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Sample records for human ether-a-go-go related

  1. Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probe for the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene Potassium Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Beilei; Ke, Bowen; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-01-01

    A novel environment-sensitive probe S2 with turn-on switch for Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel was developed herein. After careful evaluation, this fluorescent probe showed high binding affinity with hERG potassium channel with an IC50 value of 41.65 nM and can be well applied to hERG channel imaging or cellular distribution study for hERG channel blockers. Compared with other imaging techniques, such as immunofluorescence and fluorescent protein-based approaches, th...

  2. Combining cluster analysis, feature selection and multiple support vector machine models for the identification of human ether-a-go-go related gene channel blocking compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisius, Britta; Göller, Andreas H; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Blockade of the human ether-a-go-go related gene potassium channel is regarded as a major cause of drug toxicity and associated with severe cardiac side-effects. A variety of in silico models have been reported to aid in the identification of compounds blocking the human ether-a-go-go related gene channel. Herein, we present a classification approach for the detection of diverse human ether-a-go-go related gene blockers that combines cluster analysis of training data, feature selection and support vector machine learning. Compound learning sets are first divided into clusters of similar molecules. For each cluster, independent support vector machine models are generated utilizing preselected MACCS structural keys as descriptors. These models are combined to predict human ether-a-go-go related gene inhibition of our large compound data set with consistent experimental measurements (i.e. only patch clamp measurements on mammalian cell lines). Our combined support vector machine model achieves a prediction accuracy of 85% on this data set and performs better than alternative methods used for comparison. We also find that structural keys selected on the basis of statistical criteria are associated with molecular substructures implicated in human ether-a-go-go related gene channel binding.

  3. Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probe for the Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene Potassium Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Tianyu; Wang, Beilei; Ke, Bowen; Zhou, Yubin; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2016-02-02

    A novel environment-sensitive probe S2 with turn-on switch for Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel was developed herein. After careful evaluation, this fluorescent probe showed high binding affinity with hERG potassium channel with an IC50 value of 41.65 nM and can be well applied to hERG channel imaging or cellular distribution study for hERG channel blockers. Compared with other imaging techniques, such as immunofluorescence and fluorescent protein-based approaches, this method is convenient and affordable, especially since a washing procedure is not needed. Meanwhile, this environment-sensitive turn-on design strategy may provide a good example for the probe development for these targets that have no reactive or catalytic activity.

  4. Inhibition of the Human Ether-a-go-go-related Gene (HERG) K+ Channels by Lindera erythrocarpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hee-Kyung; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Kim, Young Ho; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2009-01-01

    Lindera erythrocarpa Makino (Lauraceae) is used as a traditional medicine for analgesic, antidote, and antibacterial purposes and shows anti-tumor activity. We studied the effects of Lindera erythrocarpa on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channel, which appears of importance in favoring cancer progression in vivo and determining cardiac action potential duration. Application of MeOH extract of Lindera erythrocarpa showed a dose-dependent decrease in the amplitudes of the outward currents measured at the end of the pulse (IHERG) and the tail currents of HERG (Itail). When the BuOH fraction and H2O fraction of Lindera erythrocarpa were added to the perfusate, both IHERG and Itail were suppressed, while the hexane fraction, CHCl3 fraction, and EtOAc fraction did not inhibit either IHERG or Itail. The potential required for half-maximal activation caused by EtOAc fraction, BuOH fraction, and H2O fraction shifted significantly. The BuOH fraction and H2O fraction (100 µg/mL) decreased gmax by 59.6% and 52.9%, respectively. The H2O fraction- and BuOH fraction-induced blockades of Itail progressively decreased with increasing depolarization, showing the voltage-dependent block. Our findings suggest that Lindera erythrocarpa, a traditional medicine, blocks HERG channel, which could contribute to its anticancer and cardiac arrhythmogenic effect. PMID:19949665

  5. Frequency- and state-dependent blockade of human ether-a-go-go-related gene K+ channel by arecoline hydrobromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu-yan; Liu, Yu-qi; Fu, Yi-cheng; Xu, Bin; Gao, Jin-liao; Zheng, Xiao-qin; Lin, Min; Chen, Mei-yan; Li, Yang

    2012-03-01

    The rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kr)), whose pore-forming alpha subunit is encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG), is a key contributor to the third phase of action potential repolarization. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of arecoline hydrobromide induced inhibition of hERG K(+) current (I(hERG)). Transient transfection of hERG channel cDNA plasmid pcDNA3.1 into the cultured HEK293 cells was performed using Lipofectamine. A standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record the I(hERG) before and after the exposure to arecoline. Arecoline decreased the amplitude and the density of the I(hERG) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 9.55 mmol/L). At test potential of +60 mV, the magnitude of I(hERG) tail at test pulse of -40 mV was reduced from (151.7 ± 6.2) pA/pF to (84.4 ± 7.6) pA/pF (P arecoline in the open and inactivated state was significant in a state-dependent manner. The maximal blockade was achieved in the inactivated state. Studies of gating mechanism showed that the steady-state activation curve of I(hERG) was significantly negatively shifted by arecoline. Time constants of activation were shortened. Steady-state inactivation curve and time constants of fast inactivation were not significantly affected by arecoline. Furthermore, the inhibition of I(hERG) by arecoline was characterized markedly by a frequency-dependent manner from 0.03 to 1.00 Hz pulse. Arecoline could potently block I(hERG) in both frequency and state-dependent manner.

  6. Activation of human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channels by the diphenylurea 1,3-bis-(2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-urea (NS1643)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rie Schultz; Diness, Thomas Goldin; Christ, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The cardiac action potential is generated by a concerted action of different ion channels and transporters. Dysfunction of any of these membrane proteins can give rise to cardiac arrhythmias, which is particularly true for the repolarizing potassium channels. We suggest that an increased...... repolarization current could be a new antiarrhythmic principle, because it possibly would attenuate afterdepolarizations, ischemic leak currents, and reentry phenomena. Repolarization of the cardiac myocytes is crucially dependent on the late rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) conducted by ether......-a-go-go-related gene (ERG) potassium channels. We have developed the diphenylurea compound 1,3-bis-(2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-urea (NS1643) and tested whether this small organic molecule could increase the activity of human ERG (HERG) channels expressed heterologously. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, NS1643...

  7. Effect of beta-adrenoceptor blockers on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Delphine S; Klaerke, Dan A; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Patients with congenital long QT syndrome may develop arrhythmias under conditions of increased sympathetic tone. We have addressed whether some of the beta-adrenoceptor blockers commonly used to prevent the development of these arrhythmias could per se block the cardiac HERG (Human Ether....... These data showed that HERG blockade by beta-adrenoceptor blockers occurred only at high micromolar concentrations, which are significantly above the recently established safe margin of 100 (Redfern et al., 2003).......-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol hydrochloride) blocked the HERG channel with similar affinity, whereas the beta1-receptor antagonists metoprolol and atenolol showed weak effects. Further, the four compounds blocked HERG channels expressed in a mammalian HEK293 cell line...

  8. Regulation of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel by Nedd4 family interacting proteins (Ndfips).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yudi; Guo, Jun; Yang, Tonghua; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Shetuan

    2015-11-15

    The cardiac electrical disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS) pre-disposes affected individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. Dysfunction of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) channel (IKr) is a major cause of LQTS. The expression of hERG channels is controlled by anterograde trafficking of newly synthesized channels to and retrograde degradation of existing channels from the plasma membrane. We have previously shown that the E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Nedd4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4-2) targets the PY motif of hERG channels to initiate channel degradation. Although both immature and mature hERG channels contain the PY motif, Nedd4-2 selectively mediates the degradation of mature hERG channels. In the present study, we demonstrate that Nedd4-2 is directed to specific cellular compartments by the Nedd4 family interacting proteins, Nedd4 family-interacting protein 1 (Ndfip1) and Ndfip2. Ndfip1 is primarily localized in the Golgi apparatus where it recruits Nedd4-2 to mediate the degradation of mature hERG proteins during channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Although Ndfip2 directs Nedd4-2 to the Golgi apparatus, it also recruits Nedd4-2 to the multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which may impair MVB function and impede the degradation of mature hERG proteins mediated by Nedd4-2. These findings extend our understanding of hERG channel regulation and provide information which may be useful for the rescue of impaired hERG function in LQTS.

  9. APETx1 from sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima is a gating modifier peptide toxin of the human ether-a-go-go- related potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Liu, X-S; Diochot, S; Lazdunski, M; Tseng, G-N

    2007-08-01

    We studied the mechanism of action and the binding site of APETx1, a peptide toxin purified from sea anemone, on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. Similar to the effects of gating modifier toxins (hanatoxin and SGTx) on the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) 2.1 channel, APETx1 shifts the voltage-dependence of hERG activation in the positive direction and suppresses its current amplitudes elicited by strong depolarizing pulses that maximally activate the channels. The APETx1 binding site is distinctly different from that of a pore-blocking peptide toxin, BeKm-1. Mutations in the S3b region of hERG have dramatic impact on the responsiveness to APETx1: G514C potentiates whereas E518C abolishes the APETx1 effect. Restoring the negative charge at position 518 (methanethiosulfonate ethylsulfonate modification of 518C) partially restores APETx1 responsiveness, supporting an electrostatic interaction between E518 and APETx1. Among the three hERG isoforms, hERG1 and hERG3 are equally responsive to APETx1, whereas hERG2 is insensitive. The key feature seems to be an arginine residue uniquely present at the 514-equivalent position in hERG2, where the other two isoforms possess a glycine. Our data show that APETx1 is a gating modifier toxin of the hERG channel, and its binding site shares characteristics with those of gating modifier toxin binding sites on other Kv channels.

  10. A new homogeneous high-throughput screening assay for profiling compound activity on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Steven A; Beacham, Daniel; Shahane, Sampada A; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Hooten, Elizabeth; Zhao, Yong; Shou, Louie; Austin, Christopher P; Zheng, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Long QT syndrome, either inherited or acquired from drug treatments, can result in ventricular arrhythmia (torsade de pointes) and sudden death. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel inhibition by drugs is now recognized as a common reason for the acquired form of long QT syndrome. It has been reported that more than 100 known drugs inhibit the activity of the hERG channel. Since 1997, several drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to the long QT syndrome caused by hERG inhibition. Food and Drug Administration regulations now require safety data on hERG channels for investigative new drug (IND) applications. The assessment of compound activity on the hERG channel has now become an important part of the safety evaluation in the process of drug discovery. During the past decade, several in vitro assay methods have been developed and significant resources have been used to characterize hERG channel activities. However, evaluation of compound activities on hERG have not been performed for large compound collections due to technical difficulty, lack of throughput, and/or lack of biological relevance to function. Here we report a modified form of the FluxOR thallium flux assay, capable of measuring hERG activity in a homogeneous 1536-well plate format. To validate the assay, we screened a 7-point dilution series of the LOPAC 1280 library collection and reported rank order potencies of ten common hERG inhibitors. A correlation was also observed for the hERG channel activities of 10 known hERG inhibitors determined in this thallium flux assay and in the patch clamp experiment. Our findings indicate that this thallium flux assay can be used as an alternative method to profile large-volume compound libraries for compound activity on the hERG channel.

  11. Inhibition of human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channels by alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dierk; Wimmer, Anna-Britt; Wu, Kezhong; Hammerling, Bettina C; Ficker, Eckhard K; Kuryshev, Yuri A; Kiehn, Johann; Katus, Hugo A; Schoels, Wolfgang; Karle, Christoph A

    2004-05-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels are expressed in multiple tissues including the heart and adenocarcinomas. In cardiomyocytes, HERG encodes the alpha-subunit underlying the rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium current, I(Kr), and pharmacological reduction of HERG currents may cause acquired long QT syndrome. In addition, HERG currents have been shown to be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Recently, doxazosin has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Moreover, quinazoline-derived alpha 1-inhibitors induce apoptosis in cardiomyocytes and prostate tumor cells independently of alpha1-adrenoceptor blockade. To assess the action of the effects of prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin on HERG currents, we investigated their acute electrophysiological effects on cloned HERG potassium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK 293 cells.Prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin blocked HERG currents in Xenopus oocytes with IC(50) values of 10.1, 18.2, and 113.2 microM respectively, whereas the IC(50) values for HERG channel inhibition in human HEK 293 cells were 1.57 microM, 585.1 nM, and 17.7 microM. Detailed biophysical studies revealed that inhibition by the prototype alpha 1-blocker prazosin occurred in closed, open, and inactivated channels. Analysis of the voltage-dependence of block displayed a reduction of inhibition at positive membrane potentials. Frequency-dependence was not observed. Prazosin caused a negative shift in the voltage-dependence of both activation (-3.8 mV) and inactivation (-9.4 mV). The S6 mutations Y652A and F656A partially attenuated (Y652A) or abolished (F656A) HERG current blockade, indicating that prazosin binds to a common drug receptor within the pore-S6 region. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that HERG

  12. The S4-S5 linker directly couples voltage sensor movement to the activation gate in the human ether-a'-go-go-related gene (hERG) K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Tania; Rupp, Jason; Piper, David R; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin

    2006-05-05

    A key unresolved question regarding the basic function of voltage-gated ion channels is how movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to channel opening. We previously proposed that the S4-S5 linker couples voltage sensor movement to the S6 domain in the human ether-a'-go-go-related gene (hERG) K+ channel. The recently solved crystal structure of the voltage-gated Kv1.2 channel reveals that the S4-S5 linker is the structural link between the voltage sensing and pore domains. In this study, we used chimeras constructed from hERG and ether-a'-go-go (EAG) channels to identify interactions between residues in the S4-S5 linker and S6 domain that were critical for stabilizing the channel in a closed state. To verify the spatial proximity of these regions, we introduced cysteines in the S4-S5 linker and at the C-terminal end of the S6 domain and then probed for the effect of oxidation. The D540C-L666C channel current decreased in an oxidizing environment in a state-dependent manner consistent with formation of a disulfide bond that locked the channel in a closed state. Disulfide bond formation also restricted movement of the voltage sensor, as measured by gating currents. Taken together, these data confirm that the S4-S5 linker directly couples voltage sensor movement to the activation gate. Moreover, rather than functioning simply as a mechanical lever, these findings imply that specific interactions between the S4-S5 linker and the activation gate stabilize the closed channel conformation.

  13. Bag1 Co-chaperone Promotes TRC8 E3 Ligase-dependent Degradation of Misfolded Human Ether a Go-Go-related Gene (hERG) Potassium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantouche, Christine; Williamson, Brittany; Valinsky, William C; Solomon, Joshua; Shrier, Alvin; Young, Jason C

    2017-02-10

    Cardiac long QT syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in the human ether a go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel, many of which cause misfolding and degradation at the endoplasmic reticulum instead of normal trafficking to the cell surface. The Hsc70/Hsp70 chaperones assist the folding of the hERG cytosolic domains. Here, we demonstrate that the Hsp70 nucleotide exchange factor Bag1 promotes hERG degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system at the endoplasmic reticulum to regulate hERG levels and channel activity. Dissociation of hERG complexes containing Hsp70 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP requires the interaction of Bag1 with Hsp70, but this does not involve the Bag1 ubiquitin-like domain. The interaction with Bag1 then shifts hERG degradation to the membrane-anchored E3 ligase TRC8 and its E2-conjugating enzyme Ube2g2, as determined by siRNA screening. TRC8 interacts through the transmembrane region with hERG and decreases hERG functional expression. TRC8 also mediates degradation of the misfolded hERG-G601S disease mutant, but pharmacological stabilization of the mutant structure prevents degradation. Our results identify TRC8 as a previously unknown Hsp70-independent quality control E3 ligase for hERG. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Acute alteration of cardiac ECG, action potential, I{sub Kr} and the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K{sup +} channel by PCB 126 and PCB 77

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi-Hyeong; Park, Won Sun; Jo, Su-Hyun, E-mail: suhyunjo@kangwon.ac.kr

    2012-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been known as serious persistent organic pollutants (POPs), causing developmental delays and motor dysfunction. We have investigated the effects of two PCB congeners, 3,3′,4,4′-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77) and 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) on ECG, action potential, and the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K{sup +} current (I{sub Kr}) of guinea pigs' hearts, and hERG K{sup +} current expressed in Xenopus oocytes. PCB 126 shortened the corrected QT interval (QTc) of ECG and decreased the action potential duration at 90% (APD{sub 90}), and 50% of repolarization (APD{sub 50}) (P < 0.05) without changing the action potential duration at 20% (APD{sub 20}). PCB 77 decreased APD{sub 20} (P < 0.05) without affecting QTc, APD{sub 90}, and APD{sub 50}. The PCB 126 increased the I{sub Kr} in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes held at 36 °C and hERG K{sup +} current amplitude at the end of the voltage steps in voltage-dependent mode (P < 0.05); however, PCB 77 did not change the hERG K{sup +} current amplitude. The PCB 77 increased the diastolic Ca{sup 2+} and decreased Ca{sup 2+} transient amplitude (P < 0.05), however PCB 126 did not change. The results suggest that PCB 126 shortened the QTc and decreased the APD{sub 90} possibly by increasing I{sub Kr}, while PCB 77 decreased the APD{sub 20} possibly by other modulation related with intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The present data indicate that the environmental toxicants, PCBs, can acutely affect cardiac electrophysiology including ECG, action potential, intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, and channel activity, resulting in toxic effects on the cardiac function in view of the possible accumulation of the PCBs in human body. -- Highlights: ► PCBs are known as serious environmental pollutants and developmental disruptors. ► PCB 126 shortened QT interval of ECG and action potential duration. ► PCB 126 increased human ether-a-go-go-related K{sup +} current and I{sub Kr}.

  15. The human ether-a'-go-go related gene (hERG) K+ channel blockade by the investigative selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor CONA-437: limited dependence on S6 aromatic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, A J; Milnes, J T; Sun, S Z; Fermini, B; Kim, S C; Jenkinson, S; Leishman, D J; Witchel, H J; Hancox, J C; Leaney, J L

    2014-08-01

    Diverse non-cardiac drugs adversely influence cardiac electrophysiology by inhibiting repolarising K(+) currents mediated by channels encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). In this study, pharmacological blockade of hERG K(+) channel current (I(hERG)) by a novel investigative serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), CONA-437, was investigated. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements of I(hERG) were made from human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells expressing wild-type (WT) or mutant forms of the hERG channel. With a step-ramp voltage-command, peak I(hERG) was inhibited with an IC(50) of 1.34 μM at 35 ±1°C; the IC(50) with the same protocol was not significantly different at room temperature. Voltage-command waveform selection had only a modest effect on the potency of I(hERG) block: the IC50 with a ventricular action potential command was 0.72 μM. I(hERG) blockade developed rapidly with time following membrane depolarisation and showed a weak dependence on voltage, accompanied by a shift of ≈ -5 mV in voltage-dependence of activation. There was no significant effect of CONA-437 on voltage-dependence of I(hERG) inactivation, though at some voltages an apparent acceleration of the time-course of inactivation was observed. Significantly, mutation of the S6 aromatic amino acid residues Y652 and F656 had only a modest effect on I(hERG) blockade by CONA-437 (a 3-4 fold shift in affinity). CONA-437 at up to 30 μM had no significant effect on either Nav1.5 sodium channels or L-type calcium channels. In conclusion, the novel SSRI CONA-437 is particularly notable as a gating-dependent hERG channel inhibitor for which neither S6 aromatic amino-acid constituent of the canonical drug binding site on the hERG channel appears obligatory for I(hERG) inhibition to occur.

  16. Structural basis for ether-a-go-go-related gene K+ channel subtype-dependent activation by niflumic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David; Sargent, John; Sachse, Frank B; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2008-04-01

    Niflumic acid [2-((3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)amino)-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid, NFA] is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modulates the gating of a wide spectrum of ion channels. Here we investigated the mechanism of channel activation by NFA on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG) K(+) channel subtypes expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques. NFA acted from the extracellular side of the membrane to differentially enhance ERG channel currents independent of channel state. At 1 mM, NFA shifted the half-point for activation by -6, -18, and -11 mV for ERG1, ERG2, and ERG3 channels, respectively. The half-point for channel inactivation was shifted by +5 to +9 mV by NFA. The structural basis for the ERG subtype-specific response to NFA was explored with chimeric channels and site-directed mutagenesis. The molecular determinants of enhanced sensitivity of ERG2 channels to NFA were isolated to an Arg and a Thr triplet in the extracellular S3-S4 linker.

  17. Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Becerra, Rocio [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Camacho, Javier [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, Cindy Sharon [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Avila, Euclides [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bargallo, Enrique [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arrecillas, Myrna [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-02-01

    Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

  18. Demonstration of physical proximity between the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Pilar; Alonso-Ron, Carlos; Machín, Angeles; Fernández-Trillo, Jorge; Carretero, Luis; Domínguez, Pedro; Barros, Francisco

    2011-05-27

    Potassium channels encoded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) contribute to cardiac repolarization as a result of their characteristic gating properties. The hERG channel N terminus acts as a crucial determinant in gating. It is also known that the S4-S5 linker couples the voltage-sensing machinery to the channel gate. Moreover, this linker has been repeatedly proposed as an interaction site for the distal portion of the N terminus controlling channel gating, but direct evidence for such an interaction is still lacking. In this study, we used disulfide bond formation between pairs of engineered cysteines to demonstrate the close proximity between the beginning of the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker. Currents from channels with introduced cysteines were rapidly and strongly attenuated by an oxidizing agent, this effect being maximal for cysteine pairs located around amino acids 3 and 542 of the hERG sequence. The state-dependent modification of the double-mutant channels, but not the single-cysteine mutants, and the ability to readily reverse modification with the reducing agent dithiothreitol indicate that a disulfide bond is formed under oxidizing conditions, locking the channels in a non-conducting state. We conclude that physical interactions between the N-terminal-most segment of the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker constitute an essential component of the hERG gating machinery, thus providing a molecular basis for previous data and indicating an important contribution of these cytoplasmic domains in controlling its unusual gating and hence determining its physiological role in setting the electrical behavior of cardiac and other cell types.

  19. Structural Basis for Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene K+ Channel Subtype-Dependent Activation by Niflumic Acid[S

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, David; Sargent, John; Frank B Sachse; Sanguinetti, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Niflumic acid [2-((3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)amino)-3-pyridin-ecarboxylic acid, NFA] is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modulates the gating of a wide spectrum of ion channels. Here we investigated the mechanism of channel activation by NFA on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG) K+ channel subtypes expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques. NFA acted from the extracellular side of the membrane to differentially enhance ERG channel ...

  20. Structural Basis for Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene K+ Channel Subtype-Dependent Activation by Niflumic Acid[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David; Sargent, John; Sachse, Frank B.; Sanguinetti, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    Niflumic acid [2-((3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)amino)-3-pyridin-ecarboxylic acid, NFA] is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modulates the gating of a wide spectrum of ion channels. Here we investigated the mechanism of channel activation by NFA on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG) K+ channel subtypes expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques. NFA acted from the extracellular side of the membrane to differentially enhance ERG channel currents independent of channel state. At 1 mM, NFA shifted the half-point for activation by −6, −18, and −11 mV for ERG1, ERG2, and ERG3 channels, respectively. The half-point for channel inactivation was shifted by +5 to +9 mV by NFA. The structural basis for the ERG subtype-specific response to NFA was explored with chimeric channels and site-directed mutagenesis. The molecular determinants of enhanced sensitivity of ERG2 channels to NFA were isolated to an Arg and a Thr triplet in the extracellular S3-S4 linker. PMID:18218980

  1. Discovery of 5-Chloro-1-(5-chloro-2-(methylsulfonyl)benzyl)-2-imino-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide (TAK-259) as a Novel, Selective, and Orally Active α1D Adrenoceptor Antagonist with Antiurinary Frequency Effects: Reducing Human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) Liabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakauchi, Nobuki; Kohara, Yasuhisa; Sato, Ayumu; Suzaki, Tomohiko; Imai, Yumi; Okabe, Yuichi; Imai, Shigemitsu; Saikawa, Reiko; Nagabukuro, Hiroshi; Kuno, Haruhiko; Fujita, Hisashi; Kamo, Izumi; Yoshida, Masato

    2016-04-14

    A novel structural class of iminopyridine derivative 1 was identified as a potent and selective human α1D adrenoceptor (α1D adrenergic receptor; α1D-AR) antagonist against α1A- and α1B-AR through screening of an in-house compound library. From initial structure-activity relationship studies, we found lead compound 9m with hERG K(+) channel liability. To develop analogues with reduced hERG K(+) channel inhibition, a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and docking studies was employed. Further optimization led to the discovery of (R)-9s and 9u, which showed antagonistic activity by a bladder strip test in rats with bladder outlet obstruction, as well as ameliorated cystitis-induced urinary frequency in rats. Ultimately, 9u was selected as a clinical candidate. This is the first study to show the utility of iminopyridine derivatives as selective α1D-AR antagonists and evaluate their effects in vivo.

  2. Mechanism of action of a novel human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casis, Oscar; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2005-01-01

    depolarizations, NS1643 enhanced the magnitude of wild-type hERG current in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner with an EC(50) of 10.4 microM at -10 mV. The fully activated current-voltage relationship revealed that the drug increased outward but not inward currents, consistent with altered inactivation...

  3. Improved functional expression of recombinant human ether-a-go-go (hERG K+ channels by cultivation at reduced temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Bruce

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HERG potassium channel blockade is the major cause for drug-induced long QT syndrome, which sometimes cause cardiac disrhythmias and sudden death. There is a strong interest in the pharmaceutical industry to develop high quality medium to high-throughput assays for detecting compounds with potential cardiac liability at the earliest stages of drug development. Cultivation of cells at lower temperature has been used to improve the folding and membrane localization of trafficking defective hERG mutant proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of lower temperature maintenance on wild type hERG expression and assay performance. Results Wild type hERG was stably expressed in CHO-K1 cells, with the majority of channel protein being located in the cytoplasm, but relatively little on the cell surface. Expression at both locations was increased several-fold by cultivation at lower growth temperatures. Intracellular hERG protein levels were highest at 27°C and this correlated with maximal 3H-dofetilide binding activity. In contrast, the expression of functionally active cell surface-associated hERG measured by patch clamp electrophysiology was optimal at 30°C. The majority of the cytoplasmic hERG protein was associated with the membranes of cytoplasmic vesicles, which markedly increased in quantity and size at lower temperatures or in the presence of the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin. Incubation with the endocytic trafficking blocker, nocodazole, led to an increase in hERG activity at 37°C, but not at 30°C. Conclusion Our results are consistent with the concept that maintenance of cells at reduced temperature can be used to boost the functional expression of difficult-to-express membrane proteins and improve the quality of assays for medium to high-throughput compound screening. In addition, these results shed some light on the trafficking of hERG protein under these growth conditions.

  4. Local anesthetic interaction with human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels: role of aromatic amino acids Y652 and F656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Schmitt, Nicole; Friederich, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    was to determine the effect of the mutations Y652A and F656A in the putative drug binding region of HERG on the inhibition by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. METHODS: The authors examined the inhibition of wild-type and mutant HERG channels, transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells...... by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed at room temperature. RESULTS: Inhibition of HERG wild-type and mutant channels by the different local anesthetics was concentration dependent, stereoselective, and reversible. The sensitivity decreased in the order...... bupivacaine > ropivacaine > mepivacaine for wild-type and mutant channels. The mutant channels were approximately 4-30 times less sensitive to the inhibitory action of the different local anesthetics than the wild-type channel. The concentration-response data were described by Hill functions (bupivacaine...

  5. PK/PD Modelling of the QT Interval: a Step Towards Defining the Translational Relationship Between In Vitro, Awake Beagle Dogs, and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marostica, Eleonora; Van Ammel, Karel; Teisman, Ard; Gallacher, David; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; De Ridder, Filip; Boussery, Koen; Vermeulen, An

    2016-07-01

    Inhibiting the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded potassium ion channel is positively correlated with QT-interval prolongation in vivo, which is considered a risk factor for the occurrence of Torsades de Pointes (TdP). A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed for four compounds that reached the clinic, to relate drug-induced QT-interval change in awake dogs and humans and to derive a translational scaling factor a 1. Overall, dogs were more sensitive than humans to QT-interval change, an a 1 of 1.5 was found, and a 10% current inhibition in vitro produced a higher percent QT-interval change in dogs as compared to humans. The QT-interval changes in dogs were predictive for humans. In vitro and in vivo information could reliably describe the effects in humans. Robust translational knowledge is likely to reduce the need for expensive thorough QT studies; therefore, expanding this work to more compounds is recommended.

  6. Predictive lethal proarrhythmic risk evaluation using a closed-loop-circuit cell network with human induced pluripotent stem cells derived cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Hattori, Akihiro; Terazono, Hideyuki; Kim, Hyonchol; Odaka, Masao; Sugio, Yoshihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    For the prediction of lethal arrhythmia occurrence caused by abnormality of cell-to-cell conduction, we have developed a next-generation in vitro cell-to-cell conduction assay, i.e., a quasi in vivo assay, in which the change in spatial cell-to-cell conduction is quantitatively evaluated from the change in waveforms of the convoluted electrophysiological signals from lined-up cardiomyocytes on a single closed loop of a microelectrode of 1 mm diameter and 20 µm width in a cultivation chip. To evaluate the importance of the closed-loop arrangement of cardiomyocytes for prediction, we compared the change in waveforms of convoluted signals of the responses in the closed-loop circuit arrangement with that of the response of cardiomyocyte clusters using a typical human ether a go-go related gene (hERG) ion channel blocker, E-4031. The results showed that (1) waveform prolongation and fluctuation both in the closed loops and clusters increased depending on the E-4031 concentration increase. However, (2) only the waveform signals in closed loops showed an apparent temporal change in waveforms from ventricular tachycardia (VT) to ventricular fibrillation (VF), which is similar to the most typical cell-to-cell conductance abnormality. The results indicated the usefulness of convoluted waveform signals of a closed-loop cell network for acquiring reproducible results acquisition and more detailed temporal information on cell-to-cell conduction.

  7. A radiolabeled peptide ligand of the hERG channel, [125I]-BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelo, Kamilla; Korolkova, Yuliya V; Grunnet, Morten

    2003-01-01

    The wild-type scorpion toxin BeKm-1, which selectively blocks human ether-a-go-go related (hERG) channels, was radiolabeled with iodine at tyrosine 11. Both the mono- and di-iodinated derivatives were found to be biologically active. In electrophysiological patch-clamp recordings mono-[127I]-BeKm-1...

  8. Reconstitution of Human Ion Channels into Solvent-free Lipid Bilayers Enhanced by Centrifugal Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Ishinari, Yutaka; Yoshida, Miyu; Araki, Shun; Tadaki, Daisuke; Miyata, Ryusuke; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2016-05-24

    Artificially formed bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) provide well-defined systems for functional analyses of various membrane proteins, including ion channels. However, difficulties associated with the integration of membrane proteins into BLMs limit the experimental efficiency and usefulness of such BLM reconstitution systems. Here, we report on the use of centrifugation to more efficiently reconstitute human ion channels in solvent-free BLMs. The method improves the probability of membrane fusion. Membrane vesicles containing the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, the human cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5), and the human GABAA receptor (GABAAR) channel were formed, and the functional reconstitution of the channels into BLMs via vesicle fusion was investigated. Ion channel currents were recorded in 67% of the BLMs that were centrifuged with membrane vesicles under appropriate centrifugal conditions (14-55 × g). The characteristic channel properties were retained for hERG, Nav1.5, and GABAAR channels after centrifugal incorporation into the BLMs. A comparison of the centrifugal force with reported values for the fusion force revealed that a centrifugal enhancement in vesicle fusion was attained, not by accelerating the fusion process but by accelerating the delivery of membrane vesicles to the surface of the BLMs, which led to an increase in the number of membrane vesicles that were available for fusion. Our method for enhancing the probability of vesicle fusion promises to dramatically increase the experimental efficiency of BLM reconstitution systems, leading to the realization of a BLM-based, high-throughput platform for functional assays of various membrane proteins.

  9. Drug-Induced Long QT Syndrome and Arrhythmia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童鸿

    2012-01-01

    @@Genetic defects associated with profound increases in Q-TC have frequently been associated with either a reduction in an outward potassium current (via Iks: LQT1 and LQT5; or via Ikr: LQT2 and LQT6)or augmentation of an inward sodium current(INa: LQT3)or calcium current.Most clinically relevant drug-related Q-TC prolongation occurs via inhibition of Ikr, a potassium current mediated in humans by the ion channel KCNH2 encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene(HERG)1, analogous to the genetic LQT2 form of the disease.

  10. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...... der mellem Human Relations (Hawthorne-eksperimenter ne) og Neo-Human Relations (behovsteorierne), men i denne fremstilling bruges Human Relations som en samlebetegnelse for begge disse – noget forskellige – forskningstraditioner. De har i dag opnået stor udbredelse og er praktisk talt obligatorisk...

  11. Human Relations-skolen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2014-01-01

    , men også arbejdssociologien, arbejdspsykologien og human resource development. Den første retning udsprang af de såkaldte Hawthorne-eksperimenter og psykologen Elton Mayos bearbejdelse af resultaterne derfra. Den anden er en løsere gruppering bestående af navne som Abraham Maslow og Frederick Herzberg......Human Relations-skolen er en samlebetegnelse for to forskningsretninger, som tilsammen bidrog som nogle af de første til at indkredse og belyse de mellemmenneskelige relationers betydning for motivation og trivsel i arbejdslivet, og som skulle få stor ind"ydelse ikke bare på organisationsteorien......, som formulerede en række teorier og modeller om menneskets motivation, trivsel og behov i arbejdslivet. Selvom de ikke nødvendigvis relaterede sig til hinandens arbejde, er de forskellige bidragsydere i dag kendt som repræsentanter for den paradigmatiske betegnelse Human Relations. Undertiden skelnes...

  12. Lessons in Human Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Joanne Lozar

    2003-01-01

    Explores the importance of relationship literacy--the ability to create good relationships with others--in the next economy and offers perspectives on how business education instructors can help students develop and improve their human relations skills for business success. (Author/JOW)

  13. SwissProt search result: AK100739 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100739 J023118D04 (Q96L42) Potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily H member 8 (...Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv12.1) (Ether-a-go-go-like potassium channel 3) (ELK channel 3) (ELK3) (ELK1) (hElk1) KCNH8_HUMAN 2e-25 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK243602 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243602 J100084P18 (Q96L42) Potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily H member 8 (...Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv12.1) (Ether-a-go-go-like potassium channel 3) (ELK channel 3) (ELK3) (ELK1) (hElk1) KCNH8_HUMAN 2e-19 ...

  15. [Projective identification in human relations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göka, Erol; Yüksel, Fatih Volkan; Göral, F Sevinç

    2006-01-01

    Melanie Klein, one of the pioneers of Object Relations Theory, first defined "projective identification", which is regarded as one of the most efficacious psychoanalytic concepts after the discovery of the "unconscious". Examination of the literature on "projective identification" shows that there are various perspectives and theories suggesting different uses of this concept. Some clinicians argue that projective identification is a primitive defense mechanism observed in severe psychopathologies like psychotic disorder and borderline personality disorder, where the intra-psychic structure has been damaged severely. Others suggest it to be an indispensable part of the transference and counter-transference between the therapist and the patient during psychotherapy and it can be used as a treatment material in the therapy by a skillful therapist. The latter group expands the use of the concept through normal daily relationships by stating that projective identification is one type of communication and part of the main human relation mechanism operating in all close relationships. Therefore, they suggest that projective identification has benign forms experienced in human relations as well as malign forms seen in psychopathologies. Thus, discussions about the definition of the concept appear complex. In order to clarify and overcome the complexity of the concept, Melanie Klein's and other most important subsequent approaches are discussed in this review article. Thereby, the article aims to explain its important function in understanding the psychopathologies, psychotherapeutic relationships and different areas of normal human relations.

  16. In Silico Predictions of hERG Channel Blockers in Drug Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Sørensen, Flemming Steen

    2011-01-01

    The risk for cardiotoxic side effects represents a major problem in clinical studies of drug candidates and regulatory agencies have explicitly recommended that all new drug candidates should be tested for blockage of the human Ether-a-go-go Related-Gene (hERG) potassium channel. Indeed, several....... Significant progress has been made in structure-based and ligand-based drug design and a number of models have been developed to predict hERG blockage.Although approaches such as homology modeling in combination with docking and molecular dynamics bring us closer to understand the drug-channel interactions...... on current methods to predict hERG blockers and the need of consistent data to improve the quality and performance of the in silico models. Finally, integration of network-based analysis on drugs inducing potentially long-QT syndrome and arrhythmia will be discussed as a new perspective for a better...

  17. In silico predictions of hERG channel blockers in drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2011-01-01

    The risk for cardiotoxic side effects represents a major problem in clinical studies of drug candidates and regulatory agencies have explicitly recommended that all new drug candidates should be tested for blockage of the human Ether-a-go-go Related-Gene (hERG) potassium channel. Indeed, several....... Significant progress has been made in structure-based and ligand-based drug design and a number of models have been developed to predict hERG blockage. Although approaches such as homology modeling in combination with docking and molecular dynamics bring us closer to understand the drug-channel interactions...... on current methods to predict hERG blockers and the need of consistent data to improve the quality and performance of the in silico models. Finally, integration of network-based analysis on drugs inducing potentially long-QT syndrome and arrhythmia will be discussed as a new perspective for a better...

  18. A toxin to nervous, cardiac, and endocrine ERG K+ channels isolated from Centruroides noxius scorpion venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrola, G B; Rosati, B; Rocchetti, M; Pimienta, G; Zaza, A; Arcangeli, A; Olivotto, M; Possani, L D; Wanke, E

    1999-05-01

    Toxins isolated from a variety of venoms are tools for probing the physiological function and structure of ion channels. The ether-a-go-go-related genes (erg) codify for the K+ channels (ERG), which are crucial in neurons and are impaired in human long-QT syndrome and Drosophila 'seizure' mutants. We have isolated a peptide from the scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann that has no sequence homologies with other toxins, and demonstrate that it specifically inhibits (IC50=16+/-1 nM) only ERG channels of different species and distinct histogenesis. These results open up the possibility of investigating ERG channel structure-function relationships and novel pharmacological tools with potential therapeutic efficacy.

  19. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of piperidine (piperazine)-substituted benzoxazole derivatives as multi-target antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yin, Lei; Chen, Bangyin; Song, Jinchun

    2015-11-15

    The present study describes the optimization of a series of novel benzoxazole-piperidine (piperazine) derivatives combining high dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A receptor affinities. Of these derivatives, the pharmacological features of compound 29 exhibited high affinities for the DA D2, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, but low affinities for the 5-HT2C and histamine H1 receptors and human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels. Furthermore, compound 29 reduced apomorphine-induced climbing and 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI)-induced head twitching without observable catalepsy, even at the highest dose tested. Thus, compound 29 is a promising candidate as a multi-target antipsychotic treatment.

  20. Syncope and QT prolongation among patients treated with methadone for heroin dependence in the city of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanoe, Søren; Hvidt, C; Ege, P

    2007-01-01

    Background: Methadone is prescribed to heroin addicts to decrease illicit opioid use. Prolongation of the QT interval in the ECG of patients with torsade de pointes (TdP) has been reported in methadone users. As heroin addicts sometimes faint while using illicit drugs, doctors might attribute too...... were collected in a population of adult heroin addicts treated with methadone or buprenorphine on a daily basis. Of the patients at the Drug Addiction Service in the municipal of Copenhagen, 450 ( 52%) were included. The QT interval was estimated from 12 lead ECGs. All participants were interviewed...... odds for syncope. Conclusions: Methadone is associated with QT prolongation and higher reporting of syncope in a population of heroin addicts. Abbreviations: HERG, human ether-a-go-go related gene; LQT2, type 2 of the long QT syndrome; TdP, torsade de pointes....

  1. Utility of hERG assays as surrogate markers of delayed cardiac repolarization and QT safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintant, Gary A; Su, Zhi; Martin, Ruth L; Cox, Bryan F

    2006-01-01

    HERG (human-ether-a-go-go-related gene) encodes for a cardiac potassium channel that plays a critical role in defining ventricular repolarization. Noncardiovascular drugs associated with a rare but potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmia (Torsades de Pointes) have been linked to delayed cardiac repolarization and block of hERG current. This brief overview will discuss the role of hERG current in cardiac electrophysiology, its involvement in drug-induced delayed repolarization, and approaches used to define drug effects on hERG current. In addition, examples of hERG blocking drugs acting differently (i.e., overt and covert hERG blockade due to multichannel block) together with the utility and limitations of hERG assays as tools to predict the risk of delayed repolarization and proarrhythmia are discussed.

  2. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    The scorpion toxin BeKm-1 is unique among a variety of known short scorpion toxins affecting potassium channels in its selective action on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG)-type channels. BeKm-1 shares the common molecular scaffold with other short scorpion toxins. The toxin spatial structure...... resolved by NMR consists of a short alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. By toxin mutagenesis study we identified the residues that are important for the binding of BeKm-1 to the human ERG K+ (HERG) channel. The most critical residues (Tyr-11, Lys-18, Arg-20, Lys-23) are located...... in the alpha-helix and following loop whereas the "traditional" functional site of other short scorpion toxins is formed by residues from the beta-sheet. Thus the unique location of the binding site of BeKm-1 provides its specificity toward the HERG channel....

  3. NGO Duties in Relation to Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, J.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298979446

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the moral duties that human rights NGOs, such as Amnesty International, and development NGOs, such as Oxfam, have in relation to human rights – especially in relation to the human right to a decent standard of living. The mentioned NGOs are powerful new agents on the global

  4. NGO Duties in Relation to Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the moral duties that human rights NGOs, such as Amnesty International, and development NGOs, such as Oxfam, have in relation to human rights – especially in relation to the human right to a decent standard of living. The mentioned NGOs are powerful new agents on the global s

  5. Human relations in SMEs from Arequipa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lizandro Arias Gallegos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present research settles as aim, to determine the kind of human relations which prevail in small and medium enterprises (SMEs at Paucarpata district from Arequipa City. In order to, we use the Human Relations Questionnaire with acceptable levels of validity and reliability (α = 0,648 and discriminate between four types of human relations: unsecure, collaborative, selfish and hostile. The results point that predominant human relations in SMEs are the hostile type, and make us to suppose that work conditions don’t benefit employees and could even have negative consequences in their job performance and welfare.

  6. Human frontal lobes are not relatively large.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Robert A; Venditti, Chris

    2013-05-28

    One of the most pervasive assumptions about human brain evolution is that it involved relative enlargement of the frontal lobes. We show that this assumption is without foundation. Analysis of five independent data sets using correctly scaled measures and phylogenetic methods reveals that the size of human frontal lobes, and of specific frontal regions, is as expected relative to the size of other brain structures. Recent claims for relative enlargement of human frontal white matter volume, and for relative enlargement shared by all great apes, seem to be mistaken. Furthermore, using a recently developed method for detecting shifts in evolutionary rates, we find that the rate of change in relative frontal cortex volume along the phylogenetic branch leading to humans was unremarkable and that other branches showed significantly faster rates of change. Although absolute and proportional frontal region size increased rapidly in humans, this change was tightly correlated with corresponding size increases in other areas and whole brain size, and with decreases in frontal neuron densities. The search for the neural basis of human cognitive uniqueness should therefore focus less on the frontal lobes in isolation and more on distributed neural networks.

  7. Human dignity: intrinsic or relative value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Marie-Jo

    2010-09-01

    Is human dignity an intrinsic value? Or is it a relative value, depending on the perception or assessment of quality of life? History had delineated some of its key features, but the advent of human rights and the Holocaust put special emphasis on this notion, particularly in the field of bioethics. But if modern medicine regards human dignity as crucial, it tends to support this notion while assessing and measuring it. The quality of life becomes the gauge for measuring human dignity, starting from a distinction between a viable and a non-viable existence, which may eventually lead to assisted death, or to letting die. This article argues that the concept of quality of life is of great relevant for medical practice, but on the condition of not being used as a standard to measure the dignity of the individual. Rather, the quality of life should be regarded as an imperative posed by human dignity, which is necessarily intrinsic. If the quality of life measures dignity, humankind is divided into two categories: lives worthy of living, and lives unworthy of living, and society becomes a jungle. Raising the quality of life as a requirement of the inherent human dignity does not solve automatically all problems and does not eliminate a feeling of unworthiness. But it ensures its 'human' value: the equal respect for every human being.

  8. Relational and Transcendental Humanism: Exploring the Consequences of a Thoroughly Pragmatic Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James T.

    2007-01-01

    The relational and transcendental elements of humanism are considered. Although the relational component of humanism is extraordinarily valuable, the author argues that the transcendental portion of humanism should be abandoned. The implications of a thoroughly pragmatic humanism are explored.

  9. Relational and Transcendental Humanism: Exploring the Consequences of a Thoroughly Pragmatic Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James T.

    2007-01-01

    The relational and transcendental elements of humanism are considered. Although the relational component of humanism is extraordinarily valuable, the author argues that the transcendental portion of humanism should be abandoned. The implications of a thoroughly pragmatic humanism are explored.

  10. Alcohol-related brain damage in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia M Erdozain

    Full Text Available Chronic excessive alcohol intoxications evoke cumulative damage to tissues and organs. We examined prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area (BA 9 from 20 human alcoholics and 20 age, gender, and postmortem delay matched control subjects. H & E staining and light microscopy of prefrontal cortex tissue revealed a reduction in the levels of cytoskeleton surrounding the nuclei of cortical and subcortical neurons, and a disruption of subcortical neuron patterning in alcoholic subjects. BA 9 tissue homogenisation and one dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE proteomics of cytosolic proteins identified dramatic reductions in the protein levels of spectrin β II, and α- and β-tubulins in alcoholics, and these were validated and quantitated by Western blotting. We detected a significant increase in α-tubulin acetylation in alcoholics, a non-significant increase in isoaspartate protein damage, but a significant increase in protein isoaspartyl methyltransferase protein levels, the enzyme that triggers isoaspartate damage repair in vivo. There was also a significant reduction in proteasome activity in alcoholics. One dimensional PAGE of membrane-enriched fractions detected a reduction in β-spectrin protein levels, and a significant increase in transmembranous α3 (catalytic subunit of the Na+,K+-ATPase in alcoholic subjects. However, control subjects retained stable oligomeric forms of α-subunit that were diminished in alcoholics. In alcoholics, significant loss of cytosolic α- and β-tubulins were also seen in caudate nucleus, hippocampus and cerebellum, but to different levels, indicative of brain regional susceptibility to alcohol-related damage. Collectively, these protein changes provide a molecular basis for some of the neuronal and behavioural abnormalities attributed to alcoholics.

  11. Screening for cardiac HERG potassium channel interacting proteins using the yeast two-hybrid technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyan; Yu, Hong; Lin, Jijin; Sun, Yifan; Shen, Xinyuan; Ren, Li

    2014-02-01

    The human ERG protein (HERG or Kv 11.1) encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (herg) is the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) responsible for action potential (AP) repolarization. Mutations in HERG lead to long-QT syndrome, a major cause of arrhythmias. Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for ion channel trafficking, membrane localization, and functional modulation. To identify proteins involved in the regulation of the HERG channel, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library using the C-terminus or N-terminus of HERG as bait. Fifteen proteins were identified as HERG amino terminal (HERG-NT)-interacting proteins, including Caveolin-1 (a membrane scaffold protein with multiple interacting partners, including G-proteins, kinases and NOS), the zinc finger protein, FHL2 and PTPN12 (a non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase). Eight HERG carboxylic terminal (HERG-CT)-interacting proteins were also identified, including the NF-κB-interacting protein myotrophin, We have identified multiple potential interacting proteins that may regulate cardiac IKr through cytoskeletal interactions, G-protein modulation, phosphorylation and downstream second messenger and transcription cascades. These findings provide further insight into dynamic modulation of HERG under physiological conditions and arrhythmogenesis.

  12. State-dependent block of HERG potassium channels by R-roscovitine: implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Sindura B; Kester, Mark; Elmslie, Keith S

    2009-04-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channel acts as a delayed rectifier in cardiac myocytes and is an important target for both pro- and antiarrhythmic drugs. Many drugs have been pulled from the market for unintended HERG block causing arrhythmias. Conversely, recent evidence has shown that HERG plays a role in cell proliferation and is overexpressed both in multiple tumor cell lines and in primary tumor cells, which makes HERG an attractive target for cancer treatment. Therefore, a drug that can block HERG but that does not induce cardiac arrhythmias would have great therapeutic potential. Roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that is in phase II clinical trials as an anticancer agent. In the present study we show that R-roscovitine blocks HERG potassium current (human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably expressing HERG) at clinically relevant concentrations. The block (IC(50) = 27 microM) was rapid (tau = 20 ms) and reversible (tau = 25 ms) and increased with channel activation, which supports an open channel mechanism. Kinetic study of wild-type and inactivation mutant HERG channels supported block of activated channels by roscovitine with relatively little effect on either closed or inactivated channels. A HERG gating model reproduced all roscovitine effects. Our model of open channel block by roscovitine may offer an explanation of the lack of arrhythmias in clinical trials using roscovitine, which suggests the utility of a dual CDK/HERG channel block as an adjuvant cancer therapy.

  13. Toward a psychology of human-animal relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, Catherine E; Bastian, Brock

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman animals are ubiquitous to human life, and permeate a diversity of social contexts by providing humans with food and clothing, serving as participants in research, improving healing, and offering entertainment, leisure, and companionship. Despite the impact that animals have on human lives and vice versa, the field of psychology has barely touched upon the topic of human-animal relations as an important domain of human activity. We review the current state of research on human-animal relations, showing how this body of work has implications for a diverse range of psychological themes including evolutionary processes, development, normative factors, gender and individual differences, health and therapy, and intergroup relations. Our aim is to highlight human-animal relations as a domain of human life that merits theoretical and empirical attention from psychology as a discipline. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Rosuvastatin blocks hERG current and prolongs cardiac repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Isabelle; Vigneault, Patrick; Drolet, Benoît; Turgeon, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    Blocking of the potassium current I(Kr) [human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG)] is generally associated with an increased risk of long QT syndrome (LQTS). The 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, rosuvastatin, is a methanesulfonamide derivative, which shows structural similarities with several I(Kr) blockers. Hence, we assessed the effects of rosuvastatin on cardiac repolarization by using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models. Patch clamp experiments on hERG-transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells established the potency of rosuvastatin to block hERG [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50) ) = 195 nM]. We showed in isolated guinea pig hearts that 195 nM rosuvastatin prolonged (basic cycle length of 250 ms; p cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance gene (MDR1)] and influx [organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 2B1] transporters involved in the disposition and cardiac distribution of the drug. Genetic polymorphisms observed for BCRP, MDR1, and OATP2B1, and IC(50) determined for hERG blocking lead us to propose that some patients may be at risk of rosuvastatin-induced LQTS.

  15. Prediction and modeling of effects on the QTc interval for clinical safety margin assessment, based on single-ascending-dose study data with AZD3839.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparve, Erik; Quartino, Angelica L; Lüttgen, Maria; Tunblad, Karin; Gårdlund, Anna Teiling; Fälting, Johanna; Alexander, Robert; Kågström, Jens; Sjödin, Linnea; Bulgak, Alexander; Al-Saffar, Ahmad; Bridgland-Taylor, Matthew; Pollard, Chris; Swedberg, Michael D B; Vik, Torbjörn; Paulsson, Björn

    2014-08-01

    Corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation in humans is usually predictable based on results from preclinical findings. This study confirms the signal from preclinical cardiac repolarization models (human ether-a-go-go-related gene, guinea pig monophasic action potential, and dog telemetry) on the clinical effects on the QTc interval. A thorough QT/QTc study is generally required for bioavailable pharmaceutical compounds to determine whether or not a drug shows a QTc effect above a threshold of regulatory interest. However, as demonstrated in this AZD3839 [(S)-1-(2-(difluoromethyl)pyridin-4-yl)-4-fluoro-1-(3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)phenyl)-1H-isoindol-3-amine hemifumarate] single-ascending-dose (SAD) study, high-resolution digital electrocardiogram data, in combination with adequate efficacy biomarker and pharmacokinetic data and nonlinear mixed effects modeling, can provide the basis to safely explore the margins to allow for robust modeling of clinical effect versus the electrophysiological risk marker. We also conclude that a carefully conducted SAD study may provide reliable data for effective early strategic decision making ahead of the thorough QT/QTc study.

  16. [Progress in research on defective protein trafficking and functional restoration in HERG-associated long QT syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peiliang; Lian, Jiangfang

    2016-02-01

    The human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) encodes the α -subunit of the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) channel, which is essential for the third repolarization of the action potential of human myocardial cells. Mutations of the HERG gene can cause type II hereditary long QT syndrome (LQT2), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval, abnormal T wave, torsade de pointes, syncope and sudden cardiac death. So far more than 300 HERG mutations have been identified, the majority of which can cause LQT2 due to HERG protein trafficking defect. It has been reported that certain drugs can induce acquired long QT syndrome through directly blocking the pore and/or affecting the HERG trafficking. The trafficking defects and K(+) currents can be restored with low temperature and certain drugs. However, the mechanisms underlying defective trafficking caused by HERG mutations and the inhibition/restoration of HERG trafficking by drugs are still unknown. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms including HERG trafficking under physiological and pathological conditions, and the effects of drugs on the HERG trafficking, in order to provide theoretical evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of long QT syndrome.

  17. Blockade by NIP-142, an antiarrhythmic agent, of carbachol-induced atrial action potential shortening and GIRK1/4 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Ito, Mie; Ishimaru, Sayoko; Tsuruoka, Noriko; Saito, Tomoaki; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Hashimoto, Norio; Yamashita, Toru; Tsuruzoe, Nobutomo; Tanaka, Hikaru; Shigenobu, Koki

    2006-08-01

    Mechanisms for the atria-specific action potential-prolonging action of NIP-142 ((3R*,4S*)-4-cyclopropylamino-3,4-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-6-(4-methoxyphenylacetylamino)-7-nitro-2H-1-benzopyran-3-ol), a benzopyran compound that terminates experimental atrial arrhythmia, was examined. In isolated guinea-pig atrial tissue, NIP-142 reversed the shortening of action potential duration induced by either carbachol or adenosine. These effects were mimicked by tertiapin, but not by E-4031. NIP-142 concentration-dependently blocked the human G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel current (GIRK1/4 channel current) expressed in HEK-293 cells with an EC50 value of 0.64 microM. At higher concentrations, NIP-142 blocked the human ether a go-go related gene (HERG) channel current with an EC50 value of 44 microM. In isolated guinea-pig papillary muscles, NIP-142 had no effect on the negative inotropic effect of carbachol under beta-adrenergic stimulation, indicating lack of effect on the muscarinic receptor and Gi protein. These results suggest that NIP-142 directly inhibits the acetylcholine-activated potassium current.

  18. Caco-2 Permeability Studies and In Vitro hERG Liability Assessment of Tryptanthrin and Indolinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähne, Evelyn A; Eigenmann, Daniela E; Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Verjee, Sheela; Butterweck, Veronika; Hebeisen, Simon; Hettich, Timm; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Smieško, Martin; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2016-08-01

    Tryptanthrin and (E,Z)-3-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)indolinone (indolinone) were recently isolated from Isatis tinctoria as potent anti-inflammatory and antiallergic alkaloids, and shown to inhibit COX-2, 5-LOX catalyzed leukotriene synthesis, and mast cell degranulation at low µM to nM concentrations. To assess their suitability for oral administration, we screened the compounds in an in vitro intestinal permeability assay using human colonic adenocarcinoma cells. For exact quantification of the compounds, validated UPLC-MS/MS methods were used. Tryptanthrin displayed high permeability (apparent permeability coefficient > 32.0 × 10(-6) cm/s) across the cell monolayer. The efflux ratio below 2 ( 10 µM) and indolinone (IC50 of 24.96 µM). The analysis of compounds using various in silico methods confirmed favorable pharmacokinetic properties, as well as a slight inhibition of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channel at micromolar concentrations.

  19. Group & Intergroup Relations in Living Human Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    investigations summarized in Table 2-1 include analyses of a broad range of system properties (cf. Adorno et al, 1950, MacKinnon, 1965; Beavers, 1977, Goffman...also characteristic of the authoritarian personality ( Adorno , et al., 1950). The balance of feeling within an underbounded system is typically less...groups being studied. 2 - 45 REFERENCES Adam R.N. and Preiss, J.J. (eds.) Human Organization Research. Homewood, Illinois: Dorsey, 1960. Adorno , T.W

  20. Modeling of The hERG K+ Channel Blockage Using Online Chemical Database and Modeling Environment (OCHEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Huanhuan; Zhao, Yong

    2017-08-30

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) K+ channel plays an important role in cardiac action potential. Blockage of hERG channel may result in long QT syndrome (LQTS), even cause sudden cardiac death. Many drugs have been withdrawn from the market because of the serious hERG-related cardiotoxicity. Therefore, it is quite essential to estimate the chemical blockage of hERG in the early stage of drug discovery. In this study, a diverse set of 3721 compounds with hERG inhibition data was assembled from literature. Then, we make full use of the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM), which supplies rich machine learning methods and descriptor sets, to build a series of classification models for hERG blockage. We also generated two consensus models based on the top-performing individual models. The consensus models performed much better than the individual models both on 5-fold cross validation and external validation. Especially, consensus model II yielded the prediction accuracy of 89.5 % and MCC of 0.670 on external validation. This result indicated that the predictive power of consensus model II should be stronger than most of the previously reported models. The 17 top-performing individual models and the consensus models and the data sets used for model development are available at https://ochem.eu/article/103592. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Role of the activation gate in determining the extracellular potassium dependency of block of HERG by trapped drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Kristeen; Chu, Elaine; Dodyk, Katrina; Richter, Kristofer; Miller, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Drug induced long QT syndrome (diLQTS) results primarily from block of the cardiac potassium channel HERG (human-ether-a-go-go related gene). In some cases long QT syndrome can result in the lethal arrhythmia torsade de pointes, an arrhythmia characterized by a rapid heart rate and severely compromised cardiac output. Many patients requiring medication present with serum potassium abnormalities due to a variety of conditions including gastrointestinal dysfunction, renal and endocrine disorders, diuretic use, and aging. Extracellular potassium influences HERG channel inactivation and can alter block of HERG by some drugs. However, block of HERG by a number of drugs is not sensitive to extracellular potassium. In this study, we show that block of WT HERG by bepridil and terfenadine, two drugs previously shown to be trapped inside the HERG channel after the channel closes, is insensitive to extracellular potassium over the range of 0 mM to 20 mM. We also show that bepridil block of the HERG mutant D540K, a mutant channel that is unable to trap drugs, is dependent on extracellular potassium, correlates with the permeant ion, and is independent of HERG inactivation. These results suggest that the lack of extracellular potassium dependency of block of HERG by some drugs may in part be related to the ability of these drugs to be trapped inside the channel after the channel closes.

  2. Histamine H3-receptor inverse agonists as novel antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chihiro

    2009-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) that is resistant to treatment with dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists may involve changes other than those in the dopaminergic system. Recently, histamine (HA), which regulates arousal and cognitive functions, has been suggested to act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Four HA receptors-H1, H2, H3, and H4-have been identified. Our recent basic and clinical studies revealed that brain HA improved the symptoms of SZ. The H3 receptor is primarily localized in the central nervous system, and it acts not only as a presynaptic autoreceptor that modulates the HA release but also as a presynaptic heteroreceptor that regulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as monoamines and amino acids. H3-receptor inverse agonists have been considered to improve cognitive functions. Many atypical antipsychotics are H3-receptor antagonists. Imidazole-containing H3-receptor inverse agonists inhibit not only cytochrome P450 but also hERG potassium channels (encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene). Several imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists also have high affinity for H4 receptors, which are expressed at high levels in mast cells and leukocytes. Clozapine is an H4-receptor agonist; this agonist activity may be related to the serious side effect of agranulocytosis caused by clozapine. Therefore, selective non-imidazole H3-receptor inverse agonists can be considered as novel antipsychotics that may improve refractory SZ.

  3. A novel splice mutation of HERG in a Chinese family with long QT syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Yun-peng; XIE Xu-dong; WANG Xing-xiang; CHEN Jun-zhu; ZHU Jian-hua; TAO Qian-min; ZHENG Liang-rong

    2005-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetically heterogeneous disease in which six ion-channel genes have been identified. The phenotype-genotype relationships of the HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) mutations are not fully understood. The objective of this study is to identify the underlying genetic basis of a Chinese family with LQTS and to characterize the clinical manifestations properties of the mutation. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses were conducted on DNA fragments amplified by polymerase chain reaction from five LQT-related genes. Aberrant conformers were analyzed by DNA sequencing. A novel splice mutation in C-terminus of HERG was identified in this Chinese LQTS family,leading to the deletion of 11-bp at the acceptor splice site of Exon9 [Exon9 IVS del (-12→-2)]. The mutation might affect,through deficient splicing, the putative cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of the HERG K+ channel. This mutation resulted in a mildly affected phenotype. Only the proband had a history of syncopes, while the other three individuals with long QT interval had no symptoms. Two other mutation carriers displayed normal phenotype. No sudden death occurred in the family. The 4 affected individuals and the two silent mutation carriers were all heterozygous for the mutation. It is the first splice mutation of HERG reported in Chinese LQTS families. Clinical data suggest that the CNBD mutation may be less malignant than mutations occurring in the pore region and be partially dominant over wild-type function.

  4. Fast rule-based bioactivity prediction using associative classification mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Pulan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Relating chemical features to bioactivities is critical in molecular design and is used extensively in the lead discovery and optimization process. A variety of techniques from statistics, data mining and machine learning have been applied to this process. In this study, we utilize a collection of methods, called associative classification mining (ACM, which are popular in the data mining community, but so far have not been applied widely in cheminformatics. More specifically, classification based on predictive association rules (CPAR, classification based on multiple association rules (CMAR and classification based on association rules (CBA are employed on three datasets using various descriptor sets. Experimental evaluations on anti-tuberculosis (antiTB, mutagenicity and hERG (the human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene blocker datasets show that these three methods are computationally scalable and appropriate for high speed mining. Additionally, they provide comparable accuracy and efficiency to the commonly used Bayesian and support vector machines (SVM methods, and produce highly interpretable models.

  5. Unsolved issues related to human mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombès, Anne; Auré, Karine; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Gilleron, Mylène; Jardel, Claude

    2014-05-01

    Human mitochondrial diseases, defined as the diseases due to a mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defect, represent a large group of very diverse diseases with respect to phenotype and genetic causes. They present with many unsolved issues, the comprehensive analysis of which is beyond the scope of this review. We here essentially focus on the mechanisms underlying the diversity of targeted tissues, which is an important component of the large panel of these diseases phenotypic expression. The reproducibility of genotype/phenotype expression, the presence of modifying factors, and the potential causes for the restricted pattern of tissular expression are reviewed. Special emphasis is made on heteroplasmy, a specific feature of mitochondrial diseases, defined as the coexistence within the cell of mutant and wild type mitochondrial DNA molecules. Its existence permits unequal segregation during mitoses of the mitochondrial DNA populations and consequently heterogeneous tissue distribution of the mutation load. The observed tissue distributions of recurrent human mitochondrial DNA deleterious mutations are diverse but reproducible for a given mutation demonstrating that the segregation is not a random process. Its extent and mechanisms remain essentially unknown despite recent advances obtained in animal models.

  6. Human milk and related oligosaccharides as prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, Daniela; Rastall, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are believed to have a range of biological activities beyond providing nutrition to the infant. Principal among these is that they may act as prebiotics. Prebiotics are dietary ingredients, usually oligosaccharides that provide a health benefit to the host mediated by the modulation of the human gut microbiota. While it is clear that such oligosaccharides may have potential applications in infants and adults alike, this potential is limited by the difficulties in manufacturing HMO. Consequently functional alternatives such as galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) are under investigation. GOS are produced enzymatically from lactose for commercial use in food applications--including addition to infant formulae--as similar to breast milk oligosaccharides, they encourage a gut bacteria population that promotes health and reduces the incidence of intestinal infections. New methods for separation and concentration of complex, breast milk-like oligosaccharides from bovine milk industrial streams that contain only low amounts of these valuable oligosaccharides are providing the opportunity to investigate other viable sources of specific oligosaccharides for use as prebiotics in supplements or food products.

  7. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore); Kang, CongBao, E-mail: cbkang@etc.a-star.edu.sg [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} The N-terminal domain (NTD, eag domain) containing 135 residues of hERG was expressed and purified from E. coli cells. {yields} Solution structure of NTD was determined with NMR spectroscopy. {yields} The alpha-helical region (residues 13-23) was demonstrated to possess the characteristics of an amphipathic helix. {yields} NMR titration confirmed the interaction between NTD and the peptide from the S4-S5 linker. -- Abstract: The human Ether-a-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  8. Mutations within the S4-S5 linker alter voltage sensor constraints in hERG K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyke, Aaron C; Rezazadeh, Saman; Snopkowski, Mischa; Shi, Patrick; Allard, Charlene R; Claydon, Tom W

    2010-11-03

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel gating is associated with slow activation, yet the mechanistic basis for this is unclear. Here, we examine the effects of mutation of a unique glycine residue (G546) in the S4-S5 linker on voltage sensor movement and its coupling to pore gating. Substitution of G546 with residues possessing different physicochemical properties shifted activation gating by ∼-50 mV (with the exception of G546C). With the activation shift taken into account, the time constant of activation was also accelerated, suggesting a stabilization of the closed state by ∼1.6-4.3 kcal/mol (the energy equivalent of one to two hydrogen bonds). Predictions of the α-helical content of the S4-S5 linker suggest that the presence of G546 in wild-type hERG provides flexibility to the helix. Deactivation gating was affected differentially by the G546 substitutions. G546V induced a pronounced slow component of closing that was voltage-independent. Fluorescence measurements of voltage sensor movement in G546V revealed a slow component of voltage sensor return that was uncoupled from charge movement, suggesting a direct effect of the mutation on voltage sensor movement. These data suggest that G546 plays a critical role in channel gating and that hERG channel closing involves at least two independently modifiable reconfigurations of the voltage sensor.

  9. Modulating effect of ginseng saponins on heterologously expressed HERG currents in Xenopus oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuk-seong KIM; Sook-jin SON; Hyo-shin KIM; Yong-duk KIM; Kyu-seung LEE; Byeong-hwa JEON; Kwang-jin KIM; Jin-kyu PARK; Jin-bong PARK

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effects of ginseng saponins on the heterologously expressed human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) that encodes the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K+ channel. Methods: A two-electrode voltage clamp tech nique was used. HERG currents were recorded in Xenopus oocytes injected with HERG cRNA. Results: Crude saponins of Korean red ginseng (GS) induced a minimal increase of the maximal HERG conductance without changes in the voltage-dependent HERG current activation and inactivation curves. GS, however,decelerated HERG current deactivation in a concentration-dependent manner,which was more noticeable with panaxitriol (PT) than panaxidiol (PD). Consistently,ginseng saponins increased the HERG deactivation time constants with the order of potency of Rg1 (a major component of PT)>Rf 1>Rb1 (a major component of PD).Re had little effect on HERG deactivation. During a cardiac action Potential, GS increased the outward HERG current. Conclusion: Ginseng saponins enhance HERG currents, which could be in part a possible mechanism of the shortening cardiac action potential of ginseng saponins.

  10. Ubiquitination-dependent quality control of hERG K+ channel with acquired and inherited conformational defect at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaja, Pirjo M; Foo, Brian; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Valinsky, William C; Barriere, Herve; Atanasiu, Roxana; Ficker, Eckhard; Lukacs, Gergely L; Shrier, Alvin

    2013-12-01

    Membrane trafficking in concert with the peripheral quality control machinery plays a critical role in preserving plasma membrane (PM) protein homeostasis. Unfortunately, the peripheral quality control may also dispose of partially or transiently unfolded polypeptides and thereby contribute to the loss-of-expression phenotype of conformational diseases. Defective functional PM expression of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channel leads to the prolongation of the ventricular action potential that causes long QT syndrome 2 (LQT2), with increased propensity for arrhythmia and sudden cardiac arrest. LQT2 syndrome is attributed to channel biosynthetic processing defects due to mutation, drug-induced misfolding, or direct channel blockade. Here we provide evidence that a peripheral quality control mechanism can contribute to development of the LQT2 syndrome. We show that PM hERG structural and metabolic stability is compromised by the reduction of extracellular or intracellular K(+) concentration. Cardiac glycoside-induced intracellular K(+) depletion conformationally impairs the complex-glycosylated channel, which provokes chaperone- and C-terminal Hsp70-interacting protein-dependent polyubiquitination, accelerated internalization, and endosomal sorting complex required for transport-dependent lysosomal degradation. A similar mechanism contributes to the down-regulation of PM hERG harboring LQT2 missense mutations, with incomplete secretion defect. These results suggest that PM quality control plays a determining role in the loss-of-expression phenotype of hERG in certain hereditary and acquired LTQ2 syndromes.

  11. Proline Scan of the hERG Channel S6 Helix Reveals the Location of the Intracellular Pore Gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouta, Samrat; Sokolov, Stanislav; Abe, Yuki; Clark, Sheldon J.; Cheng, Yen M.; Claydon, Tom W.

    2014-01-01

    In Shaker-like channels, the activation gate is formed at the bundle crossing by the convergence of the inner S6 helices near a conserved proline-valine-proline motif, which introduces a kink that allows for electromechanical coupling with voltage sensor motions via the S4-S5 linker. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels lack the proline-valine-proline motif and the location of the intracellular pore gate and how it is coupled to S4 movement is less clear. Here, we show that proline substitutions within the S6 of hERG perturbed pore gate closure, trapping channels in the open state. Performing a proline scan of the inner S6 helix, from Ile655 to Tyr667 revealed that gate perturbation occurred with proximal (I655P-Q664P), but not distal (R665P-Y667P) substitutions, suggesting that Gln664 marks the position of the intracellular gate in hERG channels. Using voltage-clamp fluorimetry and gating current analysis, we demonstrate that proline substitutions trap the activation gate open by disrupting the coupling between the voltage-sensing unit and the pore of the channel. We characterize voltage sensor movement in one such trapped-open mutant channel and demonstrate the kinetics of what we interpret to be intrinsic hERG voltage sensor movement. PMID:24606930

  12. Fast stochastic simulation of biochemical reaction systems by alternative formulations of the chemical Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mélykúti, Bence; Burrage, Kevin; Zygalakis, Konstantinos C

    2010-04-28

    The Chemical Langevin Equation (CLE), which is a stochastic differential equation driven by a multidimensional Wiener process, acts as a bridge between the discrete stochastic simulation algorithm and the deterministic reaction rate equation when simulating (bio)chemical kinetics. The CLE model is valid in the regime where molecular populations are abundant enough to assume their concentrations change continuously, but stochastic fluctuations still play a major role. The contribution of this work is that we observe and explore that the CLE is not a single equation, but a parametric family of equations, all of which give the same finite-dimensional distribution of the variables. On the theoretical side, we prove that as many Wiener processes are sufficient to formulate the CLE as there are independent variables in the equation, which is just the rank of the stoichiometric matrix. On the practical side, we show that in the case where there are m(1) pairs of reversible reactions and m(2) irreversible reactions there is another, simple formulation of the CLE with only m(1) + m(2) Wiener processes, whereas the standard approach uses 2(m(1) + m(2)). We demonstrate that there are considerable computational savings when using this latter formulation. Such transformations of the CLE do not cause a loss of accuracy and are therefore distinct from model reduction techniques. We illustrate our findings by considering alternative formulations of the CLE for a human ether a-go-go related gene ion channel model and the Goldbeter-Koshland switch.

  13. A novel deletion-frameshift mutation in the S1 region of HERG gene in a Chinese family with long QT syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying; ZHANG Ping; LI Xue-bin; WU Cun-cao; GUO Ji-hong

    2013-01-01

    Background The congenital Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary cardiac channelopathy that is characterized by a prolonged QT interval,syncope,ventricular arrhythmias,and sudden death.The chromosome 7-linked type 2 congenital LQTS (LQT2) is caused by gene mutations in the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG).Methods A Chinese family diagnosed with LQTS were screened for KCNQ1,HERG and SCN5A,using polymerase chain reaction (PCR),direct sequencing,and clong sequencing.We also investigated the mRNA expression of the HERG gene.Results We identified a novel i414fs+98X mutation in the HERG gene.The deletion mutation of 14-bp in the first transmembrane segment (S1) introduced premature termination codons (PTCs) at the end of exon 6.This mutation would result in a serious phenotype if the truncated proteins co-assembled with normal subunit to form the defective channels.But only the proband was symptomatic.Conclusions We found that the mRNA level of the HERG gene was significantly lower in 1414fs+98X carriers than in noncarriers.We found a novel 1414fs+98X mutation.The mRNA level supports that NMD mechanism might regulate the novel mutation.

  14. Rapid component I(Kr) of cardiac delayed rectifier potassium currents in guinea-pig is inhibited by alpha(1)-adrenoreceptor activation via protein kinase A and protein kinase C-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Xu, Dong-Jie; Cai, Jing-Bo; Huang, Yuan-Zhu; Zou, Jian-Gang; Cao, Ke-Jiang

    2009-04-17

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias are often precipitated by physical or emotional stress, indicating a link between increased adrenergic stimulation and cardiac ion channel activity. Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) potassium channels conduct the rapid component of delayed rectifier potassium current, I(kr), a crucial component for action potential repolarization. To evaluate the correlation between increased alpha(1)-adrenergic activity and the rapid component of cardiac I(kr), whole-cell patch-clamp recording was performed in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. Stimulation of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors using phenylephrine (0.1 nM-100 microM) reduced I(kr) current in a dose-dependent manner at 37 degrees C. Phenylephrine (0.1 microM) reduced I(kr) current to 66.83+/-3.16%. Chelerythrine (1 microM), a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) completely inhibited the changes in I(kr) trigged by 0.1 microM phenylephrine. KT5720 (2.5 microM), a specific inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA) partially inhibited the current decrease induced by 0.1 microM phenylephrine. Both chelerythrine and KT5720 drastically reduced the phenylephrine-induced effects, indicating possible involvement of PKC and PKA in the alpha(1)-adrenergic inhibition of I(kr). Our data suggest a link between I(kr) and the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor, involving activation of PKC and PKA in arrhythmogenesis.

  15. Structural insight into the transmembrane segments 3 and 4 of the hERG potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxin; Wong, Ying Lei; Ng, Hui Qi; Gayen, Shovanlal; Kang, CongBao

    2014-12-01

    The hERG (human ether-a-go-go related gene) potassium channel is a voltage-gated potassium channel containing an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane segment 4 (S4) is important for sensing changes of membrane potentials through positively charge residues. A construct containing partial S2-S3 linker, S3, S4 and the S4-S5 linker of the hERG channel was purified into detergent micelles. This construct exhibits good quality NMR spectrum when it was purified in lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (LMPG) micelles. Structural study showed that S3 contains two short helices with a negatively charged surface. The S4 and S4-S5 linker adopt helical structures. The six positively charged residues in S4 localize at different sides, suggesting that they may have different functions in channel gating. Relaxation studies indicated that S3 is more flexible than S4. The boundaries of S3-S4 and S4-S4-S5 linker were identified. Our results provided structural information of the S3 and S4, which will be helpful to understand their roles in channel gating.

  16. Effect of terfenadine and pentamidine on the HERG channel and its intracellular trafficking: combined analysis with automated voltage clamp and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hikaru; Takahashi, Yukiko; Hamaguchi, Shogo; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Oka, Takayuki; Nishio, Masato; Ohtsuki, Atsushi; Namekata, Iyuki

    2014-01-01

    The effects of terfenadine and pentamidine on the human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel current and its intracellular trafficking were evaluated. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-linked hERG channels were expressed in HEK293 cells, and the membrane current was measured by an automated whole cell voltage clamp system. To evaluate drug effects on channel trafficking to the cell membrane, the fraction of channel present on the cell membrane was quantified by current measurement after drug washout and confocal microscopy. Terfenadine directly blocked the hERG channel current but had no effect on trafficking of hERG channels to the cell membrane after application in culture medium for 2 d. In contrast, pentamidine had no direct effect on the hERG channel current but reduced trafficking of hERG channels. The two drugs inhibited hERG channel function through different mechanisms: terfenadine through direct channel blockade and pentamidine through inhibition of channel trafficking to the cell membrane. Combined use of automated voltage clamp and confocal microscopic analyses would provide insights into the mechanisms of drug-induced QT-prolongation and arrhythmogenesis.

  17. Teacher Leader Human Relations Skills: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 142 graduate school teachers working in schools throughout southwestern Ohio assessed their human relation skills. A human relations survey was used for the study, and results were compared with colleagues assessing the teachers in the study. The survey was developed using a Likert-type scale, and was based on key elements affecting…

  18. A Human Relations Approach to the Practice of Educational Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebore, Ronald W.

    This book centers on the human-relation skills and knowledge that educational leaders need to lead public schools effectively. The purpose of the book is to help administrators and those studying to become administrators enhance their human-relations skills. The content and method of this book are centered on the first four of the six Interstate…

  19. Teacher Leader Human Relations Skills: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 142 graduate school teachers working in schools throughout southwestern Ohio assessed their human relation skills. A human relations survey was used for the study, and results were compared with colleagues assessing the teachers in the study. The survey was developed using a Likert-type scale, and was based on key elements affecting…

  20. Cyborg intentionality : rethinking the phenomenology of human- technology relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Peter P.C.C.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the types of intentionality involved in human-technology relations. It aims to augment Don Ihde's analysis of the relations between human beings and technological artifacts, by analyzing a number of concrete examples at the limits of Ihde's analysis. The article

  1. Biomarkers related to aging in human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, Eileen; Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Kim, Jung Ki; Alley, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Biomarkers are increasingly employed in empirical studies of human populations to understand physiological processes that change with age, diseases whose onset appears linked to age, and the aging process itself. In this chapter, we describe some of the most commonly used biomarkers in population aging research, including their collection, associations with other markers, and relationships to health outcomes. We discuss biomarkers of the cardiovascular system, metabolic processes, inflammation, activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and organ functioning (including kidney, lung, and heart). In addition, we note that markers of functioning of the central nervous system and genetic markers are now becoming part of population measurement. Where possible, we detail interrelationships between these markers by providing correlations between high risk levels of each marker from three population-based surveys: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III, NHANES 1999-2002, and the MacArthur Study of Successful Aging. NHANES III is used instead of NHANES 1999-2002 when specific markers of interest are available only in NHANES III and when we examine the relationship of biomarkers to mortality which is only known for NHANES III. We also describe summary measures combining biomarkers across systems. Finally, we examine associations between individual markers and mortality and provide information about biomarkers of growing interest for future research in population aging and health.

  2. Humans, Animals and Robots: A Phenomenological Approach to Human-Robot Relations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that our understanding of many human-robot relations can be enhanced by comparisons with human-animal relations and by a phenomenological approach which highlights the significance of how robots appear to humans. Some potential gains of this approach are explored by discussing the

  3. Human Auditory Processing: Insights from Cortical Event-related Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra P. Key

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human communication and language skills rely heavily on the ability to detect and process auditory inputs. This paper reviews possible applications of the event-related potential (ERP technique to the study of cortical mechanisms supporting human auditory processing, including speech stimuli. Following a brief introduction to the ERP methodology, the remaining sections focus on demonstrating how ERPs can be used in humans to address research questions related to cortical organization, maturation and plasticity, as well as the effects of sensory deprivation, and multisensory interactions. The review is intended to serve as a primer for researchers interested in using ERPs for the study of the human auditory system.

  4. Therapy of Human Papillomavirus-Related Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Peter L.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Hampson, Ian N.; Broker, Thomas; Fiander, Alison; Lacey, Charles J.; Kitchener, Henry C.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    and broad systemic HPV-specific T cell response and modulation of key local immune factors. Treatments that can shift the balance of immune effectors locally in combination with vaccination are now being tested. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled “Opportunities for comprehensive control of HPV infections and related diseases” Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement X, 2012. PMID:23199967

  5. International Human Rights Mechanism and Construction of Harmonious Human Rights Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU JIE

    2007-01-01

    @@ The international human rights mechanism is a product of the pursuit for peace and justice of the human society. As the core values of the international human rights mechanism, the universal human rights standards provide the international community with a basic path of human rights development in different countries. In recent years a limited few of countries have utilized the universal human rights standards to promote their own strategic wills, and interfere in the sovereignty and domestic affairs of other countries with the excuse of human rights.However, the establishment and improvement of the human rights mechanism provide an institutional mode and path for the promotion of equality, dialog, and cooperation in the human rights issues of all countries. In addition, the establishment and improvement of the human rights mechanism also benefit the construction of harmonious human rights relations in a faster pace on the precondition of respect for national sovereignty by the international community.

  6. Genomic signatures of diet-related shifts during human origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Warner, Lisa R; Fedrigo, Olivier; Wall, Christine E; Wray, Gregory A

    2011-04-07

    There are numerous anthropological analyses concerning the importance of diet during human evolution. Diet is thought to have had a profound influence on the human phenotype, and dietary differences have been hypothesized to contribute to the dramatic morphological changes seen in modern humans as compared with non-human primates. Here, we attempt to integrate the results of new genomic studies within this well-developed anthropological context. We then review the current evidence for adaptation related to diet, both at the level of sequence changes and gene expression. Finally, we propose some ways in which new technologies can help identify specific genomic adaptations that have resulted in metabolic and morphological differences between humans and non-human primates.

  7. Baboons, like humans, solve analogy by categorical abstraction of relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Timothy M; Thompson, Roger K R; Fagot, Joël

    2013-05-01

    Reasoning by analogy is one of the most complex and highly adaptive cognitive processes in abstract thinking. For humans, analogical reasoning entails the judgment and conceptual mapping of relations-between-relations and is facilitated by language (Gentner in Cogn Sci 7:155-170, 1983; Premack in Thought without language, Oxford University Press, New York, 1986). Recent evidence, however, shows that monkeys like "language-trained" apes exhibit similar capacity to match relations-between-relations (Fagot and Thompson in Psychol Sci 22:1304-1309, 2011; Flemming et al. in J Exp Psychol: Anim Behav Process 37:353-360, 2011; Truppa et al. in Plos One 6(8):e23809, 2011). Whether this behavior is driven by the abstraction of categorical relations or alternatively by direct perception of variability (entropy) is crucial to the debate as to whether nonhuman animals are capable of analogical reasoning. In the current study, we presented baboons (Papio papio) and humans (Homo sapiens) with a computerized same/different relational-matching task that in principle could be solved by either strategy. Both baboons and humans produced markedly similar patterns of responding. Both species responded different when the perceptual variability of a stimulus array fell exactly between or even closer to that of a same display. Overall, these results demonstrate that categorical abstraction trumped perceptual properties and, like humans, Old World monkeys can solve the analogical matching task by judging the categorical abstract equivalence of same/different relations-between-relations.

  8. Human evolution and osteoporosis-related spinal fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan M Cotter

    Full Text Available The field of evolutionary medicine examines the possibility that some diseases are the result of trade-offs made in human evolution. Spinal fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fracture in humans, but are not observed in apes, even in cases of severe osteopenia. In humans, the development of osteoporosis is influenced by peak bone mass and strength in early adulthood as well as age-related bone loss. Here, we examine the structural differences in the vertebral bodies (the portion of the vertebra most commonly involved in osteoporosis-related fractures between humans and apes before age-related bone loss occurs. Vertebrae from young adult humans and chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and gibbons (T8 vertebrae, n = 8-14 per species, male and female, humans: 20-40 years of age were examined to determine bone strength (using finite element models, bone morphology (external shape, and trabecular microarchitecture (micro-computed tomography. The vertebrae of young adult humans are not as strong as those from apes after accounting for body mass (p<0.01. Human vertebrae are larger in size (volume, cross-sectional area, height than in apes with a similar body mass. Young adult human vertebrae have significantly lower trabecular bone volume fraction (0.26±0.04 in humans and 0.37±0.07 in apes, mean ± SD, p<0.01 and thinner vertebral shells than apes (after accounting for body mass, p<0.01. Since human vertebrae are more porous and weaker than those in apes in young adulthood (after accounting for bone mass, even modest amounts of age-related bone loss may lead to vertebral fracture in humans, while in apes, larger amounts of bone loss would be required before a vertebral fracture becomes likely. We present arguments that differences in vertebral bone size and shape associated with reduced bone strength in humans is linked to evolutionary adaptations associated with bipedalism.

  9. Professional and veterinary competencies: addressing human relations and the human-animal bond in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cindy L; Conlon, Peter D; Long, Kendra C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and degree of coverage of human relations and the human-animal bond in veterinary curricula across North America. The attitudes and opinions of a cohort of veterinary students and alumni about human relations skills and human-animal bond training in the veterinary program was also investigated. Twenty veterinary schools across North America were contacted and data were collected regarding their coverage of human relations and the human-animal bond in the curriculum. A survey was developed to measure attitudes and opinions about this type of training. The survey was disseminated to students in years 1 to 4 and alumni from the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC). Data were analyzed descriptively. Based on availability of contact people, 20 schools in North America were contacted, and all participated in the study. Each of the veterinary schools surveyed has incorporated strategies for teaching human relations skills through required courses, electives, guest speakers, and/or community service programs. The overall participation rate for OVC students was 53%. Ninety-nine percent of all students surveyed agreed that their ability to deal with people using effective human relations skills was a concern, and all students said they would like to receive more training in this area. There was a 41% participation rate for OVC alumni. Fifty-five percent of alumni said they had learned enough in the veterinary program to employ effective human relations skills in practice, yet 65% felt they had not received enough instruction in addressing the human-animal bond specifically. It is apparent that veterinary schools recognize the need to prepare entry-level practitioners to deal with the human-animal bond and with human relations. It is also evident that students and practitioners value receiving information of this nature in the curriculum and desire further training. Specific learning objectives for veterinary curricula have

  10. Klotho is a serum factor related to human aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖能明; 张焱明; 郑权; 顾军

    2004-01-01

    Background Does klotho (KL) protein exist in human serum, and is there any correlation between KL protein in serum with human aging? In order to answer those questions, we identified KL protein in human serum and established the correlation between KL protein in human serum and aging.Methods We prepared a polyclonal antibody against human KL protein that was able to recognize the C-terminal of human secreted KL protein. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to identify KL protein in human serum.Results In Western blot, the antibody specifically recognized a 60-kD KL protein in both human and mice serum. The population aged from 0 to 91 years screened by ELISA revealed that the level of serum KL declined while age increased, though each individual level was variable and that the trend of decreasing in serum KL had no difference in sex.Conclusion Our data suggest that KL is a serum factor related to human aging.

  11. Second-order relational manipulations affect both humans and monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph D Dahl

    Full Text Available Recognition and individuation of conspecifics by their face is essential for primate social cognition. This ability is driven by a mechanism that integrates the appearance of facial features with subtle variations in their configuration (i.e., second-order relational properties into a holistic representation. So far, there is little evidence of whether our evolutionary ancestors show sensitivity to featural spatial relations and hence holistic processing of faces as shown in humans. Here, we directly compared macaques with humans in their sensitivity to configurally altered faces in upright and inverted orientations using a habituation paradigm and eye tracking technologies. In addition, we tested for differences in processing of conspecific faces (human faces for humans, macaque faces for macaques and non-conspecific faces, addressing aspects of perceptual expertise. In both species, we found sensitivity to second-order relational properties for conspecific (expert faces, when presented in upright, not in inverted, orientation. This shows that macaques possess the requirements for holistic processing, and thus show similar face processing to that of humans.

  12. Similarity or dissimilarity in the relations between human service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruynooghe, Kevin; Verhaeghe, Mieke; Bracke, Piet

    2008-01-01

    Exchange theory and homophily theory give rise to counteracting expectations for the interaction between human service organizations. Based on arguments of exchange theory, more interaction is expected between dissimilar organizations having complementary resources. Based on arguments of homophily theory, organizations having similar characteristics are expected to interact more. Interorganizational relations between human service organizations in two regional networks in Flanders are examined in this study. Results indicate that human service organizations tend to cooperate more with similar organizations as several homophily effects but not one effect of dissimilarity were found to be significant. The results of this study contribute to the understanding of interorganizational networks of human service organizations and have implications for the development of integrated care.

  13. Relational adaptivity - enacting human-centric systems design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve

    2016-01-01

    Human centered design approaches places the experiencing human at the center of concern, situated in relation to the dynamics of the environmental condition and the variables of the system of control and sensing. Taking the approach of enacted design methods to enforce the experience...... of the inhabitant as core in human-centered design solutions, the intelligence of the connected sensors is suggested to be developed as an actual learning and self-adjusting adaptive environment, where the adaptive system is part of a negotiation with users on the qualities of the environment. We will present...... and activity, driven by detailed encounters with human centered investigations and experiential accounts. The sensor system is a test environment, using a very elaborate system design to enable extensive variations in the sensor and network parameters. But, the suggestion is, that by using this kind of high...

  14. The Reconfigured Body. Human-animal relations in xenotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Hansson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explores issues concerning the reconfiguration of human and animal bodies in modern biotechnology. The examples are based on xenotransplantation: Transplantation of cells, tissue and organs from animals to humans. Three thematic issues that emerged from xenotransplantation research in Sweden in the 1990s and early 2000s are examined in the article. The first issue concerns how the pig was introduced as a donor animal in xenotransplantation and, at the same time, dehumanized in relation to what is human. Baboons and chimpanzees that had previously been used in xenotransplantation now became an ethically problematic choice, and were in stead humanized. The second issue concerns the introduction of transgenic and cloned pigs as commoditized objects. The biotechnological development reconfigured the pig’s cells, tissue and organs to become more human-like. The third issue concerns the risk that pigs contain retrovirus that could infect the transplanted patients. The human body became part of a network of both animal and retrovirus. Boundlessness between human and animal bodies appears in these three thematic phases and is analysed from a cultural perspective.

  15. Neurolinguistic Relativity: How Language Flexes Human Perception and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    The time has come, perhaps, to go beyond merely acknowledging that language is a core manifestation of the workings of the human mind and that it relates interactively to all aspects of thinking. The issue, thus, is not to decide whether language and human thought may be ineluctably linked (they just are), but rather to determine what the characteristics of this relationship may be and to understand how language influences-and may be influenced by-nonverbal information processing. In an attempt to demystify linguistic relativity, I review neurolinguistic studies from our research group showing a link between linguistic distinctions and perceptual or conceptual processing. On the basis of empirical evidence showing effects of terminology on perception, language-idiosyncratic relationships in semantic memory, grammatical skewing of event conceptualization, and unconscious modulation of executive functioning by verbal input, I advocate a neurofunctional approach through which we can systematically explore how languages shape human thought.

  16. Human Relations: The Cornerstone of a Roeper Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Lori A.; Nichols, Susannah

    2016-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of a moral philosophy curriculum originally taught by George A. Roeper in the earliest years of The Roeper School. The first author, a student at The Roeper School in the 1960s and 1970s, describes the impact of the class George Roeper called "Human Relations" on her life. Returning to the School as a…

  17. Ours is human: on the pervasiveness of infra-humanization in intergroup relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladino, Maria-Paola; Vaes, Jeroen

    2009-06-01

    Both at a conceptual and an empirical level, infra-humanization has been put on par with the relative greater attribution of uniquely human emotions to the in-group, assuming that a group's humanity is exclusively a matter of having uniquely human characteristics. In the present research we suggest that people also adopt another strategy to infra-humanize the out-group by considering those aspects that characterize and differentiate the in-group from the out-group as more uniquely human. In three studies, characteristics presented as typical of the in-group and the out-group were judged on a not uniquely human-uniquely human dimension. In addition to humanity, in Study 3 participants judged in-group and out-group characteristics also on an evaluative dimension. Consistent with the hypothesis, participants judged in-group characteristics as more human than those of the out-group, independent of their valence. The implications of these results for infra-humanization theory are discussed.

  18. Principle of relative positioning of structures in the human body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Buliang Meng; Ailan Pang; Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    The arrangement of various biological structures should generally ensure the safety of crucial structures and increase their working efficiency; however, other principles governing the relative positions of structures in humans have not been reported. The present study therefore investigated other principles using nerves and their companion vessels in the human body as an example. Nerves and blood vessels usually travel together and in the most direct way towards their targets. Human embryology, histology, and gross anatomy suggest that there are many possible positions for these structures during development. However, for mechanical reasons, tougher or stronger structures should take priority. Nerves are tougher than most other structures, followed by arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. Nerves should therefore follow the most direct route, and be followed by the arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. This general principle should be applicable to all living things.

  19. Principle of relative positioning of structures in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Buliang; Pang, Ailan; Li, Ming

    2013-03-25

    The arrangement of various biological structures should generally ensure the safety of crucial structures and increase their working efficiency; however, other principles governing the relative positions of structures in humans have not been reported. The present study therefore investigated other principles using nerves and their companion vessels in the human body as an example. Nerves and blood vessels usually travel together and in the most direct way towards their targets. Human embryology, histology, and gross anatomy suggest that there are many possible positions for these structures during development. However, for mechanical reasons, tougher or stronger structures should take priority. Nerves are tougher than most other structures, followed by arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. Nerves should therefore follow the most direct route, and be followed by the arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. This general principle should be applicable to all living things.

  20. Rapidly quantifying the relative distention of a human bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companion, John A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Mineo, Beth A. (Inventor); Cavalier, Albert R. (Inventor); Blalock, Travis N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A device and method was developed to rapidly quantify the relative distention of the bladder of a human subject. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned on the human subject near the bladder. A microprocessor controlled pulser excites the transducer by sending an acoustic wave into the human subject. This wave interacts with the bladder walls and is reflected back to the ultrasonic transducer where it is received, amplified, and processed by the receiver. The resulting signal is digitized by an analog to digital converter, controlled by the microprocessor again, and is stored in data memory. The software in the microprocessor determines the relative distention of the bladder as a function of the propagated ultrasonic energy. Based on programmed scientific measurements and the human subject's past history as contained in program memory, the microprocessor sends out a signal to turn on any or all of the available alarms. The alarm system includes and audible alarm, the visible alarm, the tactile alarm, and the remote wireless alarm.

  1. A Synthesis of Human-related Avian Mortality in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Calvert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many human activities in Canada kill wild birds, yet the relative magnitude of mortality from different sources and the consequent effects on bird populations have not been systematically evaluated. We synthesize recent estimates of avian mortality in Canada from a range of industrial and other human activities, to provide context for the estimates from individual sources presented in this special feature. We assessed the geographic, seasonal, and taxonomic variation in the magnitude of national-scale mortality and in population-level effects on species or groups across Canada, by combining these estimates into a stochastic model of stage-specific mortality. The range of estimates of avian mortality from each source covers several orders of magnitude, and, numerically, landbirds were the most affected group. In total, we estimate that approximately 269 million birds and 2 million nests are destroyed annually in Canada, the equivalent of over 186 million breeding individuals. Combined, cat predation and collisions with windows, vehicles, and transmission lines caused > 95% of all mortality; the highest industrial causes of mortality were the electrical power and agriculture sectors. Other mortality sources such as fisheries bycatch can have important local or species-specific impacts, but are relatively small at a national scale. Mortality rates differed across species and families within major bird groups, highlighting that mortality is not simply proportional to abundance. We also found that mortality is not evenly spread across the country; the largest mortality sources are coincident with human population distribution, while industrial sources are concentrated in southern Ontario, Alberta, and southwestern British Columbia. Many species are therefore likely to be vulnerable to cumulative effects of multiple human-related impacts. This assessment also confirms the high uncertainty in estimating human-related avian mortality in terms of species

  2. Representation of stable social dominance relations by human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, Olivier; Csibra, Gergely

    2012-05-01

    What are the origins of humans' capacity to represent social relations? We approached this question by studying human infants' understanding of social dominance as a stable relation. We presented infants with interactions between animated agents in conflict situations. Studies 1 and 2 targeted expectations of stability of social dominance. They revealed that 15-mo-olds (and, to a lesser extent, 12-mo-olds) expect an asymmetric relationship between two agents to remain stable from one conflict to another. To do so, infants need to infer that one of the agents (the dominant) will consistently prevail when her goals conflict with those of the other (the subordinate). Study 3 and 4 targeted the format of infants' representation of social dominance. In these studies, we found that 12- and 15-mo-olds did not extend their expectations of dominance to unobserved relationships, even when they could have been established by transitive inference. These results suggest that infants' expectation of stability originates from their representation of social dominance as a relationship between two agents rather than as an individual property. Infants' demonstrated understanding of social dominance reflects the cognitive underpinning of humans' capacity to represent social relations, which may be evolutionarily ancient, and may be shared with nonhuman species.

  3. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  4. Plasticity of the human auditory cortex related to musical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, Christo; Herholz, Sibylle C

    2011-11-01

    During the last decades music neuroscience has become a rapidly growing field within the area of neuroscience. Music is particularly well suited for studying neuronal plasticity in the human brain because musical training is more complex and multimodal than most other daily life activities, and because prospective and professional musicians usually pursue the training with high and long-lasting commitment. Therefore, music has increasingly been used as a tool for the investigation of human cognition and its underlying brain mechanisms. Music relates to many brain functions like perception, action, cognition, emotion, learning and memory and therefore music is an ideal tool to investigate how the human brain is working and how different brain functions interact. Novel findings have been obtained in the field of induced cortical plasticity by musical training. The positive effects, which music in its various forms has in the healthy human brain are not only important in the framework of basic neuroscience, but they also will strongly affect the practices in neuro-rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Carotid baroreceptor-muscle sympathetic relation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, R F; Eckberg, D L

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the relation between carotid distending pressure and muscle sympathetic activity in humans. Carotid baroreceptors of nine healthy subjects were compressed or stretched for 5 s with graded neck pressure or suction (+40 to -65 mmHg), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded. The results delineate several features of human baroreflex function. First, the carotid-muscle sympathetic relation is well described by an inverse sigmoid function. Second, a linear relation exists between carotid distending pressure and sympathetic outflow over a range of approximately 25 mmHg. Third, sympathetic responses to changes of carotid pressures are asymmetric; increases of sympathetic activity during carotid compression are much greater than reductions of sympathetic activity during carotid stretch. Fourth, at rest, normal subjects operate near the threshold level for sympathetic excitation. Thus the carotid-muscle sympathetic baroreflex is poised to oppose reductions more effectively than elevations of arterial pressure, and the range of pressures over which the reflex is active is wider than thought hitherto.

  6. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  7. [Human social activity under conditions of relative social isolation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhvatilov, A Iu

    1992-01-01

    The differences in using a "social isolation" concept in the psychological literature are presented. The term of "relative social isolation" is clarified. A relationship between human adaptation to the relative social isolation environments and the development of his social qualities and social activities is presented. The "social context", dictating motivation attitudes of a man to the isolation situation, emotional experiences, self-appraisal of activity is of crucial importance for evaluating the real environments of relative social isolations. Social activity of a personality is studied as the relations of a man with the conditions of his activity. The results of studying the dynamics of the psychic state of a man during individual and group isolation are compared. It is concluded that social activity of man and his functional state are interrelated. The particular manifestations and direction of the changes in the social activity of the subject depend on the duration of isolation and are determined first of all by social significance and meaningful and balanced work for a person as well as by the amount and frequency of direct and mediated social contacts under specific conditions of relative social isolation.

  8. Memory-related brain lateralisation in birds and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Sanne; Nicol, Alister U

    2015-03-01

    Visual imprinting in chicks and song learning in songbirds are prominent model systems for the study of the neural mechanisms of memory. In both systems, neural lateralisation has been found to be involved in memory formation. Although many processes in the human brain are lateralised--spatial memory and musical processing involves mostly right hemisphere dominance, whilst language is mostly left hemisphere dominant--it is unclear what the function of lateralisation is. It might enhance brain capacity, make processing more efficient, or prevent occurrence of conflicting signals. In both avian paradigms we find memory-related lateralisation. We will discuss avian lateralisation findings and propose that birds provide a strong model for studying neural mechanisms of memory-related lateralisation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Unified phase variables of relative degree two for human locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Dario J; Gregg, Robert D; Villarreal, Dario J; Gregg, Robert D; Gregg, Robert D; Villarreal, Dario J

    2016-08-01

    A starting point to achieve stable locomotion is synchronizing the leg joint kinematics during the gait cycle. Some biped robots parameterize a nonlinear controller (e.g., input-output feedback linearization) whose main objective is to track specific kinematic trajectories as a function of a single mechanical variable (i.e., a phase variable) in order to allow the robot to walk. A phase variable capable of parameterizing the entire gait cycle, the hip phase angle, has been used to control wearable robots and was recently shown to provide a robust representation of the phase of human gait. However, this unified phase variable relies on hip velocity, which is difficult to measure in real-time and prevents the use of derivative corrections in phase-based controllers for wearable robots. One derivative of this phase variable yields accelerations (i.e., the equations of motion), so the system is said to be relative degree-one. This means that there are states of the system that cannot be controlled. The goal of this paper is to offer relative degree-two alternatives to the hip phase angle and examine their robustness for parameterizing human gait.

  10. Discovery and characterization of 6-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)propoxy]phenyl}-2H-pyridazin-3-one (CEP-26401, irdabisant): a potent, selective histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudkins, Robert L; Raddatz, Rita; Tao, Ming; Mathiasen, Joanne R; Aimone, Lisa D; Becknell, Nadine C; Prouty, Catherine P; Knutsen, Lars J S; Yazdanian, Mehran; Moachon, Gilbert; Ator, Mark A; Mallamo, John P; Marino, Michael J; Bacon, Edward R; Williams, Michael

    2011-07-14

    Optimization of a novel series of pyridazin-3-one histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R) antagonists/inverse agonists identified 6-{4-[3-(R)-2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)propoxy]phenyl}-2H-pyridazin-3-one (8a, CEP-26401; irdabisant) as a lead candidate for potential use in the treatment of attentional and cognitive disorders. 8a had high affinity for both human (K(i) = 2.0 nM) and rat (K(i) = 7.2 nM) H(3)Rs with greater than 1000-fold selectivity over the hH(1)R, hH(2)R, and hH(4)R histamine receptor subtypes and against an in vitro panel of 418 G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, transporters, and enzymes. 8a demonstrated ideal pharmaceutical properties for a CNS drug in regard to water solubility, permeability and lipophilicity and had low binding to human plasma proteins. It weakly inhibited recombinant cytochrome P450 isoforms and human ether-a-go-go-related gene. 8a metabolism was minimal in rat, mouse, dog, and human liver microsomes, and it had good interspecies pharmacokinetic properties. 8a dose-dependently inhibited H(3)R agonist-induced dipsogenia in the rat (ED(50) = 0.06 mg/kg po). On the basis of its pharmacological, pharmaceutical, and safety profiles, 8a was selected for preclinical development. The clinical portions of the single and multiple ascending dose studies assessing safety and pharmacokinetics have been completed allowing for the initiation of a phase IIa for proof of concept.

  11. Economic burden of human papillomavirus-related diseases in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Baio

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human papilloma virus (HPV genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18 impose a substantial burden of direct costs on the Italian National Health Service that has never been quantified fully. The main objective of the present study was to address this gap: (1 by estimating the total direct medical costs associated with nine major HPV-related diseases, namely invasive cervical cancer, cervical dysplasia, cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and head and neck, anogenital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and (2 by providing an aggregate measure of the total economic burden attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infection. METHODS: For each of the nine conditions, we used available Italian secondary data to estimate the lifetime cost per case, the number of incident cases of each disease, the total economic burden, and the relative prevalence of HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, in order to estimate the aggregate fraction of the total economic burden attributable to HPV infection. RESULTS: The total direct costs (expressed in 2011 Euro associated with the annual incident cases of the nine HPV-related conditions included in the analysis were estimated to be €528.6 million, with a plausible range of €480.1-686.2 million. The fraction attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 was €291.0 (range €274.5-315.7 million, accounting for approximately 55% of the total annual burden of HPV-related disease in Italy. CONCLUSIONS: The results provided a plausible estimate of the significant economic burden imposed by the most prevalent HPV-related diseases on the Italian welfare system. The fraction of the total direct lifetime costs attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infections, and the economic burden of noncervical HPV-related diseases carried by men, were found to be cost drivers relevant to the making of informed decisions about future investments in programmes of HPV prevention.

  12. Inference of distant genetic relations in humans using "1000 genomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khudhair, Ahmed; Qiu, Shuhao; Wyse, Meghan; Chowdhury, Shilpi; Cheng, Xi; Bekbolsynov, Dulat; Saha-Mandal, Arnab; Dutta, Rajib; Fedorova, Larisa; Fedorov, Alexei

    2015-01-07

    Nucleotide sequence differences on the whole-genome scale have been computed for 1,092 people from 14 populations publicly available by the 1000 Genomes Project. Total number of differences in genetic variants between 96,464 human pairs has been calculated. The distributions of these differences for individuals within European, Asian, or African origin were characterized by narrow unimodal peaks with mean values of 3.8, 3.5, and 5.1 million, respectively, and standard deviations of 0.1-0.03 million. The total numbers of genomic differences between pairs of all known relatives were found to be significantly lower than their respective population means and in reverse proportion to the distance of their consanguinity. By counting the total number of genomic differences it is possible to infer familial relations for people that share down to 6% of common loci identical-by-descent. Detection of familial relations can be radically improved when only very rare genetic variants are taken into account. Counting of total number of shared very rare single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from whole-genome sequences allows establishing distant familial relations for persons with eighth and ninth degrees of relationship. Using this analysis we predicted 271 distant familial pairwise relations among 1,092 individuals that have not been declared by 1000 Genomes Project. Particularly, among 89 British and 97 Chinese individuals we found three British-Chinese pairs with distant genetic relationships. Individuals from these pairs share identical-by-descent DNA fragments that represent 0.001%, 0.004%, and 0.01% of their genomes. With affordable whole-genome sequencing techniques, very rare SNPs should become important genetic markers for familial relationships and population stratification. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Mitochondrial theory of aging in human age-related sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Gianni; De Lisio, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Understanding age-related sarcopenia and, more importantly, devising counterstrategies require an intimate knowledge of the underlying mechanism(s) of sarcopenia. The mitochondrial theory of aging (MTA) has been a leading theory on aging for the last decade; however, there is relatively little information from human tissue to support or rebut the involvement of the MTA in aging skeletal muscle. It is believed that mitochondria may contribute to sarcopenia in a stochastic fashion where regions of fibers containing dysfunctional mitochondria are forced to atrophy. Resistance exercise, a known hypertrophic stimulus, has been shown to improve the mitochondrial phenotype of aged skeletal muscle. Furthermore, activation of skeletal muscle stem cells by resistance exercise may attenuate sarcopenia in two ways. First by inducing nuclear addition to postmitotic fibers, and, second, by increasing the proportion of functional mitochondria donated by muscle stem cells in a process termed 'gene shifting'. In this chapter we review the evidence supporting the MTA, the potential to attenuate the MTA with a known hypertrophic stimuli and explore the role of muscle stem cells in gene shifting to determine the connection between mitochondrial dysfunction and age-related sarcopenia. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Modulation of hERG potassium channel gating normalizes action potential duration prolonged by dysfunctional KCNQ1 potassium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Yu, Haibo; Moretti, Alessandra; Wang, Xiaoying; Yan, Wei; Babcock, Joseph J.; Bellin, Milena; McManus, Owen B.; Tomaselli, Gordon; Nan, Fajun; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disease characterized by a prolonged QT interval in an electrocardiogram (ECG), leading to higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Among the 12 identified genes causal to heritable LQTS, ∼90% of affected individuals harbor mutations in either KCNQ1 or human ether-a-go-go related genes (hERG), which encode two repolarizing potassium currents known as IKs and IKr. The ability to quantitatively assess contributions of different current components is therefore important for investigating disease phenotypes and testing effectiveness of pharmacological modulation. Here we report a quantitative analysis by simulating cardiac action potentials of cultured human cardiomyocytes to match the experimental waveforms of both healthy control and LQT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) action potentials. The quantitative evaluation suggests that elevation of IKr by reducing voltage sensitivity of inactivation, not via slowing of deactivation, could more effectively restore normal QT duration if IKs is reduced. Using a unique specific chemical activator for IKr that has a primary effect of causing a right shift of V1/2 for inactivation, we then examined the duration changes of autonomous action potentials from differentiated human cardiomyocytes. Indeed, this activator causes dose-dependent shortening of the action potential durations and is able to normalize action potentials of cells of patients with LQT1. In contrast, an IKr chemical activator of primary effects in slowing channel deactivation was not effective in modulating action potential durations. Our studies provide both the theoretical basis and experimental support for compensatory normalization of action potential duration by a pharmacological agent. PMID:22745159

  15. Moral Problem of Suicide and its Relation to Human Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Liliana Lacramioara

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The thesis treats the problem of suicide by putting it in relation to the individual freedom of human. I will concentrate on just a few problems which target to attempt to offer an answer to the themeabove mentioned. To achieve the purpose I use different opinions and theories regarding theme in question which demonstrates that the theme has been treated thoroughly and also by prominent authors like G. Minois, E. Cioran, A. Schopenhauer or Paul-Ludwig Landsberg. We were asking ourselves whether suicide is a moral problem. How about a solution to escape from the existential anguish? People have never understood completely the acts of suicide showing almost constantly contempt, fear, pity or indifference to these.

  16. Primary function analysis of human mental retardation related gene CRBN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wang; Xiaohua, Ni; Peilin, Chen; Xin, Chen; Yaqiong, Sun; Qihan, Wu

    2008-06-01

    The mutation of human cereblon gene (CRBN) is revealed to be related with mild mental retardation. Since the molecular characteristics of CRBN have not been well presented, we investigated the general properties of CRBN. We analyzed its gene structure and protein homologues. The CRBN protein might belong to a family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent Lon protease. We also found that CRBN was widely expressed in different tissues, and the expression level in testis is significantly higher than other tissues. This may suggested it could play some important roles in several other tissues besides brain. Transient transfection experiment in AD 293 cell lines suggested that both CRBN and CRBN mutant (nucleotide position 1,274(C > T)) are located in the whole cells. This may suggest new functions of CRBN in cell nucleolus besides its mitochondria protease activity in cytoplasm.

  17. Glycoconjugates and Related Molecules in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells (ECs form the inner lining of blood vessels. They are critically involved in many physiological functions, including control of vasomotor tone, blood cell trafficking, hemostatic balance, permeability, proliferation, survival, and immunity. It is considered that impairment of EC functions leads to the development of vascular diseases. The carbohydrate antigens carried by glycoconjugates (e.g., glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids, and proteoglycans mainly present on the cell surface serve not only as marker molecules but also as functional molecules. Recent studies have revealed that the carbohydrate composition of the EC surface is critical for these cells to perform their physiological functions. In this paper, we consider the expression and functional roles of endogenous glycoconjugates and related molecules (galectins and glycan-degrading enzymes in human ECs.

  18. Escitalopram block of hERG potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yun Ju; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hong Joon; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2014-01-01

    Escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the pharmacologically active S-enantiomer of the racemic mixture of RS-citalopram and is widely used in the treatment of depression. The effects of escitalopram and citalopram on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels expressed in human embryonic kidney cells were investigated using voltage-clamp and Western blot analyses. Both drugs blocked hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.6 μM for escitalopram and an IC50 value of 3.2 μM for citalopram. The blocking of hERG by escitalopram was voltage-dependent, with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. However, voltage independence was observed over the full range of activation. The blocking by escitalopram was frequency dependent. A rapid application of escitalopram induced a rapid and reversible blocking of the tail current of hERG. The extent of the blocking by escitalopram during the depolarizing pulse was less than that during the repolarizing pulse, suggesting that escitalopram has a high affinity for the open state of the hERG channel, with a relatively lower affinity for the inactivated state. Both escitalopram and citalopram produced a reduction of hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane but did not affect the short-term internalization of the hERG channel. These results suggest that escitalopram blocked hERG currents at a supratherapeutic concentration and that it did so by preferentially binding to both the open and the inactivated states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking of hERG channel protein to the plasma membrane.

  19. Generative models: Human embryonic stem cells and multiple modeling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Melinda Bonnie

    2016-04-01

    Model organisms are at once scientific models and concrete living things. It is widely assumed by philosophers of science that (1) model organisms function much like other kinds of models, and (2) that insofar as their scientific role is distinctive, it is in virtue of representing a wide range of biological species and providing a basis for generalizations about those targets. This paper uses the case of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to challenge both assumptions. I first argue that hESC can be considered model organisms, analogous to classic examples such as Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster. I then discuss four contrasts between the epistemic role of hESC in practice, and the assumptions about model organisms noted above. These contrasts motivate an alternative view of model organisms as a network of systems related constructively and developmentally to one another. I conclude by relating this result to other accounts of model organisms in recent philosophy of science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human attribute concepts: relative ubiquity across twelve mutually isolated languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Gerard; Thalmayer, Amber Gayle; Bel-Bahar, Tarik S

    2014-07-01

    It has been unclear which human-attribute concepts are most universal across languages. To identify common-denominator concepts, we used dictionaries for 12 mutually isolated languages-Maasai, Supyire Senoufo, Khoekhoe, Afar, Mara Chin, Hmong, Wik-Mungkan, Enga, Fijian, Inuktitut, Hopi, and Kuna-representing diverse cultural characteristics and language families, from multiple continents. A composite list of every person-descriptive term in each lexicon was closely examined to determine the content (in terms of English translation) most ubiquitous across languages. Study 1 identified 28 single-word concepts used to describe persons in all 12 languages, as well as 41 additional terms found in 11 of 12. Results indicated that attribute concepts related to morality and competence appear to be as cross-culturally ubiquitous as basic-emotion concepts. Formulations of universal-attribute concepts from Osgood and Wierzbicka were well-supported. Study 2 compared lexically based personality models on the relative ubiquity of key associated terms, finding that 1- and 2-dimensional models draw on markedly more ubiquitous terms than do 5- or 6-factor models. We suggest that ubiquitous attributes reflect common cultural as well as common biological processes.

  1. Relative clock demonstrates the endogenous heterogeneity of human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Changsong

    2011-01-01

    The heavy-tailed inter-event time distributions are widely observed in many human-activated systems, which may result from both endogenous mechanisms like the highest-priority-first protocol and exogenous factors like the varying global activity versus time. To distinguish the effects on temporal statistics from different mechanisms is this of theoretical significance. In this Letter, we propose a new timing method by using a relative clock, where the time length between two consecutive events of an individual is counted as the number of other individuals' events appeared during this interval. We propose a model, in which agents act either in a constant rate or with a power-law inter-event time distribution, and the global activity either keeps unchanged or varies periodically versus time. Our analysis shows that the heavy tails caused by the heterogeneity of global activity can be eliminated by setting the relative clock, yet the heterogeneity due to real individual behaviors still exists. We perform extensi...

  2. Mechanism and pharmacological rescue of berberine-induced hERG channel deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Meng Yan,1 Kaiping Zhang,1 Yanhui Shi,1 Lifang Feng,1 Lin Lv,1 Baoxin Li1,2 1Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, 2State-Province Key Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Engineering, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Berberine (BBR, an isoquinoline alkaloid mainly isolated from plants of Berberidaceae family, is extensively used to treat gastrointestinal infections in clinics. It has been reported that BBR can block human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel and inhibit its membrane expression. The hERG channel plays crucial role in cardiac repolarization and is the target of diverse proarrhythmic drugs. Dysfunction of hERG channel can cause long QT syndrome. However, the regulatory mechanisms of BBR effects on hERG at cell membrane level remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate in detail how BBR decreased hERG expression on cell surface and further explore its pharmacological rescue strategies. In this study, BBR decreases caveolin-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells stably expressing hERG channel. Knocking down the basal expression of caveolin-1 alleviates BBR-induced hERG reduction. In addition, we found that aromatic tyrosine (Tyr652 and phenylalanine (Phe656 in S6 domain mediate the long-term effect of BBR on hERG by using mutation techniques. Considering both our previous and present work, we propose that BBR reduces hERG membrane stability with multiple mechanisms. Furthermore, we found that fexofenadine and resveratrol shorten action potential duration prolongated by BBR, thus having the potential effects of alleviating the cardiotoxicity of BBR. Keywords: berberine, hERG, cavoline-1, cardiotoxicity, LQTS, pharmacological rescue

  3. Cholesterol regulates HERG K+ channel activation by increasing phospholipase C β1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Yoon Sun; Oh, Hyun Geun; Park, Myoung Kyu; Cho, Hana; Chung, Sungkwon

    2013-01-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) K+ channel underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ conductance (IKr) during normal cardiac repolarization. Also, it may regulate excitability in many neuronal cells. Recently, we showed that enrichment of cell membrane with cholesterol inhibits HERG channels by reducing the levels of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] due to the activation of phospholipase C (PLC). In this study, we further explored the effect of cholesterol enrichment on HERG channel kinetics. When membrane cholesterol level was mildly increased in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing HERG channel, the inactivation and deactivation kinetics of HERG current were not affected, but the activation rate was significantly decelerated at all voltages tested. The application of PtdIns(4,5)P2 or inhibitor for PLC prevented the effect of cholesterol enrichment, while the presence of antibody against PtdIns(4,5)P2 in pipette solution mimicked the effect of cholesterol enrichment. These results indicate that the effect of cholesterol enrichment on HERG channel is due to the depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P2. We also found that cholesterol enrichment significantly increases the expression of β1 and β3 isoforms of PLC (PLCβ1, PLCβ3) in the membrane. Since the effects of cholesterol enrichment on HERG channel were prevented by inhibiting transcription or by inhibiting PLCβ1 expression, we conclude that increased PLCβ1 expression leads to the deceleration of HERG channel activation rate via downregulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2. These results confirm a crosstalk between two plasma membrane-enriched lipids, cholesterol and PtdIns(4,5)P2, in the regulation of HERG channels. PMID:23793622

  4. Hippocampal sleep features: relations to human memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Michele; Moroni, Fabio; De Gennaro, Luigi; Nobili, Lino

    2012-01-01

    The recent spread of intracranial electroencephalographic (EEG) recording techniques for presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients is providing new information on the activity of different brain structures during both wakefulness and sleep. The interest has been mainly focused on the medial temporal lobe, and in particular the hippocampal formation, whose peculiar local sleep features have been recently described, providing support to the idea that sleep is not a spatially global phenomenon. The study of the hippocampal sleep electrophysiology is particularly interesting because of its central role in the declarative memory formation. Recent data indicate that sleep contributes to memory formation. Therefore, it is relevant to understand whether specific patterns of activity taking place during sleep are related to memory consolidation processes. Fascinating similarities between different states of consciousness (wakefulness, REM sleep, non-REM sleep) in some electrophysiological mechanisms underlying cognitive processes have been reported. For instance, large-scale synchrony in gamma activity is important for waking memory and perception processes, and its changes during sleep may be the neurophysiological substrate of sleep-related deficits of declarative memory. Hippocampal activity seems to specifically support memory consolidation during sleep, through specific coordinated neurophysiological events (slow waves, spindles, ripples) that would facilitate the integration of new information into the pre-existing cortical networks. A few studies indeed provided direct evidence that rhinal ripples as well as slow hippocampal oscillations are correlated with memory consolidation in humans. More detailed electrophysiological investigations assessing the specific relations between different types of memory consolidation and hippocampal EEG features are in order. These studies will add an important piece of knowledge to the elucidation of the ultimate

  5. Hippocampal sleep features: relations to human memory function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eFerrara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent spread of intracranial EEG recordings techniques for presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients is providing new information on the activity of different brain structures during both wakefulness and sleep. The interest has been mainly focused on the medial temporal lobe, and in particular the hippocampal formation, whose peculiar local sleep features have been recently described, providing support to the idea that sleep is not a spatially global phenomenon. The study of the hippocampal sleep electrophysiology is particularly interesting because of its central role in the declarative memory formation. Recent data indicate that sleep contributes to memory formation. Therefore, it is relevant to understand whether specific pattern of activity taking place during sleep are related to memory consolidation processes. Fascinating similarities between different states of consciousness (wakefulness, REM sleep, NREM sleep in some electrophysiological mechanisms underlying cognitive processes have been reported. For instance, large-scale synchrony in gamma activity is important for waking memory and perception processes, and its changes during sleep may be the neurophysiological substrate of sleep-related deficits of declarative memory. Hippocampal activity seems to specifically support memory consolidation during sleep, through specific coordinated neurophysiological events (slow waves, spindles, ripples that would facilitate the integration of new information into the pre-existing cortical networks. A few studies indeed provided direct evidence that rhinal ripples as well as slow hippocampal oscillations are correlated with memory consolidation in humans. More detailed electrophysiological investigations assessing the specific relations between different types of memory consolidation and hippocampal EEG features are in order. These studies will add an important piece of knowledge to the elucidation of the ultimate sleep

  6. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments-the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation-we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception.

  7. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments–the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation—we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception. PMID:28163677

  8. The relations between neuroscience and human behavioral science.

    OpenAIRE

    Strumwasser, F.

    1994-01-01

    Neuroscience seeks to understand how the human brain, perhaps the most complex electrochemical machine in the universe, works, in terms of molecules, membranes, cells and cell assemblies, development, plasticity, learning, memory, cognition, and behavior. The human behavioral sciences, in particular psychiatry and clinical psychology, deal with disorders of human behavior and mentation. The gap between neuroscience and the human behavioral sciences is still large. However, some major advances...

  9. A comparison of currents carried by HERG, with and without coexpression of MiRP1, and the native rapid delayed rectifier current. Is MiRP1 the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerapura, Manjula; Nattel, Stanley; Chartier, Denis; Caballero, Ricardo; Hébert, Terence E

    2002-04-01

    Although it has been suggested that coexpression of minK related peptide (MiRP1) is required for reconstitution of native rapid delayed-rectifier current (I(Kr)) by human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG), currents resulting from HERG (I(HERG)) and HERG plus MiRP1 expression have not been directly compared with native I(Kr). We compared the pharmacological and selected biophysical properties of I(HERG) with and without MiRP1 coexpression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with those of guinea-pig I(Kr) under comparable conditions. Comparisons were also made with HERG expressed in Xenopus oocytes. MiRP1 coexpression significantly accelerated I(HERG) deactivation at potentials negative to the reversal potential, but did not affect more physiologically relevant deactivation of outward I(HERG), which remained slower than that of I(Kr). MiRP1 shifted I(HERG) activation voltage dependence in the hyperpolarizing direction, whereas I(Kr) activated at voltages more positive than I(HERG). There were major discrepancies between the sensitivity to quinidine, E-4031 and dofetilide of I(HERG) in Xenopus oocytes compared to I(Kr), which were not substantially affected by coexpression with MiRP1. On the other hand, the pharmacological sensitivity of I(HERG) in CHO cells was indistinguishable from that of I(Kr) and was unaffected by MiRP1 coexpression. We conclude that the properties of I(HERG) in CHO cells are similar in many ways to those of native I(Kr) under the same recording conditions, and that the discrepancies that remain are not reduced by coexpression with MiRP1. These results suggest that the physiological role of MiRP1 may not be to act as an essential consituent of the HERG channel complex carrying native I(Kr).

  10. Research progress in drug reactions on hERG potassium channels%药物对hERG钾通道作用机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林敏; 李泱; 张建成

    2012-01-01

    人ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)钾通道表达了延迟整流钾电流的快激活成分,对动作电位的复极至关重要.hERG钾电流不仅是抗心律失常作用的主要靶点,也是诸多药物增加尖端扭转型室速和心源性猝死风险的关键位点,而该电流的降低和(或)升高与基因突变或药物阻滞作用密切相关.随着对药物与hERG钾通道相互作用机制研究的深入,药物与通道孔道区蛋白结合位点的作用及其对通道转运的影响逐步被揭示,但这些药物对hERG作用的临床应用仍有待评价.%Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channels conduct the rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium current ( Ikr). The reduction ( or increase ) of Ikr current due to either gene mutations or adverse drug effects would increase the risk of torsades de pointes and sudden cardiac death. This paper reviews various mechanisms of drug reactions of hERG potassium channels and the properties of major drug-protein reaction sites in the pore region and trafficking of hERG potassium channels under the influence of drugs. However, the effect of clinical administration of drugs on hERG remains unclear.

  11. The S4-S5 linker couples voltage sensing and activation of pacemaker channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Mitcheson, J S; Tristani-Firouzi, M; Lin, M; Sanguinetti, M C

    2001-09-25

    Voltage-gated channels are normally opened by depolarization and closed by repolarization of the membrane. Despite sharing significant sequence homology with voltage-gated K(+) channels, the gating of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) pacemaker channels has the opposite dependence on membrane potential: hyperpolarization opens, whereas depolarization closes, these channels. The mechanism and structural basis of the process that couples voltage sensor movement to HCN channel opening and closing is not understood. On the basis of our previous studies of a mutant HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) channel, we hypothesized that the intracellular linker that connects the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains (S4-S5 linker) of HCN channels might be important for channel gating. Here, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the HCN2 S4-S5 linker to identify three residues, E324, Y331, and R339, that when mutated disrupted normal channel closing. Mutation of a basic residue in the S4 domain (R318Q) prevented channel opening, presumably by disrupting S4 movement. However, channels with R318Q and Y331S mutations were constitutively open, suggesting that these channels can open without a functioning S4 domain. We conclude that the S4-S5 linker mediates coupling between voltage sensing and HCN channel activation. Our findings also suggest that opening of HCN and related channels corresponds to activation of a gate located near the inner pore, rather than recovery of channels from a C-type inactivated state.

  12. Voltage-dependent gating of hERG potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen May eCheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4-S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-a-go-go related gene, hERG, which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure-function relationships underlying voltage-dependent gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage sensing domain and the S4-S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage sensing unit and S4-S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor.

  13. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  14. Relative valuation of pain in human orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Joel S; Vlaev, Ivo; Seymour, Ben; Chater, Nick; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-10-29

    The valuation of health-related states, including pain, is a critical issue in clinical practice, health economics, and pain neuroscience. Surprisingly the monetary value people associate with pain is highly context-dependent, with participants willing to pay more to avoid medium-level pain when presented in a context of low-intensity, rather than high-intensity, pain. Here, we ask whether context impacts upon the neural representation of pain itself, or alternatively the transformation of pain into valuation-driven behavior. While undergoing fMRI, human participants declared how much money they would be willing to pay to avoid repeated instances of painful cutaneous electrical stimuli delivered to the foot. We also implemented a contextual manipulation that involved presenting medium-level painful stimuli in blocks with either low- or high-level stimuli. We found no evidence of context-dependent activity within a conventional "pain matrix," where pain-evoked activity reflected absolute stimulus intensity. By contrast, in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex, a strong contextual dependency was evident, and here activity tracked the contextual rank of the pain. The findings are in keeping with an architecture where an absolute pain valuation system and a rank-dependent system interact to influence willing to pay to avoid pain, with context impacting value-based behavior high in a processing hierarchy. This segregated processing hints that distinct neural representations reflect sensory aspects of pain and components that are less directly nociceptive whose integration also guides pain-related actions. A dominance of the latter might account for puzzling phenomena seen in somatization disorders where perceived pain is a dominant driver of behavior.

  15. Reconcilable differences? Human diversity, cultural relativity, and sense of community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Greg; Kloos, Bret; Green, Eric P; Franco, Margarita M

    2011-03-01

    Sense of community (SOC) is one of the most widely used and studied constructs in community psychology. As proposed by Sarason in (The Psychological sense of community: prospects for a community psychology, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1974), SOC represents the strength of bonding among community members. It is a valuable component of community life, and it has been linked to positive mental health outcomes, citizen participation, and community connectedness. However, promotion of SOC can become problematic in community psychology praxis when it conflicts with other core values proposed to define the field, namely values of human diversity, cultural relativity, and heterogeneity of experience and perspective. Several commentators have noted that promotion of SOC can conflict with multicultural diversity because it tends to emphasize group member similarity and appears to be higher in homogeneous communities. In this paper, we introduce the idea of a community-diversity dialectic as part of praxis and research in community psychology. We argue that systematic consideration of cultural psychology perspectives can guide efforts to address a community-diversity dialectic and revise SOC formulations that ultimately will invigorate community research and action. We provide a working agenda for addressing this dialectic, proposing that systematic consideration of the creative tension between SOC and diversity can be beneficial to community psychology.

  16. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  17. Human Aging Is a Metabolome-related Matter of Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jové, Mariona; Maté, Ianire; Naudí, Alba; Mota-Martorell, Natalia; Portero-Otín, Manuel; De la Fuente, Mónica; Pamplona, Reinald

    2016-05-01

    A molecular description of the mechanisms by which aging is produced is still very limited. Here, we have determined the plasma metabolite profile by using high-throughput metabolome profiling technologies of 150 healthy humans ranging from 30 to 100 years of age. Using a nontargeted approach, we detected 2,678 metabolite species in plasma, and the multivariate analyses separated perfectly two groups indicating a specific signature for each gender. In addition, there is a set of gender-shared metabolites, which change significantly during aging with a similar tendency. Among the identified molecules, we found vitamin D2-related compound, phosphoserine (40:5), monoacylglyceride (22:1), diacylglyceride (33:2), and resolvin D6, all of them decreasing with the aging process. Finally, we found three molecules that directly correlate with age and seven that inversely correlate with age, independently of gender. Among the identified molecules (6 of 10 according to exact mass and retention time), we found a proteolytic product (l-γ-glutamyl-l-leucine), which increased with age. On the contrary, a hydroxyl fatty acid (25-hydroxy-hexacosanoic), a polyunsaturated fatty acid (eicosapentaenoic acid), two phospholipids (phosphocholine [42:9]and phosphoserine [42:3]) and a prostaglandin (15-keto-prostaglandin F2α) decreased with aging. These results suggest that lipid species and their metabolism are closely linked to the aging process.

  18. Trafficking-deficient hERG K⁺ channels linked to long QT syndrome are regulated by a microtubule-dependent quality control compartment in the ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer L; McBride, Christie M; Nataraj, Parvathi S; Bartos, Daniel C; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2011-07-01

    The human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) encodes the voltage-gated K(+) channel that underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier current in cardiac myocytes. hERG is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an "immature" N-linked glycoprotein and is terminally glycosylated in the Golgi apparatus. Most hERG missense mutations linked to long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2) reduce the terminal glycosylation and functional expression. We tested the hypothesis that a distinct pre-Golgi compartment negatively regulates the trafficking of some LQT2 mutations to the Golgi apparatus. We found that treating cells in nocodazole, a microtubule depolymerizing agent, altered the subcellular localization, functional expression, and glycosylation of the LQT2 mutation G601S-hERG differently from wild-type hERG (WT-hERG). G601S-hERG quickly redistributed to peripheral compartments that partially colocalized with KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu) chaperones but not calnexin, Sec31, or the ER golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). Treating cells in E-4031, a drug that increases the functional expression of G601S-hERG, prevented the accumulation of G601S-hERG to the peripheral compartments and increased G601S-hERG colocalization with the ERGIC. Coexpressing the temperature-sensitive mutant G protein from vesicular stomatitis virus, a mutant N-linked glycoprotein that is retained in the ER, showed it was not restricted to the same peripheral compartments as G601S-hERG at nonpermissive temperatures. We conclude that the trafficking of G601S-hERG is negatively regulated by a microtubule-dependent compartment within the ER. Identifying mechanisms that prevent the sorting or promote the release of LQT2 channels from this compartment may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for LQT2.

  19. Molecular determinants of interactions between the N-terminal domain and the transmembrane core that modulate hERG K+ channel gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernández-Trillo

    Full Text Available A conserved eag domain in the cytoplasmic amino terminus of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel is critical for its slow deactivation gating. Introduction of gene fragments encoding the eag domain are able to restore normal deactivation properties of channels from which most of the amino terminus has been deleted, and also those lacking exclusively the eag domain or carrying a single point mutation in the initial residues of the N-terminus. Deactivation slowing in the presence of the recombinant domain is not observed with channels carrying a specific Y542C point mutation in the S4-S5 linker. On the other hand, mutations in some initial positions of the recombinant fragment also impair its ability to restore normal deactivation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis of fluorophore-tagged proteins under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF conditions revealed a substantial level of FRET between the introduced N-terminal eag fragments and the eag domain-deleted channels expressed at the membrane, but not between the recombinant eag domain and full-length channels with an intact amino terminus. The FRET signals were also minimized when the recombinant eag fragments carried single point mutations in the initial portion of their amino end, and when Y542C mutated channels were used. These data suggest that the restoration of normal deactivation gating by the N-terminal recombinant eag fragment is an intrinsic effect of this domain directed by the interaction of its N-terminal segment with the gating machinery, likely at the level of the S4-S5 linker.

  20. Concatenated hERG1 tetramers reveal stoichiometry of altered channel gating by RPR-260243.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Gardner, Alison; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Activation of human ether-a-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) K(+) channels mediates repolarization of action potentials in cardiomyocytes. RPR-260243 [(3R,4R)-4-[3-(6-methoxy-quinolin-4-yl)-3-oxo-propyl]-1-[3-(2,3,5-trifluorophenyl)-prop-2-ynyl]-piperidine-3-carboxylic acid] (RPR) slows deactivation and attenuates inactivation of hERG1 channels. A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanism of hERG1 agonists such as RPR may facilitate the design of more selective and potent compounds for prevention of arrhythmia associated with abnormally prolonged ventricular repolarization. RPR binds to a hydrophobic pocket located between two adjacent hERG1 subunits, and, hence, a homotetrameric channel has four identical RPR binding sites. To investigate the stoichiometry of altered channel gating induced by RPR, we constructed and characterized tetrameric hERG1 concatemers containing a variable number of wild-type subunits and subunits containing a point mutation (L553A) that rendered the channel insensitive to RPR, ostensibly by preventing ligand binding. The slowing of deactivation by RPR was proportional to the number of wild-type subunits incorporated into a concatenated tetrameric channel, and four wild-type subunits were required to achieve maximal slowing of deactivation. In contrast, a single wild-type subunit within a concatenated tetramer was sufficient to achieve half of the maximal RPR-induced shift in the voltage dependence of hERG1 inactivation, and maximal effect was achieved in channels containing three or four wild-type subunits. Together our findings suggest that the allosteric modulation of channel gating involves distinct mechanisms of coupling between drug binding and altered deactivation and inactivation.

  1. Effects of the histamine H1 receptor antagonist hydroxyzine on hERG K+ channels and cardiac action potential duration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung Hoon LEE; Seung Ho LEE; Daehyun CHU; Jin Won HYUN; Han CHOE; Bok Hee CHOI; Su-Hyun JO

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of hydroxyzine on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels to determine the electrolphysiological basis for its proarrhythmic effects.Methods:hERG channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells,and the effects of hydroxyzine on the channels were examined using two-microelectrode voltage-clamp and patch-clamp techniques,respectively.The effects of hydroxyzine on action potential duration were examined in guinea pig ventricular myocytes using current clamp.Results:Hydroxyzine (0.2 and 2 μmol/L) significantly increased the action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90) in both concentration- and time-dependent manners.Hydroxyzine (0.03-3 μmol/L) blocked both the steady-state and tail hERG currents.The block was voltage-dependent,and the values of IC50 for blocking the steady-state and tail currents at +20 mV was 0.18±0.02 μmol/L and 0.16±0.01 μmol/L,respectively,in HEK293 cells.Hydroxyzine (5 μmol/L) affected both the activated and the inactivated states of the channels,but not the closed state.The S6 domain mutation Y652A attenuated the blocking of hERG current by ~6-fold.Conclusion:The results suggest that hydroxyzine could block hERG channels and prolong APD.The tyrosine at position 652 in the channel may be responsible for the proarrhythmic effects of hydroxyzine.

  2. Increased expression of HERG K(+) channels contributes to myelodysplastic syndrome progression and displays correlation with prognosis stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Du, Wen; Liu, Wei; Guo, Dongmei; He, Xiaoqi; Li, Huiyu

    2016-12-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) K(+) channels are shown to be aberrantly expressed in a variety of cancer cells where they play roles in contributing to cancer progression. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clinical heterogeneous disorders characterized by bone marrow failure and dysplasia of blood cells. However, the involvement of HERG K(+) channels in MDS development is poorly understood. The expression of HERG K(+) channels in untreated MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and the control group was detected by flow cytometry. The roles of HERG K(+) channels in regulation of SKM-1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle were determined by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. We found that expression of HERG K(+) channels in MDS patients was significantly higher than controls and was lower than AML. Percentage of HERG K(+) channels on CD34+CD38- cells gradually increased from controls to high-grade MDS subtypes. And HERG K(+) channel levels showed an ascending tendency from low-risk to high-risk MDS group. In addition, the CCK-8 assay, apoptosis and cell cycle analysis were performed and showed that blockage of HERG K(+) channels decreased the proliferation of MDS cells but rarely had effects on cell apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. Our study demonstrated that HERG K(+) channels might be a potential tumor marker of MDS. These channels were likely to contribute to MDS progression and were helpful for predicting prognosis of MDS. Inhibition of HERG K(+) channels might be a novel therapeutic measure for MDS.

  3. Indexing molecules for their hERG liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Anwar; Falah, Mizied; Raiyn, Jamal; Da'adoosh, Beny; Kadan, Sleman; Zaid, Hilal; Goldblum, Amiram

    2013-07-01

    The human Ether-a-go-go-Related-Gene (hERG) potassium (K(+)) channel is liable to drug-inducing blockage that prolongs the QT interval of the cardiac action potential, triggers arrhythmia and possibly causes sudden cardiac death. Early prediction of drug liability to hERG K(+) channel is therefore highly important and preferably obligatory at earlier stages of any drug discovery process. In vitro assessment of drug binding affinity to hERG K(+) channel involves substantial expenses, time, and labor; and therefore computational models for predicting liabilities of drug candidates for hERG toxicity is of much importance. In the present study, we apply the Iterative Stochastic Elimination (ISE) algorithm to construct a large number of rule-based models (filters) and exploit their combination for developing the concept of hERG Toxicity Index (ETI). ETI estimates the molecular risk to be a blocker of hERG potassium channel. The area under the curve (AUC) of the attained model is 0.94. The averaged ETI of hERG binders, drugs from CMC, clinical-MDDR, endogenous molecules, ACD and ZINC, were found to be 9.17, 2.53, 3.3, -1.98, -2.49 and -3.86 respectively. Applying the proposed hERG Toxicity Index Model on external test set composed of more than 1300 hERG blockers picked from chEMBL shows excellent performance (Matthews Correlation Coefficient of 0.89). The proposed strategy could be implemented for the evaluation of chemicals in the hit/lead optimization stages of the drug discovery process, improve the selection of drug candidates as well as the development of safe pharmaceutical products.

  4. Fast stochastic simulation of biochemical reaction systems by alternative formulations of the chemical Langevin equation

    KAUST Repository

    Mélykúti, Bence

    2010-01-01

    The Chemical Langevin Equation (CLE), which is a stochastic differential equation driven by a multidimensional Wiener process, acts as a bridge between the discrete stochastic simulation algorithm and the deterministic reaction rate equation when simulating (bio)chemical kinetics. The CLE model is valid in the regime where molecular populations are abundant enough to assume their concentrations change continuously, but stochastic fluctuations still play a major role. The contribution of this work is that we observe and explore that the CLE is not a single equation, but a parametric family of equations, all of which give the same finite-dimensional distribution of the variables. On the theoretical side, we prove that as many Wiener processes are sufficient to formulate the CLE as there are independent variables in the equation, which is just the rank of the stoichiometric matrix. On the practical side, we show that in the case where there are m1 pairs of reversible reactions and m2 irreversible reactions there is another, simple formulation of the CLE with only m1 + m2 Wiener processes, whereas the standard approach uses 2 m1 + m2. We demonstrate that there are considerable computational savings when using this latter formulation. Such transformations of the CLE do not cause a loss of accuracy and are therefore distinct from model reduction techniques. We illustrate our findings by considering alternative formulations of the CLE for a human ether a-go-go related gene ion channel model and the Goldbeter-Koshland switch. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of amino-terminal and S4-S5 loop HERG channel mutants under steady-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Ron, Carlos; de la Peña, Pilar; Miranda, Pablo; Domínguez, Pedro; Barros, Francisco

    2008-05-15

    Gating kinetics and underlying thermodynamic properties of human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes were studied using protocols able to yield true steady-state kinetic parameters. Channel mutants lacking the initial 16 residues of the amino terminus before the conserved eag/PAS region showed significant positive shifts in activation voltage dependence associated with a reduction of z(g) values and a less negative DeltaG(o), indicating a deletion-induced displacement of the equilibrium toward the closed state. Conversely, a negative shift and an increased DeltaG(o), indicative of closed-state destabilization, were observed in channels lacking the amino-terminal proximal domain. Furthermore, accelerated activation and deactivation kinetics were observed in these constructs when differences in driving force were considered, suggesting that the presence of distal and proximal amino-terminal segments contributes in wild-type channels to specific chemical interactions that raise the energy barrier for activation. Steady-state characteristics of some single point mutants in the intracellular loop linking S4 and S5 helices revealed a striking parallelism between the effects of these mutations and those of the amino-terminal modifications. Our data indicate that in addition to the recognized influence of the initial amino-terminus region on HERG deactivation, this cytoplasmic region also affects activation behavior. The data also suggest that not only a slow movement of the voltage sensor itself but also delaying its functional coupling to the activation gate by some cytoplasmic structures possibly acting on the S4-S5 loop may contribute to the atypically slow gating of HERG.

  6. Interactions between S4-S5 linker and S6 transmembrane domain modulate gating of HERG K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Chen, Jun; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2002-05-24

    Outward movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to activation in voltage-gated ion channels; however, the precise mechanism and structural basis of this gating event are poorly understood. Potential insight into the coupling mechanism was provided by our previous finding that mutation to Lys of a single residue (Asp(540)) located in the S4-S5 linker endowed HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) K(+) channels with the unusual ability to open in response to membrane depolarization and hyperpolarization in a voltage-dependent manner. We hypothesized that the unusual hyperpolarization-induced gating occurred through an interaction between Lys(540) and the C-terminal end of the S6 domain, the region proposed to form the activation gate. Therefore, we mutated six residues located in this region of S6 (Ile(662)-Tyr(667)) to Ala in D540K HERG channels. Mutation of Arg(665), but not the other five residues, prevented hyperpolarization-dependent reopening of D540K HERG channels. Mutation of Arg(665) to Gln or Asp also prevented reopening. In addition, D540R and D540K/R665K HERG reopened in response to hyperpolarization. Together these findings suggest that a single residue (Arg(665)) in the S6 domain interacts with Lys(540) by electrostatic repulsion to couple voltage sensing to hyperpolarization-dependent opening of D540K HERG K(+) channels. Moreover, our findings suggest that the C-terminal ends of S4 and S6 are in close proximity at hyperpolarized membrane potentials.

  7. Stereoselective Blockage of Quinidine and Quinine in the hERG Channel and the Effect of Their Rescue Potency on Drug-Induced hERG Trafficking Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diastereoisomers of quinidine and quinine are used to treat arrhythmia and malaria, respectively. It has been reported that both drugs block the hERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channel which is essential for myocardium repolarization. Abnormality of repolarization increases risk of arrhythmia. The aim of our research is to study and compare the impacts of quinidine and quinine on hERG. Results show that both drugs block the hERG channel, with quinine 14-fold less potent than quinidine. In addition, they presented distinct impacts on channel dynamics. The results imply their stereospecific block effect on the hERG channel. However, F656C-hERG reversed this stereoselectivity. The mutation decreases affinity of the two drugs with hERG, and quinine was more potent than quinidine in F656C-hERG blockage. These data suggest that F656 residue contributes to the stereoselective pocket for quinidine and quinine. Further study demonstrates that both drugs do not change hERG protein levels. In rescue experiments, we found that they exert no reverse effect on pentamidine- or desipramine-induced hERG trafficking defect, although quinidine has been reported to rescue trafficking-deficient pore mutation hERG G601S based on the interaction with F656. Our research demonstrated stereoselective effects of quinidine and quinine on the hERG channel, and this is the first study to explore their reversal potency on drug-induced hERG deficiency.

  8. The relative paucity of IgE in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underdown, B J; Knight, A; Papsin, F R

    1976-05-01

    The levels of IgE were determined in paired samples of serum and milk when whey obtained 3 to 8 days of postpartum, from 16 human lactating mothers who had reported a history of allergy to a variety of common allergens. Two assay procedures were employed to measure total IgE, a double-antibody assay and a commercially available solid phase assay (RIST). In addition, each sample of serum and whey was tested for specific IgE antibodies to a variety of allergens by the RAST test. The levels of total serum IgE were between 30 and 2300 I.U./ml and relatively good agreement was observed for both the double-antibody and RIST methods. In contrast, total IgE levels in milk whey were either undetectable (less than 3.0 I.U./ml in 14 of 16 subjects) or very low when analyzed by the double-antibody method, but were very high (400 to 1650 I.U./ml when analyzed by the RIST method. However, IgE added to milk whey could be measured by the double-antibody procedure indicating that the low levels detected in milk were not a fault of the double-antibody assay. It was assumed that the RIST test was subject to nonspecific interference by factors in milk whey which caused the determination of high, but incorrect, levels of IgE. Specific IgE antibodies were detected in the serum of 10 of 16 subjects but were not present in milk whey. A comparison of the whey/serum ratios of albumin, IgA, and IgE suggested that little, if any, IgE is selectively synthesized or secreted in the mammary gland.

  9. Human papillomavirus-related carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A; Guo, Theresa W; Smith, David F; Wang, Hao; Ogawa, Takenori; Pai, Sara I; Westra, William H

    2013-02-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is an established cause of head and neck carcinomas arising in the oropharynx. The presence of HPV has also been reported in some carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract, but little is known about their overall incidence or their clinicopathologic profile. The surgical pathology archives of The Johns Hopkins Hospital were searched for all carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract from 1995 to 2011, and tissue microarrays were constructed. p16 immunohistochemical analysis and DNA in situ hybridization for high-risk types of HPV were performed. Demographic and clinical outcome data were extracted from patient medical records. Of 161 sinonasal carcinomas, 34 (21%) were positive for high-risk HPV DNA, including type 16 (82%), type 31/33 (12%), and type 18 (6%). HPV-positive carcinomas consisted of 28 squamous cell carcinomas and variants (15 nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing, 4 papillary, 5 adenosquamous, 4 basaloid), 1 small cell carcinoma, 1 sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, and 4 carcinomas that were difficult to classify but exhibited adenoid cystic carcinoma-like features. Immunohistochemistry for p16 was positive in 59/161 (37%) cases, and p16 expression strongly correlated with the presence of HPV DNA: 33 of 34 (97%) HPV-positive tumors exhibited high p16 expression, whereas only 26 of 127 (20%) HPV-negative tumors were p16 positive (Pcarcinomas occurred in 19 men and 15 women ranging in age from 33 to 87 years (mean, 54 y). A trend toward improved survival was observed in the HPV-positive group (hazard ratio=0.58, 95% confidence interval [0.26, 1.28]). The presence of high-risk HPV in 21% of sinonasal carcinomas confirms HPV as an important oncologic agent of carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract. Although nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histologic type, there is a wide morphologic spectrum of HPV-related disease that includes a variant that resembles adenoid cystic carcinoma. The

  10. The Functions of Selected Human Rights Institutions and Related Role-Players in the Protection of Human Rights in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Chitimira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various violations of the human rights of ordinary people and human rights defenders have been reported in Zimbabwe since the late 1980s. It is widely acknowledged that such violations have been perpetrated mostly by the government through its different organs for political and other related reasons. Human rights violations were also easily committed against ordinary people and human rights defenders because there was no Constitution that adequately protected such people's fundamental human rights (including their civil and political rights and their socio-economic rights in Zimbabwe. Given this background, the article discusses the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe, in the light of the Zimbabwe Constitution Amendment Act 20 of 2013 (Zimbabwe Constitution 2013. This is done in order to investigate whether the promotion, protection, enforcement and respect for human rights in Zimbabwe has now improved. To this end, the functions of selected national human rights institutions and other related role-players, namely civil society, the judiciary, the law enforcement organs and the Zimbabwe Human Rights Commission, are briefly discussed first. Secondly, the functions of selected regional and international institutions, namely the Southern African Development Community, the African Union and the United Nations are discussed in relation to the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe. Thereafter, concluding remarks and possible recommendations that could be utilised to combat human rights violations and enhance the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe are provided.

  11. Citation relations of theories of human information behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamid R. Jamali

    2013-01-01

    Interrelation of models and theories of human information behaviour (HIB), their common roots, and the extent to which they are indebted to the fields other than library and information science (LIS) were investigated...

  12. Citation relations of theories of human information behaviour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamid R Jamali

    2013-01-01

      Interrelation of models and theories of human information behaviour (HIB), their common roots, and the extent to which they are indebted to the fields other than library and information science (LIS) were investigated...

  13. Wildlife carrying capacities in relation to human settlement

    OpenAIRE

    S.K. Eltringham

    1990-01-01

    Human encroachment into wildlife areas, which has increased almost exponentially over the past few decades, has usually resulted in the elimination of the larger species, particularly the large mammals. This is not an inevitable consequence and this paper considers the extent to which man and wildlife can coexist. There is a linear inverse relationship between human and elephant densities and the reasons for this are discussed with particular reference to Uganda. Such a relationship does not ...

  14. Wildlife carrying capacities in relation to human settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Eltringham

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Human encroachment into wildlife areas, which has increased almost exponentially over the past few decades, has usually resulted in the elimination of the larger species, particularly the large mammals. This is not an inevitable consequence and this paper considers the extent to which man and wildlife can coexist. There is a linear inverse relationship between human and elephant densities and the reasons for this are discussed with particular reference to Uganda. Such a relationship does not necessarily hold for all species and the outcome of increasing human pressure on wildlife habitats varies with a variety of factors including the species concerned, the rainfall, vegetation, soil and, above all, the attitudes of the people towards wildlife. Wild animals are more likely to be tolerated if they do no harm to human activities or if the harm they do is outweighed by the benefits to be obtained from their exploitation. In many parts of Africa utilisation is likely to be the best hope for the conservation of wildlife. Some examples are given of situations in which worthwhile carrying capacities of wildlife can be maintained in the presence of human activities.

  15. Advancements in Violin-Related Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overholt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Finesse is required while performing with many traditional musical instruments, as they are extremely responsive to human inputs. The violin is specifically examined here, as it excels at translating a performer’s gestures into sound in manners that evoke a wide range of affective qualities...... of human intelligence and emotion is at the core of the Musical Interface Technology Design Space, MITDS. This is a framework that endeavors to retain and enhance such traits of traditional instruments in the design of interactive live performance interfaces. Utilizing the MITDS, advanced Human......-Computer Interaction technologies for the violin are developed in order to allow musicians to explore new methods of creating music. Through this process, the aim is to provide musicians with control systems that let them transcend the interface itself, and focus on musically compelling performances....

  16. Ketamine inhibits human sperm function by Ca(2+)-related mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanqiao; Zou, Qianxing; Li, Bingda; Chen, Houyang; Du, Xiaohong; Weng, Shiqi; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Xuhui

    2016-09-09

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, which was widely used in human and animal medicine, has become a popular recreational drug, as it can induce hallucinatory effects. Ketamine abuse can cause serious damage to many aspects of the organism, mainly reflected in the nervous system and urinary system. It has also been reported that ketamine can impair the male genital system. However, the detailed effect of ketamine on human spermatozoa remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the in vitro effects of ketamine on human sperm functions, to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were treated in vitro with different concentrations of ketamine (0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1 g/L). The results showed that 0.25-1 g/L ketamine inhibited sperm total motility, progressive motility and linear velocity, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the sperm's ability to penetrate viscous medium and the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction were significantly inhibited by ketamine. Ketamine did not affect sperm viability, capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reaction. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which is a central factor in the regulation of human sperm function, was decreased by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the currents of the sperm-specific Ca(2+) channel, CatSper, which modulates Ca(2+) influx in sperm, were inhibited by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ketamine induces its toxic effects on human sperm functions by reducing sperm [Ca(2+)]i through inhibition of CatSper channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Human in Relation between Urban Life & Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qodratullah Qorbani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Historical documents show that urban life and urbanization is the first manifestation of complete form of human life, and it seems that most of human thoughts, like philosophies, were shaped in the cities and urbanizations. It means that the urban life is a society which has many social factors like: social classes and groups, economy, political power, organizations, family, cultures and geographical and environmental circumstances, that they cause to form many thoughts like human philosophies, then we see that most of past philosophers were in the cities in where urbanization was formed and thinkers could think by using of elements which are grown in such urbanizations. So, the being of urban life is necessary for making philosophical thoughts, because there are such social factors of urban living, can effect human's thinking and shape his/her worldview. But we can see the role of humankinds as a free existent who has divine position, intellect and freedom, then, he/she can manage, control and change the impacts of urban factors on philosophical thought. It means that effects of urbanizations and cultures as clear manifestation of urban life on philosophies is possible only by using of human‘s will and thinking as the central factor of the urban life and philosophy, while he/she can control and change these impacts. In fact, although human is under the impact of social and urban factors, he/she is not determined absolutely, but has freedom and intellect to control and change them. So, there is no place for absolute determinism due to social forces of urban life, but it seems there is a kind of intermediate state between absolute determinism and libertarianism. In this paper, it is tries to analysis the role of social and urban factors as the most important elements of the urban life on philosophy and philosophical thinking, and to argue that how human can manage this process.

  18. [Didactic psychodrama: strategy for the humanization of work relations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Toyoko; Corrêa, Adriana Kátia; de Mello Souza, Maria Conceição Bernardo; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the use of pedagogical psychodrama as a strategy for reflecting on the humanization of health care. Five meetings were held from May to June 2000. In these meetings the following themes were developed: context of work in emergencies; updating of the personal and professional, individual and group reference, and acknowledgement of users. In view of the need of rethinking humanization in emergency care, we consider that the psychodrama approach alerted health professionals for the necessary commitment and responsibility in their work.

  19. Talking to robots: on the linguistic construction of personal human-robot relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, Maarten H.; Coeckelbergh, Mark; Verbeek, Fons J.

    2010-01-01

    How should we make sense of 'personal' human-robot relations, given that many people view robots as 'mere machines'? This paper proposes that we understand human-robot relations from a phenomenological view as social relations in which robots are constructed as quasi-others. It is argued that langua

  20. Talking to robots: on the linguistic construction of personal human-robot relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, Maarten H.; Coeckelbergh, Mark; Verbeek, Fons J.

    2010-01-01

    How should we make sense of 'personal' human-robot relations, given that many people view robots as 'mere machines'? This paper proposes that we understand human-robot relations from a phenomenological view as social relations in which robots are constructed as quasi-others. It is argued that

  1. Talking to robots: on the linguistic construction of personal human-robot relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark; Lamers, Maarten H.; Verbeek, Fons J.

    2010-01-01

    How should we make sense of 'personal' human-robot relations, given that many people view robots as 'mere machines'? This paper proposes that we understand human-robot relations from a phenomenological view as social relations in which robots are constructed as quasi-others. It is argued that langua

  2. Industrial Buying Behavior Related to Human Resource Consulting Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Hollensen, Svend; Kahle, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to extend the understanding of the industrial buying process in connection with purchasing professional business (B2B) services, specifically human resource (HR) consulting services. Early B2B buying-behavior literature strongly emphasizes the rational aspects...

  3. A Relational Hermeneutical Approach to Human Rights Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daraweesh, Fuad

    2010-01-01

    This research is an effort to transcend the debate of universalism and cultural relativism by offering a new conceptualization of human rights. The conceptualization is presented through the development of a theoretical framework in the form of an epistemology. The research articulates and defends the epistemology, which is grounded on…

  4. A multidisciplinary framework for (teaching) human product relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Wouter; Bijl-Brouwer, van der Mieke; Boks, C.; McMahon, C.; Ion, W.; Parkinson, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a framework for dealing with the complexity of human-product relationships. The actual framework is a matrix of design perspectives, with three cooperating disciplines on the one hand and three levels of abstraction on the other hand. Basis of the framework is the notion t

  5. Industrial Buying Behavior Related to Human Resource Consulting Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Hollensen, Svend; Kahle, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to extend the understanding of the industrial buying process in connection with purchasing professional business (B2B) services, specifically human resource (HR) consulting services. Early B2B buying-behavior literature strongly emphasizes the rational aspects...

  6. Inequity among human service professionals : Measurement and relation to burnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDierendonck, D; Schaufeli, WB; Buunk, BP

    1996-01-01

    This research investigated the impact on burnout of inequity experienced by human service professionals. Two studies were conducted, among therapists working with inmates in a forensic psychiatric center (N = 112) and among staff members of an institute for the direct care of mentally disabled (N =

  7. A Relational Hermeneutical Approach to Human Rights Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daraweesh, Fuad

    2010-01-01

    This research is an effort to transcend the debate of universalism and cultural relativism by offering a new conceptualization of human rights. The conceptualization is presented through the development of a theoretical framework in the form of an epistemology. The research articulates and defends the epistemology, which is grounded on…

  8. A multidisciplinary framework for (teaching) human product relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Wouter; van der Bijl-Brouwer, Mieke; Boks, C.; McMahon, C.; Ion, W.; Parkinson, B

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a framework for dealing with the complexity of human-product relationships. The actual framework is a matrix of design perspectives, with three cooperating disciplines on the one hand and three levels of abstraction on the other hand. Basis of the framework is the notion

  9. Relation between HLA genes, human skin volatiles and attractiveness of humans to malaria mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Beijleveld, H.; Qiu, Y.T.; Maliepaard, C.A.; Verduyn, W.; Haasnoot, G.W.; Claas, F.H.J.; Mumm, R.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Takken, W.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Smallegange, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical cues are considered to be the most important cues for mosquitoes to find their hosts and humans can be ranked for attractiveness to mosquitoes based on the chemical cues they emit. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are considered to be involved in the regulation of human body odor and may

  10. Relating land use and human intra-city mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Minjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding human mobility patterns -- how people move in their everyday lives -- is an interdisciplinary research field. It is a question with roots back to the 19th century that has been dramatically revitalized with the recent increase in data availability. Models of human mobility often take the population distribution as a starting point. Another, sometimes more accurate, data source is land-use maps. In this paper, we discuss how the intra-city movement patterns, and consequently population distribution, can be predicted from such data sources. As a link between, land use and mobility, we show that the purposes of people's trips are strongly correlated with the land use of the trip's origin and destination. We calibrate, validate and discuss our model using survey data.

  11. The Human-Computer Domain Relation in UX Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil

    This paper argues that the conceptualization of the human, the computer and the domain of use in competing lines of UX research have problematic similarities and superficial differences. The paper qualitatively analyses concepts and models in five research papers that together represent two...... influential lines of UX research: aesthetics and temporal UX, and two use situations: using a website and starting to use a smartphone. The results suggest that the two lines of UX research share a focus on users’ evaluative judgments of technology, both focuses on product qualities rather than activity...... domains, give little details about users, and treat human-computer interaction as perception. The conclusion gives similarities and differences between the approaches to UX. The implications for theory building are indicated....

  12. Safe asleep? Human-machine relations in medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Maggie; Goodwin, Dawn; Smith, Andrew F; Pope, Catherine

    2005-11-01

    In the process of anaesthesia the patient must surrender vital functions to the care of clinicians and machines who will act for, and advocate for the patient during the surgical procedure. In this paper, we discuss the practices and knowledge sources that underpin safety in a risky field in which many boundaries are crossed and dissolved. Anaesthetic practice is at the frontier not only of conscious/unconsciousness but is also at the human/machine frontier, where a range of technologies acts as both delegates and intermediaries between patient and practitioner. We are concerned with how practitioners accommodate and manage these shifting boundaries and what kinds of knowledge sources the 'expert' must employ to make decisions. Such sources include clinical, social and electronic which in their various forms demonstrate the hybrid and collective nature of anaesthetised patients. In managing this collective, the expert is one who is able to judge where the boundary lies between what is routine and what is critical in practice, while the junior must judge the personal limits of expertise in practice. In exploring the working of anaesthetic hybrids, we argue that recognising the changing distribution of agency between humans and machines itself illustrates important features of human authorship and expertise.

  13. Postphenomenological Investigations: Essays on Human-Technology Relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberger, Robert; Verbeek, Peter-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Postphenomenological Investigations: Essays on Human–Technology Relations provides an introduction to the school of thought called postphenomenology and showcases projects at the cutting edge of this perspective. Postphenomenology presents a unique blend of insights from the philosophical traditions

  14. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    consisted of the pGL3- CYP3A4, pCDG1-SXR, and pRL-TK plasmids in the amounts of 360, 90, and 10 ng, respectively, along with 540 ng sonicated salmon sperm...oxidative stress in rat brain and liver is prevented by vitamin E or allopurinol. Toxicol. Lett. 2001; 118: 139-146. 34. Li, P., Nijhawan, D...acids, eicosanoids, fat- soluble vitamins /1/. Among fifty-seven CYP isoforms known in humans, fifteen are involved in the metabolism of

  15. Electrophysiological CNS-processes related to associative learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Gert R J; Schachtman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiology of human associative memory has been studied with electroencephalographic techniques since the 1930s. This research has revealed that different types of electrophysiological processes in the human brain can be modified by conditioning: sensory evoked potentials, sensory induced gamma-band activity, periods of frequency-specific waves (alpha and beta waves, the sensorimotor rhythm and the mu-rhythm) and slow cortical potentials. Conditioning of these processes has been studied in experiments that either use operant conditioning or repeated contingent pairings of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (classical conditioning). In operant conditioning, the appearance of a specific brain process is paired with an external stimulus (neurofeedback) and the feedback enables subjects to obtain varying degrees of control of the CNS-process. Such acquired self-regulation of brain activity has found practical uses for instance in the amelioration of epileptic seizures, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It has also provided communicative means of assistance for tetraplegic patients through the use of brain computer interfaces. Both extra and intracortically recorded signals have been coupled with contingent external feedback. It is the aim for this review to summarize essential results on all types of electromagnetic brain processes that have been modified by classical or operant conditioning. The results are organized according to type of conditioned EEG-process, type of conditioning, and sensory modalities of the conditioning stimuli.

  16. mRNA related to insulin family in human placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, M.A.; D' Agostino, J.B.; Frazier, M.L.; Besch, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that human term placenta contains mRNA displaying sequence homology to a rat preproinsulin I cDNA clone (p119). When placental poly(A/sup +/) RNA was analyzed for homology to p119 by RNA/DNA blot hybridization, prominent hybridization was observed which was found by densitometric analysis to be three-fold higher than control. To further characterize this insulin-like message, a cDNA library was generated (approx.7000 transformants) using normal term cesarean-sectioned tissue to prepare placental poly(A/sup +/) RNA templates. Five hundred transformants were initially screened by colony hybridization using a /sup 32/P-labeled rat preproinsulin I cDNA as probe. Of the ten initial positives obtained, three were found to be true positives based on Southern hybridization analyses of the recombinant plasmids. Using Taq I digested pBr322 as a size marker, the cDNAs were found to be approximately 300 bp in length. Preliminary DNA sequencing using the Sanger dideoxy chain termination method has revealed that one of these clones displays significant homology to the 5' region of human insulin-like growth factors I and II.

  17. Chromosomal aberrations related to metastasis of human solid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lun-Xiu Qin

    2002-01-01

    The central role of sequential accumulation of genetic alterations during the development of cancer has been firmly established since the pioneering cytogenetic studies successfully defined recurrent chromosome changes in spedfic types of tumor. In the course of carcinogenesis, cells experience several genetic alterations that are associated with the transition from a preneoplastic lesion to an invasive tumor and finally to the metastatic state. Tumor progression is characterized by stepwise accumulation of genetic alterations.So does the dominant metastatic clone. Modern molecular genetic analyses have clarified that genomic changes accumulate during the development and progression of cancers. In comparison with the corresponding primary tumor,additional events of chromosomal aberrations (including gains or allelic losses) are frequently found in metastases, and the incidence of combined chromosomal alterations in the primary tumor, plus the occurrence of additional aberrations inthe distant metastases, correlated significantly with decreased postmetastatic survival. The deletions at 3p, 4p, 6q, 8p, 10q,11p, 11q, 12p, 13q, 16q, 17p, 18q, 21q, and 22q, as well as the over-representations at 1q, 8q, 9q, 14q and 15q, have been found to associate preferentially with the metastatic phenotype of human cancers. Among of them, the deletions on chromosomes 8p, 17p, 11p and 13p seem to be more significant, and more detail fine regions of them, including 8p11, 8p21-12, 8p22, 8p23, 17p13.3, 11p15.5, and 13q12-13 have been suggested harboring metastasis-suppressor genes.During the past decade, several human chromosomes have been functionally tested through the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT), and metastasis-suppressor activities have been reported on chromosomes 1, 6, 7, 8, 10,11, 12, 16, and 17. However, it is not actually known at what stage of the metastatic cascade these alterations have occurred.There is still controversial with the association

  18. Concomitant Human Infections with 2 Cowpox Virus Strains in Related Cases, France, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducournau, Corinne; Ferrier-Rembert, Audrey; Ferraris, Olivier; Joffre, Aurélie; Favier, Anne-Laure; Flusin, Olivier; Van Cauteren, Dieter; Kecir, Kaci; Auburtin, Brigitte; Védy, Serge; Bessaud, Maël

    2013-01-01

    We investigated 4 related human cases of cowpox virus infection reported in France during 2011. Three patients were infected by the same strain, probably transmitted by imported pet rats, and the fourth patient was infected by another strain. The 2 strains were genetically related to viruses previously isolated from humans with cowpox infection in Europe. PMID:24274113

  19. Moving beyond a Human Relations Approach in Multicultural Art Education Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Christina

    2016-01-01

    While literature on multicultural education indicates that Human Relations approaches to multicultural education are the most commonly practiced, such approaches also tend to be the most heavily critiqued by theorists. Scholars often offer speculative theoretical suggestions on how to improve upon Human Relations approaches. However, ethnographic…

  20. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  1. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  2. Age-related changes in mucins from human whole saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, P C; Denny, P A; Klauser, D K; Hong, S H; Navazesh, M; Tabak, L A

    1991-10-01

    The predominant mucins in human whole saliva, MG1 and MG2, serve to protect and to lubricate the oral cavity. In this study, both unstimulated and stimulated whole salivas were collected from two groups of subjects: young (18-35 years of age) and aged (65-83 years of age). The subjects were in apparent good health. Saliva samples from each subject were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The gels were stained with Stains-all, and both MG1 and MG2 were quantitated by video-image densitometry. The protocol gave reproducible values for each mucin. The stimulated and unstimulated salivas from aged subjects showed significant reductions in concentrations of both MG1 and MG2, as quantitated in mucin dye-binding units. Possible associations of these reductions with the aging process are discussed.

  3. Planetary protection issues related to human missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, A.; Arnould, J.

    2008-09-01

    In accordance with the United Nations Outer Space Treaties [United Nations, Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies, UN doc A/RES/34/68, resolution 38/68 of December 1979], currently maintained and promulgated by the Committee on Space Research [COSPAR Planetary Protection Panel, Planetary Protection Policy accepted by the COSPAR Council and Bureau, 20 October 2002, amended 24 March 2005, http://www.cosparhq.org/scistr/PPPolicy.htm], missions exploring the Solar system must meet planetary protection requirements. Planetary protection aims to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and to protect the Earth environment from potential biological contamination carried by returned samples or space systems that have been in contact with an extraterrestrial environment. From an exobiology perspective, Mars is one of the major targets, and several missions are currently in operation, in transit, or scheduled for its exploration. Some of them include payloads dedicated to the detection of life or traces of life. The next step, over the coming years, will be to return samples from Mars to Earth, with a view to increasing our knowledge in preparation for the first manned mission that is likely to take place within the next few decades. Robotic missions to Mars shall meet planetary protection specifications, currently well documented, and planetary protection programs are implemented in a very reliable manner given that experience in the field spans some 40 years. With regards to sample return missions, a set of stringent requirements has been approved by COSPAR [COSPAR Planetary Protection Panel, Planetary Protection Policy accepted by the COSPAR Council and Bureau, 20 October 2002, amended 24 March 2005, http://www.cosparhq.org/scistr/PPPolicy.htm], and technical challenges must now be overcome in order to preserve the Earth’s biosphere from any eventual contamination risk. In addition to the human dimension of

  4. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  5. Increasing Parental Knowledge Related to the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Joseph J; Scoloveno, Robert; Kelly, Angela

    2017-08-16

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate parental attitudes toward general vaccination protocols and increase parental knowledge of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. A nonprobability convenience sample (N = 75) using a pre-/postintervention study design was conducted in a pediatric office in southern New Jersey. The Parental Attitudes Module measured the general disposition toward having children receive any type of vaccine. The HPV Knowledge Survey was a second tool used to specifically measures knowledge of the HPV vaccine. A self-directed computer-based learning was part of the educational intervention. A paired t test showed that HPV Knowledge Survey postintervention scores were significantly higher than HPV Knowledge Survey preintervention scores (t = -10.585, p < .001). The Parental Attitudes Module and the HPV Knowledge Survey pretest showed a positive moderate relationship (rs = .552, p < .001). In the 10 years since the HPV vaccine has been on the market, there is a continued need to increase parental knowledge about the HPV vaccine to close the gap on vaccine nonadherence. A self-directed, computer-based learning tablet appears to be an effective tool to educate parents or legal guardians about the purpose, efficacy, and safety of the HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. "Nutraceuticals" in relation to human skeletal muscle and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Colleen S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Smith, Kenneth; Etheridge, Timothy; Atherton, Philip J

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal muscles have a fundamental role in locomotion and whole body metabolism, with muscle mass and quality being linked to improved health and even lifespan. Optimizing nutrition in combination with exercise is considered an established, effective ergogenic practice for athletic performance. Importantly, exercise and nutritional approaches also remain arguably the most effective countermeasure for muscle dysfunction associated with aging and numerous clinical conditions, e.g., cancer cachexia, COPD, and organ failure, via engendering favorable adaptations such as increased muscle mass and oxidative capacity. Therefore, it is important to consider the effects of established and novel effectors of muscle mass, function, and metabolism in relation to nutrition and exercise. To address this gap, in this review, we detail existing evidence surrounding the efficacy of a nonexhaustive list of macronutrient, micronutrient, and "nutraceutical" compounds alone and in combination with exercise in relation to skeletal muscle mass, metabolism (protein and fuel), and exercise performance (i.e., strength and endurance capacity). It has long been established that macronutrients have specific roles and impact upon protein metabolism and exercise performance, (i.e., protein positively influences muscle mass and protein metabolism), whereas carbohydrate and fat intakes can influence fuel metabolism and exercise performance. Regarding novel nutraceuticals, we show that the following ones in particular may have effects in relation to 1) muscle mass/protein metabolism: leucine, hydroxyl β-methylbutyrate, creatine, vitamin-D, ursolic acid, and phosphatidic acid; and 2) exercise performance: (i.e., strength or endurance capacity): hydroxyl β-methylbutyrate, carnitine, creatine, nitrates, and β-alanine. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Immune therapy for human papillomaviruses-related cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Ricardo; Rosales, Carlos

    2014-12-10

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of double strand DNA viruses comprising more than 180 types. Infection with HPV is very common and it is associated with benign and malignant proliferation of skin and squamous mucosae. Many HPVs, considered low-risk such as HPV 6 and 11, produce warts; while high-risk viruses, such as HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, and 58, induce tumors. About 5% of all cancers in men and women are associated with HPV infection. Because there are not antiviral drugs for HPV infection, current therapies for low-risk HPV infections involve physical removal of the lesion by cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, laser, or surgical removal. Surgical procedures are effective in the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions, however after these procedures, many recurrences appear due to new re-infections, or to failure of the procedure to eliminate the HPV. In addition, HPV can inhibit recognition of malignant cells by the immune system, leading to the development of cancer lesions. When this occurs, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are then used. Unfortunately, about 50% of the HPV-cancer patients still die. In the past decade, a better knowledge of the natural history of the virus-host interaction and of the immune response against this viral infection has brought new therapeutic strategies geared to modulate the immune system to generate an efficient virus-specific cytotoxic response. Novel HPV protein-expressing vaccines have shown some significant clinical efficacy and systemic HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. This review will describe the current status of the several therapeutic strategies used to treat HPV-induced lesions, and discuss the various new therapies now being tested.

  8. The human urinary microbiome and how it relates to urogynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweiss, Jenifer; Koch, Marianne; Umek, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies applying molecular techniques have demonstrated the presence of a urinary microbiota not detected by standard microbiological techniques. These have been found in the urine of healthy individuals and in those suffering from clinical symptoms. The present article reviews the findings of these studies to date, describing the molecular techniques, and specifically outlining any differences in microbiomes in relation to urogynecological disease. Further, the role of commensal bacteria in the lower urinary tract is considered. An extensive literature search was conducted to identify articles on the microbiome of the female urinary tract in health and disease. We searched the electronic meta-databases Ovid MEDLINE® 1946-2015 and Embase 1974-2015. The keywords "microbiome, microbiota, bacterial colonization, microbiology, commensal bacteria, and bacteriuria" were searched in combination with "lower urinary tract symptoms, urogenital symptoms, urinary tract infection, overactive bladder and urinary incontinence." A total of 426 papers were retrieved; 33 were included in this paper. The microbiome of the female lower urinary tract shows variance between individuals and between age groups. There are significant differences between the microbiota in the lower urinary tract of individuals with urological symptoms and those without, relating to type and proportion of commensal Lactobacillus spp. There is only weak evidence to suggest that Lactobacillus might be applied as a therapeutic measure. It is still unclear what role microbiota plays in female urinary tract health. The discovery of bacteria in the urine of healthy individuals may have implications for future therapies for lower urinary tract symptoms.

  9. Is "circling" behavior in humans related to postural asymmetry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Bestaven

    Full Text Available In attempting to walk rectilinearly in the absence of visual landmarks, persons will gradually turn in a circle to eventually become lost. The aim of the present study was to provide insights into the possible underlying mechanisms of this behavior. For each subject (N = 15 six trajectories were monitored during blindfolded walking in a large enclosed area to suppress external cues, and ground irregularities that may elicit unexpected changes in direction. There was a substantial variability from trial to trial for a given subject and between subjects who could either veer very early or relatively late. Of the total number of trials, 50% trajectories terminated on the left side, 39% on the right side and 11% were defined as "straight". For each subject, we established a "turning score" that reflected his/her preferential side of veering. The turning score was found to be unrelated to any evident biomechanical asymmetry or functional dominance (eye, hand.... Posturographic analysis, used to assess if there was a relationship between functional postural asymmetry and veering revealed that the mean position of the center of foot pressure during balance tests was correlated with the turning score. Finally, we established that the mean position of the center of pressure was correlated with perceived verticality assessed by a subjective verticality test. Together, our results suggest that veering is related to a "sense of straight ahead" that could be shaped by vestibular inputs.

  10. [Constant or break? On the relations between human genetics and eugenics in the Twentieth Century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Pascal

    2015-07-01

    The history of human genetics has been a neglected topic in history of science and medicine for a long time. Only recently, have medical historians begun to pay more attention to the history of human heredity. An important research question deals with the interconnections between human genetics and eugenics. This paper addresses this question: By focusing on a Swiss case study, the investigation of the heredity of goiter, I will argue that there existed close but also ambiguous relations between heredity research and eugenics in the twentieth century. Studies on human heredity often produced evidence that challenged eugenic aims and ideas. Concurrently, however, these studies fostered visions of genetic improvement of human populations.

  11. Mapping and annotating obesity-related genes in pig and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fontanesi, Luca; Piovesan, Damiano; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a major health problem in both developed and emerging countries. Obesity is a complex disease whose etiology involves genetic factors in strong interplay with environmental determinants and lifestyle. The discovery of genetic factors and biological pathways underlying human obesity is hampered by the difficulty in controlling the genetic background of human cohorts. Animal models are then necessary to further dissect the genetics of obesity. Pig has emerged as one of the most attractive models, because of the similarity with humans in the mechanisms regulating the fat deposition. Results. We collected the genes related to obesity in humans and to fat deposition traits in pig. We localized them on both human and pig genomes, building a map useful to interpret comparative studies on obesity. We characterized the collected genes structurally and functionally with BAR+ and mapped them on KEGG pathways and on STRING protein interaction network. Conclusions. The collected set consists of 361 obesity related genes in human and pig genomes. All genes were mapped on the human genome, and 54 could not be localized on the pig genome (release 2012). Only for 3 human genes there is no counterpart in pig, confirming that this animal is a good model for human obesity studies. Obesity related genes are mostly involved in regulation and signaling processes/pathways and relevant connection emerges between obesity-related genes and diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases.

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and adrenomedullin release in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2002-01-01

    ). Plasma values of CGRP, AM, calcitonin, noradrenaline, adrenaline, lactate and heart rate were measured at rest and during maximal exercise (W(max)). On each study day, the dopamine D(2)-receptor antagonist, domperidone (30 mg; n=6), or no medication (n=6) was given 1 h before exercise. W(max) at SL, HA1......Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) are potent vasorelaxant peptides. This study examined exercise-induced changes in CGRP and AM levels in 12 healthy sea level natives at sea level (SL) and subsequently after 24 h (HA1) and 5 days (HA5) in high altitude hypoxia (4559 m...... and HA5 increased CGRP and AM along with heart rate, lactate and catecholamines, whereas, calcitonin remained unchanged. The maximal CGRP levels at W(max) were significantly decreased at HA1 (74.3+/-6.1 pmol/l; p=0.002) and HA5 (69.6+/-6.0 pmol/l; p...

  13. A novel full-length gene of human ribosomal protein L14.22 related to human glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Zhen-yu; HUI Guo-zhen; LI Yao; ZHOU Zong-xiang; GU Shao-hua; XIE Yi

    2006-01-01

    Background This study was undertaken to obtain differentially expressed genes related to human glioma by cDNA microarray and the characterization of a novel full-length gene. Methods Total RNA was extracted from human glioma and normal brain tissues, and mRNA was used as a probe. The results of hybridization procedure were scanned with the computer system. The gene named 507E08clone was subsequently analyzed by northern blot, bioinformatic approach, and protein expression.Results Fifteen differentially expressed genes were obtained from human glioma by hybridization and scanning for four times. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the 507E08 clone was low expressed in human brain tissue and over expressed in human glioma tissues. The analysis of BLASTn and BLASTx showed that the 507E08clone was a novel full-length gene, which codes 203 amino acid of protein and is called human ribosomal protein 14.22 gene. The nucleotide sequence had been submitted to the GenBankTM with the accession number of AF329277. After expression in E. Coli., protein yielded a major band of apparent molecular mass 22 kDa on an SDS-PAGE gel.Conclusions cDNA microarray technology can be successfully used to identify differentially expressed genes.The novel full-length gene of human ribosomal protein 14.22 may be correlated with the development of human glioma.

  14. Humanity as a Contested Concept: Relations between Disability and ‘Being Human’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul van Trigt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This editorial presents the theme and approach of the themed issue “Humanity as a Contested Concept: Relations between Disability and ‘Being Human’”. The way in which the concept of humanity is or must be related to disability is critically investigated from different disciplinary perspectives in the themed issue, which is, moreover, situated in the field of disability studies and related to discussions about posthumanism. The argument is made that humanity is a concept that needs to be constantly reflected upon from a disability studies perspective. Finally, the contributions of the themed issue are briefly outlined.

  15. Human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in relation to access to medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hunt, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Although access to medicines is a vital feature of the right to the highest attainable standard of health ("right to health"), almost two billion people lack access to essential medicines, leading to immense avoidable suffering. While the human rights responsibility to provide access to medicines lies mainly with States, pharmaceutical companies also have human rights responsibilities in relation to access to medicines. This article provides an introduction to these responsibilities. It briefly outlines the new UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and places the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in this context. The authors draw from the work of the first UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, in particular the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in Relation to Access to Medicines that he presented to the UN General Assembly in 2008, and his UN report on GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). While the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights are general human rights standards applicable to all business entities, the Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies consider the specific human rights responsibilities of one sector (pharmaceutical companies) in relation to one area of activity (access to medicines). The article signals the human rights responsibilities of all pharmaceutical companies, with particular attention to patent-holding pharmaceutical companies. Adopting a right-to-health "lens," the article discusses GSK and accountability. The authors argue that human rights should shape pharmaceutical companies' policies, and provide standards in relation to which pharmaceutical companies could, and should, be held accountable. They conclude that it is now crucial to devise independent, accessible, transparent, and effective mechanisms to monitor pharmaceutical companies and hold them publicly accountable for their human rights responsibilities.

  16. Artificial companions: empathy and vulnerability mirroring in human-robot relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Under what conditions can robots become companions and what are the ethical issues that might arise in human-robot companionship relations? I argue that the possibility and future of robots as companions depends (among other things) on the robot’s capacity to be a recipient of human empathy, and tha

  17. Human Relations: Assessing the Affect of Cultural Awareness Curriculum on Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Seth; Reed, Kris; Schweinle, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human relations training is intended to prepare teachers to be culturally sensitive to an increasingly diverse population. There is a growing trend in teacher education to train preservice teachers more effectively to meet the demands of multicultural society. However, limited research is available to guide the future design of human relations…

  18. Error-related EEG patterns during tactile human-machine interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehne, M.; Ihme, K.; Brouwer, A.M.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Zander, T.O.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) has been extended from active control to passive detection of cognitive user states. These passive BCI systems can be especially useful for automatic error detection in human-machine systems by recording EEG potentials related to human error proc

  19. Training in Human Relations for Engineers at the Ecole Superieure D'Informatique-Electronique-Automatique (ESIEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafargue, M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Points out the need to provide engineers with training in human relations. Describes the process of developing a document defining the problem and steps to be taken toward solution, submitted to students for their evaluation. (JM)

  20. Training in Human Relations for Engineers at the Ecole Superieure D'Informatique-Electronique-Automatique (ESIEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafargue, M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Points out the need to provide engineers with training in human relations. Describes the process of developing a document defining the problem and steps to be taken toward solution, submitted to students for their evaluation. (JM)

  1. George Herbert Mead on Humans and Other Animals: Social Relations After Human-Animal Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoda Wilkie; Andrew McKinnon

    2013-01-01

    The turn towards nonhuman animals within sociology has shed a critical light on George Herbert Mead, his apparent prioritisation of language and the anthropocentric focus of Symbolic Interactionism (SI). Although Herbert Blumer canonised Mead as the founder of this perspective he also played a key role in excising the evolutionary and 'more-than-human' components in Mead's work. This intervention not only misrepresented Mead's intellectual project, it also made symbols the predominant concern...

  2. The Promotion and Integration of Human Rights in EU External Trade Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Velluti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Union (EU has made the upholding of human rights an integral part of its external trade relations and requires that all trade, cooperation, partnership and association agreements with third countries, including unilateral trade instruments, contain with varying modalities and intensity a commitment to the respect for human rights. The paper discusses selected aspects of the EU’s promotion and integration of human rights in its external trade relations and assesses the impact of the changes introduced by the 2009 Treaty of Lisbon (ToL on EU practice.

  3. The meaning of aluminium exposure on human health and aluminium-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisponi, Guido; Fanni, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Nemolato, Sonia; Nurchi, Valeria M; Crespo-Alonso, Miriam; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Faa, Gavino

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this review is to attempt to answer extremely important questions related to aluminium-related diseases. Starting from an overview on the main sources of aluminium exposure in everyday life, the principal aspects of aluminium metabolism in humans have been taken into consideration in an attempt to enlighten the main metabolic pathways utilised by trivalent metal ions in different organs. The second part of this review is focused on the available evidence concerning the pathogenetic consequences of aluminium overload in human health, with particular attention to its putative role in bone and neurodegenerative human diseases.

  4. Attitudes About Human Trafficking: Individual Differences Related to Belief and Victim Blame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Katherine C; Cromer, Lisa DeMarni

    2016-01-01

    Human trafficking is believed to oppress millions of people worldwide. Despite increased media attention and public awareness campaigns in recent years, no empirical research has examined public attitudes about human trafficking. The present study examined gender, sexual trauma history, and attitudes about human trafficking as they related to belief of a sex-trafficking scenario and willingness to blame the victim for the situation. Undergraduate students (N = 409) at a large private university in the Northeastern United States completed measures in which they responded to a vignette portraying sex trafficking in the United States. Participants also reported their personal trauma history and completed a Human Trafficking Myths Scale. Results indicated that gender and human trafficking myth acceptance, but not sexual trauma history, were significantly related to participants' belief of the sex-trafficking scenario and their perception of the victim's responsibility. Potential implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  5. Dynamic Relation between Rural Human Capital and Farmers’Income in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    We use relevant economic and labor force data from 1990 to 2009 of Henan Province to analyze the dynamic relation between stock of rural human capital and farmers’ income.Results indicate that a certain causal relationship and long-run equilibrium relation exist between rural human capital and farmers’ income,but their interaction shows some lagging characteristic.Increase of farmers’ income in Henan Province increases the stock of rural human capital in this province for a short term.However,in the long run,this accumulation effect will decline along with renewal and aging of knowledge.The positive promotion action of rural human capital on farmers’ income will appear after a long lag time.Therefore,the policy of strengthening rural human capital input should be long-term and continuous.

  6. Drug: D06653 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s K+ channel, KCND, Kv4.x (Shal) voltage-gated potassium channel (KCND3) [HSA:3752] [KO:K04893] Ted...isamil [ATC:C01BD06] D06653 Tedisamil sesquifumarate (USAN) K+ channel, KCNQ, Kv7.x (KQT-like) voltage-gated... sesquifumarate (USAN) K+ channel, KCNH, Kv10-12.x (Ether-a-go-go) voltage-gated potassium channel (KCNH2) [HSA:3757] [KO:K04905] Ted...isamil [ATC:C01BD06] D06653 Tedisamil sesquifumarate (USAN) Related...D06653 Drug Tedisamil sesquifumarate (USAN) (C19H32N2)2. (C4H4O4)3 924.546 925.158

  7. Pengembangan Human Relation Perspektif Nilai-nilai al-Qur’an

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fauzi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Not least the manager (leader who failed to carry out its duties and functions. This is largely due to the lack of attention to the human relations aspect in building a spirit of togetherness as one of the most dominant factor in the success of management. Since the beginning of its creation, mankind has been designed as a creature who can not live alone. Therefore, one man inevitably need to Communicate and Interact with other human beings. This study intends to examine the conceptual meaning of human relations and the urgency with psychological and sociological approach in the perspective of the values of the Koran, Because The Qur’anic principle is to guide human life. The shift in the orientation of this communication is Inseparable from the human relations that is increasingly widespread and seamless, everyone can relate to anyone who desired, Including Westerners and their world. The existence of two human relationships that must be Followed by two cultures is then led to the change tendency of the relations between the two models

  8. Age-related changes in the transmission properties of the human lens and their relevance to circadian entrainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Lundeman, Jesper Holm; Herbst, Kristina;

    2010-01-01

    To characterize age-related changes in the transmission of light through noncataractous human lenses.......To characterize age-related changes in the transmission of light through noncataractous human lenses....

  9. EDUCATION, WORK AND THEIR RELATIONS THROUGHOUT HISTORY OF HUMANITY IN DIFFERENT MODES OF PRODUCTION OF EXISTENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denize Cristina Kaminski Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article has as objective to analyze the relation between education and work throughout the history of the humanity, for in such a way, the starting point is the conceptualization of the related categories, as well as the exposition of its variations and relation in the different ways of material production of the existence human being (primitive community, slavery society, feudal system and capitalism, aiming at to apprehend the multiple influences that both exert between itself, in order to make possible a bigger understanding of the historical and social evolution of the man

  10. Concentration and distribution of dioxins and related compounds in various human organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, T.; Hirakawa, H.; Hori, T.; Tobiishi, K.; Matsueda, T. [Fukuoka Inst. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Dazaifu, Fukuoka (Japan); Todaka, T. [Japan Food Hygiene Association, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, S. [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, T. [Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and non-ortho coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Non-Co-PCBs) and mono-ortho coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Mono-Co-PCBs) accumulate in the human body due to their highly lipophilic properties. In recent years, there has been some concern about the potential health effects of dioxins and related chemicals for the general population of humans. Although there exists an enormous amount of data on this subject, most of it is from breast milk and blood, due to ease of collection; information concerning concentrations and distribution in various human organs hardly exists. Therefore, new data concerning various human tissues is required to evaluate the pathophysiological significance of dioxins and related compounds in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the concentration levels and distribution of dioxins and related compounds in various human organ tissues. We previously reported on the concentration levels in the human liver and adipose tissues from 28 donors. In this paper, we determined the concentrations of dioxin-like isomers in 8 organs, including blood, lungs, liver, bile, spleen, pancreas, kidney and mesentery fat from 20 donors.

  11. Talking to Robots: On the Linguistic Construction of Personal Human-Robot Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    How should we make sense of 'personal' human-robot relations, given that many people view robots as 'mere machines'? This paper proposes that we understand human-robot relations from a phenomenological view as social relations in which robots are constructed as quasi-others. It is argued that language mediates in this construction. Responding to research by Turkle and others, it is shown that our talking to robots (as opposed to talking about robots) reveals a shift from an impersonal third-person to a personal second-person perspective, which constitutes a different kind of human-robot relation. The paper makes suggestions for empirical research to further study this social-phenomenological process.

  12. Human rights on the thin red line between universality and relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Dragutin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rights represent an open legal and political concept with a very wide value variable. Academic discussions on human rights nature have mostly commenced after the World War II during the trend of human rights internationalization, reaching their climax after the Cold war. This paper examines actual theories on human rights, from those accepting them as universal, up to those marking another pole, favoring idea of absolute relativity of human rights. The author asserts that the most acceptable should be a middle solution, standing of moderate relativism or position of relative universalism of human rights. He claims that only a very limited circle of basic, 'substantial' human rights, having been accepted through an intercultural consensus, may pretend to be treated as universal. Out of that narrow sphere, there are many other human rights whose meaning and interpretation depend strongly upon concrete cultural context. The author points that in those cases it is important to respect a relativistic discourse and that the only solution should be explored within an intercultural and inter-civilizational dialogue, where non-western values should be equally treated as the western ones.

  13. Recovery in ERG gene expression with biventricular pacing in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Samir Saba,* Haider Mehdi,* William Barrington, Fardeen Mehdi, Zahid Islam, Barry LondonCardiovascular Institute of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Improved clinical and echocardiographic parameters have been documented with biventricular (BIV pacing in patients after myocardial infarction (MI. We investigated the changes in gene expression in cardiac tissue with BIV pacing, using a rabbit model of MI.Method: New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: sham-operated controls, MI with no pacing, MI with right ventricle (RV pacing (MI + RV, and MI with BIV pacing (MI + BIV. Pacing was initiated 1–2 weeks after the coronary ligation. At 5 weeks, the hearts were excised. The tissue extracted from the left ventricle (LV and RV underwent analysis for protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels.Results: The ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG protein levels recovered from the base of the LV away from the MI area were two- to threefold lower in the MI and the MI + RV compared with the MI + BIV groups (P = 0.07. The ERG protein levels were similar between the MI + BIV and the control groups. However, the RNA levels were comparable between the four study groups, suggesting that a posttranscriptional mechanism accounted for the difference in protein levels.Conclusion: In this rabbit model of MI, we demonstrated a recovery in ERG protein levels with BIV pacing, after MI. This recovery may underlie some of the benefits seen with BIV pacing in ischemic cardiomyopathy.Keywords: heart failure, biventricular pacing, cardiac reverse remodeling, ether-a-go-go-related gene

  14. Women's awareness of the human papilloma virus and related health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Aygul; Yılmaz, Cevriye; Yenen, Müfit Cemal; Yavan, Tülay; Kılıç, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study of women's awareness of the human papilloma virus and related health problems. Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality, making up approximately 12% of all cancers in women. Awareness on the part of carriers of human papilloma virus is crucial in preventing transmission of the infection and protecting against cervical cancer. The study was performed as a cross-sectional descriptive study. The study consists of 79 human papilloma virus-positive women who had not been diagnosed with cervical cancer and 150 women who had not been diagnosed with human papilloma virus. Data were collected via questionnaires between November 2007 and April 2008. Percentages and chi-square test were used. A significantly higher percentage of women with positive human papilloma virus knew the definition of human papilloma virus, the fact that it is transmitted via sexual contact and that it can lead to cervical cancer than did women with negative human papilloma virus. It was established that approximately half the women with positive human papilloma virus presented at the hospital with a genital wart. None of the women knew that a Pap smear test was a necessary tool in the prevention of cervical cancer. Women with positive human papilloma virus have insufficient knowledge of human papilloma virus, sexually transmitted diseases, the health risks associated with human papilloma virus and the means of preventing these risks. It is therefore necessary to evaluate the education of health workers, and especially of nurses, on human papilloma virus and its prevention. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. An interdisciplinary review of current and future approaches to improving human-predator relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, S; Barua, M; Beinart, W; Dickman, A; Holmes, G; Lorimer, J; Loveridge, A J; Macdonald, D W; Marvin, G; Redpath, S; Sillero-Zubiri, C; Zimmermann, A; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2017-06-01

    In a world of shrinking habitats and increasing competition for natural resources, potentially dangerous predators bring the challenges of coexisting with wildlife sharply into focus. Through interdisciplinary collaboration among authors trained in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, we reviewed current approaches to mitigating adverse human-predator encounters and devised a vision for future approaches to understanding and mitigating such encounters. Limitations to current approaches to mitigation include too much focus on negative impacts; oversimplified equating of levels of damage with levels of conflict; and unsuccessful technical fixes resulting from failure to engage locals, address hidden costs, or understand cultural (nonscientific) explanations of the causality of attacks. An emerging interdisciplinary literature suggests that to better frame and successfully mitigate negative human-predator relations conservation professionals need to consider dispensing with conflict as the dominant framework for thinking about human-predator encounters; work out what conflicts are really about (they may be human-human conflicts); unravel the historical contexts of particular conflicts; and explore different cultural ways of thinking about animals. The idea of cosmopolitan natures may help conservation professionals think more clearly about human-predator relations in both local and global context. These new perspectives for future research practice include a recommendation for focused interdisciplinary research and the use of new approaches, including human-animal geography, multispecies ethnography, and approaches from the environmental humanities notably environmental history. Managers should think carefully about how they engage with local cultural beliefs about wildlife, work with all parties to agree on what constitutes good evidence, develop processes and methods to mitigate conflicts, and decide how to monitor and evaluate these. Demand for

  16. Detection of novel sequences related to african Swine Fever virus in human serum and sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel M; Holtz, Lori R; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Droit, Lindsay; Villasana, Zoilmar; Todd, Collin; Pipas, James M; Calgua, Byron; Girones, Rosina; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W

    2009-12-01

    The family Asfarviridae contains only a single virus species, African swine fever virus (ASFV). ASFV is a viral agent with significant economic impact due to its devastating effects on populations of domesticated pigs during outbreaks but has not been reported to infect humans. We report here the discovery of novel viral sequences in human serum and sewage which are clearly related to the asfarvirus family but highly divergent from ASFV. Detection of these sequences suggests that greater genetic diversity may exist among asfarviruses than previously thought and raises the possibility that human infection by asfarviruses may occur.

  17. Human health risk assessment related to contaminated land: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartjes, F A

    2015-08-01

    Exposure of humans to contaminants from contaminated land may result in many types of health damage ranging from relatively innocent symptoms such as skin eruption or nausea, on up to cancer or even death. Human health protection is generally considered as a major protection target. State-of-the-art possibilities and limitations of human health risk assessment tools are described in this paper. Human health risk assessment includes two different activities, i.e. the exposure assessment and the hazard assessment. The combination of these is called the risk characterization, which results in an appraisal of the contaminated land. Exposure assessment covers a smart combination of calculations, using exposure models, and measurements in contact media and body liquids and tissue (biomonitoring). Regarding the time frame represented by exposure estimates, biomonitoring generally relates to exposure history, measurements in contact media to actual exposures, while exposure calculations enable a focus on exposure in future situations. The hazard assessment, which is different for contaminants with or without a threshold for effects, results in a critical exposure value. Good human health risk assessment practice accounts for tiered approaches and multiple lines of evidence. Specific attention is given here to phenomena such as the time factor in human health risk assessment, suitability for the local situation, background exposure, combined exposure and harmonization of human health risk assessment tools.

  18. Large-scale oscillation of structure-related DNA sequence features in human chromosome 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Miramontes, Pedro

    2006-08-01

    Human chromosome 21 is the only chromosome in the human genome that exhibits oscillation of the (G+C) content of a cycle length of hundreds kilobases (kb) ( 500kb near the right telomere). We aim at establishing the existence of a similar periodicity in structure-related sequence features in order to relate this (G+C)% oscillation to other biological phenomena. The following quantities are shown to oscillate with the same 500kb periodicity in human chromosome 21: binding energy calculated by two sets of dinucleotide-based thermodynamic parameters, AA/TT and AAA/TTT bi- and tri-nucleotide density, 5'-TA-3' dinucleotide density, and signal for 10- or 11-base periodicity of AA/TT or AAA/TTT. These intrinsic quantities are related to structural features of the double helix of DNA molecules, such as base-pair binding, untwisting or unwinding, stiffness, and a putative tendency for nucleosome formation.

  19. Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Time magazine's ""Man of the Century"", Albert Einstein is the founder of modern physics and his theory of relativity is the most important scientific idea of the modern era. In this short book, Einstein explains, using the minimum of mathematical terms, the basic ideas and principles of the theory that has shaped the world we live in today. Unsurpassed by any subsequent books on relativity, this remains the most popular and useful exposition of Einstein's immense contribution to human knowledge.With a new foreword by Derek Raine.

  20. Benchmarking human protein complexes to investigate drug-related systems and evaluate predicted protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are key entities to perform cellular functions. Human diseases are also revealed to associate with some specific human protein complexes. In fact, human protein complexes are widely used for protein function annotation, inference of human protein interactome, disease gene prediction, and so on. Therefore, it is highly desired to build an up-to-date catalogue of human complexes to support the research in these applications. Protein complexes from different databases are as expected to be highly redundant. In this paper, we designed a set of concise operations to compile these redundant human complexes and built a comprehensive catalogue called CHPC2012 (Catalogue of Human Protein Complexes. CHPC2012 achieves a higher coverage for proteins and protein complexes than those individual databases. It is also verified to be a set of complexes with high quality as its co-complex protein associations have a high overlap with protein-protein interactions (PPI in various existing PPI databases. We demonstrated two distinct applications of CHPC2012, that is, investigating the relationship between protein complexes and drug-related systems and evaluating the quality of predicted protein complexes. In particular, CHPC2012 provides more insights into drug development. For instance, proteins involved in multiple complexes (the overlapping proteins are potential drug targets; the drug-complex network is utilized to investigate multi-target drugs and drug-drug interactions; and the disease-specific complex-drug networks will provide new clues for drug repositioning. With this up-to-date reference set of human protein complexes, we believe that the CHPC2012 catalogue is able to enhance the studies for protein interactions, protein functions, human diseases, drugs, and related fields of research. CHPC2012 complexes can be downloaded from http://www1.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/xlli/CHPC2012/CHPC2012.htm.

  1. [Animal protection without limits? Human-animal relations in between anthropomorphism and objectification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Herwig; Hartnack, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    In view of recent developments in human-animal relations, vets and ethicists face a new problem: On the one hand, animals such as mammals and birds are used extensively and are in danger to be reduced to mere production units e. g. in the agricultural production, measuring devices in laboratories, sports equipment etc. On the other hand, biologically similar animals are perceived as family members or partners and are almost treated like humans. The article summarizes the results of a workshop that dealt with reductionism and anthropomorphism in human-animal relations. Vets and ethicists tackled the question how the unequal treatment of biologically similar animals can be better understood and whether it can be ethically justified. In the first section, the problem of inconsistency in human-animals relations is briefly sketched. The second part of the article addresses the ethics of unequal treatment of similar animals in different contexts. The following section inquires possible solutions and the advantages and disadvantages of biological criteria versus social criteria in animal protection. Finally, the background and reasons for our moral intuitions of injustice associated with the inconsistencies in human-animal relations are outlined. This fourth section refers to the presentation of Peter Kunzmann during the workshop on the unequal treatment of equals.The article closes with some general remarks on the issue. One main result of the workshop can be stated as follows: Due to the fact that the various human-animal relations gain their ethical justification from different ethical reasons, the unequal treatment of similar animals in different contexts is not ethically wrong per se. However, every intrusive dealing or interaction with animals is in itself in need of ethical justification.

  2. Factors of human capital related to project success in health care work units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Marjo; Paasivaara, Leena

    2011-03-01

    To explore factors of human capital related to project success that employees expect from nurse managers. Human capital refers to those resources that managers working with projects possess, such as abilities, knowledge and qualities of character. The data were collected by open interviews (n=14) with nurses, public health nurses and nurse managers working in primary health care and a hospital. Data analysis was carried out using qualitative content analysis. The main factors of human capital related to project success proved to be as follows: (1) management of enthusiastic project culture, (2) management of regeneration and (3) management of emotional intelligence. Future research is needed on the kind of means nurse managers use in human capital management in projects and how they see their possibilities in managing human capital. Human capital management skills should be underlined as an important competence area when recruiting a nurse manager. The success of health care projects cannot be improved only through education or by training of nurse managers; in addition, projects need nurse managers who understand workplace spirituality and have high emotional intelligence. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Adipogenesis-related increase of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and monoamine oxidase in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Sandy; Daviaud, Danièle; Gres, Sandra; Lefort, Corinne; Prévot, Danielle; Zorzano, Antonio; Wabitsch, Martin; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Valet, Philippe; Carpéné, Christian

    2007-08-01

    A strong induction of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) has previously been reported during murine preadipocyte lineage differentiation but it remains unknown whether this emergence also occurs during adipogenesis in man. Our aim was to compare SSAO and monoamine oxidase (MAO) expression during in vitro differentiation of human preadipocytes and in adipose and stroma-vascular fractions of human fat depots. A human preadipocyte cell strain from a patient with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome was first used to follow amine oxidase expression during in vitro differentiation. Then, human preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissues were cultured under conditions promoting ex vivo adipose differentiation and tested for MAO and SSAO expression. Lastly, human adipose tissue was separated into mature adipocyte and stroma-vascular fractions for analyses of MAO and SSAO at mRNA, protein and activity levels. Both SSAO and MAO were increased from undifferentiated preadipocytes to lipid-laden cells in all the models: 3T3-F442A and 3T3-L1 murine lineages, human SGBS cell strain or human preadipocytes in primary culture. In human subcutaneous adipose tissue, the adipocyte-enriched fraction exhibited seven-fold higher amine oxidase activity and contained three- to seven-fold higher levels of mRNAs encoded by MAO-A, MAO-B, AOC3 and AOC2 genes than the stroma-vascular fraction. MAO-A and AOC3 genes accounted for the majority of their respective MAO and SSAO activities in human adipose tissue. Most of the SSAO and MAO found in adipose tissue originated from mature adipocytes. Although the mechanism and role of adipogenesis-related increase in amine oxidase expression remain to be established, the resulting elevated levels of amine oxidase activities found in human adipocytes may be of potential interest for therapeutic intervention in obesity.

  4. A Quantitative Index to Support Recurrence Prevention Plans of Human-Related Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yochan; Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Sam; Lee, Durk Hun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, HuRAM+ (Human related event Root cause Analysis Method plus) was developed to scrutinize the causes of the human-related events. The information of the human-related events investigated by the HuRAM+ method has been also managed by a database management system, R-tracer. It is obvious that accumulating data of human error causes aims to support plans that reduce recurrences of similar events. However, in spite of the efforts for the development of the human error database, it was indicated that the database does not provide useful empirical basis for establishment of the recurrence prevention plans, because the framework to interpret the collected data and apply the insights from the data into the prevention plants has not been developed yet. In this paper, in order to support establishment of the recurrence prevention plans, a quantitative index, Human Error Repeat Interval (HERI), was proposed and its applications to human error prevention were introduced. In this paper, a quantitative index, the HERI was proposed and the statistics of HERIs were introduced. These estimations can be employed to evaluate effects of recurrence prevention plans to human errors. If a mean HERI score is low and the linear trend is not positive, it can be suspected that the recurrence prevention plans applied every human-related event has not been effectively propagated. For reducing repetitive error causes, the system design or operational culture can be reviewed. If there is a strong and negative trend, systematic investigation of the root causes behind these trends is required. Likewise, we expect that the HERI index will provide significant basis for establishing or adjusting prevention plans of human errors. The accurate estimation and application of HERI scores is expected to be done after accumulating more data. When a scatter plot of HERIs is fitted by two or more models, a statistical model selection method can be employed. Some criteria have been introduced by

  5. Victims of ‘private’ crimes and application of human rights in interpersonal relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Axelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available International human rights law has been challenged because of its alleged inability to safeguard the rights of the most vulnerable victims of violence. Whereas in real life they are often marginalized and effectively left without adequate protection, this is not to be attributed to the absence of an appropriate normative framework but rather to the contempt, lack of enforcement and systemic neglect of their claims. This paper proposes to find a ‘cure’ inside international human rights law, by strengthening the mechanisms that permit a horizontal application of human rights standards in private relations. The paper is divided in four sections. The first section describes the problematic at hand, focusing in particular on violence against women and children. The three subsequent sections then analyze the avenues open to victims in order to claim a ‘third-party’ application of human rights treaties against non-state actors who have violated their fundamental rights.

  6. Vulnerability, irregular migrants' health-related rights and the European Court of Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lomba, Sylvie

    2014-09-01

    The protection of irregular migrants' health-related rights brings to the fore the tensions that exist between human rights, citizenship and the sovereign state, and exposes the protection gaps in the international human rights regime. With this in mind, I consider the merits of a vulnerability analysis in international human rights law (IHRL). I posit that, detached from specific groups and reconceptualised as universal, vulnerability can be reclaimed as a foundation and tool of IHRL. I further contend that the deployment of a vulnerability analysis can alleviate the exclusionary dimension of IHRL and extend protections to irregular migrants. On this basis, I investigate the development of a vulnerability analysis in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. I argue that, in contrast with the Court's vulnerable population approach, a vulnerability analysis can improve protection standards for irregular migrants in the field of health.

  7. Axon guidance pathways served as common targets for human speech/language evolution and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huimeng; Yan, Zhangming; Sun, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Jianhong; Ma, Caihong; Xu, Qunyuan; Wang, Rui; Jarvis, Erich D; Sun, Zhirong

    2017-07-07

    Human and several nonhuman species share the rare ability of modifying acoustic and/or syntactic features of sounds produced, i.e. vocal learning, which is the important neurobiological and behavioral substrate of human speech/language. This convergent trait was suggested to be associated with significant genomic convergence and best manifested at the ROBO-SLIT axon guidance pathway. Here we verified the significance of such genomic convergence and assessed its functional relevance to human speech/language using human genetic variation data. In normal human populations, we found the affected amino acid sites were well fixed and accompanied with significantly more associated protein-coding SNPs in the same genes than the rest genes. Diseased individuals with speech/language disorders have significant more low frequency protein coding SNPs but they preferentially occurred outside the affected genes. Such patients' SNPs were enriched in several functional categories including two axon guidance pathways (mediated by netrin and semaphorin) that interact with ROBO-SLITs. Four of the six patients have homozygous missense SNPs on PRAME gene family, one youngest gene family in human lineage, which possibly acts upon retinoic acid receptor signaling, similarly as FOXP2, to modulate axon guidance. Taken together, we suggest the axon guidance pathways (e.g. ROBO-SLIT, PRAME gene family) served as common targets for human speech/language evolution and related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Iwamatsu, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    . Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy...... consumption rates increase as the operative temperature increases above 24 ◦C or decreases below 22 ◦C. With the data available so far, a second-order polynomial relationship between thermal sensation and the exergy consumption rate was established....... occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal...

  9. Study duration and earnings: A test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Oosterbeek

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we propose a simple test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate. It is argued that these theories lead to different predictions with respect to the earnings effects of deviations between actual and nominal durations of a study. Earnings and study duration equations ar

  10. ROLE PLAYING THE PROBLEM STORY, AN APPROACH TO HUMAN RELATIONS IN THE CLASSROOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHAFTEL, FANNIE R.; SHAFTEL, GEORGE

    AN AID TO THE CLASSROOM TEACHER IN THE TEACHING OF HUMAN RELATIONS IS PRESENTED. SOCIODRAMA, OR ROLE-PLAYING, IS PRIMARILY USEFUL IN SOLVING PROBLEMS INVOLVING RELATIONSHIPS AMONG TWO OR MORE PERSONS. IT THEREFORE PROVIDES A VALUABLE LEARNING EXPERIENCE IN SCHOOLS WHICH ARE CONCERNED WITH THE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF BOYS AND GIRLS, WITH MORAL AND…

  11. Toward a 21st-Century Understanding of Humans' Relation to Nature: Two Hats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Scott

    2008-01-01

    From its inception, environmental education (EE) has shouldered the imposition of impartiality on its methods and practices. Considering the reality of global climate change, the author urges the adoption of the more accurate theory of humans' relation to the natural world. This theory necessitates partiality toward healthy, functioning natural…

  12. TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT. J Gallagher1, J Inmon1, S Schlaegle2, A Levine2, T Rogers3, J Scott1, F Green4, M Schenker5, K Pinkerton5 1NHEERL, US-EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2RJ Lee Group Inc, Monroeville, Pa, USA; ...

  13. Is There a Relationship between Improving Human Relation Skills and Levels of Academic Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jolene; Byrne, Susan; Kiedaisch, Jan; Thiele, Nancy; Weber, Gwyn

    This Action Research Project implemented a program for improving human relation skills intended to raise the academic performance level of students. The target population consists of kindergarten, seventh grade (regular/at-risk), and high school (regular/behavior disordered) students. Analysis of both research literature and problem evidence…

  14. Human cytochrome p450 enzyme specificity for the bioactivation of estragole and related alkenylbenzenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Boersma, M.G.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Schilter, B.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of estragole to its proximate carcinogen 1 '-hydroxyestragole were identified and compared to the enzymes of importance for 1'-hydroxylation of the related alkenylbenzenes methyleugenol and safrole. Incubations with Supersomes revealed that

  15. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for the bioactivation of estragole and related alkenylbenzenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Boersma, M.G.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Schilter, B.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of estragole to its proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxyestragole were identified and compared to the enzymes of importance for 1′-hydroxylation of the related alkenylbenzenes methyleugenol and safrole. Incubations with Supersomes revealed that

  16. Snake scales, partial exposure, and the Snake Detection Theory: A human event-related potentials study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. van Strien (Jan); L.A. Isbell (Lynne A.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractStudies of event-related potentials in humans have established larger early posterior negativity (EPN) in response to pictures depicting snakes than to pictures depicting other creatures. Ethological research has recently shown that macaques and wild vervet monkeys respond strongly to pa

  17. Assessment of the relative role of climate change and human activities in desertification:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Duanyang; LI Chunlei; ZHUANG Dafang; PAN Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    Climate change and human activities are the two kinds of driving forces in desertification,and assessing their relative role in desertification is of great significance to deeply understanding the driving mechanisms and preventing desertification expansion.This paper has systematically reviewed the progress of the researches on assessing the relative role of climate change and human activities in desertification from qualitative,semi-quantitative and quantitative aspects respectively.The authors found that there were still some problems in the previous researches.For example,the subjectivity in assessment was obvious,the assessment cannot be easily repeated,and the assessment and its results were always based on administrative regions and less taken and expressed in a continuous space.According to the progress of previous researches and the works conducted by the authors recently,we put forward a quantitative approach by selecting NPP as a common indicator to measure the relative role of climate change and human activities in desertification and dividing the ecological process of “driving force effect-dynamic response of desertified land” into several scenarios.Meanwhile,validation and scale of assessment should be taken into account when quantitative assessment of the relative role of climate change and human activities in desertification are carried out.

  18. The Human Relations Class at Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Katherine J.

    Human Relations was a program offered to Grade 10 students at Churchill Secondary School during the 1971-72 school year in lieu of four courses. The emphasis of the program was on the development of students as people who were more aware of themselves, of other people, and of the environment. The class took part in a variety of activities during…

  19. Social Capital, Human Capital and Parent-Child Relation Quality: Interacting for Children's Educational Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Otter, Cecilia; Stenberg, Sten-Åke

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the utility of social capital for children's achievement, and if this utility interacts with family human capital and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Our focus is on parental activities directly related to children's school work. Our data stem from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and consist of both survey and register data.…

  20. Human betacoronavirus 2c EMC/2012-related viruses in bats, Ghana and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Augustina; Baldwin, Heather J; Corman, Victor Max; Klose, Stefan M; Owusu, Michael; Nkrumah, Evans Ewald; Badu, Ebenezer Kofi; Anti, Priscilla; Agbenyega, Olivia; Meyer, Benjamin; Oppong, Samuel; Sarkodie, Yaw Adu; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Lina, Peter H C; Godlevska, Elena V; Reusken, Chantal; Seebens, Antje; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Vallo, Peter; Tschapka, Marco; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2013-03-01

    We screened fecal specimens of 4,758 bats from Ghana and 272 bats from 4 European countries for betacoronaviruses. Viruses related to the novel human betacoronavirus EMC/2012 were detected in 46 (24.9%) of 185 Nycteris bats and 40 (14.7%) of 272 Pipistrellus bats. Their genetic relatedness indicated EMC/2012 originated from bats.

  1. Time-related contact angle measurements with human plasma on biomaterial surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G; Van der Mei, HC; Van Oeveren, W; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) was used to assess in time contact angle changes of human plasma drops placed on four different biomaterials. Results were related with conventional blood compatibility measurements: albumin adsorption, fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  2. Human Performance on the Traveling Salesman and Related Problems: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, James N.; Chu, Yun

    2011-01-01

    The article provides a review of recent research on human performance on the traveling salesman problem (TSP) and related combinatorial optimization problems. We discuss what combinatorial optimization problems are, why they are important, and why they may be of interest to cognitive scientists. We next describe the main characteristics of human…

  3. Human-Animal Relations beyond the Zoo: The Quest for a More Inclusive Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Hanna; Gyberg, Per; Henriksson, Malin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates human-animal relations in sustainability education. To understand what educational relationships and boundaries are challenged and/or strengthened in education promoting future sustainable societies, we argue that educational theory and practice must move beyond the anthropocentric framework's sole focus on relationships…

  4. A Feminist Posthumanist Political Ecology of Education for Theorizing Human-Animal Relations/Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloro-Bidart, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to a nascent conversation in environmental education (EE) research by using ethnographic data and extant theory to develop a feminist posthumanist political ecology of education for theorizing human-animal relations/relationships. Specifically, I (1) engage feminist methodologies and theories; (2) give epistemological and…

  5. Human-Animal Relations beyond the Zoo: The Quest for a More Inclusive Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Hanna; Gyberg, Per; Henriksson, Malin

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates human-animal relations in sustainability education. To understand what educational relationships and boundaries are challenged and/or strengthened in education promoting future sustainable societies, we argue that educational theory and practice must move beyond the anthropocentric framework's sole focus on relationships…

  6. Toward a 21st-Century Understanding of Humans' Relation to Nature: Two Hats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Scott

    2008-01-01

    From its inception, environmental education (EE) has shouldered the imposition of impartiality on its methods and practices. Considering the reality of global climate change, the author urges the adoption of the more accurate theory of humans' relation to the natural world. This theory necessitates partiality toward healthy, functioning natural…

  7. Guidelines for roadless area campsite spacing to minimize impact of human-related noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Dailey; Dave. Redman

    1975-01-01

    This report offers guidelines for campsite spacing and location in roadless areas to allow several levels of insulation from noise impacts between camping parties. The guidelines are based on the distance that different human-related noises travel in a variety of outdoor settings. The physical and psychological properties of these noises are described and discussed....

  8. The role of oxytocin in mother-infant relations: a systematic review of human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbally, Megan; Lewis, Andrew James; Ijzendoorn, Marinus van; Permezel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Oxytocin is associated with the establishment and quality of maternal behavior in animal models. Parallel investigations in humans are now under way. This article reviews the current research examining the role of oxytocin in mother-infant relations, attachment, and bonding in humans. A systematic search was made of three electronic databases and other bibliographic sources for published research studies that examined oxytocin and mother-infant relations in humans, including attachment, maternal behavior, parenting, and mother-infant relations. Eight studies were identified, all of which were unique in their methodologies, populations studied, and measures used. Seven studies found significant and strong associations between levels or patterns of oxytocin and aspects of mother-infant relations or attachment. Oxytocin appears to be of crucial importance for understanding mother-infant relationships. The findings of this review suggest that the pioneering, but preliminary, research undertaken to date is promising and that replication with larger samples is needed. Research that draws on more robust measures of attachment and bonding, as well as improved measures of oxytocin that include both central and peripheral levels, will elucidate the role of oxytocin in human mother-infant relationships. As the production of oxytocin is by no means restricted to mothers, the extension of the oxytocin studies to fathering, as well as to alloparental caregiving, would be an intriguing next step.

  9. Social Capital, Human Capital and Parent-Child Relation Quality: Interacting for Children's Educational Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Otter, Cecilia; Stenberg, Sten-Åke

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the utility of social capital for children's achievement, and if this utility interacts with family human capital and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Our focus is on parental activities directly related to children's school work. Our data stem from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and consist of both survey and register data.…

  10. A Feminist Posthumanist Political Ecology of Education for Theorizing Human-Animal Relations/Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloro-Bidart, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to a nascent conversation in environmental education (EE) research by using ethnographic data and extant theory to develop a feminist posthumanist political ecology of education for theorizing human-animal relations/relationships. Specifically, I (1) engage feminist methodologies and theories; (2) give epistemological and…

  11. Distributive Education Curriculum. Human Relations in Marketing and Distribution. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussow, Larry; Lindhardt, Fred

    Twenty lesson plans on human relations in marketing and distribution are presented in this performanced-based curriculum unit for distributive education. This unit is self-contained and consists of the following components: introduction (provides overview of unit content and describes why mastery of the objectives is important); performance…

  12. Relation between Local Acoustic Parameters and Protein Distribution in Human and Porcine Eye Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de C.L.; Steen, van der A.F.W.; Thijssen, J.M.; Duindam, J.J.; Otto, Cees; Puppels, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the eye lens (human, porcine) by acoustic measurements and to investigate whether relations exist with the local protein content. The acoustic measurements were performed with a 'scanning acoustic microscope' (SAM), operating at a frequency of 20 MHz. At

  13. Spotted hyaena space use in relation to human infrastructure inside a protected area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Lydia E.; Cameron, Elissa Z.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing human population growth has led to elevated levels of human-carnivore conflict. However, some carnivore populations have adapted to urban environments and the resources they supply. Such associations may influence carnivore ecology, behaviour and life-history. Pockets of urbanisation sometimes occur within protected areas, so that anthropogenic influences on carnivore biology are not necessarily confined to unprotected areas. In this study we evaluated associations between human infrastructure and related activity and space use of spotted hyaenas within one of the largest protected areas in South Africa, the Kruger National Park. Home range size was smaller for the dominant female of a clan living in close proximity to humans than that of the dominant female of a clan without direct access to human infrastructure. The home range including human infrastructure was also used less evenly during the night, presumably when the animals were active. Within this home range, a village area was preferred during the night, when the least modified areas within the village were preferred and administration and highly modified areas were avoided. During the day, however, there were no preference or avoidance of the village area, but all habitats except unmodified habitats within the village area were avoided. We suggest that human infrastructure and associated activity influenced hyaena space use, primarily through alterations in the spatial distribution of food. However, these effects may have been indirectly caused by habitat modification that generated favourable hunting habitat rather than a direct effect caused by access to human food such as garbage. Because of the often pivotal effects of apex predators in terrestrial ecosystems, we encourage further work aimed to quantify how human presence influences large carnivores and associated ecosystem processes within protected areas. PMID:27781175

  14. Oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and related compounds in human milk: Levels and effects of storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junfang; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Domellöf, Magnus; Zivkovic, Angela M; Nording, Malin L

    2016-01-01

    The presence of fatty acid derived oxylipins, endocannabinoids and related compounds in human milk may be of importance to the infant. Presently, clinically relevant protocols for storing and handling human milk that minimize error and variability in oxylipin and endocannabinoid concentrations are lacking. In this study, we compared the individual and combined effects of the following storage conditions on the stability of these fatty acid metabolites in human milk: state (fresh or frozen), storage temperature (4 °C, -20 °C or -80 °C), and duration (1 day, 1 week or 3 months). Thirteen endocannabinoids and related compounds, as well as 37 oxylipins were analyzed simultaneously by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Twelve endocannabinoids and related compounds (2-111 nM) and 31 oxylipins (1.2 pM-1242 nM) were detected, with highest levels being found for 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 17(R)hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid, respectively. The concentrations of most endocannabinoid-related compounds and oxylipins were dependent on storage condition, and especially storage at 4 °C introduced significant variability. Our findings suggest that human milk samples should be analyzed immediately after, or within one day of collection (if stored at 4 °C). Storage at -80 °C is required for long-term preservation, and storage at -20 °C is acceptable for no more than one week. These findings provide a protocol for investigating the oxylipin and endocannabinoid metabolome in human milk, useful for future milk-related clinical studies.

  15. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-09-07

    The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  16. Gene structure of the human DDX3 and chromosome mapping of its related sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Lee, S G; Park, S H; Song, K

    2001-10-31

    The human DDX3 gene (GenBank accession No. U50553) is the human homologue of the mouse Ddx3 gene and is a member of the gene family that contains DEAD motifs. Previously, we mapped the gene to the Xp11.3-11.23. In this report, we describe the structural organization of the human DDX3 gene. It consisted of 17 exons that span approximately 16 kb. An Alu element was present in the intron 13. Its organization was the same as that of the human DBY gene, a closely related sequence present on the Y chromosome. We also identified two processed pseudogenes (DDX3) with a sequence that is highly homologous to those of DDX3 cDNAs, but contain a translation termination codon within its open-reading frame. Pseudogenes are mapped on human chromosomes 4 and X, respectively. In this paper, we discuss the relationships between DDX3 and its related sequences that have been isolated.

  17. Species-Related Differences in the Proteome of Rat and Human Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Martens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The core proteomes of human and rat pancreatic beta cells were compared by label-free LC-MS/MS: this resulted in quantification of relative molar abundances of 707 proteins belonging to functional pathways of intermediary metabolism, protein synthesis, and cytoskeleton. Relative molar abundances were conserved both within and between pathways enabling the selection of a housekeeping network for geometric normalization and the analysis of potentially relevant differential expressions. Human beta cells differed from rat beta cells in their lower level of enzymes involved in glucose sensing (MDH1, PC, and ACLY and upregulation of lysosomal enzymes. Human cells also expressed more heat shock proteins and radical scavenging systems: apart from SOD2, they expressed high levels of H2O2-scavenger peroxiredoxin 3 (PRDX3, confirmed by microarray, Western blotting, and microscopy. Besides conferring lower susceptibility to oxidative stress to human cells PRDX3 might also play a role in physiological redox regulation as, in rat, its expression was restricted to a beta cell subset with higher metabolic glucose responsiveness. In conclusion, although their core proteomic architecture is conserved, human and rat beta cells differ in their molar expression of key enzymes involved in glucose sensing and redox control.

  18. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation.

  19. Amphetamine-related drugs neurotoxicity in humans and in experimental animals: Main mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moratalla, Rosario; Khairnar, Amit; Simola, Nicola; Granado, Noelia; García-Montes, Jose Ruben; Porceddu, Pier Francesca; Tizabi, Yousef; Costa, Giulia; Morelli, Micaela

    2017-08-01

    Amphetamine-related drugs, such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH), are popular recreational psychostimulants. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated that, besides having the potential for abuse, amphetamine-related drugs may also elicit neurotoxic and neuroinflammatory effects. The neurotoxic potentials of MDMA and METH to dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons have been clearly demonstrated in both rodents and non-human primates. This review summarizes the species-specific cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in MDMA and METH-mediated neurotoxic and neuroinflammatory effects, along with the most important behavioral changes elicited by these substances in experimental animals and humans. Emphasis is placed on the neuropsychological and neurological consequences associated with the neuronal damage. Moreover, we point out the gap in our knowledge and the need for developing appropriate therapeutic strategies to manage the neurological problems associated with amphetamine-related drug abuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbapenem resistance in a human clinical isolate identified to be closely related to Acinetobacter indicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnin, Rémy A; Poirel, Laurent; van der Reijden, Tanny J K; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Lescat, Mathilde; Nordmann, Patrice

    2014-10-01

    Here we report a case of carbapenem resistance in a human clinical isolate that was found to be closely related to the newly described environmental species Acinetobacter indicus. This strain harboured the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase gene located on a conjugative plasmid. Partial sequencing of 16S rDNA and rpoB genes, together with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis, showed that this strain was distantly related to the Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex and was closely related to A. indicus.

  1. Justice relations as determinative factor of “human - state” relation in the J.Rawls’s theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. O. Burychko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The conceptualization of relationshuman ­ state” in J. Rawls’s theory is revealed in the article. It is concluded, that this relationship is determineted on value level by justice, which understands as fairness. Justice is the main virtue of social institutions, and in this case, if the institutions are unjust, their activity should be discarded or revised. Based on liberal ideas, justice linked to the notion of freedom, particularly in J. Rawls’s theory are described? That in the faire societies the equal freedom of citizens is regarded as being established beforehand state. The main principles of relations are the principle of participation and paternalism. Participation means the involvement of citizens in the constitutional process, the national process and participation in self­government. Paternalism is understood as the rational intervention of state in society in aim to prevent irrational expressions of relations between people. Conditions intervention: it must be justified by the apparent inability or lack of will; must match the understanding of justice as fairness, and based on sustainable interests. It is concluded, that the theory of J. Rawls resulting from the analytical experiment leaves a lot of questions as to achieve justice as fairness in the activities of individuals and social institutions.

  2. Identification and detection of a novel human endogenous retrovirus-related gene, and structural characterization of its related elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyi Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Up-regulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs is associated with many diseases, including cancer. In this study, an H family HERV (HERV-H-related gene was identified and characterized. Its spliced transcript lacks protein-coding capacity and may belong to the emerging class of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs. The 1.3-kb RNA consisting of four exons is transcribed from an Alu element upstream of a 5.0-kb structurally incomplete HERV-H element. RT-PCR and quantitative RT-PCR results indicated that expression of this HERV-related transcript was negatively associated with colon, stomach, and kidney cancers. Its expression was induced upon treatment with DNA methylation and histone deacetylation inhibitors. A BLAT search using long terminal repeats (LTRs identified 50 other LTR homogenous HERV-H elements. Further analysis of these elements revealed that all are structurally incomplete and only five exert transcriptional activity. The results presented here recommend further investigation into a potentially functional HERV-H-related ncRNA.

  3. Explosive vocal activity for attracting human attention is related to domestication in silver fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoleva, Svetlana S; Volodin, Ilya A; Volodina, Elena V; Kharlamova, Anastasia V; Trut, Lyudmila N

    2011-02-01

    Domestication affects behavioral and vocal responses, involved in communication with humans; in particular, those that attract human attention. In this study, we found that silver foxes of Tame strain, experimentally domesticated for a few tenses of generation, displayed bursts of vocal activity during the first minute after appearance of an unfamiliar human, that faded quickly during the remaining time of the test, when the experimenter stayed passively before the cage. Distinctively, foxes of Aggressive strain, artificially selected for tenses of generation for aggressive behavior toward humans, and the control group of Unselected for behavior silver foxes kept steady levels of vocal activity for the duration of the tests. We found also that Aggressive foxes vocalized for a larger proportion of time than Unselected foxes for all 5 min of the test. We discuss the obtained data in relation to proposal effects of domestication on mechanisms directed to involving people into human-animal interactions and structural similarity between human laughter and vocalization of Tame foxes.

  4. Humans (really) are animals: picture-book reading influences 5-year-old urban children's construal of the relation between humans and non-human animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Sandra R; Herrmann, Patricia; Woodring, Jennie; Medin, Douglas L

    2014-01-01

    What is the relation between humans and non-human animals? From a biological perspective, we view humans as one species among many, but in the fables and films we create for children, we often offer an anthropocentric perspective, imbuing non-human animals with human-like characteristics. What are the consequences of these distinctly different perspectives on children's reasoning about the natural world? Some have argued that children universally begin with an anthropocentric perspective and that acquiring a biological perspective requires a basic conceptual change (cf. Carey, 1985). But recent work reveals that this anthropocentric perspective, evidenced in urban 5-year-olds, is not evident in 3-year-olds (Herrmann etal., 2010). This indicates that the anthropocentric perspective is not an obligatory first step in children's reasoning about biological phenomena. In the current paper, we introduced a priming manipulation to assess whether 5-year-olds' reasoning about a novel biological property is influenced by the perspectives they encounter in children's books. Just before participating in a reasoning task, each child read a book about bears with an experimenter. What varied was whether bears were depicted from an anthropomorphic (Berenstain Bears) or biological perspective (Animal Encyclopedia). The priming had a dramatic effect. Children reading the Berenstain Bears showed the standard anthropocentric reasoning pattern, but those reading the Animal Encyclopedia adopted a biological pattern. This offers evidence that urban 5-year-olds can adopt either a biological or a human-centered stance, depending upon the context. Thus, children's books and other media are double-edged swords. Media may (inadvertently) support human-centered reasoning in young children, but may also be instrumental in redirecting children's attention to a biological model.

  5. Humans (really) are animals: picture-book reading influences 5-year-old urban children’s construal of the relation between humans and non-human animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Sandra R.; Herrmann, Patricia; Woodring, Jennie; Medin, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    What is the relation between humans and non-human animals? From a biological perspective, we view humans as one species among many, but in the fables and films we create for children, we often offer an anthropocentric perspective, imbuing non-human animals with human-like characteristics. What are the consequences of these distinctly different perspectives on children’s reasoning about the natural world? Some have argued that children universally begin with an anthropocentric perspective and that acquiring a biological perspective requires a basic conceptual change (cf. Carey, 1985). But recent work reveals that this anthropocentric perspective, evidenced in urban 5-year-olds, is not evident in 3-year-olds (Herrmann etal., 2010). This indicates that the anthropocentric perspective is not an obligatory first step in children’s reasoning about biological phenomena. In the current paper, we introduced a priming manipulation to assess whether 5-year-olds’ reasoning about a novel biological property is influenced by the perspectives they encounter in children’s books. Just before participating in a reasoning task, each child read a book about bears with an experimenter. What varied was whether bears were depicted from an anthropomorphic (Berenstain Bears) or biological perspective (Animal Encyclopedia). The priming had a dramatic effect. Children reading the Berenstain Bears showed the standard anthropocentric reasoning pattern, but those reading the Animal Encyclopedia adopted a biological pattern. This offers evidence that urban 5-year-olds can adopt either a biological or a human-centered stance, depending upon the context. Thus, children’s books and other media are double-edged swords. Media may (inadvertently) support human-centered reasoning in young children, but may also be instrumental in redirecting children’s attention to a biological model. PMID:24672493

  6. Human myeloperoxidase activity is inhibited in vitro by quercetin. Comparison with three related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincemail, J; Deby, C; Thirion, A; de Bruyn-Dister, M; Goutier, R

    1988-05-15

    Quercetin is an effective inhibitor of human myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, both with purified enzyme (IC50 = 3.5 microM) and in a system using stimulated human neutrophils. Quercetin is significantly more potent than three other related compounds (rutin, rutin sulfate and troxerutin) and than methimazole, a previously-known myeloperoxidase inhibitor. The inhibitory activity of quercetin is of the competitive type. Moreover, quercetin is directly able to scavenge hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a chlorinated species generated by the MPO/H2O2/Cl- system.

  7. Discovery of a novel hepatovirus (Phopivirus of seals) related to human Hepatitis A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony. S.J.,; St. Leger, J.A; Liang, E.; Hicks, A.L.; Sanchez-Leon, M.D; Ip, Hon S.; Jain, K.; Lefkowitch, J. H.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Knowles, N.; Goldstein, T.; Pugliares, K.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W.I.

    2015-01-01

    Describing the viral diversity of wildlife can provide interesting and useful insights into the natural history of established human pathogens. In this study, we describe a previously unknown picornavirus in harbor seals (tentatively named phopivirus) that is related to human hepatitis A virus (HAV). We show that phopivirus shares several genetic and phenotypic characteristics with HAV, including phylogenetic relatedness across the genome, a specific and seemingly quiescent tropism for hepatocytes, structural conservation in a key functional region of the type III internal ribosomal entry site (IRES), and a codon usage bias consistent with that of HAV.

  8. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  9. Testing for Gender Related Size and Shape Differences of the Human Ear canal using Statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the shape of the human ear canal. It is described how a dense surface point distribution model of the human ear canal is built based on a training set of laser scanned ear impressions and a sparse set of anatomical landmarks placed by an expert. The dense...... surface models are built by using the anatomical landmarks to warp a template mesh onto all shapes in the training set. Testing the gender related differences is done by initially reducing the dimensionality using principal component analysis of the vertices of the warped meshes. The number of components...

  10. Genetic evidence for common pathways in human age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Simon C; Dong, Xiao; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the single largest risk factor for chronic disease. Studies in model organisms have identified conserved pathways that modulate aging rate and the onset and progression of multiple age-related diseases, suggesting that common pathways of aging may influence age-related diseases in humans as well. To determine whether there is genetic evidence supporting the notion of common pathways underlying age-related diseases, we analyzed the genes and pathways found to be associated with five major categories of age-related disease using a total of 410 genomewide association studies (GWAS). While only a small number of genes are shared among all five disease categories, those found in at least three of the five major age-related disease categories are highly enriched for apoliprotein metabolism genes. We found that a more substantial number of gene ontology (GO) terms are shared among the 5 age-related disease categories and shared GO terms include canonical aging pathways identified in model organisms, such as nutrient-sensing signaling, translation, proteostasis, stress responses, and genome maintenance. Taking advantage of the vast amount of genetic data from the GWAS, our findings provide the first direct evidence that conserved pathways of aging simultaneously influence multiple age-related diseases in humans as has been demonstrated in model organisms. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Age-related changes in midbrain dopaminergic regulation of the human reward system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Jean-Claude; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kohn, Philip; Berman, Karen Faith

    2008-01-01

    The dopamine system, which plays a crucial role in reward processing, is particularly vulnerable to aging. Significant losses over a normal lifespan have been reported for dopamine receptors and transporters, but very little is known about the neurofunctional consequences of this age-related dopaminergic decline. In animals, a substantial body of data indicates that dopamine activity in the midbrain is tightly associated with reward processing. In humans, although indirect evidence from pharmacological and clinical studies also supports such an association, there has been no direct demonstration of a link between midbrain dopamine and reward-related neural response. Moreover, there are no in vivo data for alterations in this relationship in older humans. Here, by using 6-[18F]FluoroDOPA (FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) and event-related 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the same subjects, we directly demonstrate a link between midbrain dopamine synthesis and reward-related prefrontal activity in humans, show that healthy aging induces functional alterations in the reward system, and identify an age-related change in the direction of the relationship (from a positive to a negative correlation) between midbrain dopamine synthesis and prefrontal activity. These results indicate an age-dependent dopaminergic tuning mechanism for cortical reward processing and provide system-level information about alteration of a key neural circuit in healthy aging. Taken together, our findings provide an important characterization of the interactions between midbrain dopamine function and the reward system in healthy young humans and older subjects, and identify the changes in this regulatory circuit that accompany aging. PMID:18794529

  12. Human papillomavirus infection is not related with prostatitis-related symptoms: results from a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Bartoletti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTo investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV infection and prostatitis-related symptoms.Materials and MethodsAll young heterosexual patients with prostatitis-related symptoms attending the same Center from January 2005 to December 2010 were eligible for this case-control study. Sexually active asymptomatic men were considered as the control group. All subjects underwent clinical examination, Meares-Stamey test and DNA-HPV test. Patients with prostatitis-related symptoms and asymptomatic men were compared in terms of HPV prevalence. Moreover, multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine the association between HPV infection and prostatitis-related symptoms.ResultsOverall, 814 out of 2,938 patients (27.7% and 292 out of 1,081 controls (27.0% proved positive to HPV. The HPV genotype distribution was as follows: HR-HPV 478 (43.3%, PHR-HPV 77 (6.9%, LR-HPV 187 (16.9% and PNG-HPV 364 (32.9%. The most common HPV genotypes were: 6, 11, 16, 26, 51, 53 and 81. No difference was found between the two groups in terms of HPV infection (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.88-1.22; p = 0.66. We noted a statistically significant increase in HPV infection over the period 2005 to 2010 (p < 0.001 in both groups. Moreover, we found a statistically significant increase in HPV 16 frequency from 2005 to 2010 (p = 0.002.ConclusionsThis study highlights that prostatitis-like symptoms are unrelated to HPV infection. Secondary, we highlight the high prevalence of asymptomatic HPV infection among young heterosexual men.

  13. New methods for dete rmining the relative load due to physical effort of the human body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Szubert

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relative physical load (% VO2max is the quotient of oxygen uptake (Vo2 during physical effort and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max by the human body. For this purpose the stress test must be performed. The relative load shows a high correlation with minute ventilation, cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, increased concentrations of catecholamines in the blood, inner temperature, weight, height and human body surface area. The relative load is a criterion for the maximum workloads admissible for healthy and sick workers. Besides, the classification of effort can be more precise when based on the relative load than on the energy output. Material and Methods: Based on our own and international empirical evidence and the laws of heat transfer and fluid mechanics, a model of temperature control system has been developed, involving the elements of human cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Using this model, we have been able to develop our own methods of determining the relative load, applying only the body core temperature (TW or heart rate within one minute (HR, body mass (m, height (H, and body surface area (AD instead of VO2max. Results: The values of the relative physical load (% VO2max obtained by using our own methods do not differ significantly from those obtained by other methods and by other researchers. Conclusions: The developed methods for determining the relative physical load (% VO2max do not require the exercise test to be performed, therefore, they may be considered (after verification in an experimental study a feasible alternative to current methods. Med Pr 2014;65(2:189–195

  14. Is the Mouse a Good Model of Human PPARγ-Related Metabolic Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Attila; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Peloquin, Matthew; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of patients affected with metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis and insulin resistance, academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies are eager to better understand metabolic syndrome and develop new drugs for its treatment. Many studies have focused on the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), which plays a crucial role in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. These studies have been able to connect this transcription factor to several human metabolic diseases. Due to obvious limitations concerning experimentation in humans, animal models—mainly mouse models—have been generated to investigate the role of PPARγ in different tissues. This review focuses on the metabolic features of human and mouse PPARγ-related diseases and the utility of the mouse as a model. PMID:27483259

  15. The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Melissa; McLean, Andrew; McGreevy, Paul

    2016-02-23

    Equitation science is an evidence-based approach to horse training and riding that focuses on a thorough understanding of both equine ethology and learning theory. This combination leads to more effective horse training, but also plays a role in keeping horse riders and trainers safe around horses. Equitation science underpins ethical equitation, and recognises the limits of the horse's cognitive and physical abilities. Equitation is an ancient practice that has benefited from a rich tradition that sees it flourishing in contemporary sporting pursuits. Despite its history, horse-riding is an activity for which neither horses nor humans evolved, and it brings with it significant risks to the safety of both species. This review outlines the reasons horses may behave in ways that endanger humans and how training choices can exacerbate this. It then discusses the recently introduced 10 Principles of Equitation Science and explains how following these principles can minimise horse-related risk to humans and enhance horse welfare.

  16. Relation of cell proliferation to expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    2000-08-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist [(3)H]Ro5-4864 has been shown to bind with high affinity to the human breast cancer cell line BT-20. Therefore, we investigated different human breast cancer cell lines with regard to binding to [(3)H]Ro5-4864 and staining with the PBR-specific monoclonal antibody 8D7. Results were correlated with cell proliferation characteristics. In flow cytometric analysis, the estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines BT-20, MDA-MB-435-S, and SK-BR-3 showed significantly higher PBR expression (relative fluorescence intensity) than the ER-positive cells T47-D, MCF-7 and BT-474 (Pdiazepam-binding inhibitor are possibly involved in the regulation of cell proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines.

  17. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hae-Jeong Park; Sung-Vin Yim; Joo-Ho Chung; Seon-Pyo Hong; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Long-Shan Han; Long-Tai Zheng; Kyung-Hee Jung; Yoon-Kyung Uhm; Je-Hyun Lee; Ji-Seon Jeong; Woo-Sang Joo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-reiated, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cyclerelated, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes.METHODS: We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL,24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE114), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells,and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  18. Classifying human audiometric phenotypes of age-related hearing loss from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A; Lee, Fu-Shing; Matthews, Lois J; Schmiedt, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbyacusis) has a complex etiology. Results from animal models detailing the effects of specific cochlear injuries on audiometric profiles may be used to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss in older humans and predict cochlear pathologies associated with certain audiometric configurations ("audiometric phenotypes"). Patterns of hearing loss associated with cochlear pathology in animal models were used to define schematic boundaries of human audiograms. Pathologies included evidence for metabolic, sensory, and a mixed metabolic + sensory phenotype; an older normal phenotype without threshold elevation was also defined. Audiograms from a large sample of older adults were then searched by a human expert for "exemplars" (best examples) of these phenotypes, without knowledge of the human subject demographic information. Mean thresholds and slopes of higher frequency thresholds of the audiograms assigned to the four phenotypes were consistent with the predefined schematic boundaries and differed significantly from each other. Significant differences in age, gender, and noise exposure history provided external validity for the four phenotypes. Three supervised machine learning classifiers were then used to assess reliability of the exemplar training set to estimate the probability that newly obtained audiograms exhibited one of the four phenotypes. These procedures classified the exemplars with a high degree of accuracy; classifications of the remaining cases were consistent with the exemplars with respect to average thresholds and demographic information. These results suggest that animal models of age-related hearing loss can be used to predict human cochlear pathology by classifying audiograms into phenotypic classifications that reflect probable etiologies for hearing loss in older humans.

  19. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. RESULTS: All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  20. Review: Selenium contamination, fate, and reactive transport in groundwater in relation to human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan T.

    2016-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micro-nutrient for humans, but can be toxic at high levels of intake. Se deficiency and Se toxicity are linked with serious diseases, with some regions worldwide experiencing Se deficiency due to Se-poor rocks and soils and other areas dealing with Se toxicity due to the presence of Se-enriched geologic materials. In addition, Se is consumed primarily through plants that take up Se from soil and through animal products that consume these plants. Hence, the soil and groundwater system play important roles in determining the effect of Se on human health. This paper reviews current understanding of Se fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems and its relation to human health, with a focus on alluvial systems, soil systems, and the interface between alluvial systems and Cretaceous shale that release Se via oxidation processes. The review focuses first on the relation between Se and human health, followed by a summary of Se distribution in soil-aquifer systems, with an emphasis on the quantitative relationship between Se content in soil and Se concentration in underlying groundwater. The physical, chemical, and microbial processes that govern Se fate and transport in subsurface systems then are presented, followed by numerical modeling techniques used to simulate these processes in study regions and available remediation strategies for either Se-deficient or Se-toxic regions. This paper can serve as a guide to any field, laboratory or modeling study aimed at assessing Se fate and transport in groundwater systems and its relation to human health.

  1. Review: Selenium contamination, fate, and reactive transport in groundwater in relation to human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan T.

    2017-06-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micro-nutrient for humans, but can be toxic at high levels of intake. Se deficiency and Se toxicity are linked with serious diseases, with some regions worldwide experiencing Se deficiency due to Se-poor rocks and soils and other areas dealing with Se toxicity due to the presence of Se-enriched geologic materials. In addition, Se is consumed primarily through plants that take up Se from soil and through animal products that consume these plants. Hence, the soil and groundwater system play important roles in determining the effect of Se on human health. This paper reviews current understanding of Se fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems and its relation to human health, with a focus on alluvial systems, soil systems, and the interface between alluvial systems and Cretaceous shale that release Se via oxidation processes. The review focuses first on the relation between Se and human health, followed by a summary of Se distribution in soil-aquifer systems, with an emphasis on the quantitative relationship between Se content in soil and Se concentration in underlying groundwater. The physical, chemical, and microbial processes that govern Se fate and transport in subsurface systems then are presented, followed by numerical modeling techniques used to simulate these processes in study regions and available remediation strategies for either Se-deficient or Se-toxic regions. This paper can serve as a guide to any field, laboratory or modeling study aimed at assessing Se fate and transport in groundwater systems and its relation to human health.

  2. Weapon-related traumas of human skeletons from Yuigahama Chusei Shudan Bochi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomohito; Uzawa, Kazuhiro; Hirata, Kazuaki

    2009-09-01

    The Yuigahama Chusei Shudan Bochi site (AD: twelfth to thirteenth centuries), located along the seashore of the southern end of Kamakura City in Japan, and has yielded a mass grave containing hundreds of human crania. The purpose of this study is to document cut marks on crania made by an edged weapon, paying specific attention to individuals who may exhibit scratch marks, and to understand the variability of weapon-related traumas in the medieval period in Japan. The observation leads to tentative findings regarding the identification and interpretation of weapon-related traumas of human skeletal remains. From macroscopic observation, the marks display the sharpness of cut surfaces which are characteristic of unhealed cut marks. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the marks also shows that they are V-shaped in cross-section, a morphological feature that is characteristic of cut marks. This study first demonstrates that the scratches on the crania have morphological features consistent with human-induced cut marks, and that the macroscopic and microscopic approaches provide important information for identifying anthropogenic cut marks on the human skeletal remains from an archaeological site in Japan.

  3. Human membrane transporter database: a Web-accessible relational database for drug transport studies and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Q; Sadée, W

    2000-01-01

    The human genome contains numerous genes that encode membrane transporters and related proteins. For drug discovery, development, and targeting, one needs to know which transporters play a role in drug disposition and effects. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in human membrane transporters may contribute to interindividual differences in the response to drugs. Pharmacogenetics, and, on a genome-wide basis, pharmacogenomics, address the effect of genetic variants on an individual's response to drugs and xenobiotics. However, our knowledge of the relevant transporters is limited at present. To facilitate the study of drug transporters on a broad scale, including the use of microarray technology, we have constructed a human membrane transporter database (HMTD). Even though it is still largely incomplete, the database contains information on more than 250 human membrane transporters, such as sequence, gene family, structure, function, substrate, tissue distribution, and genetic disorders associated with transporter polymorphisms. Readers are invited to submit additional data. Implemented as a relational database, HMTD supports complex biological queries. Accessible through a Web browser user interface via Common Gateway Interface (CGI) and Java Database Connection (JDBC), HMTD also provides useful links and references, allowing interactive searching and downloading of data. Taking advantage of the features of an electronic journal, this paper serves as an interactive tutorial for using the database, which we expect to develop into a research tool.

  4. Disentangling the relative effects of bushmeat availability on human nutrition in central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, John E.; Olivero, Jesús; Real, Raimundo; Farfán, Miguel A.; Márquez, Ana L.; Vargas, J. Mario; Ziegler, Stefan; Wegmann, Martin; Brown, David; Margetts, Barrie; Nasi, Robert

    2015-02-01

    We studied links between human malnutrition and wild meat availability within the Rainforest Biotic Zone in central Africa. We distinguished two distinct hunted mammalian diversity distributions, one in the rainforest areas (Deep Rainforest Diversity, DRD) containing taxa of lower hunting sustainability, the other in the northern rainforest-savanna mosaic, with species of greater hunting potential (Marginal Rainforest Diversity, MRD). Wild meat availability, assessed by standing crop mammalian biomass, was greater in MRD than in DRD areas. Predicted bushmeat extraction was also higher in MRD areas. Despite this, stunting of children, a measure of human malnutrition, was greater in MRD areas. Structural equation modeling identified that, in MRD areas, mammal diversity fell away from urban areas, but proximity to these positively influenced higher stunting incidence. In DRD areas, remoteness and distance from dense human settlements and infrastructures explained lower stunting levels. Moreover, stunting was higher away from protected areas. Our results suggest that in MRD areas, forest wildlife rational use for better human nutrition is possible. By contrast, the relatively low human populations in DRD areas currently offer abundant opportunities for the continued protection of more vulnerable mammals and allow dietary needs of local populations to be met.

  5. LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic, human sperm-related protein, plays a role in fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Li, Wenshu; Yang, Zhifang; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Yixin; Bao, Jianying; Jiang, Deke; Dong, Xianping

    2017-01-01

    Lysozyme-like proteins (LYZLs) belong to the c-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family and are selectively expressed in the mammalian male reproductive tract. Two members, human sperm lysozyme-like protein (SLLP) -1 and mouse LYZL4, have been reported to contribute to fertilization but show no bacteriolytic activity. Here, we focused on the possible contribution of LYZL6 to immunity and fertilization. In humans, LYZL6 was selectively expressed by the testis and epididymis and became concentrated on spermatozoa. Native LYZL6 isolated from sperm extracts exhibited bacteriolytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Recombinant LYZL6 (rLYZL6) reached its peak activity at pH 5.6 and 15 mM of Na+, and could inhibit the growth of Gram-positive, but not Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, the bacteriolytic activity of rLYZL6 proved to be much lower than that of human lysozyme under physiological conditions. Immunodetection with a specific antiserum localized the LYZL6 protein on the postacrosomal membrane of mature spermatozoa. Immunoneutralization of LYZL6 significantly decreased the numbers of human spermatozoa fused with zona-free hamster eggs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Thus, we report here for the first time that LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic and human sperm-related protein, is likely important for fertilization but not for the innate immunity of the male reproductive tract. PMID:28182716

  6. Is the prefrontal cortex especially enlarged in the human brain allometric relations and remapping factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passingham, Richard E; Smaers, Jeroen B

    2014-01-01

    There has been no agreement as to whether the prefrontal cortex is especially enlarged in the human brain. To answer this question, we analyzed the only two datasets that provide information on total prefrontal cortex volume based on cytoarchitectonic criteria. One delineated the prefrontal cortex proper on the basis of cytoarchitectonic criteria; the other used a proxy of the prefrontal cortex based on a cytoarchitectonic delineation of the frontal lobe. To investigate whether all cortical association areas, including the prefrontal cortex, are enlarged in the human brain, we scaled the different areas to a common reference, the primary visual cortex. To investigate whether the prefrontal cortex is more enlarged than other association areas, we scaled it relative to its inputs from and outputs to other nonprimary areas. We carried out separate regression analyses using different data samples as a predictive baseline group: data for monkeys alone informs us on whether great apes are different from monkeys; data for all non-human anthropoids, including great apes, informs us on whether humans are different from all other primates. The analyses show that the value for the human prefrontal cortex is greater than expected, and that this is true even when data for the great apes are included in the analysis. They also show that the chimpanzee prefrontal cortex is greater than expected for a monkey with a similar sized cortex. We discuss possible functional consequences.

  7. The Relation of Visual Signs In The Narrative Structure of MTV Exit Human Trafficking Campaign Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winny Gunarti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human trafficking is a violation of the human rights. One of the campaign to fight against this crime takes the form of a digital campaign that aired on television and internet.   This study discusses the narrative structure of human trafficking campaign video from non-profit organization MTV Exit in 2012. This video campaign combines art collage and graphic art in its narrative structure. Nonverbal visual elements displayed in the form of a digital photo collage with animated illustrations setting. We consider this video campaign quite interesting as it is visually inform the public about the importance of safe migration through the visual signs in the narrative structure. This study analyzes qualitatively the relation of nonverbal visual signs in the narrative collage and illustration. Denotative and connotative analysis with structural semiotics approach is needed to understand the meaning of visual signs in the context of humans as cultural beings in their communities. This study is expected to be a model example of visual communication campaigns that can foster public awareness of the issue of human trafficking, especially for young women and children as young generation.

  8. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  9. Spatial Assessment of Forest Ecosystem Functions and Services using Human Relating Factors for SDG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, C.; Lee, W. K.; Jeon, S. W.; Kim, T.; Lim, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Application of ecosystem service concept in environmental related decision making could be numerical and objective standard for policy maker between preserving and developing perspective of environment. However, pursuing maximum benefit from natural capital through ecosystem services caused failure by losing ecosystem functions through its trade-offs. Therefore, difference between ecosystem functions and services were demonstrated and would apply human relating perspectives. Assessment results of ecosystem functions and services can be divided 3 parts. Tree growth per year set as the ecosystem function factor and indicated through so called pure function map. After that, relating functions can be driven such as water conservation, air pollutant purification, climate change regulation, and timber production. Overall process and amount are numerically quantified. These functional results can be transferred to ecosystem services by multiplying economic unit value, so function reflecting service maps can be generated. On the other hand, above services, to implement more reliable human demand, human reflecting service maps are also be developed. As the validation, quantified ecosystem functions are compared with former results through pixel based analysis. Three maps are compared, and through comparing difference between ecosystem function and services and inversed trends in function based and human based service are analysed. In this study, we could find differences in PF, FRS, and HRS in relation to based ecosystem conditions. This study suggests that the differences in PF, FRS, and HRS should be understood in the decision making process for sustainable management of ecosystem services. Although the analysis is based on in sort existing process separation, it is important to consider the possibility of different usage of ecosystem function assessment results and ecosystem service assessment results in SDG policy making. Furthermore, process based functional approach

  10. The Issues of Human Rights in the India-U.S. Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharov Aleksey I.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a brief overview of India-U.S. relations during the period of Narendra Modi’s government and Barack Obama’s administration. The author analyzes the dynamics of cooperation development after the victory of Bharatiya Janata Party in the 2014 Parliamentary elections in India and studies the key directions of bilateral agenda. The current condition of India-U.S. strategic dialogue and the influence of human rights issues on the countries’ cooperation are characterized. Si...

  11. Poverty eradication and decreased human papilloma virus related cancer of the penis and vulva in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, H M; Hanchard, B

    2008-04-01

    Human papilloma virus causes genital cancers. Decreases in cervical cancer have been reported to be due to comprehensive screening programmes difficult to replicate in poorer countries. HPV cancer may be related to poverty. In Jamaica, we have seen decreases in cancer of the penis and vulva and there has also been a decrease in poverty. The decrease cannot be attributed to screening. We believe elimination of poverty has decreased HPV persistence and decreased cancer rates.

  12. The Issues of Human Rights in the India-U.S. Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharov Aleksey I.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a brief overview of India-U.S. relations during the period of Narendra Modi’s government and Barack Obama’s administration. The author analyzes the dynamics of cooperation development after the victory of Bharatiya Janata Party in the 2014 Parliamentary elections in India and studies the key directions of bilateral agenda. The current condition of India-U.S. strategic dialogue and the influence of human rights issues on the countries’ cooperation are characterized. Si...

  13. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; van Riper, Susan K.; Tawfik, Pierre N; Matthew D Stone; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Carlis, John V.; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC’s potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing quest...

  14. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Idrees Muhammad; Khan Khalida; Zahra Amreen; Faridi Rabia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, t...

  15. Inverse relation between FASN expression in human adipose tissue and the insulin resistance level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose tissue is a key regulator of energy balance playing an active role in lipid storage and may be a dynamic buffer to control fatty acid flux. Just like PPARγ, fatty acid synthesis enzymes such as FASN have been implicated in almost all aspects of human metabolic alterations such as obesity, insulin resistance or dyslipemia. The aim of this work is to investigate how FASN and PPARγ expression in human adipose tissue is related to carbohydrate metabolism dysfunction and obesity. Methods The study included eighty-seven patients which were classified according to their BMI and to their glycaemia levels in order to study FASN and PPARγ gene expression levels, anthropometric and biochemical variables. Results The main result of this work is the close relation between FASN expression level and the factors that lead to hyperglycemic state (increased values of glucose levels, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, BMI and triglycerides. The correlation of the enzyme with these parameters is inversely proportional. On the other hand, PPARγ is not related to carbohydrate metabolism. Conclusions We can demonstrate that FASN expression is a good candidate to study the pathophysiology of type II diabetes and obesity in humans.

  16. Citizenship, human rights, and dementia: Towards a new embodied relational ethic of sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Grigorovich, Alisa; Kontos, Alexis P; Miller, Karen-Lee

    2016-05-01

    Sexual citizenship and sexual rights scholarship have made important contributions to broadening citizenship and more fully accommodating rights related to sexuality. However, this scholarship has concentrated primarily on the sexuality and intimacy-related needs of younger people and those who are not cognitively impaired. Consequently, it has inadvertently served to marginalize persons living with dementia who reside in long-term residential care settings. We argue that supporting sexual rights for persons with dementia requires a particular human rights ontology for citizenship-one that recognizes that corporeality is a fundamental source of self-expression, interdependence, and reciprocal engagement. This is an ontology that underpins our model of relational citizenship and that grounds our articulation of an ethic of embodied relational sexuality. In our view, this ethic offers important direction for the development of policy, legislation, and clinical guidelines to support sexual rights for persons with dementia in long-term residential care.

  17. Relative Efficacy of Human Social Interaction and Food as Reinforcers for Domestic Dogs and Hand-Reared Wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbacher, Erica; Wynne, Clive D. L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the intimate relationship dogs share with humans in Western society, we know relatively little about the variables that produce and maintain dog social behavior towards humans. One possibility is that human social interaction is itself a reinforcer for dog behavior. As an initial assessment of the variables that might maintain dog social…

  18. Relative Efficacy of Human Social Interaction and Food as Reinforcers for Domestic Dogs and Hand-Reared Wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbacher, Erica; Wynne, Clive D. L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the intimate relationship dogs share with humans in Western society, we know relatively little about the variables that produce and maintain dog social behavior towards humans. One possibility is that human social interaction is itself a reinforcer for dog behavior. As an initial assessment of the variables that might maintain dog social…

  19. Lactation-Related MicroRNA Expression in Microvesicles of Human Umbilical Cord Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Jing; Wang, Chen-Meiyi; Wang, Yi-Ting; Qiao, Hai; Fang, Liao-Qiong; Wang, Zhi-Biao

    2016-11-24

    BACKGROUND The complex process by which lactation is initiated upon neonate delivery remains incompletely understood. Microvesicles (MVs) can transmit microRNAs (miRNAs) into recipient cells to influence cell function, and recent studies have identified miRNAs essential for mammary gland development and lactation. This study aimed to investigate the expression of lactation-related miRNAs in MVs isolated from human umbilical cord blood immediately after delivery. MATERIAL AND METHODS Umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 70 healthy pregnant women, and MVs were isolated through differential centrifugation and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Western blotting, and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Lactation-related miRNAs were screened using bioinformatics tools for miRNA target prediction, gene ontology, and signaling pathway analyses. miRNA PCR arrays were used for miRNA expression analysis, and the results were validated by real-time PCR. Upon exposure of HBL-100 human mammary epithelial cells to MVs, MV uptake was examined by fluorescence confocal microscopy and b-casein secretion was detected by ELISA. RESULTS Spherical MVs extracted from umbilical cord blood expressed CD63 and had an average diameter of 167.0±77.1 nm. We profiled 337 miRNAs in human umbilical cord blood MVs and found that 85 were related to lactation by bioinformatics analysis. The 25 most differentially expressed lactation-related miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. MV uptake by HBL-100 cells was after 4 h in culture, and significantly increased secretion of β-casein was observed after 96 h from cells exposed to MVs (PUmbilical cord blood MVs contain many lactation-related miRNAs and can induce β-casein production by HBL-100 cells in vitro. Thus, umbilical cord blood MVs may mediate secretion of β-casein through miRNAs, thereby playing an important role in fetal-maternal crosstalk.

  20. Movement-related theta rhythm in humans: coordinating self-directed hippocampal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Raphael; Doeller, Christian F; Barnes, Gareth R; Litvak, Vladimir; Düzel, Emrah; Bandettini, Peter A; Burgess, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for episodic or declarative memory and the theta rhythm has been implicated in mnemonic processing, but the functional contribution of theta to memory remains the subject of intense speculation. Recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus might function as a network hub for volitional learning. In contrast to human experiments, electrophysiological recordings in the hippocampus of behaving rodents are dominated by theta oscillations reflecting volitional movement, which has been linked to spatial exploration and encoding. This literature makes the surprising cross-species prediction that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory movements in the service of self-directed learning. We examined the links between theta, spatial exploration, and memory encoding by designing an interactive human spatial navigation paradigm combined with multimodal neuroimaging. We used both non-invasive whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG) to look at theta oscillations and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to look at brain regions associated with volitional movement and learning. We found that theta power increases during the self-initiation of virtual movement, additionally correlating with subsequent memory performance and environmental familiarity. Performance-related hippocampal theta increases were observed during a static pre-navigation retrieval phase, where planning for subsequent navigation occurred. Furthermore, periods of the task showing movement-related theta increases showed decreased fMRI activity in the parahippocampus and increased activity in the hippocampus and other brain regions that strikingly overlap with the previously observed volitional learning network (the reverse pattern was seen for stationary periods). These fMRI changes also correlated with participant's performance. Our findings suggest that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory

  1. Propofol inhibits hERG K(+) channels and enhances the inhibition effects on its mutations in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sheng-Na; Jing, Ying; Yang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Li-Rong

    2016-11-15

    QT interval prolongation, a potential risk for arrhythmias, may result from gene polymorphisms relevant to cardiomyocyte repolarization. Another noted cause of QT interval prolongation is the administration of chemical compounds such as anesthetics, which may affect a specific type of cardiac K(+) channel encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). hERG K(+) current was recorded using whole-cell patch clamp in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells expressing wild type (WT) or mutated hERG channels. Expression of hERG K(+) channel proteins was evaluated using western blot and confirmed by fluorescent staining and imaging. Computational modeling was adopted to identify the possible binding site(s) of propofol with hERG K(+) channels. Propofol had a significant inhibitory effect on WT hERG K(+) currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 60.9±6.4μM. Mutations in drug-binding sites (Y652A or F656C) of the hERG channel were found to attenuate hERG current blockage by propofol. However, propofol did not inhibit the trafficking of hERG protein to the cell membrane. Meanwhile, for the three selective hERG K(+) channel mutant heterozygotes WT/Q738X-hERG, WT/A422T-hERG, and WT/H562P-hERG, the IC50 of propofol was calculated as 14.2±2.8μM, 3.3±1.2μM, and 5.9±1.9μM, respectively, which were much lower than that for the wild type. These findings indicate that propofol may potentially increase QT interval prolongation risk in patients via direct inhibition of the hERG K(+) channel, especially in those with other concurrent triggering factors such as hERG gene mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Humans (really are animals: Picture-book reading influences five-year-old urban children’s construal of the relation between humans and non-human animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra R Waxman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available What is the relation between humans and nonhuman animals? From a biological perspective, we view humans as one species among many, but in the fables and films we create for children, we often offer an anthropocentric perspective, imbuing nonhuman animals with human-like characteristics. What are the consequences of these distinctly different perspectives on children’s reasoning about the natural world? Some have argued that children universally begin with an anthropocentric perspective and that acquiring a biological perspective requires a basic conceptual change (cf. Carey 1985. But recent work reveals that this anthropocentric perspective, evidenced in urban five-year-olds, is not evident in three-year-olds (Herrmann et al. 2010. This indicates that the anthropocentric perspective is not an obligatory first step in children’s reasoning about biological phenomena. In the current paper, we introduced a priming manipulation to assess whether five-year-olds’ reasoning about a novel biological property is influenced by the perspectives they encounter in children’s books. Just before participating in a reasoning task, each child read a book about bears with an experimenter. What varied was whether bears were depicted from an anthropomorphic (Berenstain Bears or biological perspective (Animal Encyclopedia. The priming had a dramatic effect. Children reading the Berenstain Bears showed the standard anthropocentric reasoning pattern, but those reading the Animal Encyclopedia adopted a biological pattern. This offers evidence that urban five-year-olds can adopt either a biological or a human-centered stance, depending upon the context. Thus, children’s books and other media are double-edged swords. Media may (inadvertently support human-centered reasoning in young children, but may also be instrumental in redirecting children’s attention to a biological model.

  3. Human milk bactericidal properties: effect of lyophilization and relation to maternal factors and milk components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, Jaime; Gormaz, Maria; López-Mendoza, Maria C; Nogarotto, Elisabetta; Silvestre, Dolores

    2015-04-01

    Lyophilization appears to be a viable method for storing human milk, assuring no microbiological contamination and preserving its health benefits and antibacterial properties. The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the effects of different storage methods (lyophilization and freezing at -20°C and -80°C) and maternal factors (gestational length or time postpartum) upon the microbiological contents and bactericidal activity of human milk. The possible relation between bactericidal activity and the content of certain nutrients and functional components is also investigated. Microbiological content, bactericidal activity, sialic acid, and ganglioside contents, as well as protein, fat, and lactose concentrations were assessed in 125 human milk samples from 65 healthy donors in the Human Milk Bank of La Fe (Valencia, Spain). Lyophilization and storage at -80°C significantly reduced the content of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms and Staphylococcus epidermidis when compared with storage at -20°C. Bactericidal activity was not significantly modified by lyophilization when compared with freezing at either -20°C or -80°C. Bactericidal activity was not correlated with fat, protein, or lactose content, but was significantly correlated to ganglioside content. The bactericidal activity was significantly greater (P milk and in milk from women with term delivery than in milk from early lactation (days 1-7 postpartum) and milk from women with preterm delivery, respectively. Lyophilization and storage at -80°C of human milk yields similar results and are superior to storage at -20C with regard to microbial and bactericidal capacities, being a feasible alternative for human milk banks.

  4. Metal status in human endometrium: Relation to cigarette smoking and histological lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzymski, Piotr, E-mail: rzymskipiotr@ump.edu.pl [Department of Biology and Environmental Protection, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 8, 60-806 Poznań (Poland); Rzymski, Paweł; Tomczyk, Katarzyna [Department of Mother' s and Child' s Health, Gynecologic and Obstetrical University Hospital, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań (Poland); Niedzielski, Przemysław; Jakubowski, Karol [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Poniedziałek, Barbara [Department of Biology and Environmental Protection, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 8, 60-806 Poznań (Poland); Opala, Tomasz [Department of Mother' s and Child' s Health, Gynecologic and Obstetrical University Hospital, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań (Poland)

    2014-07-15

    Human endometrium is a thick, blood vessel-rich, glandular tissue which undergoes cyclic changes and is potentially sensitive to the various endogenous and exogenous compounds supplied via the hematogenous route. As recently indicated, several metals including Cd, Pb, Cr and Ni represent an emerging class of potential metalloestrogens and can be implicated in alterations of the female reproductive system including endometriosis and cancer. In the present study, we investigated the content of five metals: Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn in 25 samples of human endometrium collected from Polish females undergoing diagnostic or therapeutic curettage of the uterine cavity. The overall mean metal concentration (analyzed using microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry MIP-OES) decreased in the following order: Cr>Pb>Zn>Ni>Cd. For the first time it was demonstrated that cigarette smoking significantly increases the endometrial content of Cd and Pb. Concentration of these metals was also positively correlated with years of smoking and the number of smoked cigarettes. Tissue samples with recognized histologic lesions (simple hyperplasia, polyposis and atrophy) were characterized by a 2-fold higher Cd level. No relation between the age of the women and metal content was found. Our study shows that human endometrium can be a potential target of metal accumulation within the human body. Quantitative analyses of endometrial metal content could serve as an additional indicator of potential impairments of the menstrual cycle and fertility. - Highlights: • Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn are detectable in human endometrium. • Mean metal content in human endometrium decreases in Cr>Pb>Zn>Ni>Cd order. • Cigarettes smoking increases endometrial content of Cd and Pb. • Lesioned endometrial tissue was characterized by higher metal contents.

  5. A murine herpesvirus closely related to ubiquitous human herpesviruses causes T-cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Swapneel J; Zhao, Guoyan; Penna, Vinay R; Park, Eugene; Lauron, Elvin J; Harvey, Ian B; Beatty, Wandy L; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Poursine-Laurent, Jennifer; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2017-02-08

    Mouse models of human herpesvirus infections The human roseoloviruses HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7 comprise the Roseolovirus genus of the human Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Infections with these viruses have been implicated in many diseases; however, it has been challenging to establish infections with Roseoloviruses as direct drivers of pathology because they are nearly ubiquitous and display species-specific tropism. Furthermore, controlled study of infection has been hampered by the lack of experimental models, and until now, a mouse roseolovirus has not been identified. Herein we describe a virus that causes severe thymic necrosis in neonatal mice, characterized by a loss of CD4(+) T-cells. These phenotypes resemble those caused by the previously described mouse thymic virus (MTV), a putative herpesvirus that has not been molecularly characterized. By Next Generation sequencing of infected tissue homogenates, we assembled a contiguous 174Kb genome sequence encoding 128 unique predicted open reading frames (ORFs), many of which were most closely related to herpesvirus genes. Moreover, the structure of the virus genome and phylogenetic analysis of multiple genes strongly suggested that this virus is a betaherpesvirus more closely related to the roseoloviruses, HHV6A, HHV6B, and HHV7, than another murine betaherpesvirus, mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). As such, we have named this virus murine roseolovirus (MRV) because these data strongly suggest that MRV is a mouse homolog of HHV6A/HHV6B/HHV7.Importance: Herein we describe the complete genome sequence of a novel murine herpesvirus. By sequence and phylogenetic analyses, we show that it is a betaherpesvirus most closely related to the roseoloviruses, human herpesvirus 6A, 6B, and 7. These data combined with physiological similarities with human roseoloviruses collectively suggest that this virus is a murine roseolovirus (MRV), the first definitively described rodent roseolovirus, to our knowledge. Many biological and

  6. Molecular Cloning of TSARG6 Gene Related to Apoptosis in Human Spermatogenic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang LIU; Guang-Xiu LU; Xiao-Wei XING

    2004-01-01

    Beginning from a mouse EST (GenBank accession No. BE644537) which was significantly up-regulated in cryptorchidism and represented a novel gene, we cloned a new gene (GenBank accessionNo. AY138810) which is related to apoptosis in human spermatogenic cells by means of GeneScan programand PCR technology. The gene whose full cDNA length is 1875 bp containing 8 exons and 7 introns islocated in human chromosome lq13.3. Its protein containing 316 amino acid residues is a new member ofHSP40 protein family because the sequence contains the highly conserved J domain which is present in allDna J-like proteins and is considered to have a critical role in DnaJ-DnaK protein-protein interactions. TSARG6protein displays a 45% identity in a 348-amino acid overlap with DJB5_HUMAN protein. The result ofRT-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that TSARG6 is specifically expressed in adult testis and thetranscript is 1.8 kb. Based upon all these observations, it is considered that we cloned a new gene whichprobably inhibited human testis spermatogenesis apoptosis.

  7. Concentration of trace elements in human semen and relation to spermatozoa quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slivkova, Jana; Popelkova, Miroslava; Massanyi, Peter; Toporcerova, Silvia; Stawarz, Robert; Formicki, Grzegorz; Lukac, Norbert; Putała, Aldona; Guzik, Marek

    2009-03-01

    In this study the concentrations of trace elements such as lead, cadmium, iron, nickel, copper and zinc in the human semen (n = 47), occurrence of pathological spermatozoa, and correlations of these elements to pathological forms were investigated. For each sample of human spermatozoa at least 500 spermatozoa were evaluated. Metal contents were determined by the voltametric method and flame absorption spectrophotometry method. The concentrations of trace elements in human semen were: lead 1.49 +/- 0.40 mg x kg(- 1), cadmium 0.13 +/- 0.15 mg x kg(- 1), iron 2.59 +/- 0.21 mg x kg(- 1), nickel 0.40 +/- 0.07 mg x kg(- 1), copper 0.28 +/- 0.06 mg x kg(- 1), and zinc 153.93 +/- 67.08 mg x kg(- 1), respectively. The total percentage of pathological spermatozoa was 41.61 +/- 9.80% with predominancy of broken flagellum, flagellum torso and separated flagellum. In relation to trace elements the analysis showed correlation between copper and lead (r = -0.47), nickel and iron (r = 0.36), lead and flagellum ball (r = -0.39), cadmium and large heads (r = 0.37) and between iron and other forms of pathological spermatozoa (r = -0.32). Results of this study describe possible effects of trace elements on the spermatozoa quality in normal human sperm.

  8. Low-altitude outbreaks of human fascioliasis related with summer rainfall in Gilan province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoreza Salahi-Moghaddam

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Following human fascioliasis outbreaks in 1988 and 1999 in Gilan province, northern Iran, efforts are now made to shed light on the seasonal pattern of fascioliasis transmission in this endemic area, taking into account snail host populations, climatic conditions and human cases. Populations of the intermediate host snail (Lymnaea spp. peak in May and November, while there is a fourfold increase in the rate of human fascioliasis in February compared to that of September. Transmission is likely to occur mainly in late autumn and sporadically in late spring. Rainfall, seasonally analysed in periods of 3 years, indicates that accumulated summer rainfall may be related with the 1988 and 1999 human fascioliasis outbreaks. Although a more detailed picture, based on the analysis of further abiotic and biotic factors influencing fascioliasis transmission in this area, is required to substantiate this hypothesis, our results serve as the first step of a geographical information system project concerning the epidemiological study of fascioliasis in Iran. This local-scale study concerning the effects of climate change and natural disasters on the spread of fascioliasis aims to facilitate the understanding of what goes on at the regional scale in this respect.

  9. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.486 Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained...

  10. High-expanding cortical regions in human development and evolution are related to higher intellectual abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Anders M; Westlye, Lars T; Amlien, Inge; Tamnes, Christian K; Grydeland, Håkon; Engvig, Andreas; Espeseth, Thomas; Reinvang, Ivar; Lundervold, Astri J; Lundervold, Arvid; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2015-01-01

    Cortical surface area has tremendously expanded during human evolution, and similar patterns of cortical expansion have been observed during childhood development. An intriguing hypothesis is that the high-expanding cortical regions also show the strongest correlations with intellectual function in humans. However, we do not know how the regional distribution of correlations between intellectual function and cortical area maps onto expansion in development and evolution. Here, in a sample of 1048 participants, we show that regions in which cortical area correlates with visuospatial reasoning abilities are generally high expanding in both development and evolution. Several regions in the frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate, showed high expansion in both development and evolution. The area of these regions was related to intellectual functions in humans. Low-expanding areas were not related to cognitive scores. These findings suggest that cortical regions involved in higher intellectual functions have expanded the most during development and evolution. The radial unit hypothesis provides a common framework for interpretation of the findings in the context of evolution and prenatal development, while additional cellular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, dendritic arborization, and intracortical myelination, likely impact area expansion in later childhood.

  11. Students’ Ideas Regarding Science and Pseudo-science in Relation to the Human Body and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Lundström

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the pseudo-scientific and superstitious ideas Swedish upper-secondary students articulate and if there is a relationship between their ideas and their knowledge of the human body and health. The study is based on a questionnaire among 300 students in which the students were asked to consider statements related to different treatments that may influence the human body and health, and questions about physiology, health and nutrition. The analysis reveals that a relatively large group of students give credance to statements such as that some people can transfer thoughts or that the phases of the moon can affect a person’s health. The analysis also shows that there is no apparent relationship between the students’ pseudo-scientific beliefs and their scientific knowledge about the human body. Furthermore, although the results do not indicate a gender difference with regards to the power of faith in pseudo-scientific ideas, they do indicate that male and females consider these questions differently. The results imply a need for discussion and critical investigation in school science concerning the relationship between science and pseudo-scientific ideas in order to enhance critical thinking and development of the understanding of the nature of science.

  12. The Issues of Human Rights in the India-U.S. Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov Aleksey I.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a brief overview of India-U.S. relations during the period of Narendra Modi’s government and Barack Obama’s administration. The author analyzes the dynamics of cooperation development after the victory of Bharatiya Janata Party in the 2014 Parliamentary elections in India and studies the key directions of bilateral agenda. The current condition of India-U.S. strategic dialogue and the influence of human rights issues on the countries’ cooperation are characterized. Since 2014 the states’ cooperation has been growing rapidly. The bilateral investment, trade and economic interdependence have significantly increased. Some experts and mass media note that Barack Obama and Narendra Modi are having friendly relations. From a different angle, a number of agreements between countries still remain unaccomplished. For instance, the U.S. support for India’s permanent seat in the United Nations Security Council, its accession to APEC and the implementation of nuclear deal have yet to be turned into achievement. Together with strengthening the bilateral strategic dialogue, the U.S. has intensified the criticism of India’s human rights record. The main part of it includes the cases of religious intolerance, which are observed in the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom reports and the remarks given by U.S. lawmakers and official representatives, including the Ambassador to India. Washington’s careful attention to the human rights issues and religious violence in particular is one of the major irritants in the U.S.-India relations. The engagement of Indian Americans in the local U.S. politics and their lobbying efforts in the context of U.S.-India relations are revealed. The author outlines the near-terms perspectives of bilateral cooperation.

  13. Gene expression profiling provides insights into pathways of oxaliplatin-related sinusoidal obstruction syndrome in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Tauzin, Sébastien; Brezault, Catherine; Delucinge-Vivier, Céline; Descombes, Patrick; Dousset, Bertand; Majno, Pietro E; Mentha, Gilles; Terris, Benoit

    2011-04-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS; formerly veno-occlusive disease) is a well-established complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, pyrrolizidine alkaloid intoxication, and widely used chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin. It is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Pathogenesis of SOS in humans is poorly understood. To explore its molecular mechanisms, we used Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays to investigate the gene expression profile of 11 human livers with oxaliplatin-related SOS and compared it to 12 matched controls. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that profiles from SOS and controls formed distinct clusters. To identify functional networks and gene ontologies, data were analyzed by the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. A total of 913 genes were differentially expressed in SOS: 613 being upregulated and 300 downregulated. Reverse transcriptase-PCR results showed excellent concordance with microarray data. Pathway analysis showed major gene upregulation in six pathways in SOS compared with controls: acute phase response (notably interleukin 6), coagulation system (Serpine1, THBD, and VWF), hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation (COL3a1, COL3a2, PDGF-A, TIMP1, and MMP2), and oxidative stress. Angiogenic factors (VEGF-C) and hypoxic factors (HIF1A) were upregulated. The most significant increase was seen in CCL20 mRNA. In conclusion, oxaliplatin-related SOS can be readily distinguished according to morphologic characteristics but also by a molecular signature. Global gene analysis provides new insights into mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-related hepatotoxicity in humans and potential targets relating to its diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Activation of VEGF and coagulation (vWF) pathways could partially explain at a molecular level the clinical observations that bevacizumab and aspirin have a preventive effect in SOS.

  14. A study on the air pollution related human diseases in Thiruvananthapuram City, Kerala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bency, K.T.; Jansy, J.; Thakappan, B.; Kumar, B.; Sreelekha, T.T.; Hareendran, N.K.; Nair, P.K.K.; Krishnan Nair, M. [National Inst. of Environmental Health, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India). Regional Cancer Centre

    2005-07-01

    This paper contains the results of a study that examined the impacts of air pollution on human health in Thiruvananthapuram City, India. The study compared health impacts arising from air pollution in three different zones including residential, commercial, and industrial. The paper presents the findings from the study according to each of these zones and presents conclusions.The study found that each zone had its individual environmental problems which were characterized by specific diseases. In the residential zone, there was a prevalence of diseases such as breast cancer and cardiac-related problems as well as dietary problems linked to obesity. In the industrial zone, respiratory illnesses related to air pollution were prevalent. Cardiac and vector-borne diseases, related to environmental hazards like waste water stagnation, dust and solid waste problem, were high in the commercial zone. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  15. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oral Cancers: The Nurse's Role in Mitigating Stigma and Dispelling Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Anne

    2017-01-01

    : The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don't understand the disease's etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It's essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and HPV-related oral cancer, thus helping to mitigate the stigma and dispel myths, and to promote vaccination in at-risk populations, including children and young adults.

  16. Structural Insight into Processive Human Mitochondrial DNA Synthesis and Disease-Related Polymerase Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Sam; Kennedy, W. Dexter; Yin, Y. Whitney; (Texas)

    2010-09-07

    Human mitochondrial DNA polymerase (Pol {gamma}) is the sole replicase in mitochondria. Pol {gamma} is vulnerable to nonselective antiretroviral drugs and is increasingly associated with mutations found in patients with mitochondriopathies. We determined crystal structures of the human heterotrimeric Pol {gamma} holoenzyme and, separately, a variant of its processivity factor, Pol {gamma}B. The holoenzyme structure reveals an unexpected assembly of the mitochondrial DNA replicase where the catalytic subunit Pol {gamma}A interacts with its processivity factor primarily via a domain that is absent in all other DNA polymerases. This domain provides a structural module for supporting both the intrinsic processivity of the catalytic subunit alone and the enhanced processivity of holoenzyme. The Pol {gamma} structure also provides a context for interpreting the phenotypes of disease-related mutations in the polymerase and establishes a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of toxicity of anti-retroviral drugs targeting HIV reverse transcriptase.

  17. Separation of human, bovine, and porcine insulins, three very closely related proteins, by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamalle, Caroline; Roland, Diane; Crommen, Jacques; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Fillet, Marianne

    2015-10-01

    Human, bovine, and porcine insulins are small proteins with very closely related amino acid sequences, which makes their separation challenging. In this study, we took advantage of the high-resolution power of CE, and more particularly of micellar electrokinetic chromatography, to separate those biomolecules. Among several surfactants, perfluorooctanoic acid ammonium salt was selected. Then, using a design of experiments approach, the optimal BGE composition was found to consist of 50 mM ammonium acetate pH 9.0, 65 mM perfluorooctanoic acid ammonium salt, and 4% MeOH. The three insulins could be separated within 12 min with a satisfactory resolution. This method could be useful to detect possible counterfeit pharmaceutical formulations. Indeed, it would be easy to determine if human insulin was replaced by bovine or porcine insulin.

  18. Event-related potential study on image-symmetry discrimination in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambul, Alwin Melkie; Murayama, Nobuki; Igasaki, Tomohiko

    2013-01-01

    The human visual system seems to have a highly perceptual sensitivity to symmetry. However, where and when the discrimination of symmetrical properties begins in the context of visual information processing is largely unclear. This study investigates event-related potential (ERP) patterns in humans when perceiving symmetry-varied complex object images. ERP responses were derived from electroencephalography (EEG) data recorded from eight healthy subjects using 128-channel scalp electrodes. Visual stimulation was provided using gray-scaled photographs of a car with six different viewpoints, hence disrupting the vertical symmetry, where one of the stimuli was intentionally made symmetric by mirroring the image about its center vertical axis. The results show that discrimination of image symmetry is revealed by potential deflection in early ERP components recorded at occipito-temporal sites and can be significantly observed around 220 ms after stimulus onset.

  19. Natural landscape features, human-related attractants, and conflict hotspots: A spatial analysis of human-grizzly bear conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S.M.; Madel, M.J.; Mattson, D.J.; Graham, J.M.; Burchfield, J.A.; Belsky, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    There is a long history of conflict in the western United States between humans and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) involving agricultural attractants. However, little is known about the spatial dimensions of this conflict and the relative importance of different attractants. This study was undertaken to better understand the spatial and functional components of conflict between humans and grizzly bears on privately owned agricultural lands in Montana. Our investigations focused on spatial associations of rivers and creeks, livestock pastures, boneyards (livestock carcass dump sites), beehives, and grizzly bear habitat with reported human-grizzly bear conflicts during 1986-2001. We based our analysis on a survey of 61 of 64 livestock producers in our study in the Rocky Mountain East Front, Montana. With the assistance of livestock and honey producers, we mapped the locations of cattle and sheep pastures, boneyards, and beehives. We used density surface mapping to identify seasonal clusters of conflicts that we term conflict hotspots. Hotspots accounted for 75% of all conflicts and encompassed approximately 8% of the study area. We also differentiated chronic (4 or more years of conflicts) from non-chronic hotspots (fewer than 4 years of conflict). The 10 chronic hotpots accounted for 58% of all conflicts. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, we found that conflict locations were most strongly associated with rivers and creeks followed by sheep lambing areas and fall sheep pastures. Conflicts also were associated with cattle calving areas, spring cow-calf pastures, summer and fall cattle pastures, and boneyards. The Monte Carlo simulations indicated associations between conflict locations and unprotected beehives at specific analysis scales. Protected (fenced) beehives were less likely to experience conflicts than unprotected beehives. Conflicts occurred at a greater rate in riparian and wetland vegetation than would be expected. The majority of conflicts occurred in a

  20. Neurophysiological analysis of target-related sympathetic pathways--from animal to human: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänig, W; Häbler, H-J

    2003-03-01

    The sympathetic nervous system regulates many different target tissues in the somatic and visceral domains of the body in a differentiated manner, indicating that there exist separate sympathetic pathways that are functionally defined by their target cells. Signals generated by central integration and channelled through the preganglionic neurons into the final sympathetic pathways are precisely transmitted through the para- and prevertebral ganglia and at the neuroeffector junctions to the effector cells. Neurophysiological recordings of activity in postganglionic neurons in skin and muscle nerves using microneurography in human subjects and in skin, muscle and visceral nerves, using conventional recording techniques in anaesthetized animals, clearly show that each type of sympathetic neuron exhibits a discharge pattern that is characteristic for its target cells and, therefore, its function. These findings justify labelling the neurons as muscle vasoconstrictor, cutaneous vasoconstrictor, sudomotor, lipomotor, cardiomotor, secretomotor neurons, etc. The discharge patterns monitor aspects of the central organization of the respective sympathetic system in the neuraxis and forebrain. They can be dissected into several distinct reflexes (initiated by peripheral and central afferent inputs) and reactions connected to central signals (related to respiration, circadian and other rhythms, command signals generated in the forebrain, etc). They are functional markers for the sympathetic final pathways. These neurophysiological recordings of the discharge patterns from functionally identified neurons of sympathetic pathways in the human and in animals are the ultimate reference for all experimental investigations that aim to unravel the central organization of the sympathetic systems. The similarities of the results obtained in the in vivo studies in the human and in animals justify concluding that the principles of the central organization of sympathetic systems are

  1. Gaze and hand position effects on finger-movement-related human brain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Patrick; Sanes, Jerome N

    2009-02-01

    Humans commonly use their hands to move and to interact with their environment by processing visual and proprioceptive information to determine the location of a goal-object and the initial hand position. It remains elusive, however, how the human brain fully uses this sensory information to generate accurate movements. In monkeys, it appears that frontal and parietal areas use and combine gaze and hand signals to generate movements, whereas in humans, prior work has separately assessed how the brain uses these two signals. Here we investigated whether and how the human brain integrates gaze orientation and hand position during simple visually triggered finger tapping. We hypothesized that parietal, frontal, and subcortical regions involved in movement production would also exhibit modulation of movement-related activation as a function of gaze and hand positions. We used functional MRI to measure brain activation while healthy young adults performed a visually cued finger movement and fixed gaze at each of three locations and held the arm in two different configurations. We found several areas that exhibited activation related to a mixture of these hand and gaze positions; these included the sensory-motor cortex, supramarginal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, and left cerebellum. We also found regions within the left insula, left cuneus, left midcingulate gyrus, left putamen, and right tempo-occipital junction with activation driven only by gaze orientation. Finally, clusters with hand position effects were found in the cerebellum bilaterally. Our results indicate that these areas integrate at least two signals to perform visual-motor actions and that these could be used to subserve sensory-motor transformations.

  2. Spatial heterogeneity of four-dimensional relative pressure fields in the human left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Jonatan; Bolger, Ann F; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino

    2015-12-01

    To assess the spatial heterogeneity of the four-dimensional (4D) relative pressure fields in the healthy human left ventricle (LV) and provide reference data for normal LV relative pressure. Twelve healthy subjects underwent a cardiac MRI examination where 4D flow and morphological data were acquired. The latter data were segmented and used to define the borders of the LV for computation of relative pressure fields using the pressure Poisson equation. The LV lumen was divided into 17 pie-shaped segments. In the normal left ventricle, the relative pressure in the apical segments was significantly higher relative to the basal segments (P pressure than the opposite basal inferolateral segment during both E-wave (P Relative pressure in the left ventricle is heterogeneous. During diastole, the main pressure differences in the LV occur along the basal-apical axis. However, pressure differences were also found in the short axis direction and may reflect important aspects of atrioventricular coupling. Additionally, this study provides reference data on LV pressure dynamics for a group of healthy subjects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Characterization and comparison of the tissue-related modules in human and mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruolin Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to the advances of high throughput technology and data-collection approaches, we are now in an unprecedented position to understand the evolution of organisms. Great efforts have characterized many individual genes responsible for the interspecies divergence, yet little is known about the genome-wide divergence at a higher level. Modules, serving as the building blocks and operational units of biological systems, provide more information than individual genes. Hence, the comparative analysis between species at the module level would shed more light on the mechanisms underlying the evolution of organisms than the traditional comparative genomics approaches. RESULTS: We systematically identified the tissue-related modules using the iterative signature algorithm (ISA, and we detected 52 and 65 modules in the human and mouse genomes, respectively. The gene expression patterns indicate that all of these predicted modules have a high possibility of serving as real biological modules. In addition, we defined a novel quantity, "total constraint intensity," a proxy of multiple constraints (of co-regulated genes and tissues where the co-regulation occurs on the evolution of genes in module context. We demonstrate that the evolutionary rate of a gene is negatively correlated with its total constraint intensity. Furthermore, there are modules coding the same essential biological processes, while their gene contents have diverged extensively between human and mouse. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that unlike the composition of module, which exhibits a great difference between human and mouse, the functional organization of the corresponding modules may evolve in a more conservative manner. Most importantly, our findings imply that similar biological processes can be carried out by different sets of genes from human and mouse, therefore, the functional data of individual genes from mouse may not apply to human in certain occasions.

  4. Human brucellosis in Maghreb: existence of a lineage related to socio-historical connections with Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounes, Nedjma; Cherfa, Moulay-Ali; Le Carrou, Gilles; Bouyoucef, Abdellah; Jay, Maryne; Garin-Bastuji, Bruno; Mick, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Despite control/eradication programs, brucellosis, major worldwide zoonosis due to the Brucella genus, is endemic in Northern Africa and remains a major public health problem in the Maghreb region (Algeria/Morocco/Tunisia). Brucella melitensis biovar 3 is mostly involved in human infections and infects mainly small ruminants. Human and animal brucellosis occurrence in the Maghreb seems still underestimated and its epidemiological situation remains hazy. This study summarizes official data, regarding Brucella melitensis infections in Algeria, from 1989 to 2012, with the purpose to provide appropriate insights concerning the epidemiological situation of human and small ruminant brucellosis in Maghreb. Algeria and Europe are closely linked for historical and economical reasons. These historical connections raise the question of their possible impact on the genetic variability of Brucella strains circulating in the Maghreb. Other purpose of this study was to assess the genetic diversity among Maghreb B. melitensis biovar 3 strains, and to investigate their possible epidemiological relationship with European strains, especially with French strains. A total of 90 B. melitensis biovar 3 Maghreb strains isolated over a 25 year-period (1989-2014), mainly from humans, were analysed by MLVA-16. The obtained results were compared with genotypes of European B. melitensis biovar 3 strains. Molecular assays showed that Algerian strains were mainly distributed into two distinct clusters, one Algerian cluster related to European sub-cluster. These results led to suggest the existence of a lineage resulting from socio-historical connections between Algeria and Europe that might have evolved distinctly from the Maghreb autochthonous group. This study provides insights regarding the epidemiological situation of human brucellosis in the Maghreb and is the first molecular investigation regarding B. melitensis biovar 3 strains circulating in the Maghreb.

  5. NASA Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH): Revitalization of Space-Related Human Factors, Environmental, and Habitability Data and Design Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Kenneth; Pickett, Lynn; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH). It provides guidance and data to aid vehicle / habitat designers in human-system integration It also aids requirements writers in development of human-system integration requirements from SFHSS Standards

  6. The psychosocial burden of human papillomavirus related disease and screening interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotta, M; Ung, L; Stein, A; Conway, E L; Mast, T C; Fairley, C K; Garland, S

    2009-12-01

    (i) To assess the psychosocial burden of testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) related genital disease or of a HPV-related diagnosis; (ii) to compare an instrument specifically designed to measure HPV-related psychosocial burden with other generic quality of life (QoL) instruments. A cross-sectional design. Researchers recruited women from outpatient clinics at a major tertiary women's hospital and a sexual health centre who completed surveys within 3 months of receiving 331 women, 18-45 years, who had experienced a normal cervical Papanicolaou (Pap) result, an abnormal Pap result, biopsy confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or external genital warts (EGW). The HPV impact profile (HIP) designed to assess the psychosocial impact of HPV; two general health-related QoL surveys-the EuroQoL VAS and the Sheehan disability scale; and a HPV knowledge survey. Response rate was 78%. Significant psychosocial impacts were found for women screened for, or having a diagnosis of, HPV-related genital disease. The largest impact was in women with CIN 2/3 and EGW. This HPV-related psychosocial impact was most sensitively detected with the HIP. Relative to generic measures of QoL, the HIP provided insight into the full range of psychosocial impacts of HPV testing and diagnoses. Clinicians need to be aware of the potential psychosocial impact of testing for or diagnosing HPV-related genital disease, in particular CIN 2/3 and EGW. The HIP survey is a more sensitive measure of the psychosocial impact of HPV-related genital disease than generic QoL surveys.

  7. Task-related changes in functional properties of the human brain network underlying attentional control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Kida

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated task-related changes in brain activation and inter-regional connectivity but the temporal dynamics of functional properties of the brain during task execution is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated task-related changes in functional properties of the human brain network by applying graph-theoretical analysis to magnetoencephalography (MEG. Subjects performed a cue-target attention task in which a visual cue informed them of the direction of focus for incoming auditory or tactile target stimuli, but not the sensory modality. We analyzed the MEG signal in the cue-target interval to examine network properties during attentional control. Cluster-based non-parametric permutation tests with the Monte-Carlo method showed that in the cue-target interval, beta activity was desynchronized in the sensori-motor region including premotor and posterior parietal regions in the hemisphere contralateral to the attended side. Graph-theoretical analysis revealed that, in beta frequency, global hubs were found around the sensori-motor and prefrontal regions, and functional segregation over the entire network was decreased during attentional control compared to the baseline. Thus, network measures revealed task-related temporal changes in functional properties of the human brain network, leading to the understanding of how the brain dynamically responds to task execution as a network.

  8. Task-related changes in functional properties of the human brain network underlying attentional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated task-related changes in brain activation and inter-regional connectivity but the temporal dynamics of functional properties of the brain during task execution is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated task-related changes in functional properties of the human brain network by applying graph-theoretical analysis to magnetoencephalography (MEG). Subjects performed a cue-target attention task in which a visual cue informed them of the direction of focus for incoming auditory or tactile target stimuli, but not the sensory modality. We analyzed the MEG signal in the cue-target interval to examine network properties during attentional control. Cluster-based non-parametric permutation tests with the Monte-Carlo method showed that in the cue-target interval, beta activity was desynchronized in the sensori-motor region including premotor and posterior parietal regions in the hemisphere contralateral to the attended side. Graph-theoretical analysis revealed that, in beta frequency, global hubs were found around the sensori-motor and prefrontal regions, and functional segregation over the entire network was decreased during attentional control compared to the baseline. Thus, network measures revealed task-related temporal changes in functional properties of the human brain network, leading to the understanding of how the brain dynamically responds to task execution as a network.

  9. Identification of molecular markers related to human alveolar bone cells and pathway analysis in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X; Ren, Q H; Bai, L; Feng, Q

    2015-10-28

    Alveolar bone osteoblasts are widely used in dental and related research. They are easily affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes. However, the mechanism of diabetes-induced alveolar bone absorption remains unclear. This study systematically explored the changes in human alveolar bone cell-related gene expression and biological pathways, which may facilitate the investigation of its mechanism. Alveolar bone osteoblasts isolated from 5 male diabetics and 5 male healthy adults were cultured. Total RNA was extracted from these cells and subjected to gene microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were screened, and a gene interaction network was constructed. An enrichment pathway analysis was simultaneously performed on differentially expressed genes to identify the biological pathways associated with changes in the alveolar bone cells of diabetic humans. In total, we identified 147 mRNAs that were differentially expressed in diabetic alveolar bone cells (than in the normal cells; 91 upregulated and 36 downregulated mRNAs). The constructed co-expression network showed 3 pairs of significantly-expressed genes. High-enrichment pathway analysis identified 8 pathways that were affected by changes in gene expression; three of the significant pathways were related to metabolism (inositol phosphate metabolism, propanoate metabolism, and pyruvate metabolism). Here, we identified a few potential genes and biological pathways for the diagnosis and treatment of alveolar bone cells in diabetic patients.

  10. Local origins impart conserved bone type-related differences in human osteoblast behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M; Gburcik, V; Reilly, P; Sankey, R A; Emery, R J; Clarkin, C E; Pitsillides, A A

    2015-03-04

    Osteogenic behaviour of osteoblasts from trabecular, cortical and subchondral bone were examined to determine any bone type-selective differences in samples from both osteoarthritic (OA) and osteoporotic (OP) patients. Cell growth, differentiation; alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) mRNA and activity, Runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2), SP7-transcription factor (SP7), bone sialoprotein-II (BSP-II), osteocalcin/bone gamma-carboxyglutamate (BGLAP), osteoprotegerin (OPG, TNFRSF11B), receptor activator of nuclear factor-κβ ligand (RANKL, TNFSF11) mRNA levels and proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) mRNA and protein release were assessed in osteoblasts from paired humeral head samples from age-matched, human OA/OP (n = 5/4) patients. Initial outgrowth and increase in cell number were significantly faster (p origins in OA and trabecular origins in OP. We found virtually identical bone type-related differences, however, in TNFRSF11B:TNFSF11 in OA and OP, consistent with greater potential for paracrine effects on osteoclasts in trabecular osteoblasts. Subchondral osteoblasts (OA) exhibited highest VEGF-A mRNA levels and release. Our data indicate that human osteoblasts in trabecular, subchondral and cortical bone have inherent, programmed diversity, with specific bone type-related differences in growth, differentiation and pro-angiogenic potential in vitro.

  11. Analysis of Onset Mechanisms of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulator Fingolimod-Induced Atrioventricular Conduction Block and QT-Interval Prolongation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Yukihiro [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Nakamura, Yuji [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Kitahara, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8541 (Japan); Harada, Takuma [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Kato, Kazuhiko; Ninomiya, Tomohisa [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Cao, Xin [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Ohara, Hiroshi [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 6-11-1 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8541 (Japan); Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); Suzuki, Kokichi [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd., 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222–8567 (Japan); Ando, Kentaro [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16 Omori-nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143–8540 (Japan); and others

    2014-11-15

    Fingolimod, a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtype 1, 3, 4 and 5 modulator, has been used for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, but atrioventricular conduction block and/or QT-interval prolongation have been reported in some patients after the first dose. In this study, we directly compared the electropharmacological profiles of fingolimod with those of siponimod, a modulator of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1 and 5, using in vivo guinea-pig model and in vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) assay to better understand the onset mechanisms of the clinically observed adverse events. Fingolimod (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) or siponimod (0.001 and 0.01 mg/kg) was intravenously infused over 10 min to the halothane-anaesthetized guinea pigs (n = 4), whereas the effects of fingolimod (1 μmol/L) and siponimod (1 μmol/L) on hERG current were examined (n = 3). The high doses of fingolimod and siponimod induced atrioventricular conduction block, whereas the low dose of siponimod prolonged PR interval, which was not observed by that of fingolimod. The high dose of fingolimod prolonged QT interval, which was not observed by either dose of siponimod. Meanwhile, fingolimod significantly inhibited hERG current, which was not observed by siponimod. These results suggest that S1P receptor subtype 1 in the heart could be one of the candidates for fingolimod- and siponimod-induced atrioventricular conduction block since S1P receptor subtype 5 is localized at the brain, and that direct I{sub Kr} inhibition may play a key role in fingolimod-induced QT-interval prolongation. - Highlights: • Fingolimod and siponimod are S1P{sub 1,3,4,5} and S1P{sub 1,5} receptor modulators, respectively. • Fingolimod and siponimod induced AV block in the halothane-anesthetized guinea pigs. • S1P{sub 1} in the hearts may be the target of fingolimod- and siponimod-induced AV block. • Fingolimod directly inhibited hERG current, which was not

  12. Recommendations for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Cindy L; Cannon, Keri; Cui, Yi; Kornbrust, Douglas J; Lagrutta, Armando; Sun, Sunny Z; Tepper, Jeff; Waldron, Gareth; Younis, Husam S

    2014-08-01

    This document was prepared by the Safety Pharmacology Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG), a group of industry and regulatory scientists involved in the development and regulation of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The mission of the Subcommittee was to develop scientific recommendations for the industry regarding the appropriate scope and strategies for safety pharmacology evaluations of oligonucleotides (ONs). These recommendations are the consensus opinion of the Subcommittee and do not necessarily reflect the current expectations of regulatory authorities. 1) Safety pharmacology testing, as described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7 guidance, is as applicable to ONs as it is to small molecule drugs and biotherapeutics. 2) Study design considerations for ONs are similar to those for other classes of drugs. In general, as with other therapeutics, studies should evaluate the drug product administered via the clinical route. Species selection should ideally consider relevance of the model with regard to the endpoints of interest, pharmacological responsiveness, and continuity with the nonclinical development program. 3) Evaluation of potential effects in the core battery (cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems) is recommended. In general: a. In vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) testing does not provide any specific value and is not warranted. b. Emphasis should be placed on in vivo evaluation of cardiovascular function, typically in nonhuman primates (NHPs). c. Due to the low level of concern, neurologic and respiratory function can be assessed concurrently with cardiovascular safety pharmacology evaluation in NHPs, within repeat-dose toxicity studies, or as stand-alone studies. In the latter case, rodents are most commonly used. 4) Other dedicated safety pharmacology studies, beyond the core battery, may have limited value for ONs. Although ONs can accumulate in the kidney and liver

  13. Pleasant and unpleasant odors influence hedonic evaluations of human faces: an event-related potential study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Jane Cook

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Odors can alter hedonic evaluations of human faces, but the neural mechanisms of such effects are poorly understood. The present study aimed to analyze the neural underpinning of odor-induced changes in evaluations of human faces in an odor-priming paradigm, using event-related potentials (ERPs. Healthy, young participants (N = 20 rated neutral faces presented after a three second pulse of a pleasant odor (jasmine, unpleasant odor (methylmercaptan, or no-odor control (clean air. Neutral faces presented in the pleasant odor condition were rated more pleasant than the same faces presented in the no-odor control condition, which in turn were rated more pleasant than faces in the unpleasant odor condition. Analysis of face-related potentials revealed four clusters of electrodes significantly affected by odor condition at specific time points during long-latency epochs (600−950 ms. In the 620−640 ms interval, two scalp-time clusters showed greater negative potential in the right parietal electrodes in response to faces in the pleasant odor condition, compared to those in the no-odor and unpleasant odor conditions. At 926 ms, face-related potentials showed greater positivity in response to faces in the pleasant and unpleasant odor conditions at the left and right lateral frontal-temporal electrodes, respectively. Our data shows that odor-induced shifts in evaluations of faces were associated with amplitude changes in the late (> 600 and ultra-late (> 900 ms latency epochs. The observed amplitude changes during the ultra-late epoch are consistent with a left/right hemisphere bias towards pleasant/unpleasant odor effects. Odors alter evaluations of human faces, even when there is a temporal lag between presentation of odors and faces. Our results provide an initial understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying effects of odors on hedonic evaluations.

  14. EPHA2 is associated with age-related cortical cataract in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyungah Jun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related cataract is a major cause of blindness worldwide, and cortical cataract is the second most prevalent type of age-related cataract. Although a significant fraction of age-related cataract is heritable, the genetic basis remains to be elucidated. We report that homozygous deletion of Epha2 in two independent strains of mice developed progressive cortical cataract. Retroillumination revealed development of cortical vacuoles at one month of age; visible cataract appeared around three months, which progressed to mature cataract by six months. EPHA2 protein expression in the lens is spatially and temporally regulated. It is low in anterior epithelial cells, upregulated as the cells enter differentiation at the equator, strongly expressed in the cortical fiber cells, but absent in the nuclei. Deletion of Epha2 caused a significant increase in the expression of HSP25 (murine homologue of human HSP27 before the onset of cataract. The overexpressed HSP25 was in an underphosphorylated form, indicating excessive cellular stress and protein misfolding. The orthologous human EPHA2 gene on chromosome 1p36 was tested in three independent worldwide Caucasian populations for allelic association with cortical cataract. Common variants in EPHA2 were found that showed significant association with cortical cataract, and rs6678616 was the most significant in meta-analyses. In addition, we sequenced exons of EPHA2 in linked families and identified a new missense mutation, Arg721Gln, in the protein kinase domain that significantly alters EPHA2 functions in cellular and biochemical assays. Thus, converging evidence from humans and mice suggests that EPHA2 is important in maintaining lens clarity with age.

  15. Expression studies of six human obesity-related genes in seven tissues from divergent pig breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera, S; Jensen, M S; Elbrønd, V S; Moesgaard, S G; Christoffersen, B Ø; Kadarmideen, H N; Skovgaard, K; Bruun, C V; Karlskov-Mortensen, P; Jørgensen, C B; Fredholm, M

    2014-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally and has become the cause of several major health risks worldwide. Presently, more than 100 loci have been related to obesity and metabolic traits in humans by genome-wide association studies. The complex genetic architecture behind obesity has triggered a need for the development of better animal models than rodents. The pig has emerged as a very promising biomedical model to study human obesity traits. In this study, we have characterized the expression patterns of six obesity-related genes, leptin (LEP), leptin receptor (LEPR), melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), fat mass and obesity associated (FTO), neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR)1 and adiponectin (ADIPOQ), in seven obesity-relevant tissues (liver; muscle; pancreas; hypothalamus; and retroperitoneal, subcutaneous and mesenteric adipose tissues) in two pig breeds (production pigs and Göttingen minipigs) that deviate phenotypically and genetically from each other with respect to obesity traits. We observe significant differential expression for LEP, LEPR and ADIPOQ in muscle and in all three adipose tissues. Interestingly, in pancreas, LEP expression is only detected in the fat minipigs. FTO shows significant differential expression in all tissues analyzed, and NEGR1 shows significant differential expression in muscle, pancreas, hypothalamus and subcutaneous adipose tissue. The MC4R transcript can be detected only in hypothalamus. In general, the expression profiles of the investigated genes are in accordance with those observed in human studies. Our study shows that both the differences between the investigated breeds and the phenotypic state with respect to obesity/leanness play a large role for differential expression of the obesity-related genes.

  16. Pleasant and Unpleasant Odors Influence Hedonic Evaluations of Human Faces: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephanie; Fallon, Nicholas; Wright, Hazel; Thomas, Anna; Giesbrecht, Timo; Field, Matt; Stancak, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Odors can alter hedonic evaluations of human faces, but the neural mechanisms of such effects are poorly understood. The present study aimed to analyze the neural underpinning of odor-induced changes in evaluations of human faces in an odor-priming paradigm, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Healthy, young participants (N = 20) rated neutral faces presented after a 3 s pulse of a pleasant odor (jasmine), unpleasant odor (methylmercaptan), or no-odor control (clean air). Neutral faces presented in the pleasant odor condition were rated more pleasant than the same faces presented in the no-odor control condition, which in turn were rated more pleasant than faces in the unpleasant odor condition. Analysis of face-related potentials revealed four clusters of electrodes significantly affected by odor condition at specific time points during long-latency epochs (600−950 ms). In the 620−640 ms interval, two scalp-time clusters showed greater negative potential in the right parietal electrodes in response to faces in the pleasant odor condition, compared to those in the no-odor and unpleasant odor conditions. At 926 ms, face-related potentials showed greater positivity in response to faces in the pleasant and unpleasant odor conditions at the left and right lateral frontal-temporal electrodes, respectively. Our data shows that odor-induced shifts in evaluations of faces were associated with amplitude changes in the late (>600) and ultra-late (>900 ms) latency epochs. The observed amplitude changes during the ultra-late epoch are consistent with a left/right hemisphere bias towards pleasant/unpleasant odor effects. Odors alter evaluations of human faces, even when there is a temporal lag between presentation of odors and faces. Our results provide an initial understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying effects of odors on hedonic evaluations. PMID:26733843

  17. Human regional cerebral glucose metabolism during non-rapid eye movement sleep in relation to waking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Miewald, Jean M; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Sembrat, Robert C; Ombao, Hernando; Reynolds, Charles F; Monk, Timothy H; Hall, Martica; Kupfer, David J; Moore, Robert Y

    2002-05-01

    Sleep is an essential human function. Although the function of sleep has generally been regarded to be restorative, recent data indicate that it also plays an important role in cognition. The neurobiology of human sleep is most effectively analysed with functional imaging, and PET studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. In this study, PET was used to determine patterns of regional glucose metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking. We hypothesized that brain structures related to waking cognitive function would show a persistence of function into the NREM sleep state. Fourteen healthy subjects (age range 21-49 years; 10 women, 4 men) underwent concurrent EEG sleep studies and [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET scans during waking and NREM sleep. Whole-brain glucose metabolism declined significantly from waking to NREM sleep. Relative decreases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM sleep occurred in wide areas of frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital association cortex, primary visual cortex, and in anterior/dorsomedial thalamus. After controlling for the whole-brain declines in absolute metabolism, relative increases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM were found bilaterally in the dorsal pontine tegmentum, hypothalamus, basal forebrain, ventral striatum, anterior cingulate cortex and extensive regions of the mesial temporal lobe, including the amygdala and hippocampus, and in the right dorsal parietal association cortex and primary somatosensory and motor cortices. The reductions in relative metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking are consistent with prior findings from blood flow studies. The relative increases in glucose utilization in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, ventral striatum, amygdala, hippocampus and pontine reticular formation are new observations that are in accordance with the view that NREM sleep is important to brain

  18. Social Robotic Experience and Media Communication Practices: An Exploration on the Emotional and Ritualized Human-technology-relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Linke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches the subject of social robots by focusing on the emotional relations people establish with media and information and communication technology (ICTs in their everyday life. It examines human-technology-relation from a social studies point of view, seeking to raise questions that enable us to make a connection between the research on human relationships and the topic of human-technology relation, especially human-humanoid-relation. In order to explore the human-technology-relations, theoretical ideas of a mediatization of communication and of a ritual interaction order are applied. Ritual theory is particularly used to enable a focus on emotion as a significant dimension in analyzing social technologies. This explorative article refers to empirical findings regarding media communication practices in close relationships. It argues that following the developed approach regarding mediatized and ritualized relational practices, useful insights for a conceptualization of the human-social robot relation can be achieved. The article concludes with remarks regarding the challenge of an empirical approach to human-social robot-relations.

  19. Detection and genetic characterization of a novel parvovirus distantly related to human bufavirus in domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Renáta; Pankovics, Péter; Kertész, Attila Mihály; Bíró, Hunor; Boros, Ákos; Phan, Tung Gia; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a novel parvovirus (strain swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN, KT965075) was detected in domestic pigs and genetically characterized by viral metagenomics and PCR methods. The novel parvovirus was distantly related to the human bufaviruses and was detected in 19 (90.5 %) of the 21 and five (33.3 %) of the 15 faecal samples collected from animals with and without cases of posterior paraplegia of unknown etiology from five affected farms and one control farm in Hungary, respectively. Swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN is highly prevalent in domestic pigs and potentially represents a novel parvovirus species in the subfamily Parvovirinae.

  20. Happiness and Human Relations: The Role of Materialistic Values. An ABM Illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Rojas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that a person’s happiness must be understood as a phenomenon that emerges not only from her individual condition but also from her place in society. Understanding that a person is socially immersed implies giving a greater role to social interactions and social structure. The paper presents a simple model to take into consideration the role of human relations. An agent-based model (ABM is used to illustrate the implementation of the model in understanding people’s happiness.

  1. Differential localization and characterization of functional calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in human subcutaneous arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Ahnstedt, H; Larsen, R;

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor are widely distributed within the circulation and the mechanism behind its vasodilation not only differs from one animal species to another but is also dependent on the type and size of vessel. The present study examines the nature of CGRP......-induced vasodilation, characteristics of the CGRP receptor antagonist telcagepant and localization of the key components calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) of the CGRP receptor in human subcutaneous arteries....

  2. Cultural relations between Hungary and Albania during the period of Humanism and Renaissance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamet Mala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cultural Hungarian-Albanian relations during the Middle Ages are characterized by a relatively poor intensity. Actually, relations between these two countries are more intense in the political field and especially through the partnership between Gjergj Kastrioti Skanderbeg and John Hunyadi. Regarding the origin, the Hungarian culture identity is rather distinct from the Albanian one. Lack of cultural contacts, among others, was conditioned also by the fact that these relations were held under war circumstances and their primary aim was the common defense from Ottoman attacks. Actually, the Albanian medieval culture remained a Mediterranean culture with elements of Byzantine influence in the continental and southern areas. Meanwhile, Hungary belonged to Central Europe, which, even though far away from Mediterranean cultural mainstream, sought to be influenced by this culture, namely by the Renaissance that emanated exactly in the Mediterranean region. It was Matthias Corvinus effort, regarding the cultural influence of the Mediterranean and Renaissance in Hungary but also the fact that Hungary possessed some of the most important towns of the Adriatic coast and particularly Ragusa. This city was the center where cultural relations between Albanian and Hungary started and became intensified in the religious, intellectual and human field.

  3. PPInterFinder--a mining tool for extracting causal relations on human proteins from literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Kalpana; Subramani, Suresh; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common and challenging problem in biomedical text mining is to mine protein-protein interactions (PPIs) from MEDLINE abstracts and full-text research articles because PPIs play a major role in understanding the various biological processes and the impact of proteins in diseases. We implemented, PPInterFinder--a web-based text mining tool to extract human PPIs from biomedical literature. PPInterFinder uses relation keyword co-occurrences with protein names to extract information on PPIs from MEDLINE abstracts and consists of three phases. First, it identifies the relation keyword using a parser with Tregex and a relation keyword dictionary. Next, it automatically identifies the candidate PPI pairs with a set of rules related to PPI recognition. Finally, it extracts the relations by matching the sentence with a set of 11 specific patterns based on the syntactic nature of PPI pair. We find that PPInterFinder is capable of predicting PPIs with the accuracy of 66.05% on AIMED corpus and outperforms most of the existing systems. DATABASE URL: http://www.biomining-bu.in/ppinterfinder/

  4. A polymorphism in the human agouti-related protein is associated with late-onset obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, George; Rankinen, Tuomo; Neufeld, Doni R; Rice, Treva; Province, Michael A; Leon, Arthur S; Skinner, James S; Wilmore, Jack H; Rao, D C; Bouchard, Claude

    2002-09-01

    The mouse agouti-related protein (AGRP) is a powerful appetite effector that results in hyperphagia and the development of obesity when administered intracerebroventricularly or when overexpressed in transgenic mice. Animal studies have also shown that exogenous administration of AGRP predisposes toward hedonic intake of high fat and high sucrose diets. The human ortholog (hAGRP) maps on chromosome 16q22 and has similar physiological properties, as tested in animal models. A polymorphism was identified in the third exon of hAGRP, c.199G-->A, that resulted in a nonconservative amino acid substitution, Ala(67)Thr. Computational analysis of the protein showed significant differences in the coils of the two polymorphic isoforms of the protein. Human studies showed no genotype effects in individuals with a mean age of 25 yr. However, the G/G genotype was significantly associated with fatness and abdominal adiposity in the parental population with a mean age of 53 yr. The c.199G-->A polymorphism in hAGRP could, therefore, play a role in the development of human obesity in an age-dependent fashion.

  5. Legal Issues Related to Donation of Organs, Tissues and Cells of Human Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Mironov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific developments, positive changes in attitude of the man and the new legal framework allow the donation of organs, tissues and cells of human origin. In this context it is necessary to clarifywhether the donation covered by the special law is, legally, one and the same as that covered by the Romanian Civil Code in force and qualified the successor’s right to accept or reject late withdrawals for transplantation. The right to life and physical integrity is personal patrimony; it is a subjective civil right that has no economic content and it cannot be measured in money. Consequently, the content of these rights can not be expressed in money, the property does not belong to their owner. Given the above view, "the right of disposal" to donation of organs, tissues and cells of human origin is an attribute of ownership, right to life and physical integrity, as a personal right that is an intimate attribute patrimonial related to the person’s right to dispose of his body as it wishes, within the law. Addressing these issues it is necessary to clarify the legal consequences of donating organs, tissues and cells of human origin, considering that medical activities are becoming more numerous.

  6. Adaptation of hybrid human-computer interaction systems using EEG error-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Biasiucci, Andrea; Forster, Killian; Roggen, Daniel; Troster, Gerhard; Millan, Jose Del R

    2010-01-01

    Performance improvement in both humans and artificial systems strongly relies in the ability of recognizing erroneous behavior or decisions. This paper, that builds upon previous studies on EEG error-related signals, presents a hybrid approach for human computer interaction that uses human gestures to send commands to a computer and exploits brain activity to provide implicit feedback about the recognition of such commands. Using a simple computer game as a case study, we show that EEG activity evoked by erroneous gesture recognition can be classified in single trials above random levels. Automatic artifact rejection techniques are used, taking into account that subjects are allowed to move during the experiment. Moreover, we present a simple adaptation mechanism that uses the EEG signal to label newly acquired samples and can be used to re-calibrate the gesture recognition system in a supervised manner. Offline analysis show that, although the achieved EEG decoding accuracy is far from being perfect, these signals convey sufficient information to significantly improve the overall system performance.

  7. The Seven Deadly Tensions of Health-Related Human Information Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Johnson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tensions are a ubiquitous feature of social life and are manifested in a number of particular forms: contradictory logics, competing demands, clashes of ideas, contradictions, dialectics, irony, paradoxes, and/or dilemmas. This essay aims to explore in detail tensions surrounding seven common findings of the information seeking literature relating to: interpersonal communication, accessibility, level of skill, individual preferences, psychological limits, inertia, and costs. Our incomplete understanding of these tensions can lead us to suggest resolutions that do not recognize their underlying dualities. Human information behavior stands at the intersection of many important theoretical and policy issues (e.g., personalized medicine. Policy makers need to be more attuned to these basic tensions of information seeking recognizing the real human limits they represent to informing the public. So, even if you build a great information system, people will not necessarily use it because of the force of these underlying tensions. While rationality rules systems, irrationality rules people. The proliferation of navigator roles over the last several years is actually a hopeful sign: recognition that people need a human interface to inform them about our ever more complex health care systems.

  8. The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Starling

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Equitation science is an evidence-based approach to horse training and riding that focuses on a thorough understanding of both equine ethology and learning theory. This combination leads to more effective horse training, but also plays a role in keeping horse riders and trainers safe around horses. Equitation science underpins ethical equitation, and recognises the limits of the horse’s cognitive and physical abilities. Equitation is an ancient practice that has benefited from a rich tradition that sees it flourishing in contemporary sporting pursuits. Despite its history, horse-riding is an activity for which neither horses nor humans evolved, and it brings with it significant risks to the safety of both species. This review outlines the reasons horses may behave in ways that endanger humans and how training choices can exacerbate this. It then discusses the recently introduced 10 Principles of Equitation Science and explains how following these principles can minimise horse-related risk to humans and enhance horse welfare.

  9. Age-related changes in human posture control: Sensory organization tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1989-01-01

    Postural control was measured in 214 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. Sensory organization tests measured the magnitude of anterior-posterior body sway during six 21 s trials in which visual and somatosensory orientation cues were altered (by rotating the visual surround and support surface in proportion to the subject's sway) or vision eliminated (eyes closed) in various combinations. No age-related increase in postural sway was found for subjects standing on a fixed support surface with eyes open or closed. However, age-related increases in sway were found for conditions involving altered visual or somatosensory cues. Subjects older than about 55 years showed the largest sway increases. Subjects younger than about 15 years were also sensitive to alteration of sensory cues. On average, the older subjects were more affected by altered visual cues whereas younger subjects had more difficulty with altered somatosensory cues.

  10. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  11. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  12. Electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs) with human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Gregory A; Williams, Lisa E; Minow, Falk; Sprock, Joyce; Rissling, Anthony; Sharp, Richard; Swerdlow, Neal R; Braff, David L

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the basic neural processes that underlie complex higher-order cognitive operations and functional domains is a fundamental goal of cognitive neuroscience. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive method for assessing neurophysiological function that can be used to achieve this goal. EEG measures the electrical activity of large, synchronously firing populations of neurons in the brain with electrodes placed on the scalp. This unit outlines the basics of setting up an EEG experiment with human participants, including equipment, and a step-by-step guide to applying and preparing an electrode cap. Also included are support protocols for two event-related potential (ERP) paradigms, P50 suppression, and mismatch negativity (MMN), which are measures of early sensory processing. These paradigms can be used to assess the integrity of early sensory processing in normal individuals and clinical populations, such as individuals with schizophrenia.

  13. Identification of cardioviruses related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus in human infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Kanada, Kimberly; Kwok, Thomas; Fischer, Kael F; Runckel, Charles; Louie, Janice K; Glaser, Carol A; Yagi, Shigeo; Schnurr, David P; Haggerty, Tom D; Parsonnet, Julie; Ganem, Don; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2008-09-16

    Cardioviruses comprise a genus of picornaviruses that cause severe illnesses in rodents, but little is known about the prevalence, diversity, or spectrum of disease of such agents among humans. A single cardiovirus isolate, Saffold virus, was cultured in 1981 in stool from an infant with fever. Here, we describe the identification of a group of human cardioviruses that have been cloned directly from patient specimens, the first of which was detected using a pan-viral microarray in respiratory secretions from a child with influenza-like illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the nearly complete viral genome (7961 bp) revealed that this virus belongs to the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) subgroup of cardioviruses and is most closely related to Saffold virus. Subsequent screening by RT-PCR of 719 additional respiratory specimens [637 (89%) from patients with acute respiratory illness] and 400 cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with neurological disease (aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, and multiple sclerosis) revealed no evidence of cardiovirus infection. However, screening of 751 stool specimens from 498 individuals in a gastroenteritis cohort resulted in the detection of 6 additional cardioviruses (1.2%). Although all 8 human cardioviruses (including Saffold virus) clustered together by phylogenetic analysis, significant sequence diversity was observed in the VP1 gene (66.9%-100% pairwise amino acid identities). These findings suggest that there exists a diverse group of novel human Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-like cardioviruses that hitherto have gone largely undetected, are found primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, can be shed asymptomatically, and have potential links to enteric and extraintestinal disease.

  14. Characterization of age-related changes of tendon stem cells from adult human tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzini, Laura; Abbruzzese, Franca; Rainer, Alberto; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Trombetta, Marcella; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-11-01

    The present study evaluated the presence of stem cells in hamstring tendons from adult subjects of different ages. The aim was to isolate, characterize and expand these cells in vitro, and to evaluate whether cell activities are influenced by age. Tendon stem cells (TSCs) were isolated through magnetic sorting from the hamstring tendons of six patients. TSC percentage, morphology and clonogenic potential were evaluated, as well as the expression of specific surface markers. TSC multi-potency was also investigated as a function of age, and quantitative polimerase chain reaction was used to evaluate gene expression of TSCs cultured in suitable differentiating media. The presence of easily harvestable stem cell population within adult human hamstring tendons was demonstrated. These cells exhibit features such as clonogenicity, multi-potency and mesenchymal stem cells markers expression. The age-related variations in human TSCs affect the number of isolated cells and their self-renewal potential, while multi-potency assays are not influenced by tendon ageing, even though cells from younger individuals expressed higher levels of osteogenic and adipogenic genes, while chondrogenic genes were highly expressed in cells from older individuals. These results may open new opportunities to study TSCs to better understand tendon physiology, healing and pathological processes such as tendinopathy and degenerative age-related changes opening new frontiers in the management of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures.

  15. Analyses of natural resources in 10 CFR Part 60 as related to inadvertent human intrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklas, M.P. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lefevre, H.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the intent of the regulatory language of the portions of 10 CFR Part 60 which deal with considerations of the natural resources of a proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive wastes as they relate to inadvertent human intrusion. Four Potentially Adverse Conditions (PAC) the requirements of 10 CFR 60.21(c)(13) are shown to be related to natural resources. Groundwater is identified as a natural resource known to be present at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. For economic considerations of natural resources, the {open_quotes}foreseeable future{close_quotes} is thought to be no more than 50 years. Two of the topics addressed by the PACs, subsurface mining and drilling at a proposed repository site, are pre-site-characterization activities which must be evaluated in the context of repository performance criteria set by the US EPA standard, 40 CFR Part 191. An alternative US DOE compliance demonstration to another PAC, 10 CFR 60.122(c)(17), might be to use an {open_quotes}explorationist perspective{close_quotes} of natural resource assessment. The Commission intends for DOE to evaluate the likelihood and consequence of inadvertent human intrusion into a geologic repository as a result of exploration or exploitation of natural resources within or near a proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository.

  16. Human-chromatin-related protein interactions identify a demethylase complex required for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Edyta; Ni, Zuyao; Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L; Trimble, Sandra Smiley; Olsen, Jonathan B; Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind; Silverman-Gavrila, Lorelei; Phanse, Sadhna; Guo, Hongbo; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Xinghua; Young, Peter; Bailey, Swneke; Roudeva, Denitza; Zhao, Dorothy; Hewel, Johannes; Li, Joyce; Gräslund, Susanne; Paduch, Marcin; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Lupien, Mathieu; Emili, Andrew; Wodak, Shoshana J; Greenblatt, Jack

    2014-07-10

    Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision) network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  17. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  18. Late Holocene vegetation changes in relation with climate fluctuations and human activities in Languedoc (Southern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Azuara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Holocene climate fluctuations and human activities since the Neolithic have shaped present-day Mediterranean environments. Separating anthropogenic effects from climatic impacts to reconstruct Mediterranean paleoenvironments over the last millennia remains a challenging issue. High resolution pollen analyses were undertaken on two cores from the Palavasian lagoon system (Hérault, southern France. These records allow reconstruction of vegetation dynamics over the last 4500 years. Results are compared with climatic, historical and archeological archives. A long-term aridification trend is highlighted during the Late Holocene and three superimposed arid events are recorded at 4600–4300, 2800–2400 and 1300–1100 cal BP. These periods of climatic instability coincide in time with the rapid climatic events depicted in the Atlantic Ocean (Bond et al., 2001. From the Bronze Age (4000 cal BP to the end of the Iron Age (around 2000 cal BP, the spread of evergreen taxa and loss of forest cover result from anthropogenic impact. The Antiquity is characterized by a major reforestation event related to the concentration of rural activities and populations in coastal plains leading to forest recovery in the mountains. A major regional deforestation occurred at the beginning of the High Middle Ages. Around 1000 cal BP, forest cover is minimal while cover of olive, chestnut and walnut expands in relation to increasing human influence. The present day vegetation dominated by Mediterranean shrubland and pines has been in existence since the beginning of the 20th century.

  19. MicroRNA Expression Patterns in Human Astrocytes in Relation to Anatomical Location and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vijayaraghava T S; Ludwin, Samuel K; Fuh, Shih-Chieh; Sawaya, Robin; Moore, Craig S; Ho, Ming-Kai; Bedell, Barry J; Sarnat, Harvey B; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-02-01

    Anatomic distribution and age are variables linked to functions of astrocytes under physiologic and pathologic conditions. We measured the relative expression of a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) in astrocytes captured by laser micro-dissection from normal human adult white and grey matter, human fetal white matter and germinal matrix samples. Although expression of most miRNAs was comparable between adult and fetal samples, regional differences were observed. In the adult cerebral cortex, expression of miRNAs in morphologically distinct inter-laminar astrocytes underlying the glial limitans differed from those in deeper cortical layers, suggesting functional specialization possibly related to structural stability and defense from potentially harmful factors in the cerebrospinal fluid. Differences between adult white and grey matter miRNA expression included higher expression of pro-inflammatory miRNAs in the former, potentially contributing to differences in inflammation between grey and white matter plaques in multiple sclerosis. Lower expression of miRNAs in fetal versus adult white matter astrocytes likely reflects the immaturity of these migrating cells. Highly expressed miRNAs in the fetal germinal matrix are probably relevant in development and also recapitulate some responses to injury. Future studies can address regional alterations of miRNA expression in pathological conditions.

  20. Comparative Study of Apoptosis-related Gene Loci in Human, Mouse and Rat Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Bin YIN; Yong ZHANG; Peng YU; Jing-Chu LUO; Ying JIANG; Song-Gang LI

    2005-01-01

    Many genes are involved in mammalian cell apoptosis pathway. These apoptosis genes often contain characteristic functional domains, and can be classified into at least 15 functional groups, according to previous reports. Using an integrated bioinformatics platform for motif or domain search from three public mammalian proteomes (International Protein Index database for human, mouse, and rat), we systematically cataloged all of the proteins involved in mammalian apoptosis pathway. By localizing those proteins onto the genomes, we obtained a gene locus centric apoptosis gene catalog for human, mouse and rat.Further phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the apoptosis related gene loci are conserved among these three mammals. Interestingly, about one-third of apoptosis gene loci form gene clusters on mammal chromosomes, and exist in the three species, which indicated that mammalian apoptosis gene orders are also conserved. In addition, some tandem duplicated gene loci were revealed by comparing gene loci clusters in the three species. All data produced in this work were stored in a relational database and may be viewed at http://pcas.cbi.pku.edu.cn/database/apd.php.

  1. Hardiness in relation to organisational commitment in the Human Resource Management field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ferreira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Employees’ hardiness is increasingly recognised as an aspect of their well-being and feelings of career success. Psychological well-being and feelings of subjective career success have positive implications for the motivation, satisfaction, performance and commitment of young talented staff.Research purpose: The study empirically investigated the relationship between an individual’s hardiness (measured by the Personal Views Survey II [PVS-II] and organisational commitment (measured by the Organisational Commitment Scale.Motivation for the study: Research on an individual’s hardiness profile as an aspect of their career well-being and success and how these attributes influence their psychological attachment to the organisation, is needed to guide human resource career development support practices aimed at retaining valuable staff.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative survey was conducted on a convenience sample of predominantly Black (92.2% and female (71% employed adults (N = 355 at managerial and staff levels in the human resource management field.Main findings: Correlational and multiple regression analyses revealed a number of significant relationships between the two variables.Practical/managerial implications: Managers and human resource practitioners need to recognise how people’s hardiness relates to their sense of psychological attachment to the organisation. Organisations concerned with the retention and well-being of their equity staff members need to find a way to enhance and develop their hardiness and commitment.Contribution/value-add: The research contributes new insights into and knowledge of the factors that influence their employees’ hardiness and how these relate to their organisational commitment. The results may be used to inform career development support interventions that aim to increase employees’ sense of career well-being and success.

  2. Structure-mechanical function relations at nano-scale in heat-affected human dental tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Le Bourhis, Eric; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical properties of dental materials related to their hierarchical structure is essential for understanding and predicting the effect of microstructural alterations on the performance of dental tissues in the context of forensic and archaeological investigation as well as laser irradiation treatment of caries. So far, few studies have focused on the nano-scale structure-mechanical function relations of human teeth altered by chemical or thermal treatment. The response of dental tissues to thermal treatment is thought to be strongly affected by the mineral crystallite size, their spatial arrangement and preferred orientation. In this study, synchrotron-based small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques were used to investigate the micro-structural alterations (mean crystalline thickness, crystal perfection and degree of alignment) of heat-affected dentine and enamel in human dental teeth. Additionally, nanoindentation mapping was applied to detect the spatial and temperature-dependent nano-mechanical properties variation. The SAXS/WAXS results revealed that the mean crystalline thickness distribution in dentine was more uniform compared with that in enamel. Although in general the mean crystalline thickness increased both in dentine and enamel as the temperature increased, the local structural variations gradually reduced. Meanwhile, the hardness and reduced modulus in enamel decreased as the temperature increased, while for dentine, the tendency reversed at high temperature. The analysis of the correlation between the ultrastructure and mechanical properties coupled with the effect of temperature demonstrates the effect of mean thickness and orientation on the local variation of mechanical property. This structural-mechanical property alteration is likely to be due to changes of HAp crystallites, thus dentine and enamel exhibit different responses at different temperatures. Our results enable an improved understanding of

  3. An approach to classifying human resources constraints to attaining health-related Millennium Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Kaspar

    2004-07-06

    BACKGROUND: For any wide-ranging effort to scale up health-related priority interventions, human resources for health (HRH) are likely to be a key to success. This study explores constraints related to human resources in the health sector for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in low-income countries. METHODS AND FRAMEWORK: The analysis drew on information from a variety of publicly-available sources and principally on data presented in published papers in peer-reviewed journals. For classifying HRH constraints an analytical framework was used that considers constraints at five levels: individual characteristics, the health service delivery level, the health sector level, training capacities and the sociopolitical and economic context of a country. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: At individual level, the decision to enter, remain and serve in the health sector workforce is influenced by a series of social, economic, cultural and gender-related determinants. For example, to cover the health needs of the poorest it is necessary to employ personnel with specific social, ethnic and cultural characteristics. At health-service level, the commitment of health staff is determined by a number of organizational and management factors. The workplace environment has a great impact not only on health worker performance, but also on the comprehensiveness and efficiency of health service delivery. At health-sector level, the use of monetary and nonmonetary incentives is of crucial importance for having the accurate skill mix at the appropriate place. Scaling up of priority interventions is likely to require significant investments in initial and continuous training. Given the lead time required to produce new health workers, such investments must occur in the early phases of scaling up. At the same time coherent national HRH policies are required for giving direction on HRH development and linking HRH into health-sector reform issues, the scaling-up of priority

  4. An approach to classifying human resources constraints to attaining health-related Millennium Development Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyss Kaspar

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For any wide-ranging effort to scale up health-related priority interventions, human resources for health (HRH are likely to be a key to success. This study explores constraints related to human resources in the health sector for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs in low-income countries. Methods and framework The analysis drew on information from a variety of publicly-available sources and principally on data presented in published papers in peer-reviewed journals. For classifying HRH constraints an analytical framework was used that considers constraints at five levels: individual characteristics, the health service delivery level, the health sector level, training capacities and the sociopolitical and economic context of a country. Results and discussion At individual level, the decision to enter, remain and serve in the health sector workforce is influenced by a series of social, economic, cultural and gender-related determinants. For example, to cover the health needs of the poorest it is necessary to employ personnel with specific social, ethnic and cultural characteristics. At health-service level, the commitment of health staff is determined by a number of organizational and management factors. The workplace environment has a great impact not only on health worker performance, but also on the comprehensiveness and efficiency of health service delivery. At health-sector level, the use of monetary and nonmonetary incentives is of crucial importance for having the accurate skill mix at the appropriate place. Scaling up of priority interventions is likely to require significant investments in initial and continuous training. Given the lead time required to produce new health workers, such investments must occur in the early phases of scaling up. At the same time coherent national HRH policies are required for giving direction on HRH development and linking HRH into health-sector reform issues, the scaling

  5. Are PrP(C)s involved in some human myelin diseases? Relating experimental studies to human pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veber, Daniela; Scalabrino, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    We have experimentally demonstrated that cobalamin (Cbl) deficiency increases normal cellular prion (PrP(C)) levels in rat spinal cord (SC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and decreases PrP(C)-mRNA levels in rat SC. Repeated intracerebroventricular administrations of anti-octapeptide repeat-PrP(C)-region antibodies to Cbl-deficient (Cbl-D) rats prevent SC myelin lesions, and the administrations of PrP(C)s to otherwise normal rats cause SC white matter lesions similar to those induced by Cbl deficiency. Cbl positively regulates SC PrP(C) synthesis in rat by stimulating the local synthesis of epidermal growth factor (EGF), which also induces the local synthesis of PrP(C)-mRNAs, and downregulating the local synthesis of tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-α, thus preventing local PrP(C) overproduction. We have clinically demonstrated that PrP(C) levels are increased in the CSF of patients with subacute combined degeneration (SCD), unchanged in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and decreased in the CSF and SC of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), regardless of its clinical course. We conclude that SCD (human and experimental) is a neurological disease due to excess PrP(C) without conformational change and aggregation, that the increase in PrP(C) levels in SCD and Cbl-D polyneuropathy and their decrease in MS CNS make them antipodian myelin diseases in terms of quantitative PrP(C) abnormalities, and that these abnormalities are related to myelin damage in the former, and impede myelin repair in the latter.

  6. Estradiol formation by human osteoblasts via multiple pathways: relation with osteoblast function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J M; Bland, R; Hewison, M; Coughtrie, M W; Sharp, S; Arts, J; Pols, H A; van Leeuwen, J P

    1999-12-01

    The importance of estrogens in bone metabolism is illustrated by the accelerated bone loss and increase in osteoporotic fractures associated with postmenopausal estrogen deficiency. In this study, the expression and activity of the enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism in human osteoblastic cells were investigated in relation to differentiation of these cells. PCR reactions using mRNA from an in vitro differentiating human cell line (SV-HFO) were performed to assess mRNA expression of the enzymes aromatase, different subtypes of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD), and steroid sulfatase. Aromatase, sulfatase, and 17beta-HSD type 2 and 4 were found to be expressed throughout differentiation. Expression of 17beta-HSD type 3, however, was relatively weak, except for early time points in differentiation. Type 1 17beta-HSD expression was not detected. Aromatase activity decreased during differentiation, as was demonstrated by the conversion of androstenedione (A) and testosterone (T) into estrone (E(1)) and estradiol (E(2)), respectively. The 17beta-HSD isozymes catalysing a reductive reaction convert androstenedione and estrone into testosterone and estradiol, respectively. Their activity declined with differentiation. Analysis of 17beta-HSD activity indicated both oxidative (E(2) to E(1); T to A) and reductive (E(1) to E(2); A to T) metabolism at all stages of osteoblast differentiation. Both activities declined as cells moved toward a differentiating mineralizing phenotype. However, the oxidative reaction was increasingly in favor of the reductive reaction at all times during differentiation. Sulfatase activity, as demonstrated by the conversion of estrone-sulfate into estrone, was constant during differentiation. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that all enzymes necessary for estrogen metabolism are expressed and biologically active in differentiating human osteoblasts. The activity of aromatase and 17beta-HSD was found to be dependent on the stage

  7. Characterization of Diaphanous-related formin FMNL2 in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf Caroline

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diaphanous-related formins govern actin-based processes involved in many cellular functions, such as cell movement and invasion. Possible connections to developmental processes and cellular changes associated with malignant phenotype make them interesting study targets. In spite of this, very little is known of the tissue distribution and cellular location of any mammalian formin. Here we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the formin family member formin -like 2 (FMNL2 in human tissues. Results An FMNL2 antibody was raised and characterized. The affinity-purified FMNL2 antibody was validated by Western blotting, Northern blotting, a peptide competition assay and siRNA experiments. Bioinformatics-based mRNA profiling indicated that FMNL2 is widely expressed in human tissues. The highest mRNA levels were seen in central and peripheral nervous systems. Immunohistochemical analysis of 26 different human tissues showed that FMNL2 is widely expressed, in agreement with the mRNA profile. The widest expression was detected in the central nervous system, since both neurons and glial cells expressed FMNL2. Strong expression was also seen in many epithelia. However, the expression in different cell types was not ubiquitous. Many mesenchymal cell types showed weak immunoreactivity and cells lacking expression were seen in many tissues. The subcellular location of FMNL2 was cytoplasmic, and in some tissues a strong perinuclear dot was detected. In cultured cells FMNL2 showed mostly a cytoplasmic localization with perinuclear accumulation consistent with the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, FMNL2 co-localized with F-actin to the tips of cellular protrusions in WM164 human melanoma cells. This finding is in line with FMNL2's proposed function in the formation of actin filaments in cellular protrusions, during amoeboid cellular migration. Conclusion FMNL2 is expressed in multiple human tissues, not only in the central nervous system

  8. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  9. Technology-Related Research in Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) Publications: A Review between 2000 and 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Githens, Rod P.; Dirani, Khalil; Gitonga, Jacqueline; Teng, Ya-Ting; Benson, Angela D.

    2006-01-01

    The growth of technology has influenced human resource development (HRD) practitioners to embrace technology for both training and non-training interventions. This study examined technology-related articles in Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) publications in order to understand what these articles address and the future needs of…

  10. Impacts of human-related practices on Ommatissus lybicus infestations of date palm in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Khalifa M; Kwan, Paul; Andrew, Nigel R; Welch, Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    Date palm cultivation is economically important in the Sultanate of Oman, with significant financial investments coming from both the government and private individuals. However, a widespread Dubas bug (DB) (Ommatissus lybicus Bergevin) infestation has impacted regions including the Middle East, North Africa, Southeast Russia, and Spain, resulting in widespread damages to date palms. In this study, techniques in spatial statistics including ordinary least squares (OLS), geographically weighted regression (GRW), and exploratory regression (ER) were applied to (a) model the correlation between DB infestations and human-related practices that include irrigation methods, row spacing, palm tree density, and management of undercover and intercropped vegetation, and (b) predict the locations of future DB infestations in northern Oman. Firstly, we extracted row spacing and palm tree density information from remote sensed satellite images. Secondly, we collected data on irrigation practices and management by using a simple questionnaire, augmented with spatial data. Thirdly, we conducted our statistical analyses using all possible combinations of values over a given set of candidate variables using the chosen predictive modelling and regression techniques. Lastly, we identified the combination of human-related practices that are most conducive to the survival and spread of DB. Our results show that there was a strong correlation between DB infestations and several human-related practices parameters (R2 = 0.70). Variables including palm tree density, spacing between trees (less than 5 x 5 m), insecticide application, date palm and farm service (pruning, dethroning, remove weeds, and thinning), irrigation systems, offshoots removal, fertilisation and labour (non-educated) issues, were all found to significantly influence the degree of DB infestations. This study is expected to help reduce the extent and cost of aerial and ground sprayings, while facilitating the allocation of

  11. Impacts of human-related practices on Ommatissus lybicus infestations of date palm in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Khalifa M.; Andrew, Nigel R.; Welch, Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    Date palm cultivation is economically important in the Sultanate of Oman, with significant financial investments coming from both the government and private individuals. However, a widespread Dubas bug (DB) (Ommatissus lybicus Bergevin) infestation has impacted regions including the Middle East, North Africa, Southeast Russia, and Spain, resulting in widespread damages to date palms. In this study, techniques in spatial statistics including ordinary least squares (OLS), geographically weighted regression (GRW), and exploratory regression (ER) were applied to (a) model the correlation between DB infestations and human-related practices that include irrigation methods, row spacing, palm tree density, and management of undercover and intercropped vegetation, and (b) predict the locations of future DB infestations in northern Oman. Firstly, we extracted row spacing and palm tree density information from remote sensed satellite images. Secondly, we collected data on irrigation practices and management by using a simple questionnaire, augmented with spatial data. Thirdly, we conducted our statistical analyses using all possible combinations of values over a given set of candidate variables using the chosen predictive modelling and regression techniques. Lastly, we identified the combination of human-related practices that are most conducive to the survival and spread of DB. Our results show that there was a strong correlation between DB infestations and several human-related practices parameters (R2 = 0.70). Variables including palm tree density, spacing between trees (less than 5 x 5 m), insecticide application, date palm and farm service (pruning, dethroning, remove weeds, and thinning), irrigation systems, offshoots removal, fertilisation and labour (non-educated) issues, were all found to significantly influence the degree of DB infestations. This study is expected to help reduce the extent and cost of aerial and ground sprayings, while facilitating the allocation of

  12. Construction and analysis of SSH cDNA library of human vascular endothelial cells related to gastrocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct subtracted cDNA libraries of human vascular endothelial cells (VECs) related to gastrocarcinoma using suppression substractive hybridization (SSH) and to analyze cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and VECs in Cancer Gene Anatomy Project (CGAP) database.

  13. Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methanomassiliicoccus intestinalis" Issoire-Mx1, a Third Thermoplasmatales-Related Methanogenic Archaeon from Human Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrel, Guillaume; Harris, Hugh M B; Parisot, Nicolas; Gaci, Nadia; Tottey, William; Mihajlovski, Agnès; Deane, Jennifer; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Bardot, Olivier; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre; O'Toole, Paul W; Brugère, Jean-François

    2013-07-11

    "Candidatus Methanomassiliicoccus intestinalis" Issoire-Mx1 is a methanogenic archaeon found in the human gut and is a representative of the novel order of methanogens related to Thermoplasmatales. Its complete genome sequence is presented here.

  14. Relating dynamic brain states to dynamic machine states: Human and machine solutions to the speech recognition problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Cai; Su, Li; Liu, Xunying; Zhang, Chao; Woodland, Phil; Thwaites, Andrew; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Marslen-Wilson, William D

    2017-09-01

    There is widespread interest in the relationship between the neurobiological systems supporting human cognition and emerging computational systems capable of emulating these capacities. Human speech comprehension, poorly understood as a neurobiological process, is an important case in point. Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) systems with near-human levels of performance are now available, which provide a computationally explicit solution for the recognition of words in continuous speech. This research aims to bridge the gap between speech recognition processes in humans and machines, using novel multivariate techniques to compare incremental 'machine states', generated as the ASR analysis progresses over time, to the incremental 'brain states', measured using combined electro- and magneto-encephalography (EMEG), generated as the same inputs are heard by human listeners. This direct comparison of dynamic human and machine internal states, as they respond to the same incrementally delivered sensory input, revealed a significant correspondence between neural response patterns in human superior temporal cortex and the structural properties of ASR-derived phonetic models. Spatially coherent patches in human temporal cortex responded selectively to individual phonetic features defined on the basis of machine-extracted regularities in the speech to lexicon mapping process. These results demonstrate the feasibility of relating human and ASR solutions to the problem of speech recognition, and suggest the potential for further studies relating complex neural computations in human speech comprehension to the rapidly evolving ASR systems that address the same problem domain.

  15. BAIAP2 is related to emotional modulation of human memory strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksys, Gediminas; Ackermann, Sandra; Coynel, David; Fastenrath, Matthias; Gschwind, Leo; Heck, Angela; Rasch, Bjoern; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Memory performance is the result of many distinct mental processes, such as memory encoding, forgetting, and modulation of memory strength by emotional arousal. These processes, which are subserved by partly distinct molecular profiles, are not always amenable to direct observation. Therefore, computational models can be used to make inferences about specific mental processes and to study their genetic underpinnings. Here we combined a computational model-based analysis of memory-related processes with high density genetic information derived from a genome-wide study in healthy young adults. After identifying the best-fitting model for a verbal memory task and estimating the best-fitting individual cognitive parameters, we found a common variant in the gene encoding the brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1-associated protein 2 (BAIAP2) that was related to the model parameter reflecting modulation of verbal memory strength by negative valence. We also observed an association between the same genetic variant and a similar emotional modulation phenotype in a different population performing a picture memory task. Furthermore, using functional neuroimaging we found robust genotype-dependent differences in activity of the parahippocampal cortex that were specifically related to successful memory encoding of negative versus neutral information. Finally, we analyzed cortical gene expression data of 193 deceased subjects and detected significant BAIAP2 genotype-dependent differences in BAIAP2 mRNA levels. Our findings suggest that model-based dissociation of specific cognitive parameters can improve the understanding of genetic underpinnings of human learning and memory.

  16. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Review of Nursing Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKiernan, Janet; Thom, Bridgette

    2016-08-01

    : The overall incidence of head and neck cancer-which includes laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, nasal cavity, paranasal sinus, nasopharyngeal, oral, oropharyngeal, and salivary gland cancers-has declined in the United States over the past 30 years with the concomitant reduction in tobacco use. Over that same period, however, the worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has escalated significantly, most notably among men and women under age 60 who live in developed countries. This epidemic rise in oropharyngeal cancer is largely attributed to certain genotypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV). In the United States, HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal tumors increased dramatically, from roughly 16% between 1984 and 1989 to nearly 73% between 2000 and 2004, and the annual incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is expected to surpass that of HPV-related cervical cancer by 2020.This article provides an overview of head and neck cancer-its incidence, risk factors, treatment, and posttreatment sequelae-with a focus on HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Unlike other forms of head and neck cancer, HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer tends to affect younger patients with few or none of the traditional risk factors and has a distinctive presentation, histology, and natural course. In order to provide appropriate patient education and to help these patients monitor and manage late and long-term treatment effects, it is important for nurses to be aware of this disease and its treatment, and of the unique survivorship issues that arise for affected patients.

  17. BAIAP2 is related to emotional modulation of human memory strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Luksys

    Full Text Available Memory performance is the result of many distinct mental processes, such as memory encoding, forgetting, and modulation of memory strength by emotional arousal. These processes, which are subserved by partly distinct molecular profiles, are not always amenable to direct observation. Therefore, computational models can be used to make inferences about specific mental processes and to study their genetic underpinnings. Here we combined a computational model-based analysis of memory-related processes with high density genetic information derived from a genome-wide study in healthy young adults. After identifying the best-fitting model for a verbal memory task and estimating the best-fitting individual cognitive parameters, we found a common variant in the gene encoding the brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1-associated protein 2 (BAIAP2 that was related to the model parameter reflecting modulation of verbal memory strength by negative valence. We also observed an association between the same genetic variant and a similar emotional modulation phenotype in a different population performing a picture memory task. Furthermore, using functional neuroimaging we found robust genotype-dependent differences in activity of the parahippocampal cortex that were specifically related to successful memory encoding of negative versus neutral information. Finally, we analyzed cortical gene expression data of 193 deceased subjects and detected significant BAIAP2 genotype-dependent differences in BAIAP2 mRNA levels. Our findings suggest that model-based dissociation of specific cognitive parameters can improve the understanding of genetic underpinnings of human learning and memory.

  18. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Van Riper, Susan K; Tawfik, Pierre N; Stone, Matthew D; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Carlis, John V.; Griffin, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC’s potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing question one, we coupled DRC with covalent glycopeptide enrichment and MS/MS. With DRC we identified ~2 times more N-linked glycoproteins and their glycosylation sites than without DRC, dramatically increasing the known salivary glycoprotein catalog. Addressing question two, we compared differentially stable isotope-labeled saliva samples pooled from healthy and metastatic breast cancer women using a multidimensional peptide fractionation-based workflow, analyzing in parallel one sample portion with DRC and one portion without. Our workflow categorizes proteins with higher absolute abundance, whose relative abundance ratios are altered by DRC, from proteins of lower absolute abundance detected only after DRC. Within each of these salivary protein categories we identified novel abundance changes putatively associated with breast cancer, demonstrating feasibility and benefits of DRC for relative abundance profiling. Collectively, our results bring us closer to realizing the full potential of DRC for proteomic studies. PMID:21142092

  19. Prominent periventricular fiber system related to ganglionic eminence and striatum in the human fetal cerebrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasung, L; Jovanov-Milošević, N; Pletikos, M; Mori, S; Judaš, M; Kostović, Ivica

    2011-01-01

    Periventricular pathway (PVP) system of the developing human cerebrum is situated medial to the intermediate zone in the close proximity to proliferative cell compartments. In order to elucidate chemical properties and developing trajectories of the PVP we used DTI in combination with acetylcholinesterase histochemistry, SNAP-25 immunocytochemistry and axonal cytoskeletal markers (SMI312, MAP1b) immunocytochemistry on postmortem paraformaldehyde-fixed brains of 30 human fetuses ranging in age from 10 to 38 postconceptional weeks (PCW), 2 infants (age 1-3 months) and 1 adult brain. The PVP appears in the early fetal period (10-13 PCW) as two defined fibre bundles: the corpus callosum (CC) and the fetal fronto-occipital fascicle (FOF). In the midfetal period (15-18 PCW), all four components of the PVP can be identified: (1) the CC, which at rostral levels forms a voluminous callosal plate; (2) the FOF, with SNAP-25-positive fibers; (3) the fronto-pontine pathway (FPP) which for a short distance runs within the PVP; and (4) the subcallosal fascicle of Muratoff (SFM) which contains cortico-caudate projections. The PVPs are situated medial to the internal capsule at the level of the cortico-striatal junction; they remain prominent during the late fetal and early preterm period (19-28 PCW) and represent a portion of the wider periventricular crossroad of growing associative, callosal and projection pathways. In the perinatal period, the PVPs change their topographical relationships, decrease in size and the FOF looses its SNAP-25-reactivity. In conclusion, the hitherto undescribed PVP of the human fetal cerebrum contains forerunners of adult associative and projection pathways. Its transient chemical properties and relative exuberance suggest that the PVP may exert influence on the development of cortical connectivity (intermediate targeting) and other neurogenetic events such as neuronal proliferation. The PVP's topographical position also indicates that it is a major

  20. Foundational Methane Propulsion Related Technology Efforts, and Challenges for Applications to Human Exploration Beyond Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas; Klem, Mark; McRight, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Current interest in human exploration beyond earth orbit is driving requirements for high performance, long duration space transportation capabilities. Continued advancement in photovoltaic power systems and investments in high performance electric propulsion promise to enable solar electric options for cargo delivery and pre-deployment of operational architecture elements. However, higher thrust options are required for human in-space transportation as well as planetary descent and ascent functions. While high thrust requirements for interplanetary transportation may be provided by chemical or nuclear thermal propulsion systems, planetary descent and ascent systems are limited to chemical solutions due to their higher thrust to weight and potential planetary protection concerns. Liquid hydrogen fueled systems provide high specific impulse, but pose challenges due to low propellant density and the thermal issues of long term propellant storage. Liquid methane fueled propulsion is a promising compromise with lower specific impulse, higher bulk propellant density and compatibility with proposed in-situ propellant production concepts. Additionally, some architecture studies have identified the potential for commonality between interplanetary and descent/ascent propulsion solutions using liquid methane (LCH4) and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellants. These commonalities may lead to reduced overall development costs and more affordable exploration architectures. With this increased interest, it is critical to understand the current state of LOX/LCH4 propulsion technology and the remaining challenges to its application to beyond earth orbit human exploration. This paper provides a survey of NASA's past and current methane propulsion related technology efforts, assesses the accomplishments to date, and examines the remaining risks associated with full scale development.

  1. Acetaldehyde production and other ADH-related characteristics of aerobic bacteria isolated from hypochlorhydric human stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väkeväinen, S; Tillonen, J; Blom, M; Jousimies-Somer, H; Salaspuro, M

    2001-03-01

    Acetaldehyde is a known local carcinogen in the digestive tract in humans. Bacterial overgrowth in the hypochlorhydric stomach enhances production of acetaldehyde from ethanol in vivo after alcohol ingestion. Therefore, microbially produced acetaldehyde may be a potential risk factor for alcohol-related gastric and cardiac cancers. This study was aimed to investigate which bacterial species and/or groups are responsible for acetaldehyde formation in the hypochlorhydric human stomach and to characterize their alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes. After 7 days of treatment with 30 mg of lansoprazole twice a day, a gastroscopy was performed on eight volunteers to obtain hypochlorhydric gastric juice. Samples were cultured and bacteria were isolated and identified; thereafter, their acetaldehyde production capacity was measured gas chromatographically by incubating intact bacterial suspensions with ethanol at 37 degrees C. Cytosolic ADH activities, Km values, and protein concentration were determined spectrophotometrically. Acetaldehyde production of the isolated bacterial strains (n = 51) varied from less than 1 to 13,690 nmol of acetaldehyde/10(9) colony-forming units/hr. ADH activity of the strains that produced more than 100 nmol of acetaldehyde/10(9) colony-forming units/hr (n = 23) varied from 3.9 to 1253 nmol of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide per minute per milligram of protein, and Km values for ethanol ranged from 0.65 to 116 mM and from 0.5 to 3.1 M (high Km). There was a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.64, p Streptococcus salivarius, whereas nearly all Stomatococcus, Staphylococcus, and other Streptococcus species had a very low capacity to produce acetaldehyde. This study demonstrated that certain bacterial species or groups that originate from the oral cavity are responsible for the bulk of acetaldehyde production in the hypochlorhydric stomach. These findings provide new information with the respect to the local production of carcinogenic

  2. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  3. Concentrations of AMH and inhibin-B in relation to follicular diameter in normal human small antral follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Schmidt, Kirsten Tryde; Kristensen, Stine Gry;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the intrafollicular concentrations of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibin-B and steroids in normal human small antral follicles and to relate them to follicular size.......The aim of the present study was to determine the intrafollicular concentrations of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibin-B and steroids in normal human small antral follicles and to relate them to follicular size....

  4. Snake scales, partial exposure, and the Snake Detection Theory: A human event-related potentials study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Strien, Jan W; Isbell, Lynne A

    2017-04-07

    Studies of event-related potentials in humans have established larger early posterior negativity (EPN) in response to pictures depicting snakes than to pictures depicting other creatures. Ethological research has recently shown that macaques and wild vervet monkeys respond strongly to partially exposed snake models and scale patterns on the snake skin. Here, we examined whether snake skin patterns and partially exposed snakes elicit a larger EPN in humans. In Task 1, we employed pictures with close-ups of snake skins, lizard skins, and bird plumage. In task 2, we employed pictures of partially exposed snakes, lizards, and birds. Participants watched a random rapid serial visual presentation of these pictures. The EPN was scored as the mean activity (225-300 ms after picture onset) at occipital and parieto-occipital electrodes. Consistent with previous studies, and with the Snake Detection Theory, the EPN was significantly larger for snake skin pictures than for lizard skin and bird plumage pictures, and for lizard skin pictures than for bird plumage pictures. Likewise, the EPN was larger for partially exposed snakes than for partially exposed lizards and birds. The results suggest that the EPN snake effect is partly driven by snake skin scale patterns which are otherwise rare in nature.

  5. Expression of human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand extracellular region in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐蓓; HE; Fengtian; 等

    2002-01-01

    This study is conducted to clone the cDNA encoding human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand(hTRAIL)extracellular region(amino acids 41-281,hTRAIL41-281)and to express it in E.coli.The hTRAIL41-281 cDNA is amplified by reverse transcription(RT)PCR from total RNA derived from human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60.After sequenced,the cDNA is cloned into the vector pQE-80L and transformed into E.coli DH5α to express the recombinant hTRAIL41-281(rhTRAIL41-281)induced by IPTG.The recombinant protein is analyzed by SDS-PAGE.The cloned cDNA is consistent with the cDNA sequence encoding hTRAIL41-281 reported in GenBankTM.After inducing.the hTRAIL41-281 protein is expressed,and the mass of the recombinant protein is about 30% of total bacteria protein,which demonstrates that the cDNA encoding hTRAIL41-281 is successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli.

  6. The hemodynamics of human septic shock relate to circulating innate immunity factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemink, Koen J; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2010-01-01

    The role of innate immunity, e.g., complement activation and cytokine release in the hemodynamic alterations in the course of human septic shock is largely unknown. We prospectively studied 14 consecutive septic shock patients with a pulmonary artery catheter in place. For 3 days after admission, hemodynamic variables and plasma levels of C3a, a product of complement activation, and interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were measured 6-hourly. Doses of vasoactive drugs were recorded. Of the 14 patients, 8 died in the ICU. Patients had a hyperdynamic circulation with tachycardia, mild hypotension, increased cardiac index, peripheral vasodilation and myocardial depression. C3a, IL-6 and TNF-α plasma levels were supranormal in 123 of 138 (89%), 132 of 138 (96%) and 83 of 111 (75%) measurements, respectively. Independently of blood culture results, treatment with vasoactive drugs and outcome, mean arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance index were lower when IL-6 levels were higher and left ventricular function was less depressed when C3a levels were higher in the course of septic shock. The TNF-α levels did not invariably relate to peripheral vascular and myocardial function parameters. Our serial observations suggest that, in human septic shock, peripheral vasodilation is most strongly and independently, of all inflammatory factors, associated with IL-6 release, whereas complement activation partly offsets the myocardial depression of the syndrome. Innate immunity factors may thus differ in their contribution to the course of hemodynamic abnormalities of septic shock.

  7. Distribution of human waste samples in relation to sizing waste processing in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dick; Gallagher, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    Human waste processing for closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) in space requires that there be an accurate knowledge of the quantity of wastes produced. Because initial CELSS will be handling relatively few individuals, it is important to know the variation that exists in the production of wastes rather than relying upon mean values that could result in undersizing equipment for a specific crew. On the other hand, because of the costs of orbiting equipment, it is important to design the equipment with a minimum of excess capacity because of the weight that extra capacity represents. A considerable quantity of information that had been independently gathered on waste production was examined in order to obtain estimates of equipment sizing requirements for handling waste loads from crews of 2 to 20 individuals. The recommended design for a crew of 8 should hold 34.5 liters per day (4315 ml/person/day) for urine and stool water and a little more than 1.25 kg per day (154 g/person/day) of human waste solids and sanitary supplies.

  8. Levels of perfluorooctanesulfonate and related fluorochemicals in human blood from the general population of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Sun-Young; Shin, Im-Hee [Catholic Univ. of Daegu, School of Medicine, Dept. of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Daegu (Korea); Kannan, K. [Wardsworth Center, New York State Dept. of Health and Dept. of Env. Health and Tox., SUNY, Albany, NY (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was found to be widespread in human populations and wildlife Major applications of these POSF-based products have included surfactants in: specialty paper and packaging products, carpet, upholstery, and textile products and in certain insecticide formulation. Depending on the specific functional derivatization or the degree of polymerization, such POSF based products may degrade or metabolize to PFOS, a stable and persistent end product that has the potential to bioaccumulate in the food chain. The mechanisms and pathways leading to the presence of PFOS in human blood are not well characterized but likely involve environmental and dietary exposure to PFOS or to precursor molecules of PFOS. PFOS and related perfluorinated compounds have recently been detected at low parts per billion (nanogram per milliliter) concentrations in the general population from 10 different countries including Korea. In the present report, the levels of perfluoroalkylated compounds in the general population from Korea were analyzed with respect to occupation, smoking status, sex, age and socio-economic status. The degree of association between the four target fluorochemicals measured in this study (PFOS, PFHxS, PFOA, and PFOSA) were also analyzed by linear regression to determine the potential association between their sources of exposure.

  9. MicroRNA-16 suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition‑related gene expression in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Xu; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Glioma is one of the most prevalent types of brain tumor and is associated with the highest mortality rate of all CNS cancers. Epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been recognized as an important factor in tumor metastasis. Previously, it has been demonstrated that microRNA-16 (miR-16) has an important role in tumor metastasis in human cancer cell lines. However, the role of miR-16 in epithelial‑mesenchymal transition of human glioma cells remains unclear. In the present study, U87 and U251 glioma cell lines overexpressing miR-16 were established and it was identified that miR-16 suppressed invasion, adhesion, cell cycle, production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and transforming growth factor-β, and EMT-related gene expression, including vimentin, β-catenin and E-cadherin in miR-16 overexpressing U87 and U251 glioma cells. Furthermore, miR-16 suppressed EMT mainly through the downregulation of p-FAK and p-Akt expression, and nuclear factor-κB and Slug transcriptional activity. Therefore, miR-16 may be an important therapeutic target and predictor for glioma therapy.

  10. Never resting brain: simultaneous representation of two alpha related processes in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eti Ben-Simon

    Full Text Available Brain activity is continuously modulated, even at "rest". The alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz has been known as the hallmark of the brain's idle-state. However, it is still debated if the alpha rhythm reflects synchronization in a distributed network or focal generator and whether it occurs spontaneously or is driven by a stimulus. This EEG/fMRI study aimed to explore the source of alpha modulations and their distribution in the resting brain. By serendipity, while computing the individually defined power modulations of the alpha-band, two simultaneously occurring components of these modulations were found. An 'induced alpha' that was correlated with the paradigm (eyes open/ eyes closed, and a 'spontaneous alpha' that was on-going and unrelated to the paradigm. These alpha components when used as regressors for BOLD activation revealed two segregated activation maps: the 'induced map' included left lateral temporal cortical regions and the hippocampus; the 'spontaneous map' included prefrontal cortical regions and the thalamus. Our combined fMRI/EEG approach allowed to computationally untangle two parallel patterns of alpha modulations and underpin their anatomical basis in the human brain. These findings suggest that the human alpha rhythm represents at least two simultaneously occurring processes which characterize the 'resting brain'; one is related to expected change in sensory information, while the other is endogenous and independent of stimulus change.

  11. Flavonoids as Antioxidants and Developmental Regulators: Relative Significance in Plants and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Tattini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenylpropanoids, particularly flavonoids have been recently suggested as playing primary antioxidant functions in the responses of plants to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Furthermore, flavonoids are effective endogenous regulators of auxin movement, thus behaving as developmental regulators. Flavonoids are capable of controlling the development of individual organs and the whole-plant; and, hence, to contribute to stress-induced morphogenic responses of plants. The significance of flavonoids as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS in humans has been recently questioned, based on the observation that the flavonoid concentration in plasma and most tissues is too low to effectively reduce ROS. Instead, flavonoids may play key roles as signaling molecules in mammals, through their ability to interact with a wide range of protein kinases, including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, that supersede key steps of cell growth and differentiation. Here we discuss about the relative significance of flavonoids as reducing agents and signaling molecules in plants and humans. We show that structural features conferring ROS-scavenger ability to flavonoids are also required to effectively control developmental processes in eukaryotic cells.

  12. Pharmacological manipulations in animal models of anorexia and binge eating in relation to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, M A; Kostrzewa, E; Adan, R A H; Janhunen, S K

    2014-10-01

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorders (BED), are described as abnormal eating habits that usually involve insufficient or excessive food intake. Animal models have been developed that provide insight into certain aspects of eating disorders. Several drugs have been found efficacious in these animal models and some of them have eventually proven useful in the treatment of eating disorders. This review will cover the role of monoaminergic neurotransmitters in eating disorders and their pharmacological manipulations in animal models and humans. Dopamine, 5-HT (serotonin) and noradrenaline in hypothalamic and striatal regions regulate food intake by affecting hunger and satiety and by affecting rewarding and motivational aspects of feeding. Reduced neurotransmission by dopamine, 5-HT and noradrenaline and compensatory changes, at least in dopamine D2 and 5-HT(2C/2A) receptors, have been related to the pathophysiology of AN in humans and animal models. Also, in disorders and animal models of BN and BED, monoaminergic neurotransmission is down-regulated but receptor level changes are different from those seen in AN. A hypofunctional dopamine system or overactive α2-adrenoceptors may contribute to an attenuated response to (palatable) food and result in hedonic binge eating. Evidence for the efficacy of monoaminergic treatments for AN is limited, while more support exists for the treatment of BN or BED with monoaminergic drugs.

  13. Human factor H-related protein 2 (CFHR2 regulates complement activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes U Eberhardt

    Full Text Available Mutations and deletions within the human CFHR gene cluster on chromosome 1 are associated with diseases, such as dense deposit disease, CFHR nephropathy or age-related macular degeneration. Resulting mutant CFHR proteins can affect complement regulation. Here we identify human CFHR2 as a novel alternative pathway complement regulator that inhibits the C3 alternative pathway convertase and terminal pathway assembly. CFHR2 is composed of four short consensus repeat domains (SCRs. Two CFHR2 molecules form a dimer through their N-terminal SCRs, and each of the two C-terminal ends can bind C3b. C3b bound CFHR2 still allows C3 convertase formation but the CFHR2 bound convertases do not cleave the substrate C3. Interestingly CFHR2 hardly competes off factor H from C3b. Thus CFHR2 likely acts in concert with factor H, as CFHR2 inhibits convertases while simultaneously allowing factor H assisted degradation by factor I.

  14. Properties of cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the human hand related to touch sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallbo, A B; Johansson, R S

    1984-01-01

    Recordings from single peripheral nerve fibres made it possible to analyse the functional properties of tactile afferent units supplying the glabrous skin of the human hand and to assess directly the relation between impulse discharge and perceptive experiences. The 17,000 tactile units in this skin area of the human hand are of four different types: two fast adapting types, FA I and FA II (formerly RA and PC), and two slowly adapting types, SA I and SA II. The receptive field characteristics and the densities in the skin of the type I units (FA I and SA I) indicate that these account for the detailed spatial resolution that is of paramount importance for the motor skill and the explorative role of the hand. The relationship between the stimulus amplitude and perceived intensity during sustained skin indentations did not match the corresponding stimulus response functions of SA units suggesting non-linear transformations within the central nervous system. These transformations, in turn, appear to vary between subjects. A single impulse in a single FA I unit may be felt when originating from the most important tactile regions of the hand, indicating that the psychophysical detection may be set by the threshold of the sense organs. Moreover, no significant noise seems to be superimposed in the respective central sensory pathways.

  15. Fibronectin-related substance located in the chief cells of human and rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, S; Yabana, T; Ichiyanagi, S; Chen, J; Yachi, A

    1990-01-01

    A novel substance located in the chief cells of human and rat gastric mucosa, which was detected immunologically by either polyclonal or monoclonal antihuman fibronectin (FN) antibodies, is reported. All three polyclonal antihuman FN antibodies used in this study reacted immunohistologically exclusively with the chief cells. Monoclonal antibody against C-terminal peptide or cell binding peptide reacted clearly with the human chief cells, but monoclonal antibodies against FN N-terminal and midmolecule failed to react with the cells. Western blot analysis of the rat gastric mucosal extract with polyclonal antihuman FN antibody showed that this substance has a molecular weight of about 70,000 Da. Therefore, this substance appears to be a fragment containing the C-terminal peptide of whole molecule FN and thus in the present study is named FN-related substance (FNRS). In a further study with ethanol-induced ulcer model of the rat, the physiological significance of FNRS was examined. The FNRS decreased remarkably, in a dose-dependent manner, in the fundic mucosa of the rats that ingested ethanol. The FNRS appeared to be associated with development of mucosal damage and repair, subsequently playing, in part, an important role in the gastric mucosal protection mechanism.

  16. cDNA cloning and expression of an apoptosis-related gene, human TFAR15 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉刚; 刘洪涛; 张颖妹; 马大龙

    1999-01-01

    By means of cDNA-RDA method. some cDNA fragments were found to have high levels of expression during deprivation of GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor) in a human myeloid cell line, TF-1 cells. One of these tragments was identified as a novel gene. To get the full length of cDNA, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and expressed sequence tags (EST) overlapping fragments assembling strategies were used. The novel gene was named TRAF15 (TF-1 cell apoptosis related gene-15), which consists of 1218 nueleotides and encodes 212 amino acids. The putative protein protein product of TFAR15 is partially homologous to C. elegans protein C14A4. 11. TFAR15 mRNA is expressed in fetal liver, kidney, spleen and lung. and also in some human myeloid cell lines. Both of the TFAR15 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in TF-(?) cells after GM-CSF withdrawal. In vitro analysis showed that the recombinant TFAR15 protein co(?)ld inhibit the natural cell death of 293 cells, an embryonic kidney cell

  17. Anal human papillomavirus infection: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of related lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, Maria; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Ravenda, Paola Simona; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is mostly asymptomatic, but may also have many diverse clinical signs encompassing benign ano-genital lesions, and carcinomas. Recently, interest has also particularly focused on anal cancer since, over the last decades, its incidence has been greatly increasing in developed countries, both in women and men and is drastically higher in specific risk groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-1 infected individuals. Approximately 88% of anal cancer cases worldwide are associated with HPV infection. This review summarizes our current understanding of anal HPV infection, discussing its epidemiology and risk factors in various populations, and the state of the art in the detection of anal HPV infection and its related lesions through both cytology and histology. Finally, we discuss the clinical management and therapy for these lesions.

  18. Targeted Differentiation of Regional Ventral Neuroprogenitors and Related Neuronal Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liankai Chi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Embryoid body (EB formation and adherent culture (AD paradigms are equivalently thought to be applicable for neural specification of human pluripotent stem cells. Here, we report that sonic hedgehog-induced ventral neuroprogenitors under EB conditions are fated to medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, while the AD cells mostly adopt a floor-plate (FP fate. The EB-MGE later on differentiates into GABA and cholinergic neurons, while the AD-FP favors dopaminergic neuron specification. Distinct developmental, metabolic, and adhesion traits in AD and EB cells may potentially account for their differential patterning potency. Gene targeting combined with small-molecule screening experiments identified that concomitant inhibition of Wnts, STAT3, and p38 pathways (3i could largely convert FP to MGE under AD conditions. Thus, differentiation paradigms and signaling regulators can be integrated together to specify distinct neuronal subtypes for studying and treating related neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease.

  19. Prokaryotic Expression and Preparation of Polyantibody of Human Histydyl-tRNA Synthetase Related Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟宪芳; 施静; 刘晓春; 陈金中

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to express and purify human histydyl-tRNA synthetase related gene and to prepare its polyantibody. The open reading frame was amplified by PCR, and then recombined into prokaryoticexpression vector pQE30 and transformed into E. coli M15 for expression. The expressed products were induced by IPTG after the reconstructed pQE30 was transferred into M15. Afterpurified by Ni affinity chromatography, the product was identified to be a single band by SDS-PAGE. The rabbits were inoculated with purified products. High-titer polyantibody was successfully prepared. Highly-purified expression product and prepared polyantibody may provide a good basis for further study.

  20. Investigating the social relations of human service provision: Institutional ethnography and activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Nichols

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I reflect on my experiences using institutional ethnography to support socially just policy, practice and organizational change. I focus specifically on three inter-related institutional ethnographic research projects that have informed my approach to working with social workers, shelter workers, lawyers, policy analysts, community organizers, teachers, probation officers and youth to create change. Although strategic collaborations to change institutional practices and knowledge are rife with tensions, I show how institutional ethnography can be used reflexively throughout the collaborative process to create conditions for critical consciousness-raising among participants; inspire reflection and action on the part of human service professionals and inform collective efforts to create systemic change, as well as to guide the research process itself. I conclude by suggesting that institutional ethnographers seeking to influence socially just change need to find ways to balance the demands of academic writing, while being true to the activist origins of this sociological approach.

  1. Human resource in tourism and hospitality industry: Relation between level of education and job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Bojana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a concise summary of current problems including the impact of education on (dissatisfaction of human resources in tourism and hospitality industry. In recent years, many researches have been focused on the phenomena of the relation between level of education and job satisfaction of the employees in tourism organizations as it is well known that employee satisfaction enhance competitiveness and efficiency in business. A current issue was set as the fundamental goal in designing this paper, and the basic parameter of the research is employee satisfaction with business operations and working conditions, or to be more precise, examining the extent of (dissatisfaction with the given segments depending on the employees' educational level. This paper represents a synthesis of the electronic research, the analysis of available references, as well as the use of descriptive, analytical and synthetic methods, and it will result in a critical analysis and confirmation (denial of certain hypotheses.

  2. Mechanical properties of the normal human cartilage-bone complex in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Linde, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the age-related variations in the mechanical properties of the normal human tibial cartilage-bone complex and the relationships between cartilage and bone. DESIGN: A novel technique was applied to assess the mechanical properties of the cartilage and bone by means...... normal donors aged 16-83 years were tested in compression. The deformation was measured simultaneously in bone and cartilage to obtain the mechanical properties of both tissues. RESULTS: The stiffnesses and elastic energies of both cartilage and bone showed an initial increase, with maxima at 40 years......, followed by a steady decline. The viscoelastic energy was maximal at younger ages (16-29 years), followed by a steady decline. The energy absorption capacity did not vary with age. Stiffnesses and elastic energies were correlated significantly between cartilage and bone. CONCLUSIONS: The present study...

  3. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV and its relation with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrees Muhammad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV.

  4. Age-related changes in human vestibulo-ocular and optokinetic reflexes: Pseudorandom rotation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.; Schoenhoff, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and optokinetic reflex (OKR) were characterized in 216 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. The object of this cross-sectional study was to determine the effects of aging on VOR and OKR reflex dynamics, and to identify the distributions of parameters which describe VOR and OKR responses to pseudorandom stimuli in a putatively normal population. In general, VOR and OKR response parameters changed in a manner consistent with declining function with increasing age. For the VOR this was reflected in declining response amplitudes, although the magnitude of the decline was small relative to the variability of the data. For the OKR the lag time of the response, probably associated with the time required for visual information processing, increased linearly with age at a rate of about 1 ms per year.

  5. Neural correlates of mental state decoding in human adults: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Mark A; Moulson, Margaret C; Harkness, Kate L

    2004-04-01

    Successful negotiation of human social interactions rests on having a theory of mind - an understanding of how others' behaviors can be understood in terms of internal mental states, such as beliefs, desires, intentions, and emotions. A core theory-of-mind skill is the ability to decode others' mental states on the basis of observable information, such as facial expressions. Although several recent studies have focused on the neural correlates of reasoning about mental states, no research has addressed the question of what neural systems underlie mental state decoding. We used dense-array event-related potentials (ERP) to show that decoding mental states from pictures of eyes is associated with an N270-400 component over inferior frontal and anterior temporal regions of the right hemisphere. Source estimation procedures suggest that orbitofrontal and medial temporal regions may underlie this ERP effect. These findings suggest that different components of everyday theory-of-mind skills may rely on dissociable neural mechanisms.

  6. Gene expression profiles of single human mature oocytes in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, M L; Andersen, Claus Yding; Bogstad, J

    2010-01-01

    The development competence of human oocytes declines with increasing age. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of age on gene expression profile in mature human oocytes.......The development competence of human oocytes declines with increasing age. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of age on gene expression profile in mature human oocytes....

  7. Social Differentiation in Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) that Engage in Human-Related Foraging Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Carolyn J; Perrtree, Robin M; Cox, Tara M

    2017-01-01

    Both natural and human-related foraging strategies by the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) have resulted in social segregation in several areas of the world. Bottlenose dolphins near Savannah, Georgia beg at an unprecedented rate and also forage behind commercial shrimp trawlers, providing an opportunity to study the social ramifications of two human-related foraging behaviors within the same group of animals. Dolphins were photo-identified via surveys conducted throughout estuarine waterways around Savannah in the summers of 2009-2011. Mean half-weight indices (HWI) were calculated for each foraging class, and community division by modularity was used to cluster animals based on association indices. Pairs of trawler dolphins had a higher mean HWI (0.20 ± 0.07) than pairs of non-trawler dolphins (0.04 ± 0.02) or mixed pairs (0.02 ± 0.02). In contrast, pairs of beggars, non-beggars, and mixed pairs all had similar means, with HWI between 0.05-0.07. Community division by modularity produced a useful division (0.307) with 6 clusters. Clusters were predominately divided according to trawler status; however, beggars and non-beggars were mixed throughout clusters. Both the mean HWI and social clusters revealed that the social structure of common bottlenose dolphins near Savannah, Georgia was differentiated based on trawler status but not beg status. This finding may indicate that foraging in association with trawlers is a socially learned behavior, while the mechanisms for the propagation of begging are less clear. This study highlights the importance of taking into account the social parameters of a foraging behavior, such as how group size or competition for resources may affect how the behavior spreads. The positive or negative ramifications of homophily may influence whether the behaviors are exhibited by individuals within the same social clusters and should be considered in future studies examining social relationships and foraging behaviors.

  8. Exploring the Animal Turn: Human-animal relations in Science, Society and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Animals' omnipresence in human society makes them both close to and ye tremarkably distant from humans. Human and animal lives have always been entangled, but the way we see and practice the relationships between humans and animals - as close, intertwined, or clearly separate - varies from time to time and between cultures, societies, and even situations. By putting these complex relationships in focus, this anthology investigates the ways in which human society deals with its co-existence wi...

  9. Mouse models of telomere dysfunction phenocopy skeletal changes found in human age-related osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy A. Brennan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A major medical challenge in the elderly is osteoporosis and the high risk of fracture. Telomere dysfunction is a cause of cellular senescence and telomere shortening, which occurs with age in cells from most human tissues, including bone. Telomere defects contribute to the pathogenesis of two progeroid disorders characterized by premature osteoporosis, Werner syndrome and dyskeratosis congenital. It is hypothesized that telomere shortening contributes to bone aging. We evaluated the skeletal phenotypes of mice with disrupted telomere maintenance mechanisms as models for human bone aging, including mutants in Werner helicase (Wrn−/−, telomerase (Terc−/− and Wrn−/−Terc−/− double mutants. Compared with young wild-type (WT mice, micro-computerized tomography analysis revealed that young Terc−/− and Wrn−/−Terc−/− mice have decreased trabecular bone volume, trabecular number and trabecular thickness, as well as increased trabecular spacing. In cortical bone, young Terc−/− and Wrn−/−Terc−/− mice have increased cortical thinning, and increased porosity relative to age-matched WT mice. These trabecular and cortical changes were accelerated with age in Terc−/− and Wrn−/−Terc−/− mice compared with older WT mice. Histological quantification of osteoblasts in aged mice showed a similar number of osteoblasts in all genotypes; however, significant decreases in osteoid, mineralization surface, mineral apposition rate and bone formation rate in older Terc−/− and Wrn−/−Terc−/− bone suggest that osteoblast dysfunction is a prominent feature of precocious aging in these mice. Except in the Wrn−/− single mutant, osteoclast number did not increase in any genotype. Significant alterations in mechanical parameters (structure model index, degree of anistrophy and moment of inertia of the Terc−/− and Wrn−/−Terc−/− femurs compared with WT mice were also observed. Young Wrn

  10. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression.

  11. Relations between urban bird and plant communities and human well-being and connection to nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Gary W; Davidson, Penny; Boxall, Dianne; Smallbone, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    By 2050, 70% of the world's population will live in urban areas. In many cases urbanization reduces the richness and abundance of native species. Living in highly modified environments with fewer opportunities to interact directly with a diversity of native species may adversely affect residents' personal well-being and emotional connection to nature. We assessed the personal well-being, neighborhood well-being (a measure of a person's satisfaction with their neighborhood), and level of connection to nature of over 1000 residents in 36 residential neighborhoods in southeastern Australia. We modeled these response variables as a function of natural features of each neighborhood (e.g., species richness and abundance of birds, density of plants, and amount of vegetation cover) and demographic characteristics of surveyed residents. Vegetation cover had the strongest positive relations with personal well-being, whereas residents' level of connection to nature was weakly related to variation in species richness and abundance of birds and density of plants. Demographic characteristics such as age and level of activity explained the greatest proportion of variance in well-being and connection to nature. Nevertheless, when controlling for variation in demographic characteristics (examples were provided above), neighborhood well-being was positively related to a range of natural features, including species richness and abundance of birds, and vegetation cover. Demographic characteristics and how well-being was quantified strongly influenced our results, and we suggest demography and metrics of well-being must be considered when attempting to determine relations between the urban environment and human well-being. © 2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Counseling in Pediatric Training: Are We Discussing Otolaryngology-Related Manifestations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagi, Sharon H; Gnagi, Forrest T; Schraff, Scott A; Hinni, Michael L

    2016-07-01

    Demonstrate the need for increased education regarding otolaryngology-related manifestations of human papillomavirus (HPV). Highlight a need to incorporate otolaryngology-related manifestations of HPV in vaccine counseling. Survey. Tertiary care academic children's hospital. Pediatric residents, fellows, and staff. An online survey was made available regarding HPV education and vaccination. Participants (N = 348) initiated the survey representing 28.4%, 25.6%, and 19.0% postgraduate year 1, 2, and 3 residents, respectively, as well as 17.5% chief residents/fellows and 9.5% attendings. Participants rated their prior education as none or fair regarding recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (63.8%) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (68.3%). In contrast, 60.6% and 70.9% rated their education on genital warts and cervical cancer correspondingly as good or excellent. When asked what was routinely discussed during HPV vaccine counseling, 63.3% reported "never" discussing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and 52.9% "never" discussing oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. A range from 92.7% to 95.5% responded that there was a need for increased education regarding HPV and its role in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Increased education about HPV and its otolaryngology-related manifestations should be undertaken to increase provider, patient, and parent awareness of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We propose that discussing the risks of otolaryngology-related disease be routinely included in HPV vaccination counseling. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  13. Productive human immunodeficiency virus infection levels correlate with AIDS-related manifestations in the patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathez, D.; Paul, D.; de Belilovsky, C.; Sultan, Y.; Deleuze, J.; Gorin, I.; Saurin, W.; Decker, R.; Leibowitch, J. (Univ. Rene-Descartes Paris-Ouest, Garches (France))

    1990-10-01

    Mononuclear cells were obtained from 71 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive subjects presenting and first visit either as asymptomatic or with minor symptoms and with CD4 lymphocytes greater than 550 per mm3 (group A, 35 patients) or as patients with AIDS, AIDS-related illnesses, or CD4 lymphocytes less than 400 per mm3 (group B, 36 patients). After 1-5 years of follow-up, 13 patients of group A had essentially retained their initial status (asymptomatics); the 22 others had suffered clinical or immunological deterioration (progressors). Frozen cells were thawed and submitted to lethal gamma-irradiation in vitro (4500 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 Gy) before they were cultured with normal phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes to determine radiation-resistant HIV expression ex vivo (R-HEV). HIV antigenemia correlated with R-HEV values in 142 samples (r = 0.92, P less than 0.001) but was a less sensitive predictor of disease than R-HEV. R-HEV was detected in all specimens from patients with major AIDS-related illnesses or HIV-associated CD4 lymphopenia. In 77% of the progressors from group A, R-HEV detection preceded the onset of AIDS-associated disease or CD4 lymphopenia by 1 year (average). Conversely, R-HEV was low or was not detected in 36 sequential specimens from the 13 patients who remained asymptomatic over the following 2-5 years. Thus, persistently low HIV expression in vivo predicted a nondiseased state, whereas higher HIV expression levels seemed necessary for disease to occur. These data indicate that R-HEV is related to productive HIV infection in vivo, the latter acting as a determinant of AIDS-related illnesses. In view of this, measurement of HIV expression levels in the patient should be useful in antiviral efficacy trials.

  14. Harnessing the Risk-Related Data Supply Chain: An Information Architecture Approach to Enriching Human System Research and Operations Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buquo, Lynn E.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2011-01-01

    An Information Architecture facilitates the understanding and, hence, harnessing of the human system risk-related data supply chain which enhances the ability to securely collect, integrate, and share data assets that improve human system research and operations. By mapping the risk-related data flow from raw data to useable information and knowledge (think of it as a data supply chain), the Human Research Program (HRP) and Space Life Science Directorate (SLSD) are building an information architecture plan to leverage their existing, and often shared, IT infrastructure.

  15. Expression of pRb and p16INK4 in human thymic epithelial tumors in relation to the presence of human polyomavirus 7

    OpenAIRE

    Keijzers, Marlies; Rensspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Haugg, Anke; Maessen, Jos G; Baets, Marc H. De; zur Hausen, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background We have recently reported the presence of the Human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors as assessed by diverse molecular techniques. Here we report on the co-expression of p16, retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (phospho-Rb) in human thymic epithelial tumors in relation to HPyV7. Methods PRB, phospho-RB and p16 expression was assessed by immuno-histochemistry in 37 thymomas and 2 thymic carcinomas. 17 thymomas (46 %) and 1 th...

  16. How Does Adult Attachment Affect Human Recognition of Love-related and Sex-related Stimuli: An ERP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Juan; Chen, Xin; Liu, Jinqun; Yao, Fangshu; Huang, Jiani; Ndasauka, Yamikani; Ma, Ru; Zhang, Yuting; Lan, Jing; Liu, Lu; Fang, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship among three emotion-motivation systems (adult attachment, romantic love, and sex). We recorded event-related potentials in 37 healthy volunteers who had experienced romantic love while they viewed SEX, LOVE, FRIEND, SPORT, and NEUTRAL images. We also measured adult attachment styles, level of passionate love and sexual attitudes. As expected, results showed that, firstly, response to love-related image-stimuli and sex-related image-stimuli on the electrophysiological data significantly different on N1, N2, and positive slow wave (PSW) components. Secondly, the different adult attachment styles affected individuals' recognition processing in response to love-related and sex-related images, especially, to sex-related images. Further analysis showed that voltages elicited by fearful attachment style individuals were significantly lower than voltages elicited by secure and dismissing attachment style individuals on sex-related images at frontal sites, on N1 and N2 components. Thirdly, from behavior data, we found that adult attachment styles were not significantly related to any dimension of sexual attitudes but were significantly related to passionate love scale (PLS) total points. Thus, the behavior results were not in line with the electrophysiological results. The present study proved that adult attachment styles might mediate individuals' lust and attraction systems.

  17. Identification of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus Infection-Related Human Genes Based on Shortest Paths in a Virus-Human Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently emerging Influenza A/H7N9 virus is reported to be able to infect humans and cause mortality. However, viral and host factors associated with the infection are poorly understood. It is suggested by the “guilt by association” rule that interacting proteins share the same or similar functions and hence may be involved in the same pathway. In this study, we developed a computational method to identify Influenza A/H7N9 virus infection-related human genes based on this rule from the shortest paths in a virus-human protein interaction network. Finally, we screened out the most significant 20 human genes, which could be the potential infection related genes, providing guidelines for further experimental validation. Analysis of the 20 genes showed that they were enriched in protein binding, saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. We also compared the results with those from human rhinovirus (HRV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV by the same method. It was indicated that saccharide or polysaccharide metabolism related pathways might be especially associated with the H7N9 infection. These results could shed some light on the understanding of the virus infection mechanism, providing basis for future experimental biology studies and for the development of effective strategies for H7N9 clinical therapies.

  18. Study about the relation of gender equity and human development in northeastern Mexico, 1995- 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Zamudio Sánchez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of indexes taken from easily measurable variables, this paper takes a look at both the gains and setbacks of Mexican society in its fight for gender equality and its relation to human development. The object of this paper is to show the possible future tendencies in this context, insofar as opportunities arise for both men and women to both fully develop their capacities and to take advantage of the same within their surroundings. The case study focuses on the municipalities of the northeast region of Mexico, formed by the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, for the years 1995, 2000 and 2005. A reduction in the inequality gap in health, education and income is observed, although the condition of women is still far from being on a par with that of men, especially where resources for a dignified life are concerned. The most noticeable gap between men and women is related precisely to the limited access and control of resources that allow women to make their own decisions regarding their lives and consequently, their empowerment is marginal.

  19. Large-Scale Investigation of Human TF-miRNA Relations Based on Coexpression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Chien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding, endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs are fairly well known for regulating gene expression rather than protein coding. Dysregulation of miRNA gene, either upregulated or downregulated, may lead to severe diseases or oncogenesis, especially when the miRNA disorder involves significant bioreactions or pathways. Thus, how miRNA genes are transcriptionally regulated has been highlighted as well as target recognition in recent years. In this study, a large-scale investigation of novel cis- and trans-elements was undertaken to further determine TF-miRNA regulatory relations, which are necessary to unravel the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. Based on miRNA and annotated gene expression profiles, the term “coTFBS” was introduced to detect common transcription factors and the corresponding binding sites within the promoter regions of each miRNA and its coexpressed annotated genes. The computational pipeline was successfully established to filter redundancy due to short sequence motifs for TFBS pattern search. Eventually, we identified more convinced TF-miRNA regulatory relations for 225 human miRNAs. This valuable information is helpful in understanding miRNA functions and provides knowledge to evaluate the therapeutic potential in clinical research. Once most expression profiles of miRNAs in the latest database are completed, TF candidates of more miRNAs can be explored by this filtering approach in the future.

  20. Mutation analysis of novel human liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Liao; Tsai-Ping Li; Mu-Jun Zhao; Jing Zhao; Hai Song; Pascal Pineau; Agnès Marchio; Anne Dejean; Pierre Tiollais; Hong-Yang Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To find the point mutations meaningful for inactivationof liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene (LPTS) gene,a human novel liver-related putative tumor suppressor geneand telomerase inhibitor in hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: The entire coding sequence of LPTS genewas examined for mutations by single strand conformationpolymorphism (SSCP) assay and PCR products directsequencing in 56 liver cancer cell lines, 7 ovarian cancerand 7 head & neck tumor cell lines and 70 pairs of HCCtissues samples. The cDNA fragment coding for the mostfrequent mutant protein was subcloned into GST fusionexpression vector. The product was expressed in E. coliand purified by glutathione-agarose column. Telomericrepeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays wereperformed to study the effect of point mutation totelomerase inhibitory activity.RESULTS: SSCP gels showed the abnormal shifting bandsand DNA sequencing found that there were 5 differentmutations and/or polymorphisms in 12 tumor cell lineslocated at exon2, exon5 and exon7. The main alterationswere A(778)A/G and A(880)T in exon7. The change in siteof 778 could not be found in HCC tissue samples, while themutation in position 880 was seen in 7 (10 %) cases. Themutation in the site of 880 had no effect on telomeraseinhibitory activity.CONCLUSION: Alterations identified in this study arepolymorphisms of LPTS gene. LPTS mutations occur in HCCbut are infrequent and of little effect on the telomeraseinhibitory function of the protein. Epigenetics, such asmethylation, acetylation, may play the key role in inactivationof LPTS.

  1. Prognostic Significance of Apoptosis Related Gene Family bcl-2 in Human Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the prognostic effect of bcl-2 oncogene and its gene family members bax, bcl-x expression in breast cancer patients. Methods: expression of bcl-2, bax proteins in 91 human breast cancer tissue sections were studied by immunohistochemical method. Bcl-x1 mRNA expression in frozen tissues from 16 breast cancer patients were detected using Northern blot method. Results: bcl-2 protein positivity was found in 60/91 (65.9%) patients, and bax positivity 59/91 (64.8%). Bcl-2 and bax expression levels were associated with apoptotic index(AI), histological grade, axillary lymph node metastasis, postoperative local recurrence and metastasis. Bcl-2 expression was related to ER positivity. In univariate analysis for disease free survival (DFS), bcl-2 and bax protein levels, and Al were all found to have prognostic value. The result of Cox's model multivariate analysis showed that bcl-2 protein level was an independent prognostic factor. In 16 frozen breast cancer tissues, 8/16(50%) had higher level of bcl-x1 mRNA, which showed correlation with bcl-2 protein expression and axillary lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: The findings indicate that dysregulated expressions of bcl-2, bax and bcl-x1 apoptosis-related genes, suggestive of serious deregulation of apoptotic process, may contribute to the biologic aggressiveness of breast cancer. Bcl-2 protein is an independent indicator of prognosis in breast cancer patients.

  2. Review of evoked and event-related delta responses in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güntekin, Bahar; Başar, Erol

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, the brain's oscillatory responses have invaded the literature. The studies on delta (0.5-3.5Hz) oscillatory responses in humans upon application of cognitive paradigms showed that delta oscillations are related to cognitive processes, mainly in decision making and attentional processes. The present manuscript comprehensively reviews the studies on delta oscillatory responses upon cognitive stimulation in healthy subjects and in different pathologies, namely Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and alcoholism. Further delta oscillatory response upon presentation of faces, facial expressions, and affective pictures are reviewed. The relationship between pre-stimulus delta activity and post-stimulus evoked and event-related responses and/or oscillations is discussed. Cross-frequency couplings of delta oscillations with higher frequency windows are also included in the review. The conclusion of this review includes several important remarks, including that delta oscillatory responses are involved in cognitive and emotional processes. A decrease of delta oscillatory responses could be a general electrophysiological marker for cognitive dysfunction (Alzheimer's disease, MCI, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and alcoholism). The pre-stimulus activity (phase or amplitude changes in delta activity) has an effect on post-stimulus EEG responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Large-scale investigation of human TF-miRNA relations based on coexpression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chia-Hung; Chiang-Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Weng, Shun-Long; Chang, Wen-Chi; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding, endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) are fairly well known for regulating gene expression rather than protein coding. Dysregulation of miRNA gene, either upregulated or downregulated, may lead to severe diseases or oncogenesis, especially when the miRNA disorder involves significant bioreactions or pathways. Thus, how miRNA genes are transcriptionally regulated has been highlighted as well as target recognition in recent years. In this study, a large-scale investigation of novel cis- and trans-elements was undertaken to further determine TF-miRNA regulatory relations, which are necessary to unravel the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. Based on miRNA and annotated gene expression profiles, the term "coTFBS" was introduced to detect common transcription factors and the corresponding binding sites within the promoter regions of each miRNA and its coexpressed annotated genes. The computational pipeline was successfully established to filter redundancy due to short sequence motifs for TFBS pattern search. Eventually, we identified more convinced TF-miRNA regulatory relations for 225 human miRNAs. This valuable information is helpful in understanding miRNA functions and provides knowledge to evaluate the therapeutic potential in clinical research. Once most expression profiles of miRNAs in the latest database are completed, TF candidates of more miRNAs can be explored by this filtering approach in the future.

  4. Effects of Arsenic on Cell Proliferation and Its Related Gene Expression in Human Epidermal Keratinocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾军; 毕新岭; 米庆胜; 文军慧

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the effects of low concentration of arsenic (As2O3) on DNA synthesisand related transcription factor gene E2F1 expression in keratinocyte. Methods: Human epidermal kerati-nocyte (cell line HaCaT) cultured in vitro was used. After treatment with various concentrations of arse-nic, DNA synthesis and E2F1 expression in HaCaT cells were detected by using 3 H-TdR method and RT-PCR. Results: Arsenic caused a modest increase of keratinocyte DNA synthesis when the concentrationreached the range within 0.5-16 nmol/L, but the amount of incorporated 3 H-TdR decreased and returnedto baseline level when the concentration of arsenic increased to over 16 nmol/L. RT-PCR analysis showedthe level of E2F1 mRNA was elevated in HaCaT cells with the increase of DNA synthesis. Conclusion:Ar-senic of a certain concentration could increase DNA synthesis and enhance E2F1 expression in HaCaT cellline, which might be one of the pathological mechanisms of skin disease related to arsenic.

  5. Oral mucocele/ranula: Another human immunodeficiency virus-related salivary gland disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syebele, Kabunda; Munzhelele, Thifhelimbilu I

    2015-05-01

    To describe clinical characteristics of oral mucoceles/ranulas, with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related salivary gland diseases. A descriptive and clinical study, with review of patient data. We reviewed 113 referred cases of oral mucocele. The following anatomical sites were identified: lip, tongue, and floor of the mouth (simple ranulas), as well as plunging ranulas. The age and gender data of the patients with oral mucoceles were recorded. The HIV status of the patients and other information were reviewed. There were 30 (26.5%) males and 83 (73.5%) females. Most patients were below 30 years of age, with the peak frequency in the first and second decade. Ranula (simple and plunging) represented 84.1% of the mucocele locations. Mucocele on the lips represented 10.6%. Seventy-two (63.7%) patients were HIV positive; and 97.2% of them had ranulas. Thirty-eight (33.6%) patients presented with plunging ranulas; and 92.1% of them were HIV positive, compared with two patients presenting with plunging ranulas in the HIV-negative group. These results strongly suggest that an HIV-positive patient is statistically (P mucoceles/ranulas, as observed in HIV-positive patients. Additionally, it suggests a possible clinical link between the two pathologies. The authors strongly support the suggestion that oral mucocele/ranula is an HIV-related salivary gland disease. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Lifelong expression of apolipoprotein D in the human brainstem: correlation with reduced age-related neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Navarro

    Full Text Available The lipocalin apolipoprotein D (Apo D is upregulated in peripheral nerves following injury and in regions of the central nervous system, such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, during aging and progression of certain neurological diseases. In contrast, few studies have examined Apo D expression in the brainstem, a region necessary for survival and generally less prone to age-related degeneration. We measured Apo D expression in whole human brainstem lysates by slot-blot and at higher spatial resolution by quantitative immunohistochemistry in eleven brainstem nuclei (the 4 nuclei of the vestibular nuclear complex, inferior olive, hypoglossal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and Roller`s nucleus. In contrast to cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, apolipoprotein D was highly expressed in brainstem tissue from subjects (N = 26, 32-96 years of age with no history of neurological disease, and expression showed little variation with age. Expression was significantly stronger in somatomotor nuclei (hypoglossal, oculomotor, facial than visceromotor or sensory nuclei. Both neurons and glia expressed Apo D, particularly neurons with larger somata and glia in the periphery of these brainstem centers. Immunostaining was strongest in the neuronal perinuclear region and absent in the nucleus. We propose that strong brainstem expression of Apo D throughout adult life contributes to resistance against neurodegenerative disease and age-related degeneration, possibly by preventing oxidative stress and ensuing lipid peroxidation.

  7. Human papillomavirus infection in male patients with STI-related symptoms in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hai Ha Long; Bi, Xiuqiong; Ishizaki, Azumi; Van Le, Hung; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Hosaka, Norimitsu; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence, genotypes, and risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Hanoi, Vietnam. The study included 192 males (mean age, 32.9 years) with symptoms related to sexually transmitted infections (STI). Urinary, penile, and urethral samples were collected in April and May, 2014. HPV DNA was detected with PCR, performed with modified and/or original GP5(+)/GP6(+) primers. HPV genotypes were determined with a gene array assay. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) DNA were detected with loop-mediated isothermal amplification. HPV DNA, NG, and CT were detected in 48 (25.0%), 23 (12.0%), and 41 (21.4%) patients, respectively. HPV DNA appeared in penile samples (21.0%, 39/186) more frequently than in urinary (3.1%, 6/191, P infections were determined in 33.3% and 64.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of HPV infection in urethra with younger sexual debut age. HPV52 was the most prevalent high-risk HPV genotype, whereas HPV16 was less common in the male Vietnamese patients with STI-related symptoms. Younger sexual-debut age was a risk factor for HPV infection in urethra. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Influence of moisturizer and relative humidity on human emissions of fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J; Fang, W; Cao, Q; Yang, L; Chang, V W-C; Nazaroff, W W

    2017-05-01

    Utilizing the ultraviolet light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) measurement technique as embodied in the Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A), we evaluated the fluorescent particle emissions associated with human shedding while walking in a chamber. The mean emission rates of supermicron (1-10 μm) fluorescent particles were in the range 6.8-7.5 million particles per person-h (~0.3 mg per person-h) across three participants, for conditions when the relative humidity was 60%-70% and no moisturizer was applied after showering. The fluorescent particles displayed a lognormal distribution with the geometric mean diameter in the range 2.5-4 μm and exhibited asymmetry factors that increased with particle size. Use of moisturizer was associated with changes in number and mass emission rates, size distribution, and particle shape. Emission rates were lower when the relative humidity was reduced, but these differences were not statistically significant. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Assessing the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Climate change and human activities are driving forces of sandy desertification and the relative role of them in sandy desertification is the hot point in related researches. A study was carried to assess the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region in China. Potential NPP and the difference between potential and actual NPP were selected as indicators to assess the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification, respectively. Assessing methods were built based on some scenarios for the reversion and expansion of sandy desertification and the relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region were assessed from 1981 to 2000. The results showed that although some local places experienced an expansion of sandy desertification, the change of sandy desertification of Ordos region from 1981 to 2000 showed a stably reversing trend. The relative role of climate change and human activities in sandy desertification of Ordos region varied at different temporal and spatial scales in the reversion and expansion processes. In the reversion of sandy desertification, climate change was the dominant factor in the period of 1981 to 1990 and the reversed areas mainly induced by climate change including Mu Us sandy land and the transition zone between temperate steppe and temperate deciduous scrubs in north east of Ordos region; however, human activities controlled the reversed process during the period from 1991 to 2000 and the areas mainly induced by human activities distributed in all banners of Ordos region. In the expansion of sandy desertification, human activities were the dominant factor in the period of 1981 to 1990 and the expanded areas mainly included the regions around common boundary of Hanggin, Dalad Banners and Dongsheng City; however, climate change dominated the expansion of sandy desertification from 1991 to 2000, the expanded areas equably

  11. Event-related brain potentials reveal correlates of the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, L M; Farina, F R; Hussey, I; Roche, R A P

    2015-03-02

    This research aimed to explore the neural correlates of relational learning by recording high-density EEG during a behavioural task involving derivation levels of varying complexity. A total of 15 participants (5 male; age range 18-23 years; mean age=20.0 years) completed contextual cue training, relational learning, function training and a derivation task while 128-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the scalp (Background). Differences in response latencies were observed between the two derived (symmetry and equivalence) and directly trained relations, with longest latencies found for equivalence and shortest for the directly trained relations. This pattern failed to reach statistical significance. Importantly, ERPs revealed an early P3a positivity (from 230 to 350ms) over right posterior scalp sites. Significantly larger mean amplitudes were found at three channels (P6, E115 and E121) for the equivalence relations compared to the two other types (Results). We believe this may constitute a first demonstration of differences in brain electrophysiology in the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations of hierarchical levels of complexity (Conclusions). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose-related Effects of Salvinorin A in Humans: Dissociative, Hallucinogenic, and Memory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Katherine A.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Reissig, Chad J.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the plant Salvia divinorum, which has increased in popularity as a recreational drug over the past decade. Few human studies have examined salvinorin A. Objective This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the dose-related effects of inhaled salvinorin A in individuals with histories of hallucinogen use. Methods Eight healthy hallucinogen-using adults inhaled up to 16 doses of salvinorin A (0.375 - 21 μg/kg) in ascending order. Physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min after administration. Qualitative subjective effects were assessed retrospectively via questionnaires at the end of sessions. Persisting effects were assessed 1 month later. Results Orderly dose-related effects peaked at 2 min and then rapidly dissipated, replicating previous findings. Subjective effects were intense, with maximal drug strength ratings or unresponsiveness frequently observed at high doses. Questionnaires assessing qualitative effects (Hallucinogen Rating Scale, Pharmacological Class Questionnaire) suggested some overlap with serotonergically mediated classic hallucinogens. Salvinorin A also produced dose-related dissociative effects and impairments in recall/recognition memory. At 1-month follow-up, there was no evidence of persisting adverse effects. Participants reported salvinorin A effects were qualitatively different from other drugs. Conclusions Salvinorin A produces a unique profile of subjective and cognitive effects, including strong dissociative effects and memory impairment, which only partially overlap with classic hallucinogen effects. Along with nonhuman studies of salvinorin A, these results are important for understanding the neurobiology of the kappa opioid system and may ultimately have important therapeutic applications. PMID:23135605

  13. Claspin as a biomarker of human papillomavirus-related high grade lesions of uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benevolo Maria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Claspin is a nuclear protein involved in DNA replication and damage response and is a key mediator for the S-phase checkpoint. Claspin expression is significantly high in several human solid tumors. Furthermore, high levels of claspin have been found in cervical cancer cell lines. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding claspin expression in cervical tissues. Methods In order to investigate whether claspin immunoreactivity is related to the lesion severity and High-Risk (HR HPV infection, we analyzed claspin expression by immunohistochemistry in a series of cervical biopsies which represent the steps occurring during cervical carcinogenesis (normal tissues, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasias 1, 2 and 3, Squamous Cell Carcinomas. All patients also had a cervico-vaginal sample for HPV testing, collected immediately before the colposcopy-guided biopsy. The HR-HPV DNA detection was performed by the HR-HPV Hybrid Capture 2 test. HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Results Our results evidenced a constant and significant increase of the rate of claspin positivity from the normal tissues to carcinomas (pχ2trend 2  Conclusions Our findings indicate that in vivo claspin expression is significantly related to HR-HPV infection and lesion grade both in histological and cytological samples. Therefore, the analysis of claspin expression could be clinically relevant in the diagnosis of HPV-related cervical lesions, in particular when applied to cervico-vaginal cytology. Moreover, giving information on the proliferation rate of each lesion, claspin immunostaining may contribute to the evaluation of progression risk, thus being helpful in patient management. Nevertheless, only large prospective studies may clarify the true clinical usefulness of claspin expression in distinguishing lesions with different progression potential.

  14. Potential impact of climate change on air pollution-related human health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaris, Efthimios; Liao, Kuo-Jen; Delucia, Anthony J; Deck, Leland; Amar, Praveen; Russell, Armistead G

    2009-07-01

    The potential health impact of ambient ozone and PM2.5 concentrations modulated by climate change over the United States is investigated using combined atmospheric and health modeling. Regional air quality modeling for 2001 and 2050 was conducted using CMAQ Modeling System with meteorology from the GISS Global Climate Model, downscaled regionally using MM5,keeping boundary conditions of air pollutants, emission sources, population, activity levels, and pollution controls constant. BenMap was employed to estimate the air pollution health outcomes at the county, state, and national level for 2050 caused by the effect of meteorology on future ozone and PM2.5 concentrations. The changes in calculated annual mean PM2.5 concentrations show a relatively modest change with positive and negative responses (increasing PM2.5 levels across the northeastern U.S.) although average ozone levels slightly decrease across the northern sections of the U.S., and increase across the southern tier. Results suggest that climate change driven air quality-related health effects will be adversely affected in more then 2/3 of the continental U.S. Changes in health effects induced by PM2.5 dominate compared to those caused by ozone. PM2.5-induced premature mortality is about 15 times higher then that due to ozone. Nationally the analysis suggests approximately 4000 additional annual premature deaths due to climate change impacts on PM2.5 vs 300 due to climate change-induced ozone changes. However, the impacts vary spatially. Increased premature mortality due to elevated ozone concentrations will be offset by lower mortality from reductions in PM2.5 in 11 states. Uncertainties related to different emissions projections used to simulate future climate, and the uncertainties forecasting the meteorology, are large although there are potentially important unaddressed uncertainties (e.g., downscaling, speciation, interaction, exposure, and concentration-response function of the human health studies).

  15. Osteopontin but not parathyroid hormone-related protein predicts prognosis in human renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papworth, Karin; Bergh, Anders; Grankvist, Kjell; Ljungberg, Börje; Sandlund, Johanna; Rasmuson, Torgny

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteopontin (OPN) in serum and plasma and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in serum, plasma and tumour tissue, and to assess the prognostic impact of OPN and PTHrP in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The study included 269 patients with RCC. In 189 patients, immunohistochemical (IHC) PTHrP tumour tissue expression was evaluated, and OPN and PTHrP in serum were assessed. In 80 patients, plasma OPN and PTHrP were analysed. Tumour type, TNM stage, nuclear grade and RCC-specific survival were also registered. In a sub-group, IHC expression of CD 31 was assessed. The prognostic information of the factors was analysed using uni- and multivariate analyses. The median OPN level was 2.3 times higher in plasma than in serum. Serum OPN was significantly higher in patients with papillary RCC compared to clear cell RCC and chromophobe RCC. Both serum and plasma OPN levels were positively correlated to TNM stage and nuclear grade. Multivariate analysis showed that serum and plasma OPN levels were independent prognostic factors for RCC-specific survival, along with TNM stage. Immunohistochemical expression of PTHrP associated to TNM stage but not to nuclear grade or serum OPN. Furthermore, IHC expression of PTHrP was positively correlated to serum PTHrP but inversely to tumour CD31 expression. Plasma PTHrP was increased in 20% of the patients and related to TNM stage but not to nuclear grade. Plasma OPN was significantly higher in patients with increased PTHrP levels, compared to those with normal levels. Plasma OPN levels differed between RCC types, and in clear cell RCC, both serum and plasma OPN levels were independent predictors of survival. We found no evidence for prognostic value related to circulating levels or the IHC expression of PTHrP.

  16. Differences in Moral Judgment on Animal and Human Ethics Issues between University Students in Animal-Related, Human Medical and Arts Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrinder, Joy M; Ostini, Remo; Phillips, Clive J C

    2016-01-01

    Moral judgment in relation to animal ethics issues has rarely been investigated. Among the research that has been conducted, studies of veterinary students have shown greater use of reasoning based on universal principles for animal than human ethics issues. This study aimed to identify if this was unique to students of veterinary and other animal-related professions. The moral reasoning of first year students of veterinary medicine, veterinary technology, and production animal science was compared with that of students in non-animal related disciplines of human medicine and arts. All students (n = 531) completed a moral reasoning test, the VetDIT, with animal and human scenarios. When compared with reasoning on human ethics issues, the combined group of students evaluating animal ethics issues showed higher levels of Universal Principles reasoning, lower levels of Personal Interest reasoning and similar levels of Maintaining Norms reasoning. Arts students showed more personal interest reasoning than students in most animal-related programs on both animal and human ethics issues, and less norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues. Medical students showed more norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues than all of the animal-related groups. There were no differences in principled reasoning on animal ethics issues between program groups. This has implications for animal-related professions and education programs showing that students' preference for principled reasoning on animal ethics issues is not unique to animal-related disciplines, and highlighting the need to develop student (and professional) capacity to apply principled reasoning to address ethics issues in animal industries to reduce the risk of moral distress.

  17. Social status, glucocorticoids, immune function, and health: can animal studies help us understand human socioeconomic-status-related health disparities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavigelli, Sonia A; Chaudhry, Hashim S

    2012-08-01

    For humans in developed nations, socioeconomic status (SES)--relative income, education and occupational position in a society--is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality rates, with increasing SES predicting longer life span (e.g. Marmot et al., 1991). Mechanisms underlying this relationship have been examined, but the relative role of each mechanism still remains unknown. By understanding the relative role of specific mechanisms that underlie dramatic health disparities between high and low social status individuals we can begin to identify effective, targeted methods to alleviate health disparities. In the current paper, we take advantage of a growing number of animal studies that have quantified biological health-related correlates (glucocorticoid production and immune function) of social status and compare these studies to the current literature on human SES and health to determine if and how animal studies can further our understanding of SES-associated human health disparities. Specifically, we compared social-status related glucocorticoid production and immune function in humans and animals. From the review, we show that our present understanding of the relationships between social status and glucocorticoid production/immune function is still growing, but that there are already identifiable parallels (and non-parallels) between humans and animals. We propose timely areas of future study focused on (1) specific aspects of social status that may influence stress-related physiology, (2) mechanisms underlying long-term influences of social status on physiology and health, and (3) intervention studies to alleviate potentially negative physiological correlates of social status.

  18. Construction and analysis of SSH cDNA library of human vascular endothelial cells related to gastrocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Bo Liu; Zhao-Xia Wei; Li Li; Hang-Sheng Li; Hui Chen; Xiao-Wen Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct subtracted cDNA libraries of human vascular endothelial cells (VECs) related to gastrocarcinoma using suppression substractive hybridization (SSH) and to analyze cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and VECs in Cancer Gene Anatomy Project (CGAP) database.METHODS: Human VECs related to gastric adenocarcinoma and corresponding normal tissue were separated by magnetic beads coupled with antibody CD31 (Dynabeads CD31). A few amount of total RNA were synthesized and amplified by SMARTTM PCR cDNA Synthesis Kit. Then, using SSH and T/A cloning techniques, cDNA fragments of differentially expressed genes in human VECs of gastric adenocarcinoma were inserted into JM109 bacteria. One hundred positive bacteria clones were randomly picked and identified by colony PCR method. To analyze cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and VECs in CGAP database, the tools of Library Finder,cDNA xProfiler, Digital GENE Expression Displayer (DGED),and Digital Differential Display (DDD) were used.RESULTS: Forward and reverse subtraction cDNA libraries of human VECs related to gastrocarcinoma were constructed successfully with SSH and T/A cloning techniques. Analysis of CGAP database indicated that no appropriate library of VECs related to carcinoma was constructed.CONCLUSION: Construction of subtraction cDNA libraries of human VECs related to gastrocarcinoma was successful and necessary, which laid a foundation for screening and cloning new and specific genes of VECs related to gastrocardnoma.

  19. Trends in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Risk Behaviors among High School Students--United States, 1991-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Nancy; Kann, Laura; Lowry, Richard; Wechsler, Howell; Romero, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper examined changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related risk behaviors among high school students in the United States during 1991-2005. Data from 8 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys conducted during that period were analyzed. During 1991-2005, the percentage of US high school students engaging in HIV-related sexual risk…

  20. Differential expression of sphingolipids in P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance-related protein 1 expressing human neuroblastoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuis, AJ; Douwes, J; Kamps, W; Sietsma, H; Kok, JW

    2003-01-01

    The sphingolipid composition and multidrug resistance status of three human neuroblastoma cell lines were established. SK-N-FI cells displayed high expression and functional (efflux) activity of P-glycoprotein, while multidrug resistance-related protein 1 was relatively abundant and most active in S

  1. Differential expression of sphingolipids in P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance-related protein 1 expressing human neuroblastoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuis, AJ; Douwes, J; Kamps, W; Sietsma, H; Kok, JW

    2003-01-01

    The sphingolipid composition and multidrug resistance status of three human neuroblastoma cell lines were established. SK-N-FI cells displayed high expression and functional (efflux) activity of P-glycoprotein, while multidrug resistance-related protein 1 was relatively abundant and most active in

  2. Human Resource Management Strategies and Teacher’s Efficiency within Schools: A Co-relational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Hashmi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to study Human Resource Management and Development (HRMD strategies and their effect on teachers’ efficiency within the Catholic Board of Education (CBE schools of Pakistan whose teachers are graduates in educational leadership courses from a private teacher education institutes in Karachi. The study endeavored to build a simple theoretical and conceptual framework where the effectiveness of HRMD strategies in educational leadership were studied to explore their impact on enhancing teachers’ efficiency. Leadership education is a relatively a new field of study in the Pakistani education and the concept of Human Resource Management (HRM is regarded as novel and its effective usage is rarely seen. HRM strategies if effectively utilized may become a source of developing a transparent performance management system, a collaborative and cooperative environment in the schools and of promoting teachers’ efficiency in the areas of knowledge, values, skills and development as professionals as well as enhancing a school’s productivity and improving its overall performance. A survey methodology was adopted for the current research with purposive sampling to select 50 research participants and a questionnaire was used for data collection using an attitudinal scale. The results of the study revealed firstly that no relationship exists between the organization of the school and the newly acquired knowledge and skills of HRM. The school leaders are unaware of the various functions and strategies which are necessary to promote teachers’ efficiency. Secondly, the study showed that some of the educational leaders are striving to meet the educational requirements of the times and to face challenges while using the learnt strategies of HRM to promote teachers’ efficiency for the improvement of their particular schools.

  3. Isolating gait-related movement artifacts in electroencephalography during human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Julia E.; Huang, Helen J.; Snyder, Kristine L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. High-density electroencephelography (EEG) can provide an insight into human brain function during real-world activities with walking. Some recent studies have used EEG to characterize brain activity during walking, but the relative contributions of movement artifact and electrocortical activity have been difficult to quantify. We aimed to characterize movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes at a range of walking speeds and to test the efficacy of artifact removal methods. We also quantified the similarity between movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes and a head-mounted accelerometer. Approach. We used a novel experimental method to isolate and record movement artifact with EEG electrodes during walking. We blocked electrophysiological signals using a nonconductive layer (silicone swim cap) and simulated an electrically conductive scalp on top of the swim cap using a wig coated with conductive gel. We recorded motion artifact EEG data from nine young human subjects walking on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4 to 1.6 m s-1. We then tested artifact removal methods including moving average and wavelet-based techniques. Main results. Movement artifact recorded with EEG electrodes varied considerably, across speed, subject, and electrode location. The movement artifact measured with EEG electrodes did not correlate well with head acceleration. All of the tested artifact removal methods attenuated low-frequency noise but did not completely remove movement artifact. The spectral power fluctuations in the movement artifact data resembled data from some previously published studies of EEG during walking. Significance. Our results suggest that EEG data recorded during walking likely contains substantial movement artifact that: cannot be explained by head accelerations; varies across speed, subject, and channel; and cannot be removed using traditional signal processing methods. Future studies should focus on more sophisticated methods for removal of EEG

  4. Thermal Conductivity of Human Bone in Cryoprobe Freezing as Related to Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle E; Baldini, Todd; Lindeque, Bennie G

    2016-12-09

    Cryoprobes create localized cell destruction through freezing. Bone is resistant to temperature flow but is susceptible to freezing necrosis at warmer temperatures than tumor cells. Few studies have determined the thermal conductivity of human bone. No studies have examined conductivity as related to density. The study goal was to examine thermal conductivity in human bone while comparing differences between cancellous and cortical bone. An additional goal was to establish a relationship between bone density and thermal conductivity. Six knee joints from 5 cadavers were obtained. The epiphyseal region was sliced in half coronally prior to inserting an argon-circulating cryoprobe directed away from the joint line. Thermistor thermometers were placed perpendicularly at measured increments, and the freezing cycle was recorded until steady-state conditions were achieved. For 2 cortical samples, the probe was placed intramedullary in metaphyseal samples and measurements were performed radially from the central axis of each sample. Conductivity was calculated using Fournier's Law and then plotted against measured density of each sample. Across samples, density of cancellous bone ranged from 0.86 to 1.38 g/mL and average thermal conductivity ranged between 0.404 and 0.55 W/mK. Comparatively, cortical bone had a density of 1.70 to 1.86 g/mL and thermal conductivity of 0.0742 to 0.109 W/mK. A strong 2-degree polynomial correlation was seen (R(2)=0.8226, P<.001). Bone is highly resistant to temperature flow. This resistance varies and inversely correlates strongly with density. This information is clinically relevant to maximize tumor ablation while minimizing morbidity through unnecessary bone loss and damage to surrounding structures. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  5. Activated effects of parathyroid hormone-related protein on human hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen-Fen Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: After years of experiments and clinical studies, parathyroid hormone-related protein(PTHrP has been shown to be a bone formation promoter that elicits rapid effects with limited adverse reaction. Recently, PTHrP was reported to promote fibrosis in rat kidney in conjunction with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1, which is also a fibrosis promoter in liver. However, the effect of PTHrP in liver has not been determined. In this study, the promoting actions of PTHrP were first investigated in human normal hepatic stellate cells (HSC and LX-2 cell lines. METHODS: TGF-β1, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, and collagen I mRNA were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR after HSCs or LX-2 cells were treated with PTHrP(1-36 or TGF-β1. Protein levels were also assessed by western-blot analysis. Alpha-SMA were also detected by immunofluorescence, and TGF-β1 secretion was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA of HSC cell culture media. RESULTS: In cultured human HSCs, mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA, collagen I, MMP-2, and TGF-β1 were increased by PTHrP treatment. A similar increasing pattern was also observed in LX-2 cells. Moreover, PTHrP significantly increased TGF-β1 secretion in cultured media from HSCs. CONCLUSIONS: PTHrP activated HSCs and promoted the fibrosis process in LX-2 cells. These procedures were probably mediated via TGF-β1, highlighting the potential effects of PTHrP in the liver.

  6. Activated effects of parathyroid hormone-related protein on human hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fen-Fen; Liu, Cui-Ping; Li, Li-Xuan; Xue, Min-Min; Xie, Fang; Guo, Yu; Bai, Lan

    2013-01-01

    After years of experiments and clinical studies, parathyroid hormone-related protein(PTHrP) has been shown to be a bone formation promoter that elicits rapid effects with limited adverse reaction. Recently, PTHrP was reported to promote fibrosis in rat kidney in conjunction with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), which is also a fibrosis promoter in liver. However, the effect of PTHrP in liver has not been determined. In this study, the promoting actions of PTHrP were first investigated in human normal hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and LX-2 cell lines. TGF-β1, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), and collagen I mRNA were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after HSCs or LX-2 cells were treated with PTHrP(1-36) or TGF-β1. Protein levels were also assessed by western-blot analysis. Alpha-SMA were also detected by immunofluorescence, and TGF-β1 secretion was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of HSC cell culture media. In cultured human HSCs, mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA, collagen I, MMP-2, and TGF-β1 were increased by PTHrP treatment. A similar increasing pattern was also observed in LX-2 cells. Moreover, PTHrP significantly increased TGF-β1 secretion in cultured media from HSCs. PTHrP activated HSCs and promoted the fibrosis process in LX-2 cells. These procedures were probably mediated via TGF-β1, highlighting the potential effects of PTHrP in the liver.

  7. Antagonism of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) by chromones and related isoflavones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Cheng, Ni; Ye, Richard D; Quinn, Mark T

    2014-12-15

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. Because FPRs play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions implicated in disease pathogenesis, FPR antagonists may represent novel therapeutics for modulating innate immunity. Previously, 4H-chromones were reported to be potent and competitive FPR1 antagonists. In the present studies, 96 additional chromone analogs, including related synthetic and natural isoflavones were evaluated for FPR1 antagonist activity. We identified a number of novel competitive FPR1 antagonists that inhibited fMLF-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR1-HL60 cells and effectively competed with WKYMVm-FITC for binding to FPR1 in FPR1-HL60 and FPR1-RBL cells. Compound 10 (6-hexyl-2-methyl-3-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromen-7-yl acetate) was found to be the most potent FPR1-specific antagonist, with binding affinity Ki∼100 nM. These chromones inhibited Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis in human neutrophils with nanomolar-micromolar IC50 values. In addition, the most potent novel FPR1 antagonists inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) in FPR1-RBL cells. These antagonists were specific for FPR1 and did not inhibit WKYMVM/WKYMVm-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR2-HL60 cells, FPR3-HL60 cells, RBL cells transfected with murine Fpr1, or interleukin 8-induced Ca2+ flux in human neutrophils and RBL cells transfected with CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1). Moreover, pharmacophore modeling showed that the active chromones had a significantly higher degree of similarity with the pharmacophore template as compared to inactive analogs. Thus, the chromone/isoflavone scaffold represents a relevant backbone for development of novel FPR1 antagonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High-level expression of nonglycosylated human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Deprez-Beauclair, Paule; Berton, Amelie; Crenon, Isabelle

    2006-10-01

    The human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (HPLRP2) was produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The HPLRP2 cDNA corresponding to the protein coding sequence including the native signal sequence, was cloned into the pPIC9K vector and integrated into the genome of P. pastoris. P. pastoris transformants secreting high-level rHPLRP2 were obtained and the expression level into the liquid culture medium reached about 40mg/L after 4 days of culture. rHPLRP2 was purified by a single anion-exchange step after an overnight dialysis. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the purified rHPLRP2 mature protein possessed a correct N-terminal amino acid sequence indicating that its signal peptide was properly processed. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that the recombinant HPLRP2 molecular weight was 52,532Da which was 2451Da greater than the mass calculated from the sequence of the protein (50,081Da) and 1536Da greater than the mass of the native human protein (50,996Da). In vitro deglycosylation experiments by peptide:N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) indicated that rHPLRP2 secreted from P. pastoris was N-glycosylated. Specific conditions were setup in order to obtain a recombinant protein free of glycan chain. We observed that blocking glycosylation in vivo by addition of tunicamycin in the culture medium during the production resulted in a correct processing of the rHPLRP2 mature protein. The lipase activity of glycosylated or nonglycosylated rHPLRP2, which was about 800U/mg on tributyrin, was inhibited by the presence of bile salts and not restored by adding colipase. In conclusion, the experimental procedure which we have developed will allow us to get a high-level production in P. pastoris of glycosylated and nonglycosylated rHPLRP2, suitable for subsequent biophysical and structural studies.

  9. QKI-7 regulates expression of interferon-related genes in human astrocyte glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human QKI gene, called quaking homolog, KH domain RNA binding (mouse, is a candidate gene for schizophrenia encoding an RNA-binding protein. This gene was shown to be essential for myelination in oligodendrocytes. QKI is also highly expressed in astrocytes, but its function in these cells is not known. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the effect of small interference RNA (siRNA-mediated QKI depletion on global gene expression in human astrocyte glioma cells. Microarray measurements were confirmed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. The presence of QKI binding sites (QRE was assessed by a bioinformatic approach. Viability and cell morphology were also studied. The most significant alteration after QKI silencing was the decreased expression of genes involved in interferon (IFN induction (P = 6.3E-10, including IFIT1, IFIT2, MX1, MX2, G1P2, G1P3, GBP1 and IFIH1. All eight genes were down-regulated after silencing of the splice variant QKI-7, but were not affected by QKI-5 silencing. Interestingly, four of them were up-regulated after treatment with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol that also resulted in increased QKI-7 mRNA levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The coordinated expression of QKI-7 splice variant and IFN-related genes supports the idea that this particular splice variant has specific functions in astrocytes. Furthermore, a role of QKI-7 as a regulator of an inflammatory gene pathway in astrocytes is suggested. This hypothesis is well in line with growing experimental evidence on the role of inflammatory components in schizophrenia.

  10. Osteogenic-related gene expression profiles of human dental follicle cells induced by dexamethasone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo-lin JIN; Yong-kuan ZHANG; Hai-yan SUN; Zhu LIN; Ying-chun BI; Yin-zhong DUAN; Yin DING

    2008-01-01

    Aim:Human dental follicle cells (hDFC) have the ability to differentiate into mineralized tissue-forming cells during root and periodontal development or os-teogenic induction in vitro. The present study aimed to validate the osteogenic induction of hDFC by dexamethasone (DEX) and to explore the changes of related genes responsible for the osteogenic differentiation process. Methods: Passage-cultured hDFC were induced by DEX and analyzed for mineralization activity by morphological observation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and alizarin red S staining. GEArray Q series human osteogenesis gene array was used to describe large-scale gene expression in treated hDFC compared to the control group. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed to confirm the microarray data by analyzing the expression of 7 critical transcripts. Results: Osteogenic differentiation of hDFC was confirmed by morphological change, elevated ALP activity and calcified nodules. In 96 genes investigated through the microarray analysis, 20 genes were upregulated and 8 genes were downregn-lated more than 2-fold. The results of the real-time RT-PCR correlated with the microarray analysis. The expression of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily showed varying degrees of increase, and fibroblast growth factors exhibited a differential changing trend of expression. The expression of most types of collagen genes representative of extracellular matrixes increased under DEX treatment while small mothers against decapentaplegic 6 and 7 expressions significantly decreased. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that hDFC dis-played osteoblastic features in both phenotypic and genotypic traits induced by DEX in vitro.

  11. Identification of Chlamydia pneumoniae within human choroidal neovascular membranes secondary to age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayoglu, Murat V; Bula, Deisy; Arroyo, Jorge; Gragoudas, Evangelos S; D'Amico, Donald; Miller, Joan W

    2005-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the United States, and increasing evidence suggests that it is an inflammatory disease. The prokaryotic obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae is emerging as a novel risk factor in cardiovascular disease, and recent sero-epidemiological data suggest that C. pneumoniae infection is also associated with AMD. In this study, we examined choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) tissue from patients with neovascular AMD for the presence of C. pneumoniae and determined whether the pathogen can dysregulate the function of key cell types in ways that can cause neovascular AMD. Nine CNV removed from patients with neovascular AMD were examined for the presence of C. pneumoniae by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR); in addition, we performed PCR on nine non-AMD eyes, and IHC on five non-AMD CNV, seven non-AMD eyes, and one internal limiting membrane specimen. Finally, human monocyte-derived macrophages and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were exposed to C. pneumoniae and assayed in vitro for the production of pro-angiogenic immunomodulators (VEGF, IL-8, and MCP-1). C. pneumoniae was detected in four of nine AMD CNV by IHC and two of nine AMD CNV by PCR, induced VEGF production by human macrophages, and increased production of IL-8 and MCP-1 by RPE cells. In contrast, none of the 22 non-AMD specimens showed evidence for C. pneumoniae. These data indicate that a pathogen capable of inducing chronic inflammation and pro-angiogenic cytokines can be detected in some AMD CNV, and suggest that infection may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  12. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Andrea B. [University of North Texas Health Sciences Center (United States); Dyke, Jason V. [University of Texas at Arlington (United States); Ohira, Shin-Ichi [Kumamoto University (Japan); Dasgupta, Purnendu K., E-mail: Dasgupta@uta.edu [University of Texas at Arlington (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24 h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards. - Highlights: ► Residence in an area with perchlorate-contaminated water may be a poor predictor of exposure. ► Exposures to perchlorate from food are likely underestimated. ► The relative contributions for human perchlorate exposures should be weighted more heavily towards non-water sources.

  13. Posthumanism and somatechnologies: exploring the intimate relations between humans and technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalibert, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Recently, with the advent of technoscience, and especially the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information and communication technology and the cognitive sciences (NBIC), has come the prospect of human enhancement. Even though the latter – the technological enhancement of human beings

  14. Posthumanism and somatechnologies: exploring the intimate relations between humans and technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalibert, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    Recently, with the advent of technoscience, and especially the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information and communication technology and the cognitive sciences (NBIC), has come the prospect of human enhancement. Even though the latter – the technological enhancement of human beings

  15. Alkali metals levels in the human brain tissue: Anatomical region differences and age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Patrícia; Santos, Agostinho; Pinto, Edgar; Pinto, Nair Rosas; Mendes, Ricardo; Magalhães, Teresa; Almeida, Agostinho

    2016-12-01

    The link between trace elements imbalances (both "toxic" and "essential") in the human brain and neurodegenerative disease has been subject of extensive research. More recently, some studies have highlighted the potential role of the homeostasis deregulation of alkali metals in specific brain regions as key factor in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Using flame atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples, alkali metals (Na, K, Li, Rb and Cs) were determined in 14 different areas of the human brain (frontal cortex, superior and middle temporal gyri, caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, cingulated gyrus, hippocampus, inferior parietal lobule, visual cortex of the occipital lobe, midbrain, pons, medulla and cerebellum) of adult individuals (n=42; 71±12, range: 50-101 years old) with no known history and evidence of neurodegenerative, neurological or psychiatric disorder. Potassium was found as the most abundant alkali metal, followed by Na, Rb, Cs and Li. Lithium, K and Cs distribution showed to be quite heterogeneous. On the contrary, Rb and Na appeared quite homogeneously distributed within the human brain tissue. The lowest levels of Na, K, Rb and Li were found in the brainstem (midbrain, medulla and pons) and cerebellum, while the lowest levels of Cs were found in the frontal cortex. The highest levels of K (mean±sd; range 15.5±2.5; 8.9-21.8mg/g) Rb (17.2±6.1; 3.9-32.4μg/g and Cs (83.4±48.6; 17.3-220.5ng/g) were found in putamen. The highest levels of Na and Li were found in the frontal cortex (11.6±2.4; 6.6-17.1mg/g) and caudate nucleus (7.6±4.6 2.2-21.3ng/g), respectively. Although K, Cs and Li levels appear to remain largely unchanged with age, some age-related changes were observed for Na and Rb levels in particular brain regions (namely in the hippocampus). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All

  16. A bad trip for health-related human rights: implications of Momcilovic v The Queen (2011) 85 ALJR 957.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Tim; Faunce, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Momcilovic v The Queen (2011) 85 ALJR 957; [2011] HCA 34 arose from a prosecution for drug trafficking brought under the Drugs, Poisons and Controlled Substances Act 1981 (Vic). The Australian High Court held that the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act 2006 (Vic) (the Charter) validly conferred a power on the Victorian Supreme Court and Court of Appeal to interpret legislation in a manner consistent with a defined list of human rights. By a slim majority it also held that the Charter validly created a judicial power to "declare" a law inconsistent with one or more enumerated human rights. In reaching its decision, however, the majority supported a narrow interpretation likely to undermine the intended capacity of the Charter to act as a remedial mechanism to reform laws, regulations and administrative practices which infringe human rights and freedoms. Although Momcilovic involved interpretation of a specific State human rights law, the High Court judgments allude to significant problems should the Federal Government seek to introduce a similar charter-based human rights system. Momcilovic, therefore, represents a risk to future efforts to develop nationally consistent Australian human rights jurisprudence. This has particular relevance to health and medically related areas such as the freedom from torture and degrading and inhuman treatment and, in future, enforceable constitutional health-related human rights such as that to emergency health care.

  17. Human relations with soil are changing rapidly: SSSA's new Work Group on Soil Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humanity has rapidly become Earth’s chief agent of soil change, and geologists have named the epoch in which we live the Anthropocene, due to the global scale of human impact on the environment, including soil. In response to the increasing influence of humans on soil processes, the disciplines of ...

  18. Immunohistochemical characterization of hepatic stem cell-related cells in developing human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; HU Yong; WANG Jian; ZHOU Ji; ZHANG Taiping; YU Hongyu

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the expression characteristics of the various kinds of possible markers in hepatic stem cells(HSCs)and other HSC-related cells in human fetal liver in various developmental stages.It is significant to investigate the immunohistochemical expression for better understanding of the origin,difierentiation and migration of HSCs in the developing human liver.H-E staining and immunohistochemical methods were used to observe the expression of hepatic/cholangiocellular differentiation markers(AFF,GST-π,CK7,CK19)and hematopoietic stem cell markers(CD34 and c-kit)in several kinds of HSC-related cells in thirty cases of fetal liver samples (4-35 weeks after pregnancy).AFP expression appears in fetal hepatocytes at four weeks'gestation.It Deaks at 16-24 weeks'gestation and decreases gradually afterwards.Finally,weak signals were only found in some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells.GST-π was detected in hepatic cord cells from the sixth week and in the ductal plate cells from the eighth week.Twenty-six weeks later,only some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells show positive signals.CK19 expression peaks during the 6th-11th weeks in hepatic cord cells and decreases gradually afterwards,except for the ductal plates.CK7 expression was limited in the ductal plate cells and bile ducts cells from the 14th week.CD34 and c-kit were detected at the eighth week in some ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic cords/mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.After 21 weeks.CD34 and c-kit were found only in ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.Fetal hepatocytes at 4-16 weeks'gestation are mainly constituted by HSCs characterized with bi-potential differentiation capacity.At 16 weeks'gestation,most hepatic cord cells begin to differentiate into hepatocytes and abundant HSCs remain in ductal plate(the origin site of Hering canals).It is also indicated mat the

  19. Industry and traffic related particles and their role in human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravisjaervi, K.

    2013-11-01

    Combustion generated ultrafine particles have been found to be responsible for adverse effects on human health. New emission reduction technologies and fuels will change the composition of particle emissions. It is important to confirm that the new reduction technologies are designed to minimise the adverse health effects. In this doctoral thesis the potential health effects caused by traffic and industrially generated particles were studied using epidemiological, experimental and in silico studies. The effects of short-term changes in PM2.5 on the respiratory health of symptomatic children living near a steel works were studied to investigate whether specific sources of PM2.5 have the possible health effects. The PM2.5 emission sources were identified: long-range transport, a steel works, soil and street dust and a mechanical engineering works. Significant associations were not found between respiratory symptoms and PM2.5 or the sources markers. The deposition of traffic-related particles into the human respiratory system was computed using the lung deposition model. Particle size distribution was measured from diesel- and compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled busses and an off-road diesel engine under different combustion situations. The majority of the measured traffic-related particle numbers reach the alveolar region of the lungs. There were differences in the deposition of particles when different catalysts, engines or fuels were used. CNG or a diesel particulate filter (DPF) significantly reduced lung exposure to particles. Also physical activity, age and gender affected the deposition of particles. The diesel particles comprised compounds (carcinogenic PAHs, transition metals), which may have the ability to generate reactive oxygen. This study provides new knowledge how of the emission abatement technologies and fuels affects particle number and their composition, as well health hazards. Cleaner technology (CNG, DPF), emits significantly fewer particles in

  20. Differences in Moral Judgment on Animal and Human Ethics Issues between University Students in Animal-Related, Human Medical and Arts Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Verrinder, Joy M.; Remo Ostini; Phillips, Clive J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Moral judgment in relation to animal ethics issues has rarely been investigated. Among the research that has been conducted, studies of veterinary students have shown greater use of reasoning based on universal principles for animal than human ethics issues. This study aimed to identify if this was unique to students of veterinary and other animal-related professions. The moral reasoning of first year students of veterinary medicine, veterinary technology, and production animal science was co...

  1. Plasma clearance of human low-density lipoprotein in human apolipoprotein B transgenic mice is related to particle diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneis, Kaspar; Shames, David M; Blanche, Patricia J; La Belle, Michael; Rizzo, Manfredi; Krauss, Ronald M

    2004-04-01

    To test for intrinsic differences in metabolic properties of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as a function of particle size, we examined the kinetic behavior of 6 human LDL fractions ranging in size from 251 to 265 A injected intravenously into human apolipoprotein (apo) B transgenic mice. A multicompartmental model was formulated and fitted to the data by standard nonlinear regression using the Simulation, Analysis and Modeling (SAAM II) program. Smaller sized LDL particles (251 to 257 A) demonstrated a significantly slower fractional catabolic rate (FCR) (0.050 +/- 0.045 h(-1)) compared with particles of larger size (262 to 265 A) (0.134 +/- -0.015 h(-1), P particles are cleared more slowly from plasma than larger LDL and are exchanged more slowly with the extravascular space. This might be due to compositional or structural features of smaller LDL that lead to retarded clearance.

  2. Age-related changes in the joint position sense of the human hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisch T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobias Kalisch,1,2,* Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth,2,* Rebecca Kowalewski,2 Martin Tegenthoff,1 Hubert R Dinse21Department of Neurology, BG-Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany; 2Neural Plasticity Lab, Institute for Neuroinformatics, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Age-related changes in lower limb joint position sense and their contributions to postural stability are well documented. In contrast, only a few studies have investigated the effect of age on proprioceptive hand function. Here, we introduce a novel test for measuring joint position sense in the fingers of the human hand. In a concurrent matching task, subjects had to detect volume differences between polystyrene balls grasped with their dominant (seven test stimuli: 126–505 cm3 and their nondominant hand (three reference stimuli: 210, 294, and 505 cm3. A total of 21 comparisons were performed to assess the number of errors, the weight of errors (ie, the volume difference between test and reference stimuli, and the direction of errors (ie, over- or underestimation of test stimulus. The test was applied to 45 healthy subjects aged 21 to 79 years. Our results revealed that all variables changed significantly with age, with the number of errors showing the strongest increase. We also assessed tactile acuity (two-point discrimination thresholds and sensorimotor performance (pegboard performance in a subset of subjects, but these scores did not correlate with joint position sense performance, indicating that the test reveals specific information about joint position sense that is not captured with pure sensory or motor tests. The average test–retest reliability assessed on 3 consecutive days was 0.8 (Cronbach's alpha. Our results demonstrate that this novel test reveals age-related decline in joint position sense acuity that is independent from sensorimotor performance.Keywords: aging, hand

  3. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Daghighi, Mojtaba; Özcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W M; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-10-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and pancreas with T2D for targeting to develop new drugs for DNs therapy. AT-T2D displayed 15 (e.g. SYT4 up-regulated and VGF down-regulated) and pancreas-T2D showed 10 (e.g. BAG3 up-regulated, VAV3 and APOA1 down-regulated) highly differentially expressed genes with neuronal functions as compared to control tissues. ELISA was blindly performed to measure proteins of 5 most differentially expressed genes in 41 human subjects. SYT4 protein was upregulated, VAV3 and APOA1 were down-regulated, and BAG3 remained unchanged in 1- Obese and 2- Obese-T2D without insulin, VGF protein was higher in these two groups as well as in group 3- Obese-T2D receiving insulin than 4-lean subjects. Interaction networks analysis of these 5 genes showed several metabolic pathways (e.g. lipid metabolism and insulin signaling). Pancreas is a novel site for APOA1 synthesis. VGF is synthesized in AT and could be considered as good diagnostic, and even prognostic, marker for age-induced diseases obesity and T2D. This study provides new targets for rational drugs development for the therapy of age-related DNs.

  4. Estimate of oxygen consumption and intracellular zinc concentration of human spermatozoa in relation to motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolf-BernhardSchill; KerstinDefosse; Hans-HilhelmKoyro; NorbertWeissmann

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the human sperm oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content in relation to motility.Methods:In washed spermatozoa from 67 ejaculates,the oxygen consumption was determined.Following calculation of the total oxygen consumed by the Ideal Gas Law,the energy consumption of spermatozoa was calculated.In addition,the zinc content of the sperm was determined using an atomic absorption spectrometer.The resulting data were correlated to the vitality and motility.Results:The oxygen consumption averaged 0.24μmol/106 sperm×24h,0.28μmol/106 live sperm×24h and 0.85μmol/106 live & motile sperm×24h.Further calculations revealed that sperm motility was the most energy consuming process(164.31mJ/106 motile spermatozoa×24h),while the oxygen consumption of the total spermatozoa was 46.06mJ/106 spermatozoa ×24h.The correlation of the oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content with motility showed significant negative correlations(r=-0.759;P<0.0001 and r=-0.441;P<0.0001,respectively).However,when correlating sperm energy consumption with the zinc content,a significant positive relation(r=0.323;P=0.01)was observed.Conclusion:Poorly motile sperm are actually wasting the available energy.Moreover,our data clearly support the “Geometric Clutch Model”of the oneme function and demonstrate the importance of the outer dense fibers for the generation of sperm motility,especially progressive motility.

  5. A novel method for measuring the ATP-related compounds in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel Hugo; Galicia, Othir; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario Alberto; Martinez-Morales, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-related compounds in whole blood or red blood cells have been used to evaluate the energy status of erythrocytes and the degradation level of the phosphorylated compounds under various conditions, such as chronic renal failure, drug monitoring, cancer, exposure to environmental toxics, and organ preservation. The complete interpretation of the energetic homeostasis of erythrocytes is only performed using the compounds involved in the degradation pathway for adenine nucleotides alongside the uric acid value. For the first time, we report a liquid chromatographic method using a diode array detector that measures all of these compounds in a small human whole blood sample (125 μL) within an acceptable time of 20 min. The stability was evaluated for all of the compounds and ranged from 96.3 to 105.1% versus the day zero values. The measurement had an adequate sensitivity for the ATP-related compounds (detection limits from 0.001 to 0.097 μmol/L and quantification limits from 0.004 to 0.294 μmol/L). This method is particularly useful for measuring inosine monophosphate, inosine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid. Moreover, this assay had acceptable linearity (r > 0.990), precision (coefficients of variation ranged from 0.1 to 2.0%), specificity (similar retention times and spectra in all samples) and recoveries (ranged from 89.2 to 104.9%). The newly developed method is invaluable for assessing the energetic homeostasis of red blood cells under diverse conditions, such as in vitro experiments and clinical settings.

  6. EFFECT OF TITANIUM-ALLOY PARTICLES ON EXPRESSION OF MEDIATING-RELATED GENES IN HUMAN OSTEOBLASTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旭; 杨庆铭; 邓廉夫; 许福平; 张玥

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study mRNA expression of the mediating-related genes in osteoblasts after exposure to Titanium-alloy particles and cytochalasin-D. Methods Human osteoblasts were isolated from trabecular fragments and exposed to 0. 01% (v/v) titanium-alloy particles for 8h. Pretreatment of osteoblasts with cytochalasinD( 5μmol/L ) to prevent phagocytosis prior to the addition of Titanium-alloy particles, mRNA expression of RANKL,OPG, and IL-6 was semi-quantified by RT-PCR. Results Expressions of RANKL, OPG, and lL-6 mRNA at respective levels were found in osteoblasts under normal condition, which did not show significant changes in the samples treated with cytochalasin-D but without particles. Exposure of osteoblasts to particles after being treated with or without cytochalasin-D altered mRNA expression of these genes, however, an increase in the ratio of RANKL/ OPG mRNA was only found in samples without cytochalassin-D treatment. Conclusion Changes of expression of RANKL, OPG, and IL-6 mRNA in osteoblasts after exposure to titanium-alloy particles were independent of phagocytosis, whereas phagocytosis has a direct effect on their ability to stimulate osteoclast differentiation and function.

  7. Structural basis of human transcription factor Sry-related box 17 binding to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nana; Jiang, Wei; Gao, Hai; Cheng, Zhong; Qian, Huolian; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Yong

    2013-04-01

    Sry-related box (Sox) transcription factors share a conserved high-mobility-group box domain (HMG-domain) that binds DNA in the minor groove and bends DNA for further assembly of transcriptional machineries. During organogenesis, each member of the Sox family triggers a specific cell lineage differentiation, indicating that their interactions with DNA are different from each other. Therefore, investigating structural rearrangement of each Sox transcription factor HMG-domain upon binding to DNA would help to elucidate the distinctive molecular mechanism by which they interact with DNA. Previous studies have determined the crystal structures of Sox2 HMG-domain/DNA, Sox4 HMGdomain/ DNA, Sox9 HMG-domain/DNA and Sox17 HMG-domain/DNA complexes. However, major gaps remain in the structural information on the Sox transcription factor HMG-domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human Sox17 HMG-domain alone at 2.4 A resolution. Comparing this structure and the structure of the mouse Sox17 HMGdomain/ DNA complex provides structural understanding of the mechanism of Sox17 binding to DNA. Specifically, after electrostatic interactions attract Sox17 to DNA, Asn73, Ser99, and Trp106 form hydrogen bonds with DNA, Arg70, Lys80, Arg83, His94, and Asn95 on Sox17 undergo conformational changes and form hydrogen bonds with DNA, contributing to the electrostatic interaction between Sox17 and DNA.

  8. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  9. Assessment of ganglioside age-related and topographic specificity in human brain by Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbu, Mirela; Dehelean, Liana; Munteanu, Cristian V A; Vukelić, Željka; Zamfir, Alina D

    2017-03-15

    The gangliosides (GGs) of the central nervous system (CNS) exhibit age and topographic specificity and these patterns may correlate with the functions and pathologies of the brain regions. Here, chloroform extraction, nanoelectrospray (nanoESI) negative ionization, together with Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) determined the topographic and age-related GG specificity in normal adult human brain. Mapping of GG mixtures extracted from 20 to 82 year old frontal and occipital lobes revealed besides a decrease in the GG number with age, a variability of sialylation degree within the brain regions. From the 111 species identified, 105 were distinguished in the FL20, 74 in OL20, 46 in FL82 and 56 in OL82. The results emphasize that within the juvenile brain, GG species exhibit a higher expression in the FL than in OL, while in the aged brain the number of GG species is higher in the OL. By applying MS/MS analysis, the generated fragment ions confirmed the incidence of GT1c (d18:1/18:0) and GT1c (d18:1/20:0) in the investigated samples. The present findings are of major value for further clinical studies carried out using Orbitrap MS in order to correlate gangliosides with CNS disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging Alzheimer's disease-related protein aggregates in human cells using a selenium label

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, E. K.; Motskin, M.; Knowles, T. P. J.; Dobson, C. M.; McComb, D. W.; Porter, A. E.

    2010-07-01

    The aberrant folding and subsequent aggregation of proteins and peptides is associated with a range of pathological conditions from the systemic amyloidoses to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. While this link is well established there is a lack of understanding of the exact role protein aggregates play in disease pathogenesis. Part of the reason for this is that it has proved extremely challenging to characterise the localisation and structure of amyloid fibrils within the cellular environment due to a lack of contrast between the carbon rich protein aggregates and the carbon rich cell. We report a novel method for visualising Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibrils inside human cells without the use of invasive or unreliable stains or tags. The naturally occurring sulfur atom in the amyloid-β peptide is replaced with a selenium atom, a heavier element in the same group of the periodic table of elements. Using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) in a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) the selenium-labelled aggregates can be identified within the cellular environment.

  11. Cystoisosporiasis-related human acalculous cholecystitis: the need for increased awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Agholi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystitis is one of the common surgical indications affecting human beings in many countries. A variety of infectious agents can be associated with acute or chronic acalculous cholecystitis, especially in HIV/AIDS patients. In this investigation, the authors aim to describe two cases of histologically and molecularly documented cystoisosporiasis (syn. isosporiasis as the cause of chronic acalculous cholecystitis in two immunodeficient patients. During microscopic examinations of more than 2500 diarrheic patients’ samples, 11 cases of cystoisosporiasis-related recurrent persistent/chronic diarrhea were detected. A review of the medical records of Cystoisospora belli (syn. Isospora belli-positive patients showed that two of them, i.e. a patient with prolonged corticosteroid therapy and an AIDS patient, several months prior to fecal examinations had undergone cholecystectomy due to acalculous cholecystitis. The study was continued by a review of the histopathological investigation of the recuts prepared from the excised gallbladder tissue sections and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in order to detect a possible specific clinical correlation with cystoisosporiasis. Light microscopic examination revealed the presence of various developmental stages of a coccidial parasite, namely Cystoisospora belli , in both patients’ gallbladder tissue sections. To the best of our knowledge, C. bellii -associated cholecystitis has not been previously reported in a patient with prolonged corticosteroid therapy.

  12. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  13. Is the human dystrophin gene's intron structure related to its intron instability?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛文利; 陈江瑛; 朱良付; 刘焯霖

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the human dystrophin gene molecular deletion mechanism, we analyzed breakpoint regions within junction fragments of deletion-type patients and investigated whether the dystrophin gene's intron structure might be related to intron instability.Methods Junction fragments corresponding to exon 46 and 51 deletions were cloned. The breakpoint regions were sequenced, and the features of introns with available Genebank sequences were analyzed.Results An analysis of junction fragment sequences corresponding to exon 46 and 51 deletions showed that all 5' and 3' breakpoints are located within repeat sequences. No small insertions, small deletions, or point mutations are located near the breakpoint junctions. By analyzing the secondary structure of the junction fragments, we demonstrated that all junction fragment breakpoints are located in non-matching regions of single-stranded hairpin loops. A high concentration of repetitive elements is found to be a key feature of many dystrophin introns. In total, 34.8% of the overall dystrophin intron sequences is composed of repeat sequences.Conclusion Repeat elements in many dystrophin gene introns are the key to their structural bases and reflect intron instability. As a result of the primary DNA sequences, single-stranded hairpin loops form, increasing the instability of the gene, and forming the base for breaks in the DNA. The formation of the single-stranded hairpins can result in reattachment of two different breakpoints, producing a deletion.

  14. Common raven occurrence in relation to energy transmission line corridors transiting human-altered sagebrush steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Howe, Kristy B.; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-related infrastructure and other human enterprises within sagebrush steppe of the American West often results in changes that promote common raven (Corvus corax; hereafter, raven) populations. Ravens, a generalist predator capable of behavioral innovation, present a threat to many species of conservation concern. We evaluate the effects of detailed features of an altered landscape on the probability of raven occurrence using extensive raven survey (n= 1045) and mapping data from southern Idaho, USA. We found nonlinear relationships between raven occurrence and distances to transmission lines, roads, and facilities. Most importantly, raven occurrence was greater with presence of transmission lines up to 2.2 km from the corridor.We further explain variation in raven occurrence along anthropogenic features based on the amount of non-native vegetation and cover type edge, such that ravens select fragmented sagebrush stands with patchy, exotic vegetative introgression. Raven occurrence also increased with greater length of edge formed by the contact of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate spp.) with non-native vegetation cover types. In consideration of increasing alteration of sagebrush steppe, these findings will be useful for planning energy transmission corridor placement and other management activities where conservation of sagebrush obligate species is a priority.

  15. Structure-activity relations in binding of perfluoroalkyl compounds to human thyroid hormone T3 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yin-Feng; Guo, Liang-Hong; Qin, Zhan-Fen; Lv, Qi-Yan; Zhang, Lian-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt thyroid functions through thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated pathways, but direct binding of PFCs with TR has not been demonstrated. We investigated the binding interactions of 16 structurally diverse PFCs with human TR, their activities on TR in cells, and the activity of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in vivo. In fluorescence competitive binding assays, most of the 16 PFCs were found to bind to TR with relative binding potency in the range of 0.0003-0.05 compared with triiodothyronine (T3). A structure-binding relationship for PFCs was observed, where fluorinated alkyl chain length longer than ten, and an acid end group were optimal for TR binding. In thyroid hormone (TH)-responsive cell proliferation assays, PFOS, perfluorohexadecanoic acid, and perfluorooctadecanoic acid exhibited agonistic activity by promoting cell growth. Furthermore, similar to T3, PFOS exposure promoted expression of three TH upregulated genes and inhibited three TH downregulated genes in amphibians. Molecular docking analysis revealed that most of the tested PFCs efficiently fit into the T3-binding pocket in TR and formed a hydrogen bond with arginine 228 in a manner similar to T3. The combined in vitro, in vivo, and computational data strongly suggest that some PFCs disrupt the normal activity of TR pathways by directly binding to TR.

  16. Constitutive expression of human pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloulou, Ahmed; Grandval, Philippe; De Caro, Josiane; De Caro, Alain; Carrière, Frédéric

    2006-06-01

    High-level constitutive expression of the human pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 (HPLRP1) was achieved using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The HPLRP1 cDNA, including its original leader sequence, was subcloned into the pGAPZB vector and further integrated into the genome of P. pastoris X-33 under the control of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) constitutive promoter. A major protein with a molecular mass of 50 kDa was found to be secreted into the culture medium and was identified using anti-HPLRP1 polyclonal antibodies as HPLRP1 recombinant protein. The level of expression reached 100-120 mg of HPLRP1 per liter of culture medium after 40 h, as attested by specific and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A single cation-exchange chromatography sufficed to obtain a highly purified recombinant HPLRP1 after direct batch adsorption onto S-Sepharose of the HPLRP1 present in the culture medium, at pH 5.5. N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis were carried out to monitor the production of the mature protein and to confirm that its signal peptide was properly processed.

  17. 12th international conference on human retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lairmore Michael D

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 12th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, was held at the Half Moon Hotel in Montego Bay, Jamaica, from June 22nd to June 25th 2005. The scientific conference, sponsored by the International Retrovirology Association, is held biennially at rotating international venues around the world. The meeting brings together basic scientists, epidemiologists and clinical researchers to discuss findings to prevent HTLV infection or develop new therapies against HTLV-mediated diseases. The Association fosters the education and training of young scientists to bring new approaches to the complex problems of HTLV research, such as translational research to bring findings from the laboratory into clinical trials that benefit HTLV-infected patients. The breadth and quality of research presentations and workshops at the 12th International Conference indicate that these goals are being accomplished. As HTLV research enters its third decade a new generation of scientists face many challenges. However, HTLV scientists and clinicians displayed exciting new approaches and discoveries during plenary talks and poster sessions. The conference encouraged research in HTLV infections and disease, fostered collaborations, and stimulated new partnerships between clinicians and scientists to encourage clinical trials and novel therapeutic interventions.

  18. Mouse models of human PIK3CA-related brain overgrowth have acutely treatable epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Achira; Skibo, Jonathan; Kalume, Franck; Ni, Jing; Rankin, Sherri; Lu, Yiling; Dobyns, William B; Mills, Gordon B; Zhao, Jean J; Baker, Suzanne J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PIK3CA) and other PI3K-AKT pathway components have been associated with cancer and a wide spectrum of brain and body overgrowth. In the brain, the phenotypic spectrum of PIK3CA-related segmental overgrowth includes bilateral dysplastic megalencephaly, hemimegalencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia, the most common cause of intractable pediatric epilepsy. We generated mouse models expressing the most common activating Pik3ca mutations (H1047R and E545K) in developing neural progenitors. These accurately recapitulate all the key human pathological features including brain enlargement, cortical malformation, hydrocephalus and epilepsy, with phenotypic severity dependent on the mutant allele and its time of activation. Underlying mechanisms include increased proliferation, cell size and altered white matter. Notably, we demonstrate that acute 1 hr-suppression of PI3K signaling despite the ongoing presence of dysplasia has dramatic anti-epileptic benefit. Thus PI3K inhibitors offer a promising new avenue for effective anti-epileptic therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy patients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12703.001 PMID:26633882

  19. Metabolomics of human brain aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jové, Mariona; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Naudí, Alba; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald

    2014-07-01

    Neurons in the mature human central nervous system (CNS) perform a wide range of motor, sensory, regulatory, behavioral, and cognitive functions. Such diverse functional output requires a great diversity of CNS neuronal and non-neuronal populations. Metabolomics encompasses the study of the complete set of metabolites/low-molecular-weight intermediates (metabolome), which are context-dependent and vary according to the physiology, developmental state, or pathologic state of the cell, tissue, organ, or organism. Therefore, the use of metabolomics can help to unravel the diversity-and to disclose the specificity-of metabolic traits and their alterations in the brain and in fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, thus helping to uncover potential biomarkers of aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the current applications of metabolomics in studies of CNS aging and certain age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Neurometabolomics will increase knowledge of the physiologic and pathologic functions of neural cells and will place the concept of selective neuronal vulnerability in a metabolic context.

  20. Experimental human muscle damage: morphological changes in relation to other indices of damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D A; Newham, D J; Round, J M; Tolfree, S E

    1986-06-01

    The effects of eccentric exercise have been examined in human calf and biceps muscles. Release of muscle creatine kinase and uptake of technetium pyrophosphate have been followed for up to 20 days after the exercise and the results are related to the morphological changes seen in needle biopsy samples. The response to exercise was variable, all subjects developing pain and tenderness in the exercised muscles after 1-2 days and this was followed, in most subjects, by a large increase in plasma creatine kinase 4-6 days after the exercise. This was paralleled by an increased uptake of technetium pyrophosphate into the exercised muscle. Biopsies of the affected muscles showed little or no change in the first 7 days after the exercise but later degenerating fibres were seen, as well as infiltration by mononuclear cells and eventually, by 20 days, signs of regeneration. Very extensive changes were seen in the calf muscle of one subject; changes in the biceps were qualitatively similar but not so severe. In the severely affected calf muscle type II fibres were preferentially damaged. Mononuclear cell infiltration both between and within degenerating fibres was maximal well after the time of peak plasma creatine kinase and it is likely that in eccentrically exercised muscle infiltrating mononuclear cells act to scavenge cellular debris rather than to cause damage to the muscle.

  1. Genotype distribution and the relative risk factors for human papillomavirus in Urumqi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhifang; Meng, Wei; DU, Rong; Zhu, Yuejie; Zhang, Yi; Ding, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV genotype distributions in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China. The related risk factors for high-risk HPV infection was also analyzed. A stratified cluster sampling method was used for the population-based cervical cancer screening of women aged 18-69 years in the Urumqi Saybagh district. Exfoliated cervical cell samples were collected for liquid-based cytology detection and HPV genotyping DNA microarrays. Education level, number of sexual partners, condom use and occupation were used in the multivariate analysis model. The HPV infection rate of women working in service industries was significantly higher compared with those of white-collar workers, community residents and migrant workers. The 35-44-year-old migrant worker group had the highest HPV infection rates among all of the groups in the three different age ranges. The number of marriages, education level, smoking history, number of abortions, use of condoms, number of sexual partners, number of sexual partners in the past five years and occupation were all associated with female HPV infection rate (P<0.05). The 35-44-year-old women were the age group with the highest HPV infection rate. The HPV infection rate of females in service industries was the highest. Education level and condom use were protective factors of HPV infection, while the number of sexual partners and occupation were risk factors for HPV infection.

  2. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  3. A Survey on the HFE-related Technologies for the Improvements of Human Performance of Safety Personnel in Rail System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, I. S.; Park, G. O.; Suh, S. M.; Sim, Y. R.; Go, J. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Son, C. H

    2005-08-15

    Many studies have shown that the most cases of rail accidents have occurred because of performing his/her tasks in inappropriate way. It is generally recognised that the rail system without human element could never be happened quite long time. So human element in rail system is going to be the major factor to the next tragic accident. This state-of-the-art report describes three major HFE-related technologies, training simulator, the integrated test facility for human factors engineering, and human performance evaluation system, that are used in the other industries including nuclear power industry for the purpose of increasing rail safety through out the improvement of human task performance. Base on this report, the way of developing those technologies that should be applied to the korean rail system is presented.

  4. The relation between flexibility of human resources and performance indexes of selected hospitals of Tehran Medical Sciences University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Alibakhshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, flexibility has turned to one of important issues in management theories and policies and most current discussions about flexibility patterns focus on management policies, so that these patterns are one of important aspects of human resources strategic management. This study was performed with the aim of assessing the flexibility rate of human resources and performance indexes of Tehran Medical Sciences University hospitals and determining the possible relation between these variables. The present study is descriptive – analytical which was conducted in cross-sectional form in 2015. The statistical population was selected by stratifies random sampling method as 317 persons from nursing, administrative and financial personnel of 5 hospitals of Tehran Medical Sciences University. Data collecting toll was hospitals performance indexes form and Wright & Snell flexibility questionnaire of human resources. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 18 software and with the aid of descriptive statistical indexes and linear regression analysis. The results showed that personnel ( human resources had high flexibility = 4.16.\tthere was a significant relation between total flexibility and the index of bed circulation so that by one unit increase in bed circulation space, normally, the average of total flexibility decreased 0.64 units ( p-value<0.05. The results showed that human resources of Tehran Medical Sciences University hospitals have high flexibility, so authorities and policy makers are suggested to adopt policies of human resources management for creating flexibility in human resources and improving hospitals performance and amending hospitals status.

  5. Cost analysis of Human Papillomavirus-related cervical diseases and genital warts in Swaziland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Benn; Dlamini, Xolisile; Östensson, Ellinor

    2017-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has proven to be the cause of several severe clinical conditions on the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, oropharynx and penis. Several studies have assessed the costs of cervical lesions, cervical cancer (CC), and genital warts. However, few have been done in Africa and none in Swaziland. Cost analysis is critical in providing useful information for economic evaluations to guide policymakers concerned with the allocation of resources in order to reduce the disease burden. Materials and methods A prevalence-based cost of illness (COI) methodology was used to investigate the economic burden of HPV-related diseases. We used a top-down approach for the cost associated with hospital care and a bottom-up approach to estimate the cost associated with outpatient and primary care. The current study was conducted from a provider perspective since the state bears the majority of the costs of screening and treatment in Swaziland. All identifiable direct medical costs were considered for cervical lesions, cervical cancer and genital warts, which were primary diagnoses during 2015. A mix of bottom up micro-costing ingredients approach and top-down approaches was used to collect data on costs. All costs were computed at the price level of 2015 and converted to dollars ($). Results The total annual estimated direct medical cost associated with screening, managing and treating cervical lesions, CC and genital warts in Swaziland was $16 million. The largest cost in the analysis was estimated for treatment of high-grade cervical lesions and cervical cancer representing 80% of the total cost ($12.6 million). Costs for screening only represented 5% of the total cost ($0.9 million). Treatment of genital warts represented 6% of the total cost ($1million). Conclusion According to the cost estimations in this study, the economic burden of HPV-related cervical diseases and genital warts represents a major public health issue in Swaziland. Prevention of HPV

  6. [The relationships among occupational and organizational commitment, human relations in the workplace, and well-being in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Tadayuki

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the relationship among human relations in the workplace, job involvement, affective commitment and continuance commitment with occupational and organizational commitment, and well-being. Questionnaires were completed by 855 female nurses who worked in four public hospitals (mean age = 32.6 years). The results of factor analysis showed that each component of the vocational constructs was distinguishable from the others. Path analysis showed that human relations in the workplace directly influenced job involvement and affective commitment both to the occupation and to the organization. Job involvement in turn directly influenced affective commitment and continuance commitment to the occupation. Job involvement also influenced affective commitment to the organization directly, and indirectly through affective commitment to the occupation. Finally, it was found that human relations in the workplace and affective commitment to the occupation positively influenced well-being; continuance commitment to the occupation was a negative influence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  7. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein, Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Adipogenic Capacity and Healthy Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Rodríguez, María Mar; El Bekay, Rajaa; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Gómez-Serrano, María; Coin-Aragüez, Leticia; Oliva-Olivera, Wilfredo; Lhamyani, Said; Clemente-Postigo, Mercedes; García-Santos, Eva; de Luna Diaz, Resi; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Fernández Real, José M; Peral, Belén; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to define the potential role of PTHrP on adipogenic regulation and to analyze its relationship with obesity and insulin resistance. This was a cross-sectional study in which visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue were extracted from 19 morbidly obese, 10 obese, and 10 lean subjects. PTHrP mRNA levels were measured in VAT and SAT. VAT mesenchymal stem cells and 3T3-L1 cells were differentiated into adipocytes in presence or absence of PTHrP siRNA. PTHrP mRNA and protein levels as well as adipogenic markers were evaluated by Western blotting or qPCR. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence procedures were used for PTHrP intracellular localization. Both human VAT and SAT express PTHrP protein mainly in the nucleolar compartment of stromal vascular fraction cells. The highest levels of PTHrP mRNA and protein expression were detected in undifferentiated mesenchymal cells and progressively decreased during adipogenesis. Remarkably, adipogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells (A-hMSC) was significantly impaired in a pthrp knockdown. PTHrP seems to be related to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR), given that we found that PTHrP mRNA expression was higher in VAT from morbidly obese with a low IR degree (MO-L-IR) subjects than those from morbidly obese with a high IR degree (MO-H-IR) and lean subjects, and correlated positively with body mass index and hip circumference. We also found that A-hMSC from MO-L-IRs displayed higher adipogenic capacity than those from both MO-H-IRs and leans. In addition, adipogenesis was impaired in VAT from MO-H-IRs, given that mRNA expression levels of key adipogenic regulators were lower than those from MO-L-IR subjects. PTHrP could be a potential new therapeutic target for the reprograming of adipogenesis and adipose tissue expansion, thus possibly ameliorating the metabolic syndrome in obese subjects.

  8. The Relation of Visual Signs In The Narrative Structure of MTV Exit Human Trafficking Campaign Video

    OpenAIRE

    Winny Gunarti; Dendi Pratama; Rina Wahyu Winarni

    2013-01-01

    Human trafficking is a violation of the human rights. One of the campaign to fight against this crime takes the form of a digital campaign that aired on television and internet.   This study discusses the narrative structure of human trafficking campaign video from non-profit organization MTV Exit in 2012. This video campaign combines art collage and graphic art in its narrative structure. Nonverbal visual elements displayed in the form of a digital photo collage with animated illustrations s...

  9. Age related depth profiles of human Stratum Corneum barrier-related molecular parameters by confocal Raman microscopy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-08-24

    In this study, stratum corneum (SC) depth profiles of hydrogen bound water molecule types, intercellular lipid (ICL) ordering, concentration of natural moisturizing factor (NMF) and keratin folding/unfolding properties are investigated in vivo for older (mean 50 years old) and younger (mean 29 years old) human skin using confocal Raman microscopy. The results show that the SC of the older group is modestly thicker (p <0.1), has more hydrogen bound water molecules at the depth 20-30% of the SC thickness (p <0.05), has a higher ordered organization of ICL (p <0.1) and higher concentration of NMF (p <0.05) at the depth 20-40% of the SC thickness compared to the younger group. This study also reveals, that the hydrogen bonding state of water highly correlates with NMF and the lateral structure of ICL but not with keratin's folding/unfolding properties. The presented results let suggest, that the decreased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) with increasing age cannot be sufficiently explained by only the increased SC thickness, but additionally by the increase of ICL ordering, higher NMF concentration and thus larger amount of hydrogen bound water molecules at the depth 20-40% of the SC thickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lissner, Michelle M; Thomas, Brandon J; Wee, Kathleen; Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R; Smale, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    .... An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults...

  11. PTTG expression in different experimental and human prolactinomas in relation to dopaminergic control of lactotropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronstein Marcello D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary tumor transforming gene (pttg is a novel oncogene that is expressed at higher level in most of the tumors analyzed to date compared to normal tissues. Nevertheless, its expression in prolactinomas and its relation with the pituitary dopamine receptor 2 (D2R are not well defined. We sought to determine the pituitary level of pttg in three different experimental models of prolactinomas with altered dopaminergic control of the pituitary: the dopaminergic D2R knockout female mouse, the estrogen-treated rat, and the senescent female rat. These three models shared the characteristics of increased pituitary weight, hyperprolactinemia, lactotrope hyperplasia and reduced or absent dopaminergic action at the pituitary level. We also studied samples from human macroprolactinomas, which were characterized as responsive or resistant to dopamine agonist therapy. Results When compared to female wild-type mice, pituitaries from female D2R knockout mice had decreased PTTG concentration, while no difference in pttg mRNA level was found. In senescent rats no difference in pituitary PTTG protein expression was found when compared to young rats. But, in young female rats treated with a synthetic estrogen (Diethylstylbestrol, 20 mg PTTG protein expression was enhanced (P = 0.029. Therefore, in the three experimental models of prolactinomas, pituitary size was increased and there was hyperprolactinemia, but PTTG levels followed different patterns. Patients with macroprolactinomas were divided in those in which dopaminergic therapy normalized or failed to normalize prolactin levels (responsive and resistant, respectively. When pituitary pttg mRNA level was analyzed in these macroprolactinomas, no differences were found. We next analyzed estrogen action at the pituitary by measuring pituitary estrogen receptor α levels. The D2R knockout female mice have low estrogen levels and in accordance, pituitary estrogen receptors were increased (P

  12. Developmental upregulation of human parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor gene expression from conserved and human-specific promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoun, J D; Minagawa, M; Hendy, G N; Alpert, L C; Goodyer, C G; Goltzman, D; White, J H

    1998-09-01

    The parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor (PTHR) functions in skeletal development and mediates an array of other physiological responses modulated by PTH and PTHrP. PTHR gene transcription in mouse is controlled by two promoters: P1, which is highly and selectively active in kidney; and P2, which functions in a variety of tissues. P1 and P2 are conserved in human tissue; however, P1 activity in kidney is weak. We have now identified a third human promoter, P3, which is widely expressed and accounts for approximately 80% of renal PTHR transcripts in the adult. No P3 activity was detected in mouse kidney, indicating that renal PTHR gene expression is controlled by different signals in human and mouse. During development, only P2 is active at midgestation in many human tissues, including calvaria and long bone. This strongly suggests that factors regulating well conserved P2 control PTHR gene expression during skeletal development. Our results indicate that human PTHR gene transcription is upregulated late in development with the induction of both P1 and P3 promoter activities. In addition, P2-specific transcripts are differentially spliced in a number of human cell lines and adult tissues, but not in fetal tissues, giving rise to a shorter and less structured 5' UTR. Thus, our studies show that both human PTHR gene transcription and mRNA splicing are developmentally regulated. Moreover, our data indicate that renal and nonrenal PTHR gene expression are tightly coordinated in humans.

  13. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    JIAN, YUAN; Chen, Yuling; GENG, CHUANYING; Liu, Nian; YANG, GUANGZHONG; Liu, Jinwei; Li, Xin; Deng, Haiteng; CHEN, WENMING

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially ex...

  14. Preliminary study on the time-related changes of the infrared thermal images of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng; Lin, Gang; Chen, Zhigang

    2009-08-01

    It is of great importance to study the manifestations and the influencing factors of the time-related changes of infrared thermal images (ITI) of human body since the variable body surface temperature distribution seriously affected the application of ITI in medicine. In this paper, manifestations of time-related changes of the ITI of human body from three double-blind randomized trials and their correlation with meteorological factors (e.g. temperature, pressure, humidity, cold front passage and tropical cyclone landing) were studied. The trials were placebo or drug controlled studying the influences of Chinese medicine health food (including Shengsheng capsule with immunity adjustment function, Shengan capsule with sleep improvement function and Shengyi capsule with the function of helping to decrease serum lipid) on the ITI of