation system to obtain effective ZFNs directly in yeast AH109. This system is based on Gal4 reporter system carrying a unique intermediate reporter plasmid with two 30-bp Gal4 homology arms and a ZFN target site. DNA double strand breaks introduced on target sequence by ZFNs were repaired by single strand annealing (SSA mechanism, and the restored Gal4 drove reporter genes expression. Taking the advantage of OPEN (Oligomerized Pool ENgineering selection, we constructed 3 randomized ZFNs libraries and 9 reporter strains for each target gene. We tested this system by taking goat α s1-casein as target gene following three-step selection. Consequently, 3 efficient pairs of ZFNs were obtained from positive colonies on selective medium. The ZFNs achieved a 15.9% disruption frequency in goat mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, we created a novel system to obtain effective ZFNs directly with simultaneous screening and validation.

  14. Oxidative Stress Impairs Cell Death by Repressing the Nuclease Activity of Mitochondrial Endonuclease G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L.J. Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Endonuclease G (EndoG is a mitochondrial protein that is released from mitochondria and relocated into the nucleus to promote chromosomal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis. Here, we show that oxidative stress causes cell-death defects in C. elegans through an EndoG-mediated cell-death pathway. In response to high reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, homodimeric CPS-6—the C. elegans homolog of EndoG—is dissociated into monomers with diminished nuclease activity. Conversely, the nuclease activity of CPS-6 is enhanced, and its dimeric structure is stabilized by its interaction with the worm AIF homolog, WAH-1, which shifts to disulfide cross-linked dimers under high ROS levels. CPS-6 thus acts as a ROS sensor to regulate the life and death of cells. Modulation of the EndoG dimer conformation could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of diseases resulting from oxidative stress.

  15. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in axolotl using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, G. Parker; Timberlake, Andrew T.; Mclean, Kaitlin C.; Monaghan, James R.; Crews, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Among tetrapods, only urodele salamanders, such as the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum, can completely regenerate limbs as adults. The mystery of why salamanders, but not other animals, possess this ability has for generations captivated scientists seeking to induce this phenomenon in other vertebrates. Although many recent advances in molecular biology have allowed limb regeneration and tissue repair in the axolotl to be investigated in increasing detail, the molecular toolkit for the study of this process has been limited. Here, we report that the CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease system can efficiently create mutations at targeted sites within the axolotl genome. We identify individual animals treated with RNA-guided nucleases that have mutation frequencies close to 100% at targeted sites. We employ this technique to completely functionally ablate EGFP expression in transgenic animals and recapitulate developmental phenotypes produced by loss of the conserved gene brachyury. Thus, this advance allows a reverse genetic approach in the axolotl and will undoubtedly provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms of salamanders' unique regenerative ability. PMID:24764077

  16. Leishmania infantum EndoG is an endo/exo-nuclease essential for parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Rico

    Full Text Available EndoG, a member of the DNA/RNA non-specific ββα-metal family of nucleases, has been demonstrated to be present in many organisms, including Trypanosomatids. This nuclease participates in the apoptotic program in these parasites by migrating from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, where it takes part in the degradation of genomic DNA that characterizes this process. We now demonstrate that Leishmania infantum EndoG (LiEndoG is an endo-exonuclease that has a preferential 5' exonuclease activity on linear DNA. Regardless of its role during apoptotic cell death, this enzyme seems to be necessary during normal development of the parasites as indicated by the reduced growth rates observed in LiEndoG hemi-knockouts and their poor infectivity in differentiated THP-1 cells. The pro-life role of this protein is also corroborated by the higher survival rates of parasites that over-express this protein after treatment with the LiEndoG inhibitor Lei49. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this enzyme plays essential roles in both survival and death of Leishmania parasites.

  17. Leishmania infantum EndoG Is an Endo/Exo-Nuclease Essential for Parasite Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Kilian Jesús; Alzate, Juan Fernando; Genes, Carlos Mario; Moreno, David; Casanova, Elena; Gigante, Alba; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Camarasa, María-José; Clos, Joachim; Gago, Federico; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    EndoG, a member of the DNA/RNA non-specific ββα-metal family of nucleases, has been demonstrated to be present in many organisms, including Trypanosomatids. This nuclease participates in the apoptotic program in these parasites by migrating from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, where it takes part in the degradation of genomic DNA that characterizes this process. We now demonstrate that Leishmania infantum EndoG (LiEndoG) is an endo-exonuclease that has a preferential 5′ exonuclease activity on linear DNA. Regardless of its role during apoptotic cell death, this enzyme seems to be necessary during normal development of the parasites as indicated by the reduced growth rates observed in LiEndoG hemi-knockouts and their poor infectivity in differentiated THP-1 cells. The pro-life role of this protein is also corroborated by the higher survival rates of parasites that over-express this protein after treatment with the LiEndoG inhibitor Lei49. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this enzyme plays essential roles in both survival and death of Leishmania parasites. PMID:24651293

  18. SOME FEATURES OF HYDROLYSIS OF THE HYBRID B-Z-FORM DNA BY SERRATIA MARCESCENS NUCLEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filimonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly polymerized herring testis DNA of the random nucleotide sequence was used as a model of natural substrate to study some features of hydrolysis of the hybrid B-Z form with Serratia marcescens nuclease. The hybrid B-Z-form was formed upon addition of 1.15 M MgSO4 and 0.421 mM Co(NH36Cl3. The DNA transition from the right handed B-form to the hybrid B-Z-form caused a decrease in Vmax of DNA cleavage with the nuclease. The diminishing Vmax was consistent with diminishing values of Km and Kcat. The binding of Mg2+ or Co(NH363+ to highly polymerized DNA caused correspondingly about 80-or 7-fold decrease in Km and more than 1600 or 600 decrease in Kcat compared with that of Mg-DNA complex of B-form.

  19. Editing of the heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori using transcription activator like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujun; Nakagaki, Masao

    2014-07-18

    The silk gland of Bombyx mori represents an established in vivo system for producing recombinant proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have limited the system's further development because endogenous silk proteins were present. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) tool which work in pairs to bind and cleave DNA at specific sites, have recently been shown to be effective for genome editing in various organisms, including silkworms. To improve the yield of recombinant proteins synthesized in the silkworm by eliminated competition with endogenous fibroin synthesis, the heavy chain (H-chain) gene was knocked out using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A pair of TALENs that targets the 1st exon in the H-chain gene was synthesized and microinjected into silkworm embryos; the injected silkworms were screened for H-chain gene knock out (H-KO) based on their sericin cocoon-making characteristics. Sequence analysis revealed that the H-chain of the mutation was successfully edited. The TALENs was very efficient in editing the genome DNA of silkworm. By being eliminated competition with the H-chain, the production of recombinant proteins would be expected to increase markedly if this H-KO system is used.

  20. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  1. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  2. Nuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 functions in targeted nucleotide alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Usher, Michael; Hu, Yiling; Kmiec, Eric B

    2003-10-01

    Oligonucleotides can be used to direct site-specific changes in genomic DNA through a process in which mismatched base pairs in the oligonucleotide and the target DNA are created. The mechanism by which these complexes are developed and resolved is being studied by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Genetic analyses have revealed that in all likelihood the reaction occurs in two phases: DNA pairing and DNA repair. While the former phase involves strand assimilation, the latter phase likely involves an endonucleolytic processing step that leads to joint resolution. In this study, we established the importance of a functioning MRE11 gene in the overall reaction, as yeast strains deficient in MRE11 exhibited severely reduced activity. The activity could be rescued by complementation with wild-type MRE11 genes but not with MRE11 alleles lacking the nuclease function. Taken together, the data suggest that Mre11 provides nuclease activity for targeted nucleotide exchange, a process that could be used to reengineer yeast genes.

  3. (NZCH...O Contacts assist crystallization of a ParB-like nuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Zihe

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major bottleneck for determination of 3 D structures of proteins using X-rays is the production of diffraction quality crystals. Often proteins are subjected to chemical modification to improve the chances of crystallization Results Here, we report the successful crystallization of a nuclease employing a reductive methylation protocol. The key to crystallization was the successful introduction of 44 new cohesive (NZ CH...O contacts (3.2 – 3.7 Å by the addition of 2 methyl groups to the side chain amine nitrogen (NZ of 9 lysine residues of the nuclease. The new contacts dramatically altered the crystallization properties of the protein, resulting in crystals that diffracted to 1.2 Å resolution. Analytical ultracentrifugation analysis and thermodynamics results revealed a more compact protein structure with better solvent exclusion of buried Trp residues in the folded state of the methylated protein, assisting crystallization. Conclusion In this study, introduction of novel cohesive (NZCH...O contacts by reductive methylation resulted in the crystallization of a protein that had previously resisted crystallization in spite of extensive purification and crystallization space screening. Introduction of (NZCH...O contacts could provide a solution to crystallization problems for a broad range of protein targets.

  4. Targeted Mutagenesis in Plant Cells through Transformation of Sequence-Specific Nuclease mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Stoddard

    Full Text Available Plant genome engineering using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs promises to advance basic and applied plant research by enabling precise modification of endogenous genes. Whereas DNA is an effective means for delivering SSNs, DNA can integrate randomly into the plant genome, leading to unintentional gene inactivation. Further, prolonged expression of SSNs from DNA constructs can lead to the accumulation of off-target mutations. Here, we tested a new approach for SSN delivery to plant cells, namely transformation of messenger RNA (mRNA encoding TAL effector nucleases (TALENs. mRNA delivery of a TALEN pair targeting the Nicotiana benthamiana ALS gene resulted in mutation frequencies of approximately 6% in comparison to DNA delivery, which resulted in mutation frequencies of 70.5%. mRNA delivery resulted in three-fold fewer insertions, and 76% were 10bp. In an effort to increase mutation frequencies using mRNA, we fused several different 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs from Arabidopsis thaliana genes to the TALEN coding sequence. UTRs from an A. thaliana adenine nucleotide α hydrolases-like gene (At1G09740 enhanced mutation frequencies approximately two-fold, relative to a no-UTR control. These results indicate that mRNA can be used as a delivery vehicle for SSNs, and that manipulation of mRNA UTRs can influence efficiencies of genome editing.

  5. Improving nuclease activity of copper(II)-terpyridine complex through solubilizing and charge effects of glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Wang, Xiaoyong; Hu, Ming; Guo, Zijian

    2013-04-01

    Copper complexes are potential metallonucleases that may find application in biotechnology and molecular biology. In this study, a ternary copper-terpyridine complex [Cu(ttpy)(Gly)(NO3)](NO3)·H2O (1) (ttpy=4'-p-tolyl-2,2':6,2″-terpyridine) is synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography and ESI-MS as an artificial nuclease. Glycine (Gly) is introduced into the complex to enhance the water-solubility and electrostatic affinity for the nucleic acid target. The interaction between complex 1 and DNA has been studied by spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis, using a structural analog [Cu(ttpy)(NO3)2] (2) as the reference. Complex 1 demonstrates an increased DNA binding ability and oxidative cleavage activity towards supercoiled pBR322 DNA as compared with complex 2. The enhanced water-solubility and positive charge of complex 1 may facilitate its access to DNA and formation of hydrogen bonds with the sugar-phosphate backbone. The results indicate that carefully positioned auxiliary groups in a copper complex can significantly affect the substrate binding or activation ability and consequently the nuclease efficiency of the complex.

  6. Surveyor nuclease detection of mutations and polymorphisms of mtDNA in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilch, Jacek; Asman, Marek; Jamroz, Ewa; Kajor, Maciej; Kotrys-Puchalska, Elżbieta; Goss, Małgorzata; Krzak, Maria; Witecka, Joanna; Gmiński, Jan; Sieroń, Aleksander L

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are complex disorders with wide range of clinical manifestations. Particularly time-consuming is the identification of mutations in mitochondrial DNA. A group of 20 children with clinical manifestations of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies was selected for molecular studies. The aims were (a) to identify mutations in mtDNA isolated from muscle and (b) to verify detected mutations in DNA isolated from blood, in order to assess the utility of a Surveyor nuclease assay kit for patient screening. The most common changes found were polymorphisms, including a few missense mutations altering the amino acid sequence of mitochondrial proteins. In two boys with MELAS (i.e., mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes), a mutation A→G3243 was detected in the tRNALeu gene of mtDNA isolated from muscle and blood. In one boy, the carrier status of his mother was confirmed, based on molecular analysis of DNA isolated from blood. A method using Surveyor nuclease allows systematic screening for small mutations in mtDNA, using as its source blood of the patients and asymptomatic carriers. The method still requires confirmation studying a larger group. In some patients, the use of this method should precede and might limit indications for traumatic muscle and skin biopsy.

  7. Oligolysine-based coating protects DNA nanostructures from low-salt denaturation and nuclease degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuswamy, Nandhini; Bastings, Maartje M. C.; Nathwani, Bhavik; Ryu, Ju Hee; Chou, Leo Y. T.; Vinther, Mathias; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Anastassacos, Frances M.; Mooney, David J.; Shih, William M.

    2017-05-01

    DNA nanostructures have evoked great interest as potential therapeutics and diagnostics due to ease and robustness of programming their shapes, site-specific functionalizations and responsive behaviours. However, their utility in biological fluids can be compromised through denaturation induced by physiological salt concentrations and degradation mediated by nucleases. Here we demonstrate that DNA nanostructures coated by oligolysines to 0.5:1 N:P (ratio of nitrogen in lysine to phosphorus in DNA), are stable in low salt and up to tenfold more resistant to DNase I digestion than when uncoated. Higher N:P ratios can lead to aggregation, but this can be circumvented by coating instead with an oligolysine-PEG copolymer, enabling up to a 1,000-fold protection against digestion by serum nucleases. Oligolysine-PEG-stabilized DNA nanostructures survive uptake into endosomal compartments and, in a mouse model, exhibit a modest increase in pharmacokinetic bioavailability. Thus, oligolysine-PEG is a one-step, structure-independent approach that provides low-cost and effective protection of DNA nanostructures for in vivo applications.

  8. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in axolotl using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, G Parker; Timberlake, Andrew T; McLean, Kaitlin C; Monaghan, James R; Crews, Craig M

    2014-05-01

    Among tetrapods, only urodele salamanders, such as the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum, can completely regenerate limbs as adults. The mystery of why salamanders, but not other animals, possess this ability has for generations captivated scientists seeking to induce this phenomenon in other vertebrates. Although many recent advances in molecular biology have allowed limb regeneration and tissue repair in the axolotl to be investigated in increasing detail, the molecular toolkit for the study of this process has been limited. Here, we report that the CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease system can efficiently create mutations at targeted sites within the axolotl genome. We identify individual animals treated with RNA-guided nucleases that have mutation frequencies close to 100% at targeted sites. We employ this technique to completely functionally ablate EGFP expression in transgenic animals and recapitulate developmental phenotypes produced by loss of the conserved gene brachyury. Thus, this advance allows a reverse genetic approach in the axolotl and will undoubtedly provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms of salamanders' unique regenerative ability.

  9. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Arildo Nerys-Junior; Costa, Lendel C.; Braga-Dias,Luciene P.; Márcia Oliveira; Rossi,Átila D.; Rodrigo Delvecchio da Cunha; Gonçalves,Gabriel S.; Amilcar Tanuri

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double- strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produc...

  10. Robotic transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: experience with a first case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, P.M.; Consten, E.C.J.; Broeders, I.A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A transanal approach for total mesorectal excision (TME) using a single incision port is feasible. The disadvantages are technical difficulties associated with limited manoeuvrability. Methods: We present our first experience with robotic-assisted transanal total mesorectal excision.

  11. An immobilization-free electrochemical impedance biosensor based on duplex-specific nuclease assisted target recycling for amplified detection of microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Dong-Zhi; Cai, Shu-Xian; Chen, Mei; Xia, Yao-Kun; Wu, Fang; Chen, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-15

    An immobilization-free electrochemical impedance biosensor for microRNA detection was developed in this work, which was based on both the duplex-specific nuclease assisted target recycling (DSNATR) and capture probes (Cps) enriched from the solution to electrode surface via magnetic beads (MBs). In the absence of miR-21, Cps cannot be hydrolyzed due to the low activity of duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) against ssDNA. Therefore, the intact Cps could be attached to the surface of magnetic glass carbon electrode (MGCE), resulting in a compact negatively charged layer as well as a large charge-transfer resistance. While in the presence of miR-21, it hybridized with Cp to form a DNA-RNA heteroduplex. Due to the considerable cleavage preference for DNA in DNA-RNA hybrids, DSN hydrolyzed the target-binding part of the Cp while liberating the intact miR-21 to hybridize with a new Cp and initiate the second cycle of hydrolysis. In this way, a single miR-21 was able to trigger the permanent hydrolysis of multiple Cps. Finally, all Cps were digested. Thus, the negatively charged layer could not be formed, resulting in a small charge-transfer resistance. By employing the above strategy, the proposed biosensor achieved ultrahigh sensitivity toward miR-21 with a detection limit of 60aM. Meanwhile, the method showed little cross-hybridization among the closely related miRNA family members even at the single-base-mismatched level. Successful attempts were made in applying the approach to detect miR-21 in human serum samples of breast cancer patients.

  12. Targeted gene disruption by use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Chizue; Ogino, Yukiko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Toyota, Kenji; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-11-18

    The cosmopolitan microcrustacean Daphnia pulex provides a model system for both human health research and monitoring ecosystem integrity. It is the first crustacean to have its complete genome sequenced, an unprecedented ca. 36% of which has no known homologs with any other species. Moreover, D. pulex is ideally suited for experimental manipulation because of its short reproductive cycle, large numbers of offspring, synchronization of oocyte maturation, and other life history characteristics. However, existing gene manipulation techniques are insufficient to accurately define gene functions. Although our previous investigations developed an RNA interference (RNAi) system in D. pulex, the possible time period of functional analysis was limited because the effectiveness of RNAi is transient. Thus, in this study, we developed a genome editing system for D. pulex by first microinjecting transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNAs into early embryos and then evaluating TALEN activity and mutation phenotypes. We assembled a TALEN construct specific to the Distal-less gene (Dll), which is a homeobox transcription factor essential for distal limb development in invertebrates and vertebrates, and evaluated its activity in vitro by single-strand annealing assay. Then, we injected TALEN mRNAs into eggs within 1 hour post-ovulation. Injected embryos presented with defects in the second antenna and altered appendage development, and indel mutations were detected in Dll loci, indicating that this technique successfully knocked out the target gene. We succeeded, for the first time in D. pulex, in targeted mutagenesis by use of Platinum TALENs. This genome editing technique makes it possible to conduct reverse genetic analysis in D. pulex, making this species an even more appropriate model organism for environmental, evolutionary, and developmental genomics.

  13. Endoscopic excision of intraventricular neurocysticercosis blocking foramen of Monro bilaterally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Harshil Chimanlal; Jain, Kapil; Shah, Jaimin Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infestation of the central nervous system. NCC parasitic infestation can be misdiagnosed as hydatid cyst or intraventricular epidermoid cyst that can cause a diagnostic dilemma. A 23-year-old male patient presented with headache and vomiting for 3–4 days and giddiness for 4–5 days. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast was suggestive of a rim-enhancing lesion at the level of the foramen of Monro. Endoscopic excision of the lesion was done, and the patient had relief of a headache and vomiting immediately after the procedure. He is being followed up regularly. Intraventricular NCC occluding both foramen of Monro is a rare entity. Complete endoscopic surgical excision followed by appropriate drug therapy should be given to achieve a cure. PMID:27057236

  14. Excise tax avoidance: the case of state cigarette taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCicca, Philip; Kenkel, Donald; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    We conduct an applied welfare economics analysis of cigarette tax avoidance. We develop an extension of the standard formula for the optimal Pigouvian corrective tax to incorporate the possibility that consumers avoid the tax by making purchases in nearby lower tax jurisdictions. To provide a key parameter for our formula, we estimate a structural endogenous switching regression model of border-crossing and cigarette prices. In illustrative calculations, we find that for many states, after taking into account tax avoidance the optimal tax is at least 20% smaller than the standard Pigouvian tax that simply internalizes external costs. Our empirical estimate that tax avoidance strongly responds to the price differential is the main reason for this result. We also use our results to examine the benefits of replacing avoidable state excise taxes with a harder-to-avoid federal excise tax on cigarettes.

  15. T1a glottic cancers may be removed by "cold steel" excision biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiors, Jacob; Tvedskov, Jesper; Kristensen, Claus Andrup

    2013-01-01

    Phonosurgical excision biopsies are gradually replacing traditional punch biopsies during direct lar-yngoscopy. As excision aims at removing all pathologic tissue, some malignant lesions may be completely removed. We present our experience with phonosurgical excision biopsies of T1a glottic cance...

  16. 77 FR 37838 - Disregarded Entities and the Indoor Tanning Services Excise Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... Services Excise Tax AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... (including qualified subchapter S subsidiaries) and the indoor tanning services excise tax. These regulations affect disregarded entities responsible for collecting the indoor tanning services excise tax and...

  17. Successful treatment of recurrent epididymo-orchitis: Laparoscopic excision of the prostatic utricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwane Ashish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic utricle presenting with recurrent epididymo-orchitis is not uncommon. Excision of prostatic utricle is the treatment of choice. The various techniques described in literature suffer from the disadvantages of incomplete excision due to poor view. We report the successful laparoscopic excision of prostatic utricle in childhood.

  18. 29 CFR 779.263 - Excise taxes not at the retail level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excise taxes not at the retail level. 779.263 Section 779... Coverage Excise Taxes § 779.263 Excise taxes not at the retail level. There are also a wide variety of taxes levied at the manufacturer's or distributor's level and not at the retail level. It should...

  19. Envisioning the molecular choreography of DNA base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, S S; Mol, C D; Hosfield, D J; Tainer, J A

    1999-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs integrate individual DNA repair enzyme structures, biochemistry and biology to outline the structural cell biology of the DNA base excision repair pathways that are essential to genome integrity. Thus, we are starting to envision how the actions, movements, steps, partners and timing of DNA repair enzymes, which together define their molecular choreography, are elegantly controlled by both the nature of the DNA damage and the structural chemistry of the participating enzymes and the DNA double helix.

  20. Targeted gene deletions in C. elegans using transposon excision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Davis, M. Wayne; Hollopeter, Gunther; Taylor, Jon; Harris, Todd; Nix, Paola; Lofgren, Rachel; Prestgard-Duke, Michael; Bastiani, Michael; Moerman, Donald G.; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a method, MosDel, to generate targeted knock-outs of genes in C. elegans. We make use of the Mos1 transposase to excise a Mos1 transposon adjacent to the region to be deleted. The double-strand break is repaired using injected DNA as a template. Repair can delete up to 25 kb of DNA and simultaneously insert a positive selection marker. PMID:20418868

  1. Excise Tax Overshifting in the Hungarian Beer Market

    OpenAIRE

    Bakó, Barna; Berezvai, Zombor

    2013-01-01

    We conduct this paper on excise tax shifting in the Hungarian beer market. Using a regression model we show that tax overshifting occurs in this market. We present a model with oligopolistic competition to explain how tax overshifting can occur because of the separated vertical structure. Our results suggests that Hungarian beer producers compete in Bertrand fashion and the hypothesis of collusion between beer producers can be rejected.

  2. Nucleic acids and survival of excised anthers in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VASIL, I K

    1959-05-29

    Excised anthers of Allium cepa and Rhoeo discolor have been successfully cultured in modified White's medium supplemented with various concentrations of ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid. Ribonucleic acid proved to be much more useful than deoxyribonucleic acid and reduced the time required for the completion of meiosis from 48 hours to 24 hours. The role of nucleic acids in the control of nuclear divisions has been indicated.

  3. Do alcohol excise taxes affect traffic accidents? Evidence from Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Indrek

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the association between alcohol excise tax rates and alcohol-related traffic accidents in Estonia. Monthly time series of traffic accidents involving drunken motor vehicle drivers from 1998 through 2013 were regressed on real average alcohol excise tax rates while controlling for changes in economic conditions and the traffic environment. Specifically, regression models with autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) errors were estimated in order to deal with serial correlation in residuals. Counterfactual models were also estimated in order to check the robustness of the results, using the level of non-alcohol-related traffic accidents as a dependent variable. A statistically significant (P traffic accidents was disclosed under alternative model specifications. For instance, the regression model with ARIMA (0, 1, 1)(0, 1, 1) errors revealed that a 1-unit increase in the tax rate is associated with a 1.6% decrease in the level of accidents per 100,000 population involving drunk motor vehicle drivers. No similar association was found in the cases of counterfactual models for non-alcohol-related traffic accidents. This article indicates that the level of alcohol-related traffic accidents in Estonia has been affected by changes in real average alcohol excise taxes during the period 1998-2013. Therefore, in addition to other measures, the use of alcohol taxation is warranted as a policy instrument in tackling alcohol-related traffic accidents.

  4. Structural and Functional Studies on Nucleotide Excision Repair From Recognition to Incision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Kisker

    2001-01-01

    Maintenance of the correct genetic information is crucial for all living organisms because mutations are the primary cause of hereditary diseases, as well as cancer and may also be involved in aging. The importance of genomic integrity is underscored by the fact that 80 to 90% of all human cancers are ultimately due to DNA damage. Among the different repair mechanisms that have evolved to protect the genome, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a universal pathway found in all organisms. NER removes a wide variety of bulky DNA adducts including the carcinogenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV radiation, benzo(a)pyrene-guanine adducts caused by smoking and the guanine-cisplatin adducts induced by chemotherapy. The importance of this repair mechanism is reflected by three severe inherited diseases in humans, which are due to defects in NER: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome and trichothiodystrophy.

  5. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired “safe” harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in

  6. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  7. Precise genome modification via sequence-specific nucleases-mediated gene targeting for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homology-directed repair (HDR. While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired ‘safe’ harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential

  8. Fine tuning of the catalytic activity of colicin e7 nuclease domain by systematic n-terminal mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Németh, Eszter; Körtvélyesi, Tamás; Thulstrup, Peter W.;

    2014-01-01

    The nuclease domain of colicin E7 (NColE7) promotes the nonspecific cleavage of nucleic acids at its C-terminal HNH motif. Interestingly, the deletion of four N-terminal residues (446–449NColE75KRNK) resulted in complete loss of the enzyme activity. R447A mutation was reported to decrease the nuc...

  9. Development of Cell Lines Stably Expressing Staphylococcal Nuclease Fused to Dengue 2 Virus Capsid Protein for CTVI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Feng QIN; E-De QIN

    2004-01-01

    To explore the potential application of capsid-targeted viral inactivation(CTVI)strategy in prophylactic model against dengue virus(DV)infection,here we fused a Ca2+-dependent nuclease,staphylococcal nuclease(SN),to the capsid protein of dengue 2 virus(D2C)at the carboxyl terminal,and constructed the desired expression plasmid pc/D2C-SN and control plasmids pc/D2C-SN* and pc/D2C.A mammalian cell line BHK-21 was transfected by electroporation with those plasmids and thereafter selected by 5 μg/ml blasticidin.The resistant cell clones were then expanding cultured and screened by RT-PCR and Western Blot assays.The nuclease activity of the expressed fusion protein D2C-SN was analyzed by in vitro DNA digestion assay.It was confirmed cell lines stably expressing D2C-SN and control constructs were obtained.The intracellular expressed fusion protein D2C-SN had ideal nuclease activity and no cytotoxicity on mammalian cells.Those engineered cell lines provided the experimental system for CTVI application in prophylactic model and paved the new road for combating DV infection with CTVI.

  10. A simple, high sensitivity mutation screening using Ampligase mediated T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease with microfluidic capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mo Chao; Cheong, Wai Chye; Lim, Li Shi; Li, Mo-Huang

    2012-03-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection is of increasing importance for a variety of medical applications, including identification of cancer biomarkers and genotyping for inherited genetic disorders. Among various mutation-screening technologies, enzyme mismatch cleavage (EMC) represents a great potential as an ideal scanning method for its simplicity and high efficiency, where the heteroduplex DNAs are recognized and cleaved into DNA fragments by mismatch-recognizing nucleases. Thereby, the enzymatic cleavage activities of the resolving nucleases play a critical role for the EMC sensitivity. In this study, we utilized the unique features of microfluidic capillary electrophoresis and de novo gene synthesis to explore the enzymatic properties of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease for EMC. Homoduplex and HE DNAs with specific mismatches at desired positions were synthesized using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) gene synthesis. The effects of nonspecific cleavage, preference of mismatches, exonuclease activity, incubation time, and DNA loading capability were systematically examined. In addition, the utilization of a thermostable DNA ligase for real-time ligase mediation was investigated. Analysis of the experimental results has led to new insights into the enzymatic cleavage activities of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease, and aided in optimizing EMC conditions, which enhance the sensitivity and efficiency in screening of unknown DNA variations.

  11. Genotypic and Antimicrobial Characterisation of Propionibacterium acnes Isolates from Surgically Excised Lumbar Disc Herniations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jess Rollason

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic skin commensal Propionibacterium acnes is an underestimated cause of human infections and clinical conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for the bacterium in lumbar disc herniation and infection. To further investigate this, five biopsy samples were surgically excised from each of 64 patients with lumbar disc herniation. P. acnes and other bacteria were detected by anaerobic culture, followed by biochemical and PCR-based identification. In total, 24/64 (38% patients had evidence of P. acnes in their excised herniated disc tissue. Using recA and mAb typing methods, 52% of the isolates were type II (50% of culture-positive patients, while type IA strains accounted for 28% of isolates (42% patients. Type III (11% isolates; 21% patients and type IB strains (9% isolates; 17% patients were detected less frequently. The MIC values for all isolates were lowest for amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, rifampicin, tetracycline, and vancomycin (≤1mg/L. The MIC for fusidic acid was 1-2 mg/L. The MIC for trimethoprim and gentamicin was 2 to ≥4 mg/L. The demonstration that type II and III strains, which are not frequently recovered from skin, predominated within our isolate collection (63% suggests that the role of P. acnes in lumbar disc herniation should not be readily dismissed.

  12. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L; Paulsen, Renee D; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-12-18

    R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability; however, the mechanisms underlying R-loop-induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability.

  13. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L.; Paulsen, Renee D.; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability, however the mechanisms underlying R-loop induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability. PMID:25435140

  14. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of Duplex-Specific Nuclease from the hepatopancreas of the Kamchatka crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Laura L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleases, which are key components of biologically diverse processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination, antiviral defense, apoptosis and digestion, have revolutionized the field of molecular biology. Indeed many standard molecular strategies, including molecular cloning, studies of DNA-protein interactions, and analysis of nucleic acid structures, would be virtually impossible without these versatile enzymes. The discovery of nucleases with unique properties has often served as the basis for the development of modern molecular biology methods. Thus, the search for novel nucleases with potentially exploitable functions remains an important scientific undertaking. Results Using degenerative primers and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE procedure, we cloned the Duplex-Specific Nuclease (DSN gene from the hepatopancreas of the Kamchatka crab and determined its full primary structure. We also developed an effective method for purifying functional DSN from the crab hepatopancreas. The isolated enzyme was highly thermostable, exhibited a broad pH optimum (5.5 – 7.5 and required divalent cations for activity, with manganese and cobalt being especially effective. The enzyme was highly specific, cleaving double-stranded DNA or DNA in DNA-RNA hybrids, but not single-stranded DNA or single- or double-stranded RNA. Moreover, only DNA duplexes containing at least 9 base pairs were effectively cleaved by DSN; shorter DNA duplexes were left intact. Conclusion We describe a new DSN from Kamchatka crab hepatopancreas, determining its primary structure and developing a preparative method for its purification. We found that DSN had unique substrate specificity, cleaving only DNA duplexes longer than 8 base pairs, or DNA in DNA-RNA hybrids. Interestingly, the DSN primary structure is homologous to well-known Serratia-like non-specific nucleases structures, but the properties of DSN are distinct. The unique substrate

  15. The UV-damaged DNA binding protein mediates efficient targeting of the nucleotide excision repair complex to UV-induced photo lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, J; Volker, M; Kool, H; Alekseev, S; Vrieling, H; Yasui, A; van Zeeland, AA; Mullenders, LHF

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies point to the XPC-hHR23B complex as the principal initiator of global genome nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, responsible for the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) in human cells. However, the UV-damaged DNA binding protei

  16. High-risk HPV presence in cervical specimens after a large loop excision of the cervical transformation zone: significance of newly detected hr-HPV genotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M.A. van; Hamont, D. van; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Bulten, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Large loop excision of the cervical transformation zone (LLETZ) is a well-established treatment for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. It has even been postulated that LLETZ is responsible for the elimination of the infectious agent, human papillomavirus (HPV), causing the lesion. Most s

  17. Nuclease-free target recycling signal amplification for ultrasensitive multiplexing DNA biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhihan; Chen, Shixing; Wang, Jianbang; Su, Jing; Xu, Jiaqiang; Mathur, Sanjay; Fan, Chunhai; Song, Shiping

    2017-08-15

    Ultrasensitive biosensing technologies without gene amplification held great promise for direct detection of DNA. Herein we report a novel biosensing method, combining target recycling signal-amplification strategy and a homemade electrochemical device. Especially, the target recycling was achieved by a strand displacement process, no needing the help of any nucleases. In the presence of target DNA, the recycling system could be activated to generate a cascade of assembly steps with three hairpin DNA segments. Each recycling process were accompanied by a disassembly step that the last hairpin DNA segment displaces target DNA from the complex at the end of each circulation, freeing targets to activate the self-assembly of more trefoil DNA structures. This biosensing method could detect target DNA at aM level and can distinguish target DNA from interfering DNAs, demonstrating its high sensitivity and high selectivity. Importantly, the biosensing method could work well with serum samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Indirect DNA Sequence Recognition and Its Impact on Nuclease Cleavage Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Abigail R; Hallinan, Jazmine P; Shen, Betty W; Chik, Jennifer K; Bolduc, Jill M; Kulshina, Nadia; Robins, Lori I; Kaiser, Brett K; Jarjour, Jordan; Havens, Kyle; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Stoddard, Barry L

    2016-06-07

    LAGLIDADG meganucleases are DNA cleaving enzymes used for genome engineering. While their cleavage specificity can be altered using several protein engineering and selection strategies, their overall targetability is limited by highly specific indirect recognition of the central four base pairs within their recognition sites. In order to examine the physical basis of indirect sequence recognition and to expand the number of such nucleases available for genome engineering, we have determined the target sites, DNA-bound structures, and central four cleavage fidelities of nine related enzymes. Subsequent crystallographic analyses of a meganuclease bound to two noncleavable target sites, each containing a single inactivating base pair substitution at its center, indicates that a localized slip of the mutated base pair causes a small change in the DNA backbone conformation that results in a loss of metal occupancy at one binding site, eliminating cleavage activity.

  19. Unidirectional cloning by cleaving heterogeneous sites with a single sandwiched zinc finger nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, Kazuki; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2011-11-04

    We previously developed a novel type of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), sandwiched ZFNs that can discriminate DNA substrates from cleavage products and thus cleave DNA much more efficiently than conventional ZFNs as well as perform with multiple turnovers like restriction endonucleases. In the present study, we used the sandwiched ZFN to unidirectionally clone exogenous genes into target vectors by cleaving heterogeneous sites that contained heterogeneous spacer DNAs between two zinc-finger protein binding sites with a single sandwiched ZFN. We demonstrated that the sandwiched ZFN cleaved a 40-fold excess of both insert and vector plasmids within 1h and confirmed by sequencing that the resulting recombinants harbored the inserted DNA fragment in the desired orientation. Because sandwiched ZFNs can recognize and cleave a variety of long (≥ 26-bp) target DNAs, they may not only expand the utility of ZFNs for construction of recombinant plasmids, but also serve as useful meganucleases for synthesis of artificial genomes.

  20. Design, construction, and analysis of specific zinc finger nucleases for microphthalmia - associate transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the design, construction, and cleavage analysis of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs that could cut the specific sequences within microphthalmia - associate transcription factor (mitfa of zebra fish. The target site and ZFPs were selected and designed with zinc finger tools, while the ZFPs were synthesized using DNAWorks and two-step PCR. The ZFNs were constructed, expressed, purified, and analyzed in vitro. As expected, the designed ZFNs could create a double-stand break (DSB at the target site in vitro. The DNAWorks, two-step PCR, and an optimized process of protein expression were firstly induced in the construction of ZFNs successfully, which was an effective and simplified protocol. These results could be useful for further application of ZFNs - mediated gene targeting.

  1. Germline-transmitted genome editing in Arabidopsis thaliana Using TAL-effector-nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Forner

    Full Text Available Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs are custom-made bi-partite endonucleases that have recently been developed and applied for genome engineering in a wide variety of organisms. However, they have been only scarcely used in plants, especially for germline-modification. Here we report the efficient creation of small, germline-transmitted deletions in Arabidopsis thaliana via TALENs that were delivered by stably integrated transgenes. Using meristem specific promoters to drive expression of two TALEN arms directed at the CLV3 coding sequence, we observed very high phenotype frequencies in the T2 generation. In some instances, full CLV3 loss-of-function was already observed in the T1 generation, suggesting that transgenic delivery of TALENs can cause highly efficient genome modification. In contrast, constitutive TALEN expression in the shoot apical meristem (SAM did not cause additional phenotypes and genome re-sequencing confirmed little off-target effects, demonstrating exquisite target specificity.

  2. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  3. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  4. Germline-transmitted genome editing in Arabidopsis thaliana Using TAL-effector-nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forner, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Anne; Langenecker, Tobias; Manavella, Pablo A; Manavella, Pablo; Lohmann, Jan U

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are custom-made bi-partite endonucleases that have recently been developed and applied for genome engineering in a wide variety of organisms. However, they have been only scarcely used in plants, especially for germline-modification. Here we report the efficient creation of small, germline-transmitted deletions in Arabidopsis thaliana via TALENs that were delivered by stably integrated transgenes. Using meristem specific promoters to drive expression of two TALEN arms directed at the CLV3 coding sequence, we observed very high phenotype frequencies in the T2 generation. In some instances, full CLV3 loss-of-function was already observed in the T1 generation, suggesting that transgenic delivery of TALENs can cause highly efficient genome modification. In contrast, constitutive TALEN expression in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) did not cause additional phenotypes and genome re-sequencing confirmed little off-target effects, demonstrating exquisite target specificity.

  5. Function of the N-terminal segment of the RecA-dependent nuclease Ref.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Angela J; Olsen, Tayla M; Dvorak, Rachel H; Cox, Michael M

    2015-02-18

    The bacteriophage P1 Ref (recombination enhancement function) protein is a RecA-dependent, HNH endonuclease. It can be directed to create targeted double-strand breaks within a displacement loop formed by RecA. The 76 amino acid N-terminal region of Ref is positively charged (25/76 amino acid residues) and inherently unstructured in solution. Our investigation of N-terminal truncation variants shows this region is required for DNA binding, contains a Cys involved in incidental dimerization and is necessary for efficient Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Specifically, Ref N-terminal truncation variants lacking between 21 and 47 amino acids are more effective RecA-mediated targeting nucleases. We propose a more refined set of options for the Ref-mediated cleavage mechanism, featuring the N-terminal region as an anchor for at least one of the DNA strand cleavage events.

  6. DNA sensor's selectivity enhancement and protection from contaminating nucleases due to a hydrated ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Pramanik, Smritimoy; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-07-07

    The thermodynamic stability of certain mismatched base pairs has made the development of DNA sequence sensing systems challenging. Thus, the stability of fully matched and mismatched DNA oligonucleotides in the hydrated ionic liquid choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) was investigated. Mismatched base pairs were significantly destabilized in choline dhp relative to those in aqueous buffer. A molecular beacon that forms a triplex with a conserved HIV-1 sequence was then designed and tested in choline dhp. The molecular beacon specifically detected the target duplex via triplex formation at concentrations as low as 1 pmol per 10 μL with 10,000-fold sequence selectivity. Moreover, the molecular beacon was protected from a contaminating nuclease in choline dhp, and DNAs in aqueous solutions were not sufficiently stable for practical use.

  7. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooistra, J.; Small, G.D.; Setlow, J.K.; Shapanka, R.

    1976-04-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity.

  8. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-01-24

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  9. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  10. Molecular insights into DNA interference by CRISPR-associated nuclease-helicase Cas3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bei; Shin, Minsang; Sun, Jiali; Jung, Che-Hun; Bolt, Edward L; van der Oost, John; Kim, Jeong-Sun

    2014-11-18

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria are neutralized by a system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. Type I CRISPR-Cas systems use a "Cascade" ribonucleoprotein complex to guide RNA specifically to complementary sequence in invader double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a process called "interference." After target recognition by Cascade, formation of an R-loop triggers recruitment of a Cas3 nuclease-helicase, completing the interference process by destroying the invader dsDNA. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of CRISPR interference, we analyzed crystal structures of Cas3 from the bacterium Thermobaculum terrenum, with and without a bound ATP analog. The structures reveal a histidine-aspartate (HD)-type nuclease domain fused to superfamily-2 (SF2) helicase domains and a distinct C-terminal domain. Binding of ATP analog at the interface of the SF2 helicase RecA-like domains rearranges a motif V with implications for the enzyme mechanism. The HD-nucleolytic site contains two metal ions that are positioned at the end of a proposed nucleic acid-binding tunnel running through the SF2 helicase structure. This structural alignment suggests a mechanism for 3' to 5' nucleolytic processing of the displaced strand of invader DNA that is coordinated with ATP-dependent 3' to 5' translocation of Cas3 along DNA. In agreement with biochemical studies, the presented Cas3 structures reveal important mechanistic details on the neutralization of genetic invaders by type I CRISPR-Cas systems.

  11. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masahito [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Umeyama, Kazuhiro [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); International Cluster for Bio-Resource Research, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Matsunari, Hitomi [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Takayanagi, Shuko [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo University, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); and others

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. {yields} ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. {yields} Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  12. Rapid and highly efficient construction of TALE-based transcriptional regulators and nucleases for genome modification

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2012-01-22

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) can be used as DNA-targeting modules by engineering their repeat domains to dictate user-selected sequence specificity. TALEs have been shown to function as site-specific transcriptional activators in a variety of cell types and organisms. TALE nucleases (TALENs), generated by fusing the FokI cleavage domain to TALE, have been used to create genomic double-strand breaks. The identity of the TALE repeat variable di-residues, their number, and their order dictate the DNA sequence specificity. Because TALE repeats are nearly identical, their assembly by cloning or even by synthesis is challenging and time consuming. Here, we report the development and use of a rapid and straightforward approach for the construction of designer TALE (dTALE) activators and nucleases with user-selected DNA target specificity. Using our plasmid set of 100 repeat modules, researchers can assemble repeat domains for any 14-nucleotide target sequence in one sequential restriction-ligation cloning step and in only 24 h. We generated several custom dTALEs and dTALENs with new target sequence specificities and validated their function by transient expression in tobacco leaves and in vitro DNA cleavage assays, respectively. Moreover, we developed a web tool, called idTALE, to facilitate the design of dTALENs and the identification of their genomic targets and potential off-targets in the genomes of several model species. Our dTALE repeat assembly approach along with the web tool idTALE will expedite genome-engineering applications in a variety of cell types and organisms including plants. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  13. From hacking the human genome to editing organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In the recent decades, human genome engineering has been one of the major interesting research subjects, essentially because it raises new possibilities for personalized medicine and biotechnologies. With the development of engineered nucleases such as the Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), the Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and more recently the Clustered Regularly Interspaced short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), the field of human genome edition has evolved very rapidly. Every new genetic tool is broadening the scope of applications on human tissues, even before we can completely master each of these tools. In this review, we will present the recent advances regarding human genome edition tools, we will discuss the numerous implications they have in research and medicine, and we will mention the limits and concerns about such technologies.

  14. Vaccination with Streptococcus pyogenes nuclease A stimulates a high antibody response but no protective immunity in a mouse model of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Fiona J; Fraser, John D; Proft, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen which causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from pharyngitis to rheumatic fever, necrotising fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. Development of a vaccine for S. pyogenes has been confounded both by the diversity of the disease-causing serotypes and the spectre of inadvertently stimulating autoimmunity. The S. pyogenes nuclease A (SpnA) is a recently characterised virulence factor that is highly conserved across strains and expressed during human disease. Deletion of spnA from S. pyogenes results in reduced survival of bacteria in whole human blood and attenuated virulence in a mouse model of infection. Collectively these features suggest that SpnA has potential as a vaccine candidate for S. pyogenes. Mice vaccinated subcutaneously with single or multiple doses of recombinant SpnA emulsified in Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant developed a robust and durable IgG response, including neutralising activity, to this protein. However, vaccination with rSpnA conferred no advantage in terms of lesion development, disease symptoms or colonisation levels after a sub-lethal subcutaneous challenge with S. pyogenes. Anti-SpnA serum IgG responses and neutralising activity were increased in response to challenge, indicating that SpnA is expressed in vivo. SpnA is unlikely to be a suitable antigen for a vaccine against S. pyogenes.

  15. A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    purification of proteins used in this study. Both wildtype (WT) and nuclease-dead mutant (MUT) of his-tagged FAN1 were expressed in sf9 cells and purified by...tagged FAN1 expressed in sf9 cells. Both wildtype (WT) and nuclease-dead mutant (MUT) FAN1 were purified in parallel. (b) Incision assay was performed...XPF-ERCC1 or MUS81-EME1 in sf9 cells and purified by anti-FLAG purification (Figure 3). Both WT and MUT nucleases (Figure 3a and 3b respectively

  16. Russian decree on excise duty on petroleum extraction, ukase on excise tax on mineral users and decree on improving free trade in Russia. Export trade information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The decree defines the rates for an excise duty included in the price for petroleum and gas condensate in Russia; how the excise duty is to be paid to the Russian Federation budget when petroleum and gas condensate are sold; and maximum levels of profitability in the production of all types of petroleum products.

  17. Female urogenital dysfunction following total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ashraf

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of Total Mesorectal Excision (TME on sexual function in the male is well documented. However, there is little literature in female patients. The aim of this study was to review the pelvic autonomic nervous anatomy in the female and to perform a retrospective audit of urinary and sexual function in women following surgery for rectal cancer where TME had been performed. Urogenital dysfunction was assessed through interview and questionnaire. Method Twenty-three questionnaires, eighteen returned, were sent to women with a mean age 65.5 yrs (range 34–86. All had undergone total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer between 1998–2001. Mean follow-up was 18.8 months (range 3–35. Results Preoperatively 5/18 (28% were sexually active, 3/18 (17% of patients described urinary frequency and nocturia and 7/18 (39% described symptoms of stress incontinence prior to surgery. Postoperatively all sexually active patients remained active although all described some discomfort with penetration. Two of the patients sexually active described reduced libido secondary to the stoma. Postoperative urinary symptoms developed with 59% reporting the development of nocturia, 18% developed stress incontinence and one patient required a permanent catheter. Of those with symptoms, 80% persisted longer than three months from surgery. Symptoms were predominant in those patients with low rectal cancers, particularly those undergoing abdomino-perineal excision and in those who had previously undergone abdominal hysterectomy. Conclusion The treatment of rectal cancer involves surgery to the pelvic floor. Despite nerve preservation this is associated with the development of worsening nocturia and stress incontinence. This is most marked in those patients who had previously undergone a hysterectomy. Further studies are warranted to assess the interaction with previous gynaecological surgery.

  18. [Alternative therapeutic excision of intraepithelial conjunctival carcinoma with corneal extension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, M; Stamate, Alina-Cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Sîrbu, Laura Nicoleta Urucu; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment for conjunctival neoplasms, with wide local excision, with or without supplemental cryotherapy to the surgical margins represents the treatment of choice for this pathology. In some cases, these neoplasms can be diffuse or multifocal, with borders that are difficult to detect clinically, such that topical therapies offer a more efficient method for treating the entire ocular surface, delivering high drug concentrations at this level, with negligible systemic side effects. Beginning from the clinical case of a patient diagnosed with conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia, we try to present other therapeutical alternatives, although in this case the therapeutical approach was the classic one.

  19. Successful surgical excision of primary right atrial angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Horst Iwan CC

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare and aggressive tumor with a high incidence of metastatic spread (up to 89% at the time of diagnosis, which restricts the indication for surgical resection to a small number of patients. We report the case of a 50-year old Caucasian woman with non-metastatic primary right atrial angiosarcoma, who underwent successful surgical excision of the tumor (with curative intent and reconstruction of the right atrium with a porcine pericardial patch. However, after a symptom-free survival of five months the patient presented with bone and liver metastases without evidence of local tumor recurrence.

  20. Transanal vs laparoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perdawood, Sharaf; Al Khefagie, Ghalib Ali Abod

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (LaTME) has improved short-term outcomes of rectal cancer surgery with comparable oncological results to open approach. LaTME can be difficult in the lower most part of the rectum, leading potentially to higher rates of complications, conversion...... to open surgery and probably suboptimal oncological quality. Transanal TME (TaTME) can potentially solve these problems. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term results after TaTME with those after LaTME. METHODS: A prospectively collected database of consecutive patients who underwent Ta...

  1. Robot assisted laparoscopic excision of a paraganglioma: new therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cochetti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Paraganglioma is the most common extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma arising from neural crest (1 (It will better to write: The paraganglioma is an extra-adrenal pheocromocytoma arising from the neural crest. 10% of pheocromocytomas are extra-adrenal and can arise form chromaffin tissue derived from primitive neuroectoderm. Minimally invasive techniques allow surgeons to perform the procedure without wide exposure and mobilization of intra abdominal organs. To our knowledge we present the third case of robotic excision of a retroperitoneal paraganglioma (2,3.

  2. Excision arthroplasty for management of coxofemoral luxation in pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCoy, D M

    1989-01-01

    Coxofemoral luxation, although not a common injury, can cause considerable pelvic limb dysfunction in pet birds. Luxation usually is craniodorsal, as it is in dogs. Previously recommended treatments have not always been effective in managing the injury. Sequelae can include dorsolateral deviation of the pelvic limb, with loss of function and bumblefoot in the nonluxated limb, owing to abnormal weight-bearing. Excision arthroplasty combined with a muscular sling constructed from a segment of the iliofibularis muscle was used to treat coxofemoral luxation in a hyacinth macaw, a moluccan cockatoo, and an African gray parrot. The outcome was excellent in 2 of the 3 birds.

  3. Cytokinin and growth of excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1971-02-01

    Excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum require for growth both auxin and cytokinin. This is demonstrated by the poor growth of 2-mm root tips in a basal medium of mineral salts, sucrose, and vitamins supplemented with either an auxin or a cytokinin, and much better growth when the basal medium is supplemented with both auxin and cytokinin. However, both substances are synthesized by the root, as is demonstrated by the growth of large inocula (dry wt 6-7 mg) through many successive passages in a medium limited to mineral salts, sugar, and vitamins.

  4. Arthroscopic excision of spinoglenoid notch cyst through two different approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-jian; CUI Guo-qing

    2010-01-01

    @@ With the advent of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ganglion cysts adjacent to the superior labrum have been increasinglyrecognized.1-3The spinoglenoid notch cyst (SGNC) which causes suprascapular nerve compression has been well documented,3-16 and the association of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions with spinoglenoid cysts has gained more attention.2.5-16 Mostly, the SGNC is approached through7 the labral tear within the glenohumeral joint. Because this approach can not provide enough space to operate, normally the SGNC can only be decompressed. So we try to find approaches to expose and excise the SGNC exactly.

  5. TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Lipid-Based Transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, William T; Jiang, Xin; Daheron, Laurence; Cowan, Chad A

    2015-08-03

    Using custom-engineered nuclease-mediated genome editing, such as Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) RNA-guided Cas9 nucleases, human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) lines with knockout or mutant alleles can be generated and differentiated into various cell types. This strategy of genome engineering in hPSCs will prove invaluable for studying human biology and disease. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for design and construction of TALEN and CRISPR vectors, testing of their nuclease activity, and delivery of TALEN or CRISPR vectors into hPSCs. In addition, we describe the use of single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs) to introduce or repair point mutations. Next, we describe the identification of edited hPSC clones without antibiotic selection, including their clonal selection, genotyping, and expansion for downstream applications.

  6. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M.

    2013-06-06

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), one of the structure-specific 5\\' nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5\\' nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5\\' end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5\\' nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5\\' flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5\\' nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection ofDNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage. 2013 The Authors.

  7. 26 CFR 55.4981-2 - Imposition of excise tax with respect to certain undistributed income of real estate investment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... certain undistributed income of real estate investment trusts; calendar years beginning after December 31... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) EXCISE TAX ON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS AND REGULATED INVESTMENT COMPANIES Excise Tax on Real Estate Investment Trusts § 55.4981-2 Imposition of excise tax with...

  8. Excision repair of UV radiation-induced DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P.S.; Hevelone, J.; Dwarakanath, V.; Mitchell, D.L. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Radioimmunoassays were used to monitor the removal of antibody-binding sites associated with the two major UV radiation-induced DNA photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts). Unlike with cultured human cells, where (6-4) photoproducts are removed more rapidly than cyclobutane dimers, the kinetics of repair were similar for both lesions. Repair capacity in wild type diminished throughout development. The radioimmunoassays were also employed to confirm the absence of photoreactivation in C. elegans. In addition, three radiation-sensitive mutants (rad-1, rad-2, rad-7) displayed normal repair capacities. An excision defect was much more pronounced in larvae than embryos in the fourth mutant tested (rad-3). This correlates with the hypersensitivity pattern of this mutant and suggests that DNA repair may be developmentally regulated in C. elegans. The mechanism of DNA repair in C. elegans as well as the relationship between the repair of specific photoproducts and UV radiation sensitivity during development are discussed.

  9. Regulation of global genome nucleotide excision repair by SIRT1 through xeroderma pigmentosum C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Mei; Shea, Christopher R.; Guo, Xiumei; Li, Xiaoling; Soltani, Keyoumars; Han, Weinong; He, Yu-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Disruption of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway by mutations can cause xeroderma pigmentosum, a syndrome predisposing affected individuals to development of skin cancer. The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) protein is essential for initiating global genome NER by recognizing the DNA lesion and recruiting downstream factors. Here we show that inhibition of the deacetylase and longevity factor SIRT1 impairs global genome NER through suppressing the transcription of XPC in a SIRT1 deacetylase-dependent manner. SIRT1 enhances XPC expression by reducing AKT-dependent nuclear localization of the transcription repressor of XPC. Finally, we show that SIRT1 levels are significantly reduced in human skin tumors from Caucasian patients, a population at highest risk. These findings suggest that SIRT1 acts as a tumor suppressor through its role in DNA repair. PMID:21149730

  10. Surgical radical excision alone as a treatment for the giant condyloma acuminatum: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indalecio Parapar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Condylomas or genital warts are caused by the human papilloma virus, from which exist more than 100 different genotypes. About 40 of them are sexually transmitted. We report a case of a female patient with a giant condyloma acuminatum in the vulvar perineal and perianal regions, of around five years of course, which disturbs her urination, sexual intercourse, and even walk; accompanied by pruritus, foul-smelling, and occasionally pain. The histopathological study was compatible with condyloma acuminatum. She was treated conservatively with radical local surgical excision of the tumor with excellent functional and cosmetic results. No postoperative complications were observed. A year later there were neither recurrences nor hypertrophic scars. We consider interesting to publish it due to it’s the first case published in the state of Eritrea, developing country of the horn of Africa.

  11. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania S Quiroz

    Full Text Available The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis, a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD. In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  12. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Tania S; Nieto, Pamela A; Tobar, Hugo E; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Lizana, Rodrigo J; Quezada, Carolina P; Santiviago, Carlos A; Araya, Daniela V; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis), a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD). In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  13. Framing the policy debate over spirits excise tax in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatoński, Mateusz; Hawkins, Benjamin; McKee, Martin

    2016-12-23

    Industry lobbying remains an obstacle to effective health-oriented alcohol policy. In 2013, an increase in excise tax on spirits was announced by the Polish government. This article presents a qualitative analysis of the public debate that ensued on the potential economic, health and social effects of the policy. It focuses on how competing groups, including industry actors, framed their position and sought to dominate the debate. Online archives of five Polish national newspapers, two spirits trade associations, and parliamentary and ministerial archives were searched. A thematic content analysis of the identified sources was conducted. The overall findings were compared with existing research on the framing of the Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) debate in the UK. A total of 155 sources were analysed. Two main frames were identified: health, and economic The spirits industry successfully promoted the economic frame in their own publications and in the media. The debate was dominated by arguments about potential growth of the grey market and losses in tax revenue that might result from the excise tax increase. The framing of the debate in Poland differed from the framing of the MUP debate in the United Kingdom. The Polish public health community was unsuccessful in making health considerations a significant element of the alcohol policy debate. The strategies pursued by UK health advocates offer lessons for how to make a more substantial impact on media coverage and promote health-oriented legislation.

  14. Simultaneous laparoscopic excision for rectal carcinoma and synchronous hepatic metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Kai-yun; XIANG Guo-an; WANG Han-ning; XIAO Fang-lian

    2011-01-01

    Background Rectal carcinoma patients are often accompanied by hepatic metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of simultaneous laparoscopic excision for rectal carcinoma with synchronous hepatic metastasis.Methods A total of 41 patients with rectal carcinoma and synchronous hepatic metastasis detected by CT scan were included in this study. Among them, 23 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery and 18 patients underwent traditional open surgery to simultaneously remove the rectal tumor and hepatic metastasis lesions. All patients received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients were followed up from 36 to 72 months (mean 45.3 months).Results All the operations were performed successfully and no patient was turned to open surgery in laparoscopic group. The mean blood loss, the mean postoperative hospital stay, the mean blood transfusion and the mean intestinal functional recovery time showed a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05). The 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 82.6%, 43.5% and 8.6% in the laparoscopic group, without significant difference compared with the open group (77.8%, 38.9% and 0) (P>0.05).Conclusions Simultaneous laparoscopic excision for rectal carcinoma and synchronous hepatic metastasis is safe and effective with similar survival achieved by the traditional open abdominal surgery.

  15. A review of wide surgical excision of hidradenitis suppurativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alharbi Ziyad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disorder that involves the infundibular terminal follicles in areas rich of apocrine glands. It can be associated with fistulating sinus, scarring and abscesses formation. Hidradenitis suppurativa is a challenging aspect and requires a proper treatment plan which may involve different specialties. We present herein the option of surgical treatment involving wide surgical excision and methods of reconstruction as well as the rate of recurrence. Furthermore, review of the literature regarding surgical treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa is provided. Methods A retrospective analysis reviewed 50 operative procedures for 32 patients in 5 anatomical sites. These anatomical sites have been divided to 23 sites involving the axilla, 17 sites involving the inguinal region and 8 sites involving the perianal/perineal area, 1 site involving the gluteal region and 1 site involving the trunk region. Results Twenty six patients (81, 25 % showed no recurrence after surgery and the average time of hospital stay period was 5 days. Recurrence was observed only in 6 patients (18, 75 %. Conclusion Elimination of the acute inflammatory process should occur in advance, including the use of antibiotics and minor surgeries such as abscess drainage with proper irrigations. After stabilizing the acute phase, wide surgical excision is recommended. Herein, planning of surgical reconstruction should be initiated to achieve the best outcome and consequently decreasing the risk of recurrence and complications after surgery.

  16. The nuclease hSNM1B/Apollo is linked to the Fanconi anemia pathway via its interaction with FANCP/SLX4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewsky, Bastian; Schmiester, Maren; Schindler, Detlev; Digweed, Martin; Demuth, Ilja

    2012-11-15

    The recessive genetic disorder Fanconi anemia (FA) is clinically characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and an increased incidence of cancer. Cells derived from FA patients exhibit hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL)-inducing agents. We have earlier reported a similar cellular phenotype for human cells depleted of hSNM1B/Apollo (siRNA). In fact, hSNM1B/Apollo has a dual role in the DNA damage response and in generation and maintenance of telomeres, the latter function involving interaction with the shelterin protein TRF2. Here we find that ectopically expressed hSNM1B/Apollo co-immunoprecipitates with SLX4, a protein recently identified as a new FA protein, FANCP, and known to interact with several structure-specific nucleases. As shown by immunofluorescence analysis, FANCP/SLX4 depletion (siRNA) resulted in a significant reduction of hSNM1B/Apollo nuclear foci, supporting the functional relevance of this new protein interaction. Interestingly, as an additional consequence of FANCP/SLX4 depletion, we found a reduction of cellular TRF2, in line with its telomere-related function. Finally, analysis of human cells following double knockdown of hSNM1B/Apollo and FANCP/SLX4 indicated that they function epistatically. These findings further substantiate the role of hSNM1B/Apollo in a downstream step of the FA pathway during the repair of DNA ICLs.

  17. 环形电切术治疗高级别宫颈上皮内瘤样病变后人乳头瘤病毒16、18持续感染的影响因素分析%Analysis of influencing factors associated with human papillomavirus 16,18 persistent infection after the treatment for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with loop electrosurgical excision procedure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晶雪; 李立

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the short-term efficacy of loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) in the treatment of human papillomavirus(HPV) 16,18 persistent infection after the operation for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia(CIN) and to explore the influcing factor of HPV16,18 persistent infection. Methods:Totally 167 cases of CIN II /HI were confirmed by coloposcopy cervical biopsy and received treatment in the department of gynecology of Iiuzhou People' s Hospital from January 2007 to June 2009 were enrolled. HPV16,18 DNA was detected in all patients and cervical LEEP was performed on all of them. Thinprep cytologic test (TCT) ,HPV16,18 DNA detection and follow-up were applied at six months after the operation. Results:HPV infection rate was 77.951% preoperatively and 7.87% at six months after the operation in the follow-up visit. Cervix biopsy was performed in 43 patients with persistent positive HPV-DNA, abnormal TCT or positive surgical margin. Rate of residual lesions was 9.3%. Conclusions-, ①HPV16,18 infection in female genital tract can be effectively cleared by LEEP. ②Influencing factors of persistent HPV16,18 infection after the treatment of high-grade CIN by LEEP include age,age at first sexual activity,multiple deliver)' and positive margin involvement.③Positive margin involvement is the risk factor for the residual lesion of high-grade CIN after treating by LEEP.%目的:探讨宫颈环形电切术(loop electrosurgical excision procedure,LEEP)治疗高级别宫颈上皮内瘤样病变(cervical intraepithelial neoplasia,CIN)术后人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus,HPV) 16、18清除的近期效果并分析对HPV16、18持续感染的相关影响因素.方法:选取2007年1月至2009年6月就诊于柳州市人民医院妇科,阴道镜下宫颈活检确诊为CINⅡ/Ⅲ的患者167例.均对其检测HPV16、18 DNA并行宫颈LEEP治疗.术后6个月检测HPV 16、18 DNA及液基薄层细胞学检查(thinprep cytologic test,TCT)进

  18. EXCISE TAX AS EXTERNAL VARIABLE (ON TABACCO PRODUCTS AT STATE AND LOCAL COMMUNITIES IN BIH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinko Primorac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is themovement and accounting for excise tax as aseparate subsystem of sales tax, with an emphasison tobacco products. Since the excise tax ontobacco products is a specific category of excisableproducts, it is possible to fully distance it fromother products. Unlike other excise goods, excisetaxes on tobacco products can not be distinguishedby the criterion of luxury and by the criterion ofharm to health. This paper explains the reasons,effects and the basic characteristics of excise taxes,and full adjustment of the special tax. The aim ofthe research paper is to present and analyze thesystem of excise tax revenue in Bosnia andHerzegovina, with special reference to the excisetax on tobacco products. Furthermore the aim is toexplore how the excise tax system in Bosnia andHerzegovina functions and how the funds fromexcise taxes are collected, and where exactly theyare expended.

  19. Lambda Excision Revisited: Testing a Model for Synapsis of Prophage Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Martin L.

    2001-01-01

    Excision of lambda prophage was reexamined to test a model for prophage end synapsis. The model proposes that, during in situ prophage replication, following induction, the diverging replication forks are held together. Consequently, prophage DNA is spooled through the replication machinery, drawing the prophage ends together and facilitating synapsis. The model predicts that excision will be slowed if in situ lambda replication is inhibited, and the predicted low rate of excision of a nonreplicating prophage was observed after thermoinduction. However, excision was rapid if additional Int protein was supplied or if the temperature was reduced after induction, showing that (i) Int is partially thermosensitive for excision at 42°C and (ii) in situ replication is not required for rapid excision, a finding that is inconsistent with the model. PMID:11489876

  20. Mre11 nuclease and C-terminal tail-mediated DDR functions are required for initiating yeast telomere healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, M K; Matthews, K M; Lustig, A J

    2008-08-01

    Mre11 is a central factor in creating an optimal substrate for telomerase loading and elongation. We have used a G2/M synchronized telomere-healing assay as a tool to separate different functions of Mre11 that are not apparent in null alleles. An analysis of healing efficiencies of several mre11 alleles revealed that both nuclease and C-terminal mutations led to a loss of healing. Interestingly, trans-complementation of the 49 amino acid C-terminal deletion (DeltaC49) and the D16A mutant, deficient in nuclease activity and partially defective in MRX complex formation, restores healing. DeltaC49 provokes Rad53 phosphorylation after treatment with the radiomimetic agent MMS exclusively through the Tel1 pathway, suggesting that a Tel1-mediated function is initiated through the C-terminal tail.